Science.gov

Sample records for activation tagging element

  1. Activation of Tag1 transposable elements in Arabidopsis dedifferentiating cells and their regulation by CHROMOMETHYLASE 3-mediated CHG methylation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asif; Yadav, Narendra Singh; Morgenstern, Yaakov; Zemach, Assaf; Grafi, Gideon

    2016-10-01

    Dedifferentiation, that is, the acquisition of stem cell-like state, commonly induced by stress (e.g., protoplasting), is characterized by open chromatin conformation, a chromatin state that could lead to activation of transposable elements (TEs). Here, we studied the activation of the Arabidopsis class II TE Tag1, in which two copies, situated close to each other (near genes) on chromosome 1 are found in Landsberg erecta (Ler) but not in Columbia (Col). We first transformed protoplasts with a construct in which a truncated Tag1 (ΔTag1 non-autonomous) blocks the expression of a reporter gene AtMBD5-GFP and found a relatively high ectopic excision of ΔTag1 accompanied by expression of AtMBD5-GFP in protoplasts derived from Ler compared to Col; further increase was observed in ddm1 (decrease in DNA methylation1) protoplasts (Ler background). Ectopic excision was associated with transcription of the endogenous Tag1 and changes in histone H3 methylation at the promoter region. Focusing on the endogenous Tag1 elements we found low level of excision in Ler protoplasts, which was slightly and strongly enhanced in ddm1 and cmt3 (chromomethylase3) protoplasts, respectively, concomitantly with reduction in Tag1 gene body (GB) CHG methylation and increased Tag1 transcription; strong activation of Tag1 was also observed in cmt3 leaves. Notably, in cmt3, but not in ddm1, Tag1 elements were excised out from their original sites and transposed elsewhere in the genome. Our results suggest that dedifferentiation is associated with Tag1 activation and that CMT3 rather than DDM1 plays a central role in restraining Tag1 activation via inducing GB CHG methylation. PMID:27475038

  2. Shark Tagging Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current: The Journal of Marine Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    In this group activity, children learn about the purpose of tagging and how scientists tag a shark. Using a cut-out of a shark, students identify, measure, record data, read coordinates, and tag a shark. Includes introductory information about the purpose of tagging and the procedure, a data sheet showing original tagging data from Tampa Bay, and…

  3. Expression of the Arabidopsis transposable element Tag1 is targeted to developing gametophytes.

    PubMed

    Galli, Mary; Theriault, Angie; Liu, Dong; Crawford, Nigel M

    2003-12-01

    The Arabidopsis transposon Tag1 undergoes late excision during vegetative and germinal development in plants containing 35S-Tag1-GUS constructs. To determine if transcriptional regulation can account for the developmental control of Tag1 excision, the transcriptional activity of Tag1 promoter-GUS fusion constructs of various lengths was examined in transgenic plants. All constructs showed expression in the reproductive organs of developing flowers but no expression in leaves. Expression was restricted to developing gametophytes in both male and female lineages. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed that Tag1 expression predominates in the reproductive organs of flower buds. These results are consistent with late germinal excision of Tag1, but they cannot explain the vegetative excision activity of Tag1 observed with 35S-Tag1-GUS constructs. To resolve this issue, Tag1 excision was reexamined using elements with no adjacent 35S promoter sequences. Tag1 excision in this context is restricted to germinal events with no detectable vegetative excision. If a 35S enhancer sequence is placed next to Tag1, vegetative excision is restored. These results indicate that the intrinsic activity of Tag1 is restricted to germinal excision due to targeted expression of the Tag1 transposase to developing gametophytes and that this activity is altered by the presence of adjacent enhancers or promoters. PMID:14704189

  4. The transposition frequency of Tag1 elements is increased in transgenic Arabidopsis lines.

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, A M; Lister, C; Crawford, N; Dean, C

    1998-01-01

    Tag1 was identified as a highly active endogenous transposable element in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana Landsberg erecta plants carrying the maize transposable element Activator (Ac). Here, we describe experiments designed to determine the basis for the high activity of Tag1. The frequency of transposition of Tag1 elements was compared in lines containing or lacking Ac transposase to assess the effect of Ac transposase on Tag1 activity. Three populations of nontransgenic plants, including nontransformed regenerants, were also analyzed. The high level of activity of Tag1 did not correlate with the presence or absence of Ac transposase but was significantly higher in transgenic lines. This result was maintained through at least six generations after transformation. These data suggest that Tag1 transposition is stimulated by processes that occur during the Agrobacterium transformation and that thereafter remain active. Two Tag1 elements are tightly linked in the Landsberg erecta genome and map to the lower arm of chromosome 1. Tag1 elements were found in only a few A. thaliana ecotypes but were present in four other Arabidopsis species. PMID:9501115

  5. TAG (Teaching Active Games) for the Holidays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Heather E.; Bachtel, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Holidays present the perfect opportunity for physical educators to utilize creative TAG (Teaching Active Games) games to offer maximum physical activity opportunities for their students. The TAG ideas in this article offer physical education teachers quick, instant activities that involve very little equipment, time management, or instruction. At…

  6. Element-tagged immunoassay with ICP-MS detection: evaluation and comparison to conventional immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Razumienko, Eva; Ornatsky, Olga; Kinach, Robert; Milyavsky, Michael; Lechman, Eric; Baranov, Vladimir; Winnik, Mitchell A.; Tanner, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of using element-tagged antibodies for protein detection and quantification in microplate format using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), and compared the results to conventional immunoassays, such as Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The technique was further employed to detect low levels and measure DNA-binding activity of transcription factor p53 in leukemia cell lysates through its interaction with immobilized oligonucleotides and recognition by element-tagged antibodies. The advantages of ICP-MS detection for routine performance of immunoassays include increased sensitivity, wide dynamic range, minimal interference from complex matrices, and high throughput. Our approach advances the ICP-MS technology and demonstrates its applicability to proteomic studies through the use of antibodies directly labeled with polymer tags bearing multiple atoms of lanthanides. Development of this novel methodology will enable fast and quantitative identification of multiple analytes in a single well. PMID:18456275

  7. The Arabidopsis transposable element Tag1 is widely distributed among Arabidopsis ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Frank, M J; Preuss, D; Mack, A; Kuhlmann, T C; Crawford, N M

    1998-02-01

    Tag1 is an autonomous transposable element (3.3 kb in length) first identified as an insertion in the CHL1 (NRT1) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. Tag1 has been found in the Landsberg erecta ecotype of A. thaliana but not in Columbia or WS. In this paper, 41 additional ecotypes were examined for the presence of Tag1. Using an internal Tag1 fragment as probe, we found that DNA form 19 of the 41 ecotypes strongly hybridized to Tag1. Almost all of the Tag1-containing ecotypes had only one or two copies of Tag1 per haploid genome, as determined by Southern blot analysis. The only exception, Bf-1 from Bretagny-sur-Orge, France, had four copies. Two ecotypes, Di-G and S96, gave identical Southern blot patterns to that of Landsberg erecta and were subsequently shown to contain Tag1 at the same two positions found in Landsberg erecta (loci designated as Tag1-2 and Tag1-3). Two other ecotypes, Ag-0 and Lo-1, had a Tag1 element located at Tag1-2 but not at Tag1-3. The distance between these two loci was determined to be 0.37 cM. Analysis of DNA from two related species, A. griffithiana and A. pumila, showed that both species contain sequences that hybridize to Tag1 and that could be amplified with an oligonucleotide specific to the terminal inverted repeats of Tag1. These results show that Tag1 and related elements are present, and may be useful for insertional mutagenesis, in many A. thaliana ecotypes and several Arabidopsis species. PMID:9529529

  8. Current radar responsive tag development activities at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, Kenneth W.; Ormesher, Richard C.

    2003-09-01

    Over the past ten years, Sandia has developed RF radar responsive tag systems and supporting technologies for various government agencies and industry partners. RF tags can function as RF transmitters or radar transponders that enable tagging, tracking, and location determination functions. Expertise in tag architecture, microwave and radar design, signal analysis and processing techniques, digital design, modeling and simulation, and testing have been directly applicable to these tag programs. In general, the radar responsive tag designs have emphasized low power, small package size, and the ability to be detected by the radar at long ranges. Recently, there has been an interest in using radar responsive tags for Blue Force tracking and Combat ID (CID). The main reason for this interest is to allow airborne surveillance radars to easily distinguish U.S. assets from those of opposing forces. A Blue Force tracking capability would add materially to situational awareness. Combat ID is also an issue, as evidenced by the fact that approximately one-quarter of all U.S. casualties in the Gulf War took the form of ground troops killed by friendly fire. Because the evolution of warfare in the intervening decade has made asymmetric warfare the norm rather than the exception, swarming engagements in which U.S. forces will be freely intermixed with opposing forces is a situation that must be anticipated. Increasing utilization of precision munitions can be expected to drive fires progressively closer to engaged allied troops at times when visual de-confliction is not an option. In view of these trends, it becomes increasingly important that U.S. ground forces have a widely proliferated all-weather radar responsive tag that communicates to all-weather surveillance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent, current, and future radar responsive research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories that support both the Blue Force Tracking

  9. SERS-active nanoparticle aggregate technology for tags and seals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Leif O; Montoya, Velma M; Havrilla, George J; Doorn, Stephen K

    2010-06-03

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to create a modern tagging and sealing technology for international safeguards application. Our passive tagging methods are based on SANAs (SERS-Active Nanoparticle Aggregates; SERS: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering). These SANAs offer robust spectral barcoding capability in an inexpensive tag/seal, with the possibility of rapid in-field verification that requires no human input. At INMM 2009, we introduced SANAs, and showed approaches to integrating our technology with tags under development at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Here, we will focus on recent LANL development work, as well as adding additional dimensionality to the barcoding technique. The field of international safeguards employs a broad array of tags, seals, and tamper-indicating devices to assist with identification, tracking, and verification of components and materials. These devices each have unique strengths suited to specific applications, and span a range of technologies from passive metal cup seals and adhesive seals to active, remotely monitored fiber optic seals. Regardless of the technology employed, essential characteristics center around security, environmental and temporal stability, ease of use, and the ability to provide confidence to all parties. Here, we present a new inexpensive tagging technology that will deliver these attributes, while forming the basis of either a new seal, or as a secure layer added to many existing devices. Our approach uses the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) response from SANAs (SERS-Active Nanoparticle Aggregates, Figure 1) to provide a unique identifier or signature for tagging applications. SANAs are formed from gold or silver nanoparticles in the 40-80 nm size range. A chemical dye is installed on the nanoparticle surface, and the nanoparticles are then aggregated into ensembles of {approx}100 to 500 nm diameter, prior to being coated with silica. The silica shell protects the finished SANA from

  10. Transport of rare earth element-tagged soil particles in response to thunderstorm runoff.

    PubMed

    Matisoff, G; Ketterer, M E; Wilson, C G; Layman, R; Whiting, P J

    2001-08-15

    The downslope transport of rare earth element-tagged soil particles remobilized during a spring thunderstorm was studied on both a natural prairie and an agricultural field in southwestern Iowa (U.S.A.). A technique was developed for tagging natural soils with the rare earth elements Eu, Tb, and Ho to approximately 1,000 ppm via coprecipitation with MnO2. Tagged material was replaced in target locations; surficial soil samples were collected following precipitation and runoff; and rare earth element concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Diffusion and exponential models were applied to the concentration-distance data to determine particle transport distances. The results indicate that the concentration-distance data are well described by the diffusion model, butthe exponential model does not simulate the rapid drop-off in concentrations near the tagged source. Using the diffusion model, calculated particle transport distances at all hillside locations and at both the cultivated and natural prairie sites were short, ranging from 3 to 73 cm during this single runoff event. This study successfully demonstrates a new tool for studying soil erosion. PMID:11529577

  11. Activation Tagging Identifies a Conserved MYB Regulator of Phenylpropanoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Borevitz, Justin O.; Xia, Yiji; Blount, Jack; Dixon, Richard A.; Lamb, Chris

    2000-01-01

    Plants produce a wide array of natural products, many of which are likely to be useful bioactive structures. Unfortunately, these complex natural products usually occur at very low abundance and with restricted tissue distribution, thereby hindering their evaluation. Here, we report a novel approach for enhancing the accumulation of natural products based on activation tagging by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation with a T-DNA that carries cauliflower mosaic virus 35S enhancer sequences at its right border. Among ∼5000 Arabidopsis activation-tagged lines, we found a plant that exhibited intense purple pigmentation in many vegetative organs throughout development. This upregulation of pigmentation reflected a dominant mutation that resulted in massive activation of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and enhanced accumulation of lignin, hydroxycinnamic acid esters, and flavonoids, including various anthocyanins that were responsible for the purple color. These phenotypes, caused by insertion of the viral enhancer sequences adjacent to an MYB transcription factor gene, indicate that activation tagging can overcome the stringent genetic controls regulating the accumulation of specific natural products during plant development. Our findings suggest a functional genomics approach to the biotechnological evaluation of phytochemical biodiversity through the generation of massively enriched tissue sources for drug screening and for isolating underlying regulatory and biosynthetic genes. PMID:11148285

  12. Activity of radio-tagged black-footed ferrets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biggins, Dean E.; Shroeder, Max H.; Forrest, Steven C.; Richardson, Louise

    1986-01-01

    Activity of two radio-tagged black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) was investigated during October-November 1981 (an adult male monitored for 16 days), and during August-November 1982 (a young female monitored for 101 days). Aboveground activity of the male averaged 2.95 hr/night, 15% of the total time monitored. From 22 September to 5 November, aboveground activity of the female averaged 1.9 hours; 26% of the time she was stationary and 74% of the time she was moving. During August the juvenile female emerged at least once on 93% of the nights. She was least active in November. Both animals were primarily nocturnal (although daylight activity was not uncommon), and timing of nightly activity was similar, peaking from 0100 to 0359.

  13. An active ac/ds transposon system for activation tagging in tomato cultivar m82 using clonal propagation.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jared D; Pereira, Andy; Dickerman, Allan W; Veilleux, Richard E

    2013-05-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a model organism for Solanaceae in both molecular and agronomic research. This project utilized Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and the transposon-tagging construct Activator (Ac)/Dissociator (Ds)-ATag-Bar_gosGFP to produce activation-tagged and knockout mutants in the processing tomato cultivar M82. The construct carried hygromycin resistance (hyg), green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the transposase (TPase) of maize (Zea mays) Activator major transcript X054214.1 on the stable Ac element, along with a 35S enhancer tetramer and glufosinate herbicide resistance (BAR) on the mobile Ds-ATag element. An in vitro propagation strategy was used to produce a population of 25 T0 plants from a single transformed plant regenerated in tissue culture. A T1 population of 11,000 selfed and cv M82 backcrossed progeny was produced from the functional T0 line. This population was screened using glufosinate herbicide, hygromycin leaf painting, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Insertion sites of transposed Ds-ATag elements were identified through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and resulting product sequences were aligned to the recently published tomato genome. A population of 509 independent, Ds-only transposant lines spanning all 12 tomato chromosomes has been developed. Insertion site analysis demonstrated that more than 80% of these lines harbored Ds insertions conducive to activation tagging. The capacity of the Ds-ATag element to alter transcription was verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR in two mutant lines. The transposon-tagged lines have been immortalized in seed stocks and can be accessed through an online database, providing a unique resource for tomato breeding and analysis of gene function in the background of a commercial tomato cultivar. PMID:23569107

  14. Overexpression of Soluble Recombinant Human Lysyl Oxidase by Using Solubility Tags: Effects on Activity and Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Madison A.; Gonzalez, Jesica; Hussain, Anjum; Oldfield, Rachel N.; Johnston, Kathryn A.; Lopez, Karlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase is an important extracellular matrix enzyme that has not been fully characterized due to its low solubility. In order to circumvent the low solubility of this enzyme, three solubility tags (Nus-A, Thioredoxin (Trx), and Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST)) were engineered on the N-terminus of mature lysyl oxidase. Total enzyme yields were determined to be 1.5 mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme (0.75 mg/L of media), 7.84 mg for the Trx tagged enzyme (3.92 mg/L of media), and 9.33 mg for the GST tagged enzyme (4.67 mg/L of media). Enzymatic activity was calculated to be 0.11 U/mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme and 0.032 U/mg for the Trx tagged enzyme, and no enzymatic activity was detected for the GST tagged enzyme. All three solubility-tagged forms of the enzyme incorporated copper; however, the GST tagged enzyme appears to bind adventitious copper with greater affinity than the other two forms. The catalytic cofactor, lysyl tyrosyl quinone (LTQ), was determined to be 92% for the Nus-A and Trx tagged lysyl oxidase using the previously reported extinction coefficient of 15.4 mM−1 cm−1. No LTQ was detected for the GST tagged lysyl oxidase. Given these data, it appears that Nus-A is the most suitable tag for obtaining soluble and active recombinant lysyl oxidase from E. coli culture. PMID:26942005

  15. Overexpression of Soluble Recombinant Human Lysyl Oxidase by Using Solubility Tags: Effects on Activity and Solubility.

    PubMed

    Smith, Madison A; Gonzalez, Jesica; Hussain, Anjum; Oldfield, Rachel N; Johnston, Kathryn A; Lopez, Karlo M

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase is an important extracellular matrix enzyme that has not been fully characterized due to its low solubility. In order to circumvent the low solubility of this enzyme, three solubility tags (Nus-A, Thioredoxin (Trx), and Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST)) were engineered on the N-terminus of mature lysyl oxidase. Total enzyme yields were determined to be 1.5 mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme (0.75 mg/L of media), 7.84 mg for the Trx tagged enzyme (3.92 mg/L of media), and 9.33 mg for the GST tagged enzyme (4.67 mg/L of media). Enzymatic activity was calculated to be 0.11 U/mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme and 0.032 U/mg for the Trx tagged enzyme, and no enzymatic activity was detected for the GST tagged enzyme. All three solubility-tagged forms of the enzyme incorporated copper; however, the GST tagged enzyme appears to bind adventitious copper with greater affinity than the other two forms. The catalytic cofactor, lysyl tyrosyl quinone (LTQ), was determined to be 92% for the Nus-A and Trx tagged lysyl oxidase using the previously reported extinction coefficient of 15.4 mM(-1 )cm(-1). No LTQ was detected for the GST tagged lysyl oxidase. Given these data, it appears that Nus-A is the most suitable tag for obtaining soluble and active recombinant lysyl oxidase from E. coli culture. PMID:26942005

  16. Bioadsorption of rare earth elements through cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, Dan M.; Reed, David W.; Yung, Mimi C.; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-02-02

    In this study, with the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb3+ could be effectively recovered using citrate,more » consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb3+ by citrate. No reduction in Tb3+ adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.« less

  17. Bioadsorption of Rare Earth Elements through Cell Surface Display of Lanthanide Binding Tags.

    PubMed

    Park, Dan M; Reed, David W; Yung, Mimi C; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb(3+) could be effectively recovered using citrate, consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb(3+) by citrate. No reduction in Tb(3+) adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation. PMID:26836847

  18. An Active Ac/Ds Transposon System for Activation Tagging in Tomato Cultivar M82 Using Clonal Propagation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jared D.; Pereira, Andy; Dickerman, Allan W.; Veilleux, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a model organism for Solanaceae in both molecular and agronomic research. This project utilized Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and the transposon-tagging construct Activator (Ac)/Dissociator (Ds)-ATag-Bar_gosGFP to produce activation-tagged and knockout mutants in the processing tomato cultivar M82. The construct carried hygromycin resistance (hyg), green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the transposase (TPase) of maize (Zea mays) Activator major transcript X054214.1 on the stable Ac element, along with a 35S enhancer tetramer and glufosinate herbicide resistance (BAR) on the mobile Ds-ATag element. An in vitro propagation strategy was used to produce a population of 25 T0 plants from a single transformed plant regenerated in tissue culture. A T1 population of 11,000 selfed and cv M82 backcrossed progeny was produced from the functional T0 line. This population was screened using glufosinate herbicide, hygromycin leaf painting, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Insertion sites of transposed Ds-ATag elements were identified through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and resulting product sequences were aligned to the recently published tomato genome. A population of 509 independent, Ds-only transposant lines spanning all 12 tomato chromosomes has been developed. Insertion site analysis demonstrated that more than 80% of these lines harbored Ds insertions conducive to activation tagging. The capacity of the Ds-ATag element to alter transcription was verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR in two mutant lines. The transposon-tagged lines have been immortalized in seed stocks and can be accessed through an online database, providing a unique resource for tomato breeding and analysis of gene function in the background of a commercial tomato cultivar. PMID:23569107

  19. Antenna for passive RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Vladescu, Marian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Minuscule devices, called RFID tags are attached to objects and persons and emit information which positioned readers may capture wirelessly. Many methods of identification have been used, but that of most common is to use a unique serial number for identification of person or object. RFID tags can be characterized as either active or passive [1,2]. Traditional passive tags are typically in "sleep" state until awakened by the reader's emitted field. In passive tags, the reader's field acts to charge the capacitor that powers the badge and this can be a combination of antenna and barcodes obtained with SAW( Surface Acoustic Wave) devices [1,2,3] . The antenna in an RFID tag is a conductive element that permits the tag to exchange data with the reader. The paper contribution are targeted to antenna for passive RFID tags. The electromagnetic field generated by the reader is somehow oriented by the reader antenna and power is induced in the tag only if the orientation of the tag antenna is appropriate. A tag placed orthogonal to the reader yield field will not be read. This is the reason that guided manufacturers to build circular polarized antenna capable of propagating a field that is alternatively polarized on all planes passing on the diffusion axis. Passive RFID tags are operated at the UHF frequencies of 868MHz (Europe) and 915MHz (USA) and at the microwave frequencies of 2,45 GHz and 5,8 GHz . Because the tags are small dimensions, in paper, we present the possibility to use circular polarization microstrip antenna with fractal edge [2].

  20. Acoustic tracking of sperm whales in the Gulf of Alaska using a two-element vertical array and tags.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Delphine; Thode, Aaron M; Straley, Jan; Andrews, Russel D

    2013-09-01

    Between 15 and 17 August 2010, a simple two-element vertical array was deployed off the continental slope of Southeast Alaska in 1200 m water depth. The array was attached to a vertical buoy line used to mark each end of a longline fishing set, at 300 m depth, close to the sound-speed minimum of the deep-water profile. The buoy line also served as a depredation decoy, attracting seven sperm whales to the area. One animal was tagged with both a LIMPET dive depth-transmitting satellite and bioacoustic "B-probe" tag. Both tag datasets were used as an independent check of various passive acoustic schemes for tracking the whale in depth and range, which exploited the elevation angles and relative arrival times of multiple ray paths recorded on the array. Analytical tracking formulas were viable up to 2 km range, but only numerical propagation models yielded accurate locations up to at least 35 km range at Beaufort sea state 3. Neither localization approach required knowledge of the local bottom bathymetry. The tracking system was successfully used to estimate the source level of an individual sperm whale's "clicks" and "creaks" and predict the maximum detection range of the signals as a function of sea state. PMID:23968042

  1. Imidazolium tagged acridines: Synthesis, characterization and applications in DNA binding and anti-microbial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Gembali; Vishwanath, S.; Prasad, Archana; Patel, Basant K.; Prabusankar, Ganesan

    2016-03-01

    New water soluble 4,5-bis imidazolium tagged acridines have been synthesized and structurally characterized by multinuclear NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The DNA binding and anti-microbial activities of these acridine derivatives were investigated by fluorescence and far-UV circular dichroism studies.

  2. Current radar-responsive tag development activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Plummer, Kenneth W.; Wells, Lars M.

    2004-08-01

    Over the past ten years, Sandia has developed RF radar responsive tag systems and supporting technologies for various government agencies and industry partners. RF tags can function as RF transmitters or radar transponders that enable tagging, tracking, and location determination functions. Expertise in tag architecture, microwave and radar design, signal analysis and processing techniques, digital design, modeling and simulation, and testing have been directly applicable to these tag programs. In general, the radar responsive tag designs have emphasized low power, small package size, and the ability to be detected by the radar at long ranges. Recently, there has been an interest in using radar responsive tags for Blue Force tracking and Combat ID (CID). The main reason for this interest is to allow airborne surveillance radars to easily distinguish U.S. assets from those of opposing forces. A Blue Force tracking capability would add materially to situational awareness. Combat ID is also an issue, as evidenced by the fact that approximately one-quarter of all U.S. casualties in the Gulf War took the form of ground troops killed by friendly fire. Because the evolution of warfare in the intervening decade has made asymmetric warfare the norm rather than the exception, swarming engagements in which U.S. forces will be freely intermixed with opposing forces is a situation that must be anticipated. Increasing utilization of precision munitions can be expected to drive fires progressively closer to engaged allied troops at times when visual de-confliction is not an option. In view of these trends, it becomes increasingly important that U.S. ground forces have a widely proliferated all-weather radar responsive tag that communicates to all-weather surveillance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent, current, and future radar responsive research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories that support both the Blue Force Tracking

  3. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M.; Specht, Christian G.; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling. PMID:26711992

  4. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M; Specht, Christian G; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-19

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling. PMID:26711992

  5. Two-dimensional phos-tag zymograms for tracing phosphoproteins by activity in-gel staining

    PubMed Central

    Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Schwendke, Alexandra; Lüthje, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications regulating many cellular processes. The phos-tag technology was combined with two-dimensional zymograms, which consisted of non-reducing IEF PAGE or NEPHGE in the first dimension and high resolution clear native electrophoresis (hrCNE) in the second dimension. The combination of these electrophoresis methods was mild enough to accomplish in-gel activity staining for Fe(III)-reductases by NADH/Fe(III)-citrate/ferrozine, 3,3′-Diaminobenzidine/H2O2 or TMB/H2O2 in the second dimension. The phos-tag zymograms can be used to investigate phosphorylation-dependent changes in enzyme activity. Phos-tag zymograms can be combined with further downstream analysis like mass spectrometry. Non-reducing IEF will resolve proteins with a pI of 3–10, whereas non-reducing NEPHGE finds application for alkaline proteins with a pI higher than eight. Advantages and disadvantages of these new methods will be discussed in detail. PMID:25926840

  6. Directed tagging of the Arabidopsis FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 (FAE1) gene with the maize transposon activator.

    PubMed Central

    James, D W; Lim, E; Keller, J; Plooy, I; Ralston, E; Dooner, H K

    1995-01-01

    The FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 (FAE1) gene of Arabidopsis is required for the synthesis of very long chain fatty acids in the seed. The product of the FAE1 gene is presumed to be a condensing enzyme that extends the chain length of fatty acids from C18 to C20 and C22. We report here the cloning of FAE1 by directed transposon tagging with the maize element Activator (Ac). An unstable fae1 mutant was isolated in a line carrying Ac linked to the FAE1 locus on chromosome 4. Cosegregation and reversion analyses established that the new mutant was tagged by Ac. A DNA fragment flanking Ac was cloned by inverse polymerase chain reaction and used to isolate FAE1 genomic clones and a cDNA clone from a library made from immature siliques. The predicted amino acid sequence of the FAE1 protein shares homology with those of other condensing enzymes (chalcone synthase, stilbene synthases, and beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III), supporting the notion that FAE1 is the structural gene for a synthase or condensing enzyme. FAE1 is expressed in developing seed, but not in leaves, as expected from the effect of the fae1 mutation on the fatty acid compositions of those tissues. PMID:7734965

  7. 18 Sco: A solar twin rich in refractory and neutron-capture elements. Implications for chemical tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Meléndez, Jorge; Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Tucci Maia, Marcelo; Freitas, Fabrício C.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Yong, David; Asplund, Martin; Bedell, Megan; Bean, Jacob; Bergemann, Maria; Do Nascimento, José-Dias Jr.; Castro, Matthieu; Bazot, Michael; Alves-Brito, Alan

    2014-08-10

    We study with unprecedented detail the chemical composition and stellar parameters of the solar twin 18 Sco in a strictly differential sense relative to the Sun. Our study is mainly based on high-resolution (R ∼ 110,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (800-1,000) Very Large Telescope UVES spectra, which allow us to achieve a precision of about 0.005 dex in differential abundances. The effective temperature and surface gravity of 18 Sco are T{sub eff} = 5823 ± 6 K and log g = 4.45 ± 0.02 dex, i.e., 18 Sco is 46 ± 6 K hotter than the Sun and log g is 0.01 ± 0.02 dex higher. Its metallicity is [Fe/H] = 0.054 ± 0.005 dex, and its microturbulence velocity is +0.02 ± 0.01 km s{sup –1} higher than solar. Our precise stellar parameters and differential isochrone analysis show that 18 Sco has a mass of 1.04 ± 0.02 M{sub ☉} and that it is ∼1.6 Gyr younger than the Sun. We use precise High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) radial velocities to search for planets, but none are detected. The chemical abundance pattern of 18 Sco displays a clear trend with condensation temperature, thus showing higher abundances of refractories in 18 Sco than in the Sun. Intriguingly, there are enhancements in the neutron-capture elements relative to the Sun. Despite the small element-to-element abundance differences among nearby n-capture elements (∼0.02 dex), we successfully reproduce the r-process pattern in the Solar System. This is independent evidence for the universality of the r process. Our results have important implications for chemical tagging in our Galaxy and nucleosynthesis in general.

  8. SORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY ACTIVATED CARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms and rate of elemental mercury (HgO) capture by activated carbons have been studied using a bench-scale apparatus. Three types of activated carbons, two of which are thermally activated (PC-100 and FGD) and one with elemental sulfur (S) impregnated in it (HGR), were...

  9. Identification of thyroid hormone response elements in vivo using mice expressing a tagged thyroid hormone receptor α1

    PubMed Central

    Dudazy-Gralla, Susi; Nordström, Kristina; Hofmann, Peter Josef; Meseh, Dina Abdul; Schomburg, Lutz; Vennström, Björn; Mittag, Jens

    2013-01-01

    TRα1 (thyroid hormone receptor α1) is well recognized for its importance in brain development. However, due to the difficulties in predicting TREs (thyroid hormone response elements) in silico and the lack of suitable antibodies against TRα1 for ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation), only a few direct TRα1 target genes have been identified in the brain. Here we demonstrate that mice expressing a TRα1–GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion protein from the endogenous TRα locus provide a valuable animal model to identify TRα1 target genes. To this end, we analysed DNA–TRα1 interactions in vivo using ChIP with an anti-GFP antibody. We validated our system using established TREs from neurogranin and hairless, and by verifying additional TREs from known TRα1 target genes in brain and heart. Moreover, our model system enabled the identification of novel TRα1 target genes such as RNF166 (ring finger protein 166). Our results demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing a tagged nuclear receptor constitute a feasible approach to study receptor–DNA interactions in vivo, circumventing the need for specific antibodies. Models like the TRα1–GFP mice may thus pave the way for genome-wide mapping of nuclear receptor-binding sites, and advance the identification of novel target genes in vivo. PMID:23398480

  10. 18 Sco: A Solar Twin Rich in Refractory and Neutron-capture Elements. Implications for Chemical Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, Jorge; Ramírez, Iván; Karakas, Amanda I.; Yong, David; Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Bedell, Megan; Bergemann, Maria; Asplund, Martin; Tucci Maia, Marcelo; Bean, Jacob; do Nascimento, José-Dias, Jr.; Bazot, Michael; Alves-Brito, Alan; Freitas, Fabrício C.; Castro, Matthieu

    2014-08-01

    We study with unprecedented detail the chemical composition and stellar parameters of the solar twin 18 Sco in a strictly differential sense relative to the Sun. Our study is mainly based on high-resolution (R ~ 110,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (800-1,000) Very Large Telescope UVES spectra, which allow us to achieve a precision of about 0.005 dex in differential abundances. The effective temperature and surface gravity of 18 Sco are T eff = 5823 ± 6 K and log g = 4.45 ± 0.02 dex, i.e., 18 Sco is 46 ± 6 K hotter than the Sun and log g is 0.01 ± 0.02 dex higher. Its metallicity is [Fe/H] = 0.054 ± 0.005 dex, and its microturbulence velocity is +0.02 ± 0.01 km s-1 higher than solar. Our precise stellar parameters and differential isochrone analysis show that 18 Sco has a mass of 1.04 ± 0.02 M ⊙ and that it is ~1.6 Gyr younger than the Sun. We use precise High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) radial velocities to search for planets, but none are detected. The chemical abundance pattern of 18 Sco displays a clear trend with condensation temperature, thus showing higher abundances of refractories in 18 Sco than in the Sun. Intriguingly, there are enhancements in the neutron-capture elements relative to the Sun. Despite the small element-to-element abundance differences among nearby n-capture elements (~0.02 dex), we successfully reproduce the r-process pattern in the Solar System. This is independent evidence for the universality of the r process. Our results have important implications for chemical tagging in our Galaxy and nucleosynthesis in general. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal Observatory; the 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile (observing programs 083.D-0871 and 188.C-0265); and at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated jointly by Caltech, the University of California, and NASA.

  11. Protein assembly onto patterned microfabricated devices through enzymatic activation of fusion pro-tag.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Angela T; Yi, Hyunmin; Luo, Xiaolong; Payne, Gregory F; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary W; Bentley, William E

    2008-02-15

    We report a versatile approach for covalent surface-assembly of proteins onto selected electrode patterns of pre-fabricated devices. Our approach is based on electro-assembly of the aminopolysaccharide chitosan scaffold as a stable thin film onto patterned conductive surfaces of the device, which is followed by covalent assembly of the target protein onto the scaffold surface upon enzymatic activation of the protein's "pro-tag." For our demonstration, the model target protein is green fluorescent protein (GFP) genetically fused with a pentatyrosine pro-tag at its C-terminus, which assembles onto both two-dimensional chips and within fully packaged microfluidic devices in situ and under flow. Our surface-assembly approach enables spatial selectivity and orientational control under mild experimental conditions. We believe that our integrated approach harnessing genetic manipulation, in situ enzymatic activation, and electro-assembly makes it advantageous for a wide variety of bioMEMS and biosensing applications that require facile "biofunctionalization" of microfabricated devices. PMID:17625789

  12. EEG frequency tagging to explore the cortical activity related to the tactile exploration of natural textures

    PubMed Central

    Moungou, Athanasia; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Mouraux, André

    2016-01-01

    When sliding our fingertip against a textured surface, complex vibrations are produced in the skin. It is increasingly recognised that the neural transduction and processing of these vibrations plays an important role in the dynamic tactile perception of textures. The aim of the present study was to develop a novel means to tag the cortical activity related to the processing of these vibrations, by periodically modulating the amplitude of texture exploration-induced vibrations such as to record a steady-state evoked potential (SS-EP). The EEG was recorded while the right index fingertip was scanned against four different textures using a constant exploration velocity. Amplitude modulation of the elicited vibrations was achieved by periodically modulating the force applied against the finger. Frequency analysis of the recorded EEG signals showed that modulation of the vibrations induced by the fingertip-texture interactions elicited an SS-EP at the frequency of modulation (3 Hz) as well as its second harmonic (6 Hz), maximal over parietal regions contralateral to the stimulated side. Textures generating stronger vibrations also generated SS-EPs of greater magnitude. Our results suggest that frequency tagging using SS-EPs can be used to isolate and explore the brain activity related to the tactile exploration of natural textures. PMID:26853820

  13. EEG frequency tagging to explore the cortical activity related to the tactile exploration of natural textures.

    PubMed

    Moungou, Athanasia; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Mouraux, André

    2016-01-01

    When sliding our fingertip against a textured surface, complex vibrations are produced in the skin. It is increasingly recognised that the neural transduction and processing of these vibrations plays an important role in the dynamic tactile perception of textures. The aim of the present study was to develop a novel means to tag the cortical activity related to the processing of these vibrations, by periodically modulating the amplitude of texture exploration-induced vibrations such as to record a steady-state evoked potential (SS-EP). The EEG was recorded while the right index fingertip was scanned against four different textures using a constant exploration velocity. Amplitude modulation of the elicited vibrations was achieved by periodically modulating the force applied against the finger. Frequency analysis of the recorded EEG signals showed that modulation of the vibrations induced by the fingertip-texture interactions elicited an SS-EP at the frequency of modulation (3 Hz) as well as its second harmonic (6 Hz), maximal over parietal regions contralateral to the stimulated side. Textures generating stronger vibrations also generated SS-EPs of greater magnitude. Our results suggest that frequency tagging using SS-EPs can be used to isolate and explore the brain activity related to the tactile exploration of natural textures. PMID:26853820

  14. Semantic Wavelet-Induced Frequency-Tagging (SWIFT) Periodically Activates Category Selective Areas While Steadily Activating Early Visual Areas

    PubMed Central

    Koenig-Robert, Roger; VanRullen, Rufin; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2015-01-01

    Primate visual systems process natural images in a hierarchical manner: at the early stage, neurons are tuned to local image features, while neurons in high-level areas are tuned to abstract object categories. Standard models of visual processing assume that the transition of tuning from image features to object categories emerges gradually along the visual hierarchy. Direct tests of such models remain difficult due to confounding alteration in low-level image properties when contrasting distinct object categories. When such contrast is performed in a classic functional localizer method, the desired activation in high-level visual areas is typically accompanied with activation in early visual areas. Here we used a novel image-modulation method called SWIFT (semantic wavelet-induced frequency-tagging), a variant of frequency-tagging techniques. Natural images modulated by SWIFT reveal object semantics periodically while keeping low-level properties constant. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we indeed found that faces and scenes modulated with SWIFT periodically activated the prototypical category-selective areas while they elicited sustained and constant responses in early visual areas. SWIFT and the localizer were selective and specific to a similar extent in activating category-selective areas. Only SWIFT progressively activated the visual pathway from low- to high-level areas, consistent with predictions from standard hierarchical models. We confirmed these results with criterion-free methods, generalizing the validity of our approach and show that it is possible to dissociate neural activation in early and category-selective areas. Our results provide direct evidence for the hierarchical nature of the representation of visual objects along the visual stream and open up future applications of frequency-tagging methods in fMRI. PMID:26691722

  15. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  16. TagSNP analyses of the PON gene cluster: effects on PON1 activity, LDL oxidative susceptibility, and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Christopher S; Heagerty, Patrick J; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Richter, Rebecca J; Ranchalis, Jane; Lewis, Julieann; Bacus, Tamara J; McKinstry, Laura A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Rieder, Mark; Nickerson, Deborah; Furlong, Clement E; Chait, Alan; Jarvik, Gail P

    2006-05-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity is consistently predictive of vascular disease, although the genotype at four functional PON1 polymorphisms is not. To address this inconsistency, we investigated the role of all common PON1 genetic variability, as measured by tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs), in predicting PON1 activity for phenylacetate hydrolysis, LDL susceptibility to oxidation ex vivo, plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels, and carotid artery disease (CAAD) status. The biological goal was to establish whether additional common genetic variation beyond consideration of the four known functional SNPs improves prediction of these phenotypes. PON2 and PON3 tagSNPs were secondarily evaluated. Expanded analysis of an additional 26 tagSNPs found evidence of previously undescribed common PON1 polymorphisms that affect PON1 activity independently of the four known functional SNPs. PON1 activity was not significantly correlated with LDL oxidative susceptibility, but genotypes at the PON1(-108) promoter polymorphism and several other PON1 SNPs were. Neither PON1 activity nor PON1 genotype was significantly correlated with plasma Hcy levels. This study revealed previously undetected common functional PON1 polymorphisms that explain 4% of PON1 activity and a high rate of recombination in PON1, but the sum of the common PON1 locus variation does not explain the relationship between PON1 activity and CAAD. PMID:16474172

  17. Alkyne-tag Raman imaging of bio-active small molecules in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Jun; Palonpon, Almar F.; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Kawata, Satoshi; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-12-01

    Raman microscopy is useful for molecular imaging and analysis of biological specimens. Here, we used alkyne containing a carbon-carbon triple bond as a Raman tag for observing small molecules in live cells. Alkyne tags can maintain original properties of target molecules with providing high chemical specificity owing to its distinct peak in a Raman-silent window of biomolecules. For demonstrations, alkyne-tagged thymidine and coenzyme Q analogue in live cells were visualized with high-spatial resolution. We extended the application of alkyne-tag imaging to visualize cell organelles and specific lipid components in artificial monolayer membranes.

  18. Element distribution over the surface of fish scales and its connection to the geochemical environment of habitats: a potential biogeochemical tag.

    PubMed

    Wang, TsingHai; Lai, Yan-Chen; Chiang, Chia-Che; Cheng, Yu-Rong; Hsieh, Yi-Kong; Wang, Chu-Fang

    2016-03-01

    The elemental content of fish scales is known to be a reliable biogeochemical tag for tracing the origin of fishes. In this study, this correlation is further confirmed to exist on the surface of fish scales using a novel environmental analytical method, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), which bypasses several complicated sample preparation procedures such as acid digestion and pre-concentration. The results suggest that the elemental ratios of Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, and Mn/Ca on the surface of fish scales are strongly correlated with the geochemical environment of their original habitat. This correlation is further demonstrated to be sensitive to variation of water in the habitat due to the adsorbed inorganic ions. In this sense, the limitation of fish scales as a biogeochemical tag is the sensitivity of LA-ICP-MS toward the studied elements. Graphical abstract Illustration of the connection between element distribution pattern over the surface of fish scales and biogeochemical environment of its habitat. PMID:26899028

  19. Germinal and Somatic Activity of the Maize Element Activator (Ac) in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Keller, J.; Lim, E.; James-Jr., D. W.; Dooner, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the germinal and somatic activity of the maize Activator (Ac) element in Arabidopsis with the objective of developing an efficient transposon-based system for gene isolation in that plant. Transposition activity was assayed with a chimeric marker that consists of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and a bacterial streptomycin phosphotransferase gene (SPT). Somatic activity was detected in seedlings germinated on plates containing streptomycin as green-resistant sectors against a background of white-sensitive cells. Germinal excisions resulted in fully green seedlings. The transposition frequency was extremely low when a single copy of the transposon was present, but appeared to increase with an increase in Ac copy number. Plants that were selected as variegated produced an increased number of green progeny. The methylation state of the Ac elements in lines with either low or high levels of excision was assessed by restriction analysis. No difference was found between these lines, indicating that the degree of methylation did not contribute to the level of Ac activity. Germinal excision events were analyzed molecularly and shown to carry reinserted transposons in about 50% of the cases. In several instances, streptomycin-resistant siblings carried the same transposed Ac element, indicating that excision had occurred prior to meiosis in the parent. We discuss parameters that need to be considered to optimize the use of Ac as a transposon tag in Arabidopsis. PMID:1322854

  20. Characterization and RNA-seq analysis of underperformer, an activation-tagged potato mutant.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, Sukhwinder S; Veilleux, Richard E; Dickerman, Allan W; Tang, Guozhu; Flinn, Barry S

    2014-04-01

    The potato cv. Bintje and a Bintje activation-tagged mutant, underperformer (up) were compared. Mutant up plants grown in vitro were dwarf, with abundant axillary shoot growth, greater tuber yield, altered tuber traits and early senescence compared to wild type. Under in vivo conditions, the dwarf and early senescence phenotypes of the mutant remained, but the up plants exhibited a lower tuber yield and fewer axillary shoots compared to wild type. Southern blot analyses indicated a single T-DNA insertion in the mutant, located on chromosome 10. Initial PCR-based gene expression studies indicated transcriptional activation/repression of several genes in the mutant flanking the insertion. The gene immediately flanking the right border of the T-DNA insertion, which encoded an uncharacterized Broad complex, Tramtrac, Bric-a-brac; also known as Pox virus and Zinc finger (BTB/POZ) domain-containing protein (StBTB/POZ1) containing an Armadillo repeat region, was up-regulated in the mutant. Global gene expression comparisons between Bintje and up using RNA-seq on leaves from 60 day-old plants revealed a dataset of over 1,600 differentially expressed genes. Gene expression analyses suggested a variety of biological processes and pathways were modified in the mutant, including carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cell division and cell cycle activity, biotic and abiotic stress responses, and proteolysis. PMID:24306493

  1. The Heritable Activation of Cryptic Suppressor-Mutator Elements by an Active Element

    PubMed Central

    Fedoroff, N.

    1989-01-01

    A weakly active maize Suppressor-mutator (Spm-w) element is able to heritably activate cryptic Spm elements in the maize genome. The spontaneous activation frequency, which is 1-5 X 10(-5) in the present genetic background, increases by about 100-fold in the presence of an Spm-w and remains an order of magnitude above the background level a generation after removal of the activating Spm-w. Sectorial somatic reactivation of cryptic elements can be detected phenotypically in kernels. Selection of such kernels constitutes an efficient selection for plants with reactivated Spm elements. Analysis of the reactivation process reveals that it is gradual and proceeds through genetically metastable intermediates that exhibit different patterns of element expression during plant development. Newly reactivated elements tend to return to an inactive form. However, the probability that an element will remain in a heritably active state increases when the element is maintained in the presence of an active Spm element for several generations. PMID:2541047

  2. Identifying the best iron-peak and α-capture elements for chemical tagging: The impact of the number of lines on measured scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibekyan, V.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; Sousa, S. G.; Faria, J. P.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Oshagh, M.; Tsantaki, M.; Hakobyan, A. A.; González Hernández, J. I.; Suárez-Andrés, L.; Israelian, G.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: The main goal of this work is to explore which elements carry the most information about the birth origin of stars and, as such, which are best suited for chemical tagging. Methods: We explored different techniques to minimize the effect of outlier value lines in the abundances by using Ni abundances derived for 1111 FGK-type stars. We evaluate how the limited number of spectral lines can affect the final chemical abundance. Then we make an efficient even footing comparison of the [X/Fe] scatter between the elements that have a different number of observable spectral lines in the studied spectra. Results: When several spectral lines are available, we find that the most efficient way of calculating the average abundance of elements is to use a weighted mean (WM), whereby we consider the distance from the median abundance as a weight. This method can be used effectively without removing suspected outlier lines. When the same number of lines are used to determine chemical abundances, we show that the [X/Fe] star-to-star scatter for iron group and α-capture elements is almost the same. The largest scatter among the studied elements, was observed for Al and the smallest for Cr and Ni. Conclusions: We recommend caution when comparing [X/Fe] scatters among elements where a different number of spectral lines are available. A meaningful comparison is necessary to identify elements that show the largest intrinsic scatter, which can then be used for chemical tagging. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Activation tagging using the maize En-I transposon system for the identification of abiotic stress resistance genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Harb, Amal; Pereira, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Activation tagging is a high-throughput method of overexpressing genes by using an enhancer present in insertion sequences that are randomly inserted in the genome to enhance the expression of adjacent genes. Gain-of-function approaches are advantageous to identify the functions of redundant genes that are not identifiable by knockout (KO) mutations, and for identification of phenotypes with small effects, which are enhanced by activation. An activation tag (ATag) library of 800 lines was generated in Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia using the En-I (Spm) transposon system. The ATag lines were used in a forward genetics strategy to identify novel genes that confer resistance/tolerance to abiotic stresses. The ATag lines were screened for altered drought and salt stress response phenotypes using quantitative assays for biomass accumulation under stress, revealing a number of resistant and sensitive ATag mutants. PMID:23918430

  4. SERS-active nanoparticles as a barcoding technology for tags and seals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Leif O; Doorn, Stephen K; Merkle, Peter B

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present our work to modernize tagging and sealing technologies for international safeguards applications. Our work combines technologies developed at both Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), to offer a passive tag and seal system that can be applied and verified in field, with minimal training for on-site personnel, along with a low per-seal cost. Here, we focus primarily on LANL technology: the use of Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) as an inexpensive verification tool. Our nanoparticles offer unique SERS responses, which we can then use to incorporate robust barcoding into tag materials. We describe this technology in more detail, offer preliminary results, and outline integration with SNL developments.

  5. Conductive heat flow at the TAG Active Hydrothermal Mound: Results from 1993-1995 submersible surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K.; Von Herzen, R.; Kirklin, J.; Evans, R.; Kadko, D.; Kinoshita, M.; Matsubayashi, O.; Mills, R.; Schultz, A.; Rona, P.

    We report 70 measurements of conductive heat flow at the 50-m-high, 200-m-diameter TAG active hydrothermal mound, made during submersible surveys with Alvin in 1993 and 1995 and Shinkai 6500 in 1994. The stations were all measured with 5-thermistor, 0.6- or 1-m-long Alvin heat flow probes, which are capable of determining both gradient and thermal conductivity, and were transponder-navigated to an estimated accuracy of ±5-10 m relative to the 10-m-diameter central complex of black smokers. Within 20 m of this complex, conductive heat flow values are extremely variable (0.1- > 100 W/m²), which can only be due to local spatial and possible temporal variability in the immediate vicinity of the vigorous discharge sites. A similar local variability is suggested in the “Kremlin” area of white smokers to the southeast of the black smoker complex. On the south and southeast side of the mound, there is very high heat flow (3.7- > 25 W/m²) on the sedimented terraces that slope down from the Kremlin area. Heat flow is also high (0.3-3 W/m²) in the pelagic carbonate sediments on the surrounding seafloor within a few tens of meters of the southwest, northwest, and northeast sides of the mound. On the west side of the sulfide rubble plateau that surrounds the central black smoker peak, there is a coherent belt of very low heat flow (<20 mW/m²) 20-50 m west of the smokers, suggestive of local, shallow recharge of bottom water. The three submersible surveys spanned nearly two years, but showed no indication of any temporal variability in conductive heat flow over this time scale, whether natural or induced by ODP drilling in 1994.

  6. Ear tag

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: An inherited tendency to have this facial feature A genetic syndrome that includes having these pits or tags A sinus tract problem (an abnormal connection between the skin and tissue underneath) When to Contact a Medical Professional Your provider will usually find the skin tag ...

  7. Adaptive Evolution of a Tagged Chimeric Gammaretrovirus: Identification of Novel cis-Acting Elements That Modulate Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Logg, Christopher R.; Baranick, Brian T.; Lemp, Nathan A.; Kasahara, Noriyuki

    2010-01-01

    Summary Retroviruses are well known for their ability to incorporate envelope proteins from other retroviral strains and genera and even from other virus families. This characteristic has been widely exploited for the generation of replication-defective retroviral vectors, including those derived from murine leukemia virus (MLV), bearing heterologous envelope proteins. We desired to investigate the possibility of “genetically” pseudotyping replication-competent MLV by replacing the native env gene in a full-length viral genome with that of another gammaretrovirus. We previously developed replication-competent versions of MLV that stably transmit and express transgenes inserted in the 3′ untranslated region of the viral genome. In one such tagged MLV expressing green fluorescent protein, we replaced the native env sequence with that of gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV). Although the GALV Env protein is commonly used to make high titer pseudotypes of MLV vectors, we found that the env replacement greatly attenuated viral replication. However, passage of cells exposed to the chimeric virus resulted in selection of mutants exhibiting rapid replication kinetics and different variants arose in different infections. Two of these variants had acquired mutations at or adjacent to the splice acceptor site and three others had acquired dual mutations within the long terminal repeat. Analysis of the levels of unspliced and spliced viral RNA produced by the parental and adapted viruses showed that the mutations gained by each of these variants functioned to reverse an imbalance in splicing caused by the env gene substitution. Our results reveal the presence of previously unknown cis-acting sequences in MLV that modulate splicing of the viral transcript and demonstrate that tagging of the retroviral genome with an easily assayed transgene can be combined with in vitro evolution to efficiently generate and screen for replicating mutants of replication-impaired recombinant

  8. An active site–tail interaction in the structure of hexahistidine-tagged Thermoplasma acidophilum citrate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Donini, Stefano; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2015-09-23

    Citrate synthase from the thermophilic euryarchaeon T. acidophilum fused to a hexahistidine tag was purified and biochemically characterized. The structure of the unliganded enzyme at 2.2 Å resolution contains tail–active site contacts in half of the active sites. Citrate synthase (CS) plays a central metabolic role in aerobes and many other organisms. The CS reaction comprises two half-reactions: a Claisen aldol condensation of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) that forms citryl-CoA (CitCoA), and CitCoA hydrolysis. Protein conformational changes that ‘close’ the active site play an important role in the assembly of a catalytically competent condensation active site. CS from the thermoacidophile Thermoplasma acidophilum (TpCS) possesses an endogenous Trp fluorophore that can be used to monitor the condensation reaction. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of TpCS fused to a C-terminal hexahistidine tag (TpCSH6) reported here is an ‘open’ structure that, when compared with several liganded TpCS structures, helps to define a complete path for active-site closure. One active site in each dimer binds a neighboring His tag, the first nonsubstrate ligand known to occupy both the AcCoA and OAA binding sites. Solution data collectively suggest that this fortuitous interaction is stabilized by the crystalline lattice. As a polar but almost neutral ligand, the active site–tail interaction provides a new starting point for the design of bisubstrate-analog inhibitors of CS.

  9. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael

    2011-06-23

    Plants utilize light as a source of information via families of photoreceptors such as the red/far-red absorbing phytochromes (PHY) and the blue/UVA absorbing cryptochromes (CRY). The main goal of the Neff lab is to use molecular-genetic mutant screens to elucidate signaling components downstream of these photoreceptors. Activation-tagging mutagenesis led to the identification of two putative transcription factors that may be involved in both photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling pathways. sob1-D (suppressor of phyB-dominant) mutant phenotypes are caused by the over-expression of a Dof transcription factor previously named OBP3. Our previous studies indicate that OBP3 is a negative regulator of light-mediated cotyledon expansion and may be involved in modulating responsiveness to the growth-regulating hormone auxin. The sob2-D mutant uncovers a role for LEP, a putative AP2/EREBP-like transcription factor, in seed germination, hypocotyl elongation and responsiveness to the hormone abscisic acid. Based on photobiological and genetic analysis of OBP3-knockdown and LEP-null mutations, we hypothesize that these transcription factors are involved in both light-mediated seedling development and hormone signaling. To examine the role that these genes play in photomorphogenesis we will: 1) Further explore the genetic role of OBP3 in cotyledon/leaf expansion and other photomorphogenic processes as well as examine potential physical interactions between OBP3 and CRY1 or other signaling components that genetically interact with this transcription factor 2) Test the hypothesis that OBP3 is genetically involved in auxin signaling and root development as well as examine the affects of this hormone and light on OBP3 protein accumulation. 3) Test the hypothesis that LEP is involved in seed germination, seedling photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling. Together these experiments will lead to a greater understanding of the complexity of interactions between photoreceptors and DNA

  10. Project 8 Tags

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos-Burrows, Michele

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes 8 Tags, a project that she used with her eighth-grade studio art students to encourage them to come up with original and creative solutions to an assignment. She also wanted to incorporate their knowledge of the elements of art and principles of design. In this project, students were challenged to create an…

  11. An active site-tail interaction in the structure of hexahistidine-tagged Thermoplasma acidophilum citrate synthase.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jesse R; Donini, Stefano; Kappock, T Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) plays a central metabolic role in aerobes and many other organisms. The CS reaction comprises two half-reactions: a Claisen aldol condensation of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) that forms citryl-CoA (CitCoA), and CitCoA hydrolysis. Protein conformational changes that `close' the active site play an important role in the assembly of a catalytically competent condensation active site. CS from the thermoacidophile Thermoplasma acidophilum (TpCS) possesses an endogenous Trp fluorophore that can be used to monitor the condensation reaction. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of TpCS fused to a C-terminal hexahistidine tag (TpCSH6) reported here is an `open' structure that, when compared with several liganded TpCS structures, helps to define a complete path for active-site closure. One active site in each dimer binds a neighboring His tag, the first nonsubstrate ligand known to occupy both the AcCoA and OAA binding sites. Solution data collectively suggest that this fortuitous interaction is stabilized by the crystalline lattice. As a polar but almost neutral ligand, the active site-tail interaction provides a new starting point for the design of bisubstrate-analog inhibitors of CS. PMID:26457521

  12. An active site–tail interaction in the structure of hexahistidine-tagged Thermoplasma acidophilum citrate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Donini, Stefano; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) plays a central metabolic role in aerobes and many other organisms. The CS reaction comprises two half-reactions: a Claisen aldol condensation of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) that forms citryl-CoA (CitCoA), and CitCoA hydrolysis. Protein conformational changes that ‘close’ the active site play an important role in the assembly of a catalytically competent condensation active site. CS from the thermoacidophile Thermoplasma acidophilum (TpCS) possesses an endogenous Trp fluorophore that can be used to monitor the condensation reaction. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of TpCS fused to a C-terminal hexahistidine tag (TpCSH6) reported here is an ‘open’ structure that, when compared with several liganded TpCS structures, helps to define a complete path for active-site closure. One active site in each dimer binds a neighboring His tag, the first nonsubstrate ligand known to occupy both the AcCoA and OAA binding sites. Solution data collectively suggest that this fortuitous interaction is stabilized by the crystalline lattice. As a polar but almost neutral ligand, the active site–tail interaction provides a new starting point for the design of bisubstrate-analog inhibitors of CS. PMID:26457521

  13. THE ORIGINS OF LIGHT AND HEAVY R-PROCESS ELEMENTS IDENTIFIED BY CHEMICAL TAGGING OF METAL-POOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujimoto, Takuji; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2014-11-01

    Growing interests in neutron star (NS) mergers as the origin of r-process elements have sprouted since the discovery of evidence for the ejection of these elements from a short-duration γ-ray burst. The hypothesis of a NS merger origin is reinforced by a theoretical update of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers successful in yielding r-process nuclides with A > 130. On the other hand, whether the origin of light r-process elements are associated with nucleosynthesis in NS merger events remains unclear. We find a signature of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers from peculiar chemical abundances of stars belonging to the Galactic globular cluster M15. This finding combined with the recent nucleosynthesis results implies a potential diversity of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers. Based on these considerations, we are successful in the interpretation of an observed correlation between [light r-process/Eu] and [Eu/Fe] among Galactic halo stars and accordingly narrow down the role of supernova nucleosynthesis in the r-process production site. We conclude that the tight correlation by a large fraction of halo stars is attributable to the fact that core-collapse supernovae produce light r-process elements while heavy r-process elements such as Eu and Ba are produced by NS mergers. On the other hand, stars in the outlier, composed of r-enhanced stars ([Eu/Fe] ≳ +1) such as CS22892-052, were exclusively enriched by matter ejected by a subclass of NS mergers that is inclined to be massive and consist of both light and heavy r-process nuclides.

  14. Identification of activation-tag Arabidopsis mutants with altered production of germination stimulants for Phelipanche ramosa (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kirilova, Ina; Denev, Iliya D.; Bineva, Rumyana; Gevezova, Maria; Alexandrova, Milena; Kostov, Kaloyan; Batchvarova, Rossitza

    2014-01-01

    Germination of seeds of root parasites like broomrapes (Orobanchaceae) is tightly regulated by chemical products exuded from the roots of the host plant, known as germination stimulants (GSs). Changes in the levels of synthesis and emission of GS can allow the development of practical measures for control of the crops-harming parasitic species. However, the genes encoding enzymes responsible for GS biosynthesis are still unknown. We performed a large-scale screening of 62,000 Arabidopsis activation-tag mutants for alteration in susceptibility to Phelipanche ramosa and to identify lines with altered GS production among them. After five successive screenings we identified 36 lines with altered susceptibility to P. ramosa. Seven of them displayed altered levels of GS production. By using a combination of Southern blot and thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction (TAIL-PCR), we pinpointed the location of activation-tag constructs in these lines. A combination of differential display and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) allowed us to identify several affected genes. Two of them are directly involved in isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway in chloroplasts, and we believe that their activation led to increased levels of GS production. We believe that these genes are responsible for increased GS production in five of the Arabidopsis lines resistant to P. ramosa. PMID:26740753

  15. Tag team simulation: An innovative approach for promoting active engagement of participants and observers during group simulations.

    PubMed

    Levett-Jones, Tracy; Andersen, Patrea; Reid-Searl, Kerry; Guinea, Stephen; McAllister, Margaret; Lapkin, Samuel; Palmer, Lorinda; Niddrie, Marian

    2015-09-01

    Active participation in immersive simulation experiences can result in technical and non-technical skill enhancement. However, when simulations are conducted in large groups, maintaining the interest of observers so that they do not disengage from the learning experience can be challenging. We implemented Tag Team Simulation with the aim of ensuring that both participants and observers had active and integral roles in the simulation. In this paper we outline the features of this innovative approach and provide an example of its application to a pain simulation. Evaluation was conducted using the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale. A total of 444 year nursing students participated from a population of 536 (response rate 83%). Cronbach's alpha for the Scale was .94 indicating high internal consistency. The mean satisfaction score for participants was 4.63 compared to 4.56 for observers. An independent sample t test revealed no significant difference between these scores (t (300) = -1.414, p = 0.16). Tag team simulation is an effective approach for ensuring observers' and participants' active involvement during group-based simulations and one that is highly regarded by students. It has the potential for broad applicability across a range of leaning domains both within and beyond nursing. PMID:25936431

  16. Characterization and isolation of a T-DNA tagged banana promoter active during in vitro culture and low temperature stress

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Efrén; Remy, Serge; Thiry, Els; Windelinckx, Saskia; Swennen, Rony; Sági, László

    2009-01-01

    Background Next-generation transgenic plants will require a more precise regulation of transgene expression, preferably under the control of native promoters. A genome-wide T-DNA tagging strategy was therefore performed for the identification and characterization of novel banana promoters. Embryogenic cell suspensions of a plantain-type banana were transformed with a promoterless, codon-optimized luciferase (luc+) gene and low temperature-responsive luciferase activation was monitored in real time. Results Around 16,000 transgenic cell colonies were screened for baseline luciferase activity at room temperature 2 months after transformation. After discarding positive colonies, cultures were re-screened in real-time at 26°C followed by a gradual decrease to 8°C. The baseline activation frequency was 0.98%, while the frequency of low temperature-responsive luciferase activity was 0.61% in the same population of cell cultures. Transgenic colonies with luciferase activity responsive to low temperature were regenerated to plantlets and luciferase expression patterns monitored during different regeneration stages. Twenty four banana DNA sequences flanking the right T-DNA borders in seven independent lines were cloned via PCR walking. RT-PCR analysis in one line containing five inserts allowed the identification of the sequence that had activated luciferase expression under low temperature stress in a developmentally regulated manner. This activating sequence was fused to the uidA reporter gene and back-transformed into a commercial dessert banana cultivar, in which its original expression pattern was confirmed. Conclusion This promoter tagging and real-time screening platform proved valuable for the identification of novel promoters and genes in banana and for monitoring expression patterns throughout in vitro development and low temperature treatment. Combination of PCR walking techniques was efficient for the isolation of candidate promoters even in a multicopy T

  17. Active and relict sea-floor hydrothermal mineralization at the TAG hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A. . Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Labs.); Hannington, M.D. ); Raman, C.V. ); Thompson, G.; Tivey, M.K.; Humphris, S.E. ); Lalou, C. . Lab. CNRS-CEA); Petersen, S. Aachen Univ. of Technology )

    1993-12-01

    The TAG hydrothermal field is a site of major active and inactive volcanic-hosted hydrothermal mineralization in the rift valley of the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 26[degree]N. The axial high is the principal locus of present magmatic intrusions. The TAG field contains three main areas of present and past hydrothermal activity: (1) an actively venting high-temperature sulfide mound; (2) two former high-temperature vent areas; (3) a zone of low-temperature venting and precipitation of Fe and Mn oxide deposits. The volcanic centers occur at the intersections between ridge axis-parallel normal faults and projected axis-transverse transfer faults. The intersections of these active fault systems may act as conduits both for magmatic intrusions from sources beneath the axial high that build the volcanic centers and for hydrothermal upwelling that taps the heat sources. Radiometric dating of sulfide samples and manganese crusts in the hydrothermal zones and dating of sediments intercalated with pillow lava flows in the volcanic center adjacent to the active sulfide mound indicate multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity throughout the field driven by heat supplied by episodic intrusions over a period of at least 140 [times] 10[sup 3] yr. The sulfide deposits are built by juxtaposition and superposition during relatively long residence times near episodic axial heat sources counterbalanced by mass wasting in the tectonically active rift valley of the slow-spreading oceanic ridge. Hydrothermal reworking of a relict hydrothermal zone by high-temperature hydrothermal episodes has recrystallized sulfides and concentrated the first visible primary gold reported in a deposit at an oceanic ridge.

  18. A Colorimetric Microplate Assay for DNA-Binding Activity of His-Tagged MutS Protein.

    PubMed

    Banasik, Michał; Sachadyn, Paweł

    2016-09-01

    A simple microplate method was designed for rapid testing DNA-binding activity of proteins. The principle of the assay involves binding of tested DNA by his-tagged protein immobilized on a nickel-coated ELISA plate, following colorimetric detection of biotinylated DNA with avidin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. The method was used to compare DNA mismatch binding activities of MutS proteins from three bacterial species. The assay required relatively low amounts of tested protein (approximately 0.5-10 pmol) and DNA (0.1-10 pmol) and a relatively short time of analysis (up to 60 min). The method is very simple to apply and convenient to test different buffer conditions of DNA-protein binding. Sensitive colorimetric detection enables naked eye observations and quantitation with an ELISA reader. The performance of the assay, which we believe is a distinguishing trait of the method, is based on two strong and specific molecular interactions: binding of a his-tagged protein to a nickel-coated microplate and binding of biotinylated DNA to avidin. In the reported experiments, the solution was used to optimize the conditions for DNA mismatch binding by MutS protein; however, the approach could be implemented to test nucleic acids interactions with any protein of interest. PMID:27241123

  19. Encoding Active Device Elements at Nanowire Tips.

    PubMed

    No, You-Shin; Gao, Ruixuan; Mankin, Max N; Day, Robert W; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M

    2016-07-13

    Semiconductor nanowires and other one-dimensional materials are attractive for highly sensitive and spatially confined electrical and optical signal detection in biological and physical systems, although it has been difficult to localize active electronic or optoelectronic device function at one end of such one-dimensional structures. Here we report a new nanowire structure in which the material and dopant are modulated specifically at only one end of nanowires to encode an active two-terminal device element. We present a general bottom-up synthetic scheme for these tip-modulated nanowires and illustrate this with the synthesis of nanoscale p-n junctions. Electron microscopy imaging verifies the designed p-Si nanowire core with SiO2 insulating inner shell and n-Si outer shell with clean p-Si/n-Si tip junction. Electrical transport measurements with independent contacts to the p-Si core and n-Si shell exhibited a current rectification behavior through the tip and no detectable current through the SiO2 shell. Electrical measurements also exhibited an n-type response in conductance versus water-gate voltage with pulsed gate experiments yielding a temporal resolution of at least 0.1 ms and ∼90% device sensitivity localized to within 0.5 μm from the nanowire p-n tip. In addition, photocurrent experiments showed an open-circuit voltage of 0.75 V at illumination power of ∼28.1 μW, exhibited linear dependence of photocurrent with respect to incident illumination power with an estimated responsivity up to ∼0.22 A/W, and revealed localized photocurrent generation at the nanowire tip. The tip-modulated concept was further extended to a top-down/bottom-up hybrid approach that enabled large-scale production of vertical tip-modulated nanowires with a final synthetic yield of >75% with >4300 nanowires. Vertical tip-modulated nanowires were fabricated into >50 individually addressable nanowire device arrays showing diode-like current-voltage characteristics. These tip

  20. Hop, an active Mutator-like element in the genome of the fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Chalvet, Fabienne; Grimaldi, Christine; Kaper, Fiona; Langin, Thierry; Daboussi, Marie-Josée

    2003-08-01

    A new type of active DNA transposon has been identified in the genome of Fusarium oxysporum by its transposition into the niaD target gene. Two insertions within the final exon, in opposite orientations at the same nucleotide site, have been characterized. These elements, called Hop, are 3,299 bp long, with perfect terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of 99 bp. The sequencing of genomic copies reveals a 9-bp target site duplication and no apparent sequence specificity at the insertion sites. The sequencing of a cDNA indicates that Hop does not contain an intron and encodes a putative transposase of 836 amino acids. The structural features (length, TIRs size, and 9-bp duplication), together with the presence of conserved domains in the transposase, strongly suggest that Hop is a Mutator-like element (MULE). Hop is thus the first active member of this family found beyond plants. The high rate of excision observed indicates that Hop is very active and thus represents a promising efficient tagging system for the isolation of fungal genes. The distribution of Hop elements within the Fusarium genus revealed that they are present in different species, suggesting that related elements could be present in other fungal genomes. In fact, Hop-related sequences have been identified in the survey of the entire genome sequence of three other ascomycetes, Magnaporthe grisea, Neurospora crassa, and Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:12777515

  1. Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging.

    PubMed

    Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2007-01-30

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns. PMID:17244704

  2. Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging

    PubMed Central

    Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns. PMID:17244704

  3. High-throughput generation of an activation-tagged mutant library for functional genomic analyses in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Gong, Daping; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Dawei; Cui, Mengmeng; Zhang, Zhiguo; Liu, Guanshan; Wu, Jinxia; Wang, Yuanying

    2015-03-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) is an ideal model system for molecular biological and genetic studies. In this study, activation tagging was used to generate approximately 100,000 transgenic tobacco plants. Southern blot analysis indicated that there were 1.6 T-DNA inserts per line on average in our transformed population. The phenotypes observed include abnormalities in leaf and flower morphology, plant height, flowering time, branching, and fertility. Among 6,000 plants in the T0 generation, 57 displayed obvious phenotypes. Among 4,105 lines in the T1 generation, 311 displayed abnormal phenotypes. Fusion primer and nested integrated PCR was used to identify 963 independent genomic loci of T-DNA insertion sites in 1,257 T1 lines. The distribution of T-DNA insertions was non-uniform and correlated well with the predicted gene density along each chromosome. The insertions were biased toward genic regions and noncoding regions within 5 kb of a gene. Fifteen plants that showed the same phenotype as their parent with a dominant pattern in the T2 generation were chosen randomly to detect the expression levels of genes adjacent to the T-DNA integration sites by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Fifteen candidate genes were identified. Activation was observed in 7 out of the 15 adjacent genes, including one that was located 13.1 kb away from the enhancer sequence. The activation-tagged population described in this paper will be a highly valuable resource for tobacco functional genomics research using both forward and reverse genetic approaches. PMID:25408504

  4. Exploring how musical rhythm entrains brain activity with electroencephalogram frequency-tagging.

    PubMed

    Nozaradan, Sylvie

    2014-12-19

    The ability to perceive a regular beat in music and synchronize to this beat is a widespread human skill. Fundamental to musical behaviour, beat and meter refer to the perception of periodicities while listening to musical rhythms and often involve spontaneous entrainment to move on these periodicities. Here, we present a novel experimental approach inspired by the frequency-tagging approach to understand the perception and production of rhythmic inputs. This approach is illustrated here by recording the human electroencephalogram responses at beat and meter frequencies elicited in various contexts: mental imagery of meter, spontaneous induction of a beat from rhythmic patterns, multisensory integration and sensorimotor synchronization. Collectively, our observations support the view that entrainment and resonance phenomena subtend the processing of musical rhythms in the human brain. More generally, they highlight the potential of this approach to help us understand the link between the phenomenology of musical beat and meter and the bias towards periodicities arising under certain circumstances in the nervous system. Entrainment to music provides a highly valuable framework to explore general entrainment mechanisms as embodied in the human brain. PMID:25385771

  5. Locatable-body temperature monitoring based on semi-active UHF RFID tags.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangwei; Mao, Luhong; Chen, Liying; Xie, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the use of radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology for the real-time remote monitoring of body temperature, while an associated program can determine the location of the body carrying the respective sensor. The RFID chip's internal integrated temperature sensor is used for both the human-body temperature detection and as a measurement device, while using radio-frequency communication to broadcast the temperature information. The adopted RFID location technology makes use of reference tags together with a nearest neighbor localization algorithm and a multiple-antenna time-division multiplexing location system. A graphical user interface (GUI) was developed for collecting temperature and location data for the data fusion by using RFID protocols. With a puppy as test object, temperature detection and localization experiments were carried out. The measured results show that the applied method, when using a mercury thermometer for comparison in terms of measuring the temperature of the dog, has a good consistency, with an average temperature error of 0.283 °C. When using the associated program over the area of 12.25 m2, the average location error is of 0.461 m, which verifies the feasibility of the sensor-carrier location by using the proposed program. PMID:24675759

  6. Locatable-Body Temperature Monitoring Based on Semi-Active UHF RFID Tags

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangwei; Mao, Luhong; Chen, Liying; Xie, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the use of radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology for the real-time remote monitoring of body temperature, while an associated program can determine the location of the body carrying the respective sensor. The RFID chip's internal integrated temperature sensor is used for both the human-body temperature detection and as a measurement device, while using radio-frequency communication to broadcast the temperature information. The adopted RFID location technology makes use of reference tags together with a nearest neighbor localization algorithm and a multiple-antenna time-division multiplexing location system. A graphical user interface (GUI) was developed for collecting temperature and location data for the data fusion by using RFID protocols. With a puppy as test object, temperature detection and localization experiments were carried out. The measured results show that the applied method, when using a mercury thermometer for comparison in terms of measuring the temperature of the dog, has a good consistency, with an average temperature error of 0.283 °C. When using the associated program over the area of 12.25 m2, the average location error is of 0.461 m, which verifies the feasibility of the sensor-carrier location by using the proposed program. PMID:24675759

  7. Exploring how musical rhythm entrains brain activity with electroencephalogram frequency-tagging

    PubMed Central

    Nozaradan, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The ability to perceive a regular beat in music and synchronize to this beat is a widespread human skill. Fundamental to musical behaviour, beat and meter refer to the perception of periodicities while listening to musical rhythms and often involve spontaneous entrainment to move on these periodicities. Here, we present a novel experimental approach inspired by the frequency-tagging approach to understand the perception and production of rhythmic inputs. This approach is illustrated here by recording the human electroencephalogram responses at beat and meter frequencies elicited in various contexts: mental imagery of meter, spontaneous induction of a beat from rhythmic patterns, multisensory integration and sensorimotor synchronization. Collectively, our observations support the view that entrainment and resonance phenomena subtend the processing of musical rhythms in the human brain. More generally, they highlight the potential of this approach to help us understand the link between the phenomenology of musical beat and meter and the bias towards periodicities arising under certain circumstances in the nervous system. Entrainment to music provides a highly valuable framework to explore general entrainment mechanisms as embodied in the human brain. PMID:25385771

  8. Tide-related variability of TAG hydrothermal activity observed by deep-sea monitoring system and OBSH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Kantaro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Kato, Kazuhiro; Aoki, Misumi; Mitsuzawa, Kyohiko; Kinoshita, Masataka; Nishizawa, Azusa

    1997-12-01

    Hydrothermal activities were monitored by an ocean bottom seismometer with hydrophone (OBSH) and a composite measuring system (Manatee) including CTD, current meter, transmission meter and cameras at a small depression on the TAG hydrothermal mound in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Low-frequency pressure pulses detected by the hydrophone with semi-diurnal periodicity seem to correspond to cycles of hydrothermal upflow from a small and short-lived smoker vent close to the observing site. The peaks of pressure pulses are synchronous with the maximum gradient of areal strain decrease due to tidal load release. Microearthquakes with very near epicenters occur sporadically and do not appear to be directly correlatable to hydrothermal venting. Temporal variations in bottom water temperature also have semi-diurnal periodicity but are more complicated than the pressure events. Temperatures may be affected both by upwelling of hot water and by lateral flow of the bottom current changing its directions with ocean tide.

  9. Repetitive genome elements in a European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, bacterial artificial chromosome library were indicated by bacterial artificial chromosome end sequencing and development of sequence tag site markers: implications for lepidopteran genomic research.

    PubMed

    Coates, Brad S; Sumerford, Douglas V; Hellmich, Richard L; Lewis, Leslie C

    2009-01-01

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, is a serious pest of food, fiber, and biofuel crops in Europe, North America, and Asia and a model system for insect olfaction and speciation. A bacterial artificial chromosome library constructed for O. nubilalis contains 36 864 clones with an estimated average insert size of >or=120 kb and genome coverage of 8.8-fold. Screening OnB1 clones comprising approximately 2.76 genome equivalents determined the physical position of 24 sequence tag site markers, including markers linked to ecologically important and Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance traits. OnB1 bacterial artificial chromosome end sequence reads (GenBank dbGSS accessions ET217010 to ET217273) showed homology to annotated genes or expressed sequence tags and identified repetitive genome elements, O. nubilalis miniature subterminal inverted repeat transposable elements (OnMITE01 and OnMITE02), and ezi-like long interspersed nuclear elements. Mobility of OnMITE01 was demonstrated by the presence or absence in O. nubilalis of introns at two different loci. A (GTCT)n tetranucleotide repeat at the 5' ends of OnMITE01 and OnMITE02 are evidence for transposon-mediated movement of lepidopteran microsatellite loci. The number of repetitive elements in lepidopteran genomes will affect genome assembly and marker development. Single-locus sequence tag site markers described here have downstream application for integration within linkage maps and comparative genomic studies. PMID:19132072

  10. Differential cellulolytic activity of native-form and C-terminal tagged-form cellulase derived from coptotermes formosanus and expressed in E. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The endogenous cellulase gene (CfEG3a) of Coptotermes formosanus, an economically important pest termite, was cloned and overexpressed in both native form (nCfEG) and C-terminal His-tagged form (tCfEG) in E.coli. Both forms of recombinant cellulases showed hydrolytic activity on cellulosic substrate...

  11. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Frederick M.; Linder, Kathryn M.; Cardozo, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter. PMID:26379245

  12. Targeted activation tagging of the Arabidopsis NBS-LRR gene, ADR1, conveys resistance to virulent pathogens.

    PubMed

    Grant, John J; Chini, Andrea; Basu, Debrabata; Loake, Gary J

    2003-08-01

    A transgenic Arabidopsis line containing a chimeric PR-1::luciferase (LUC) reporter gene was subjected to mutagenesis with activation tags. Screening of lines via high-throughput LUC imaging identified a number of dominant Arabidopsis mutants that exhibited enhanced PR-1 gene expression. Here, we report the characterization of one of these mutants, designated activated disease resistance (adr) 1. This line showed constitutive expression of a number of key defense marker genes and accumulated salicylic acid but not ethylene or jasmonic acid. Furthermore, adr1 plants exhibited resistance against the biotrophic pathogens Peronospora parasitica and Erysiphe cichoracearum but not the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Analysis of a series of adr1 double mutants suggested that adr1-mediated resistance against P. parasitica was salicylic acid (SA)-dependent, while resistance against E. cichoracearum was both SA-dependent and partially NPR1-dependent. The ADR1 gene encoded a protein possessing a number of key features, including homology to subdomains of protein kinases, a nucleotide binding domain, and leucine-rich repeats. The controlled, transient expression of ADR1 conveyed striking disease resistance in the absence of yield penalty, highlighting the potential utility of this gene in crop protection. PMID:12906111

  13. Active pixel sensors with substantially planarized color filtering elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor imaging system preferably having an active pixel sensor array compatible with a CMOS fabrication process. Color-filtering elements such as polymer filters and wavelength-converting phosphors can be integrated with the image sensor.

  14. Characterization of an activation-tagged mutant uncovers a role of GLABRA2 in anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xianling; Hu, Qingnan; Dai, Xuemei; Tian, Hainan; Zheng, Kaijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Mao, Tonglin; Chen, Jin-Gui; Wang, Shucai

    2015-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, anthocyanin biosynthesis is controlled by a MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) transcriptional activator complex. The MBW complex activates the transcription of late biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway, leading to the production of anthocyanins. A similar MBW complex regulates epidermal cell fate by activating the transcription of GLABRA2 (GL2), a homeodomain transcription factor required for trichome formation in shoots and non-hair cell formation in roots. Here we provide experimental evidence to show that GL2 also plays a role in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. From an activation-tagged mutagenized population of Arabidopsis plants, we isolated a dominant, gain-of-function mutant with reduced anthocyanins. Molecular cloning revealed that this phenotype is caused by an elevated expression of GL2, thus the mutant was named gl2-1D. Consistent with the view that GL2 acts as a negative regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis, gl2-1D seedlings accumulated less whereas gl2-3 seedlings accumulated more anthocyanins in response to sucrose. Gene expression analysis indicated that expression of late, but not early, biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway was dramatically reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants. Further analysis showed that expression of some MBW component genes involved in the regulation of late biosynthesis genes was reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants, and chromatin immunoprecipitation results indicated that some MBW component genes are targets of GL2. We also showed that GL2 functions as a transcriptional repressor. Taken together, these results indicate that GL2 negatively regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by directly repressing the expression of some MBW component genes. PMID:26017690

  15. Elements of active vibration control for rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Heinz

    1990-01-01

    The success or failure of active vibration control is determined by the availability of suitable actuators, modeling of the entire system including all active elements, positioning of the actuators and sensors, and implementation of problem-adapted control concepts. All of these topics are outlined and their special problems are discussed in detail. Special attention is given to efficient modeling of systems, especially for considering the active elements. Finally, design methods for and the application of active vibration control on rotating machinery are demonstrated by several real applications.

  16. Functional Connectivity in Frequency-Tagged Cortical Networks During Active Harm Avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Miskovic, Vladimir; Príncipe, José C.; Keil, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many behavioral and cognitive processes are grounded in widespread and dynamic communication between brain regions. Thus, the quantification of functional connectivity with high temporal resolution is highly desirable for capturing in vivo brain function. However, many of the commonly used measures of functional connectivity capture only linear signal dependence and are based entirely on relatively simple quantitative measures such as mean and variance. In this study, the authors used a recently developed algorithm, the generalized measure of association (GMA), to quantify dynamic changes in cortical connectivity using steady-state visual evoked potentials (ssVEPs) measured in the context of a conditioned behavioral avoidance task. GMA uses a nonparametric estimator of statistical dependence based on ranks that are efficient and capable of providing temporal precision roughly corresponding to the timing of cognitive acts (∼100–200 msec). Participants viewed simple gratings predicting the presence/absence of an aversive loud noise, co-occurring with peripheral cues indicating whether the loud noise could be avoided by means of a key press (active) or not (passive). For active compared with passive trials, heightened connectivity between visual and central areas was observed in time segments preceding and surrounding the avoidance cue. Viewing of the threat stimuli also led to greater initial connectivity between occipital and central regions, followed by heightened local coupling among visual regions surrounding the motor response. Local neural coupling within extended visual regions was sustained throughout major parts of the viewing epoch. These findings are discussed in a framework of flexible synchronization between cortical networks as a function of experience and active sensorimotor coupling. PMID:25557925

  17. A sensitive electrochemical biosensor for detection of protein kinase A activity and inhibitors based on Phos-tag and enzymatic signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huanshun; Wang, Mo; Li, Bingchen; Yang, Zhiqing; Zhou, Yunlei; Ai, Shiyun

    2015-01-15

    A simple, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical assay is developed for the detection of protein kinase A (PKA) activity based on the specific recognition utility of Phos-tag for kinase-induced phosphopeptides and enzymatic signal amplification. When the substrate peptide was phosphorylated by PKA reaction, they could specifically bind with Phos-tag-biotin in the presence of Zn(2+) through the formation of a specific noncovalent complex with the phosphomonoester dianion in phosphorylated peptides. Through the further specific interaction between biotin and avidin, avidin functionalized horseradish peroxidase (HRP) can be captured on the electrode surface. Under the catalytic effect of HRP, a sensitive electrochemical signal for benzoquinone was obtained, which was related to PKA activity. Under the optimal experiment conditions, the proposed electrochemical method presented dynamic range from 0.5 to 25 unit/mL with low detection limit of 0.15 unit/mL. This new detection strategy was also successfully applied to analyze the inhibition effect of inhibitors (ellagic acid and H-89) on PKA activity and monitored the PKA activity in cell lysates. Therefore, this Phos-tag-based electrochemical assay offers an alternative platform for PKA activity assay and inhibitor screening, and thus it might be a valuable tool for development of targeted therapy and clinical diagnosis. PMID:25048450

  18. Conformal optical elements for correcting wavefront distortions in YAG : Nd{sup 3+} active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Korolkov, V P; Nasyrov, R K; Poleshchuk, A G; Arapov, Yu D; Ivanov, A F

    2013-02-28

    Correction of the wavefront is studied for the light beam passing wide-aperture YAG : Nd3+ single-crystal rods, which are used as active elements in high-power solid-state lasers. A nonideal character of the crystal structure is responsible for the deformation of the wavefront of passing radiation. By using the halftone technology we have developed conformal aberration correctors capable of compensating rod nonuniformities and reducing the laser radiation divergence by an order of magnitude. The results obtained make it possible to employ optically nonuniform active elements in laser constructions. (laser optics 2012)

  19. Tag gas capsule with magnetic piercing device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Ira V.

    1976-06-22

    An apparatus for introducing a tag (i.e., identifying) gas into a tubular nuclear fuel element. A sealed capsule containing the tag gas is placed in the plenum in the fuel tube between the fuel and the end cap. A ferromagnetic punch having a penetrating point is slidably mounted in the plenum. By external electro-magnets, the punch may be caused to penetrate a thin rupturable end wall of the capsule and release the tag gas into the fuel element. Preferably the punch is slidably mounted within the capsule, which is in turn loaded as a sealed unit into the fuel element.

  20. D-TAG: erasing the tag of gang membership.

    PubMed

    Gurke, B; Armstrong, M L

    1997-04-01

    Gangs are noted for establishing their territory, flaunting gang affiliation, intimidating nonmembers, and documenting their "services performed." These examples are a few reasons for the practice of "tagging," the labeling of an area, person, or object with gang-related graffiti or markings, such as tattoos. This article describes a school nurse's response to gang "tagging" and her efforts to assist former gang members who request removal of their tattoos, to get them removed-in essence to D-TAG themselves from their gang affiliation. D-TAG is a volunteer rehabilitation program utilizing family and community interaction to support gang tattoo removal and direct activities away from gang affiliations toward alternative educational programs and life styles. PMID:9146217

  1. Evolutionary active transposable elements in the genome of the coelacanth.

    PubMed

    Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Simakov, Oleg; Meyer, Axel; Schartl, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    The apparent morphological stasis in the lineage of the coelacanth, which has been called a "living fossil" by many, has been suggested to be causally related to a slow evolution of its genome, with strongly reduced activity of transposable elements (TEs). Analysis of the African coelacanth showed that at least 25% of its genome is constituted of transposable elements including retrotransposons, endogenous retroviruses and DNA transposons, with a strong predominance of non-Long Terminal Repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons. The coelacanth genome has been shaped by four major general bursts of transposition during evolution, with major contributions of LINE1, LINE2, CR1, and Deu non-LTR retrotransposons. Many transposable elements are expressed in different tissues and might be active. The number of TE families in coelacanth, but also in lungfish, is lower than in teleost fish, but is higher than in chicken and human. This observation is in agreement with the hypothesis of a sequential elimination of many TE families in the sarcopterygian lineage during evolution. Taken together, our analysis indicates that the coelacanth contains more TE families than birds and mammals, and that these elements have been active during the evolution of the coelacanth lineage. Hence, at the level of transposable element activity, the coelacanth genome does not appear to evolve particularly slowly. PMID:23908136

  2. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.; Lambert, J.B.; Herzog, J.P.

    1997-02-11

    A method and system are disclosed for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod. 12 figs.

  3. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Laug, Matthew T.; Lambert, John D. B.; Herzog, James P.

    1997-01-01

    A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

  4. FRET analysis using sperm-activating peptides tagged with fluorescent proteins reveals that ligand-binding sites exist as clusters.

    PubMed

    Arcos-Hernández, César; Romero, Francisco; Sánchez-Guevara, Yoloxochitl; Beltrán, Carmen; Nishigaki, Takuya

    2016-02-01

    Long-range cellular communication between the sperm and egg is critical for external fertilization. Sperm-activating peptides (SAPs) are diffusible components of the outer layer of eggs in echinoderms, and function as chemoattractants for spermatozoa. The decapeptide named speract is the best-characterized sea urchin SAP. Biochemical and physiological actions of speract have been studied with purified or chemically synthesized peptides. In this work, we prepared recombinant speract fused to a fluorescent protein (FP; FP-speract) using three color variants: a cyan (eCFP), a yellow (mVenus) and a large Stokes shift yellow (mAmetrine) FP. Although these fluorescence tags are 20 times larger than speract, competitive binding experiments using mAmetrine-speract revealed that this FP-speract has binding affinity to the receptor that is comparable (7.6-fold less) to that of non-labeled speract. Indeed, 10 nmol l(-1) eCFP-speract induces physiological sperm responses such as membrane potential changes and increases in intracellular pH and Ca(2+) concentrations similar to those triggered by 10 nmol l(-1) speract. Furthermore, FP-speract maintains its fluorescence upon binding to its receptor. Using this property, we performed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements with eCFP-speract and mVenus-speract as probes and obtained a positive FRET signal upon binding to the receptor, which suggests that the speract receptor exists as an oligomer, at least as a dimer, or alternatively that a single speract receptor protein possesses multiple binding sites. This property could partially account for the positive and/or negative cooperative binding of speract to the receptor. PMID:26889001

  5. Finite-element model of the active organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, Stephen J; Baumgart, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The cochlear amplifier that provides our hearing with its extraordinary sensitivity and selectivity is thought to be the result of an active biomechanical process within the sensory auditory organ, the organ of Corti. Although imaging techniques are developing rapidly, it is not currently possible, in a fully active cochlea, to obtain detailed measurements of the motion of individual elements within a cross section of the organ of Corti. This motion is predicted using a two-dimensional finite-element model. The various solid components are modelled using elastic elements, the outer hair cells (OHCs) as piezoelectric elements and the perilymph and endolymph as viscous and nearly incompressible fluid elements. The model is validated by comparison with existing measurements of the motions within the passive organ of Corti, calculated when it is driven either acoustically, by the fluid pressure or electrically, by excitation of the OHCs. The transverse basilar membrane (BM) motion and the shearing motion between the tectorial membrane and the reticular lamina are calculated for these two excitation modes. The fully active response of the BM to acoustic excitation is predicted using a linear superposition of the calculated responses and an assumed frequency response for the OHC feedback. PMID:26888950

  6. Baggage Tags for Learning Out of Doors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roller, Lib

    The manual provides teachers with not only educational outdoor activities, but also with activities that can be provided on an individual level. The only equipment needed for most of these activities is a bought or homemade "baggage tag". These tags are used for a variety of purposes such as plant and animal identification, nature quiz games, and…

  7. Isolation of a highly active photosystem II preparation from Synechocystis 6803 using a histidine-tagged mutant of CP 47.

    PubMed

    Bricker, T M; Morvant, J; Masri, N; Sutton, H M; Frankel, L K

    1998-11-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis was used to produce a Synechocystis mutant containing a histidine tag at the C terminus of the CP 47 protein of Photosystem II. This mutant cell line, designated HT-3, exhibited slightly above normal rates of oxygen evolution and appeared to accumulate somewhat more Photosystem II reaction centers than a control strain. A rapidly isolatable (<7 h) oxygen-evolving Photosystem II preparation was prepared from HT-3 using dodecyl-beta-d-maltoside solubilization and Co2+ metal affinity chromatography. This histidine-tagged Photosystem II preparation stably evolved oxygen at a high rate (2440 micromol O2 (mg chl)-1 h-1), exhibited an alpha-band absorption maximum at 674 nm, and was highly enriched in a number of Photosystem II components including cytochrome c550. Fluorescence yield analysis using water or hydroxylamine as an electron donor to the Photosystem II preparation indicated that virtually all of the Photosystem II reaction centers were capable of evolving oxygen. Proteins associated with Photosystem II were highly enriched in this preparation. 3,3',5, 5'-Tetramethylbenzidine staining indicated that the histidine-tagged preparation was enriched in cytochromes c550 and b559 and depleted of cytochrome f. This result was confirmed by optical difference spectroscopy. This histidine-tagged Photosystem II preparation may be very useful for the isolation of Photosystem II preparations from mutants containing lesions in other Photosystem II proteins. PMID:9804889

  8. What Do Tag Games Teach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belka, David

    2006-01-01

    Tag games have been described as "Chasing, fleeing, and dodging" type activities. Most "fleeing" activities involve dramatic play, use of movement concepts (such as quick and light), or movement changes without a partner, while many of the chasing and dodging activities utilize dodging concepts between partners or within small groups and are…

  9. Cellular tagging as a neural network mechanism for behavioural tagging

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Masanori; Ohkawa, Noriaki; Nishizono, Hirofumi; Yokose, Jun; Suzuki, Akinobu; Matsuo, Mina; Tsujimura, Shuhei; Takahashi, Yukari; Nagase, Masashi; Watabe, Ayako M.; Kato, Fusao; Inokuchi, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Behavioural tagging is the transformation of a short-term memory, induced by a weak experience, into a long-term memory (LTM) due to the temporal association with a novel experience. The mechanism by which neuronal ensembles, each carrying a memory engram of one of the experiences, interact to achieve behavioural tagging is unknown. Here we show that retrieval of a LTM formed by behavioural tagging of a weak experience depends on the degree of overlap with the neuronal ensemble corresponding to a novel experience. The numbers of neurons activated by weak training in a novel object recognition (NOR) task and by a novel context exploration (NCE) task, denoted as overlapping neurons, increases in the hippocampal CA1 when behavioural tagging is successfully achieved. Optical silencing of an NCE-related ensemble suppresses NOR–LTM retrieval. Thus, a population of cells recruited by NOR is tagged and then preferentially incorporated into the memory trace for NCE to achieve behavioural tagging. PMID:27477539

  10. An active DNA transposon nDart causing leaf variegation and mutable dwarfism and its related elements in rice.

    PubMed

    Tsugane, Kazuo; Maekawa, Masahiko; Takagi, Kyoko; Takahara, Hiroyuki; Qian, Qian; Eun, Chang-Ho; Iida, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    While characterized mutable alleles caused by DNA transposons have been abundant in maize since the discovery of Dissociation conferring variegation by Barbara McClintock, only a few mutable alleles have been described in rice even though the rice genome contains various transposons. Here, we show that a spontaneous mutable virescent allele, pyl-v, is caused by the disruption of the nuclear-coded essential chloroplast protease gene, OsClpP5, due to insertion of a 607-bp non-autonomous DNA transposon, non-autonomous DNA-based active rice transposon one (nDart1), belonging to the hAT superfamily. The transposition of nDart1 can be induced by crossing with a line containing an autonomous element, aDart, and stabilized by segregating out of aDart. We also identified a novel mutable dwarf allele thl-m caused by an insertion of nDart1. The japonica cultivar Nipponbare carries no aDart, although it contains epigenetically silenced Dart element(s), which can be activated by 5-azacytidine. Nipponbare bears four subgroups of about 3.6-kb Dart-like sequences, three of which contain potential transposase genes, and around 3.6-kb elements without an apparent transposase gene, as well as three subgroups of about 0.6-kb nDart1-related elements that are all internal deletions of the Dart-like sequences. Both nDart1 and 3.6-kb Dart-like elements were also present in indica varieties 93-11 and Kasalath. nDart1 appears to be the most active mutagen among nDart1-related elements contributing to generating natural variations. A candidate for an autonomous element, aDart, and a possible application of nDart1 for transposon tagging are discussed. PMID:16367953

  11. Fabrication of cerium active terbium aluminum garnet (TAG:Ce) phosphor powder via the solid-state reaction method

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, M.-S. Liu, G.-M.; Chung, S.-L.

    2008-05-06

    A modified solid-state reaction method for the formation of terbium aluminum garnet (TAG:Ce) powder was studied. The starting materials, which included terbium oxide (Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}), boehmite and cerium chloride (CeCl{sub 3}.7H{sub 2}O), were pre-aged at pH 3. This pre-aging process helps to form the core-shell structure, which leads to the formation of TAG:Ce phosphor powder via a solid-state reaction more easily. The emission intensity at 551 nm of the product pre-aged at pH 3 is higher than that formed without pre-aging.

  12. A Method to Site-Specifically Identify and Quantitate Carbonyl End Products of Protein Oxidation Using Oxidation-Dependent Element Coded Affinity Tags (O-ECAT) and NanoLiquid Chromatography Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Young, N L; Whetstone, P A; Cheal, S M; Benner, W H; Lebrilla, C B; Meares, C F

    2005-08-25

    Protein oxidation is linked to cellular stress, aging, and disease. Protein oxidations that result in reactive species are of particular interest, since these reactive oxidation products may react with other proteins or biomolecules in an unmediated and irreversible fashion, providing a potential marker for a variety of disease mechanisms. We have developed a novel system to identify and quantitate, relative to other states, the sites of oxidation on a given protein. A specially designed Oxidation-dependent carbonyl-specific Element-Coded Affinity Mass Tag (O-ECAT), AOD, ((S)-2-(4-(2-aminooxy)-acetamido)-benzyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid, is used to covalently tag the residues of a protein oxidized to aldehyde or keto end products. After proteolysis, the resulting AOD-tagged peptides are affinity purified, and analyzed by nanoLC-FTICR-MS, which provides high specificity in extracting co-eluting AOD mass pairs with a unique mass difference and affords relative quantitation based on isotopic ratios. Using this methodology, we have mapped the surface oxidation sites on a model protein, recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) in its native form (as purchased) and after FeEDTA oxidation. A variety of modified amino acid residues including lysine, arginine, proline, histidine, threonine, aspartic and glutamic acids, were found to be oxidized to aldehyde and keto end products. The sensitivity of this methodology is shown by the number of peptides identified, twenty peptides on the native protein and twenty-nine after surface oxidation using FeEDTA and ascorbate. All identified peptides map to the surface of the HSA crystal structure validating this method for identifying oxidized amino acids on protein surfaces. In relative quantitation experiments between FeEDTA oxidation and native protein oxidation, identified sites showed different relative propensities towards oxidation independent of amino acid residue. We expect to extend

  13. Cutaneous skin tag

    MedlinePlus

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  14. Recombineering BAC transgenes for protein tagging.

    PubMed

    Ciotta, Giovanni; Hofemeister, Helmut; Maresca, Marcello; Fu, Jun; Sarov, Mihail; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis

    2011-02-01

    Protein tagging offers many advantages for proteomic and regulomic research, particularly due to the use of generic and highly sensitive methods that can be applied with reasonable throughput. Ideally, protein tagging is equivalent to having a high affinity antibody for every chosen protein. However, these advantages are compromised if the tagged protein is overexpressed, which is usually the case from cDNA expression vectors. BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenes present a way to express a chosen protein at physiological levels with all regulatory elements in their native configurations, including cell cycle, alternative splicing and microRNA regulation. Recombineering has become the method of choice for modifying large constructs like BACs. Here, we present a method for protein tagging by recombineering BACs, transfecting cells and evaluating tagged protein expression. PMID:20868752

  15. Extracting Tag Hierarchies

    PubMed Central

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the “flat” organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of search

  16. Extracting tag hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the "flat" organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of search. Moreover

  17. VISUAL ELEMENTS OF SUBJECTIVE PREFERENCE MODULATE AMYGDALA ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Moshe; Neta, Maital

    2010-01-01

    What are the basic visual cues that determine our preference towards mundane everyday objects? We previously showed that a highly potent cue is the nature of the object’s contour: people generally like objects with a curved contour compared with objects that have pointed features and a sharp-angled contour. This bias is hypothesized here to stem from an implicit perception of potential threat conveyed by sharp elements. Using human neuroimaging to test this hypothesis, we report that the amygdala, a brain structure that is involved in fear processing and has been shown to exhibit activation level that is proportional to arousal in general, is significantly more active for everyday sharp objects (e.g., a sofa with sharp corners) compared with their curved-contour counterparts. Therefore, our results indicate that a preference bias towards a visual object can be induced by low-level perceptual properties, independent of semantic meaning, via visual elements that on some level could be associated with threat. We further present behavioral results that provide initial support for the link between the sharpness of the contour and threat perception. Our brains might be organized to extract these basic contour elements rapidly for deriving an early warning signal in the presence of potential danger. PMID:17462678

  18. Transition Metals Catalyzed Element-Cyano Bonds Activations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Falck, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Cyano group as a versatile functionalized intermediate has been explored for several decades, as it readily transfers to many useful functionalization groups such as amine, amide, acid, etc., which make it possess high popularization and use value in organic synthesis. Reactions involved with element-cyano bond cleavage can provide not only a new cyano group but also a freshly functionalized skeleton in one-pot, consequently making it of high importance. The highlights reviewed herein include H-CN, Si-CN, C-CN, B-CN, Sn-CN, Ge-CN, S-CN, Halo-CN, N-CN, and O-CN bonds cleavages and will summarize progress in such an important research area. This review article will focus on transition metal catalyzed reactions involving element-cyano bond activation. PMID:25558119

  19. Non-Elimination Tag: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, J. Scott; Mohr, Derek J.; Waronsky, Clint; Grana, Mario M.

    2006-01-01

    The activity of tag may be one of the most widely played games in elementary physical education programs. It comes in many shapes and sizes and can be morphed to meet many needs. For example, tag is used as a general body warm-up for young children (Rosengard, Mckenzie, & Short, 2000), to teach chasing, dodging, and fleeing skills (Graham,…

  20. Matching Element Symbols with State Abbreviations: A Fun Activity for Browsing the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woelk, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    A classroom activity is presented in which students are challenged to find matches between the United States two-letter postal abbreviations for states and chemical element symbols. The activity aims to lessen negative apprehensions students might have when the periodic table of the elements with its more than 100 combinations of letters is first…

  1. Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components

    DOEpatents

    Bunch, Wilbur L.; Schenter, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

  2. Lysine-tagged peptide coupling onto polylactide nanoparticles coated with activated ester-based amphiphilic copolymer: a route to highly peptide-functionalized biodegradable carriers.

    PubMed

    Handké, Nadège; Ficheux, Damien; Rollet, Marion; Delair, Thierry; Mabrouk, Kamel; Bertin, Denis; Gigmes, Didier; Verrier, Bernard; Trimaille, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Efficient biomolecule conjugation to the surface of biodegradable colloidal carriers is crucial for their targeting efficiency in drug/vaccine delivery applications. We here propose a potent strategy to drastically improve peptide immobilization on biodegradable polylactide (PLA) nanoparticles (NPs). Our approach particularly relies on the use of an amphiphilic block copolymer PLA-b-poly(N-acryloxysuccinimide-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PLA-b-P(NAS-co-NVP)) as NP surface modifier, whose the N-succinimidyl (NS) ester functions of the NAS units along the polymer chain ensure N-terminal amine peptide coupling. The well-known immunostimulatory peptide sequence derived from the human interleukin 1β (IL-1β), VQGEESNDK, was coupled on the NPs of 169 nm mean diameter in phosphate buffer (pH 8, 10 mM). A maximum amount of 2 mg immobilized per gram of NPs (i.e. 0.042 peptidenm(-2)) was obtained. Introduction of a three lysine tag at the peptide N-terminus (KKKVQGEESNDK) resulted in a dramatic improvement of the immobilized peptide amounts (27.5 mg/g NP, i.e. 0.417 peptidenm(-2)). As a comparison, the density of tagged peptide achievable on surfactant free PLA NPs of similar size (140 nm), through classical EDC or EDC/NHS activation of the surface PLA carboxylic end-groups, was found to be 6 mg/g NP (i.e. 0.075 peptidenm(-2)), showing the decisive impact of the P(NAS-co-NVP)-based hairy corona for high peptide coupling. These results demonstrate that combined use of lysine tag and PLA-b-P(NAS-co-NVP) surfactant represents a valuable platform to tune and optimize surface bio-functionalization of PLA-based biodegradable carriers. PMID:23277324

  3. Active control of multi-element rotor blade airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, Michael S. (Inventor); Moffitt, Robert C. (Inventor); Bagai, Ashish (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A multi-element rotor blade includes an individually controllable main element and fixed aerodynamic surface in an aerodynamically efficient location relative to the main element. The main element is controlled to locate the fixed aerodynamic surface in a position to increase lift and/or reduce drag upon the main element at various azimuthal positions during rotation.

  4. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOEpatents

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-29

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  5. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOEpatents

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2010-06-01

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  6. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  7. THE BINARY FREQUENCY OF r-PROCESS-ELEMENT-ENHANCED METAL-POOR STARS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS: CHEMICAL TAGGING IN THE PRIMITIVE HALO OF THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Terese; Andersen, Johannes; Nordstroem, Birgitta; Buchhave, Lars A.; Beers, Timothy C. E-mail: ja@astro.ku.dk E-mail: beers@pa.msu.edu

    2011-12-10

    A few rare halo giants in the range [Fe/H] {approx_equal} -2.9 {+-} 0.3 exhibit r-process element abundances that vary as a group by factors up to [r/Fe] {approx}80, relative to those of the iron peak and below. Yet, the astrophysical production site of these r-process elements remains unclear. We report initial results from four years of monitoring the radial velocities of 17 r-process-enhanced metal-poor giants to detect and characterize binaries in this sample. We find three (possibly four) spectroscopic binaries with orbital periods and eccentricities that are indistinguishable from those of Population I binaries with giant primaries, and which exhibit no signs that the secondary components have passed through the asymptotic giant branch stage of evolution or exploded as supernovae. The other 14 stars in our sample appear to be single-including the prototypical r-process-element-enhanced star CS 22892-052, which is also enhanced in carbon, but not in s-process elements. We conclude that the r-process (and potentially carbon) enhancement of these stars was not a local event due to mass transfer or winds from a binary companion, but was imprinted on the natal molecular clouds of these (single and binary) stars by an external source. These stars are thus spectacular chemical tracers of the inhomogeneous nature of the early Galactic halo system.

  8. Tempo and Mode of Transposable Element Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Robert; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of transposable element (TE) insertions have been of continued interest since TE activity has important implications for genome evolution and adaptation. Here, we infer the transposition dynamics of TEs by comparing their abundance in natural D. melanogaster and D. simulans populations. Sequencing pools of more than 550 South African flies to at least 320-fold coverage, we determined the genome wide TE insertion frequencies in both species. We suggest that the predominance of low frequency insertions in the two species (>80% of the insertions have a frequency <0.2) is probably due to a high activity of more than 58 families in both species. We provide evidence for 50% of the TE families having temporally heterogenous transposition rates with different TE families being affected in the two species. While in D. melanogaster retrotransposons were more active, DNA transposons showed higher activity levels in D. simulans. Moreover, we suggest that LTR insertions are mostly of recent origin in both species, while DNA and non-LTR insertions are older and more frequently vertically transmitted since the split of D. melanogaster and D. simulans. We propose that the high TE activity is of recent origin in both species and a consequence of the demographic history, with habitat expansion triggering a period of rapid evolution. PMID:26186437

  9. Degradation of HaloTag-fused nuclear proteins using bestatin-HaloTag ligand hybrid molecules.

    PubMed

    Tomoshige, Shusuke; Naito, Mikihiko; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Minoru

    2015-10-14

    We have developed a protein knockdown technology using hybrid small molecules designed as conjugates of a ligand for the target protein and a ligand for ubiquitin ligase cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (cIAP1). However, this technology has several limitations. Here, we report the development of a novel protein knockdown system to address these limitations. In this system, target proteins are fused with HaloTag to provide a common binding site for a degradation inducer. We designed and synthesized small molecules consisting of alkyl chloride as the HaloTag-binding degradation inducer, which binds to HaloTag, linked to BE04 (2), which binds to cIAP1. Using this system, we successfully knocked down HaloTag-fused cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (HaloTag-CREB1) and HaloTag-fused c-jun (HaloTag-c-jun), which are ligand-unknown nuclear proteins, in living cells. HaloTag-binding degradation inducers can be synthesized easily, and are expected to be useful as biological tools for pan-degradation of HaloTag-fused proteins. PMID:26338696

  10. Gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.; Laug, Matthew T.

    1985-01-01

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, that are grouped in preselected different ratios one to the other and are then sealed as tags in different cladded nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Failure of the cladding of any fuel element allows fission gases generated in the reaction and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas held in the reactor over the fuel elements. The isotopes specifically are Ne.sup.20, Ne.sup.21 and Ne.sup.22 of neon and Ar.sup.36, Ar.sup.38 and Ar.sup.40 of argon, and the cover gas is helium. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between approximately 0.degree. and -25.degree. C. operable to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags and the second or tag recovery system bed is held between approximately -170.degree. and -185.degree. C. operable to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis further is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be specifically determined.

  11. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gloria; Martini, K. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE’s orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  12. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Neil H; Lee, Gloria; Sherer, Nicholas A; Martini, K Michael; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Kuhlman, Thomas E

    2016-06-28

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE's orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  13. A Hyperactive Transposase of the Maize Transposable Element Activator (Ac)

    PubMed Central

    Lazarow, Katina; Du, My-Linh; Weimer, Ruth; Kunze, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable elements from maize are widely used as insertional mutagenesis and gene isolation tools in plants and more recently also in medaka and zebrafish. They are particularly valuable for plant species that are transformation-recalcitrant and have long generation cycles or large genomes with low gene densities. Ac/Ds transposition frequencies vary widely, however, and in some species they are too low for large-scale mutagenesis. We discovered a hyperactive Ac transposase derivative, AcTPase4x, that catalyzes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 100-fold more frequent Ds excisions than the wild-type transposase, whereas the reintegration frequency of excised Ds elements is unchanged (57%). Comparable to the wild-type transposase in plants, AcTPase4x catalyzes Ds insertion preferentially into coding regions and to genetically linked sites, but the mutant protein apparently has lost the weak bias of the wild-type protein for insertion sites with elevated guanine–cytosine content and nonrandom protein-DNA twist. AcTPase4x exhibits hyperactivity also in Arabidopsis thaliana where it effects a more than sixfold increase in Ds excision relative to wild-type AcTPase and thus may be useful to facilitate Ac/Ds-based insertion mutagenesis approaches. PMID:22562933

  14. Neutron activation analysis; A sensitive test for trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, T.Z. . Ward Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses neutron activation analysis (NAA), an extremely sensitive technique for determining the elemental constituents of an unknown specimen. Currently, there are some twenty-five moderate-power TRIGA reactors scattered across the United States (fourteen of them at universities), and one of their principal uses is for NAA. NAA is procedurally simple. A small amount of the material to be tested (typically between one and one hundred milligrams) is irradiated for a period that varies from a few minutes to several hours in a neutron flux of around 10{sup 12} neutrons per square centimeter per second. A tiny fraction of the nuclei present (about 10{sup {minus}8}) is transmuted by nuclear reactions into radioactive forms. Subsequently, the nuclei decay, and the energy and intensity of the gamma rays that they emit can be measured in a gamma-ray spectrometer.

  15. Friction induced skin tags.

    PubMed

    Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

    2008-01-01

    Skin tags are common benign neoplasm located predominantly in intertriginous skin. Generally of cosmetic concern, they can be easily treated with cryotherapy, electrodessication or snip-excision. Despite their high incidence data about their etiopathogenesis are scarce in the medical literature. We describe a patient who developed multiple skin tags arranged in a linear fashion suggesting an etiopathogenic role for friction. PMID:18627719

  16. A new large-DNA-fragment delivery system based on integrase activity from an integrative and conjugative element.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Ryo; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2013-07-01

    During the past few decades, numerous plasmid vectors have been developed for cloning, gene expression analysis, and genetic engineering. Cloning procedures typically rely on PCR amplification, DNA fragment restriction digestion, recovery, and ligation, but increasingly, procedures are being developed to assemble large synthetic DNAs. In this study, we developed a new gene delivery system using the integrase activity of an integrative and conjugative element (ICE). The advantage of the integrase-based delivery is that it can stably introduce a large DNA fragment (at least 75 kb) into one or more specific sites (the gene for glycine-accepting tRNA) on a target chromosome. Integrase recombination activity in Escherichia coli is kept low by using a synthetic hybrid promoter, which, however, is unleashed in the final target host, forcing the integration of the construct. Upon integration, the system is again silenced. Two variants with different genetic features were produced, one in the form of a cloning vector in E. coli and the other as a mini-transposable element by which large DNA constructs assembled in E. coli can be tagged with the integrase gene. We confirmed that the system could successfully introduce cosmid and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) DNAs from E. coli into the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida in a site-specific manner. The integrase delivery system works in concert with existing vector systems and could thus be a powerful tool for synthetic constructions of new metabolic pathways in a variety of host bacteria. PMID:23686268

  17. Comparative Performance of Acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged Juvenile Salmonids

    SciTech Connect

    Hockersmith, Eric E.; Brown, Richard S.; Liedtke, Theresa L.

    2008-02-01

    Numerous research tools and technologies are currently being used to evaluate fish passage and survival to determine the impacts of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) on endangered and threatened juvenile salmonids, including PIT tags, balloon tags, hydroacoustic evaluations, radio telemetry, and acoustic telemetry. Each has advantages and disadvantages, but options are restricted in some situations because of limited capabilities of a specific technology, lack of detection capability downstream, or availability of adequate numbers of fish. However, there remains concern about the comparative effects of the tag or the tagging procedure on fish performance. The recently developed Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic transmitter is the smallest active acoustic tag currently available. The goal of this study was to determine whether fish tagged with the JSATS acoustic-telemetry tag can provide unbiased estimates of passage behavior and survival within the performance life of the tag. We conducted both field and laboratory studies to assess tag effects. For the field evaluation we released a total of 996 acoustic-tagged fish in conjunction with 21,026 PIT-tagged fish into the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam on 6 and 13 May. Travel times between release and downstream dams were not significantly different for the majority of the reaches between acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged fish. In addition to the field evaluation, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if growth and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters is different than untagged or PIT tagged juvenile Chinook salmon. Only yearling fish with integrated and non-integrated transmitters experienced mortalities, and these were low (<4.5%). Mortality among sub-yearling control and PIT-tag treatments ranged up to 7.7% while integrated and non-integrated treatments had slightly higher rates (up to 8.3% and 7

  18. Improved gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1983-09-26

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, sealed as tags in different cladding nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Cladding failure allows fission gases and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas. The isotopes are Ne/sup 20/, Ne/sup 21/ and Ne/sup 22/ and Ar/sup 36/, Ar/sup 38/ and Ar/sup 40/, and the cover gas is He. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between 0 and -25/sup 0/C to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags, and the second or tag recovery system bed between -170 and -185/sup 0/C to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be determined.

  19. Assessment of nose protector for sport activities: finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Coto, Neide Pena; Meira, Josete Barbosa Cruz; Brito e Dias, Reinaldo; Driemeier, Larissa; de Oliveira Roveri, Guilherme; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito

    2012-04-01

    There has been a significant increase in the number of facial fractures stemming from sport activities in recent years, with the nasal bone one of the most affected structures. Researchers recommend the use of a nose protector, but there is no standardization regarding the material employed. Clinical experience has demonstrated that a combination of a flexible and rigid layer of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) offers both comfort and safety to practitioners of sports. The aim of the present study was the investigation into the stresses generated by the impact of a rigid body on the nasal bone on models with and without an EVA protector. For such, finite element analysis was employed. A craniofacial model was constructed from images obtained through computed tomography. The nose protector was modeled with two layers of EVA (1 mm of rigid EVA over 2 mm of flexible EVA), following the geometry of the soft tissue. Finite element analysis was performed using the LS Dyna program. The bone and rigid EVA were represented as elastic linear material, whereas the soft tissues and flexible EVA were represented as hyperelastic material. The impact from a rigid sphere on the frontal region of the face was simulated with a constant velocity of 20 m s(-1) for 9.1 μs. The model without the protector served as the control. The distribution of maximal stress of the facial bones was recorded. The maximal stress on the nasal bone surpassed the breaking limit of 0.13-0.34 MPa on the model without a protector, while remaining below this limit on the model with the protector. Thus, the nose protector made from both flexible and rigid EVA proved effective at protecting the nasal bones under high-impact conditions. PMID:21790992

  20. Human ubiquitin-activating enzyme, E1. Indication of potential nuclear and cytoplasmic subpopulations using epitope-tagged cDNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Handley-Gearhart, P M; Stephen, A G; Trausch-Azar, J S; Ciechanover, A; Schwartz, A L

    1994-12-30

    The ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 catalyzes the first step in the ubiquitin conjugation pathway. Previously, we have cloned and sequenced the cDNA for human E1. Expression of the E1 cDNA in the ts20 cell line, which harbors a thermolabile E1, abrogated the phenotypic defects associated with this line. However, little is known of the cell biology of the E1 protein or the nature of the E1 doublet. Thus, we constructed epitope-tagged E1 cDNAs in which the HA monoclonal antibody epitope tag sequence (from influenza hemagglutinin and recognized by the 12CA5 monoclonal antibody) was fused to the amino terminus of E1. Because the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of E1 is unknown, three constructs were made in which the HA tag was placed at each of the first three ATGs in the open reading frame (HA-1E1, HA-2E1, and HA-3E1). Western analysis of HeLa cells transfected with the constructs revealed that HA-1E1 closely comigrated with the upper band of the E1 doublet, and HA-2E1 comigrated with the lower band of the E1 doublet; HA-3E1 appeared smaller than either of the E1 bands. Metabolic labeling with 32P and immunoprecipitation with anti-HA antibody revealed that only the HA-1E1 protein product is phosphorylated; polyclonal anti-E1 antibody showed that only the upper band of the endogenous E1 doublet is phosphorylated. Each of the constructs was able to rescue the mutant phenotype of the ts20 cell line. Immunofluorescence studies showed that HA-2E1 and HA-3E1 were distributed in the cytoplasm with both negative and positive nuclei. This pattern of distribution has also been observed when immunostaining with a monoclonal antibody to E1 (1C5). However, the staining pattern associated with a polyclonal anti-E1 antibody (JJJ) is characterized by positive staining cytoplasm and nuclei in all cells. The HA-1E1 construct exhibited apparently exclusive nuclear distribution in HeLa cells. The difference between the staining patterns of the polyclonal and monoclonal anti-E1

  1. LRE2, an active human L1 element, has low level transcriptional activity and extremely low reverse transcriptase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.E.; Dombroski, B.A.; Sassaman, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we found a 2 kb insertion containing a rearranged L1 element plus a unique sequence component (USC) within exon 48 of the dystrophin gene of a patient with muscular dystrophy. We used the USC to clone the precursor of this insertion, the second known {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} human L1 element. The locus LRE2 (L1 Retrotransposable Element 2) has an allele derived from the patient which matches the insertion sequence exactly. LRE2 has a perfect 13-15 bp target site duplication, 2 open reading frames (ORFs), and an unusual 21 bp truncation of the 5{prime} end in a region known to be important for L1 transcription. The truncated LRE2 promoter has about 20% of the transcriptional activity of a previously studied L1 promoter after transfection into NTera2D1 cells of a construct in which the L1 promoter drives the expression of a lacZ gene. In addition, the reverse transcriptase (RT) encoded by LRE2 is active in an in vivo pseudogene assay in yeast and an in vitro assay. However, in both assays the RT of LRE2 is 1-5% as active as that of LRE1. These data demonstrate that multiple {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} L1 elements exist in the human genome, and that active elements can have highly variable rates of transcription and reverse transcriptase activity. That the RT of LRE2 has extremely low activity suggests the possibility that retrotransposition of an L1 element may in some cases involve an RT encoded by another L1 element.

  2. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of benzophenone tagged pyridine analogues towards activation of caspase activated DNase mediated nuclear fragmentation in Dalton's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghorbani, Mohammed; Thirusangu, Prabhu; Gurupadaswamy, H D; Girish, V; Shamanth Neralagundi, H G; Prabhakar, B T; Khanum, Shaukath Ara

    2016-04-01

    A series of benzophenones possessing pyridine nucleus 8a-l were synthesized by multistep reaction sequence and evaluated for antiproliferative activity against DLA cells by in vitro and in vivo studies. The results suggested that, compounds 8b with fluoro group and 8e with chloro substituent at the benzoyl ring of benzophenone scaffold as well as pyridine ring with hydroxy group exhibited significant activity. Further investigation in mouse model suggests that compounds 8b and 8e have the potency to activate caspase activated DNase (endonuclease) which is responsible for DNA fragmentation, a primary hallmark of apoptosis and thereby inhibits the Dalton's lymphoma ascites tumour growth. PMID:26874345

  3. Spiral MR myocardial tagging.

    PubMed

    Ryf, Salome; Kissinger, Kraig V; Spiegel, Marcus A; Börnert, Peter; Manning, Warren J; Boesiger, Peter; Stuber, Matthias

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, complementary spatial modulation of magnetization (CSPAMM) myocardial tagging was extended with an interleaved spiral imaging sequence. The use of a spiral sequence enables the acquisition of grid-tagged images with a tagline distance as low as 4 mm in a single breath-hold. Alternatively, a high temporal resolution of 77 frames per second was obtained with 8-mm grid spacing. Ten healthy adult subjects were studied. With this new approach, high-quality images can be obtained and the tags persist throughout the entire cardiac cycle. PMID:14755646

  4. Transcriptome annotation using tandem SAGE tags

    PubMed Central

    Rivals, Eric; Boureux, Anthony; Lejeune, Mireille; Ottones, Florence; Pecharromàn Pérez, Oscar; Tarhio, Jorma; Pierrat, Fabien; Ruffle, Florence; Commes, Thérèse; Marti, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of several million expressed gene signatures (tags) revealed an increasing number of different sequences, largely exceeding that of annotated genes in mammalian genomes. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) can reveal new Poly(A) RNAs transcribed from previously unrecognized chromosomal regions. However, conventional SAGE tags are too short to identify unambiguously unique sites in large genomes. Here, we design a novel strategy with tags anchored on two different restrictions sites of cDNAs. New transcripts are then tentatively defined by the two SAGE tags in tandem and by the spanning sequence read on the genome between these tagged sites. Having developed a new algorithm to locate these tag-delimited genomic sequences (TDGS), we first validated its capacity to recognize known genes and its ability to reveal new transcripts with two SAGE libraries built in parallel from a single RNA sample. Our algorithm proves fast enough to experiment this strategy at a large scale. We then collected and processed the complete sets of human SAGE tags to predict yet unknown transcripts. A cross-validation with tiling arrays data shows that 47% of these TDGS overlap transcriptional active regions. Our method provides a new and complementary approach for complex transcriptome annotation. PMID:17709346

  5. Emergy of the Global Biogeochemical Cycles of Biologically Active Elements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate estimates of the emergy of elemental flows are needed to accurately evaluate the far field effects of anthropogenic wastes. The transformity and specific emergy of the elements and of their different chemical species is also needed to quantify the inputs to many producti...

  6. TAG Advertisement Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    LaRc SI Material Overall photograph showing the material specimens, the graphite composite, the gold composite and the molded gears on a black background. These photos were used for the TAG CO-OP Public Relations and promotions

  7. Active populations of rare microbes in oceanic environments as revealed by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and 454 tag sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Koji; Taniguchi, Akito; Tada, Yuya; Kaneko, Ryo; Miki, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    The "rare biosphere" consisting of thousands of low-abundance microbial taxa is important as a seed bank or a gene pool to maintain microbial functional redundancy and robustness of the ecosystem. Here we investigated contemporaneous growth of diverse microbial taxa including rare taxa and determined their variability in environmentally distinctive locations along a north-south transect in the Pacific Ocean in order to assess which taxa were actively growing and how environmental factors influenced bacterial community structures. A bromodeoxyuridine-labeling technique in combination with PCR amplicon pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes gave 215-793 OTUs from 1200 to 3500 unique sequences in the total communities and 175-299 OTUs nearly 860 to 1800 sequences in the active communities. Unexpectedly, many of the active OTUs were not detected in the total fractions. Among these active but rare OTUs, some taxa (2-4% of rare OTUs) showed much higher abundance (>0.10% of total reads) in the active fraction than in the total fraction, suggesting that their contribution to bacterial community productivity or growth was much larger than that expected from their standing stocks at each location. An ordination plot by the principal component analysis presented that bacterial community compositions among 4 sampling locations and between total and active fractions were distinctive with each other. A redundancy analysis revealed that the variability of community compositions significantly correlated to seawater temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration. Also, a variation partitioning analysis showed that the environmental factors explained 49% of the variability of community compositions and the distance only explained 4.0% of its variability. These results implied very dynamic change of community structures due to environmental filtering. The active bacterial populations are more diverse and spread further in rare biosphere than we have ever seen. This study implied that rare

  8. Trace element analysis of coal by neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The irradiation, counting, and data reduction scheme is described for an analysis capability of 1000 samples per year. Up to 56 elements are reported on each sample. The precision and accuracy of the method are shown for 25 elements designated as hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The interference corrections for selenium and ytterbium on mercury and ytterbium on selenium are described. The effect of bromine and antimony on the determination of arsenic is also mentioned. The use of factorial design techniques to evaluate interferences in the determination of mercury, selenium, and arsenic is shown. Some typical trace element results for coal, fly ash, and bottom ash are given.

  9. Trace element analysis of coal by neutron activation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The irradiation, counting, and data reduction scheme is described for an analysis capability of 1000 samples per year. Up to 56 elements are reported on each sample. The precision and accuracy of the method are shown for 25 elements designated as hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The interference corrections for selenium and ytterbium on mercury and ytterbium on selenium are described. The effect of bromine and antimony on the determination of arsenic is also mentioned. The use of factorial design techniques to evaluate interferences in the determination of mercury, selenium, and arsenic is shown. Some typical trace element results for coal, fly ash, and bottom ash are given.

  10. Facets: Ersatz, Resource and Tag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frické, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Faceted classification appears to be of utmost importance. Ersatz facets, resource faceting and tag faceting: The distinctions are drawn between facets and ersatz facets, and between faceted resources and faceted tags. Single tag resource faceting and multiple tag information object faceting: The basic features are explored of single…

  11. Development of techniques for tagging precursor and essential chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Swansiger, W.A.; Shepodd, T.J.; Phillips, M.L.F.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to identify the manufacturers and distributors of chemicals seized in raids of illicit drug labs would be of great value in controlling the diversion of these chemicals. We developed a tagging scheme based on the addition of sub-ppM concentrations of various combinations of rare-earth elements to the target chemicals and evaluated a number of techniques for detecting the tags. We developed soluble tags for tagging liquids and selected Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) as the preferred detection technique. We developed insoluble tags for tagging solids and developed methods to analyze them and mix them into solid precursors. We have successfully demonstrated the tagging of several solvents and two of the precursor chemicals used in one of the most popular clandestine methamphetamine syntheses (ephedrine reacting with hydriodic acid/red phosphorus). The tagging scheme is capable of yielding tens of thousands of signatures (using holmium as an internal standard and up to 9 rare-earths at up to 3 concentrations yields 3{sup 9} {minus} 1 = 19,682 signatures) and is applicable to most of the chemicals on the precursor and essential chemicals list. In the concentrations employed, the tags are safe enough to be added to pharmaceuticals and cheap enough to tag tanker loads of chemicals.

  12. Transposon tagging in diploid strawberry.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Richard E; Mills, Kerri P; Baxter, Aaron J; Upham, Kendall T; Ferguson, Tammy J; Holt, Sarah Hudson; Lu, Nan; Ruiz-Rojas, Juan J; Pantazis, Christopher J; Davis, Cherish M; Lindsay, Robert C; Powell, Frankie L; Dan, Yinghui; Dickerman, Allan W; Oosumi, Teruko; Shulaev, Vladimir

    2012-10-01

    Fragaria vesca was transformed with a transposon tagging construct harbouring amino terminally deleted maize transposase and EGFP (Ac element), NPTII, CaMV 35S promoter (P35S) driving transposase and mannopine synthase promoter (Pmas) driving EGFP (Ds element). Of 180 primary transgenics, 48 were potential launch pads, 72 were multiple insertions or chimaeras, and 60 exhibited somatic transposition. T₁ progeny of 32 putative launch pads were screened by multiplex PCR for transposition. Evidence of germ-line transposition occurred in 13 putative launch pads; however, the transposition frequency was too low in three for efficient recovery of transposants. The transposition frequency in the remaining launch pads ranged from 16% to 40%. After self-pollination of the T₀ launch pads, putative transposants in the T₁ generation were identified by multiplex PCR. Sequencing of hiTAIL-PCR products derived from nested primers within the Ds end sequences (either P35S at the left border or the inverted repeat at the right border) of T₁ plants revealed transposition of the Ds element to distant sites in the strawberry genome. From more than 2400 T₁ plants screened, 103 unique transposants have been identified, among which 17 were somatic transpositions observed in the T₀ generation. Ds insertion sites were dispersed among various gene elements [exons (15%), introns (23%), promoters (30%), 3' UTRs (17%) as well as intergenically (15%)]. Three-primer (one on either side of the Ds insertion and one within the Ds T-DNA) PCR could be used to identify homozygous T₂ transposon-tagged plants. The mutant collection has been catalogued in an on-line database. PMID:22845757

  13. User Interface Program for secure electronic tags

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Koehl, E.R.; Carlson, R.D.; Raptis, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    This report summarizes and documents the efforts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in developing a secure tag communication user interface program comprising a tag monitor and a communication tool. This program can perform the same functions as the software that was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), but it is enhanced with a user-friendly screen. It represents the first step in updating the TRANSCOM Tracking System (TRANSCOM) by incorporating a tag communication screen menu into the main menu of the TRANSCOM user program. A working version of TRANSCOM, enhanced with ANL secure-tag graphics, will strongly support the Department of Energy Warhead Dismantlement/Special Nuclear Materials Control initiatives. It will allow commercial satellite tracking of the movements and operational activities of treaty-limited items and transportation vehicles throughout Europe and the former USSR, as well as the continental US.

  14. New library of aminosulfonyl-tagged Hoveyda–Grubbs type complexes: Synthesis, kinetic studies and activity in olefin metathesis transformations

    PubMed Central

    Borré, Etienne; Caijo, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Summary Seven novel Hoveyda–Grubbs precatalysts bearing an aminosulfonyl function are reported. Kinetic studies indicate an activity enhancement compared to Hoveyda’s precatalyst. A selection of these catalysts was investigated with various substrates in ring-closing metathesis of dienes or enynes and cross metathesis. The results demonstrate that these catalysts show a good tolerance to various chemical functions. PMID:21165173

  15. A Cholesterol Tag at the N Terminus of the Relatively Broad-Spectrum Fusion Inhibitory Peptide Targets an Earlier Stage of Fusion Glycoprotein Activation and Increases the Peptide's Antiviral Potency In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan-Gen; Tang, Wang; Chi, Xiao-Jing; Dong, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Xi-Xi

    2013-01-01

    In previous work, we designed peptides that showed potent inhibition of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) infections in chicken embryos. In this study, we demonstrate that peptides modified with cholesterol or 3 U of polyethylene glycol (PEG3) conjugated to the peptides' N termini showed even more promising antiviral activities when tested in animal models. Both cholesterol- and cholesterol-PEG3-tagged peptides were able to protect chicken embryos from infection with different serotypes of NDV and IBV when administered 12 h prior to virus inoculation. In comparison, the untagged peptides required intervention closer to the time of viral inoculation to achieve a similar level of protection. Intramuscular injection of cholesterol-tagged peptide at 1.6 mg/kg 1 day before virus infection and then three times at 3-day intervals after viral inoculation protected 70% of the chickens from NDV infection. We further demonstrate that the cholesterol-tagged peptide has an in vivo half-life greater than that of untagged peptides. It also has the potential to cross the blood-brain barrier to enter the avian central nervous system (CNS). Finally, we show that the cholesterol-tagged peptide could play a role before the viral fusion peptide's insertion into the host cell and thereby target an earlier stage of fusion glycoprotein activation. Our findings are of importance for the further development of antivirals with broad-spectrum protective effects. PMID:23804636

  16. Hood River PIT-tag interrogation system efficiency study. Annual report of U.S. Geological Survey activities: November 2010-October 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jezorek, Ian G.; Connolly, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    An additional USGS-CRRL task, under contract number 50150, was to build three antennas for use with Destron-Fearing 2001F-ISO PIT tag readers. These antennas would be 5 used at the East Fork Hood River Acclimation site. They would be placed in the outflow channel to inform managers about the number of PIT tagged steelhead smolts released to the Hood River after a period of acclimation when some mortality and predation might occur. 

  17. Characterization of a JAZ7 activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant with increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Louise F.; Cevik, Volkan; Grant, Murray; Zhai, Bing; Jones, Jonathan D.G.; Manners, John M.; Kazan, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, jasmonate (JA)-signaling plays a key role in mediating Fusarium oxysporum disease outcome. However, the roles of JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins that repress JA-signaling have not been characterized in host resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Here, we found most JAZ genes are induced following F. oxysporum challenge, and screening T-DNA insertion lines in Arabidopsis JAZ family members identified a highly disease-susceptible JAZ7 mutant (jaz7-1D). This mutant exhibited constitutive JAZ7 expression and conferred increased JA-sensitivity, suggesting activation of JA-signaling. Unlike jaz7 loss-of-function alleles, jaz7-1D also had enhanced JA-responsive gene expression, altered development and increased susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pst DC3000 that also disrupts host JA-responses. We also demonstrate that JAZ7 interacts with transcription factors functioning as activators (MYC3, MYC4) or repressors (JAM1) of JA-signaling and contains a functional EAR repressor motif mediating transcriptional repression via the co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL). We propose through direct TPL recruitment, in wild-type plants JAZ7 functions as a repressor within the JA-response network and that in jaz7-1D plants, misregulated ectopic JAZ7 expression hyper-activates JA-signaling in part by disturbing finely-tuned COI1-JAZ-TPL-TF complexes. PMID:26896849

  18. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2012-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities

  19. Trace elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis for pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Methods and technology were developed to analyze 1000 samples/yr of coal and other pollution-related samples. The complete trace element analysis of 20-24 samples/wk averaged 3-3.5 man-hours/sample. The computerized data reduction scheme could identify and report data on as many as 56 elements. In addition to coal, samples of fly ash, bottom ash, crude oil, fuel oil, residual oil, gasoline, jet fuel, kerosene, filtered air particulates, ore, stack scrubber water, clam tissue, crab shells, river sediment and water, and corn were analyzed. Precision of the method was plus or minus 25% based on all elements reported in coal and other sample matrices. Overall accuracy was estimated at 50%.

  20. Histone deacetylase 3 inhibition re-establishes synaptic tagging and capture in aging through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mahima; Shivarama Shetty, Mahesh; Arumugam, Thiruma Valavan; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with impaired plasticity and memory. Altered epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in the impairment of memory with advanced aging. Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is an important negative regulator of memory. However, the role of HDAC3 in aged neural networks is not well established. Late long-term potentiation (late-LTP), a cellular correlate of memory and its associative mechanisms such as synaptic tagging and capture (STC) were studied in the CA1 area of hippocampal slices from 82–84 week old rats. Our findings demonstrate that aging is associated with deficits in the magnitude of LTP and impaired STC. Inhibition of HDAC3 augments the late-LTP and re-establishes STC. The augmentation of late-LTP and restoration of STC is mediated by the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) pathway. We provide evidence for the promotion of associative plasticity in aged neural networks by HDAC3 inhibition and hence propose HDAC3 and NFκB as the possible therapeutic targets for treating age -related cognitive decline. PMID:26577291

  1. An expressed sequence tag database of T-cell-enriched activated chicken splenocytes: sequence analysis of 5251 clones.

    PubMed

    Tirunagaru, V G; Sofer, L; Cui, J; Burnside, J

    2000-06-01

    The cDNA and gene sequences of many mammalian cytokines and their receptors are known. However, corresponding information on avian cytokines is limited due to the lack of cross-species activity at the functional level or strong homology at the molecular level. To improve the efficiency of identifying cytokines and novel chicken genes, a directionally cloned cDNA library from T-cell-enriched activated chicken splenocytes was constructed, and the partial sequence of 5251 clones was obtained. Sequence clustering indicates that 2357 (42%) of the clones are present as a single copy, and 2961 are distinct clones, demonstrating the high level of complexity of this library. Comparisons of the sequence data with known DNA sequences in GenBank indicate that approximately 25% of the clones match known chicken genes, 39% have similarity to known genes in other species, and 11% had no match to any sequence in the database. Several previously uncharacterized chicken cytokines and their receptors were present in our library. This collection provides a useful database for cataloging genes expressed in T cells and a valuable resource for future investigations of gene expression in avian immunology. A chicken EST Web site (http://udgenome. ags.udel. edu/chickest/chick.htm) has been created to provide access to the data, and a set of unique sequences has been deposited with GenBank (Accession Nos. AI979741-AI982511). Our new Web site (http://www. chickest.udel.edu) will be active as of March 3, 2000, and will also provide keyword-searching capabilities for BLASTX and BLASTN hits of all our clones. PMID:10860659

  2. Jordan, an active Volvox transposable element similar to higher plant transposons.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S M; Schmitt, R; Kirk, D L

    1993-01-01

    We have isolated a 1595-bp transposable element from the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri following its insertion into the nitrate reductase (nitA) locus. This element, which we have named Jordan, has short (12-bp) terminal inverted repeats and creates a 3-bp target site duplication, like some higher plant transposons of the classic type. Contained within the first 200 bp of one end of the element are 55-bp inverted repeats, one of which begins with the terminal inverted repeat. Revertants of the transposon insertion into the nitA locus were obtained at a rate of approximately 10(-4) per Volvox embryo per generation. In each revertant examined, all transposon sequences were completely excised, but footprints containing both sets of duplicated bases, in addition to three to nine extra bases, were left behind. Jordan contains no significant open reading frames and so appears to be nonautonomous. DNA gel blot analysis indicates that Jordan is a member of a large family of homologous elements in the Volvox genome. We have isolated and characterized several of these homologs and found that they contain terminal very similar to those of Jordan. Efforts to utilize Jordan and its homologs as tools to tag and clone developmentally interesting genes of Volvox are discussed. PMID:8400878

  3. Finite Element Learning Modules as Active Learning Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ashland O.; Jensen, Daniel; Rencis, Joseph; Wood, Kristin; Wood, John; White, Christina; Raaberg, Kristen Kaufman; Coffman, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of active learning is to solicit participation by students beyond the passive mode of traditional classroom lectures. Reading, writing, participating in discussions, hands-on activities, engaging in active problem solving, and collaborative learning can all be involved. The skills acquired during active learning tend to go above and…

  4. Trace elements removal from water using modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Campos, V; Buchler, P M

    2008-02-01

    This paper present the possible alternative options for the remove of trace elements from drinking water supplies in the trace. Arsenic and chromium are two of the most toxic pollutants, introduced into natural waters from a variety of sources and causing various adverse effects on living bodies. The performance of three filter bed methods was evaluated in the laboratory. Experiments were conducted to investigate the sorption of arsenic and chromium on carbon steel and removal of trace elements from drinking water with a household filtration process. The affinity of the arsenic and chromium species for Fe/Fe3C (iron/iron carbide) sites is the key factor controlling the removal of the elements. The method is based on the use of powdered block carbon, powder carbon steel and ceramic spheres in the ion-sorption columns as a cleaning process. The modified powdered block carbon is a satisfactory and economical sorbent for trace elements (arsenite and chromate) dissolved in water due to its low unit cost of about $23 and compatibility with the traditional household filtration system. PMID:18613611

  5. ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON TREATED WITH SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the adsorption of elemental mercury at 125 C by a sulfuric-acid (H2S04, 50% w/w/ solution)-treated carbon for the removal of mercury from flue gas. The pore structure of the sample was characterized by nitrogen (N2) at -196 C and the t-plot m...

  6. Nanomechanics of HaloTag tethers.

    PubMed

    Popa, Ionel; Berkovich, Ronen; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Badilla, Carmen L; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Taniguchi, Yukinori; Kawakami, Masaru; Fernandez, Julio M

    2013-08-28

    The active site of the Haloalkane Dehydrogenase (HaloTag) enzyme can be covalently attached to a chloroalkane ligand providing a mechanically strong tether, resistant to large pulling forces. Here we demonstrate the covalent tethering of protein L and I27 polyproteins between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and a glass surface using HaloTag anchoring at one end and thiol chemistry at the other end. Covalent tethering is unambiguously confirmed by the observation of full length polyprotein unfolding, combined with high detachment forces that range up to ∼2000 pN. We use these covalently anchored polyproteins to study the remarkable mechanical properties of HaloTag proteins. We show that the force that triggers unfolding of the HaloTag protein exhibits a 4-fold increase, from 131 to 491 pN, when the direction of the applied force is changed from the C-terminus to the N-terminus. Force-clamp experiments reveal that unfolding of the HaloTag protein is twice as sensitive to pulling force compared to protein L and refolds at a slower rate. We show how these properties allow for the long-term observation of protein folding-unfolding cycles at high forces, without interference from the HaloTag tether. PMID:23909704

  7. A Reliable Tag Anti-Collision Algorithm for Mobile Tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaodong; Rong, Mengtian; Liu, Tao

    As RFID technology is being more widely adopted, it is fairly common to read mobile tags using RFID systems, such as packages on conveyer belt and unit loads on pallet jack or forklift truck. In RFID systems, multiple tags use a shared medium for communicating with a reader. It is quite possible that tags will exit the reading area without being read, which results in tag leaking. In this letter, a reliable tag anti-collision algorithm for mobile tags is proposed. It reliably estimates the expectation of the number of tags arriving during a time slot when new tags continually enter the reader's reading area and no tag leaves without being read. In addition, it gives priority to tags that arrived early among read cycles and applies the expectation of the number of tags arriving during a time slot to the determination of the number of slots in the initial inventory round of the next read cycle. Simulation results show that the reliability of the proposed algorithm is close to that of DFSA algorithm when the expectation of the number of tags entering the reading area during a time slot is a given, and is better than that of DFSA algorithm when the number of time slots in the initial inventory round of next read cycle is set to 1 assuming that the number of tags arriving during a time slot follows Poisson distribution.

  8. Tags to Track Illicit Uranium and Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M. Jonathan; Forsberg, Charles W.

    2007-07-01

    With the expansion of nuclear power, it is essential to avoid nuclear materials from falling into the hands of rogue nations, terrorists, and other opportunists. This paper examines the idea of detection and attribution tags for nuclear materials. For a detection tag, it is proposed to add small amounts [about one part per billion (ppb)] of {sup 232}U to enriched uranium to brighten its radioactive signature. Enriched uranium would then be as detectable as plutonium and thus increase the likelihood of intercepting illicit enriched uranium. The use of rare earth oxide elements is proposed as a new type of 'attribution' tag for uranium and thorium from mills, uranium and plutonium fuels, and other nuclear materials. Rare earth oxides are chosen because they are chemically compatible with the fuel cycle, can survive high-temperature processing operations in fuel fabrication, and can be chosen to have minimal neutronic impact within the nuclear reactor core. The mixture of rare earths and/or rare earth isotopes provides a unique 'bar code' for each tag. If illicit nuclear materials are recovered, the attribution tag can identify the source and lot of nuclear material, and thus help police reduce the possible number of suspects in the diversion of nuclear materials based on who had access. (authors)

  9. Analysis of the biological activities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing intracellular EGF, extracellular EGF, and tagged EGF in early-weaned rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujin; Zhou, Lin; Chen, Huina; Cao, Yangchun; Zhang, Zhengfan; Yang, Jiabao; Huang, Yanlin; Guo, Chunhua

    2015-03-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays an important role in early-weaned animals. The objective of this experiment was to compare the biological activity of intracellularly expressed EGF (IE-EGF), extracellularly expressed EGF (EE-EGF), and tagged EGF (T-EGF) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) both in vivo and in vitro. Strains of S. cerevisiae expressing IE-EGF, EE-EGF, and T-EGF were designated INVSc1-IE(+), INVSc1-EE(+), and INVSc1-TE(-), respectively. The production performance, intestinal development, physio-biochemical indexes, and immunological function of early-weaned rats were measured in vivo to evaluate the biological activity of IE-EGF, EE-EGF, and T-EGF. In addition, the proliferation of rat enterocyte was also measured in vitro. In the in vivo experiment, the recombinant S. cerevisiae was shown to survive throughout the intestinal tract. The production performance (e.g., body weight) and intestinal development (e.g., mean villous height, crypt depth, total protein, DNA, and RNA) of the rats were significantly enhanced in the INVSc1-IE(+) group compared with the INVSc1-EE(+) and INVSc1-TE(-) groups (P < 0.05). However, the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), immunoglobulin A (IgA), immunoglobulin M (IgM), and immunoglobulin G (IgG) showed no difference in the INVSc1-IE(+) group compared to the INVSc1-EE(+) and INVSc1-TE(-) groups (P > 0.05), with the only significant difference being found for creatine kinase (CK) (P < 0.05). In the in vitro experiment, the proliferation of enterocyte was significantly stimulated by both IE-EGF and EE-EGF compared with T-EGF (P < 0.05). Herein, IE-EGF is more suitable for application to early-weaned animals compared with EE-EGF and T-EGF. PMID:25200838

  10. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2013-01-01

    A key technology element in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion is the development of fuel materials and components which can withstand extremely high temperatures while being exposed to flowing hydrogen. NTREES provides a cost effective method for rapidly screening of candidate fuel components with regard to their viability for use in NTR systems. The NTREES is designed to mimic the conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel elements and other components would be subjected to during reactor operation. The NTREES consists of a water cooled ASME code stamped pressure vessel and its associated control hardware and instrumentation coupled with inductive heaters to simulate the heat provided by the fission process. The NTREES has been designed to safely allow hydrogen gas to be injected into internal flow passages of an inductively heated test article mounted in the chamber.

  11. Animal Population Survey: Tag and Recapture. Grades 5-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAZWRAP, The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program.

    This brochure contains two activities for upper elementary, middle school, and high school students that focuses on the method of "tag and recapture" used to estimate wildlife populations. The first activity involves students in tagging and recapturing animal shaped cookies and building a data table used to estimate the total number of an "animal"…

  12. Tag Completion for Image Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Jin, Rong; Jain, Anil K

    2013-03-01

    Many social image search engines are based on keyword/tag matching. This is because tag-based image retrieval (TBIR) is not only efficient but also effective. The performance of TBIR is highly dependent on the availability and quality of manual tags. Recent studies have shown that manual tags are often unreliable and inconsistent. In addition, since many users tend to choose general and ambiguous tags in order to minimize their efforts in choosing appropriate words, tags that are specific to the visual content of images tend to be missing or noisy, leading to a limited performance of TBIR. To address this challenge, we study the problem of tag completion, where the goal is to automatically fill in the missing tags as well as correct noisy tags for given images. We represent the image-tag relation by a tag matrix, and search for the optimal tag matrix consistent with both the observed tags and the visual similarity. We propose a new algorithm for solving this optimization problem. Extensive empirical studies show that the proposed algorithm is significantly more effective than the state-of-the-art algorithms. Our studies also verify that the proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and scales well to large databases. PMID:22641703

  13. Ontologies and tag-statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2012-05-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of collaborative tagging systems, the research on tagged networks, hypergraphs, ontologies, folksonomies and other related concepts is becoming an important interdisciplinary area with great potential and relevance for practical applications. In most collaborative tagging systems the tagging by the users is completely ‘flat’, while in some cases they are allowed to define a shallow hierarchy for their own tags. However, usually no overall hierarchical organization of the tags is given, and one of the interesting challenges of this area is to provide an algorithm generating the ontology of the tags from the available data. In contrast, there are also other types of tagged networks available for research, where the tags are already organized into a directed acyclic graph (DAG), encapsulating the ‘is a sub-category of’ type of hierarchy between each other. In this paper, we study how this DAG affects the statistical distribution of tags on the nodes marked by the tags in various real networks. The motivation for this research was the fact that understanding the tagging based on a known hierarchy can help in revealing the hidden hierarchy of tags in collaborative tagging systems. We analyse the relation between the tag-frequency and the position of the tag in the DAG in two large sub-networks of the English Wikipedia and a protein-protein interaction network. We also study the tag co-occurrence statistics by introducing a two-dimensional (2D) tag-distance distribution preserving both the difference in the levels and the absolute distance in the DAG for the co-occurring pairs of tags. Our most interesting finding is that the local relevance of tags in the DAG (i.e. their rank or significance as characterized by, e.g., the length of the branches starting from them) is much more important than their global distance from the root. Furthermore, we also introduce a simple tagging model based on random walks on the DAG, capable of

  14. Determination of elements in National Bureau of Standards' geological Standard Reference Materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.C.; Glascock, M.D.; Carni, J.J.; Vogt, J.R.; Spalding, T.G.

    1982-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) have been used to determine elemental concentrations in two recently issued National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Materials (SRM's). The results obtained are in good agreement with the certified and information values reported by NBS for those elements in each material for which comparisons are available. Average concentrations of 35 elements in SRM 278 obsidian rock and 32 elements in SRM 688 basalt rock are reported for comparison with results that may be obtained by other laboratories.

  15. Optical activity of catalytic elements of hetero-metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Apell, S. Peter; Wadell, Carl; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of light with metals in the form of surface plasmons is used in a wide range of applications in which the scattering decay channel is important. The absorption channel is usually thought of as unwanted and detrimental to the efficiency of the device. This is true in many applications, however, recent studies have shown that maximization of the decay channel of surface plasmons has potentially significant uses. One of these is the creation of electron-hole pairs or hot electrons which can be used for e.g. catalysis. Here, we study the optical properties of hetero-metallic nanostructures that enhance light interaction with the catalytic elements of the nanostructures. A hybridized LSPR that matches the spectral characteristic of the light source is excited. This LSPR through coupling between the plasmonic elements maximizes light absorption in the catalytic part of the nanostructure. Numerically calculated visible light absorption in the catalytic nanoparticles is enhanced 12-fold for large catalytic disks and by more 30 for small nanoparticles on the order of 5 nm. In experiments we measure a sizable increase in the absorption cross section when small palladium nanoparticles are coupled to a large silver resonator. These observations suggest that heterometallic nanostructures can enhance catalytic reaction rates.

  16. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the

  17. Preconcentration and Speciation of Trace Elements and Trace-Element Analogues of Radionuclides by Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chatt, A.

    1999-11-14

    We have developed a number of preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) methods in our laboratory for the determination of trace elements in a variety of complex sample matrices. We developed a number of cocrystallization and coprecipitation methods for the determination of trace elements in water samples. We developed several methods for the determination of I in foods and diets. We have developed a number of PNAA methods in our laboratory We determined As and Sb in geological materials and natural waters by coprecipitation with Se and Au in silicate rocks and ores by coprecipitation with Te followed by NAA. We developed an indirect NAA method for the determination of B in leachates of borosilicate glass. We have been interested in studying the speciation of Am, Tc, and Np in simulated vitrified groundwater leachates of high-level wastes under oxid and anoxic conditions using a number of techniques. We then used PNAA methods to study speciation of trace-element analogues of radionuclides. We have been able to apply biochemical techniques and NAA for the separation, preconcentration, and characterization of metalloprotein and protein-bound trace-element species in subcellular fractions of bovine kidneys. Lately, we have concentrated our efforts to develop chemical and biochemical methods in conjunction with NAA, NMR, and MS for the separation and identification of extractable organohalogens (EOX) in tissues of beluga whales, cod, and northern pink shrimp

  18. Novel assay utilizing fluorochrome-tagged physostigmine (Ph-F) to in situ detect active acetylcholinesterase (AChE) induced during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuan; Lee, Brian; Johnson, Gary; Naleway, John; Guzikowski, Anthony; Dai, Wei; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2005-01-01

    It was recently reported that acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is expressed in cells undergoing apoptosis and that its presence is essential for assembly of the apoptosome and subsequent caspase-9 activation. To obtain a marker of active AChE that could assay this enzyme in live intact cells and be applicable to fluorescence microscopy and cytometry, the fluorescein-tagged physostigmine (Ph-F), high affinity ligand (inhibitor) reactive with the active center of AChE, was constructed and tested for its ability to in situ label AChE and measure its induction during apoptosis. Ph-F inhibited cholinesterase activity in vitro (IC50 = 10(-6) and 5 x 10(-6) M for equine butyrylcholinesterase and human erythrocyte AChE, respectively) and was a selective marker of cells and structures that were AChE-positive. Thus, exposure of mouse bone marrow cells to Ph-F resulted in the exclusive labeling of megakaryocytes, and of the diaphragm muscle, preferential labeling of the nerve-muscle junctions (end-plates). During apoptosis of carcinoma HeLa cells and leukemic HL-60 or Jurkat cells triggered either by the DNA topoisomerase 1 inhibitor topotecan (TPT) or by oxidative stress (H2O2), the cells become reactive with Ph-F. Their Ph-F derived fluorescence was measured by flow and laser scanning cytometry. The appearance of Ph-F binding sites during apoptosis was preceded by the loss of mitochondrial potential, was concurrent with the presence of activated caspases, and was followed by loss of membrane integrity. At a very early stage of apoptosis, when nucleolar segregation was apparent, the Ph-F binding sites were distinctly localized within the nucleolus and at later stages of apoptosis in the cytoplasm. During apoptosis triggered by TPT, Ph-F binding was preferentially induced in S-phase cells. Our data on megakaryocytes and end-plates indicate that Ph-F reacts with active sites of AChE, and can be used to reveal the presence of this enzyme in live cells and possibly to study its

  19. Social Tagging Recommender Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, Leandro Balby; Nanopoulos, Alexandros; Schmidt-Thieme, Lars; Jäschke, Robert; Hotho, Andreas; Stumme, Gerd; Symeonidis, Panagiotis

    The new generation of Web applications known as (STS) is successfully established and poised for continued growth. STS are open and inherently social; features that have been proven to encourage participation. But while STS bring new opportunities, they revive old problems, such as information overload. Recommender Systems are well known applications for increasing the level of relevant content over the "noise" that continuously grows as more and more content becomes available online. In STS however, we face new challenges. Users are interested in finding not only content, but also tags and even other users. Moreover, while traditional recommender systems usually operate over 2-way data arrays, STS data is represented as a third-order tensor or a hypergraph with hyperedges denoting (user, resource, tag) triples. In this chapter, we survey the most recent and state-of-the-art work about a whole new generation of recommender systems built to serve STS.We describe (a) novel facets of recommenders for STS, such as user, resource, and tag recommenders, (b) new approaches and algorithms for dealing with the ternary nature of STS data, and (c) recommender systems deployed in real world STS. Moreover, a concise comparison between existing works is presented, through which we identify and point out new research directions.

  20. Emergy Evaluations of the Global Biogeochemical Cycles of Six Biologically Active Elements and Two Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of the emergy carried by the flows of biologically active elements (BAE) and compounds are needed to accurately evaluate the near and far field effects of anthropogenic wastes. The transformities and specific emergies of these elements and of their different chemical sp...

  1. Compensation for thermally induced birefringence in polycrystalline ceramic active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M A; Khazanov, E A

    2003-10-31

    Polycrystalline ceramics differ significantly from single crystals in that the crystallographic axes (and hence of the axes of thermally induced birefringence) are oriented randomly in each granule of the ceramic. The quaternion formalism is employed to calculate the depolarisation in the ceramics and the efficiency of its compensation. The obtained analytic expressions are in good agreement with the numerical relations. It is shown that the larger the ratio of the sample length to the granule size, the closer the properties of the ceramics to those of a single crystal with the [111] orientation (in particular, the uncompensated depolarisation is inversely proportional to this ratio). (active media)

  2. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  3. neutron activation analysis using thermochromatography. II. thermochromatographic separation of elements in the analysis of geological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, G.; Davydov, A.V.; Khamatov, S.; Kist, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    The use of gas thermochromatography (GTC) in the radioactivation analysis of difficulty soluble samples with a strongly activating substrate is discussed. The effect of sample coarseness and ore type on the rate of extraction of gold and accompanying elements was studied. The limits of detection of 22 elements were compared using neutron activation analysis with GTC and INAA. The analytical parameters of the procedure were estimated.

  4. Comparison of the biological activities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae-expressed intracellular EGF, extracellular EGF, and tagged EGF in early-weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujin; Guo, Chunhua; Zhou, Lin; Zhang, Zhengfan; Huang, Yanling; Yang, Jiabao; Bai, Xue; Yang, Kuanmin

    2015-09-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) ameliorates stress and prevents incomplete gastrointestinal development in early-weaned piglets in commercial swine farming. This study aimed to further analyze the biological activities of intracellularly expressed EGF (IE-EGF), extracellularly expressed EGF (EE-EGF), and tagged EGF (T-EGF) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in early-weaned pigs. In this study, we assigned 24 pigs to each of 5 groups that were provided a basic diet (the control group) or a diet supplemented with empty vector-expressing S. cerevisiae [the INVSc1(EV) group], T-EGF-expressing S. cerevisiae [the INVSc1-TE(-) group], EE-EGF-expressing S. cerevisiae [the INVSc1-EE(+) group], or IE-EGF-expressing S. cerevisiae [the INVSc1-IE(+) group]. All treatments were delivered at a dose of 60 μg EGF/kg body weight (BW) everyday. All the piglets were sacrificed after 21 day to determine their physio-biochemical indexes, immune functions, and intestinal development. In the piglet experiments, recombinant S. cerevisiae survived throughout the intestinal tract. The BW and intestinal development (e.g., mean villous height, crypt depth, villous height:crypt depth ratio (IVR), and total protein, DNA, and RNA contents) of the piglets were significantly enhanced in the INVSc1-IE(+) group compared with the animals in the INVSc1-EE(+) and INVSc1-TE(-) groups (P < 0.05). In addition, increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining was observed in the piglets that received the INVSc1-IE(+) treatment (approximately 80 %) compared with those that received the INVSc1-TE(-) (approximately 70 %) and INVSc1-EE(+) treatments (approximately 70 %). The levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), immunoglobulin A (IgA), immunoglobulin M (IgM), and immunoglobulin G (IgG) were also significantly increased in the INVSc1-IE(+) group compared with the INVSc1-EE(+) and INVSc1-TE(-) groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the proliferation of

  5. Tagged neutron capabilities for detecting hidden explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batyaev, V. F.; Belichenko, S. G.; Bestaev, R. R.; Gavryuchenkov, A. V.; Karetnikov, M. D.

    2015-05-01

    The work is devoted to illegal materials detection via tagged neutron method (TNM). The detection of hazardous substances is based on recording of gamma radiation from a neutron-irradiated object and analysis of its elemental composition. As against other neutron radiation methods the TNM enables to obtain 3D distribution of elements in the inspected area. The results of experimental part of the research show operational capabilities (probabilities of missing and false alarm) of a portable TNM inspection system when inspecting small hand-luggage-type objects.

  6. Social Tagging of Mission Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey S.; Wallick, Michael N.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Powell, Mark W.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Mittman, David S.; Abramyan, Lucy; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Fox, Jason M.; Pyrzak, Guy; Vaughn, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Mars missions will generate a large amount of data in various forms, such as daily plans, images, and scientific information. Often, there is a semantic linkage between images that cannot be captured automatically. Software is needed that will provide a method for creating arbitrary tags for this mission data so that items with a similar tag can be related to each other. The tags should be visible and searchable for all users. A new routine was written to offer a new and more flexible search option over previous applications. This software allows users of the MSLICE program to apply any number of arbitrary tags to a piece of mission data through a MSLICE search interface. The application of tags creates relationships between data that did not previously exist. These tags can be easily removed and changed, and contain enough flexibility to be specifically configured for any mission. This gives users the ability to quickly recall or draw attention to particular pieces of mission data, for example: Give a semantic and meaningful description to mission data; for example, tag all images with a rock in them with the tag "rock." Rapidly recall specific and useful pieces of data; for example, tag a plan as"driving template." Call specific data to a user s attention; for example, tag a plan as "for:User." This software is part of the MSLICE release, which was written in Java. It will run on any current Windows, Macintosh, or Linux system.

  7. Towards an "Intelligent" Tagging Tool for Blogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Juraj; Motschnig, Renate; Homola, Martin

    Tagging allows people to effectively organize web resources such as images, bookmarks or blog articles. Things are found easier by browsing tag clouds relying on the tags that have been assigned before. The success is by large determined by the quality and relevance of tags assigned to content - and so it is dependent on people who do the tagging. We investigate mental processes that underlie tagging. In order to improve quality of tagging, we provide guidelines for users of tagging systems and in addition we suggest features that an "intelligent" tagging tool should bear in order to facilitate the tagging process.

  8. Which Neuronal Elements are Activated Directly by Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Holsheimer, Jan

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss which nerve fibers in the various quadrants of the spinal cord are immediately activated under normal conditions of spinal cord stimulation, ie, at voltages within the therapeutic range. The conclusions are based on both empirical and computer modeling data. The recruitment of dorsal column (DC) fibers is most likely restricted to Aβ fibers with a diameter ≥ 10.7 μm in a 0.20-0.25 mm layer under the pia mater and fibers of 9.4-10.7 μm in an even smaller outer layer when a conventional SCS lead is used. In a 0.25-mm outer layer of the T11 segment the number of Aβ fibers ≥ 10.7 μm, as estimated in a recent morphometric study, is about 56 in each DC. Because a DC at T11 innervates 12 dermatomes, a maximum of 4-5 fibers (≥ 10.7 μm) may be recruited in each dermatome near the discomfort threshold. The dermatome activated just below the discomfort threshold is likely to be stimulated by just a single fiber, suggesting that paresthesia and pain relief may be effected in a dermatome by the stimulation of a single large Aβ fiber. The depth of stimulation in the DCs, and thereby the number of recruited Aβ fibers, may be increased 2-3 fold when stimulation is applied by an optimized electrode configuration (a narrow bi/tripole or a transverse tripole). Assuming that the largest Aβ fibers in a dorsal root have a diameter of 15 μm, the smallest ones recruited at discomfort threshold would be 12 μm. The latter are presumably of proprioceptive origin and responsible for segmental reflexes and uncomfortable sensations. Furthermore, it is shown to be unlikely that, apart from dorsal roots and a thin outer layer of the DCs, any other spinal structures are recruited when stimulation is applied in the dorsal epidural space. Finally, anodal excitation and anodal propagation block are unlikely to occur with SCS. PMID:22151778

  9. In Vitro Transcripts of Wild-Type and Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Triticum mosaic virus (Family Potyviridae) are Biologically Active in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; McMechan, Anthony J; Bartels, Melissa; Hein, Gary L; Graybosch, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) (genus Poacevirus, family Potyviridae) is a recently described eriophyid mite-transmitted wheat virus. In vitro RNA transcripts generated from full-length cDNA clones of TriMV proved infectious on wheat. Wheat seedlings inoculated with in vitro transcripts elicited mosaic and mottling symptoms similar to the wild-type virus, and the progeny virus was efficiently transmitted by wheat curl mites, indicating that the cloned virus retained pathogenicity, movement, and wheat curl mite transmission characteristics. A series of TriMV-based expression vectors was constructed by engineering a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP) open reading frame with homologous NIa-Pro cleavage peptides between the P1 and HC-Pro cistrons. We found that GFP-tagged TriMV with seven or nine amino acid cleavage peptides efficiently processed GFP from HC-Pro. TriMV-GFP vectors were stable in wheat for more than 120 days and for six serial passages at 14-day intervals by mechanical inoculation and were transmitted by wheat curl mites similarly to the wild-type virus. Fluorescent protein-tagged TriMV was observed in wheat leaves, stems, and crowns. The availability of fluorescent protein-tagged TriMV will facilitate the examination of virus movement and distribution in cereal hosts and the mechanisms of cross protection and synergistic interactions between TriMV and Wheat streak mosaic virus. PMID:26214124

  10. Activation of enhancer elements by the homeobox gene Cdx2 is cell line specific.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J K; Levy, T; Suh, E R; Traber, P G

    1997-01-01

    Cdx2 is a caudal-related homeodomain transcription factor that is expressed in complex patterns during mouse development and at high levels in the intestinal epithelium of adult mice. Cdx2 activates transcription of intestinal gene promoters containing specific binding sites. Moreover, Cdx2 has been shown to induce intestinal differentiation in cell lines. In this study, we show that Cdx2 is able to bind to two well defined enhancer elements in the HoxC8 gene. We then demonstrate that Cdx2 is able to activate transcription of heterologous promoters when its DNA binding element is placed in an enhancer context. Furthermore, the ability to activate enhancer elements is cell-line dependent. When the Cdx2 activation domain was linked to the Gal4 DNA binding domain, the chimeric protein was able to activate Gal4 enhancer constructs in an intestinal cell line, but was unable to activate transcription in NIH3T3 cells. These data suggest that there are cell-specific factors that allow the Cdx2 activation domain to function in the activation of enhancer elements. We hypothesize that either a co-activator protein or differential phosphorylation of the activation domain may be the mechanism for intestinal cell line-specific function of Cdx2 and possibly in other tissues in early development. PMID:9171078

  11. Tunable diffractive optical elements on various electro active polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Sebastian; Kollosche, Matthias; Hildebrandt, Niko; Stumpe, Joachim; Kofod, Guggi

    2010-05-01

    An innovative approach for voltage-tunable optical gratings based on dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) using electro active polymers is presented. Sinusoidal surface gratings, holographically written into azobenzene containing films, are transferred via nanoimprinting to DEAs of different carrier materials. We demonstrate that the surface relief deformation depends on the mechanical and geometrical properties of the actuators. The tested DEAs were made using commercially available elastomers, including a tri-block copolymer poly-styrene-ethylene-butadiene-styrene (SEBS), a silicone polydimethylsiloxane rubber (PDMS) and commonly used polyacrylic glue. The polyacrylic glue is ready to use, whereas the SEBS and the PDMS precursors have to be processed into thin films via different casting methods. The DEA material was pre-stretched, fixed to a stiff frame and coated with stretchable electrodes in appropriate designs. Since the actuation strain of the DEA depends strongly upon the conditions such as material properties, pre-stretch and geometry, the desired voltage-controllable deformations can be optimized during manufacturing of the DEA and also in the choice of materials in the grating transfer process. A full characterization of the grating deformation includes measurements of the grating pitch and depth modulation, plus the change of the diffraction angle and efficiency. The structural surface distortion was characterized by measuring the shape of the transmitted and diffracted laser beam with a beam profiling system while applying an electro-mechanical stress to the grating. Such surface distortions may lead to decreasing diffraction efficiency and lower beam quality. With properly chosen manufacturing parameters, we found a period shift of up to 9 % in a grating with 1 μm pitch. To describe the optical behavior, a model based on independently measured material parameters is presented.

  12. Heavy metals and rare earth elements source-sink in some Egyptian cigarettes as determined by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nada, A; Abdel-Wahab, M; Sroor, A; Abdel-Haleem, A S; Abdel-Sabour, M F

    1999-07-01

    Heavy metals and rare earth elements in two types of cigarettes were studied. The contents of trace elements were determined by using delayed neutron activation analysis. In the present study 11 elements have been detected in popular and fine brand cigarettes marketed in Egypt. Evaluation of these elements with their potential hazards for smokers is briefly discussed. The material balance (source and sink) for each element was determined. Also the ratio of element recovery to the total amount was assessed. PMID:10376325

  13. Buddy Tag CONOPS and Requirements.

    SciTech Connect

    Brotz, Jay Kristoffer; Deland, Sharon M.

    2015-12-01

    This document defines the concept of operations (CONOPS) and the requirements for the Buddy Tag, which is conceived and designed in collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Princeton University under the Department of State Key VerificationAssets Fund. The CONOPS describe how the tags are used to support verification of treaty limitations and is only defined to the extent necessary to support a tag design. The requirements define the necessary functions and desired non-functional features of the Buddy Tag at a high level

  14. Role of Oxygen as Surface-Active Element in Linear GTA Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadaiah, Nirsanametla; Bag, Swarup

    2013-11-01

    Although the surface-active elements such as oxygen and sulfur have an adverse effect on momentum transport in liquid metals during fusion welding, such elements can be used beneficially up to a certain limit to increase the weld penetration in the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The fluid flow pattern and consequently the weld penetration and width change due to a change in coefficient of surface tension from a negative value to a positive value. The present work is focused on the analysis of possible effects of surface-active elements to change the weld pool dimensions in linear GTA welding. A 3D finite element-based heat transfer and fluid flow model is developed to study the effect of surface-active elements on stainless steel plates. A velocity in the order of 180 mm/s due to surface tension force is estimated at an optimum concentration of surface-active elements. Further, the differential evolution-based global optimization algorithm is integrated with the numerical model to estimate uncertain model parameters such as arc efficiency, effective arc radius, and effective values of material properties at high temperatures. The effective values of thermal conductivity and viscosity are estimated to be enhanced nine and seven times, respectively, over corresponding room temperature values. An error analysis is also performed to find out the overall reliability of the computed results, and a maximum reliability of 0.94 is achieved.

  15. [Archival tags and geolocation methods for marine animals: A review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-feng; Fan, Wei; Dai, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Archival tags, a group of data storable electronic tags, are widely used as strong tools for obtaining long term and large scale activity information of marine animals, specifically highly migratory oceanic fishes, and corresponding environmental data. Though retrieving tags is an indispensable step for obtaining data, which is a shortage of archival tags, a series of achievements have been made on marine animals by using archival tags since the 1990s. With the appearance of pop-up satellite tag, which solved the problem of data retrieving and was fully independent of the fishing, both breadth and depth of marine animals' studies are extended by the end of the 1990s. Geolocation based on light intensity is the key to estimate marine animals' movement and has achieved some progress in the past 20 years. However, the accuracy of geolocation for latitude is not high enough, and there is still much room for improvement. To date, most geolocation methods that use ambient daylight involve identifying the times when the sun is at a precisely known zenith angle (e.g., sunrise and sunset). The problem of estimating longitude has been proved easy to solve, but accurate latitude estimates remain elusive. This paper mainly introduced two tags, i. e., archival tags and pop-up tags, and three geolocation methods, i.e. , 1) the "fixed reference" method, 2) the "variable reference" method, and 3) the "reflection" method. We also presented a prospect analysis on archival tags and possible research direction of geolocation methods. We believed that miniaturization and multi-sensor integration are the trends for electronic tags while more environmental factors such as depth, SST (sea surface temperature) or magnetic field intensity, instead of single factor, as auxiliary parameters would be used for improving the geolocation accuracy in the future. PMID:26915216

  16. Tagging for Subject Access: A Glimpse into Current Practice by Vendors, Libraries, and Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Sharon Q.

    2012-01-01

    The study looked into the 307 Koha libraries listed in Breeding's Library Technology Guides. Since all the tag clouds in Koha are user-contributed, their adoption and usage can shed light on the extent to which libraries are supporting user tagging. The research also revealed that public library users are more actively involved in tagging than…

  17. IN-FLIGHT CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY A CHLORINE-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the in-flight capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) by a chlorine (C1)-impregnated activated carbon. Efforts to develop sorbents for the control of Hg emissions have demonstrated that C1-impregnation of virgin activated carbons using dilute solutions of hydrogen ...

  18. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  19. EFFECT OF MOISTURE ON ADSORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses experiments using activated carbon to capture elemental mercury (Hgo), and a bench-scale dixed-bed reactor and a flow reactor to determine the role of surface moisture in Hgo adsorption. Three activated-carbon samples, with different pore structure and ash co...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A CL-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ENTRAINED-FLOW CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts to discern the role of an activated carbon's surface functional groups on the adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] and mercuric chloride demonstrated that chlorine (Cl) impregnation of a virgin activated carbon using dilute solutions of hydrogen chloride leads to incre...

  1. Prediction of Geomagnetic Activity and Key Parameters in High-Latitude Ionosphere-Basic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatsky, W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2007-01-01

    Prediction of geomagnetic activity and related events in the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere is an important task of the Space Weather program. Prediction reliability is dependent on the prediction method and elements included in the prediction scheme. Two main elements are a suitable geomagnetic activity index and coupling function -- the combination of solar wind parameters providing the best correlation between upstream solar wind data and geomagnetic activity. The appropriate choice of these two elements is imperative for any reliable prediction model. The purpose of this work was to elaborate on these two elements -- the appropriate geomagnetic activity index and the coupling function -- and investigate the opportunity to improve the reliability of the prediction of geomagnetic activity and other events in the Earth's magnetosphere. The new polar magnetic index of geomagnetic activity and the new version of the coupling function lead to a significant increase in the reliability of predicting the geomagnetic activity and some key parameters, such as cross-polar cap voltage and total Joule heating in high-latitude ionosphere, which play a very important role in the development of geomagnetic and other activity in the Earth s magnetosphere, and are widely used as key input parameters in modeling magnetospheric, ionospheric, and thermospheric processes.

  2. BENCH-SCALE INVESTIGATION OF MECHANISMS OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY CAPTURE BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an investigation of the sorption and desorption of gaseous elemental mercury by activated carbon sorbents. wo sorbents were chosen for the study, one (PC-100) thermally activated and the other (HGR) chemically impregnated with sulfur. he sorbents had si...

  3. Binding among Select Episodic Elements Is Altered via Active Short-Term Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Donna J.; Voss, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Of the many elements that comprise an episode, are any disproportionately bound to the others? We tested whether active short-term retrieval selectively increases binding. Individual objects from multiobject displays were retrieved after brief delays. Memory was later tested for the other objects. Cueing with actively retrieved objects facilitated…

  4. Transposon tagging and the study of root development in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsugeki, R.; Olson, M. L.; Fedoroff, N. V.

    1998-01-01

    The maize Ac-Ds transposable element family has been used as the basis of transposon mutagenesis systems that function in a variety of plants, including Arabidopsis. We have developed modified transposons and methods which simplify the detection, cloning and analysis of insertion mutations. We have identified and are analyzing two plant lines in which genes expressed either in the root cap cells or in the quiescent cells, cortex/endodermal initial cells and columella cells of the root cap have been tagged with a transposon carrying a reporter gene. A gene expressed in root cap cells tagged with an enhancer-trap Ds was isolated and its corresponding EST cDNA was identified. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the gene show no significant similarity to other genes in the database. Genetic ablation experiments have been done by fusing a root cap-specific promoter to the diphtheria toxin A-chain gene and introducing the fusion construct into Arabidopsis plants. We find that in addition to eliminating gravitropism, root cap ablation inhibits elongation of roots by lowering root meristematic activities.

  5. Impact of detector-element active-area shape and fill factor on super-resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, Russell; Droege, Douglas; Dapore, Alexander; Greiner, Mark

    2015-05-01

    In many undersampled imaging systems, spatial integration from the individual detector elements is the dominant component of the system point spread function (PSF). Conventional focal plane arrays (FPAs) utilize square detector elements with a nearly 100% fill factor, where fill factor is defined as the fraction of the detector element area that is active in light detection. A large fill factor is generally considered to be desirable because more photons are collected for a given pitch, and this leads to a higher signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR). However, the large active area works against super-resolution (SR) image restoration by acting as an additional low pass filter in the overall PSF when modeled on the SR sampling grid. A high fill factor also tends to increase blurring from pixel cross-talk. In this paper, we study the impact of FPA detector-element shape and fill factor on SR. A detailed modulation transfer function analysis is provided along with a number of experimental results with both simulated data and real data acquired with a midwave infrared (MWIR) imaging system. We demonstrate the potential advantage of low fill factor detector elements when combined with SR image restoration. Our results suggest that low fill factor circular detector elements may be the best choice. New video results are presented using robust adaptive Wiener filter SR processing applied to data from a commercial MWIR imaging system with both high and low detector element fill factors.

  6. Survey of trace elements in coals and coal-related materials by neutron activation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.; Cahill, R.A.; Frost, J.K.; Camp, L.R.; Gluskoter, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    Utilizing primarily instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and other analytical methods as many as 61 elements were quantitatively surveyed in 170 U.S. whole coals, 70 washed coals, and 40 bench samples. Data on areal and vertical distributions in various regions were obtained along with extensive information on the mode of occurrence of various elements in the coal matrix itself. ?? 1977 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  7. Multi-element analysis of emeralds and associated rocks by k(o) neutron activation analysis

    PubMed

    Acharya; Mondal; Burte; Nair; Reddy; Reddy; Reddy; Manohar

    2000-12-01

    Multi-element analysis was carried out in natural emeralds, their associated rocks and one sample of beryl obtained from Rajasthan, India. The concentrations of 21 elements were assayed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis using the k0 method (k0 INAA method) and high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The data reveal the segregation of some elements from associated (trapped and host) rocks to the mineral beryl forming the gemstones. A reference rock standard of the US Geological Survey (USGS BCR-1) was also analysed as a control of the method. PMID:11077961

  8. Determination of Interesting Toxicological Elements in PM2.5 by Neutron and Photon Activation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Capannesi, Geraldo; Lopez, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Human activities introduce compounds increasing levels of many dangerous species for environment and population. In this way, trace elements in airborne particulate have a preeminent position due to toxic element presence affecting the biological systems. The main problem is the analytical determination of such species at ultratrace levels: a very specific methodology is necessary with regard to the accuracy and precision and contamination problems. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Instrumental Photon Activation Analysis assure these requirements. A retrospective element analysis in airborne particulate collected in the last 4 decades has been carried out for studying their trend. The samples were collected in urban location in order to determine only effects due to global aerosol circulation; semiannual samples have been used to characterize the summer/winter behavior of natural and artificial origin. The levels of natural origin element are higher than those in other countries owing to geological and meteorological factors peculiar to Central Italy. The levels of artificial elements are sometimes less than those in other countries, suggesting a less polluted general situation for Central Italy. However, for a few elements (e.g., Pb) the levels measured are only slight lower than those proposed as air ambient standard. PMID:23878525

  9. Identification of three kinds of mutually related composite elements conferring S phase-specific transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Taoka, K; Kaya, H; Nakayama, T; Araki, T; Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1999-06-01

    Conservation of the Oct motif (CGCGGATC) is a remarkable feature of plant histone gene promoters. Many of the Oct motifs are paired with a distinct motif, Hex, TCA or CCAAT-box, constituting the type I element (CCACGTCANCGATCCGCG), type II element (TCACGCGGATC) and type III element (GATCCGCG-N14-ACCAATCA). To clarify the roles of these Oct-containing composite elements (OCEs) in cell cycle-dependent and tissue-specific expression, we performed gain-of-function experiments with transgenic tobacco cell lines and plants harboring a derivative of the 35S core promoter/beta-glucuronidase fusion gene in which three or four copies of an OCE had been placed upstream. Although their activities were slightly different, results showed that each of the three types of OCEs could confer the ability to direct S phase-specific expression on a heterologous promoter. In transgenic plants, the type I and III elements exhibited a similar activity, directing expression in meristematic tissues, whereas the activity of the type II element appeared to be restricted to young cotyledons and maturating guard cells. Mutational analyses demonstrated that the co-operation of Oct with another module (Hex, TCA or CCAAT-box) was absolutely required for both temporal and spatial regulation. Thus, OCEs play a pivotal role in regulation of the expression of plant histone genes. PMID:10417712

  10. An Overview of Social Tagging and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manish; Li, Rui; Yin, Zhijun; Han, Jiawei

    Social tagging on online portals has become a trend now. It has emerged as one of the best ways of associating metadata with web objects. With the increase in the kinds of web objects becoming available, collaborative tagging of such objects is also developing along new dimensions. This popularity has led to a vast literature on social tagging. In this survey paper, we would like to summarize different techniques employed to study various aspects of tagging. Broadly, we would discuss about properties of tag streams, tagging models, tag semantics, generating recommendations using tags, visualizations of tags, applications of tags, integration of different tagging systems and problems associated with tagging usage. We would discuss topics like why people tag, what influences the choice of tags, how to model the tagging process, kinds of tags, different power laws observed in tagging domain, how tags are created and how to choose the right tags for recommendation. Metadata generated in the form of tags can be efficiently used to improve web search, for web object classification, for generating ontologies, for enhanced browsing etc. We would discuss these applications and conclude with thoughts on future work in the area.

  11. Behavior of a modified Dissociation element in barley: a tool for genetic studies and for breeding transgenic barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize-derived sequences from the transposable elements Activator (Ac) and Dissociation (Ds) have enabled studies of gene function via transposon tagging. The characteristics of synthetic, transgene-containing Ds elements constructed for some of these studies has demonstrated their ability to resolve...

  12. Study on the activated laser welding of ferritic stainless steel with rare earth elements yttrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    The ferritic stainless steel SUS430 was used in this work. Based on a multi-component activating flux, composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09 % CaCO3, 10.43 % CaO, and 27.49 % MgO, a series of modified activating fluxes with 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of rare earth (RE) element yttrium (Y) respectively were produced, and their effects on the weld penetration (WP) and corrosion resistant (CR) property were studied. Results showed that RE element Y hardly had any effects on increasing the WP. In the FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment, the corrosion rates of almost all the samples cut from welded joints turned out to be greater than the parent metal (23.51 g/m2 h). However, there was an exception that the corrosion rate of the sample with 5% Y was only 21.96 g/m2 h, which was even better than parent metal. The further Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) test showed the existence of elements Zr, Ca, O, and Y in the molten slag near the weld seam while none of them were found in the weld metal, indicating the direct transition of element from activating fluxes to the welding seam did not exist. It was known that certain composition of activating fluxes effectively restrain the loss of Cr element in the process of laser welding, and as a result, the CR of welded joints was improved.

  13. Synthetic promoter elements obtained by nucleotide sequence variation and selection for activity

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Gerald M.; Meech, Robyn; Owens, Geoffrey C.; Jones, Frederick S.

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcriptional regulation in different cells involves large numbers and arrangements of cis and trans elements. To survey the number of cis regulatory elements that are active in different contexts, we have devised a high-throughput selection procedure permitting synthesis of active cis motifs that enhance the activity of a minimal promoter. This synthetic promoter construction method (SPCM) was used to identify >100 DNA sequences that showed increased promoter activity in the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2A. After determining DNA sequences of selected synthetic promoters, database searches for known elements revealed a predominance of eight motifs: AP2, CEBP, GRE, Ebox, ETS, CREB, AP1, and SP1/MAZ. The most active of the selected synthetic promoters contain composites of a number of these motifs. Assays of DNA binding and promoter activity of three exemplary motifs (ETS, CREB, and SP1/MAZ) were used to prove the effectiveness of SPCM in uncovering active sequences. Up to 10% of 133 selected active sequences had no match in currently available databases, raising the possibility that new motifs and transcriptional regulatory proteins to which they bind may be revealed by SPCM. The method may find uses in constructing databases of active cis motifs, in diagnostics, and in gene therapy. PMID:10725347

  14. Trace Elements Affect Methanogenic Activity and Diversity in Enrichments from Subsurface Coal Bed Produced Water

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Burcu; Perry, Verlin Ryan; Sheth, Mili; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Microbial methane from coal beds accounts for a significant and growing percentage of natural gas worldwide. Our knowledge of physical and geochemical factors regulating methanogenesis is still in its infancy. We hypothesized that in these closed systems, trace elements (as micronutrients) are a limiting factor for methanogenic growth and activity. Trace elements are essential components of enzymes or cofactors of metabolic pathways associated with methanogenesis. This study examined the effects of eight trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, zinc, manganese, boron, and copper) on methane production, on mcrA transcript levels, and on methanogenic community structure in enrichment cultures obtained from coal bed methane (CBM) well produced water samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Methane production was shown to be limited both by a lack of additional trace elements as well as by the addition of an overly concentrated trace element mixture. Addition of trace elements at concentrations optimized for standard media enhanced methane production by 37%. After 7 days of incubation, the levels of mcrA transcripts in enrichment cultures with trace element amendment were much higher than in cultures without amendment. Transcript levels of mcrA correlated positively with elevated rates of methane production in supplemented enrichments (R2 = 0.95). Metabolically active methanogens, identified by clone sequences of mcrA mRNA retrieved from enrichment cultures, were closely related to Methanobacterium subterraneum and Methanobacterium formicicum. Enrichment cultures were dominated by M. subterraneum and had slightly higher predicted methanogenic richness, but less diversity than enrichment cultures without amendments. These results suggest that varying concentrations of trace elements in produced water from different subsurface coal wells may cause changing levels of CBM production and alter the composition of the active methanogenic community. PMID

  15. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R.

    2000-10-01

    The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT

  16. Integrator element as a promoter of active learning in engineering teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Paulo C.; Oliveira, Cristina G.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a teaching proposal used in an Introductory Physics course to civil engineering students from Porto's Engineering Institute/Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto (ISEP). The proposal was born from the need to change students' perception and motivation for learning physics. It consists in the use of an integrator element, called the physics elevator project. This integrator element allows us to use, in a single project, all the content taught in the course and uses several active learning strategies. In this paper, we analyse this project as: (i) a clarifying element of the contents covered in the course; (ii) a promoter element of motivation and active participation in class and finally and (iii) a link between the contents covered in the course and the 'real world'. The data were collected by a questionnaire and interviews to students. From the data collected, it seems that the integrator element improves students' motivation towards physics and develops several skills that they consider to be important to their professional future. It also acts as a clarifying element and makes the connection between the physics that is taught and the 'real world'.

  17. Studies of generalized elemental imbalances in neurological disease patients using INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis)

    SciTech Connect

    Ehmann, W.D.; Vance, D.E.; Khare, S.S.; Kasarskis, E.J.; Markesbery, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Evidence has been presented in the literature to implicate trace elements in the etiology of several age-related neurological diseases. Most of these studies are based on brain analyses. Using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), we have observed trace element imbalances in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Picks's disease. The most prevalent elemental imbalances found in the brain were for bromine, mercury, and the alkali metals. In this study the authors report INAA studies of trace elements in nonneural tissues from Alzheimer's disease and ALS patients. Samples from household relatives were collected for use as controls wherever possible. Hair samples were washed according to the International Atomic Energy Agency recommended procedure. Fingernail samples were scraped with a quartz knife prior to washing by the same procedure. For ALS patients, blood samples were also collected. These data indicate that elemental imbalances in Alzheimer's disease and ALS are not restricted to the brain. Many elements perturbed in the brain are also altered in the several nonneural tissues examined to date. The imbalances in different tissues, however, are not always in the same direction. The changes observed may represent causes, effects, or simply epiphenomena. Longitudinal studies of nonneural tissues and blood, as well as tissue microprobe analyses at the cellular and subcellular level, will be required in order to better assess the role of trace elements in the etiology of these diseases.

  18. Electrically active light-element complexes in silicon crystals grown by cast method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kuniyuki; Ogura, Atsushi; Ono, Haruhiko

    2016-09-01

    Electrically active light-element complexes called thermal donors and shallow thermal donors in silicon crystals grown by the cast method were studied by low-temperature far-infrared absorption spectroscopy. The relationship between these complexes and either crystal defects or light-element impurities was investigated by comparing different types of silicon crystals, that is, conventional cast-grown multicrystalline Si, seed-cast monolike-Si, and Czochralski-grown Si. The dependence of thermal and the shallow thermal donors on the light-element impurity concentration and their annealing behaviors were examined to compare the crystals. It was found that crystal defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries did not affect the formation of thermal or shallow thermal donors. The formation of these complexes was dominantly affected by the concentration of light-element impurities, O and C, independent of the existence of crystal defects.

  19. Elemental characterization of Hazm El-Jalamid phosphorite by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A; Khater, Ashraf E M

    2016-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analyses (INAA) have been used to achieve accurate knowledge about the elemental analysis of phosphate ore deposits collected from Hazm El-Jalamid Northeast of Saudi Arabia. The samples were prepared for irradiation by thermal neutrons using a thermal neutron flux of 7×10(12)ncm(-2)s(-1) at ACT Lab Canada. The concentrations of 19 elements were determined. These included 12 major, minor and trace elements (Au, As, Ba, Br, Cr, Mo, Sb, Sc, Sr, Th, U and Zn) and 7 rare earth elements (REEs) (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Yb and Lu). Major elements (Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Cr, Ti, Mn, P, Sr and Ba) were determined using an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The comparison of the concentration of U and the REEs in the Hazm El-Jalamid phosphate samples with those of the Umm Wu'al phosphate from Saudi Arabia and El-Sibayia and El Hamrawein phosphate from Egypt shows that the contents of U and REEs are clearly higher in the Umm Wu'al, El-Sibayia and El Hamrawein phosphates than in the Hazm El-Jalamid phosphate samples. The results of major, trace elements, uranium and rare earth elements (REE) from El Jalamid phosphate have been compared with the global values of these elements. The concentrations for most of the elements studied are lower than the concentrations reported in the literature. The acquired data will serve as a reference for the follow-up studies to assess the agronomic effectiveness of the Hazm El-Jalamid phosphate rocks. PMID:27235886

  20. Overabundance of s-process elements in the atmosphere of the active red giant PZ Mon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Yu. V.

    2015-11-01

    Based on high-resolution ( R = 60 000) spectra taken with the NES spectrograph (the 6-m BTA telescope, the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences), we have determined the abundances of 26 elements, from lithium to europium, in the atmosphere of the active red giant PZ Mon, which belongs to the class of RS CVn variable stars, by the method of model stellar atmospheres. We have taken into account the hyperfine splitting, the isotopic shift, and the departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium. Analysis of our data has revealed an overabundance of lithium and neutron-capture elements compared to normal red giants. For lithium, this is explained by the activity of the star, while the overabundance of s-elements is presumably similar in nature to that inmild bariumstars.

  1. The Element Effect Revisited: Factors Determining Leaving Group Ability in Activated Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Nicholas A.; Bo, Bo; Cheng, Qian; Keeffe, James R.; Gronert, Scott; Wu, Weiming

    2012-01-01

    The “element effect” in nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions (SNAr) is characterized by the leaving group order, F > NO2 > Cl ≈ Br > I, in activated aryl halides. Multiple causes for this result have been proposed. Experimental evidence shows that the element effect order in the reaction of piperidine with 2,4-dinitrophenyl halides in methanol is governed by the differences in enthalpies of activation. Computational studies of the reaction of piperidine and dimethylamine with the same aryl halides using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for solvation indicate that polar, polarizability, solvation, and negative hyperconjugative effects are all of some importance in producing the element effect in methanol. In addition, a reversal of polarity of the C–X bond from reactant to transition state in the case of ArCl and ArBr compared to ArF also contributes to their difference in reactivity. The polarity reversal, and hyperconjugative influences have received little or no attention in the past. Nor has differential solvation of the different transition states been strongly emphasized. An anionic nucleophile, thiolate, gives very early transition states and negative activation enthalpies with activated aryl halides. The element effect is not established for these reactions. We suggest that the leaving group order in the gas phase will be dependent on the exact combination of nucleophile, leaving group, and substrate framework. The geometry of the SNAr transition state permits useful, qualitative conceptual distinctions to be made between this reaction and other modes of nucleophilic attack. PMID:23057717

  2. Measurement of the gain in a disk amplification stage with neodymium phosphate glass active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Voronich, Ivan N; Galakhov, I V; Garanin, Sergey G; Eroshenko, V A; Zaretskii, Aleksei I; Zimalin, B G; Ignat'ev, Ivan V; Kirdyashkin, M Yu; Kirillov, G A; Osin, Vladimir A; Rukavishnikov, N N; Sukharev, Stanislav A; Sharov, Oleg A; Charukhchev, Aleksandr V

    2003-06-30

    The measuring technique is described and time-resolved measurements of the small-signal gain as a function of the pump energy in a disk amplification stage with neodymium phosphate glass active elements in the 'Luch' facility are presented. The distribution of the gain over the amplifier aperture in the horizontal plane is measured. (lasers)

  3. Development of an active truss element for control of precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Eric H.; Moore, Donald M.; Fanson, James L.; Ealey, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    An active structural element for use in precision control of large space structures is described. The active member is intended to replace a passive strut in a truss-like structure. It incorporates an eddy current displacement sensor and an actuator that is either piezoelectric (PZT) or electrostrictive (PMN). The design of the device is summarized. Performance of separate PZT and PMN actuators is compared for several properties relevant to submicrometer control of precision structures.

  4. Tagging insulin in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobeck, Michael; Nelson, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the exact subcellular sites of action of insulin in the body has the potential to give basic science investigators a basis from which a cause and cure for this disease can be approached. The goal of this project is to create a test reagent that can be used to visualize these subcellular sites. The unique microgravity environment of the Shuttle will allow the creation of a reagent that has the possibility of elucidating the subcellular sites of action of insulin. Several techniques have been used in an attempt to isolate the sites of action of items such as insulin. One of these is autoradiography in which the test item is obtained from animals fed radioactive materials. What is clearly needed is to visualize individual insulin molecules at their sites of action. The insulin tagging process to be used on G-399 involves the conjugation of insulin molecules with ferritin molecules to create a reagent that will be used back on Earth in an attempt to elucidate the sites of action of insulin.

  5. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Ludwig, Leif S; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-04-19

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptionalcis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders. PMID:27044088

  6. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Ludwig, Leif S.; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I.; Sankaran, Vijay G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptional cis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders. PMID:27044088

  7. Rare-earth elements in Egyptian granite by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A

    2007-04-01

    The mobilization of rare-earth elements (REEs) in the environment requires monitoring of these elements in environmental matrices, in which they are mainly present at trace levels. The similarity in REEs chemical behavior makes the separate determination of each element by chemical methods difficult; instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), based on nuclear properties of the elements to be determined, is a method of choice in trace analysis of REEs and related elements. Therefore, INAA was applied as a sensitive nondestructive analytical tool for the determination of REEs to find out what information could be obtained about the REEs of some Egyptian granite collected from four locations in Aswan area in south Egypt as follows wadi El-Allaqi, El-Shelal, Gabel Ibrahim Pasha and from Sehyel Island and to estimate the accuracy, reproducibility and detection limit of NAA method in case of the given samples. The samples were properly prepared together with standards and simultaneously irradiated in a neutron flux of 7 x 10(11)n/cm(2)s in the TRIGA Mainz research reactor facilities. The following elements have been determined: La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Yb and Lu. The gamma spectra was collected by HPGe detector and the analysis was done by means of computerized multichannel analyzer. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was also used. PMID:17208446

  8. ICE Afe 1, an actively excising genetic element from the biomining bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Paula; Covarrubias, Paulo C; Levicán, Gloria; Katz, Assaf; Tapia, Pablo; Holmes, David; Quatrini, Raquel; Orellana, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) are self-transferred mobile genetic elements that contribute to horizontal gene transfer. An ICE (ICEAfe1) was identified in the genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270. Excision of the element and expression of relevant genes under normal and DNA-damaging growth conditions was analyzed. Bioinformatic tools and DNA amplification methods were used to identify and to assess the excision and expression of genes related to the mobility of the element. Both basal and mitomycin C-inducible excision as well as expression and induction of the genes for integration/excision are demonstrated, suggesting that ICEAfe1 is an actively excising SOS-regulated mobile genetic element. The presence of a complete set of genes encoding self-transfer functions that are induced in response to DNA damage caused by mitomycin C additionally suggests that this element is capable of conjugative transfer to suitable recipient strains. Transfer of ICEAfe1 may provide selective advantages to other acidophiles in this ecological niche through dissemination of gene clusters expressing transfer RNAs, CRISPRs, and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis enzymes, probably by modification of translation efficiency, resistance to bacteriophage infection and biofilm formation, respectively. These data open novel avenues of research on conjugative transformation of biotechnologically relevant microorganisms recalcitrant to genetic manipulation. PMID:23486178

  9. Quantum tagging for tags containing secret classical data

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Adrian

    2011-08-15

    Various authors have considered schemes for quantum tagging, that is, authenticating the classical location of a classical tagging device by sending and receiving quantum signals from suitably located distant sites, in an environment controlled by an adversary whose quantum information processing and transmitting power is potentially unbounded. All of the schemes proposed elsewhere in the literature assume that the adversary is able to inspect the interior of the tagging device. All of these schemes have been shown to be breakable if the adversary has unbounded predistributed entanglement. We consider here the case in which the tagging device contains a finite key string shared with distant sites but kept secret from the adversary, and show this allows the location of the tagging device to be authenticated securely and indefinitely. Our protocol relies on quantum key distribution between the tagging device and at least one distant site, and demonstrates a new practical application of quantum key distribution. It also illustrates that the attainable security in position-based cryptography can depend crucially on apparently subtle details in the security scenario considered.

  10. A Study of HTML Title Tag Creation Behavior of Academic Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noruzi, Alireza

    2007-01-01

    The HTML title tag information should identify and describe exactly what a Web page contains. This paper analyzes the "Title element" and raises a significant question: "Why is the title tag important?" Search engines base search results and page rankings on certain criteria. Among the most important criteria is the presence of the search keywords…

  11. Atmospheric Deposition of Trace Elements in Ombrotrophic Peat as a Result of Anthropic Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabio Lourençato, Lucio; Cabral Teixeira, Daniel; Vieira Silva-Filho, Emmanoel

    2014-05-01

    Ombrotrophic peat can be defined as a soil rich in organic matter, formed from the partial decomposition of vegetable organic material in a humid and anoxic environment, where the accumulation of material is necessarily faster than the decomposition. From the physical-chemical point of view, it is a porous and highly polar material with high adsorption capacity and cation exchange. The high ability of trace elements to undergo complexation by humic substances happens due to the presence of large amounts of oxygenated functional groups in these substances. Since the beginning of industrialization human activities have scattered a large amount of trace elements in the environment. Soil contamination by atmospheric deposition can be expressed as a sum of site contamination by past/present human activities and atmospheric long-range transport of trace elements. Ombrotrophic peat records can provide valuable information about the entries of trace metals into the atmosphere and that are subsequently deposited on the soil. These trace elements are toxic, non-biodegradable and accumulate in the food chain, even in relatively low quantities. Thus studies on the increase of trace elements in the environment due to human activities are necessary, particularly in the southern hemisphere, where these data are scarce. The aims of this study is to evaluate the concentrations of mercury in ombrotrophic peat altomontanas coming from atmospheric deposition. The study is conducted in the Itatiaia National Park, Brazilian conservation unit, situated between the southeastern state of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Minas Gerais. An ombrotrophic peat core is being sampled in altitude (1980m), to measure the trace elements concentrations of this material. As it is conservation area, the trace elements found in the samples is mainly from atmospheric deposition, since in Brazil don't exist significant lithology of trace elements. The samples are characterized by organic matter content which

  12. Applying thiouracil (TU)-tagging for mouse transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Leslie; Karfilis, Kate V.; Miller, Michael R.; Doe, Chris Q.; Stankunas, Kryn

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling is a powerful approach to study mouse development, physiology, and disease models. Here, we describe a protocol for mouse thiouracil-tagging (TU-tagging), a transcriptome analysis technology that includes in vivo covalent labeling, purification, and analysis of cell type-specific RNA. TU-tagging enables 1) the isolation of RNA from a given cell population of a complex tissue, avoiding transcriptional changes induced by cell isolation trauma, and 2) the identification of actively transcribed RNAs and not pre-existing transcripts. Therefore, in contrast to other cell-specific transcriptional profiling methods based on purification of tagged ribosomes or nuclei, TU-tagging provides a direct examination of transcriptional regulation. We describe how to: 1) deliver 4-thiouracil to transgenic mice to thio-label cell lineage-specific transcripts, 2) purify TU-tagged RNA and prepare libraries for Illumina sequencing, and 3) follow a straight-forward bioinformatics workflow to identify cell type-enriched or differentially expressed genes. Tissue containing TU-tagged RNA can be obtained in one day, RNA-Seq libraries generated within two days, and, following sequencing, an initial bioinformatics analysis completed in one additional day. PMID:24457332

  13. A finite element method for active vibration control of uncertain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A. L.; Rongong, J. A.; Sims, N. D.

    2012-10-01

    This work introduces a fuzzy design method using the finite element procedure to simulate and analyze active vibration control of structures subjected to uncertain parameters. The purpose of this work is to provide a tool for studying the influence of uncertainty propagation on both stability and performance of a vibration control system, whilst avoiding the need for computationally expensive probabilistic methods or complex robust control techniques. The proposed procedure applies a general and efficient strategy for computing fuzzy results to a sequence of finite element calculations. Finally, the applicability of the methodology is illustrated through some realistic case studies related to structural control where spillover instability may arise.

  14. Nuclear activation method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.F.

    1993-08-17

    A method is described for characterizing at least one activated element in an earth formation surrounding a borehole, comprising the steps of: (a) displacing in said borehole a sonde comprising a neutron source and at least two gamma ray detectors longitudinally spaced from said source, while irradiating said formation with neutrons of sufficient energy to interact with said element according to the activation reaction; (b) detecting and counting at each detector the gamma rays resulting from the activation of atoms of said element; (c) determining, at each depth, the number of gamma ray counts detected during the time period defined by the time instants when respectively said source and said detectors pass that depth, said determination of gamma ray counts being made for each detector at each depth; (d) establishing a relationship, for each depth, between the counts from the respective detectors for that depth and the corresponding time instants when the corresponding detector passes that depth; and (e) deriving from said relationship at least one characteristic of said element.

  15. Behavioral tagging of extinction learning.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Benetti, Fernando; Izquierdo, Iván

    2013-01-15

    Extinction of contextual fear in rats is enhanced by exposure to a novel environment at 1-2 h before or 1 h after extinction training. This effect is antagonized by administration of protein synthesis inhibitors anisomycin and rapamycin into the hippocampus, but not into the amygdala, immediately after either novelty or extinction training, as well as by the gene expression blocker 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole administered after novelty training, but not after extinction training. Thus, this effect can be attributed to a mechanism similar to synaptic tagging, through which long-term potentiation can be enhanced by other long-term potentiations or by exposure to a novel environment in a protein synthesis-dependent fashion. Extinction learning produces a tag at the appropriate synapses, whereas novelty learning causes the synthesis of plasticity-related proteins that are captured by the tag, strengthening the synapses that generated this tag. PMID:23277583

  16. Transposable elements become active and mobile in the genomes of aging mammalian somatic tissues.

    PubMed

    De Cecco, Marco; Criscione, Steven W; Peterson, Abigail L; Neretti, Nicola; Sedivy, John M; Kreiling, Jill A

    2013-12-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) were discovered by Barbara McClintock in maize and have since been found to be ubiquitous in all living organisms. Transposition is mutagenic and organisms have evolved mechanisms to repress the activity of their endogenous TEs. Transposition in somatic cells is very low, but recent evidence suggests that it may be derepressed in some cases, such as cancer development. We have found that during normal aging several families of retrotransposable elements (RTEs) start being transcribed in mouse tissues. In advanced age the expression culminates in active transposition. These processes are counteracted by calorie restriction (CR), an intervention that slows down aging. Retrotransposition is also activated in age-associated, naturally occurring cancers in the mouse. We suggest that somatic retrotransposition is a hitherto unappreciated aging process. Mobilization of RTEs is likely to be an important contributor to the progressive dysfunction of aging cells. PMID:24323947

  17. Active muscle response using feedback control of a finite element human arm model.

    PubMed

    Östh, Jonas; Brolin, Karin; Happee, Riender

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical human body models (HBMs) are important research tools that are used to study the human response in car crash situations. Development of automotive safety systems requires the implementation of active muscle response in HBM, as novel safety systems also interact with vehicle occupants in the pre-crash phase. In this study, active muscle response was implemented using feedback control of a nonlinear muscle model in the right upper extremity of a finite element (FE) HBM. Hill-type line muscle elements were added, and the active and passive properties were assessed. Volunteer tests with low impact loading resulting in elbow flexion motions were performed. Simulations of posture maintenance in a gravity field and the volunteer tests were successfully conducted. It was concluded that feedback control of a nonlinear musculoskeletal model can be used to obtain posture maintenance and human-like reflexive responses in an FE HBM. PMID:21294008

  18. Controlled trial of polymeric versus elemental diet in treatment of active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Giaffer, M H; North, G; Holdsworth, C D

    1990-04-01

    30 patients with active Crohn's disease, mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index 301 (SE 32), who would otherwise have been treated with steroids, were randomised to receive for 4 weeks either an elemental diet ('Vivonex') (n = 16) or a polymeric diet ('Fortison') (n = 14). Assessment on days 10 and 28 showed that clinical remission occurred in 5 (36%) of the 14 patients on fortison compared with 12 (75%) of the 16 patients assigned to vivonex. The difference in remission rate was significant (p less than 0.03). Dietary treatment resulted in little change in the nutritional state and various laboratory indices of activity over a 4 week period despite clinical improvement. Polymeric diets do not seem to offer an effective therapeutic alternative to elemental diets in patients with acute exacerbations of Crohn's disease. PMID:1969560

  19. Writingmatrix: Connecting Students with Blogs, Tags, and Social Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Vance; Quintana, Nelba; Zeinstejer, Rita; Sirk, Sasa; Molero, Doris; Arena, Carla

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an extensive online project, Writingmatrix [http://writingmatrix.wikispaces.com], involving several key elements essential to collaboration in Web 2.0, such as aggregation, tagging, and social networking. Participant teachers in several different countries--Argentina, Venezuela, and Slovenia--had their adult students at…

  20. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwes, Nick; Petrosky, Charlie; Schaller, Howard

    2002-02-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to

  1. Strep-Tagged Protein Purification.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Barbara; Spriestersbach, Anne; Kubicek, Jan; Schäfer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The Strep-tag system can be used to purify recombinant proteins from any expression system. Here, protocols for lysis and affinity purification of Strep-tagged proteins from E. coli, baculovirus-infected insect cells, and transfected mammalian cells are given. Depending on the amount of Strep-tagged protein in the lysate, a protocol for batch binding and subsequent washing and eluting by gravity flow can be used. Agarose-based matrices with the coupled Strep-Tactin ligand are the resins of choice, with a binding capacity of up to 9 mg ml(-1). For purification of lower amounts of Strep-tagged proteins, the use of Strep-Tactin magnetic beads is suitable. In addition, Strep-tagged protein purification can also be automated using prepacked columns for FPLC or other liquid-handling chromatography instrumentation, but automated purification is not discussed in this protocol. The protocols described here can be regarded as an update of the Strep-Tag Protein Handbook (Qiagen, 2009). PMID:26096503

  2. Neutron activation analysis of major, minor, and trace elements in marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, S.F.; Zeisler, R.; Koster, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques are well established in the multielement assay of geological materials. Similarly, applications of NAA to the analysis of marine sediments have been described. The different emphasis on elemental composition in studying and monitoring the health of the environment, however, presents a new challenge to the analyst. To investigate as many elements as possible, previous multielement procedures need to be reevaluated and modified. In this work, the authors have utilized the NAA steps of a recently developed sequential analysis procedure that obtained concentrations for 45 biological and pollutant elements in marine bivalves. This procedure, with modification, was applied to samples of marine sediments collected for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Status and Trends (NS T) specimen banking program.

  3. Elemental characterization of the Avogadro silicon crystal WASO 04 by neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, G.; Bergamaschi, L.; Giordani, L.; Mana, G.; Massa, E.; Oddone, M.

    2012-12-01

    Impurity measurements of the 28Si crystal used for the determination of the Avogadro constant are essential to prevent biased results or underestimated uncertainties. A review of the existing data confirmed the high purity of silicon with respect to a large number of elements. In order to obtain direct evidence of purity, we developed a relative analytical method based on neutron activation. As a preliminary test, this method was applied to a sample of the Avogadro natural silicon crystal WASO 04. The investigation concerned 29 elements. The mass fraction of Au was quantified to be (1.03 ± 0.18) × 10-12. For the remaining 28 elements, the mass fractions were below the detection limits, which ranged between 1 × 10-12 and 1 × 10-5.

  4. Time-Tag Generation Script

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Dan E.

    2010-01-01

    Time-Tag Generation Script (TTaGS) is an application program, written in the AWK scripting language, for generating commands for aiming one Ku-band antenna and two S-band antennas for communicating with spacecraft. TTaGS saves between 2 and 4 person-hours per every 24 hours by automating the repetitious process of building between 150 and 180 antenna-control commands. TTaGS reads a text database of communication satellite schedules and a text database of satellite rise and set times and cross-references items in the two databases. It then compares the scheduled start and stop with the geometric rise and set to compute the times to execute antenna control commands. While so doing, TTaGS determines whether to generate commands for guidance, navigation, and control computers to tell them which satellites to track. To help prevent Ku-band irradiation of the Earth, TTaGS accepts input from the user about horizon tolerance and accordingly restricts activation and effects deactivation of the transmitter. TTaGS can be modified easily to enable tracking of additional satellites and for such other tasks as reading Sun-rise/set tables to generate commands to point the solar photovoltaic arrays of the International Space Station at the Sun.

  5. A wireless sensor tag platform for container security and integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, Ivan A.; Cree, Johnathan V.; Mauss, Fredrick J.

    2011-04-01

    Cargo containers onboard ships are widely used in the global supply chain. The need for container security is evidenced by the Container Security Initiative launched by the U.S. Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP). One method of monitoring cargo containers is using low power wireless sensor tags. The wireless sensor tags are used to set up a network that is comprised of tags internal to the container and a central device. The sensor network reports alarms and other anomalies to a central device, which then relays the message to an outside network upon arrival at the destination port. This allows the port authorities to have knowledge of potential security or integrity issues before physically examining the container. Challenges of using wireless sensor tag networks for container security include battery life, size, environmental conditions, information security, and cost among others. PNNL developed an active wireless sensor tag platform capable of reporting data wirelessly to a central node as well as logging data to nonvolatile memory. The tags, operate at 2.4 GHz over an IEEE 802.15.4 protocol, and were designed to be distributed throughout the inside of a shipping container in the upper support frame. The tags are mounted in a housing that allows for simple and efficient installation or removal prior to, during, or after shipment. The distributed tags monitor the entire container volume. The sensor tag platform utilizes low power electronics and provides an extensible sensor interface for incorporating a wide range of sensors including chemical, biological, and environmental sensors.

  6. A wireless sensor tag platform for container security and integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Amaya, Ivan A.; Cree, Johnathan V.; Mauss, Fredrick J.

    2011-05-06

    Cargo containers onboard ships are widely used in the global supply chain. The need for container security is evidenced by the Container Security Initiative launched by the U.S. Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP). One method of monitoring cargo containers is using low power wireless sensor tags. The wireless sensor tags are used to set up a network that is comprised of tags internal to the container and a central device. The sensor network reports alarms and other anomalies to a central device, which then relays the message to an outside network upon arrival at the destination port. This allows the port authorities to have knowledge of potential security or integrity issues before physically examining the container. Challenges of using wireless sensor tag networks for container security include battery life, size, environmental conditions, information security, and cost among others. PNNL developed an active wireless sensor tag platform capable of reporting data wirelessly to a central node as well as logging data to nonvolatile memory. The tags, operate at 2.4 GHz over an IEEE 802.15.4 protocol, and were designed to be distributed throughout the inside of a shipping container in the upper support frame. The tags are mounted in a housing that allows for simple and efficient installation or removal prior to, during, or after shipment. The distributed tags monitor the entire container volume. The sensor tag platform utilizes low power electronics and provides an extensible sensor interface for incorporating a wide range of sensors including chemical, biological, and environmental sensors.

  7. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality.

    PubMed

    Pundhir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik O; Lauridsen, Felicia B; Rapin, Nicolas; Porse, Bo T

    2016-05-19

    Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak-valley-peak (PVP) pattern. However, different features of PVP patterns and their robustness in predicting active regulatory elements have never been systematically analyzed. Here, we present PARE, a novel computational method that systematically analyzes the H3K4me1 or H3K4me3 PVP patterns to predict NFRs. We show that NFRs predicted by H3K4me1 and me3 patterns are associated with active enhancers and promoters, respectively. Furthermore, asymmetry in the height of peaks flanking the central valley can predict the directionality of stable transcription at promoters. Using PARE on ChIP-seq histone modifications from four ENCODE cell lines and four hematopoietic differentiation stages, we identified several enhancers whose regulatory activity is stage specific and correlates positively with the expression of proximal genes in a particular stage. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PVP patterns delineate both the histone modification landscape and the transcriptional activities governed by active enhancers and promoters, and therefore can be used for their prediction. PARE is freely available at http://servers.binf.ku.dk/pare. PMID:27095194

  8. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality

    PubMed Central

    Pundhir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik O.; Lauridsen, Felicia B.; Rapin, Nicolas; Porse, Bo T.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak-valley-peak (PVP) pattern. However, different features of PVP patterns and their robustness in predicting active regulatory elements have never been systematically analyzed. Here, we present PARE, a novel computational method that systematically analyzes the H3K4me1 or H3K4me3 PVP patterns to predict NFRs. We show that NFRs predicted by H3K4me1 and me3 patterns are associated with active enhancers and promoters, respectively. Furthermore, asymmetry in the height of peaks flanking the central valley can predict the directionality of stable transcription at promoters. Using PARE on ChIP-seq histone modifications from four ENCODE cell lines and four hematopoietic differentiation stages, we identified several enhancers whose regulatory activity is stage specific and correlates positively with the expression of proximal genes in a particular stage. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PVP patterns delineate both the histone modification landscape and the transcriptional activities governed by active enhancers and promoters, and therefore can be used for their prediction. PARE is freely available at http://servers.binf.ku.dk/pare. PMID:27095194

  9. The Holozoan Capsaspora owczarzaki Possesses a Diverse Complement of Active Transposable Element Families

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Martin; Suga, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Capsaspora owczarzaki, a protistan symbiont of the pulmonate snail Biomphalaria glabrata, is the centre of much interest in evolutionary biology due to its close relationship to Metazoa. The whole genome sequence of this protist has revealed new insights into the ancestral genome composition of Metazoa, in particular with regard to gene families involved in the evolution of multicellularity. The draft genome revealed the presence of 23 families of transposable element, made up from DNA transposon as well as long terminal repeat (LTR) and non-LTR retrotransposon families. The phylogenetic analyses presented here show that all of the transposable elements identified in the C. owczarzaki genome have orthologous families in Metazoa, indicating that the ancestral metazoan also had a rich diversity of elements. Molecular evolutionary analyses also show that the majority of families has recently been active within the Capsaspora genome. One family now appears to be inactive and a further five families show no evidence of current transposition. Most individual element copies are evolutionarily young; however, a small proportion of inserts appear to have persisted for longer in the genome. The families present in the genome show contrasting population histories and appear to be in different stages of their life cycles. Transcriptome data have been analyzed from multiple stages in the C. owczarzaki life cycle. Expression levels vary greatly both between families and between different stages of the life cycle, suggesting an unexpectedly complex level of transposable element regulation in a single celled organism. PMID:24696401

  10. Optimization of high temperature sulfur impregnation on activated carbon for permanent sequestration of elemental mercury vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Vidic, R.D.; Brown, T.D.

    2000-02-01

    Following previous success with the use of activated carbon impregnated with sulfur at elevated temperatures for elemental mercury control, possible improvements in the impregnation procedure were evaluated in this study. Adsorbents prepared by thoroughly mixing sulfur and activated carbon in the furnace at the initial sulfur-to-carbon ratio (SCR) ranging from 4:1 to 1:2 showed similar adsorptive behavior in a fixed-bed system. Maintaining a stagnant inert atmosphere during the impregnation process improves sulfur deposition resulting in the enhanced dynamic capacity of the adsorbent when compared to other sulfur impregnated carbons. The fate of spent adsorbents was assessed using a toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP). Although mercury concentration in all leachates was below the TCLP limit, virgin activated carbon lost a significant fraction of the adsorbed elemental mercury during storage, while no loss was observed for sulfur-impregnated carbons. This finding suggests that virgin activated carbon may not be appropriate adsorbent for permanent sequestration of anthropogenic elemental mercury emissions.

  11. Amidase activity in soils. IV. Effects of trace elements and pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Frankenberger, W.T., Jr.; Tabatabai, M.A.

    1981-11-01

    Amidase was recently detected in soils, and this study was carried out to assess the effects of 21 trace elements, 12 herbicides, 2 fungicides, and 2 insecticides on the activity of this enzyme. Results showed that most of the trace elements and pesticides studied inhibited amidase activity in soils. The degree of inhibition varied among the soils used. When the trace elements were compared by using 5 ..mu..mol/g of soil, the average inhibition of amidase in three soils showed that Ag(I), Hg(I), As(III), and Se(IV) were the most effective inhibitors, but only Ag(I) and As(III) showed average inhibition > 50%. The least effective inhibitors (average inhibition < 3%) included Cu(I), Ba(II), Cu(II), Fe(II), Ni(II), Al(III), Fe(III), Ti(IV), V(IV), As(V), Mo(VI), and W(VI). Other elements that inhibited amidase activity in soils were Cd(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Pb(II), Sn(II), Zn(II), B(III), and Cr(III). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that As(III) was a competitive inhibitor of amidase, whereas Ag(I), Hg(II), and Se(IV) were noncompetitive inhibitors. When the pesticides studied were compared by using 10 ..mu..g of active ingredient per gram of soil, the average inhibition of amidase in three soils ranged from 2% with dinitroamine, EPTC plus R-25788, and captan to 10% with butylate. Other pesticides that inhibited amidase activity in soils were atrazine, naptalam, chloramben, dicamba, cyanazine, 2,4-D, alachlor, paraquat, trifluralin, maneb, diazinon, and malathion. The inhibition of amidase by diazinon, alachlor, and butylate followed noncompetitive kinetics.

  12. Transmit B1 Field Correction at 7T using Actively Tuned Coupled Inner Elements

    PubMed Central

    Merkle, Hellmut; Murphy-Boesch, Joseph; van Gelderen, Peter; Wang, Shumin; Li, Tie-Qiang; Koretsky, Alan P.; Duyn, Josef H.

    2011-01-01

    When volume coils are used for 1H imaging of the human head at 7T, wavelength effects in tissue cause intensity variations that are typically brighter at the center of the head and darker in the periphery. Much of this image non-uniformity can be attributed to variation in the effective transmit B1 field, which falls by about 50% to the left and right of center at mid-elevation in the brain. Because most of this B1 loss occurs in the periphery of the brain, we have explored use of actively controlled, off-resonant loop elements to locally enhance the transmit B1 field in these regions. When tuned to frequencies above the NMR frequency, these elements provide strong local enhancement of the B1 field of the transmit coil. Because they are tuned off-resonance, some volume coil detuning results, but resistive loading of the coil mode remains dominated by the sample. By digitally controlling their frequency offsets, the field enhancement of each inner element can be placed under active control. Using an array of eight, digitally-controlled elements placed around a custom-built head phantom, we demonstrate the feasibility of improving the B1 homogeneity of a transmit/receive volume coil without the need for multiple RF transmit channels. PMID:21437974

  13. Micromechanical analysis and finite element modeling of electromechanical properties of active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qingli; Ng, Kenny

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the combined micromechanics analysis and finite element modeling of the electromechanical properties of piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites. The active piezoelectric materials are widely used due to their high stiffness, voltage-dependent actuation capability, and broadband electro-mechanical interactions. However, the fragile nature of piezoceramics limits their sensing and actuating applications. In this study, the active PSF composites were made by deploying the longitudinally poled PSFs into a polymer matrix. The PSF itself consists a silicon carbide (SiC) or carbon core fiber as reinforcement to the fragile piezoceramic shell. To predict the electromechanical properties of PSF composites, the micromechanics analysis was firstly conducted with the dilute approximation model and the Mori-Tanaka approach. The extended Rule of Mixtures was also applied to accurately predict the transverse properties by considering the effects of microstructure including inclusion sizes and geometries. The piezoelectric finite element (FE) modeling was developed with the ABAQUS software to predict the detailed mechanical and electrical field distribution within a representative volume element (RVE) of PSF composites. The simulated energy or deformation under imposed specific boundary conditions was used to calculate each individual property with constitutive laws. The comparison between micromechanical analysis and finite element modeling indicates the combination of the dilute approximation model, the Mori-Tanaka approach and the extended Rule of Mixtures can favorably predict the electromechanical properties of three-phase PSF composites.

  14. Elemental abundances in atmospheres of cool dwarfs with solar-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipova, L. I.; Boyarchuk, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The elemental abundances in the atmosphere of the red dwarf HD 32147, which belongs to the HR 1614 moving groups, are analyzed. The atmospheric parameters determined from spectroscopic data (the condition of equal abundances for neutral and ionized atoms of a given element) differ considerably from those derived from photometry and parallax data. The abundances of several elements are also anomalous, with the anomaly increasing with decreasing ionization potential. It is concluded that this star is a red dwarf displaying solar-like activity; i.e., having dark (cool) spots on its surface, which may sometimes be considerable in size. Modeling synthetic spectra of stars with cool spots on their surfaces, with the spectral lines consisting of two components formed in media with different temperatures, indicate that the spectroscopic atmospheric parameters derived in such cases are incorrect; this can also explain the observed dependence of the elemental abundances on the corresponding ionization potentials. This leads to the conclusion thatHD32147 is indeed a star with solar-like activity. Several other such stars considered as examples display the same anomalies as those of HD 32147. These modeling results are also valid for Ap and Am stars, and are able to explain short-wavelength observations of the Sun and some stars (the FIP effect).

  15. ERV-L Elements: a Family of Endogenous Retrovirus-Like Elements Active throughout the Evolution of Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Bénit, Laurence; Lallemand, Jean-Baptiste; Casella, Jean-François; Philippe, Hervé; Heidmann, Thierry

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified in the human genome a family of 200 endogenous retrovirus-like elements, the HERV-L elements, disclosing similarities with the foamy retroviruses and which might be the evolutionary intermediate between classical intracellular retrotransposons and infectious retroviruses. Southern blot analysis of a large series of mammalian genomic DNAs shows that HERV-L-related elements—so-called ERV-L—are present among all placental mammals, suggesting that ERV-L elements were already present at least 70 million years ago. Most species exhibit a low copy number of ERV-L elements (from 10 to 30), while simians (not prosimians) and mice (not rats) have been subjected to bursts resulting in increases in the number of copies up to 200. The burst of copy number in primates can be dated to shortly after the prosimian and simian branchpoint, 45 to 65 million years ago, whereas murine species have been subjected to two much more recent bursts (less than 10 million years ago), occurring after the Mus/Rattus split. We have amplified and sequenced 360-bp ERV-L internal fragments of the highly conserved pol gene from a series of 22 mammalian species. These sequences exhibit high percentages of identity (57 to 99%) with the murine fully coding MuERV-L element. Phylogenetic analyses allowed the establishment of a plausible evolutionary scheme for ERV-L elements, which accounts for the high level of sequence conservation and the widespread dispersion among mammals. PMID:10074184

  16. Active magnetic bearing control loop modeling for a finite element rotordynamics code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genta, Giancarlo; Delprete, Cristiana; Carabelli, Stefano

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model of an active electromagnetic bearing which includes the actuator, the sensor and the control system is developed and implemented in a specialized finite element code for rotordynamic analysis. The element formulation and its incorporation in the model of the machine are described in detail. A solution procedure, based on a modal approach in which the number of retained modes is controlled by the user, is then shown together with other procedures for computing the steady-state response to both static and unbalance forces. An example of application shows the numerical results obtained on a model of an electric motor suspended on a five active-axis magnetic suspension. The comparison of some of these results with the experimental characteristics of the actual system shows the ability of the present model to predict its performance.

  17. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-05-07

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. As a result, a method for measuring themore » arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.« less

  18. Development of multi-element active aerodynamics for the formula sae car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, James Patrick

    This thesis focuses on the design, development, and implementation of an active aerodynamics system on 2013 Formula SAE car. The aerodynamics package itself consists of five element front and rear wings as well as an under body diffuser. Five element wings produce significant amounts of drag which is a compromise between the cornering ability of the car and the acceleration capability on straights. The active aerodynamics system allows for the wing angle of attack to dynamically change their configuration on track based on sensory data to optimize the wings for any given scenario. The wings are studied using computational fluid dynamics both in their maximum lift configuration as well as a minimum drag configuration. A control system is then developed using an electro mechanical actuation system to articulate the wings between these two states.

  19. Active magnetic bearing control loop modeling for a finite element rotordynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genta, Giancarlo; Delprete, Cristiana; Carabelli, Stefano

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model of an active electromagnetic bearing which includes the actuator, the sensor and the control system is developed and implemented in a specialized finite element code for rotordynamic analysis. The element formulation and its incorporation in the model of the machine are described in detail. A solution procedure, based on a modal approach in which the number of retained modes is controlled by the user, is then shown together with other procedures for computing the steady-state response to both static and unbalance forces. An example of application shows the numerical results obtained on a model of an electric motor suspended on a five active-axis magnetic suspension. The comparison of some of these results with the experimental characteristics of the actual system shows the ability of the present model to predict its performance.

  20. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-08-01

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. A method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  1. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Sondek, John

    2004-09-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, and for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:18429272

  2. 9 CFR 2.54 - Lost tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... locate and reapply the tag to the proper animal. If the lost tag is not located, the dealer or exhibitor shall affix another official tag to the animal in the manner prescribed in § 2.50, and record the tag... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lost tags. 2.54 Section 2.54...

  3. 9 CFR 2.54 - Lost tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... locate and reapply the tag to the proper animal. If the lost tag is not located, the dealer or exhibitor shall affix another official tag to the animal in the manner prescribed in § 2.50, and record the tag... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lost tags. 2.54 Section 2.54...

  4. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  5. Native Thrombocidin-1 and Unfolded Thrombocidin-1 Exert Antimicrobial Activity via Distinct Structural Elements

    PubMed Central

    Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; de Boer, Leonie; Nguyen, Leonard T.; Boszhard, Laura; Vreede, Jocelyne; Dekker, Henk L.; Speijer, Dave; Drijfhout, Jan W.; te Velde, Anje A.; Crielaard, Wim; Vogel, Hans J.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) can have direct antimicrobial activity, which is apparently related to the presence of a distinct positively charged patch on the surface. However, chemokines can retain antimicrobial activity upon linearization despite the loss of their positive patch, thus questioning the importance of this patch for activity. Thrombocidin-1 (TC-1) is a microbicidal protein isolated from human blood platelets. TC-1 only differs from the chemokine NAP-2/CXCL7 by a two-amino acid C-terminal deletion, but this truncation is crucial for antimicrobial activity. We assessed the structure-activity relationship for antimicrobial activity of TC-1. Reduction of the charge of the TC-1-positive patch by replacing lysine 17 with alanine reduced the activity against bacteria and almost abolished activity against the yeast Candida albicans. Conversely, augmentation of the positive patch by increasing charge density or size resulted in a 2–3-fold increased activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis but did not substantially affect activity against C. albicans. Reduction of TC-1 resulted in loss of the folded conformation, but this disruption of the positive patch did not affect antimicrobial activity. Using overlapping 15-mer synthetic peptides, we demonstrate peptides corresponding to the N-terminal part of TC-1 to have similar antimicrobial activity as intact TC-1. Although we demonstrate that the positive patch is essential for activity of folded TC-1, unfolded TC-1 retained antimicrobial activity despite the absence of a positive patch. This activity is probably exerted by a linear peptide stretch in the N-terminal part of the molecule. We conclude that intact TC-1 and unfolded TC-1 exert antimicrobial activity via distinct structural elements. PMID:22025617

  6. Thin-disk laser based on an Yb:YAG / YAG composite active element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I. I.; Mukhin, I. B.; Vadimova, O. L.; Palashov, O. V.

    2015-03-01

    A thin-disk laser module based on an Yb:YAG / YAG composite active element is developed with a small-signal gain of 1.25 and a stored energy of 400 mJ under cw pumping. The gain and thermally induced phase distortions in the module are studied experimentally. Based on this module, a thin-disk laser with an average power of 300 W and a slope efficiency of 42% is designed.

  7. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-05-22

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. Furthermore, the time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  8. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-09-01

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. The time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  9. New Fast Shower Max Detector Based on MCP as an Active Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Spiropulu, M.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Kim, H.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2015-02-01

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum (SM) detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We present below test beam results, obtained with different types of photo detectors based on micro channel plates (MCP) as secondary emitter. The SM time resolution - we obtained for this new type of detector is at the level of 20-30 ps. We estimate that a significant contribution to the detector response originates from secondary emission of the MCP.

  10. Qualitative Elemental Analyses of a Meteorite Sample Found in Turkey by Photo-activation Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertugay, C.; Boztosun, I.; Ozmen, S. F.; Dapo, H.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a meteorite sample provided from TÜBITAK National Observatory found in Turkey has been investigated by using a clinical linear accelerator that has endpoint energy of 18 MeV, and a high purity Germanium detector for qualitative elemental analysis within photo-activation analysis method. 21 nuclei ranging from 24Na to 149Nd have been identified in the meteorite sample.

  11. Studies of depredating sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) off Sitka, AK, using videocameras, tags, and long-range passive acoustic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, Delphine

    This dissertation uses videocameras, tags and acoustic recorders to investigate the diving and acoustic behavior of sperm whales in the Gulf of Alaska during natural and depredation foraging conditions. First, underwater videocamera footage of a sperm whale attacking a fisherman's longline at 100 m depth was used to examine its acoustic behavior at close range and to estimate its size both acoustically and visually. Second, bioacoustic tagging data demonstrated that the same individuals displayed different acoustic behaviors during natural and depredation foraging states. Two broad categories of depredation, "shallow" and "deep," were also identified. These results suggest that passive acoustic monitoring at close ranges may yield useful metrics for quantifying depredation activity. Third, the behavioral reactions of depredating sperm whales to a variety of acoustic playbacks generated at relatively low source levels were investigated using bioacoustic tags. Finally, bioacoustic and satellite tag data were used to develop passive acoustic techniques for tracking sperm whales with a short-aperture two-element vertical array. When numeric sound propagation models were exploited, localization ranges up to 35 km were obtained. The tracking methods were also used to estimate the source levels of sperm whale "clicks" and "creaks", predict the maximum detection range of the signals as a function of sea state, and measure the drift of several whales away from a visual decoy.

  12. Behavioral Tagging: A Translation of the Synaptic Tagging and Capture Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Moncada, Diego; Ballarini, Fabricio; Viola, Haydée

    2015-01-01

    Similar molecular machinery is activated in neurons following an electrical stimulus that induces synaptic changes and after learning sessions that trigger memory formation. Then, to achieve perdurability of these processes protein synthesis is required for the reinforcement of the changes induced in the network. The synaptic tagging and capture theory provided a strong framework to explain synaptic specificity and persistence of electrophysiological induced plastic changes. Ten years later, the behavioral tagging hypothesis (BT) made use of the same argument, applying it to learning and memory models. The hypothesis postulates that the formation of lasting memories relies on at least two processes: the setting of a learning tag and the synthesis of plasticity related proteins, which once captured at tagged sites allow memory consolidation. BT explains how weak events, only capable of inducing transient forms of memories, can result in lasting memories when occurring close in time with other behaviorally relevant experiences that provide proteins. In this review, we detail the findings supporting the existence of BT process in rodents, leading to the consolidation, persistence, and interference of a memory. We focus on the molecular machinery taking place in these processes and describe the experimental data supporting the BT in humans. PMID:26380117

  13. Behavioral Tagging: A Translation of the Synaptic Tagging and Capture Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Moncada, Diego; Ballarini, Fabricio; Viola, Haydée

    2015-01-01

    Similar molecular machinery is activated in neurons following an electrical stimulus that induces synaptic changes and after learning sessions that trigger memory formation. Then, to achieve perdurability of these processes protein synthesis is required for the reinforcement of the changes induced in the network. The synaptic tagging and capture theory provided a strong framework to explain synaptic specificity and persistence of electrophysiological induced plastic changes. Ten years later, the behavioral tagging hypothesis (BT) made use of the same argument, applying it to learning and memory models. The hypothesis postulates that the formation of lasting memories relies on at least two processes: the setting of a learning tag and the synthesis of plasticity related proteins, which once captured at tagged sites allow memory consolidation. BT explains how weak events, only capable of inducing transient forms of memories, can result in lasting memories when occurring close in time with other behaviorally relevant experiences that provide proteins. In this review, we detail the findings supporting the existence of BT process in rodents, leading to the consolidation, persistence, and interference of a memory. We focus on the molecular machinery taking place in these processes and describe the experimental data supporting the BT in humans. PMID:26380117

  14. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R.

    2005-04-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D

  15. The HaloTag: Improving Soluble Expression and Applications in Protein Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    N Peterson, Scott; Kwon, Keehwan

    2012-01-01

    Technological and methodological advances have been critical for the rapidly evolving field of proteomics. The development of fusion tag systems is essential for purification and analysis of recombinant proteins. The HaloTag is a 34 KDa monomeric protein derived from a bacterial haloalkane dehalogenase. The majority of fusion tags in use today utilize a reversible binding interaction with a specific ligand. The HaloTag system is unique in that it forms a covalent linkage to its chloroalkane ligand. This linkage permits attachment of the HaloTag to a variety of functional reporters, which can be used to label and immobilize recombinant proteins. The success rate for HaloTag expression of soluble proteins is very high and comparable to maltose binding protein (MBP) tag. Furthermore, cleavage of the HaloTag does not result in protein insolubility that often is observed with the MBP tag. In the present report, we describe applications of the HaloTag system in our ongoing investigation of protein-protein interactions of the Y. pestis Type 3 secretion system on a custom protein microarray. We also describe the utilization of affinity purification/mass spectroscopy (AP/MS) to evaluate the utility of the Halo Tag system to characterize DNA binding activity and protein specificity. PMID:23115610

  16. The HaloTag: Improving Soluble Expression and Applications in Protein Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    N Peterson, Scott; Kwon, Keehwan

    2012-01-01

    Technological and methodological advances have been critical for the rapidly evolving field of proteomics. The development of fusion tag systems is essential for purification and analysis of recombinant proteins. The HaloTag is a 34 KDa monomeric protein derived from a bacterial haloalkane dehalogenase. The majority of fusion tags in use today utilize a reversible binding interaction with a specific ligand. The HaloTag system is unique in that it forms a covalent linkage to its chloroalkane ligand. This linkage permits attachment of the HaloTag to a variety of functional reporters, which can be used to label and immobilize recombinant proteins. The success rate for HaloTag expression of soluble proteins is very high and comparable to maltose binding protein (MBP) tag. Furthermore, cleavage of the HaloTag does not result in protein insolubility that often is observed with the MBP tag. In the present report, we describe applications of the HaloTag system in our ongoing investigation of protein-protein interactions of the Y. pestis Type 3 secretion system on a custom protein microarray. We also describe the utilization of affinity purification/mass spectroscopy (AP/MS) to evaluate the utility of the Halo Tag system to characterize DNA binding activity and protein specificity. PMID:23115610

  17. Transposon tagging of a male-sterility, female-sterility gene, St8, revealed that the meiotic MER3 DNA helicase activity is essential for fertility in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The W4 locus in soybean encodes a dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR2) that regulates pigmentation patterns in flowers and hypocotyl. The mutable w4-m allele that governs variegated flowers has arisen through insertion of a CACTA-type transposable element, Tgm9, in DFR2. In the w4-m line, reversion fr...

  18. Extended-Range Passive RFID and Sensor Tags

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Kennedy, Timothy F.; Lin, Gregory Y.; Barton, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Extended-range passive radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags and related sensor tags are undergoing development. A tag of this type incorporates a retroreflective antenna array, so that it reflects significantly more signal power back toward an interrogating radio transceiver than does a comparable passive RFID tag of prior design, which does not incorporate a retroreflective antenna array. Therefore, for a given amount of power radiated by the transmitter in the interrogating transceiver, a tag of this type can be interrogated at a distance greater than that of the comparable passive RFID or sensor tag of prior design. The retroreflective antenna array is, more specifically, a Van Atta array, named after its inventor and first published in a patent issued in 1959. In its simplest form, a Van Atta array comprises two antenna elements connected by a transmission line so that the signal received by each antenna element is reradiated by the other antenna element (see Figure 1). The phase relationships among the received and reradiated signals are such as to produce constructive interference of the reradiated signals; that is, to concentrate the reradiated signal power in a direction back toward the source. Hence, an RFID tag equipped with a Van Atta antenna array automatically tracks the interrogating transceiver. The effective gain of a Van Atta array is the same as that of a traditional phased antenna array having the same number of antenna elements. Additional pairs of antenna elements connected by equal-length transmission lines can be incorporated into a Van Atta array to increase its directionality. Like some RFID tags here-to-fore commercially available, an RFID or sensor tag of the present developmental type includes one-port surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) devices. In simplified terms, the mode of operation of a basic one-port SAW device as used heretofore in an RFID device is the following: An interrogating radio signal is converted, at an input end, from

  19. Evaluation of RFID Tags to Permanently Mark Trees in Natural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Marczewski, Tobias; Ma, Yongpeng; Sun, Weibang

    2016-01-01

    Long-term ecological and genetic studies in natural populations of tree species require marking techniques so that individuals can be re-visited over time, even in difficult terrain. Both GPS coordinates and physical labels have disadvantages that can make re-finding trees difficult. We tested passive and semi-active radio frequency identification (RFID) tags and readers as a means to relocate individual trees. Passive RFID tags do not provide a good solution because of low transmission power of hand-held readers and strong directionality. Semi-active RFID tags provide detection over longer distances, but also suffer from strong directionality. Active RFID tags promise an improvement over semi-passive tags, and could be evaluated in a future study. We conclude that RFID technology has the potential to improve the ability of researchers to locate individual trees repeatedly under natural conditions, and can be used in conjunction with other marking techniques such as physical tags and GPS coordinates.

  20. The protist Trichomonas vaginalis harbors multiple lineages of transcriptionally active Mutator-like elements

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Fabrício R; Silva, Joana C; Benchimol, Marlene; Costa, Gustavo GL; Pereira, Gonçalo AG; Carareto, Claudia MA

    2009-01-01

    Background For three decades the Mutator system was thought to be exclusive of plants, until the first homolog representatives were characterized in fungi and in early-diverging amoebas earlier in this decade. Results Here, we describe and characterize four families of Mutator-like elements in a new eukaryotic group, the Parabasalids. These Trichomonas vaginalis Mutator- like elements, or TvMULEs, are active in T. vaginalis and patchily distributed among 12 trichomonad species and isolates. Despite their relatively distinctive amino acid composition, the inclusion of the repeats TvMULE1, TvMULE2, TvMULE3 and TvMULE4 into the Mutator superfamily is justified by sequence, structural and phylogenetic analyses. In addition, we identified three new TvMULE-related sequences in the genome sequence of Candida albicans. While TvMULE1 is a member of the MuDR clade, predominantly from plants, the other three TvMULEs, together with the C. albicans elements, represent a new and quite distinct Mutator lineage, which we named TvCaMULEs. The finding of TvMULE1 sequence inserted into other putative repeat suggests the occurrence a novel TE family not yet described. Conclusion These findings expand the taxonomic distribution and the range of functional motif of MULEs among eukaryotes. The characterization of the dynamics of TvMULEs and other transposons in this organism is of particular interest because it is atypical for an asexual species to have such an extreme level of TE activity; this genetic landscape makes an interesting case study for causes and consequences of such activity. Finally, the extreme repetitiveness of the T. vaginalis genome and the remarkable degree of sequence identity within its repeat families highlights this species as an ideal system to characterize new transposable elements. PMID:19622157

  1. The coelacanth: Can a “living fossil” have active transposable elements in its genome?

    PubMed Central

    Naville, Magali; Chalopin, Domitille; Casane, Didier; Laurenti, Patrick; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The coelacanth has long been regarded as a “living fossil,” with extant specimens looking very similar to fossils dating back to the Cretaceous period. The hypothesis of a slowly or even not evolving genome has been proposed to account for this apparent morphological stasis. While this assumption seems to be sustained by different evolutionary analyses on protein-coding genes, recent studies on transposable elements have provided more conflicting results. Indeed, the coelacanth genome contains many transposable elements and has been shaped by several major bursts of transposition during evolution. In addition, comparison of orthologous genomic regions from the genomes of the 2 extant coelacanth species L. chalumnae and L. menadoensis revealed multiple species-specific insertions, indicating transposable element recent activity and contribution to post-speciation genome divergence. These observations, which do not support the genome stasis hypothesis, challenge either the impact of transposable elements on organismal evolution or the status of the coelacanth as a “living fossil.” Closer inspection of fossil and molecular data indicate that, even if coelacanths might evolve more slowly than some other lineages due to demographic and/or ecological factors, this variation is still in the range of a “non-fossil” vertebrate species. PMID:26442185

  2. A developmentally regulated Caulobacter flagellar promoter is activated by 3' enhancer and IHF binding elements.

    PubMed Central

    Gober, J W; Shapiro, L

    1992-01-01

    The transcription of a group of flagellar genes is temporally and spatially regulated during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle. These genes all share the same 5' cis-regulatory elements: a sigma 54 promoter, a binding site for integration host factor (IHF), and an enhancer sequence, known as the ftr element. We have partially purified the ftr-binding proteins, and we show that they require the same enhancer sequences for binding as are required for transcriptional activation. We have also partially purified the Caulobacter homolog of IHF and demonstrate that it can facilitate in vitro integrase-mediated lambda recombination. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we provide the first demonstration that natural enhancer sequences and IHF binding elements that reside 3' to the sigma 54 promoter of a bacterial gene, flaNQ, are required for transcription of the operon, in vivo. The IHF protein and the ftr-binding protein is primarily restricted to the predivisional cell, the cell type in which these promoters are transcribed. flaNQ promoter expression is localized to the swarmer pole of the predivisional cell, as are other flagellar promoters that possess these regulatory sequences 5' to the start site. The requirement for an IHF binding site and an ftr-enhancer element in spatially transcribed flagellar promoters indicates that a common mechanism may be responsible for both temporal and polar transcription. Images PMID:1392079

  3. Experimental analysis of biasing elements for dielectric electro-active polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgins, Micah; Seelecke, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of three different, small profile and scalable DEAP actuators. These actuators are designed for use in small scale pumping and valve applications. The actuators used in this paper consist of a biasing element (either a mass, linear spring, or a non-linear spring) coupled with a circular dielectric electro-active polymer (DEAP). These mechanisms bias the DEAP allowing out-of-plane actuation when the voltage is cycled. A constant force input, a linear spring, and a non-linear spring are separately tested as the biasing element of a circular/diaphragm DEAP. Tests are systematically performed at various DEAP pre-deflections, biasing stiffness and electrical loading rates. The displacement stroke performance of each test is examined and analyzed. It was found that the non-linear spring provided the largest displacement stroke over two other biasing elements. It also showed better performance at higher electrical loading rates. Thus, of the three types of biasing tested the non-linear spring shows most promise for use in fluid pump/valve applications. Future work will include optimizing this biasing element for the current DEAP design.

  4. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas.

    PubMed

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  5. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T.; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  6. Observation of new spontaneous fission activities from elements 100 to 105

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, L.P.

    1982-03-01

    Several new Spontaneous Fission (SF) activities have been found. No definite identification could be made for any of the new SF activities; however, half-lives and possible assignments to element-104 isotopes consistent with several cross bombardments include /sup 257/Rf(3.8 s, 14% SF), /sup 258/Rf(13 ms), /sup 259/Rf(approx. 3 s, 8% SF), /sup 260/Rf(approx. 20 ms), and /sup 262/Rf(approx. 50 ms). The 80-ms SF activity claimed by the Dubna group for the discovery of element 104 (/sup 260/104) was not observed. A difficulty exists in the interpretation that /sup 260/Rf is a approx. 20-ms SF activity: in order to be correct, for example, the SF activities with half-lives between 14 and 24 ms produced in the reactions 109- to 119-MeV /sup 18/O + /sup 248/Cm, 88- to 100-MeV /sup 15/N + /sup 249/Bk, and 96-MeV /sup 18/O + /sup 249/Cf must be other nuclides due to their large production cross sections, or the cross sections for production of /sup 260/Rf must be enhanced by unknown mechanisms. Based on calculated total production cross sections a possible approx. 1% electron-capture branch in /sup 258/Lr(4.5 s) to the SF emitter /sup 258/No(1.2 ms) and an upper limit of 0.05% for SF branching in /sup 254/No(55 s) were determined. Other measured half-lives from unknown nuclides produced in respective reactions include approx. 1.6 s (/sup 18/O + /sup 248/CM), indications of a approx. 47-s SF activity (75-MeV /sup 12/C + /sup 249/Cf), and two or more SF activities with 3 s less than or equal to T/sub 1/2/ less than or equal to 60 s (/sup 18/O + /sup 249/Bk). The most exciting conclusion of this work is that if the tentative assignments to even-even element 104 isotopes are correct, there would be a sudden change in the SF half-life systematics at element 104 which has been predicted theoretically and attributed to the disappearance of the second hump of the double-humped fission barrier.

  7. Detection of diamonds in kimberlite by the tagged neutron method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Bystritsky, V. M.; Zamyatin, N. I.; Zubarev, E. V.; Krasnoperov, A. V.; Rapatsky, V. L.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Sadovsky, A. B.; Salamatin, A. V.; Salmin, R. A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Slepnev, V. M.; Khabarov, S. V.; Razinkov, E. A.; Tarasov, O. G.; Nikitin, G. M.

    2015-06-01

    A new technology for diamond detection in kimberlite based on the tagged neutron method is proposed. The results of experimental researches on irradiation of kimberlite samples with 14.1-MeV tagged neutrons are discussed. The source of the tagged neutron flux is a portable neutron generator with a built-in 64-pixel silicon alpha-detector with double-sided stripped readout. Characteristic gamma rays resulting from inelastic neutron scattering on nuclei of elements included in the composition of kimberlite are registered by six gamma-detectors based on BGO crystals. The criterion for diamond presence in kimberlite is an increased carbon concentration within a certain volume of the kimberlite sample.

  8. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis of toxic elements in radioactive waste packages.

    PubMed

    Ma, J-L; Carasco, C; Perot, B; Mauerhofer, E; Kettler, J; Havenith, A

    2012-07-01

    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) are conducting an R&D program to improve the characterization of long-lived and medium activity (LL-MA) radioactive waste packages. In particular, the amount of toxic elements present in radioactive waste packages must be assessed before they can be accepted in repository facilities in order to avoid pollution of underground water reserves. To this aim, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA-Cadarache has started to study the performances of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) for elements showing large capture cross sections such as mercury, cadmium, boron, and chromium. This paper reports a comparison between Monte Carlo calculations performed with the MCNPX computer code using the ENDF/B-VII.0 library and experimental gamma rays measured in the REGAIN PGNAA cell with small samples of nickel, lead, cadmium, arsenic, antimony, chromium, magnesium, zinc, boron, and lithium to verify the validity of a numerical model and gamma-ray production data. The measurement of a ∼20kg test sample of concrete containing toxic elements has also been performed, in collaboration with Forschungszentrum Jülich, to validate the model in view of future performance studies for dense and large LL-MA waste packages. PMID:22406218

  9. Social image tagging with diverse semantics.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xueming; Hua, Xian-Sheng; Tang, Yuan Yan; Mei, Tao

    2014-12-01

    We have witnessed the popularity of image-sharing websites for sharing personal experiences through photos on the Web. These websites allow users describing the content of their uploaded images with a set of tags. Those user-annotated tags are often noisy and biased. Social image tagging aims at removing noisy tags and suggests new relevant tags. However, most existing tag enrichment approaches predominantly focus on tag relevance and overlook tag diversity problem. How to make the top-ranked tags covering a wide range of semantic is still an opening, yet challenging, issue. In this paper, we propose an approach to retag social images with diverse semantics. Both the relevance of a tag to image as well as its semantic compensations to the already determined tags are fused to determine the final tag list for a given image. Different from existing image tagging approaches, the top-ranked tags are not only highly relevant to the image but also have significant semantic compensations with each other. Experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25415950

  10. Synaptic Tagging During Memory Allocation

    PubMed Central

    Rogerson, Thomas; Cai, Denise; Frank, Adam; Sano, Yoshitake; Shobe, Justin; Aranda, Manuel L.; Silva, Alcino J.

    2014-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the allocation of memory to specific neurons (neuronal allocation) and synapses (synaptic allocation) in a neurocircuit is not random and that instead specific mechanisms, such as increases in neuronal excitability and synaptic tagging and capture, determine the exact sites where memories are stored. We propose an integrated view of these processes, such that neuronal allocation, synaptic tagging and capture, spine clustering and metaplasticity reflect related aspects of memory allocation mechanisms. Importantly, the properties of these mechanisms suggest a set of rules that profoundly affect how memories are stored and recalled. PMID:24496410

  11. WebTag: Web browsing into sensor tags over NFC.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, Juan Jose; Ruiz-de-Garibay, Jonathan; Legarda, Jon; Alvarez, Maite; Ayerbe, Ana; Vazquez, Juan Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.). This work presents a novel solution (WebTag) for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm. PMID:23012511

  12. WebTag: Web Browsing into Sensor Tags over NFC

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, Juan Jose; Ruiz-de-Garibay, Jonathan; Legarda, Jon; Álvarez, Maite; Ayerbe, Ana; Vazquez, Juan Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.). This work presents a novel solution (WebTag) for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm. PMID:23012511

  13. Hoxa5 gene regulation: A gradient of binding activity to a brachial spinal cord element.

    PubMed

    Nowling, T; Zhou, W; Krieger, K E; Larochelle, C; Nguyen-Huu, M C; Jeannotte, L; Tuggle, C K

    1999-04-01

    The Hox genes cooperate in providing positional information needed for spatial and temporal patterning of the vertebrate body axis. However, the biological mechanisms behind spatial Hox expression are largely unknown. In transgenic mice, gene fusions between Hoxa5 (previously called Hox-1.3) 5' flanking regions and the lacZ reporter gene show tissue- and time-specific expression in the brachial spinal cord in day 11-13 embryos. A 604-bp regulatory region with enhancer properties directs this spatially specific expression. Fine-detail mapping of the enhancer has identified several elements involved in region-specific expression, including an element required for expression in the brachial spinal cord. Factors in embryonic day 12.5 nuclear extracts bind this element in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and protect three regions from DNase digestion. All three sites contain an AAATAA sequence and mutations at these sites reduce or abolish binding. Furthermore, this element binds specific individual embryonic proteins on a protein blot. The binding activity appears as a gradient along the anterior-posterior axis with two- to threefold higher levels observed in extracts from anterior regions than from posterior regions. In parallel with the EMSA, the proteins on the protein blot also show reduced binding to probes with mutations at the AAATAA sites. Most importantly, transgenic mice carrying Hoxa5/lacZ fusions with the three AAATAA sites mutated either do not express the transgene or have altered transgene expression. The brachial spinal cord element and its binding proteins are likely to be involved in spatial expression of Hoxa5 during development. PMID:10075847

  14. Speed of sound estimation with active PZT element for thermal monitoring during ablation therapy: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the thermal dose during ablation therapy is instrumental to successfully removing the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. In the practical scenario, surgeons must be able to determine the ablation completeness in the tumor region. Various methods have been proposed to monitor it, one of which uses ultrasound since it is a common intraoperative imaging modality due to its non-invasive, cost-effective, and convenient natures. In our approach, we propose to use time of flight (ToF) information to estimate speed of sound changes. Accurate speed of sound estimation is crucial because it is directly correlated with temperature change and subsequent determination of ablation completeness. We divide the region of interest in a circular fashion with a variable radius from the ablator tip. We introduce the concept of effective speed of sound in each of the sub-regions. Our active PZT element control system facilitates this unique approach by allowing us to acquire one-way ToF information between the PZT element and each of the ultrasound elements. We performed a simulation and an experiment to verify feasibility of this method. The simulation result showed that we could compute the effective speed of sound within 0.02m/s error in our discrete model. We also perform a sensitivity analysis for this model. Most of the experimental results had less than 1% error. Simulation using a Gaussian continuous model with multiple PZT elements is also demonstrated. We simulate the effect of the element location one the optimization result.

  15. Evaluation of the JPL X-band 32 element active array. [for deep space communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, J. F.; Postal, R. B.; Conroy, B. L.

    1979-01-01

    Tests performed on an X-band 32-element active array are described. Antenna pattern characteristics of the array were tested in its standard operating mode as well as several degraded performance modes, including failures of 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 16, and 31 elements. Additionally, the array was characterized with the addition of a metallic shroud, and also characterized versus rf drive level and at a single off-axis electronic beamsteered position. Characterization was performed on several of the 3/4-watt, three-stage, X-band solid-state power amplifier modules. The characterization included swept amplitude response, amplitude and phase versus temperature from -20 to +60 C, and intermodulation distortion of selected modules. The array is described and conclusions and recommendations based upon the experience and results achieved are included.

  16. Distribution of trace elements in the human body determined by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yukawa, M.; Suzuki-Yasumoto, M.; Amano, K.; Terai, M.

    1980-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis and instrumental semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometry were used for analysis of 20 trace elements in 10 autopsied human organs and tissues (liver, kidney, cerebrum, cerebellum, heart, muscle, pancreas, spleen, lung, and aorta) from 63 Japanese persons, whose ages ranged from 15 days to 85 yr. Distributions of aluminum, bromine, magnesium, manganese, rubidium, selenium, and vanadium in human body were almost uniform. High concentrations of cadmium were found in kidney and liver samples. There was a high mercury concentration in the liver, kidney, and brain samples. Concentrations of other elements (arsenic, gold, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, indium, antimony, selenium, titanium, and zinc) in each organ or tissue are also presented in this paper.

  17. A laboratory evaluation of tagging-related mortality and tag loss in juvenile humpback chub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, David L.; Persons, William R.; Young, Kirk; Stone, Dennis M.; Van Haverbeke, Randy; Knight, William R.

    2015-01-01

    We quantified tag retention, survival, and growth in juvenile, captive-reared Humpback Chub Gila cypha marked with three different tag types: (1) Biomark 12.5-mm, 134.2-kHz, full duplex PIT tags injected into the body cavity with a 12-gauge needle; (2) Biomark 8.4-mm, 134.2-kHz, full duplex PIT tags injected with a 16-gauge needle; and (3) Northwest Marine Technology visible implant elastomer (VIE) tags injected under the skin with a 29-gauge needle. Estimates of tag loss, tagging-induced mortality, and growth were evaluated for 60 d with each tag type for four different size-groups of fish: 40–49 mm, 50–59 mm, 60–69 mm, and 70–79 mm TL. Total length was a significant predictor of the probability of PIT tag retention and mortality for both 8-mm and 12-mm PIT tags, and the smallest fish had the highest rates of tag loss (12.5–30.0%) and mortality (7.5–20.0%). Humpback Chub of sizes 40–49 mm TL and tagged with VIE tags had no mortality but did have a 17.5% tag loss. Growth rates of all tagged fish were similar to controls. Our data indicate Humpback Chub can be effectively tagged using either 8-mm or 12-mm PIT tags with little tag loss or mortality at sizes as low as 65 mm TL.

  18. Trace element landscape of resting and activated human neutrophils on the sub-micrometer level.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, M J; De Samber, B; Garrevoet, J; Vergucht, E; Vekemans, B; De Rycke, R; Björn, E; Sandblad, L; Wellenreuther, G; Falkenberg, G; Cloetens, P; Vincze, L; Urban, C F

    2015-06-01

    Every infection is a battle for trace elements. Neutrophils migrate first to the infection site and accumulate quickly to high numbers. They fight pathogens by phagocytosis and intracellular toxication. Additionally, neutrophils form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to inhibit extracellular microbes. Yet, neutrophil trace element characteristics are largely unexplored. We investigated unstimulated and phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated neutrophils using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) on the sub-micron spatial resolution level. PMA activates pinocytosis, cytoskeletal rearrangements and the release of NETs, all mechanisms deployed by neutrophils to combat infection. By analyzing Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, P, S, and Ca, not only the nucleus but also vesicular granules were identifiable in the elemental maps. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) revealed a neutrophil-specific composition of Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn in comparison with J774 and HeLa cells, indicating a neutrophil-specific metallome complying with their designated functions. When investigating PMA-activated neutrophils, the SR-XRF analysis depicted typical subcellular morphological changes: the transformation of nucleus and granules and the emergence of void vacuoles. Mature NETs were evenly composed of Fe, P, S, and Ca with occasional hot spots containing Zn, Fe, and Ca. An ICP-MS-based quantification of NET supernatants revealed a NETosis-induced decrease of soluble Zn, whereas Fe, Cu, and Mn concentrations were only slightly affected. In summary, we present a combination of SR-XRF and ICP-MS as a powerful tool to analyze trace elements in human neutrophils. The approach will be applicable and valuable to numerous aspects of nutritional immunity. PMID:25832493

  19. UTag: Long-range Ultra-wideband Passive Radio Frequency Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Dowla, F

    2007-03-14

    Long-range, ultra-wideband (UWB), passive radio frequency (RF) tags are key components in Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) system that will revolutionize inventory control and tracking applications. Unlike conventional, battery-operated (active) RFID tags, LLNL's small UWB tags, called 'UTag', operate at long range (up to 20 meters) in harsh, cluttered environments. Because they are battery-less (that is, passive), they have practically infinite lifetimes without human intervention, and they are lower in cost to manufacture and maintain than active RFID tags. These robust, energy-efficient passive tags are remotely powered by UWB radio signals, which are much more difficult to detect, intercept, and jam than conventional narrowband frequencies. The features of long range, battery-less, and low cost give UTag significant advantage over other existing RFID tags.

  20. A protein kinase C isozyme is translocated to cytoskeletal elements on activation.

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, D; Henrich, C J; Cheever, L; Khaner, H; Simpson, P C

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC)1 isozymes comprise a family of related cytosolic kinases that translocate to the cell particulate fraction on stimulation. The activated enzyme is thought to be on the plasma membrane. However, phosphorylation of protein substrates occurs throughout the cell and is inconsistent with plasma membrane localization. Using an isozyme-specific monoclonal antibody we found that, on activation, this PKC isozyme translocates to myofibrils in cardiac myocytes and to microfilaments in fibroblasts. Translocation of this activated PKC isozyme to cytoskeletal elements may explain some of the effects of PKC on cell contractility and morphology. In addition, differences in the translocation site of individual isozymes--and, therefore, phosphorylation of different substrates localized at these sites--may explain the diverse biological effects of PKC. Images PMID:2078573

  1. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  2. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration.

    PubMed

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  3. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  4. Retrotransposon long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is activated during salamander limb regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Kuo, Dwight; Nathanson, Jason; Satoh, Akira; Pao, Gerald M.; Yeo, Gene W.; Bryant, Susan V.; Voss, S. Randal; Gardiner, David M.; Hunter, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Salamanders possess an extraordinary capacity for tissue and organ regeneration when compared to mammals. In our effort to characterize the unique transcriptional fingerprint emerging during the early phase of salamander limb regeneration, we identified transcriptional activation of some germline-specific genes within the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells into a germline-like state. In this work, we focus on one of these genes, the long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon, which is usually active in germ cells and silent in most of the somatic tissues in other organisms. LINE-1 was found to be dramatically upregulated during regeneration. In addition, higher genomic LINE-1 content was also detected in the limb regenerate when compared to that before amputation indicating that LINE-1 retrotransposition is indeed active during regeneration. Active LINE-1 retrotransposition has been suggested to have a potentially deleterious impact on genomic integrity. Silencing of activated LINE-1 by small RNAs has been reported to be part of the machinery aiming to maintain genomic integrity. Indeed, we were able to identify putative LINE-1-related piRNAs in the limb blastema. Transposable element-related piRNAs have been identified frequently in the germline in other organisms. Thus, we present here a scenario in which a unique germline-like state is established during axolotl limb regeneration, and the re-activation of LINE-1 may serve as a marker for cellular dedifferentiation in the early-stage of limb regeneration. PMID:22913491

  5. Structural elements in the Girk1 subunit that potentiate G protein-gated potassium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Wydeven, Nicole; Young, Daniele; Mirkovic, Kelsey; Wickman, Kevin

    2012-12-26

    G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) (Girk/K(IR)3) channels mediate the inhibitory effect of many neurotransmitters on excitable cells. Girk channels are tetramers consisting of various combinations of four mammalian Girk subunits (Girk1 to -4). Although Girk1 is unable to form functional homomeric channels, its presence in cardiac and neuronal channel complexes correlates with robust channel activity. This study sought to better understand the potentiating influence of Girk1, using the GABA(B) receptor and Girk1/Girk2 heteromer as a model system. Girk1 did not increase the protein levels or alter the trafficking of Girk2-containing channels to the cell surface in transfected cells or hippocampal neurons, indicating that its potentiating influence involves enhancement of channel activity. Structural elements in both the distal carboxyl-terminal domain and channel core were identified as key determinants of robust channel activity. In the distal carboxyl-terminal domain, residue Q404 was identified as a key determinant of receptor-induced channel activity. In the Girk1 core, three unique residues in the pore (P) loop (F137, A142, Y150) were identified as a collective potentiating influence on both receptor-dependent and receptor-independent channel activity, exerting their influence, at least in part, by enhancing mean open time and single-channel conductance. Interestingly, the potentiating influence of the Girk1 P-loop is tempered by residue F162 in the second membrane-spanning domain. Thus, discontinuous and sometime opposing elements in Girk1 underlie the Girk1-dependent potentiation of receptor-dependent and receptor-independent heteromeric channel activity. PMID:23236146

  6. Efficient protein knockdown of HaloTag-fused proteins using hybrid molecules consisting of IAP antagonist and HaloTag ligand.

    PubMed

    Tomoshige, Shusuke; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Minoru

    2016-07-15

    We previously reported a protein knockdown system for HaloTag-fused proteins using hybrid small molecules consisting of alkyl chloride, which binds covalently to HaloTag, linked to BE04 (2), a bestatin (3) derivative with an affinity for cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (cIAP1, a kind of ubiquitin ligase). This system addressed several limitations of prior protein knockdown technology, and was applied to degrade two HaloTag-fused proteins. However, the degradation activity of these hybrid small molecules was not potent. Therefore, we set out to improve this system. We report here the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel hybrid compounds 4a and 4b consisting of alkyl chloride linked to IAP antagonist MV1 (5). Compounds 4a and 4b were confirmed to reduce the levels of HaloTag-fused tumor necrosis factor α (HaloTag-TNFα), HaloTag-fused cell division control protein 42 (HaloTag-Cdc42), and unfused HaloTag protein in living cells more potently than did BE04-linked compound 1b. Analysis of the mode of action revealed that the reduction of HaloTag-TNFα is proteasome-dependent, and is also dependent on the linker structure between MV1 (5) and alkyl chloride. These compounds appear to induce ubiquitination at the HaloTag moiety of HaloTag-fused proteins. Our results indicate that these newly synthesized MV1-type hybrid compounds, 4a and 4b, are efficient tools for protein knockdown for HaloTag-fused proteins. PMID:27236416

  7. Aortic ascorbic acid, trace elements, and superoxide dismutase activity in human aneurysmal and occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dubick, M.A.; Hunter, G.C.; Casey, S.M.; Keen, C.L.

    1987-02-01

    Altered trace elements and ascorbic acid metabolism have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, their role in the disease process, or the effect of atherosclerosis on their tissue levels within plaque, is poorly understood. The presence study analyzes the concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn, and ascorbic acid and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in tissue samples from 29 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and 14 patients with atherosclerotic occlusive disease (AOD). It was observed that the Fe and Mn concentrations in AAA and AOD tissue were higher than the levels in nondiseased control aorta, whereas Cu and Zn levels in AAA and AOD tissue were similar to the levels in controls. The Zn:Cu ratio was significantly lower in the AAA tissue in comparison to both AOD and control tissue. In addition, AAA and AOD tissue had low ascorbic acid levels and low Cu, Zn-SOD activity with Cu,Zn-SOD:Mn-SOD ratios of 0.27 and 0.19, respectively, compared to a ratio of 3.20 in control aorta. These data indicate that aorta affected by aneurysms and occlusive disease have altered trace element and ascorbic acid concentrations, as well as low Cu,Zn-SOD activity. Although these observations do not directly support the hypothesis that AAA is associated with aortic Cu deficiency they do suggest a role for oxygen radicals or increased lipid peroxidation in occlusive and aneurysmal disease of the aorta.

  8. Transcription of Mammalian cis-Regulatory Elements Is Restrained by Actively Enforced Early Termination.

    PubMed

    Austenaa, Liv M I; Barozzi, Iros; Simonatto, Marta; Masella, Silvia; Della Chiara, Giulia; Ghisletti, Serena; Curina, Alessia; de Wit, Elzo; Bouwman, Britta A M; de Pretis, Stefano; Piccolo, Viviana; Termanini, Alberto; Prosperini, Elena; Pelizzola, Mattia; de Laat, Wouter; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2015-11-01

    Upon recruitment to active enhancers and promoters, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) generates short non-coding transcripts of unclear function. The mechanisms that control the length and the amount of ncRNAs generated by cis-regulatory elements are largely unknown. Here, we show that the adaptor protein WDR82 and its associated complexes actively limit such non-coding transcription. WDR82 targets the SET1 H3K4 methyltransferases and the nuclear protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) complexes to the initiating Pol II. WDR82 and PP1 also interact with components of the transcriptional termination and RNA processing machineries. Depletion of WDR82, SET1, or the PP1 subunit required for its nuclear import caused distinct but overlapping transcription termination defects at highly expressed genes and active enhancers and promoters, thus enabling the increased synthesis of unusually long ncRNAs. These data indicate that transcription initiated from cis-regulatory elements is tightly coordinated with termination mechanisms that impose the synthesis of short RNAs. PMID:26593720

  9. SRNL Tagging and Tracking Video

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-06-15

    SRNL generates a next generation satellite base tracking system. The tagging and tracking system can work in remote wilderness areas, inside buildings, underground and other areas not well served by traditional GPS. It?s a perfect response to customer needs and market demand.

  10. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells.

    PubMed

    Breit, Andreas; Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27144291

  11. Activation of carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) by ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Ross, Ruth A.; Crabb, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a transcription factor involved in hepatic lipogenesis. Its function is in part under the control of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Given known effects of ethanol on AMPK and PP2A, it is plausible that ethanol might enhance fatty acid synthesis by increasing the activity of ChREBP. We hypothesized that another potential pathway of ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis is mediated by activation of ChREBP. Methods The effects of ethanol on ChREBP were assessed in hepatoma cells and in C57BL/6J mice fed with the Lieber-DeCarli diet. Results When the cells were exposed to ethanol (50 mM) for 24 hrs, the activity of a liver pyruvate kinase (LPK) promoter-luciferase reporter was increased by ~4-fold. Ethanol feeding of mice resulted in the translocation of ChREBP from cytosol to the nucleus. PP2A activity was increased in the liver of ethanol-fed mice by 22%. We found no difference in the levels of hepatic Xu-5-P between ethanol-fed mice and controls. Transfection of a constitutively active AMPK expression plasmid suppressed the basal activity of the LPK luciferase reporter and abolished the effect of ethanol on the reporter activity. However, transfection of rat hepatoma cells with a dominant negative AMPK expression plasmid induced basal LPK luciferase activity by only ~20%. The effect of ethanol on ChREBP was attenuated in the presence of okadaic acid, an inhibitor of PP2A. Conclusions The effects of ethanol on AMPK and PP2A may result in activation of ChREBP, providing another potential mechanism for ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis. However, additional okadaic acid-insensitive effects appear to be important as well. PMID:23266705

  12. The nature of catalytically active complexes of Ziegler-type systems based on iron subgroup elements

    SciTech Connect

    Brodskii, A.R.; Noskova, N.F.

    1995-02-01

    Complexation processes that occur in Ziegler-type systems on the basis of the carboxylate compounds of elements belonging mainly to the Iron Subgroup are investigated. The influence of genesis on the composition and structure of the complexes forming in the catalytic systems is demonstrated. A general scheme to describe the interaction of the catalyst components depending on their formation conditions is proposed. It is established that, along with other complexes, polynuclear associated species are present in the catalysts and play a decisive role in the catalytic activity of the investigated systems.

  13. Sensing Nature's Electric Fields: Ion Channels as Active Elements of Linear Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2003-05-01

    Given the parameters of familiar cellular elements — voltage-sensitive ion channels, carriers, pumps, phospholipid insulators, and electrolytic conductors — is it possible to construct an amplifier whose sensitivity matches the 5 nV/cm threshold found in behavioral experiments on elasmobranch fish? Or, in addition to clever circuitry that uses commonly known elements and principles, do we need something else to understand this sensitivity? The resolution of this question is important not only for studies in sensory biophysics seeking to reveal underlying mechanisms and molecular structures. More generally, it deepens our appreciation of the stochastic nature of inter- and intra-cellular control circuits. Here I analyze a simplified circuit involving negative differential resistance of voltage-sensitive ion channels. The analysis establishes an off-equilibrium criterion for amplification, shows that ion channels are the dominant noise sources, and, by minimizing channel noise within the given constraints, demonstrates that generic voltage-sensitive ion channels are likely candidates for the active elements of the linear cellular amplifiers. Finally, I highlight a number of unsolved issues.

  14. Reward Contingency Modulates Neuronal Activity in Rat Septal Nuclei during Elemental and Configural Association Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Nozomu; Uwano, Teruko; Hori, Etsuro; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that septal nuclei are important in the control of behavior during various reward and non-reward situations. In the present study, neuronal activity was recorded from rat septal nuclei during discrimination of conditioned sensory stimuli (CSs) of the medial forebrain bundle associated with or without a reward (sucrose solution or intracranial self-stimulation, ICSS). Rats were trained to lick a spout protruding close to the mouth just after a CS to obtain a reward stimulus. The CSs included both elemental and configural stimuli. In the configural condition, the reward contingency of the stimuli presented together was opposite to that of each elemental stimulus presented alone, although the same sensory stimuli were involved. Of the 72 responsive septal neurons, 18 responded selectively to the CSs predicting reward (CS+-related), four to the CSs predicting non-reward (CS0-related), nine to some CSs predicting reward or non-reward, and 15 non-differentially to all CSs. The remaining 26 neurons responded mainly during the ingestion/ICSS phase. A multivariate analysis of the septal neuronal responses to elemental and configural stimuli indicated that septal neurons encoded the CSs based on reward contingency, regardless of the stimulus physical properties and were categorized into three groups; CSs predicting the sucrose solution, CSs predicting a non-reward, and CSs predicting ICSS. The results suggest that septal nuclei are deeply involved in discriminating the reward contingency of environmental stimuli to manifest appropriate behaviors in response to changing stimuli. PMID:21633493

  15. Evaluation of a combination of continuum and truss finite elements in a model of passive and active muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Hedenstierna, S; Halldin, P; Brolin, K

    2008-12-01

    The numerical method of finite elements (FE) is a powerful tool for analysing stresses and strains in the human body. One area of increasing interest is the skeletal musculature. This study evaluated modelling of skeletal muscle tissue using a combination of passive non-linear, viscoelastic solid elements and active Hill-type truss elements, the super-positioned muscle finite element (SMFE). The performance of the combined materials and elements was evaluated for eccentric motions by simulating a tensile experiment from a published study on a stimulated rabbit muscle including three different strain rates. It was also evaluated for isometric and concentric contractions. The resulting stress-strain curves had the same overall pattern as the experiments, with the main limitation being sensitivity to the active force-length relation. It was concluded that the SMFE could model active and passive muscle tissue at constant rate elongations for strains below failure, as well as isometric and concentric contractions. PMID:18642161

  16. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Implantation report. Any person affixing or implanting an archival tag into a regulated species must obtain... catch, possess, retain, and land an Atlantic HMS in which an archival tag has been implanted or...

  17. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Implantation report. Any person affixing or implanting an archival tag into a regulated species must obtain... catch, possess, retain, and land an Atlantic HMS in which an archival tag has been implanted or...

  18. Freedom System Text and Graphics System (TAGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Text and Graphics System (TAGS) is a high-resolution facsimile system that scans text or graphics material and converts the analog SCAN data into serial digital data. This video shows the TAGS in operation.

  19. Active magnetic bearings used as exciters for rolling element bearing outer race defect diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanping; Di, Long; Zhou, Jin; Jin, Chaowu; Guo, Qintao

    2016-03-01

    The active health monitoring of rotordynamic systems in the presence of bearing outer race defect is considered in this paper. The shaft is assumed to be supported by conventional mechanical bearings and an active magnetic bearing (AMB) is used in the mid of the shaft location as an exciter to apply electromagnetic force to the system. We investigate a nonlinear bearing-pedestal system model with the outer race defect under the electromagnetic force. The nonlinear differential equations are integrated using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm. The simulation and experimental results show that the characteristic signal of outer race incipient defect is significantly amplified under the electromagnetic force through the AMBs, which is helpful to improve the diagnosis accuracy of rolling element bearing׳s incipient outer race defect. PMID:26803551

  20. [Antilipoxygenase activity and the trace elements content of Aloe vera in relation to the therapeutical effect].

    PubMed

    Bezáková, L; Oblozinský, M; Sýkorová, M; Paulíková, I; Kostálová, D

    2005-01-01

    Aloe vera is a rich source of many natural-health-promoting substances. The results of contemporary research on animal models indicate that the extracts have an antiinflammatory property. In this work the results of some in vitro experiments are shown: determination of the inhibitory effect of the Aloe vera extracts on the activity of partially purified lipoxygenase from the rat lung cytosol fraction, and quantitative determination of the trace elements presented in the extract (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn) carried out by using the x-ray fluorescence analysis. The findings could explain the inhibitory effect (antilipoxygenase activity) of the Aloe vera extract in the acute inflammation process, expecially in the topical application for healing of minor burns and skin ulcers. PMID:15751795

  1. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, William; Harris, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) was favorably impressed by the operational risk management approach taken by the Human Research Program (HRP) Integrated Research Plan (IRP) to address the stated life sciences issues. The life sciences community at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) seems to be focused on operational risk management. This approach is more likely to provide risk managers with the information they need at the time they need it. Concerning the information provided to the SRP by the EVA Physiology, Systems, and Performance Project (EPSP), it is obvious that a great deal of productive activity is under way. Evaluation of this information was hampered by the fact that it often was not organized in a fashion that reflects the "Gaps and Tasks" approach of the overall Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) effort, and that a substantial proportion of the briefing concerned subjects that, while interesting, are not part of the HHC Element (e.g., the pressurized rover presentation). Additionally, no information was provided on several of the tasks or how they related to work underway or already accomplished. This situation left the SRP having to guess at the efforts and relationship to other elements, and made it hard to easily map the EVA Project efforts currently underway, and the data collected thus far, to the gaps and tasks in the IRP. It seems that integration of the EPSP project into the HHC Element could be improved. Along these lines, we were concerned that our SRP was split off from the other participating SRPs at an early stage in the overall agenda for the meeting. In reality, the concerns of EPSP and other projects share much common ground. For example, the commonality of the concerns of the EVA and exercise physiology groups is obvious, both in terms of what reduced exercise capacity can do to EVA capability, and how the exercise performed during an EVA could contribute to an overall exercise countermeasure prescription.

  2. In situ tagging technique for fishes provides insight into growth and movement of invasive lionfish.

    PubMed

    Akins, John L; Morris, James A; Green, Stephanie J

    2014-10-01

    Information on fish movement and growth is primarily obtained through the marking and tracking of individuals with external tags, which are usually affixed to anesthetized individuals at the surface. However, the quantity and quality of data obtained by this method is often limited by small sample sizes owing to the time associated with the tagging process, high rates of tagging-related mortality, and displacement of tagged individuals from the initial capture location. To address these issues, we describe a technique for applying external streamer and dart tags in situ, which uses SCUBA divers to capture and tag individual fish on the sea floor without the use of anesthetic. We demonstrate this method for Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans/P. miles), species which are particularly vulnerable to barotrauma when transported to and handled at the surface. To test our method, we tagged 161 individuals inhabiting 26 coral reef locations in the Bahamas over a period of 3 years. Our method resulted in no instances of barotrauma, reduced handling and recovery time, and minimal post-tagging release displacement compared with conventional ex situ tag application. Opportunistic resighting and recapture of tagged individuals reveals that lionfish exhibit highly variable site fidelity, movement patterns, and growth rates on invaded coral reef habitats. In total, 24% of lionfish were resighted between 29 and 188 days after tagging. Of these, 90% were located at the site of capture, while the remaining individuals were resighted between 200 m and 1.1 km from initial site of capture over 29 days later. In situ growth rates ranged between 0.1 and 0.6 mm/day. While individuals tagged with streamer tags posted slower growth rates with increasing size, as expected, there was no relationship between growth rate and fish size for individuals marked with dart tags, potentially because of large effects of tag presence on the activities of small bodied lionfish (i.e., <150

  3. In situ tagging technique for fishes provides insight into growth and movement of invasive lionfish

    PubMed Central

    Akins, John L; Morris, James A; Green, Stephanie J

    2014-01-01

    Information on fish movement and growth is primarily obtained through the marking and tracking of individuals with external tags, which are usually affixed to anesthetized individuals at the surface. However, the quantity and quality of data obtained by this method is often limited by small sample sizes owing to the time associated with the tagging process, high rates of tagging-related mortality, and displacement of tagged individuals from the initial capture location. To address these issues, we describe a technique for applying external streamer and dart tags in situ, which uses SCUBA divers to capture and tag individual fish on the sea floor without the use of anesthetic. We demonstrate this method for Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans/P. miles), species which are particularly vulnerable to barotrauma when transported to and handled at the surface. To test our method, we tagged 161 individuals inhabiting 26 coral reef locations in the Bahamas over a period of 3 years. Our method resulted in no instances of barotrauma, reduced handling and recovery time, and minimal post-tagging release displacement compared with conventional ex situ tag application. Opportunistic resighting and recapture of tagged individuals reveals that lionfish exhibit highly variable site fidelity, movement patterns, and growth rates on invaded coral reef habitats. In total, 24% of lionfish were resighted between 29 and 188 days after tagging. Of these, 90% were located at the site of capture, while the remaining individuals were resighted between 200 m and 1.1 km from initial site of capture over 29 days later. In situ growth rates ranged between 0.1 and 0.6 mm/day. While individuals tagged with streamer tags posted slower growth rates with increasing size, as expected, there was no relationship between growth rate and fish size for individuals marked with dart tags, potentially because of large effects of tag presence on the activities of small bodied lionfish (i.e., <150

  4. Active transposable elements recover species boundaries and geographic structure in Madagascan coffee species.

    PubMed

    Roncal, Julissa; Guyot, Romain; Hamon, Perla; Crouzillat, Dominique; Rigoreau, Michel; Konan, Olivier N'Guessan; Rakotomalala, Jean-Jacques; Nowak, Michael D; Davis, Aaron P; de Kochko, Alexandre

    2016-02-01

    The completion of the genome assembly for the economically important coffee plant Coffea canephora (Rubiaceae) has allowed the use of bioinformatic tools to identify and characterize a diverse array of transposable elements (TEs), which can be used in evolutionary studies of the genus. An overview of the copy number and location within the C. canephora genome of four TEs is presented. These are tested for their use as molecular markers to unravel the evolutionary history of the Millotii Complex, a group of six wild coffee (Coffea) species native to Madagascar. Two TEs from the Gypsy superfamily successfully recovered some species boundaries and geographic structure among samples, whereas a TE from the Copia superfamily did not. Notably, species occurring in evergreen moist forests of eastern and southeastern Madagascar were divergent with respect to species in other habitats and regions. Our results suggest that the peak of transpositional activity of the Gypsy and Copia TEs occurred, respectively, before and after the speciation events of the tested Madagascan species. We conclude that the utilization of active TEs has considerable potential to unravel the evolutionary history and delimitation of closely related Coffea species. However, the selection of TE needs to be experimentally tested, since each element has its own evolutionary history. Different TEs with similar copy number in a given species can render different dendrograms; thus copy number is not a good selection criterion to attain phylogenetic resolution. PMID:26231981

  5. Elemental abundances and temperatures of quiescent solar active region cores from X-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2014-05-01

    A brief review of studies of elemental abundances and emission measures in quiescent solar active region cores is presented. Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observations of strong iron spectral lines have shown sharply peaked distributions around 3 MK. EIS observations of lines emitted by a range of elements have allowed good estimates of abundances relative to iron. However, X-ray observations are required to measure the plasma emission above 3 MK and the abundances of oxygen and neon. We revisit, using up-to-date atomic data, older X-ray observations obtained by a sounding rocket and by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS). We find that the Fe/O and Fe/Ne ratios are normally increased by a factor of 3.2, compared to the photospheric values. Similar results are obtained from FCS observations of six quiescent active region cores. The FCS observations also indicate that the emission measure above 3 MK has a very steep negative slope, with very little plasma observed at 5 MK or above. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Role of surface-active elements during keyhole-mode laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribic, B.; Tsukamoto, S.; Rai, R.; DebRoy, T.

    2011-12-01

    During high power density laser welding of mild steel, the keyhole depth, liquid metal flow, weld geometry and weld integrity are affected by base-metal sulfur content and oxygen (O2) present in the atmosphere or shielding gas. The role of these surface-active elements during keyhole-mode laser welding of steels is not well understood. In order to better understand their effects, welding of mild steel specimens containing various concentrations of oxygen and sulfur are examined. In addition, a numerical model is used to evaluate the influence of the surface-active elements on heat transfer and fluid flow in keyhole-mode laser welding. Increase in base-metal sulfur concentration or O2 content of shielding gas results in decreased weld widths. Sulfur results in a negligible increase in penetration depth whereas the presence of O2 in shielding gas significantly affects the weld penetration. It has earlier been proposed that oxygen, if present in the shielding gas, can get introduced into the weld pool resulting in formation of carbon monoxide (CO) at the keyhole surface and additional pressure from CO can result in increased penetration. Numerical modelling has been used in this work to understand the effects of formation of CO on the keyhole and weld geometries.

  7. Three-element trap filter radiometer based on large active area silicon photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Salim, S G R; Anhalt, K; Taubert, D R; Hollandt, J

    2016-05-20

    This paper shows the opto-mechanical design of a new filter radiometer built at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany, for the accurate determination of the thermodynamic temperature of high-temperature blackbodies. The filter radiometer is based on a three-element reflection-type trap detector that uses three large active area silicon photodiodes. Its spectral coverage and field of view are defined by a detachable narrow-band filter and a diamond-turned precision aperture, respectively. The temperature of the filter radiometer is stabilized using a water-streamed housing and is measured using a thin-film platinum thermometer placed onto the first photodiode element. The trap "mount" has been made as compact as possible, which, together with the large active area of the chosen photodiodes, allows a wide field of view. This work presents the design of the filter radiometer and discusses the criteria that have been considered in order for the filter radiometer to suit the application. PMID:27411121

  8. Identification of active transcriptional regulatory elements from GRO-seq data.

    PubMed

    Danko, Charles G; Hyland, Stephanie L; Core, Leighton J; Martins, Andre L; Waters, Colin T; Lee, Hyung Won; Cheung, Vivian G; Kraus, W Lee; Lis, John T; Siepel, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Modifications to the global run-on and sequencing (GRO-seq) protocol that enrich for 5'-capped RNAs can be used to reveal active transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) with high accuracy. Here, we introduce discriminative regulatory-element detection from GRO-seq (dREG), a sensitive machine learning method that uses support vector regression to identify active TREs from GRO-seq data without requiring cap-based enrichment (https://github.com/Danko-Lab/dREG/). This approach allows TREs to be assayed together with gene expression levels and other transcriptional features in a single experiment. Predicted TREs are more enriched for several marks of transcriptional activation—including expression quantitative trait loci, disease-associated polymorphisms, acetylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac) and transcription factor binding—than those identified by alternative functional assays. Using dREG, we surveyed TREs in eight human cell types and provide new insights into global patterns of TRE function. PMID:25799441

  9. The level of elements and antioxidant activity of commercial dietary supplement formulations based on edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Stilinović, Nebojša; Škrbić, Biljana; Živančev, Jelena; Mrmoš, Nataša; Pavlović, Nebojša; Vukmirović, Saša

    2014-12-01

    Commercial preparations of Cordyceps sinensis, Ganoderma lucidum and Coprinus comatus mushroom marketed as healthy food supplements in Serbia were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry with a graphite furnace (GFAAS) for their element content. Antioxidant activity potential and total phenolics of the same mushrooms were determined. The element content of mushroom samples was in the range of 0.130-0.360 mg kg(-1) for lead (Pb), <0.03-0.46 mg kg(-1) for arsenic (As), 0.09-0.39 mg kg(-1) for cadmium (Cd), 98.14-989.18 mg kg(-1) for iron (Fe), 0.10-101.32 mg kg(-1) for nickel (Ni), 5.06-26.50 mg kg(-1) for copper (Cu), 0.20-0.70 mg kg(-1) for cobalt (Co), 1.74-136.33 mg kg(-1) for chromium (Cr) and 2.19-21.54 mg kg(-1) for manganese (Mn). In the tests for measuring the antioxidant activity, the methanolic extract of C. sinensis showed the best properties. The same was seen for the analysis of selected phenolic compounds; C. sinensis was found to have the highest content. Commercial preparations of C. sinensis and C. comatus can be considered to be safe and suitable food supplements included in well-balanced diets. PMID:25294630

  10. Bisphenol A activates the Nrf1/2-antioxidant response element pathway in HEK 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Enikanolaiye, Mutiat I; Chepelev, Leonid L; Almohaisen, Abdulrahman; Chen, Qixuan; Scoggan, Kylie A; Coughlan, Melanie C; Cao, Xu-Liang; Jin, Xiaolei; Willmore, William G

    2013-03-18

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins for baby bottles, liners of canned food, and many other consumer products. Previously, BPA has been shown to reduce the activity of several antioxidant enzymes, which may contribute to oxidative stress. However, the underlying mechanism of the BPA-mediated effect upon antioxidant enzyme activity is unknown. Antioxidant and phase II metabolizing enzymes protect cells from oxidative stress and are transcriptionally activated by Nrf1 and Nrf2 factors through their cis-regulatory antioxidant response elements (AREs). In this work, we have assessed the effect of BPA on the Nrf1/2-ARE pathway in cultured human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Surprisingly, glutathione and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays revealed that BPA application created a more reduced intracellular environment in cultured HEK 293 cells. Furthermore, BPA increased the transactivation activity of ectopic Nrf1 and Nrf2 and increased the expression of ARE-target genes ho-1 and nqo1 at high (100-200 μM) BPA concentrations only. Our study suggests that BPA activates the Nrf1/2-ARE pathway at high (>10 μM) micromolar concentrations. PMID:23360430

  11. Stochastic analysis of exit fluid temperature records from the active TAG hydrothermal mound (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 26°N): 1. Modes of variability and implications for subsurface flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, R. A.

    2007-07-01

    Yearlong time series records of exit fluid temperature from the active TAG hydrothermal mound (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 26°N) reveal a complex space-time pattern of flow variability within the mineral deposit. Exit fluid temperatures were measured every 8-10 min from 17 sites distributed across the upper terrace of the mound from June 2003 to June 2004. High-temperature records were obtained using Deep Sea Power and Light SeaLogger® probes deployed in fractures discharging ˜360°C black smoker fluids, and low-temperature records were obtained using VEMCO Ltd. Minilog probes deployed in cracks discharging ˜20°C diffuse flow fluids. The temperature records are considerably more variable than those acquired from vent fields on the fast spreading East Pacific Rise and exhibit a complex mix of both episodic and periodic variability. The diffuse flow records alternate between periods of discharge and periods of what I infer to be recharge when fluid temperatures are equal to background water column levels (˜2.7°C) as ambient seawater is drawn into the seafloor. The space-time patterns of these episodic variations suggest that they represent reorganizations of the secondary circulation system driving diffuse discharge on the upper terrace of the mound on timescales from a few hours to a few days, most likely in response to permeability perturbations. Harmonic temperature oscillations were observed over a range of periods, with the principal lunar semidiurnal tidal period (M2) being most dominant. During certain times, exit fluid temperatures at diffuse sites pulse at diurnal and semidiurnal tidal periods when they are hovering near background water column levels, which I interpret as flow reversals associated with the vertical displacement of a fluid boundary layer at the seafloor interface when the local net flux is near zero. The pulsing behavior is predicted by poroelastic models of tidal loading but is not consistent with effects from tidal currents, which

  12. Method for designing gas tag compositions

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.

    1995-04-11

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node No. 1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node No. 2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred. 5 figures.

  13. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Archival tags. 635.33 Section 635.33..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ATLANTIC HIGHLY MIGRATORY SPECIES Management Measures § 635.33 Archival tags. (a) Implantation report. Any person affixing or implanting an archival tag into a regulated species must...

  14. Method for designing gas tag compositions

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.

    1995-01-01

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node #1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node #2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred.

  15. 9 CFR 2.54 - Lost tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lost tags. 2.54 Section 2.54 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Identification of Animals § 2.54 Lost tags. Each dealer or exhibitor shall be held accountable for all official tags acquired. In...

  16. Tagging as a Social Literacy Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGillivray, Laurie; Curwen, Margaret Sauceda

    2007-01-01

    Tagging is not simply an act of vandalism or violence; it is a social practice with its own rules and codes--a literacy practice imbued with intent and meaning. Three aspects of tagging reflect its nature as a literate practice: (1) The purpose of tagging to achieve particular social goals and group affiliations; (2) The role of talent to be…

  17. Analysis of solid-rocket effluents for aluminum, silicon, and other trace elements by neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furr, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    The sensitivity and reliability of neutron activation analysis in detecting trace elements in solid rocket effluents are discussed. Special attention was given to Al and Si contaminants. The construction and performance of a thermal column irradiation unit was reported.

  18. Priming of Short-Term Potentiation and Synaptic Tagging/Capture Mechanisms by Ryanodine Receptor Activation in Rat Hippocampal CA1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Li, Qin; Abraham, Wickliffe C.; Xiao, Zhi Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent changes in synaptic strength such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are considered to be cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory. Strengthening of a synapse for a few seconds or minutes is termed short-term potentiation (STP) and is normally unable to take part in the processes of synaptic…

  19. Addition of an N-terminal epitope tag significantly increases the activity of plant fatty acid desaturases expressed in yeast cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows great potential for development of bioreactor systems geared towards the production of high-value lipids such as polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids, the yields of which are largely dependent on the activity of ectopically-expressed enzymes. Here we show that the addit...

  20. Quantitative comparison of cis-regulatory element (CRE) activities in transgenic Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rogers, William A; Williams, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression patterns are specified by cis-regulatory element (CRE) sequences, which are also called enhancers or cis-regulatory modules. A typical CRE possesses an arrangement of binding sites for several transcription factor proteins that confer a regulatory logic specifying when, where, and at what level the regulated gene(s) is expressed. The full set of CREs within an animal genome encodes the organism's program for development, and empirical as well as theoretical studies indicate that mutations in CREs played a prominent role in morphological evolution. Moreover, human genome wide association studies indicate that genetic variation in CREs contribute substantially to phenotypic variation. Thus, understanding regulatory logic and how mutations affect such logic is a central goal of genetics. Reporter transgenes provide a powerful method to study the in vivo function of CREs. Here a known or suspected CRE sequence is coupled to heterologous promoter and coding sequences for a reporter gene encoding an easily observable protein product. When a reporter transgene is inserted into a host organism, the CRE's activity becomes visible in the form of the encoded reporter protein. P-element mediated transgenesis in the fruit fly species Drosophila (D.) melanogaster has been used for decades to introduce reporter transgenes into this model organism, though the genomic placement of transgenes is random. Hence, reporter gene activity is strongly influenced by the local chromatin and gene environment, limiting CRE comparisons to being qualitative. In recent years, the phiC31 based integration system was adapted for use in D. melanogaster to insert transgenes into specific genome landing sites. This capability has made the quantitative measurement of gene and, relevant here, CRE activity feasible. The production of transgenic fruit flies can be outsourced, including phiC31-based integration, eliminating the need to purchase expensive equipment and/or have proficiency at

  1. Transposon Tagging of a Male-Sterility, Female-Sterility Gene, St8, Revealed that the Meiotic MER3 DNA Helicase Activity Is Essential for Fertility in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Baumbach, Jordan; Pudake, Ramesh N.; Johnson, Callie; Kleinhans, Kaylin; Ollhoff, Alexandrea; Palmer, Reid G.; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.; Sandhu, Devinder

    2016-01-01

    The W4 locus in soybean encodes a dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR2) that regulates pigmentation patterns in flowers and hypocotyl. The mutable w4-m allele that governs variegated flowers has arisen through insertion of a CACTA-type transposable element, Tgm9, in DFR2. In the w4-m line, reversion from variegated to purple flower indicates excision of Tgm9, and its insertion at a new locus. Previously, we have identified a male-sterile, female-sterile mutant among the selfed progenies of a revertant plant carrying only purple flowers. Co-segregation between Tgm9 and the sterility phenotype suggested that the mutant was generated by insertion of Tgm9 at the St8 locus. The transposon was localized to exon 10 of Glyma.16G072300 that shows high identity to the MER3 DNA helicase involved in crossing over. Molecular analysis of fertile branches from two independent revertant plants confirmed precise excision of Tgm9 from the st8 allele, which restored fertility. In soybean, the gene is expressed in flower-buds, trifoliate leaves and stem. Phylogenetic analysis placed St8 in a clade with the Arabidopsis and rice MER3 suggesting that St8 is most likely the orthologous MER3 soybean gene. This study established the utility of Tgm9 in gene identification as well as in forward and reverse genetics studies. PMID:26930200

  2. Activity of a Py-Im Polyamide Targeted to the Estrogen Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Nickols, Nicholas G.; Szablowski, Jerzy O.; Hargrove, Amanda E.; Li, Benjamin C.; Raskatov, Jevgenij A.; Dervan, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im) polyamides are a class of programmable DNA minor groove binders capable of modulating the activity of DNA-binding proteins and affecting changes in gene expression. Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ERα) is a ligand-activated hormone receptor that binds as a homodimer to estrogen response elements (EREs) and is a driving oncogene in a majority of breast cancers. We tested a selection of structurally similar Py-Im polyamides with differing DNA sequence specificity for activity against 17β-estadiol (E2) induced transcription and cytotoxicity in ERα positive, E2 stimulated T47D-KBLUC cells, which express luciferase under ERα control. The most active polyamide targeted the sequence: 5’-WGGWCW-3’ (W = A or T), which is the canonical ERE-half site. Whole transcriptome analysis using RNA-Seq revealed that treatment of E2-stimulated breast cancer cells with this polyamide reduced the effects of E2 on the majority of those most strongly affected by E2, but had much less effect on the majority of E2 induced transcripts. In vivo, this polyamide circulated at detectable levels following subcutaneous injection and reduced levels of ER-driven luciferase expression in xenografted tumors in mice after subcutaneous compound administration without significant host toxicity. PMID:23443804

  3. Effects of heavy metal and other elemental additives to activated sludge on growth of Eisenia foetida

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenstein, R.; Neuhauser, E.F.; Narahara, A.

    1981-09-01

    The approximate level at which added concentrations of certain elements would cause an activated sludge to induce a toxic effect upon the growth of Eisenia foetida was determined. During 43 trials on sludge samples obtained throughout 1 year of study, earthworms grew from 3 to 10 mg live wt at hatching to 792 mg +- 18% (mean +- C.V.) in 8 weeks, when sludge was 24/sup 0/C and contained no additives. None of several elements commonly used in microbial growth media enhanced the growth rate of the earthworm. At salt concentrations up to about 6.6% on a dry wt basis, none of six anions tested was in and of itself toxic, while five of 15 cations - Co, Hg, Cu, Ni, and Cd - appeared specifically to inhibit growth rate or cause death. Manganese, Cr, and Pb were innocuous even at the highest levels of application - 22,000, 46,000, and 52,000 mg/kg, respectively. Neither the anionic nor cationic component of certain salts, such as NaCl or NH/sub 4/Cl, could be said to inhibit growth, which occurred only at high concentrations of these salts (about 3.3 and/or 6.6%). Below 7 mmho/cm, toxicity could not be correlated with electrolytic conductance, though higher values may help to explain the nonspecific growth inhibitory effects of salts like NaCl and KCl. Nor could toxicity ever be ascribed to hydrogen ion activity, since sludge pH was not altered even at the highest salt dose. It is concluded that except under very extreme conditions, the levels of heavy metals and salts generally found in activated sludges will not have an adverse affect on the growth of E. foetida.

  4. Insulin receptor binding motif tagged with IgG4 Fc (Yiminsu) works as an insulin sensitizer to activate Akt signaling in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zou, T; Yang, H X; Gong, Y Z; Xie, X J; Liu, H Y; Liao, D F

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key feature of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Interaction of insulin with the insulin receptor (IR) leads to both its auto-phosphorylation and phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on the IR substrate (IRS) proteins, initiating the activation of intracellular signaling cascades. The metabolic effects of IRS are known to be mediated through pathways involving phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase (PI-3K), which result in the activation of Akt signaling. The C-terminal region of the IR ectodomain is required to facilitate the conformational changes that are required for high-affinity binding to insulin. Furthermore, the CH2 and CH3 domains in the Fc fragments of immunoglobulins are responsible for their binding to the Fc receptor, which triggers transcytosis. In this study, we created a fusion peptide of the C-terminal end of the human IR ectodomain with the IgG4 Fc fragment, including an intervening polyG fragment to ensure enough space for insulin binding. We named this new peptide "Yiminsu", meaning an insulin sensitizer. The results of our analyses show that Yiminsu significantly facilitates insulin signaling via the activation of Akt in hepatocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further studies are required to determine whether Yiminsu can act as an insulin sensitizer. PMID:26345813

  5. Infrared tag and track technique

    DOEpatents

    Partin, Judy K.; Stone, Mark L.; Slater, John; Davidson, James R.

    2007-12-04

    A method of covertly tagging an object for later tracking includes providing a material capable of at least one of being applied to the object and being included in the object, which material includes deuterium; and performing at least one of applying the material to the object and including the material in the object in a manner in which in the appearance of the object is not changed, to the naked eye.

  6. Electronic Tag and Position Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-20

    The intent of this study phase program was to adequately define the Electronic Tag and Position Sensor chip so as to be able to price and schedule the full design and development culminating in a silicon IC. Therefore, even though Hughes Aircraft Company feels that the approach submitted in this document is what should be developed, it is still considered preliminary and could change as the full design is developed.

  7. Putative cis-Regulatory Elements Associated with Heat Shock Genes Activated During Excystation of Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Ana M.; Serrano, Myrna; Sheth, Nihar; Buck, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidiosis is a ubiquitous infectious disease, caused by the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum, leading to acute, persistent and chronic diarrhea worldwide. Although the complications of this disease can be serious, even fatal, in immunocompromised patients of any age, they have also been found to lead to long term effects, including growth inhibition and impaired cognitive development, in infected immunocompetent children. The Cryptosporidium life cycle alternates between a dormant stage, the oocyst, and a highly replicative phase that includes both asexual vegetative stages as well as sexual stages, implying fine genetic regulatory mechanisms. The parasite is extremely difficult to study because it cannot be cultured in vitro and animal models are equally challenging. The recent publication of the genome sequence of C. hominis and C. parvum has, however, significantly advanced our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of this parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, our goal was to identify cis-regulatory elements associated with heat shock response in Cryptosporidium using a combination of in silico and real time RT-PCR strategies. Analysis with Gibbs-Sampling algorithms of upstream non-translated regions of twelve genes annotated as heat shock proteins in the Cryptosporidium genome identified a highly conserved over-represented sequence motif in eleven of them. RT-PCR analyses, described herein and also by others, show that these eleven genes bearing the putative element are induced concurrent with excystation of parasite oocysts via heat shock. Conclusions/Significance Our analyses suggest that occurrences of a motif identified in the upstream regions of the Cryptosporidium heat shock genes represent parts of the transcriptional apparatus and function as stress response elements that activate expression of these genes during excystation, and possibly at other stages in the life cycle of the parasite

  8. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  9. Overexpression of a citrus basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (CubHLH1), which is homologous to Arabidopsis activation-tagged bri1 suppressor 1 interacting factor genes, modulates carotenoid metabolism in transgenic tomato.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tomoko; Fujii, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Aiko; Nakano, Michiharu; Nakajima, Naoko; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Omura, Mitsuo; Shimada, Takehiko

    2016-02-01

    To explore the transcription factors associated with carotenoid metabolism in citrus fruit, one transcription factor (CubHLH1) was selected through microarray screening in Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) fruit, which was treated with exogenous ethylene or gibberellin (GA), accelerating or retarding carotenoid accumulation in peel, respectively. The amino acid sequence of CubHLH1 has homology to Arabidopsis activation-tagged bri1 suppressor 1 (ATBS1) interacting factor (AIF), which is functionally characterized as a negative regulator of the brassinolide (BR) signalling pathway. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that protein for CubHLH1 could interact with Arabidopsis and tomato ATBS1. Overexpression of CubHLH1 caused a dwarf phenotype in transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), suggesting that CubHLH1 has a similar function to Arabidopsis AIF. In the transgenic tomato fruit at ripening stage, the lycopene content was reduced along with the changes in carotenoid biosynthetic gene expression. The abscisic acid (ABA) content of all the transgenic tomato fruit was higher than that of the wild type. These results implied that CubHLH1 is considered to have a similar function to Arabidopsis AIFs and might be directly involved in carotenoid metabolism in mature citrus fruit. PMID:26795149

  10. [KIL-d] Protein Element Confers Antiviral Activity via Catastrophic Viral Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Genjiro; Weissman, Jonathan S; Tanaka, Motomasa

    2015-11-19

    Eukaryotic cells are targeted by pathogenic viruses and have developed cell defense mechanisms against viral infection. In yeast, the cellular extrachromosomal genetic element [KIL-d] alters killer activity of M double-stranded RNA killer virus and confers cell resistance against the killer virus. However, its underlying mechanism and the molecular nature of [KIL-d] are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that [KIL-d] is a proteinaceous prion-like aggregate with non-Mendelian cytoplasmic transmission. Deep sequencing analyses revealed that [KIL-d] selectively increases the rate of de novo mutation in the killer toxin gene of the viral genome, producing yeast harboring a defective mutant killer virus with a selective growth advantage over those with WT killer virus. These results suggest that a prion-like [KIL-d] element reprograms the viral replication machinery to induce mutagenesis and genomic inactivation via the long-hypothesized mechanism of "error catastrophe." The findings also support a role for prion-like protein aggregates in cellular defense and adaptation. PMID:26590718

  11. Molluscan mobile elements similar to the vertebrate recombination-activating genes

    PubMed Central

    Panchin, Yuri; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2009-01-01

    Animal genomes contain ~20,000 genes. Additionally millions of genes for antigen receptors are generated in cells of the immune system from the sets of separate gene segments by a mechanism known as the V(D)J somatic recombination. The components of the V(D)J recombination system, Recombination-Activating Gene proteins (RAG1 and RAG2) and recombination signal sequence (RSS), are thought to have “entered” the vertebrate genome as a hypothetical “RAG transposon”. Recently discovered mobile elements have terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) similar to RSS and may encode proteins with a different degree of similarity to RAG1. We describe a novel N-RAG-TP transposon identified from the sea slug Aplysia californica that encodes a protein similar to the N-terminal part of RAG1 in vertebrates. This refines the “RAG transposon” hypothesis and allows us to propose a scenario for V(D)J recombination machinery evolution from a relic transposon related to the existing mobile elements N-RAG-TP, Chapaev and Transib. PMID:18313399

  12. Determination of trace elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis in Anatolian bentonitic clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, N.; Tulun, T.; Alemdar, A.

    1998-08-01

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was carried out for the determination of trace elements in non-swelling type bentonitic clays. Samples were irradiated in Triga Mark II type of reactor at the Nuclear Institute of Technical University of Istanbul. Irradiation was performed in two steps for "short and long lived" isotopes. The γ spectra of short lived isotopes were interpreted with respect to Al, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Ti, Mn, V qualitatively and that of long lived isotopes with respect to Sc, Cr, Br, Sb, Cs, La, Ce, Sm, Yb, Hf quantitatively. The relative richness of the trace elements (Al, Ti, Ca, Mg, Na, K) observed in the Sampo 90 program was obtained using Atomic Absorption technique by normalizing its value to that of sodium. The silicon content of samples was determined by gravimetry. The results indicated that Sample I contained relatively higher amount of REE, Sb, Ca and Na than Sample II. The amount of Sc, Cr and Br were about similar in both samples. Concentrations of La, Ce, Sm and Yb are higher than REE abundances found in all natural waters. These results suggest that Ca-bentonite samples are representative of primary deposition environment. In addition, the Sc content of both the samples indicates that Ca-bentonite deposits originated from continental crust. The relatively high amount of REE might bring about porosity problems in the use of Ca-bentonite in cement and concrete production.

  13. Finite element modeling of the cyclic wetting mechanism in the active part of wheat awns.

    PubMed

    Zickler, Gerald A; Ruffoni, Davide; Dunlop, John W C; Elbaum, Rivka; Weinkamer, Richard; Fratzl, Peter; Antretter, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Many plant tissues and organs are capable of moving due to changes in the humidity of the environment, such as the opening of the seed capsule of the ice plant and the opening of the pine cone. These are fascinating examples for the materials engineer, as these tissues are non-living and move solely through the differential swelling of anisotropic tissues and in principle may serve as examples for the bio-inspired design of artificial actuators. In this paper, we model the microstructure of the wild wheat awn (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides) by finite elements, especially focusing on the specific microscopic features of the active part of the awn. Based on earlier experimental findings, cell walls are modeled as multilayered cylindrical tubes with alternating cellulose fiber orientation in successive layers. It is shown that swelling upon hydration of this system leads to the formation of gaps between the layers, which could act as valves, thus enabling the entry of water into the cell wall. This supports the hypothesis that this plywood-like arrangement of cellulose fibrils enhances the effect of ambient humidity by accelerated water or vapor diffusion along the gaps. The finite element model shows that a certain distribution of axially and tangentially oriented fibers is necessary to generate sufficient tensile stresses within the cell wall to open nanometer-sized gaps between cell wall layers. PMID:22791359

  14. Ambient temperature fatigue tests of elements of an actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, E. L.; Elber, W.

    1977-01-01

    Elements of an actively cooled structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft have been investigated for fatigue characteristics. The study involved a bonded honeycomb sandwich panel with d-shaped coolant tubes. The curved portion of these tubes was embedded in the honeycomb, and the flat portion was bonded or soldered to the inner surface of the outer skin. The elements examined were two plain skin specimens (aluminum alloy); two specimens with skins attached to manifolds and tubes (one specimen was bonded, the other soldered); and a specimen representative of a corner section of the complete cooled sandwich. Sinusoidal loads were applied to all specimens. The honeycomb sandwich specimen was loaded in both tension and compression; the other specimens were loaded in tension only. The cooling tubes were pressurized with oil throughout the fatigue tests. The most significant results of these tests follow: All specimens exceeded their design life of 20,000 cycles without damage. Crack growth rates obtained in the plain skin specimens were used to determine the crack growth characteristics of aluminum alloy. Cracks in skins either bonded or soldered to cooling tubes propagated past the tubes without penetration. The coolant tubes served as crack arresters and temporarily stopped crack growth when a crack reached a tube-skin interface. The honeycomb core demonstrated that it could contain leakage from a tube.

  15. The Collective Knowledge of Social Tags: Direct and Indirect Influences on Navigation, Learning, and Information Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cress, Ulrike; Held, Christoph; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Tag clouds generated in social tagging systems can capture the collective knowledge of communities. Using as a basis spreading activation theories, information foraging theory, and the co-evolution model of cognitive and social systems, we present here a model for an "extended information scent," which proposes that both collective and individual…

  16. Social Tagging in a Scholarly Digital Library Environment: Users' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noorhidawati, A.; Hanum, N. Fariza; Zohoorian-Fooladi, N.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports an exploratory study examining how users participate in social tagging activities in a scholarly digital library environment to learn about their motivations, behaviour, and practices. Method: This study was conducted in two phases: a survey to investigate usage and attitudes of social tagging tool, and a…

  17. OSIRI-REx Touch and Go (TAG) Navigation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Kevin; Antreasian, Peter; Moreau, Michael C.; May, Alex; Sutter, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission is a NASA New Frontiers mission launching in 2016 to rendezvous with the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu in late 2018. Following an extensive campaign of proximity operations activities to characterize the properties of Bennu and select a suitable sample site, OSIRIS-REx will fly a Touch-And-Go (TAG) trajectory to the asteroid's surface to obtain a regolith sample. The paper summarizes the mission design of the TAG sequence, the propulsive maneuvers required to achieve the trajectory, and the sequence of events leading up to the TAG event. The paper also summarizes the Monte-Carlo simulation of the TAG sequence and presents analysis results that demonstrate the ability to conduct the TAG within 25 meters of the selected sample site and 2 cm/s of the targeted contact velocity. The paper describes some of the challenges associated with conducting precision navigation operations and ultimately contacting a very small asteroid.

  18. OSIRIS-REx Touch-And-Go (TAG) Navigation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Kevin; Antreasian, Peter; Moreau, Michael C.; May, Alex; Sutter, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource identification Security Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission is a NASA New Frontiers mission launching in 2016 to rendezvous with the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu in late 2018. Following an extensive campaign of proximity operations activities to characterize the properties of Bennu and select a suitable sample site, OSIRIES-REx will fly a Touch-And-Go (TAG) trajectory to the asteroid's surface to obtain a regolith sample. The paper summarizes the mission design of the TAG sequence, the propulsive required to achieve the trajectory, and the sequence of events leading up to the TAG event. The paper will summarize the Monte-Carlo simulation of the TAG sequence and present analysis results that demonstrate the ability to conduct the TAG within 25 meters of the selected sample site and +-2 cms of the targeted contact velocity. The paper will describe some of the challenges associated with conducting precision navigation operations and ultimately contacting a very small asteroid.

  19. An Entry/Gateway® cloning system for general expression of genes with molecular tags in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Omar S; Oliver, Daniel; Eyer, Katie; Pai, Chi-Yun

    2009-01-01

    Background Tagged fusion proteins are priceless tools for monitoring the activities of biomolecules in living cells. However, over-expression of fusion proteins sometimes leads to the unwanted lethality or developmental defects. Therefore, vectors that can express tagged proteins at physiological levels are desirable tools for studying dosage-sensitive proteins. We developed a set of Entry/Gateway® vectors for expressing fluorescent fusion proteins in Drosophila melanogaster. The vectors were used to generate fluorescent CP190 which is a component of the gypsy chromatin insulator. We used the fluorescent CP190 to study the dynamic movement of related chromatin insulators in living cells. Results The Entry/Gateway® system is a timesaving technique for quickly generating expression constructs of tagged fusion proteins. We described in this study an Entry/Gateway® based system, which includes six P-element destination vectors (P-DEST) for expressing tagged proteins (eGFP, mRFP, or myc) in Drosophila melanogaster and a TA-based cloning vector for generating entry clones from unstable DNA sequences. We used the P-DEST vectors to express fluorecent CP190 at tolerable levels. Expression of CP190 using the UAS/Gal4 system, instead, led to either lethality or underdeveloped tissues. The expressed eGFP- or mRFP-tagged CP190 proteins are fully functional and rescued the lethality of the homozygous CP190 mutation. We visualized a wide range of CP190 distribution patterns in living cell nuclei, from thousands of tiny particles to less than ten giant ones, which likely reflects diverse organization of higher-order chromatin structures. We also visualized the fusion of multiple smaller insulator bodies into larger aggregates in living cells, which is likely reflective of the dynamic activities of reorganization of chromatin in living nuclei. Conclusion We have developed an efficient cloning system for expressing dosage-sensitive proteins in Drosophila melanogaster. This system

  20. Linear Closed-form Solution and Finite-element Analysis of an Active Tensegrity Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmeť, Stanislav; Platko, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Results of the linear closed form solution of an active or adaptive tensegrity unit, as well as its numerical analysis using finite element method are presented in the paper. The shape of the unit is an octahedral cell with a square base and it is formed by thirteen members (four bottom and four top cables, four edge struts and one central strut). The central strut is designed as an actuator that allows for an adjustment of the shape of the unit which leads to changes of tensile forces in the cables. Due to the diagonal symmetry of the 3D tensegrity unit the closed-form analysis is based on the 2D solution of the equivalent planar biconvex cable system with one central strut under a vertical point load.

  1. Recent perspectives in solar physics - Elemental composition, coronal structure and magnetic fields, solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Elemental abundances in the solar corona are studied. Abundances in the corona, solar wind and solar cosmic rays are compared to those in the photosphere. The variation in silicon and iron abundance in the solar wind as compared to helium is studied. The coronal small and large scale structure is investigated, emphasizing magnetic field activity and examining cosmic ray generation mechanisms. The corona is observed in the X-ray and EUV regions. The nature of coronal transients is discussed with emphasis on solar-wind modulation of galactic cosmic rays. A schematic plan view of the interplanetary magnetic field during sunspot minimum is given showing the presence of magnetic bubbles and their concentration in the region around 4-5 AU by a fast solar wind stream.

  2. Three-dimensional display utilizing a diffractive optical element and an active matrix liquid crystal display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Gregory P.; Jones, Michael W.; Kulick, Jeffrey H.; Lindquist, Robert G.; Kowel, Stephen T.

    1996-12-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of the first real-time autostereoscopic 3D display based on the partial pixel 3D display architecture. The primary optical components of the 3D display are an active-matrix liquid crystal display and a diffractive optical element (DOE). The display operates at video frame rates and is driven with a conventional VGA signal. 3D animations with horizontal motion parallax are readily viewable as sets of stereo images. Formation of the virtual viewing slits by diffraction from the partial pixel apertures is experimentally verified. The measured contrast and perceived brightness of the display are excellent, but there are minor flaws in image quality due to secondary images. The source of these images and how they may be eliminated is discussed. The effects of manufacturing-related systematic errors in the DOE are also analyzed.

  3. Activation of antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent genes by roasted coffee extracts.

    PubMed

    Yazheng, Liu; Kitts, David D

    2012-09-01

    Coffee beans contain numerous bioactive components that exhibit antioxidant capacity when assessed using both chemical, cell free, and biological, cell-based model systems. However, the mechanisms underlying the antioxidant effects of coffee in biological systems are not totally understood and in some cases vary considerably from results obtained with simpler in vitro chemical assays. In the present study, the physicochemical characteristics and antioxidant activity of roasted and non-roasted coffee extracts were investigated in both cell free (ORAC(FL)) and cell-based systems. A profile of antioxidant gene expression in cultured human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells treated with both roasted and non-roasted coffee extracts, respectively, was investigated using Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array technology. Results demonstrated that the mechanisms of the antioxidant activity associated with coffee constituents assessed by the ORAC(FL) assay were different to those observed using an intracellular oxidation assay with Caco-2 cells. Moreover, roasted coffee (both light and dark roasted) extracts produced both increased- and decreased-expressions of numerous genes that are involved in the management of oxidative stress via the antioxidant defence system. The selective and specific positive induction of antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent genes, including gastrointestinal glutathione peroxidase (GPX2), sulfiredoxin (SRXN1), thioredoxin reductase 1 (TXNRD1), peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1), peroxiredoxin 4 (PDRX4) and peroxiredoxin 6 (PDRX6) were identified with the activation of the endogenous antioxidant defence system in Caco-2 cells. PMID:22699814

  4. Prediction and Validation of Gene Regulatory Elements Activated During Retinoic Acid Induced Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Simandi, Zoltan; Horvath, Attila; Nagy, Peter; Nagy, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic development is a multistep process involving activation and repression of many genes. Enhancer elements in the genome are known to contribute to tissue and cell-type specific regulation of gene expression during the cellular differentiation. Thus, their identification and further investigation is important in order to understand how cell fate is determined. Integration of gene expression data (e.g., microarray or RNA-seq) and results of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-based genome-wide studies (ChIP-seq) allows large-scale identification of these regulatory regions. However, functional validation of cell-type specific enhancers requires further in vitro and in vivo experimental procedures. Here we describe how active enhancers can be identified and validated experimentally. This protocol provides a step-by-step workflow that includes: 1) identification of regulatory regions by ChIP-seq data analysis, 2) cloning and experimental validation of putative regulatory potential of the identified genomic sequences in a reporter assay, and 3) determination of enhancer activity in vivo by measuring enhancer RNA transcript level. The presented protocol is detailed enough to help anyone to set up this workflow in the lab. Importantly, the protocol can be easily adapted to and used in any cellular model system. PMID:27403939

  5. Effects of Physical Activity on Trace Elements and Depression Related Biomarkers in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas

    2016-08-01

    Not much is known about the role of physical activity (PA), obesity related variables, and trace elements as potential risk factors affecting neurotransmitters in schoolchildren with depression. Our objective was to investigate the effect of physical activity (PA) on depressive symptoms in children and adolescents. Also, we aimed to study the association of demographic variables, serum levels of Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn), serotonin, and salivary cortisol with depression in this population. One hundred and fifty school children (90 boys and 60 girls) aged 7-18 years were recruited for this study. All participants were evaluated for depression using CDI-score analysis. Their physical activity levels were checked using pre-validated questionnaires. The serum levels of Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn), cortisol, and serotonin were estimated using atomic absorption, and immunoassay techniques. About 48.7 % of the study population had depressive symptoms (CDI-score; ≥13), and were classified into mild, moderate, and severe categories. Older children, especially girls, had higher levels of depression. Participants with moderate and severe depression had significantly lower physical activity, serotonin, and zinc levels, Zn/Cu ratios, and significantly higher copper and cortisol levels. Physically active boys showed significantly lower depressive CDI-scores and improvement in cortisol, serotonin, Cu, and Zn concentrations compared to girls of sedentary life style. CDI- scores correlated positively with BMI, cortisol and Cu, and negatively with PA, serotonin and Zn concentrations. BMI, cortisol, serotonin, Cu and Zn, could explain about 59.3-79 % of the depressive symptoms among schoolchildren, according to stepwise regression analysis. This was especially true in especially older girls. PA and an adequate balance in Zn and Cu levels, plays a positive role in improving CDI-depressive score, BMI, serotonin and cortisol levels among schoolchildren. PMID:26701336

  6. Sustained impact of community-based physical activity interventions: key elements for success

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Compelling evidence supports the cost effectiveness and potential impact of physical activity on chronic disease prevention and health promotion. Quality of evidence is one piece, but certainly not the sole determinant of whether public health interventions, physical activity focused or otherwise, achieve their full potential for impact. Health promotion at both population and community levels must progress beyond health intervention models that isolate individuals from social, environmental, and political systems of influence. We offer a critical evaluation of lessons learned from two successful research initiatives to provide insights as to how health promotion research contributes to sustained impact. We highlight factors key to success including the theoretical and methodological integration of: i) a social ecological approach; ii) participatory action research (PAR) methods; and iii) an interdisciplinary team. Methods To identify and illustrate the key elements of our success we layered an evaluation of steps taken atop a review of relevant literature. Results In the school-based case study (Action Schools! BC), the success of our approach included early and sustained engagement with a broad cross-section of stakeholders, establishing partnerships across sectors and at different levels of government, and team members across multiple disciplines. In the neighbourhood built environment case study, the three domains guided our approach through study design and team development, and the integration of older adults’ perspectives into greenway design plans. In each case study we describe how elements of the domains serve as a guide for our work. Conclusion To sustain and maximize the impact of community-based public health interventions we propose the integration of elements from three domains of research that acknowledge the interplay between social, environmental and poilitical systems of influence. We emphasize that a number of key factors determine

  7. Tag retention, growth, and survival of red swamp crayfish marked with a visible implant tag

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isely, J.J.; Stockett, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    Eighty juvenile (means: 42.4 mm total length, 1.6 g) red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii were implanted with sequentially numbered visible implant tags and held in the laboratory. Tags were injected transversely into the musculature just beneath the exoskeleton of the third abdominal segment from the cephalothorax; tags were visible upon inspection. An additional 20 crayfish were left untagged and served as controls. After 150 d, tag retention was 80% and all tags were readable. No tagged crayfish died during the study, and no differences in total length or weight were detected between tagged and control crayfish. All individuals molted at least three times during the 150-d study, and some individuals molted up to six times, suggesting that most tags would be permanently retained. The readability in the field without specialized equipment makes the visible implant tag ideal for studies of crayfish ecology, management, and culture.

  8. Enhancer and promoter elements directing activation and glucocorticoid repression of the. cap alpha. /sub 1/-fetoprotein gene in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Guertin, M.; La Rue, H.; Bernier, D.; Wrange, O.; Chevrette, M.; Gingras, M.C.; Belanger, L.

    1988-04-01

    Mutations were introduced in 7 kilobases of 5'-flanking rat ..cap alpha../sub 1/-fetoprotein (AFP) genomic DNA, linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. AFP promoter activity and its repression by a glucocorticoid hormone were assessed by stable and transient expression assays. Stable transfection assays were more sensitive and accurate than transient expression assays in a Morris 7777 rat hepatoma recipient (Hepa7.6), selected for its strong AFP repression by dexamethasone. The segment of DNA encompassing a hepatocyte-constitutive chromatin DNase I-hypersensitive site at -3.7 kilobases and a liver developmental stage-specific site at -2.5 kilobases contains interacting enhancer elements sufficient for high AFP promoter activity in Hepa7.6 or HepG2 cells. Deletions and point mutations define an upstream promoter domain of AFP gene activation, operating with at least three distinct promoter-activating elements, PEI at -65 base pairs, PEII at -120 base pairs, and DE at -160 base pairs. PEI and PEII share homologies with albumin promoter sequences, PEII is a near-consensus nuclear factor I recognition sequence, and DE overlaps a glucocorticoid receptor recognition sequence. An element conferring glucocorticoid repression of AFP gene activity is located in the upstream AFP promoter domain. Receptor-binding assays indicate that this element is the glucocorticoid receptor recognition sequence which overlaps with promoter-activating element DE.

  9. De novo DNA demethylation and noncoding transcription define active intergenic regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Felix; Smith, Andrew D; Gingeras, Thomas R; Hannon, Gregory J; Hodges, Emily

    2013-10-01

    Deep sequencing of mammalian DNA methylomes has uncovered a previously unpredicted number of discrete hypomethylated regions in intergenic space (iHMRs). Here, we combined whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data with extensive gene expression and chromatin-state data to define functional classes of iHMRs, and to reconstruct the dynamics of their establishment in a developmental setting. Comparing HMR profiles in embryonic stem and primary blood cells, we show that iHMRs mark an exclusive subset of active DNase hypersensitive sites (DHS), and that both developmentally constitutive and cell-type-specific iHMRs display chromatin states typical of distinct regulatory elements. We also observe that iHMR changes are more predictive of nearby gene activity than the promoter HMR itself, and that expression of noncoding RNAs within the iHMR accompanies full activation and complete demethylation of mature B cell enhancers. Conserved sequence features corresponding to iHMR transcript start sites, including a discernible TATA motif, suggest a conserved, functional role for transcription in these regions. Similarly, we explored both primate-specific and human population variation at iHMRs, finding that while enhancer iHMRs are more variable in sequence and methylation status than any other functional class, conservation of the TATA box is highly predictive of iHMR maintenance, reflecting the impact of sequence plasticity and transcriptional signals on iHMR establishment. Overall, our analysis allowed us to construct a three-step timeline in which (1) intergenic DHS are pre-established in the stem cell, (2) partial demethylation of blood-specific intergenic DHSs occurs in blood progenitors, and (3) complete iHMR formation and transcription coincide with enhancer activation in lymphoid-specified cells. PMID:23811145

  10. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yanyan; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Hongzhi; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Teng, Weiping; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-12-15

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBPα and PPARγ. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis.

  11. De novo DNA demethylation and noncoding transcription define active intergenic regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Felix; Smith, Andrew D.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Hodges, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Deep sequencing of mammalian DNA methylomes has uncovered a previously unpredicted number of discrete hypomethylated regions in intergenic space (iHMRs). Here, we combined whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data with extensive gene expression and chromatin-state data to define functional classes of iHMRs, and to reconstruct the dynamics of their establishment in a developmental setting. Comparing HMR profiles in embryonic stem and primary blood cells, we show that iHMRs mark an exclusive subset of active DNase hypersensitive sites (DHS), and that both developmentally constitutive and cell-type-specific iHMRs display chromatin states typical of distinct regulatory elements. We also observe that iHMR changes are more predictive of nearby gene activity than the promoter HMR itself, and that expression of noncoding RNAs within the iHMR accompanies full activation and complete demethylation of mature B cell enhancers. Conserved sequence features corresponding to iHMR transcript start sites, including a discernible TATA motif, suggest a conserved, functional role for transcription in these regions. Similarly, we explored both primate-specific and human population variation at iHMRs, finding that while enhancer iHMRs are more variable in sequence and methylation status than any other functional class, conservation of the TATA box is highly predictive of iHMR maintenance, reflecting the impact of sequence plasticity and transcriptional signals on iHMR establishment. Overall, our analysis allowed us to construct a three-step timeline in which (1) intergenic DHS are pre-established in the stem cell, (2) partial demethylation of blood-specific intergenic DHSs occurs in blood progenitors, and (3) complete iHMR formation and transcription coincide with enhancer activation in lymphoid-specified cells. PMID:23811145

  12. Directional Radio-Frequency Identification Tag Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Taylor, John D.; Henderson, John J.

    2004-01-01

    A directional radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag reader has been designed to facilitate finding a specific object among many objects in a crowded room. The device could be an adjunct to an electronic inventory system that tracks RFID-tagged objects as they move through reader-equipped doorways. Whereas commercial RFID-tag readers do not measure directions to tagged objects, the device is equipped with a phased-array antenna and a received signal-strength indicator (RSSI) circuit for measuring direction. At the beginning of operation, it is set to address only the RFID tag of interest. It then continuously transmits a signal to interrogate that tag while varying the radiation pattern of the antenna. It identifies the direction to the tag as the radiation pattern direction of peak strength of the signal returned by the tag. An approximate distance to the tag is calculated from the peak signal strength. The direction and distance can be displayed on a screen. A prototype containing a Yagi antenna was found to be capable of detecting a 915.5-MHz tag at a distance of approximately equal to 15 ft (approximately equal to 4.6 m).

  13. Neutron activation analysis for the determination of trace elements in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Versieck, J

    1994-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis, in both its radiochemical and instrumental forms, is a precious technique for the determination of trace elements in biological materials. Probably its most important advantage is its relative freedom from errors resulting from contamination of the samples. Invaluable characteristics are also its excellent sensitivity, outstanding selectivity, and remarkable multielement capability. It is, however, necessary to warn against uncritical expectations. This is best illustrated by the seriously inconsistent results obtained in several laboratories. Because of the necessity to have access to a nuclear research reactor, the stringent safety rules to be observed, the rather high costs of the analyses, the relatively low sample throughput, and the sometimes long delay between the taking of a sample and the obtaining the final result, the use of neutron activation analysis remained restricted to a few--essentially research--laboratories. It found its main application in solving arduous problems and in paving the way for other analytical techniques better suited to routine applications. PMID:7710855

  14. Experimental analysis of tablet properties for discrete element modeling of an active coating process.

    PubMed

    Just, Sarah; Toschkoff, Gregor; Funke, Adrian; Djuric, Dejan; Scharrer, Georg; Khinast, Johannes; Knop, Klaus; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Coating of solid dosage forms is an important unit operation in the pharmaceutical industry. In recent years, numerical simulations of drug manufacturing processes have been gaining interest as process analytical technology tools. The discrete element method (DEM) in particular is suitable to model tablet-coating processes. For the development of accurate simulations, information on the material properties of the tablets is required. In this study, the mechanical parameters Young's modulus, coefficient of restitution (CoR), and coefficients of friction (CoF) of gastrointestinal therapeutic systems (GITS) and of active-coated GITS were measured experimentally. The dynamic angle of repose of these tablets in a drum coater was investigated to revise the CoF. The resulting values were used as input data in DEM simulations to compare simulation and experiment. A mean value of Young's modulus of 31.9 MPa was determined by the uniaxial compression test. The CoR was found to be 0.78. For both tablet-steel and tablet-tablet friction, active-coated GITS showed a higher CoF compared with GITS. According to the values of the dynamic angle of repose, the CoF was adjusted to obtain consistent tablet motion in the simulation and in the experiment. On the basis of this experimental characterization, mechanical parameters are integrated into DEM simulation programs to perform numerical analysis of coating processes. PMID:23354469

  15. Sampling and major element chemistry of the recent (A.D. 1631-1944) Vesuvius activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; Kilburn, C.R.J.; de Vivo, B.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed sampling of the Vesuvius lavas erupted in the period A.D. 1631-1944 provides a suite of samples for comprehensive chemical analyses and related studies. Major elements (Si, Ti, Al, Fetotal, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, K and P), volatile species (Cl, F, S, H2O+, H2O- and CO2), and ferrous iron (Fe2+) were determined for one hundred and forty-nine lavas and five tephra from the A.D. 1631-1944 Vesuvius activity. The lavas represent a relatively homogeneous suite with respect to SiO2, TiO2, FeOtotal, MnO and P2O5, but show systematic variations among MgO, K2O, Na2O, Al2O3 and CaO. The average SiO2 content is 48.0 wt.% and the rocks are classified as tephriphonolites according to their content of alkalis. All of the lavas are silica-undersaturated and are nepheline, leucite, and olivine normative. There is no systematic variation in major-element composition with time, over the period A.D. 1631-1944. The inter-eruption and intra-eruption compositional differences are the same magnitude. The lavas are highly porphyritic with clinopyroxene and leucite as the major phases. Fractionation effects are not reflected in the silica content of the lavas. The variability of MgO, K2O, Na2O, and CaO can be modelled as a relative depletion or accumulation of clinopyroxene. ?? 1993.

  16. Study of the generation characteristics of laser converters with dye-based wide-aperture solid--liquid active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Eremenko, A.S.; Zemskii, V.I.; Kolesnikov, Y.L.; Malinin, B.G.; Meshkovsky, I.K.; Savkin, N.P.; Stepanov, V.E.; Shildyaev, V.S.

    1986-11-01

    The lasing characteristics of an active element, consisting of a fine porous silicate matrix, has been studied. Molecules of a dye (rhodamine 6G) and an ethanol solution of the same dye were introduced into the cells. It has been shown that under conditions of large heat release (when thermooptical distortions begin to appear in the dye solutions), the solid--liquid element preserves the stability of its own lasing characteristics.

  17. [Hygienic study of an activated fibrous charcoal material as a sorbing filtering element for drinking water afterpurification].

    PubMed

    Prokopov, V A; Mironets, N V; Gakal, R K; Maktaz, E D; Dugan, A M; Teteneva, I A; Tarabarova, S B; Martyshchenko, N V; Nadvornaia, Zh D

    1993-01-01

    The results of complex toxicological and hygienic study showed that the quality of pipe water filtered through the activated carbonic fibrous material (ACFM) "Dnepr-F" forming a part of absorptive filtering element improved markedly. The content of organic substances decreased drastically as well as that of nitrates and iron. Microbiological indices did not suffer appreciable changes and were within permissible limits. The water filtered through the absorptive element with ACFM had no adverse influence on the organisms of warm-blooded animals. Proceeding from foregoing one can conclude that the "Dnepr-F" may be recommended as a part of absorptive filtering element for the final refinement of drinking water. PMID:8209499

  18. Tagged-weak {pi} method

    SciTech Connect

    Margaryan, A.; Hashimoto, O.; Kakoyan, V.; Knyazyan, S.; Tang, L.

    2011-02-15

    A new 'tagged-weak {pi} method' is proposed for determination of electromagnetic transition probabilities B(E2) and B(M1) of the hypernuclear states with lifetimes of {approx}10{sup -10} s. With this method, we are planning to measure B(E2) and B(M1) for light hypernuclei at JLab. The results of Monte Carlo simulations for the case of E2(5/2{sup +}, 3/2{sup +} {yields} 1/2{sup +}) transitions in {sub {Lambda}}{sup 7}He hypernuclei are presented.

  19. Atmospheric deposition of rare earth elements in Albania studied by the moss biomonitoring technique, neutron activation analysis and GIS technology.

    PubMed

    Allajbeu, Sh; Yushin, N S; Qarri, F; Duliu, O G; Lazo, P; Frontasyeva, M V

    2016-07-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are typically conservative elements that are scarcely derived from anthropogenic sources. The mobilization of REEs in the environment requires the monitoring of these elements in environmental matrices, in which they are present at trace level. The determination of 11 REEs in carpet-forming moss species (Hypnum cupressiforme) collected from 44 sampling sites over the whole territory of the country were done by using epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) at IBR-2 fast pulsed reactor in Dubna. This paper is focused on REEs (lanthanides) and Sc. Fe as typical consistent element and Th that appeared good correlations between the elements of lanthanides are included in this paper. Th, Sc, and REEs were never previously determined in the air deposition of Albania. Descriptive statistics were used for data treatment using MINITAB 17 software package. The median values of the elements under investigation were compared with those of the neighboring countries such as Bulgaria, Macedonia, Romania, and Serbia, as well as Norway which is selected as a clean area. Geographical distribution maps of the elements over the sampled territory were constructed using geographic information system (GIS) technology. Geochemical behavior of REEs in moss samples has been studied by using the ternary diagram of Sc-La-Th, Spider diagrams and multivariate analysis. It was revealed that the accumulation of REEs in current mosses is associated with the wind-blowing metal-enriched soils that is pointed out as the main emitting factor of the elements under investigation. PMID:27044293

  20. Exosomes derived from HIV-1-infected cells contain trans-activation response element RNA.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-07-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 10(4)-10(6) copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 10(3) copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS. PMID:23661700

  1. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  2. Not All Sequence Tags Are Created Equal: Designing and Validating Sequence Identification Tags Robust to Indels

    PubMed Central

    Faircloth, Brant C.; Glenn, Travis C.

    2012-01-01

    Ligating adapters with unique synthetic oligonucleotide sequences (sequence tags) onto individual DNA samples before massively parallel sequencing is a popular and efficient way to obtain sequence data from many individual samples. Tag sequences should be numerous and sufficiently different to ensure sequencing, replication, and oligonucleotide synthesis errors do not cause tags to be unrecoverable or confused. However, many design approaches only protect against substitution errors during sequencing and extant tag sets contain too few tag sequences. We developed an open-source software package to validate sequence tags for conformance to two distance metrics and design sequence tags robust to indel and substitution errors. We use this software package to evaluate several commercial and non-commercial sequence tag sets, design several large sets (maxcount = 7,198) of edit metric sequence tags having different lengths and degrees of error correction, and integrate a subset of these edit metric tags to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers and sequencing adapters. We validate a subset of these edit metric tagged PCR primers and sequencing adapters by sequencing on several platforms and subsequent comparison to commercially available alternatives. We find that several commonly used sets of sequence tags or design methodologies used to produce sequence tags do not meet the minimum expectations of their underlying distance metric, and we find that PCR primers and sequencing adapters incorporating edit metric sequence tags designed by our software package perform as well as their commercial counterparts. We suggest that researchers evaluate sequence tags prior to use or evaluate tags that they have been using. The sequence tag sets we design improve on extant sets because they are large, valid across the set, and robust to the suite of substitution, insertion, and deletion errors affecting massively parallel sequencing workflows on all currently used platforms

  3. Reducing fungal infections and testing tag loss in juvenile Pacific lampreys implanted with passive integrated transponders.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, H.E.; Gee, L.P.; Mesa, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus are facing severe population declines, yet little is known about juvenile lamprey passage, life history, or adult return rates because until now, these small fish could not be tagged for unique identification of live individuals. Previously, we developed a simple and effective method for tagging juvenile lampreys with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and showed that tagging per se did not affect survival. Mortality in tagged and untagged control fish, however, was frequently associated with fungal infection. In this study, we addressed two outstanding issues related to handling and tagging juvenile lampreys. First, we tried to mitigate freshwater fungal infections by reducing irritation and stress from anesthesia and by treating tagged fish briefly with a prophylactic immediately after tagging. We tested four anesthetics at three concentrations each and determined that 100 mg/L MS-222 and 60 mg/L BENZOAK® (benzocaine) were the most effective for anesthetizing juvenile lampreys to handleable while minimizing irritation. We also showed that fish anesthetized with BENZOAK® may have lower rates of fungal infection than those anesthetized with MS-222 or AQUI-S® 20E (eugenol). When fish anesthetized with MS-222 or BENZOAK® were given a 30 min prophylactic treatment with Stress Coat®, hydrogen peroxide, or salt immediately after tagging, few fish presented with fungal infections. However, untreated, tagged control fish also showed few fungal infections, making it difficult to determine if the prophylactic treatments were successful. The second question we addressed was whether activity would increase tag loss in PIT-tagged lampreys. We found that active swimming did not cause tag loss if fish were first held for 20–24 h after tagging. Therefore, we recommend anesthesia with MS-222 or BENZOAK® and then tagging with a 20–24 h recovery period followed by immediate release. If field studies show that lampreys are not

  4. Understanding why users tag: A survey of tagging motivation literature and results from an empirical study

    PubMed Central

    Strohmaier, Markus; Körner, Christian; Kern, Roman

    2012-01-01

    While recent progress has been achieved in understanding the structure and dynamics of social tagging systems, we know little about the underlying user motivations for tagging, and how they influence resulting folksonomies and tags. This paper addresses three issues related to this question. (1) What distinctions of user motivations are identified by previous research, and in what ways are the motivations of users amenable to quantitative analysis? (2) To what extent does tagging motivation vary across different social tagging systems? (3) How does variability in user motivation influence resulting tags and folksonomies? In this paper, we present measures to detect whether a tagger is primarily motivated by categorizing or describing resources, and apply these measures to datasets from seven different tagging systems. Our results show that (a) users’ motivation for tagging varies not only across, but also within tagging systems, and that (b) tag agreement among users who are motivated by categorizing resources is significantly lower than among users who are motivated by describing resources. Our findings are relevant for (1) the development of tag-based user interfaces, (2) the analysis of tag semantics and (3) the design of search algorithms for social tagging systems. PMID:23471473

  5. Controlled trial comparing two types of enteral nutrition in treatment of active Crohn's disease: elemental versus polymeric diet.

    PubMed Central

    Rigaud, D; Cosnes, J; Le Quintrec, Y; René, E; Gendre, J P; Mignon, M

    1991-01-01

    To determine whether an elemental diet or a polymeric defined formula diet would be more effective for treating active Crohn's disease, we conducted a prospective randomised clinical trial in 30 patients with active Crohn's disease unresponsive to steroids and/or complicated by malnutrition. They received a four to six week enteral nutrition course with either an elemental diet or a polymeric diet. Clinical remission occurred in 10 of the 15 patients on elemental diet compared with 11 of the 15 patients assigned to polymeric diet. Both groups showed similar improvements in nutritional status, biological inflammation, alpha 1 antitrypsin clearance, and colonoscopic lesions (diminished in 17 out of 24 patients). Most patients relapsed during the year after discharge. We conclude that enteral nutrition, whatever the diet, is an efficient primary therapy for active Crohn's disease but does not influence the long term outcome. PMID:1773955

  6. Sensor-based material tagging system

    SciTech Connect

    Vercellotti, L.C.; Cox, R.W.; Ravas, R.J.; Schlotterer, J.C. . Science and Technology Center)

    1991-01-01

    Electronic identification tags are being developed for tracking material and personnel. In applying electronic identification tags to radioactive materials safeguards, it is important to measure attributes of the material to ensure that the tag remains with the material. The addition of a microcontroller with an on-board analog-to-digital converter to an electronic identification tag application-specific integrated-circuit has been demonstrated as means to provide the tag with sensor data. Each tag is assembled into a housing, which serves as a scale for measuring the weight of a paint-can-sized container and its contents. Temperature rise of the can above ambient is also measured, and a piezoelectric detector detects disturbances and immediately puts the tag into its alarm and beacon mode. Radiation measurement was also considered, but the background from nearby containers was found to be excessive. The sensor-based tagging system allows tracking of the material in cans as it is stored in vaults or is moved through the manufacturing process. The paper presents details of the sensor-based material tagging system and describes a demonstration system.

  7. Sensor-based material tagging system

    SciTech Connect

    Vercellotti, L.C.; Cox, R.W.; Ravas, R.J.; Schlotterer, J.C.

    1991-12-31

    Electronic identification tags are being developed for tracking material and personnel. In applying electronic identification tags to radioactive materials safeguards, it is important to measure attributes of the material to ensure that the tag remains with the material. The addition of a microcontroller with an on-board analog-to-digital converter to an electronic identification tag application-specific integrated-circuit has been demonstrated as means to provide the tag with sensor data. Each tag is assembled into a housing, which serves as a scale for measuring the weight of a paint-can-sized container and its contents. Temperature rise of the can above ambient is also measured, and a piezoelectric detector detects disturbances and immediately puts the tag into its alarm and beacon mode. Radiation measurement was also considered, but the background from nearby containers was found to be excessive. The sensor-based tagging system allows tracking of the material in cans as it is stored in vaults or is moved through the manufacturing process. The paper presents details of the sensor-based material tagging system and describes a demonstration system.

  8. Affinity purification of heme-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Asher, Wesley B; Bren, Kara L

    2014-01-01

    Protein affinity purification techniques are widely used for isolating pure target proteins for biochemical and structural characterization. Herein, we describe the protocol for affinity-based purification of proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that uses the coordination of a peptide tag covalently modified with heme c, known as a heme-tag, to an L-histidine immobilized Sepharose resin. This approach provides an affinity purification tag visible to the eye, facilitating tracking of the protein. In addition, we describe methods for specifically detecting heme-tagged proteins in SDS-PAGE gels using a heme-staining procedure and for quantifying the proteins using a pyridine hemochrome assay. PMID:24943311

  9. Elements of M-I Coupling in Repetitive Substorm Activity Driven by Interplanetary CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Sandholt, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    By means of case studies we explore key elements of the magnetosphere-ionosphere current system associated with repetitive substorm activity during persistent strong forcing by ICMEs. Our approach consists of a combination of the magnetospheric and ionospheric perspectives on the substorm activity. The first aspect is the near-Earth plasma sheet with its repetitive excitations of the substorm current wedge, as monitored by spacecraft GOES-10 when it traversed the 2100-0300 MLT sector, and its coupling to the westward auroral electrojet (WEJ) centered near midnight during the stable interplanetary (IP) conditions. The second aspect is the excitation of Bostrom type II currents maximizing at dusk and dawn and their associated ionospheric Pedersen current closure giving rise to EEJ (WEJ) events at dusk (dawn). As documented in our study, this aspect is related to the braking phase of Earthward-moving dipolarization fronts-bursty bulk flows. We follow the magnetospheric flow/field events from spacecraft Geotail in the midtail (X = - 11 Re) lobe to geostationary altitude at pre-dawn MLTs (GOES 10). The associated M-I coupling is obtained from ground-satellite conjunctions across the double auroral oval configuration along the meridian at dusk. By this technique we distinguish between ionospheric manifestations in three latitude regimes: (i) auroral oval south, (ii) auroral oval north, and (iii) polar cap. Regime (iii) is characterized by events of enhanced antisunward convection near the polar cap boundary (flow channel events) and in the central polar cap (PCN-index events). The repetitive substorm activity is discussed in the context of the level of IP driving as given by the geoeffective IP electric field (E_KL), magnetotail reconnection (inferred from the PCN-index and spacecraft Wind at X = - 77 Re) and the storm SYM-H index. We distinguish between different variants of the repetitive substorm activity, giving rise to electrojet (AL)-plasma convection (PCN) events

  10. Electron-phonon interaction in three-barrier nanosystems as active elements of quantum cascade detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, N. V. Seti, Ju. A.; Grynyshyn, Yu. B.

    2015-04-15

    The theory of electron tunneling through an open nanostructure as an active element of a quantum cascade detector is developed, which takes into account the interaction of electrons with confined and interface phonons. Using the method of finite-temperature Green’s functions and the electron-phonon Hamiltonian in the representation of second quantization over all system variables, the temperature shifts and electron-level widths are calculated and the contributions of different electron-phonon-interaction mechanisms to renormalization of the spectral parameters are analyzed depending on the geometrical configuration of the nanosystem. Due to weak electron-phonon coupling in a GaAs/Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As-based resonant tunneling nanostructure, the temperature shift and rf field absorption peak width are not very sensitive to the electron-phonon interaction and result from a decrease in potential barrier heights caused by a difference in the temperature dependences of the well and barrier band gaps.

  11. Active control of blade vortex interaction noise on a helicopter blade element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyur, Kartik B.; Krstic, Miroslav

    1998-07-01

    Blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise has been recognized as the primary determinant of the helicopter's far field acoustic signature. Given the limitations of design in eliminating this dynamic phenomenon, there exists a need for control. In this paper, we present the application, first of feedback control strategies, and then of adaptive cancellation of Leishman and Hariharan's linear aerodynamic model of a trailing edge flap. Lift fluctuations caused by vortices are taken as output disturbance. The contribution of the vortices to lift is obtained from Leishman's indicial model for gusts. The use of an active structure for actuation is assumed, and the actuator is approximated as a lag element. To design an adaptive cancellation scheme that is applicable not only to BVI but also to general problems with periodic disturbances, we start with the sensitivity method but arrive at the same scheme derived by Sacks, Bodson, and Khosla who introduced a phase advance into a pseudo-gradient scheme. We discuss stability of the scheme via averaging.

  12. Transcriptional activity of the transposable element Tn10 in the Salmonella typhimurium ilvGEDA operon.

    PubMed

    Blazey, D L; Burns, R O

    1982-08-01

    Polarity of Tn10 insertion mutations in the Salmonella typhimurium ilvGEDA operon depends on both the location and the orientation of the Tn10 element. One orientation of Tn10 insertions in ilvG and ilvE permits low-level expression of the downstream ilvEDA and ilvDA genes, respectively. Our analysis of Salmonella ilv recombinant plasmids shows that this residual ilv expression must result from Tn10-directed transcription and does not reflect the presence of internal promoters in the ilvGEDA operon, as was previously suggested. The opposite orientation of Tn10 insertion in ilvE prevents ilvDA expression, indicating that only one end of Tn10 is normally active in transcribing adjacent genes. Both orientations of Tn10 insertion in ilvD exert absolute polarity on ilvA expression. Expression of ilvA is known to be dependent on effective translation of ilvD, perhaps reflecting the lack of a ribosome binding site proximal to the ilvA sequence. Therefore, recognition of the ability of Tn10 to promote transcription of contiguous genes in the ilvGEDA operon apparently requires the presence of associated ribosome binding sites. PMID:6289328

  13. Activation of Elemental Sulfur at a Two-Coordinate Platinum(0) Center.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sudipta; Schürmann, Christian J; Mondal, Totan; Koley, Debasis; Herbst-Irmer, Regine; Stalke, Dietmar; Roesky, Herbert W

    2016-08-26

    Platinum dichalcogenides have been known to exhibit two-dimensional layered structures. Herein, we describe the syntheses, isolation, and characterization of air-stable crystalline cyclic alkyl(amino) carbene (cAAC)-supported monomeric platinum disulfide three-membered ring complex [(cAAC)2 Pt(S2 )] (2). The highly reactive platinum(0) [(cAAC)2 Pt] complex (1) with two-coordinate platinum activates elemental sulfur to give 2. The brown crystals of bis-carbene platinum(II)monosulfate [(cAAC)2 Pt(SO4 )x (S2 )1-x ] (4) have been isolated when the reaction was performed in air. The dioxygen analogue of 2 was formed upon exposing the THF solution of 1 to aerial oxygen (O2 ). The binding of oxygen at the Pt(0) center was found to be reversible. Additionally, DFT study has been performed to elucidate the electronic structure and bonding scenario of 2, 3, and 4. Quantum chemical calculations showed donor-acceptor-type interaction for the Pt-S bonds in 2 and Pt-O bonds in 3 and 4. PMID:27414489

  14. Transposable Elements Contribute to Activation of Maize Genes in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Makarevitch, Irina; Waters, Amanda J.; West, Patrick T.; Stitzer, Michelle; Hirsch, Candice N.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Springer, Nathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for a large portion of the genome in many eukaryotic species. Despite their reputation as “junk” DNA or genomic parasites deleterious for the host, TEs have complex interactions with host genes and the potential to contribute to regulatory variation in gene expression. It has been hypothesized that TEs and genes they insert near may be transcriptionally activated in response to stress conditions. The maize genome, with many different types of TEs interspersed with genes, provides an ideal system to study the genome-wide influence of TEs on gene regulation. To analyze the magnitude of the TE effect on gene expression response to environmental changes, we profiled gene and TE transcript levels in maize seedlings exposed to a number of abiotic stresses. Many genes exhibit up- or down-regulation in response to these stress conditions. The analysis of TE families inserted within upstream regions of up-regulated genes revealed that between four and nine different TE families are associated with up-regulated gene expression in each of these stress conditions, affecting up to 20% of the genes up-regulated in response to abiotic stress, and as many as 33% of genes that are only expressed in response to stress. Expression of many of these same TE families also responds to the same stress conditions. The analysis of the stress-induced transcripts and proximity of the transposon to the gene suggests that these TEs may provide local enhancer activities that stimulate stress-responsive gene expression. Our data on allelic variation for insertions of several of these TEs show strong correlation between the presence of TE insertions and stress-responsive up-regulation of gene expression. Our findings suggest that TEs provide an important source of allelic regulatory variation in gene response to abiotic stress in maize. PMID:25569788

  15. Characterization of active miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements in the peanut genome.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Makoto; Kiyoshima, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Sigeru; Sasamoto, Sigemi; Watanabe, Akiko; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Isobe, Sachiko

    2012-05-01

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs), some of which are known as active nonautonomous DNA transposons, are found in the genomes of plants and animals. In peanut (Arachis hypogaea), Ah-MITE1 has been identified in a gene for fatty-acid desaturase, and possessed excision activity. However, the AhMITE1 distribution and frequency of excision have not been determined for the peanut genome. In order to characterize AhMITE1s, their genomic diversity and transposition ability was investigated. Southern blot analysis indicated high AhMITE1 copy number in the genomes of A. hypogaea, A. magna and A. monticola, but not in A. duranensis. A total of 504 AhMITE1s were identified from the MITE-enriched genomic libraries of A. hypogaea. The representative AhMITE1s exhibited a mean length of 205.5 bp and a GC content of 30.1%, with AT-rich, 9 bp target site duplications and 25 bp terminal inverted repeats. PCR analyses were performed using primer pairs designed against both flanking sequences of each AhMITE1. These analyses detected polymorphisms at 169 out of 411 insertional loci in the four peanut lines. In subsequent analyses of 60 gamma-irradiated mutant lines, four Ah-MITE1 excisions showed footprint mutations at the 109 loci tested. This study characterizes AhMITE1s in peanut and discusses their use as DNA markers and mutagens for the genetics, genomics and breeding of peanut and its relatives. PMID:22294450

  16. Transcriptional Activity, Chromosomal Distribution and Expression Effects of Transposable Elements in Coffea Genomes

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Carlos R. M.; Andrade, Alan C.; Marraccini, Pierre; Teixeira, João B.; Carazzolle, Marcelo F.; Pereira, Gonçalo A. G.; Pereira, Luiz Filipe P.; Vanzela, André L. L.; Wang, Lu; Jordan, I. King; Carareto, Claudia M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant genomes are massively invaded by transposable elements (TEs), many of which are located near host genes and can thus impact gene expression. In flowering plants, TE expression can be activated (de-repressed) under certain stressful conditions, both biotic and abiotic, as well as by genome stress caused by hybridization. In this study, we examined the effects of these stress agents on TE expression in two diploid species of coffee, Coffea canephora and C. eugenioides, and their allotetraploid hybrid C. arabica. We also explored the relationship of TE repression mechanisms to host gene regulation via the effects of exonized TE sequences. Similar to what has been seen for other plants, overall TE expression levels are low in Coffea plant cultivars, consistent with the existence of effective TE repression mechanisms. TE expression patterns are highly dynamic across the species and conditions assayed here are unrelated to their classification at the level of TE class or family. In contrast to previous results, cell culture conditions per se do not lead to the de-repression of TE expression in C. arabica. Results obtained here indicate that differing plant drought stress levels relate strongly to TE repression mechanisms. TEs tend to be expressed at significantly higher levels in non-irrigated samples for the drought tolerant cultivars but in drought sensitive cultivars the opposite pattern was shown with irrigated samples showing significantly higher TE expression. Thus, TE genome repression mechanisms may be finely tuned to the ideal growth and/or regulatory conditions of the specific plant cultivars in which they are active. Analysis of TE expression levels in cell culture conditions underscored the importance of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathways in the repression of Coffea TEs. These same NMD mechanisms can also regulate plant host gene expression via the repression of genes that bear exonized TE sequences. PMID:24244387

  17. The cAMP response element binding protein, CREB, is a potent inhibitor of diverse transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaigre, F P; Ace, C I; Green, M R

    1993-01-01

    Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) activates transcription of cAMP response element (CRE)-containing promoters following an elevation of intracellular cAMP. Here we show that CREB and the highly related protein ATF-1 are also potent transcription inhibitors. Strikingly, CREB inhibits transcription of multiple activators, whose DNA-binding domains and activation regions are unrelated to one another. Inhibition requires that the CREB dimerization and DNA-binding domains are intact. However, inhibition is not dependent upon the presence of a CRE in the promoter, and does not involve heterodimer formation between CREB and the activator. The ability of an activator protein to inhibit transcription in such a promiscuous fashion has not been previously reported. Images PMID:8332500

  18. Non destructive multi elemental analysis using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis techniques: Preliminary results for concrete sample

    SciTech Connect

    Dahing, Lahasen Normanshah; Yahya, Redzuan; Yahya, Roslan; Hassan, Hearie

    2014-09-03

    In this study, principle of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been used as a technique to determine the elements in the sample. The system consists of collimated isotopic neutron source, Cf-252 with HPGe detector and Multichannel Analysis (MCA). Concrete with size of 10×10×10 cm{sup 3} and 15×15×15 cm{sup 3} were analysed as sample. When neutrons enter and interact with elements in the concrete, the neutron capture reaction will occur and produce characteristic prompt gamma ray of the elements. The preliminary result of this study demonstrate the major element in the concrete was determined such as Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe and H as well as others element, such as Cl by analysis the gamma ray lines respectively. The results obtained were compared with NAA and XRF techniques as a part of reference and validation. The potential and the capability of neutron induced prompt gamma as tool for multi elemental analysis qualitatively to identify the elements present in the concrete sample discussed.

  19. A Priori Method of Using Photon Activation Analysis to Determine Unknown Trace Element Concentrations in NIST Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Jaromy; Sun Zaijing; Wells, Doug; Benson, Buck; Maschner, Herb

    2009-03-10

    Photon activation analysis detected elements in two NIST standards that did not have reported concentration values. A method is currently being developed to infer these concentrations by using scaling parameters and the appropriate known quantities within the NIST standard itself. Scaling parameters include: threshold, peak and endpoint energies; photo-nuclear cross sections for specific isotopes; Bremstrahlung spectrum; target thickness; and photon flux. Photo-nuclear cross sections and energies from the unknown elements must also be known. With these quantities, the same integral was performed for both the known and unknown elements resulting in an inference of the concentration of the un-reported element based on the reported value. Since Rb and Mn were elements that were reported in the standards, and because they had well-identified peaks, they were used as the standards of inference to determine concentrations of the unreported elements of As, I, Nb, Y, and Zr. This method was tested by choosing other known elements within the standards and inferring a value based on the stated procedure. The reported value of Mn in the first NIST standard was 403{+-}15 ppm and the reported value of Ca in the second NIST standard was 87000 ppm (no reported uncertainty). The inferred concentrations were 370{+-}23 ppm and 80200{+-}8700 ppm respectively.

  20. [Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against His-tag and epitope analysis of cross antigens].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangrong; Zhang, Haixiang; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin; Wang, Guanghua; Qi, Zongli; Li, Yuan; Hu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Objective To explore the influence of His-tag on recombinant proteins in vaccination, immunization and pathogenesis. Methods Multiple mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against His-tag were prepared. The biological and immunoreactive characteristics of these mAbs and their cross-reactivity with the normal human tissues were investigated by ELISA, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. Results The binding activity of these anti-His mAbs was associated with the steric configuration of the his-tagged antigen. In addition, most of these mAbs reacted with human hemoglobin and some normal human tissues. Conclusion Anti-His antibodies could be elicited by His-tagged recombinant proteins in vivo experiments. Moreover, the functional studies of the His-tagged recombinant proteins might be affected by the reactions of anti-His6 antibodies with human hemoglobin and normal human tissues. PMID:27126949

  1. Studies on the introduction and mobility of the maize Activator element in Arabidopsis thaliana and Daucus carota.

    PubMed Central

    Van Sluys, M A; Tempé, J; Fedoroff, N

    1987-01-01

    We have co-transformed carrot (Daucus carota) and Arabidopsis thaliana with an Agrobacterium tumefaciens non-tumorigenic T-DNA carrying the maize transposable element Activator (Ac) and an Agrobacterium rhizogenes Ri T-DNA. We present evidence that the Ac element transposes in transformed root or root-derived callus cultures of both species. We show that fertile plants can be regenerated from transformed, root-derived callus cultures of Arabidopsis, demonstrating the utility of the Ri plasmid for introducing the maize Ac element into plants. We also present evidence that Ac elements that excise from the transforming T-DNA early after transformation continue to be mobile in carrot root cultures. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2832144

  2. Multiple single-stranded cis elements are associated with activated chromatin of the human c-myc gene in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Michelotti, G A; Michelotti, E F; Pullner, A; Duncan, R C; Eick, D; Levens, D

    1996-01-01

    Transcription activation and repression of eukaryotic genes are associated with conformational and topological changes of the DNA and chromatin, altering the spectrum of proteins associated with an active gene. Segments of the human c-myc gene possessing non-B structure in vivo located with enzymatic and chemical probes. Sites hypertensive to cleavage with single-strand-specific S1 nuclease or the single-strand-selective agent potassium permanganate included the major promoters P1 and P2 as well as the far upstream sequence element (FUSE) and CT elements, which bind, respectively, the single-strand-specific factors FUSE-binding protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in vitro. Active and inactive c-myc genes yielded different patterns of S1 nuclease and permanganate sensitivity, indicating alternative chromatin configurations of active and silent genes. The melting of specific cis elements of active c-myc genes in vivo suggested that transcriptionally associated torsional strain might assist strand separation and facilitate factor binding. Therefore, the interaction of FUSE-binding protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K with supercoiled DNA was studied. Remarkably, both proteins recognize their respective elements torsionally strained but not as liner duplexes. Single-strand- or supercoil-dependent gene regulatory proteins may directly link alterations in DNA conformation and topology with changes in gene expression. PMID:8649373

  3. Methods And System Suppressing Clutter In A Gain-Block, Radar-Responsive Tag System

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2006-04-18

    Methods and systems reduce clutter interference in a radar-responsive tag system. A radar transmits a series of linear-frequency-modulated pulses and receives echo pulses from nearby terrain and from radar-responsive tags that may be in the imaged scene. Tags in the vicinity of the radar are activated by the radar's pulses. The tags receive and remodulate the radar pulses. Tag processing reverses the direction, in time, of the received waveform's linear frequency modulation. The tag retransmits the remodulated pulses. The radar uses a reversed-chirp de-ramp pulse to process the tag's echo. The invention applies to radar systems compatible with coherent gain-block tags. The invention provides a marked reduction in the strength of residual clutter echoes on each and every echo pulse received by the radar. SAR receiver processing effectively whitens passive-clutter signatures across the range dimension. Clutter suppression of approximately 14 dB is achievable for a typical radar system.

  4. Alteration of rare earth element distribution as a result of microbial activity and empirical methane injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, D. J.; Davies, N. W.; Thurber, A. R.; Haley, B. A.; Colwell, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    As a result of warming, methane is being released into the marine environment in areas that have not historically experienced methane input. While methane is a potent greenhouse gas, microbial oxidation of methane within the sediment greatly limits the role of marine methane sources on atmospheric forcing. However, in these areas of new methane release, consumption of methane prior to its release into the atmosphere is a result of the response of the microbial community to this new input of methane. Further, rare earth elements (REEs) are not currently thought to be involved with microbial activity, but this assumption has not been rigorously tested. Here we test that: (1) microbial communities will rapidly respond to the onset of methane emission, and (2) the microbial response to this methane input will impact the distribution of REEs within the sediment. Undisturbed cores sampled from a tidal flat at Yaquina Bay, OR, were brought back to a lab and injected with anoxic seawater (as a control) or anoxic sea water saturated with methane gas for a total of 2 weeks. Aerobic methanotrophs proliferated over this short time period, becoming an abundant member of the microbial community as identified using fatty acid biomarkers. Excitingly, the experimental injection of methane also shifted the distribution of REEs within the sediment, a trend that appeared to follow the microbial response and that was different from the control cores. Further, the lightest REEs appeared to be used more than the heavier ones, supporting that the REEs are being actively used by the microbes. While we focused on identifying the response of those microbes responsible in methane-cycling, we also identified how the entire microbial community shifts as a result of methane input, and correlating with shifts in REE distribution. Here we have empirically demonstrated the rapid response of methanotrophs to the onset of methane emission and that REE distribution within the sediment is likely

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Cis-Regulatory Element Activity Using Synthetic Promoters in Transgenic Plants.

    PubMed

    Benn, Geoffrey; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic promoters, introduced stably or transiently into plants, are an invaluable tool for the identification of functional regulatory elements and the corresponding transcription factor(s) that regulate the amplitude, spatial distribution, and temporal patterns of gene expression. Here, we present a protocol describing the steps required to identify and characterize putative cis-regulatory elements. These steps include application of computational tools to identify putative elements, construction of a synthetic promoter upstream of luciferase, identification of transcription factors that regulate the element, testing the functionality of the element introduced transiently and/or stably into the species of interest followed by high-throughput luciferase screening assays, and subsequent data processing and statistical analysis. PMID:27557758

  6. To tag or not to tag: animal welfare, conservation and stakeholder considerations in fish tracking studies that use electronic tags

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Steven J.; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Murchie, Karen J.; Thiem, Jason D.; Donaldson, Michael R.; Hinch, Scott G.; Brown, Richard S.; Fisk, Aaron

    2013-11-01

    The advent and widespread adoption of electronic tags (including biotelemetry and biologging devices) for tracking animals has provided unprecedented information on the biology, management, and conservation of fish in the world’s oceans and inland waters. However, use of these tools is not without controversy. Even when scientific and management objectives may best be achieved using electronic tags, it is increasingly important to further consider other factors such as the welfare of tagged animals (i.e., the role of training and science-based surgical guidelines, anesthetic use, inability to maintain sterile conditions in field environments), the ethics of tagging threatened species vs. using surrogates, stakeholder perspectives on tagging (including aboriginals), as well as use of data emanating from such studies (e.g., by fishers to facilitate exploitation). Failure to do so will have the potential to create conflict and undermine scientific, management and public confidence in the use of this powerful tool. Indeed, there are already a number of examples of where tracking studies using electronic tags have been halted based on concerns raised by researchers, authorities, or stakeholders. Here we present a candid evaluation of several factors that should be considered when determining when to tag or not to tag fish with electronic devices. It is not our objective to judge the merit of previous studies. Rather, we hope to stimulate debate and discussion regarding the use of electronic tags to study fish. Relatedly, there is a need for more research to address these questions (e.g., what level of cleanliness is needed when conducting surgeries, what type of training should be required for fish surgery) including human dimensions studies to understand perspectives of different actors including society as a whole with respect to tagging and tracking studies.

  7. Engineering the ATLAS TAG Browser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhi; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    ELSSI is a web-based event metadata (TAG) browser and event-level selection service for ATLAS. In this paper, we describe some of the challenges encountered in the process of developing ELSSI, and the software engineering strategies adopted to address those challenges. Approaches to management of access to data, browsing, data rendering, query building, query validation, execution, connection management, and communication with auxiliary services are discussed. We also describe strategies for dealing with data that may vary over time, such as run-dependent trigger decision decoding. Along with examples, we illustrate how programming techniques in multiple languages (PHP, JAVASCRIPT, XML, AJAX, and PL/SQL) have been blended to achieve the required results. Finally, we evaluate features of the ELSSI service in terms of functionality, scalability, and performance.

  8. Expressed sequence tags: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, John; Blaxter, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are fragments of mRNA sequences derived through single sequencing reactions performed on randomly selected clones from cDNA libraries. To date, over 45 million ESTs have been generated from over 1400 different species of eukaryotes. For the most part, EST projects are used to either complement existing genome projects or serve as low-cost alternatives for purposes of gene discovery. However, with improvements in accuracy and coverage, they are beginning to find application in fields such as phylogenetics, transcript profiling and proteomics. This volume provides practical details on the generation and analysis of ESTs. Chapters are presented which cover creation of cDNA libraries; generation and processing of sequence data; bioinformatics analysis of ESTs; and their application to phylogenetics and transcript profiling. PMID:19277571

  9. Active Sphagnum girgensohnii Russow Moss Biomonitoring of an Industrial Site in Romania: Temporal Variation in the Elemental Content.

    PubMed

    Culicov, Otilia A; Zinicovscaia, Inga; Duliu, O G

    2016-05-01

    The moss-bag transplant technique was used to investigate the kinetics of the accumulation of 38 elements in Sphagnum girgensohni moss samples in the highly polluted municipality of Baia Mare, Romania. The moss samples collected from the unpolluted Vitosha Mountain Natural Reserve, Bulgaria, were analyzed after 1, 2, 3, and 4 months of exposure, respectively. The ANOVA method was used to assay the statistical significance of the observed changes in elemental content, as determined by neutron activation analysis. The content of Zn, Se, As, Ag, Cd, and Sb increased steadily, while that of physiologically active K and Cl, as well as Rb and Cs, decreased exponentially. The study showed that an adequate application of the moss transplant technique in an urban environment should consider the exposure time as a critical parameter, since particular elements are depleted in the moss at sites with high atmospheric loading of metals. PMID:27003805

  10. Novel digital diffractive tags integrating anti-counterfeiting, tamper-evident, and high-density WORM data storage features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisdur, Enrick; Kress, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    Embossed holographic tags for security and anti-counterfeiting applications are being used by industry since many years. However, such elements are not very effective since the detector is usually the human eye, and provides therefore around 80% effective counterfeiting protection of the tag. We present a novel holographic anticounterfeiting technology which provides 99.999% protection against tag counterfeiting. Horus Technologies develops such holographic tags, which include several layers of increasingly secure optical features, from standard visual holographic patterns and OVIDs (Optical Variable Imaging Devices), to micro-holographic text, down to covert features such as encrypted high resolution holographic 1d, 2d and 3d bar codes. We also demonstrate the potential of providing anti-tamper functionality on the same tag, for packaging security (especially for medical packaging). Finally, we demonstrate that more than 1Mb/square mm of digital data can be stored and encrypted on these same tags. A specific low cost laser based reader is developed to read the various security feature of such hybrid universal holographic tags. We also present a way to change and update the encrypted data in the tag in a similar way to RFID tags. Finally, we show a cost effective technique to replicate these structures in volume by roll-to-toll embossing, and even direct by glass molding within the package itself (bottle, vial, etc,..).

  11. 50 CFR 20.81 - Tagging requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Migratory Bird Preservation Facilities § 20.81 Tagging requirement. No migratory bird preservation facility shall receive or have in custody any migratory game birds unless such birds are tagged as required by § 20.36....

  12. 50 CFR 20.81 - Tagging requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Migratory Bird Preservation Facilities § 20.81 Tagging requirement. No migratory bird preservation facility shall receive or have in custody any migratory game birds unless such birds are tagged as required by § 20.36....

  13. 50 CFR 20.81 - Tagging requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Migratory Bird Preservation Facilities § 20.81 Tagging requirement. No migratory bird preservation facility shall receive or have in custody any migratory game birds unless such birds are tagged as required by § 20.36....

  14. 9 CFR 2.54 - Lost tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lost tags. 2.54 Section 2.54 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Identification of Animals § 2.54 Lost tags. Each dealer or exhibitor shall be...

  15. 9 CFR 2.54 - Lost tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lost tags. 2.54 Section 2.54 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Identification of Animals § 2.54 Lost tags. Each dealer or exhibitor shall be...

  16. A Radio Tag for Big Whales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, William A.

    1978-01-01

    Radio tags to track wildlife have been used for years. However, such tagging of whales has been more complicated and less successful. This article explores the latest technology that is designed to give information over a long period of time. (MA)

  17. 50 CFR 20.81 - Tagging requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Migratory Bird Preservation Facilities § 20.81 Tagging requirement. No migratory bird preservation facility shall receive or have in custody any migratory game birds unless such birds are tagged as required by § 20.36....

  18. 50 CFR 20.81 - Tagging requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Migratory Bird Preservation Facilities § 20.81 Tagging requirement. No migratory bird preservation facility shall receive or have in custody any migratory game birds unless such birds are tagged as required by § 20.36....

  19. Harnessing Collective Knowledge Inherent in Tag Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cress, U.; Held, C.

    2013-01-01

    Tagging systems represent the conceptual knowledge of a community. We experimentally tested whether people harness this collective knowledge when navigating through the Web. As a within-factor we manipulated people's prior knowledge (no knowledge vs. prior knowledge that was congruent/incongruent to the collective knowledge inherent in the tags).…

  20. Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.; Laug, Matthew T.

    1996-01-01

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases.

  1. Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1996-12-17

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases. 4 figs.

  2. Automated Grammatical Tagging of Child Language Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Channell, Ron W.; Johnson, Bonnie W.

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of automated methods of grammatical categorization ("tagging") of transcribed conversational language samples from 30 normally developing children. On a word-by-word basis, automated accuracy levels averaged 95.1%; accuracy of tagging whole utterances averaged 77.7%. Results suggest that further improvement of…

  3. Query-Driven Approach to Face Clustering and Tagging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyan; Wang, Xikui; Kalashnikov, Dmitri V; Mehrotra, Sharad; Ramanan, Deva

    2016-10-01

    In the era of big data, a traditional offline setting to processing image data is simply not tenable. We simply do not have the computational power to process every image with every possible tag; moreover, we will not have the manpower to clean up the potentially noisy results. In this paper, we introduce a query-driven approach to visual tagging, focusing on the application of face tagging and clustering. We integrate active learning with query-driven probabilistic databases. Rather than asking a user to provide manual labels so as to minimize the uncertainty of labels (face tags) across the entire data set, we ask the user to provide labels that minimize the uncertainty of his/her query result (e.g., "How many times did Bob and Jim appear together?"). We use a data-driven Gaussian process model of facial appearance to write the probabilistic estimates of facial identity into a probabilistic database, which can then support inference through query answering. Importantly, the database is augmented with contextual constraints (faces in the same image cannot be the same identity, while faces in the same track must be identical). Experiments on the real-world photo collections demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:27448352

  4. Radionuclide Compositions and Total Activity of Spent MTR-HEU Fuel Elements of the IAN-R1 Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarta, Josè A.; Castiblanco, Luis A.

    2005-05-01

    With cooperation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States, several calculations and tasks related to the waste disposal of spent MTR fuel enriched nominally to 93% were carried out for the conversion of the IAN-R1 Research Reactor from MTR-HEU fuel to TRIGA-LEU fuel. In order to remove the spent MTR-HEU fuel of the core and store it safely a program was established at the Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares y Energìas Alternativas (INEA). This program included training, acquisition of hardware and software, design and construction of a decay pool, transfer of the spent HEU fuel elements into the decay pool and his final transport to Savannah River in United States. In this paper are presented data of activities calculated for each relevant radionuclide present in spent MTR-HEU fuel elements of the IAN-R1 Research Reactor and the total activity. The total activity calculated takes in consideration contributions of fission, activation and actinides products. The data obtained were the base for shielding calculations for the decay pool concerning the storage of spent MTR-HEU fuel elements and the respective dosimetric evaluations in the transferring operations of fuel elements into the decay pool.

  5. Radionuclide Compositions and Total Activity of Spent MTR-HEU Fuel Elements of the IAN-R1 Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sarta, Jose A.; Castiblanco, Luis A

    2005-05-24

    With cooperation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States, several calculations and tasks related to the waste disposal of spent MTR fuel enriched nominally to 93% were carried out for the conversion of the IAN-R1 Research Reactor from MTR-HEU fuel to TRIGA-LEU fuel. In order to remove the spent MTR-HEU fuel of the core and store it safely a program was established at the Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares y Energias Alternativas (INEA). This program included training, acquisition of hardware and software, design and construction of a decay pool, transfer of the spent HEU fuel elements into the decay pool and his final transport to Savannah River in United States. In this paper are presented data of activities calculated for each relevant radionuclide present in spent MTR-HEU fuel elements of the IAN-R1 Research Reactor and the total activity. The total activity calculated takes in consideration contributions of fission, activation and actinides products. The data obtained were the base for shielding calculations for the decay pool concerning the storage of spent MTR-HEU fuel elements and the respective dosimetric evaluations in the transferring operations of fuel elements into the decay pool.

  6. NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS FOR SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN AMBIENT AIR COLLECTED ON GLASS-FIBER FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic with 25 other elements are simultaneously determined in ambient air samples collected on glass-fiber filter composites at 250 United States sites. The instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique combined with the power of a dedicated mini-computer resulted in...

  7. Notes on SAW Tag Interrogation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of interrogating a single SAW RFID tag with a known ID and known range in the presence of multiple interfering tags under the following assumptions: (1) The RF propagation environment is well approximated as a simple delay channel with geometric power-decay constant alpha >/= 2. (2) The interfering tag IDs are unknown but well approximated as independent, identically distributed random samples from a probability distribution of tag ID waveforms with known second-order properties, and the tag of interest is drawn independently from the same distribution. (3) The ranges of the interfering tags are unknown but well approximated as independent, identically distributed realizations of a random variable rho with a known probability distribution f(sub rho) , and the tag ranges are independent of the tag ID waveforms. In particular, we model the tag waveforms as random impulse responses from a wide-sense-stationary, uncorrelated-scattering (WSSUS) fading channel with known bandwidth and scattering function. A brief discussion of the properties of such channels and the notation used to describe them in this document is given in the Appendix. Under these assumptions, we derive the expression for the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for an arbitrary combination of transmitted interrogation signal and linear receiver filter. Based on this expression, we derive the optimal interrogator configuration (i.e., transmitted signal/receiver filter combination) in the two extreme noise/interference regimes, i.e., noise-limited and interference-limited, under the additional assumption that the coherence bandwidth of the tags is much smaller than the total tag bandwidth. Finally, we evaluate the performance of both optimal interrogators over a broad range of operating scenarios using both numerical simulation based on the assumed model and Monte Carlo simulation based on a small sample of measured tag waveforms. The performance evaluation results not only

  8. Atranorin and lecanoric acid antagonize TCDD-induced xenobiotic response element-driven activity, but not xenobiotic response element-independent activity.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ken-Ichi; Tanabe, Hiroki; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that consist of fungi and photosynthetic symbionts (algae and/or cyanobacteria). Previous studies of their constituents suggested lichens produce many kinds of aromatic secondary metabolites, such as depsides, quinones, and dibenzofurans. In this study, we evaluated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) antagonistic activity of 17 lichen substances and demonstrated that atranorin (1) and lecanoric acid (2), isolated from Parmotrema tinctorum Hale, showed an inhibitory effect on luciferase activity increased by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), using an XRE-driven pX4TK-Luc reporter gene assay. In addition, CYP1A1 mRNA and protein levels increased by TCDD were also suppressed by 1 and 2. Conversely, neither 1 nor 2 antagonized the suppressive effect of TCDD on interleukin (IL)-1β-induced acute-phase response (APR) gene expression. Thus, we concluded that 1 and 2 were selective AhR modulators that antagonize XRE-dependent activity, but not XRE-independent activity. However, 1 has different characteristics to 2 in that 1 alone showed a suppressive effect on IL-1β-induced APR gene expression in a similar fashion to TCDD. PMID:26979434

  9. Connecting Mechanics and Bone Cell Activities in the Bone Remodeling Process: An Integrated Finite Element Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain–damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.’s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone

  10. EEG source analysis of epileptiform activity using a 1mm anisotropic hexahedra finite element head model

    PubMed Central

    Rullmann, M.; Anwander, A.; Dannhauer, M.; Warfield, S.K.; Duffy, F.H.; Wolters, C.H.

    2009-01-01

    The major goal of the evaluation in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis for medically intractable patients is the precise reconstruction of the epileptogenic foci, preferably with non-invasive methods. This paper evaluates whether surface electroencephalography (EEG) source analysis based on a 1mm anisotropic finite element (FE) head model can provide additional guidance for presurgical epilepsy diagnosis and whether it is practically feasible in daily routine. A 1mm hexahedra FE volume conductor model of the patient’s head with special focus on accurately modeling the compartments skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the anisotropic conducting brain tissues was constructed using non-linearly co-registered T1-, T2- and diffusion-tensor- magnetic resonance imaging data. The electrodes of intra-cranial EEG (iEEG) measurements were extracted from a co-registered computed tomography image. Goal function scan (GFS), minimum norm least squares (MNLS), standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) and spatio-temporal current dipole modeling inverse methods were then applied to the peak of the averaged ictal discharges EEG data. MNLS and sLORETA pointed to a single center of activity. Moving and rotating single dipole fits resulted in an explained variance of more than 97%. The non-invasive EEG source analysis methods localized at the border of the lesion and at the border of the iEEG electrodes which mainly received ictal discharges. Source orientation was towards the epileptogenic tissue. For the reconstructed superficial source, brain conductivity anisotropy and the lesion conductivity had only a minor influence, whereas a correct modeling of the highly conducting CSF compartment and the anisotropic skull was found to be important. The proposed FE forward modeling approach strongly simplifies meshing and reduces run-time (37 Milliseconds for one forward computation in the model with 3.1 Million unknowns), corroborating the practical feasibility of the

  11. Intrinsic-surface-tag image authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, R.G.; DeVolpi, A.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this work is to further the development of a unique treaty limited item (TLI) intrinsic surface tag for arms control applications. This tag`s unique feature is the ability to capture the sub-micron scale topography of the TLI surface. The surface topography is captured by plastic castings of the surface as digitally imaged by an electron microscope. Tag authentication is accomplished by comparing digital castings images obtained in two different inspections. Surface replication experiments are described, as these experiments from the basis for the authentication algorithm. Both the experiments and the authentication algorithm are analyzed using the modulation transfer function. Recommendations for future improvements in tag authentication are also suggested by the modulation transfer function analysis. 4 refs.

  12. A Monoclonal Antibody That Discriminates Between SNAP-Tagged and CLIP-Tagged Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bialon, Magdalena; Grezella, Clara; Friesen, Ludmila; Sieben, Thorsten; Pham, Anh-Tuan; Fischer, Rainer; Barth, Stefan; Püttmann, Christiane; Stein, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    SNAP-tag technology allows recombinant proteins to be covalently labeled to O(6)-benzylguanine (BG)-modified substrates with 1:1 stoichiometry. By attaching according fluorophores, this method is ideally suited for in vitro and in vivo imaging, as well as protein interaction analyses. Fluorophores modified with BG react with the SNAP-tag, whereas those modified with O(2)-benzylcytosine (BC) conjugate to a more recent derivative known as the CLIP-tag. The orthogonal substrate specificity of the SNAP- and CLIP-tags extends the range of applications by allowing double labeling. We previously developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognizes both tags. In this study, we describe a new mAb, which is specific for the SNAP-tag alone. Therefore, this mAb allows discrimination between SNAP- and CLIP-tags within a broad range of immunological methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, western blotting, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry. PMID:27187007

  13. Activation of antioxidant response element in mouse primary cortical cultures with sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Tanacetum parthenium

    PubMed Central

    Fischedick, Justin T; Standiford, Miranda; Johnson, Delinda A.; De Vos, Ric C.H.; Todorović, Slađana; Banjanac, Tijana; Verpoorte, Rob; Johnson, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Tanacetum parthenium (Asteraceae) produces biologically active sesquiterpene lactones (SL). Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to activate a series of genes termed the antioxidant response element (ARE). Activation of the Nrf2/ARE may be useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. In this study we isolated 11 sesquiterpene lactones from T. parthenium with centrifugal partition chromatography and semi-preparative HPLC. Compounds were screened in-vitro for their ability to activate the ARE on primary mouse cortical cultures as well as for their toxicity towards the cultures. All sesquiterpene lactones containing the α-methylene-γ-lactone moiety were able to activate the ARE although a number of compounds displayed significant cellular toxicity towards the cultures. The structure activity relationship of the sesquiterpene lactones indicate that the guaianolides isolated were more active and less toxic then the germacranolides. PMID:22923197

  14. Analysis of common bean expressed sequence tags identifies sulfur metabolic pathways active in seed and sulfur-rich proteins highly expressed in the absence of phaseolin and major lectins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is associated with a near doubling of sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), particularly cysteine, elevated by 70%, and methionine, elevated by 10%. This mostly takes place at the expense of an abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methyl-cysteine. The deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is mainly compensated by increased levels of the 11S globulin legumin and residual lectins. Legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were previously identified as contributing to the increased sulfur amino acid content in the mutant line, on the basis of similarity to proteins from other legumes. Results Profiling of free amino acid in developing seeds of the BAT93 reference genotype revealed a biphasic accumulation of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine, the main soluble form of S-methyl-cysteine, with a lag phase occurring during storage protein accumulation. A collection of 30,147 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was generated from four developmental stages, corresponding to distinct phases of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine accumulation, and covering the transitions to reserve accumulation and dessication. Analysis of gene ontology categories indicated the occurrence of multiple sulfur metabolic pathways, including all enzymatic activities responsible for sulfate assimilation, de novo cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. Integration of genomic and proteomic data enabled the identification and isolation of cDNAs coding for legumin, albumin-2, defensin D1 and albumin-1A and -B induced in the absence of phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin. Their deduced amino acid sequences have a higher content of cysteine than methionine, providing an explanation for the preferential increase of cysteine in the mutant line. Conclusion The EST collection provides a foundation to further investigate sulfur metabolism and the differential accumulation of sulfur amino acids in seed

  15. A CMOS Pressure Sensor Tag Chip for Passive Wireless Applications

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Zuo, Lei; Wu, Xiang; Fu, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel monolithic pressure sensor tag for passive wireless applications. The proposed pressure sensor tag is based on an ultra-high frequency RFID system. The pressure sensor element is implemented in the 0.18 µm CMOS process and the membrane gap is formed by sacrificial layer release, resulting in a sensitivity of 1.2 fF/kPa within the range from 0 to 600 kPa. A three-stage rectifier adopts a chain of auxiliary floating rectifier cells to boost the gate voltage of the switching transistors, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 53% at the low input power of −20 dBm. The capacitive sensor interface, using phase-locked loop archietcture, employs fully-digital blocks, which results in a 7.4 bits resolution and 0.8 µW power dissipation at 0.8 V supply voltage. The proposed passive wireless pressure sensor tag costs a total 3.2 µW power dissipation. PMID:25806868

  16. A CMOS pressure sensor tag chip for passive wireless applications.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Zuo, Lei; Wu, Xiang; Fu, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel monolithic pressure sensor tag for passive wireless applications. The proposed pressure sensor tag is based on an ultra-high frequency RFID system. The pressure sensor element is implemented in the 0.18 µm CMOS process and the membrane gap is formed by sacrificial layer release, resulting in a sensitivity of 1.2 fF/kPa within the range from 0 to 600 kPa. A three-stage rectifier adopts a chain of auxiliary floating rectifier cells to boost the gate voltage of the switching transistors, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 53% at the low input power of -20 dBm. The capacitive sensor interface, using phase-locked loop archietcture, employs fully-digital blocks, which results in a 7.4 bits resolution and 0.8 µW power dissipation at 0.8 V supply voltage. The proposed passive wireless pressure sensor tag costs a total 3.2 µW power dissipation. PMID:25806868

  17. Radiopaque Tagging Masks Caries Lesions following Incomplete Excavation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Meyer-Lueckel, H; Schulz, M; Dörfer, C E; Paris, S

    2014-06-01

    One-step incomplete excavation seals caries-affected dentin under a restoration and appears to be advantageous in the treatment of deep lesions. However, it is impossible to discriminate radiographically between intentionally left, arrested lesions and overlooked or active lesions. This diagnostic uncertainty decreases the acceptance of minimally invasive excavation and might lead to unnecessary re-treatment of incompletely excavated teeth. Radiopaque tagging of sealed lesions might mask arrested lesions and assist in discrimination from progressing lesions. Therefore, we microradiographically screened 4 substances (SnCl2, AgNO3, CsF, CsCH3COO) for their effect on artificial lesions. Since water-dissolved tin chloride (SnCl2×Aq) was found to stably mask artificial lesions, we then investigated its radiographic effects on progressing lesions. Natural lesions were incompletely excavated and radiopaque tagging performed. Grey-value differences (△GV) between sound and carious dentin were determined and radiographs assessed by 20 dentists. While radiographic effects of SnCl2×Aq were stable for non-progressing lesions, they significantly decreased during a second demineralization (p < .001, t test). For natural lesions, tagging with SnCl2×Aq significantly reduced △GV (p < .001, Wilcoxon). Tagged lesions were detected significantly less often than untagged lesions (p < .001). SnCl2×Aq was suitable to mask caries-affected dentin and discriminate between arrested and progressing lesions in vitro. Radiopaque tagging could resolve diagnostic uncertainties associated with incomplete excavation. PMID:24718110

  18. Photon Activation Analysis Of Light Elements Using 'Non-Gamma' Radiation Spectroscopy - The Instrumental Determination Of Phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Christian; Goerner, Wolf

    2011-06-01

    Unlike metal determinations the analysis of light elements (e.g., carbon, oxygen, phosphorus) is frequently problematic, in particular if analysed instrumentally. In photon activation analysis (PAA) the respective activation products do not emit gamma radiation in the most cases. Usually, annihilation quanta counting and subsequent decay curve analysis have been used for determinations of C, N, O, and F. However, radiochemical separation of the respective radioisotopes mostly is indispensable. For several reasons, some of the light elements cannot be analysed following this procedure, e.g. phosphorus. In this contribution the instrumental PAA of phosphorus in organic matrix by activation with bremsstrahlung of an electron linear accelerator and subsequent beta spectroscopy is described. The accuracy of the results was excellent as obtained by analysis of a BCR Reference Material.

  19. Evaluation of antioxidant activity, polyphenolic compounds, amino acids and mineral elements of representative genotypes of Lonicera edulis.

    PubMed

    Sochor, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde; Pohanka, Miroslav; Skutkova, Helena; Baron, Mojmir; Tomaskova, Lenka; Balla, Stefan; Klejdus, Borivoj; Pokluda, Robert; Mlcek, Jiri; Trojakova, Zuzana; Saloun, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioactive substances in 19 berry cultivars of edible honeysuckle (Lonicera edulis). A statistical evaluation was used to determine the relationship between the content of selected bioactive substances and individual cultivars. Regarding mineral elements, the content of sodium was measured using potentiometry and spectrophotometry. The content of selected polyphenolic compounds with high antioxidant activity was determined by a HPLC-UV/ED method. The total amount of polyphenols was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. The antioxidant activity was determined using five methods (DPPH, FRAP, ABTS, FR and DMPD) that differ in their principles. The content of 13 amino acids was determined by ion-exchange chromatography. The experimental results obtained for the different cultivars were evaluated and compared by statistical and bioinformatic methods. A unique feature of this study lies in the exhaustive analysis of the chosen parameters (amino acids, mineral elements, polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activity) during one growing season. PMID:24853714

  20. Elemental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a learning module integrating three disciplines--physics, chemistry, and biology--and based on four elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and silicon. Includes atomic model and silicon-based life activities. (YDS)

  1. Activation of IFN-beta element by IRF-1 requires a posttranslational event in addition to IRF-1 synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, N; Sakakibara, J; Hovanessian, A G; Taniguchi, T; Fujita, T

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the Type I IFN (i.e., IFN-alpha s and IFN-beta) genes is efficiently induced by viruses at the transcriptional level. This induction is mediated by at least two types of positive regulatory elements located in the human IFN-beta gene promoter: (1) the repeated elements which bind both the transcriptional activator IRF-1 and the repressor IRF-2 (IRF-elements; IRF-Es), and (2) the kappa B element (kappa B-E), which binds NF kappa B and is located between the IRF-Es and the TATA box. In this study we demonstrate that a promoter containing synthetic IRF-E, which displays high affinity for the IRFs can be efficiently activated by Newcastle disease virus (NDV). In contrast, such activation was either very weak or nil when cells were treated by IFN-beta or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), despite the fact they both efficiently induce de novo synthesis of the short-lived IRF-1 in L929 cells. In fact, efficient activation of the IRF-E apparently requires an event in addition to de novo IRF-1 induction, which can be elicited by NDV even in the presence of protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. Moreover, efficient activation of the IRF-E by NDV is specifically inhibited by the protein kinase inhibitor, Staurosporin. Hence our results suggest the importance of IRF-1 synthesis and post-translational modification event(s), possibly phosphorylation for the efficient activation of IRF-Es, which are otherwise under negative regulation by IRF-2. Images PMID:1886766

  2. Effects of acoustic tag implantation on lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens: lack of evidence for changes in behavior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hondorp, Darryl W.; Holbrook, Christopher; Krueger, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    An assumption of studies using acoustic telemetry is that surgical implantation of acoustic transmitters or tags does not alter behavior of tagged individuals. Evaluating the validity of this assumption can be difficult for large fish, such as adult sturgeons, not amenable to controlled laboratory experimentation. The purpose of this study was to determine if and when this assumption was valid for adult lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens tagged with large (34 g) acoustic transmitters and released into the St. Clair River during 2011–2014. The hypothesis that activity and reach-scale distributions of tagged and untagged lake sturgeon did not differ was tested by comparing movement frequencies, movement rates (speed-over-ground), and location-specific detection probabilities between newly-tagged lake sturgeon and presumably fully-recovered conspecifics tagged and released in prior years.

  3. Tags and seals for arms control verification

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1990-09-18

    Tags and seals have long been recognized as important tools in arms control. The trend in control of armaments is to limit militarily significant equipment that is capable of being verified through direct and cooperative means, chiefly on-site inspection or monitoring. Although this paper will focus on the CFE treaty, the role of tags and seals for other treaties will also be addressed. Published technology and concepts will be reviewed, based on open sources. Arms control verification tags are defined as unique identifiers designed to be tamper-revealing; in that respect, seals are similar, being used as indicators of unauthorized access. Tamper-revealing tags might be considered as single-point markers, seals as two-point couplings, and nets as volume containment. The functions of an arms control tag can be considered to be two-fold: to provide field verification of the identity of a treaty-limited item (TLI), and to have a means of authentication of the tag and its tamper-revealing features. Authentication could take place in the field or be completed elsewhere. For CFE, the goal of tags and seals can be to reduce the overall cost of the entire verification system.

  4. Protein Name Tagging Guidelines: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhangzhi; Jang, Seok Bae; Samuel, Ken; Krause, Matthew; Phillips, Jon; Wu, Cathy H.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in information extraction from the biomedical literature is motivated by the need to speed up the creation of structured databases representing the latest scientific knowledge about specific objects, such as proteins and genes. This paper addresses the issue of a lack of standard definition of the problem of protein name tagging. We describe the lessons learned in developing a set of guidelines and present the first set of inter-coder results, viewed as an upper bound on system performance. Problems coders face include: (a) the ambiguity of names that can refer to either genes or proteins; (b) the difficulty of getting the exact extents of long protein names; and (c) the complexity of the guidelines. These problems have been addressed in two ways: (a) defining the tagging targets as protein named entities used in the literature to describe proteins or protein-associated or -related objects, such as domains, pathways, expression or genes, and (b) using two types of tags, protein tags and long-form tags, with the latter being used to optionally extend the boundaries of the protein tag when the name boundary is difficult to determine. Inter-coder consistency across three annotators on protein tags on 300 MEDLINE abstracts is 0.868 F-measure. The guidelines and annotated datasets, along with automatic tools, are available for research use. PMID:18629297

  5. Enhanced UHF RFID tags for drug tracing.

    PubMed

    Catarinucci, Luca; Colella, Riccardo; De Blasi, Mario; Patrono, Luigi; Tarricone, Luciano

    2012-12-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology is playing a crucial role for item-level tracing systems in healthcare scenarios. The pharmaceutical supply chain is a fascinating application context, where RFID can guarantee transparency in the drug flow, supporting both suppliers and consumers against the growing counterfeiting problem. In such a context, the choice of the most adequate RFID tag, in terms of shape, frequency, size and reading range, is crucial. The potential presence of items containing materials hostile to the electromagnetic propagation exasperates the problem. In addition, the peculiarities of the different RFID-based checkpoints make even more stringent the requirements for the tag. In this work, the performance of several commercial UHF RFID tags in each step of the pharmaceutical supply chain has been evaluated, confirming the expected criticality. On such basis, a guideline for the electromagnetic design of new high-performance tags capable to overcome such criticalities has been defined. Finally, driven by such guidelines, a new enhanced tag has been designed, realized and tested. Due to patent pending issues, the antenna shape is not shown. Nevertheless, the optimal obtained results do not lose their validity. Indeed, on the one hand they demonstrate that high performance item level tracing systems can actually be implemented also in critical operating conditions. On the other hand, they encourage the tag designer to follow the identified guidelines so to realize enhanced UHF tags. PMID:22048779

  6. Communication methods, systems, apparatus, and devices involving RF tag registration

    DOEpatents

    Burghard, Brion J.; Skorpik, James R.

    2008-04-22

    One technique of the present invention includes a number of Radio Frequency (RF) tags that each have a different identifier. Information is broadcast to the tags from an RF tag interrogator. This information corresponds to a maximum quantity of tag response time slots that are available. This maximum quantity may be less than the total number of tags. The tags each select one of the time slots as a function of the information and a random number provided by each respective tag. The different identifiers are transmitted to the interrogator from at least a subset of the RF tags.

  7. The level of selenium and some other trace elements in different Libyan arable soils using instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    El-Ghawi, U M; Al-Fakhri, S M; Al-Sadeq, A A; Bejey, M M; Doubali, K K

    2007-10-01

    Elemental analysis of soils from two different arable regions in Libya was carried out to measure the level of many trace elements. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used for the determination of 10 elements, viz., (Ba, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Sc, Se, Th, and Zn), using their long-lived radionuclides. The accuracy of the measurements has been evaluated by analyzing two IAEA soil reference materials: IAEA Soil-7 and IAEA leak sediment SL-1; precision has been estimated by triplicate analysis of the sample and that of the reference material. Irradiations were carried out at the Tajura Research Center reactor, at 5-MW power level. It is clear that in the Libyan soil selenium concentration is somewhat lower than in other countries. The results show that trace metal concentrations in Libyan clay surface soil are higher than the sandy soil. PMID:17914223

  8. Expert system for identification of simultaneous and sequential reactor fuel failures with gas tagging

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.

    1994-01-01

    Failure of a fuel element in a nuclear reactor core is determined by a gas tagging failure detection system and method. Failures are catalogued and characterized after the event so that samples of the reactor's cover gas are taken at regular intervals and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Employing a first set of systematic heuristic rules which are applied in a transformed node space allows the number of node combinations which must be processed within a barycentric algorithm to be substantially reduced. A second set of heuristic rules treats the tag nodes of the most recent one or two leakers as "background" gases, further reducing the number of trial node combinations. Lastly, a "fuzzy" set theory formalism minimizes experimental uncertainties in the identification of the most likely volumes of tag gases. This approach allows for the identification of virtually any number of sequential leaks and up to five simultaneous gas leaks from fuel elements.

  9. Expert system for identification of simultaneous and sequential reactor fuel failures with gas tagging

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.

    1994-07-26

    Failure of a fuel element in a nuclear reactor core is determined by a gas tagging failure detection system and method. Failures are catalogued and characterized after the event so that samples of the reactor's cover gas are taken at regular intervals and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Employing a first set of systematic heuristic rules which are applied in a transformed node space allows the number of node combinations which must be processed within a barycentric algorithm to be substantially reduced. A second set of heuristic rules treats the tag nodes of the most recent one or two leakers as background'' gases, further reducing the number of trial node combinations. Lastly, a fuzzy'' set theory formalism minimizes experimental uncertainties in the identification of the most likely volumes of tag gases. This approach allows for the identification of virtually any number of sequential leaks and up to five simultaneous gas leaks from fuel elements. 14 figs.

  10. Tag retention, growth, and survival of red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii marked with coded wire tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isely, J.J.; Eversole, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    Juvenile red swamp crayfish (or crawfish), Procambarus clarkii (20-41 mm in total length) were collected from a crayfish culture pond by dipnetting and tagged with sequentially numbered, standard length, binary-coded wire tags. Four replicates of 50 crayfish were impaled perpendicular to the long axis of the abdomen with a fixed needle. Tags were injected transversely into the ventral surface of the first or second abdominal segment and were imbedded in the musculature just beneath the abdominal sternum. Tags were visible upon inspection. Additionally, two replicates of 50 crayfish were not tagged and were used as controls. Growth, survival, and tag retention were evaluated after 7 d in individual containers, after 100 d in aquaria, and after 200 d in field cages. Tag retention during each sample period was 100%, and average mortality of tagged crayfish within 7 d of tagging was 1%. Mortality during the remainder of the study was high (75-91%) but was similar between treatment and control samples. Most of the deaths were probably due to cannibalism. Average total length increased threefold during the course of the study, and crayfish reached maturity. Because crayfish were mature by the end of the study, we concluded that the coded wire tag was retained through the life history of the crayfish.

  11. Determination of thorium and other select trace elements in human tissues by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, S.E.; Grimm, C.A.; Filby, R.H.

    1997-12-01

    Iyengar pointed out the significance of multidisciplinary approaches to biological trace element research and the problems that may be associated with much of the early trace element data (until the early 1970s). Problems identified included the analysis of spurious samples (e.g., hair) based on their availability with no consideration of the biological basis for the investigations and the uncontrolled collection of biological samples by investigators unable to assess the biological integrity of the sample and inadequate quality assurance/quality control. A significant inadequacy is that many trace element analysis studies have been performed on biopsies or samples that may not be representative of the whole organ, or that distribution data have been derived from pooled analyses of organs from many individuals.

  12. Tagging Water Sources in Atmospheric Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, M.

    2003-01-01

    Tagging of water sources in atmospheric models allows for quantitative diagnostics of how water is transported from its source region to its sink region. In this presentation, we review how this methodology is applied to global atmospheric models. We will present several applications of the methodology. In one example, the regional sources of water for the North American Monsoon system are evaluated by tagging the surface evaporation. In another example, the tagged water is used to quantify the global water cycling rate and residence time. We will also discuss the need for more research and the importance of these diagnostics in water cycle studies.

  13. Behavior Analysis Based on Coordinates of Body Tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luštrek, Mitja; Kaluža, Boštjan; Dovgan, Erik; Pogorelc, Bogdan; Gams, Matjaž

    This paper describes fall detection, activity recognition and the detection of anomalous gait in the Confidence project. The project aims to prolong the independence of the elderly by detecting falls and other types of behavior indicating a health problem. The behavior will be analyzed based on the coordinates of tags worn on the body. The coordinates will be detected with radio sensors. We describe two Confidence modules. The first one classifies the user's activity into one of six classes, including falling. The second one detects walking anomalies, such as limping, dizziness and hemiplegia. The walking analysis can automatically adapt to each person by using only the examples of normal walking of that person. Both modules employ machine learning: the paper focuses on the features they use and the effect of tag placement and sensor noise on the classification accuracy. Four tags were enough for activity recognition accuracy of over 93% at moderate sensor noise, while six were needed to detect walking anomalies with the accuracy of over 90%.

  14. A piezolaminated composite degenerated shell finite element for active control of structures with distributed piezosensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, V.; Narayanan, S.

    2008-06-01

    potential difference between the top and bottom surfaces of the piezoelectric layer. Few case studies of composite general shells with piezoelectric sensors and actuators have been considered by modeling them with the above elements and the active vibration control performance has been studied using linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control.

  15. Elemental analysis of granite by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF).

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A

    2012-01-01

    The instrumental neutron activation analysis technique (INAA) was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of granite samples collected from four locations in the Aswan area in South Egypt. The samples were prepared together with their standards and simultaneously irradiated in a neutron flux of 7×10(11)n/cm(2)s in the TRIGA Mainz research reactor. Gamma-ray spectra from an hyper-pure germanium detector were analyzed. The present study provides the basic data of elemental concentrations of granite rocks. The following elements have been determined Na, Mg, K, Fe, Mn, Sc, Cr, Ti, Co, Zn, Ga, Rb, Zr, Nb, Sn, Ba, Cs, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, Th and U. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was used for comparison and to detect elements, which can be detected only by XRF such as F, S, Cl, Co, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se and V. The data presented here are our contribution to understanding the elemental composition of the granite rocks. Because there are no existing databases for the elemental analysis of granite, our results are a start to establishing a database for the Egyptian granite. It is hoped that the data presented here will be useful to those dealing with geochemistry, granite chemistry and related fields. PMID:21992845

  16. Compartmentalization of trace elements in guinea pig tissues by INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis) and AAS (atomic absorption spectroscopy)

    SciTech Connect

    Chatt, A.; Holzbecher, J.; Katz, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Human scalp hair analysis has received considerable attention from a variety of disciplines over the last 20 yr or so. Trace element levels of hair have been used in environmental, epidemiological, forensic, nutritional, predictive, and preventive medicine studies. There still exist confusion, skepticism, and controversy, however, among the experts as well as lay persons in the interpretation of hair trace element data. Much of the criticism stems from the lack of quantitative and reliable data on the ability of hair to accurately reflect dose-response relationships. To better define the significance or hair trace element levels (under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency), the authors have undertaken a controlled set of animal experiments in which trace element levels in hair and other tissues have been measured after a mild state of systemic intoxication by chronic, low-does exposure to cadmium and selenium. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) methods have been developed for the determination of several elements with a high degree of precision and accuracy.

  17. Characterization of a putative cis-regulatory element that controls transcriptional activity of the pig uroplakin II gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Mi-Ryung; Park, Jong-Yi; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Oh, Jae-Wook; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} The sequences of -604 to -84 bp of the pUPII promoter contained the region of a putative negative cis-regulatory element. {yields} The core promoter was located in the 5F-1. {yields} Transcription factor HNF4 can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. {yields} These features of the pUPII promoter are fundamental to development of a target-specific vector. -- Abstract: Uroplakin II (UPII) is a one of the integral membrane proteins synthesized as a major differentiation product of mammalian urothelium. UPII gene expression is bladder specific and differentiation dependent, but little is known about its transcription response elements and molecular mechanism. To identify the cis-regulatory elements in the pig UPII (pUPII) gene promoter region, we constructed pUPII 5' upstream region deletion mutants and demonstrated that each of the deletion mutants participates in controlling the expression of the pUPII gene in human bladder carcinoma RT4 cells. We also identified a new core promoter region and putative negative cis-regulatory element within a minimal promoter region. In addition, we showed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter (5F-1) region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. Transient cotransfection experiments showed that HNF4 positively regulates pUPII gene promoter activity. Thus, the binding element and its binding protein, HNF4 transcription factor, may be involved in the mechanism that specifically regulates pUPII gene transcription.

  18. [Neutron activation analysis of human hair--multivariate analysis of factors influencing on trace element contents in hair-- (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Imahori, A; Fukushima, I

    1980-06-01

    As a part of IAEA research project, "Activation analysis of hair as an indicator of contamination of man by environmental trace element pollutants", a survey was carried out to elucidate the levels of various trace element concentrations in hair of local population in the Tokyo Metropolitan areas, by applying instrumental neutron activation analysis. A total of 202 scalp hair samples were collected from the inhabitants classified by sex and five age classes. Irradiation was made in the Rikkyo University 100 kW TRIGA MARK-II reactor. Using several combinations of irradiation time, cooling time and counting time, forty elements were determined. The relationship between several trace element contents in hair and such factors as sex, age class, hair treatment, smoking habit and dental treatment, was analyzed by using the method of multiple regression. It was shown that (1) Hair treatment had a predominant effect on the contents of bromine, magnesium and calcium in hair, (2) Aging and smoking contributed increasing mercury content in hair, and hair treatment acted reversely. PMID:7208973

  19. Immobilization of proteins onto microbeads using a DNA binding tag for enzymatic assays.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Takaaki; Mizoguchi, Takuro; Ota, Eri; Hata, Jumpei; Homma, Keisuke; Zhu, Bo; Hitomi, Kiyotaka; Nakano, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    A novel DNA-binding protein tag, scCro-tag, which is a single-chain derivative of the bacteriophage lambda Cro repressor, has been developed to immobilize proteins of interest (POI) on a solid support through binding OR consensus DNA (ORC) that is tightly bound by the scCro protein. The scCro-tag successfully bound a transglutaminase 2 (TGase 2) substrate and manganese peroxidase (MnP) to microbeads via scaffolding DNA. The resulting protein-coated microbeads can be utilized for functional analysis of the enzymatic activity using flow cytometry. The quantity of bead-bound proteins can be enhanced by increasing the number of ORCs. In addition, proteins with the scCro-tag that were synthesized using a cell-free protein synthesis system were also immobilized onto the beads, thus indicating that this bead-based system would be applicable to high-throughput analysis of various enzymatic activities. PMID:26522987

  20. Method of remote powering and detecting multiple UWB passive tags in an RFID system

    SciTech Connect

    Dowla, Farid U.; Nekoogar, Faranak; Benzel, David M.; Dallum, Gregory E.; Spiridon, Alex

    2012-05-29

    A new Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), tracking, powering apparatus/system and method using coded Ultra-wideband (UWB) signaling is introduced. The proposed hardware and techniques disclosed herein utilize a plurality of passive UWB transponders in a field of an RFID-radar system. The radar system itself enables multiple passive tags to be remotely powered (activated) at about the same time frame via predetermined frequency UWB pulsed formats. Once such tags are in an activated state, an UWB radar transmits specific "interrogating codes" to put predetermined tags in an awakened status. Such predetermined tags can then communicate by a unique "response code" so as to be detected by an UWB system using radar methods.

  1. A protein tagging system for signal amplification in gene expression and fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Qi, Lei S.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Signals in many biological processes can be amplified by recruiting multiple copies of regulatory proteins to a site of action. Harnessing this principle, we have developed a novel protein scaffold, a repeating peptide array termed SunTag, which can recruit multiple copies of an antibody-fusion protein. We show that the SunTag can recruit up to 24 copies of GFP, thereby enabling long-term imaging of single protein molecules in living cells. We also use the SunTag to create a potent synthetic transcription factor by recruiting multiple copies of a transcriptional activation domain to a nuclease-deficient CRISPR/Cas9 protein and demonstrate strong activation of endogenous gene expression and re-engineered cell behavior with this system. Thus, the SunTag provides a versatile platform for multimerizing proteins on a target protein scaffold and is likely to have many applications in imaging and in controlling biological outputs. PMID:25307933

  2. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the “AGIA” tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10−9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  3. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the "AGIA" tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10-9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  4. ABI4 Activates DGAT1 Expression in Arabidopsis Seedlings during Nitrogen Deficiency1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Yu, Xiangchun; Song, Lianfen; An, Chengcai

    2011-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) is the major seed storage lipid and is important for biofuel and other renewable chemical uses. Acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 (DGAT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the TAG biosynthesis pathway, but the mechanism of its regulation is unknown. Here, we show that TAG accumulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings increased significantly during nitrogen deprivation (0.1 mm nitrogen) with concomitant induction of genes involved in TAG biosynthesis and accumulation, such as DGAT1 and OLEOSIN1. Nitrogen-deficient seedlings were used to determine the key factors contributing to ectopic TAG accumulation in vegetative tissues. Under low-nitrogen conditions, the phytohormone abscisic acid plays a crucial role in promoting TAG accumulation in Arabidopsis seedlings. Yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE4 (ABI4), an important transcriptional factor in the abscisic acid signaling pathway, bound directly to the CE1-like elements (CACCG) present in DGAT1 promoters. Genetic studies also revealed that TAG accumulation and DGAT1 expression were reduced in the abi4 mutant. Taken together, our results indicate that abscisic acid signaling is part of the regulatory machinery governing TAG ectopic accumulation and that ABI4 is essential for the activation of DGAT1 in Arabidopsis seedlings during nitrogen deficiency. PMID:21515696

  5. Identification and characterization of the first active endogenous transposable element in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], W4 is one of the loci that control anthocyanin biosynthesis in flowers and hypocotyls. A putative transposable element was suggested to reside within or adjacent to this locus in the mutable T322 line resulting in the w4-m allele. We have shown that the W4 locu...

  6. Controls on Fe(II)-Activated Trace Element Release from Goethite and Hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2012-03-26

    Electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxides induces surface growth and dissolution that affects trace element fate and transport. We have recently demonstrated Ni(II) cycling through goethite and hematite (adsorbed Ni incorporates into the mineral structure and preincorporated Ni releases to solution) during Fe(II)-Fe(III) ETAE. However, the chemical parameters affecting net trace element release remain unknown. Here, we examine the chemical controls on Ni(II) and Zn(II) release from Ni- and Zn-substituted goethite and hematite during reaction with Fe(II). Release follows a rate law consistent with surface reaction limited mineral dissolution and suggests that release occurs near sites of Fe(III) reductive dissolution during Fe(II)-Fe(III) ETAE. Metal substituent type affects reactivity; Zn release is more pronounced from hematite than goethite, whereas the opposite trend occurs for Ni. Buildup of Ni or Zn in solution inhibits further release but this resumes upon fluid exchange, suggesting that sustained release is possible under flow conditions. Mineral and aqueous Fe(II) concentrations as well as pH strongly affect sorbed Fe(II) concentrations, which directly control the reaction rates and final metal concentrations. Our results demonstrate that structurally incorporated trace elements are mobilized from iron oxides into fluids without abiotic or microbial net iron reduction. Such release may affect micronutrient availability, contaminant transport, and the distribution of redox-inactive trace elements in natural and engineered systems.

  7. Interplanetary dust - Trace element analysis of individual particles by neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although micrometeorites of cometary origin are thought to be the dominant component of interplanetary dust, it has never been possible to positively identify such micrometer-sized particles. Two such particles have been identified as definitely micrometeorites since their abundances of volatile and nonvolatile trace elements closely match those of primitive solar system material.

  8. The hobo transposable element has transposase-dependent and -independent excision activity in drosophilid species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mobility of the hobo transposable element was determined for several strains of Drosophila melanogaster and several Drosophila species. Mobility was assessed by use of an in vivo transient assay in the soma of developing embryos, which monitored hobo excision from injected indicator plasmids. Excisi...

  9. Testosterone activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and the cAMP response element binding protein transcription factor in Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Fix, Charity; Jordan, Cynthia; Cano, Patricia; Walker, William H.

    2004-01-01

    The androgen testosterone is essential for the Sertoli cell to support the maturation of male germ cells and the production of spermatozoa (spermatogenesis). In the classical view of androgen action, binding of androgen to the intracellular androgen receptor (AR) produces a conformational change in AR such that the receptor–steroid complex has high affinity for specific DNA regulatory elements and is able to stimulate gene transcription. Here, we demonstrate that testosterone can act by means of an alternative, rapid, and sustainable mechanism in Sertoli cells that is independent of AR–DNA interactions. Specifically, the addition of physiological levels of testosterone to Sertoli cells stimulates the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and causes phosphorylation of the cAMP response element binding protein transcription factor on serine 133, a modification known to be required for Sertoli cells to support spermatogenesis. Androgen-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and cAMP response element binding protein occurs within 1 min, extends for at least 12 h and requires AR. Furthermore, androgen induces endogenous cAMP response element binding protein-mediated transcription in Sertoli cells. These newly identified mechanisms of androgen action in Sertoli cells suggest new targets for developing male contraceptive agents. PMID:15263086

  10. An electrically tunable depth-of-field endoscope using a liquid crystal lens as an active focusing element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hung-Shan; Chen, Ming-Syuan; Lin, Yi-Hsin

    2013-09-01

    An electrically tunable depth-of-field (DOF) endoscope using a liquid crystal lens (LC lens) as an active focusing element is demonstrated. The optical mechanism of the electrically-tunable DOF endoscope adopting a two-mode switching LC lens is introduced. The two-mode switching LC lens provides not only a positive lens power but also a negative lens power. Therefore, we could extend the range of DOF originally from 27 mm ~ 55 mm to 12.4 mm ~ 76.4 mm by using the two-mode switching LC lens as an active focusing element. The detail derivations of the optical mechanism of the endoscopic system adopting a LC lens are invistgated. The more detail experimental results are demonstrated. We believe this study can provide a more detail understanding of an endoscopic system adopting a tunable focusing lens.

  11. Evacuation of Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) Tags from Northern Pikeminnow Consuming Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, J.H.; Barfoot, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Prey fish implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags can be used in predation studies if the timing of tag evacuation from the predators is understood. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine how PIT tags in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were consumed by northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis were evacuated in relation to various parameters. The rate of evacuation was directly related to temperature, while predator size and the number of prey consumed had less effect on the timing of tag evacuation. A power model was fitted to predict the proportion of tags expected to be evacuated at different intervals after ingestion. These results could be used in planning field or laboratory predation experiments with PIT-tagged prey fish.

  12. Recombineering, transfection, Western, IP and ChIP methods for protein tagging via gene targeting or BAC transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Hofemeister, Helmut; Ciotta, Giovanni; Fu, Jun; Seibert, Philipp Martin; Schulz, Alexander; Maresca, Marcello; Sarov, Mihail; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis

    2011-04-01

    Protein tagging offers many advantages for proteomic and regulomic research. Ideally, protein tagging is equivalent to having a high affinity antibody for every chosen protein. However, these advantages are compromised if the tagged protein is overexpressed, which is usually the case from cDNA expression vectors. Physiological expression of tagged proteins can be achieved by gene targeting to knock-in the protein tag or by BAC transgenesis. BAC transgenes usually retain the native gene architecture including all cis-regulatory elements as well as the exon-intron configurations. Consequently most BAC transgenes are authentically regulated (e.g. by transcription factors, cell cycle, miRNA) and can be alternatively spliced. Recombineering has become the method of choice for generating targeting constructs or modifying BACs. Here we present methods with detailed protocols for protein tagging by recombineering for BAC transgenesis and/or gene targeting, including the evaluation of tagged protein expression, the retrieval of associated protein complexes for mass spectrometry and the use of the tags in ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation). PMID:21195765

  13. Magnetic vector field tag and seal

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R.

    2004-08-31

    One or more magnets are placed in a container (preferably on objects inside the container) and the magnetic field strength and vector direction are measured with a magnetometer from at least one location near the container to provide the container with a magnetic vector field tag and seal. The location(s) of the magnetometer relative to the container are also noted. If the position of any magnet inside the container changes, then the measured vector fields at the these locations also change, indicating that the tag has been removed, the seal has broken, and therefore that the container and objects inside may have been tampered with. A hollow wheel with magnets inside may also provide a similar magnetic vector field tag and seal. As the wheel turns, the magnets tumble randomly inside, removing the tag and breaking the seal.

  14. Intrinsic-surface-tag image authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, R.G.; DeVolpi, A.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this work is to further the development of a unique treaty limited item (TLI) intrinsic surface tag for arms control applications. This tag's unique feature is the ability to capture the sub-micron scale topography of the TLI surface. The surface topography is captured by plastic castings of the surface as digitally imaged by an electron microscope. Tag authentication is accomplished by comparing digital castings images obtained in two different inspections. Surface replication experiments are described, as these experiments from the basis for the authentication algorithm. Both the experiments and the authentication algorithm are analyzed using the modulation transfer function. Recommendations for future improvements in tag authentication are also suggested by the modulation transfer function analysis. 4 refs.

  15. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.; Lambert, J.

    1999-04-06

    A capsule is disclosed containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispherical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor. 3 figs.

  16. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny; Lambert, John

    1999-01-01

    A capsule containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor.

  17. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30

    goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of ± 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized σ- or π-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an “endless” hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular

  18. b-tagging at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Hanagaki, K.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    Many high p{sub T} physics analyses at the Tevatron contain a b-quark and hence a b-jet in the final states. We report on the b-jet identification methods in D0 and their performance. For 0.5% of light jet tagging rate, 40 or 45% of b-jet tagging efficiency is achieved for jets with 35 < E{sub T} < 55 GeV and |{eta}| < 1.2.

  19. Controlled trial comparing prednisolone with an elemental diet plus non-absorbable antibiotics in active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Saverymuttu, S; Hodgson, H J; Chadwick, V S

    1985-10-01

    In a randomised clinical trial, patients with moderately active Crohn's disease received either prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/day plus a normal diet, or an elemental diet plus oral framycetin, colistin and nystatin. Patients were assessed using the Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI), ESR, and faecal granulocyte excretion quantified by 111In-autologous leucocytes. Five patients were intolerant of the elemental diet plus antibiotics and were withdrawn from the trial within 72 hours. Sixteen patients completed 10 days treatment on each regime. Fifteen of 16 patients on elemental diet plus antibiotics and all 16 patients on prednisolone improved with marked, but statistically indistinguishable falls in CDAI, ESR, and faecal granulocyte excretion between the two groups. Thus a regime decreasing the intraluminal concentration of bacteria and complex food molecules, was associated with rapid improvement in activity of Crohn's disease. This suggests that these intraluminal factors play a role in maintaining inflammation and that their removal or alteration offers an approach to management. PMID:3902590

  20. Application of artificial neural network in precise prediction of cement elements percentages based on the neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekhari Zadeh, E.; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Roshani, G. H.; Rezaei, A.

    2016-05-01

    Due to variation of neutron energy spectrum in the target sample during the activation process and to peak overlapping caused by the Compton effect with gamma radiations emitted from activated elements, which results in background changes and consequently complex gamma spectrum during the measurement process, quantitative analysis will ultimately be problematic. Since there is no simple analytical correlation between peaks' counts with elements' concentrations, an artificial neural network for analyzing spectra can be a helpful tool. This work describes a study on the application of a neural network to determine the percentages of cement elements (mainly Ca, Si, Al, and Fe) using the neutron capture delayed gamma-ray spectra of the substance emitted by the activated nuclei as patterns which were simulated via the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, version 2.7. The Radial Basis Function (RBF) network is developed with four specific peaks related to Ca, Si, Al and Fe, which were extracted as inputs. The proposed RBF model is developed and trained with MATLAB 7.8 software. To obtain the optimal RBF model, several structures have been constructed and tested. The comparison between simulated and predicted values using the proposed RBF model shows that there is a good agreement between them.

  1. Helium Tagging Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy of Reactive Ions.

    PubMed

    Roithová, Jana; Gray, Andrew; Andris, Erik; Jašík, Juraj; Gerlich, Dieter

    2016-02-16

    The interrogation of reaction intermediates is key for understanding chemical reactions; however their direct observation and study remains a considerable challenge. Mass spectrometry is one of the most sensitive analytical techniques, and its use to study reaction mixtures is now an established practice. However, the information that can be obtained is limited to elemental analysis and possibly to fragmentation behavior, which is often challenging to analyze. In order to extend the available experimental information, different types of spectroscopy in the infrared and visible region have been combined with mass spectrometry. Spectroscopy of mass selected ions usually utilizes the powerful sensitivity of mass spectrometers, and the absorption of photons is not detected as such but rather translated to mass changes. One approach to accomplish such spectroscopy involves loosely binding a tag to an ion that will be removed by absorption of one photon. We have constructed an ion trapping instrument capable of reaching temperatures that are sufficiently low to enable tagging by helium atoms in situ, thus permitting infrared photodissociation spectroscopy (IRPD) to be carried out. While tagging by larger rare gas atoms, such as neon or argon is also possible, these may cause significant structural changes to small and reactive species, making the use of helium highly beneficial. We discuss the "innocence" of helium as a tag in ion spectroscopy using several case studies. It is shown that helium tagging is effectively innocent when used with benzene dications, not interfering with their structure or IRPD spectrum. We have also provided a case study where we can see that despite its minimal size there are systems where He has a huge effect. A strong influence of the He tagging was shown in the IRPD spectra of HCCl(2+) where large spectral shifts were observed. While the presented systems are rather small, they involve the formation of mixtures of isomers. We have therefore

  2. Survival and tag loss in Moapa White River springfish implanted with passive integrated transponder tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, Christopher J.; Mesa, Matthew G.

    2011-01-01

    We monitored survival and tag loss among Moapa White River springfish Crenichthys baileyi moapae that were surgically implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT; 9 × 2 mm) tags. The fish used in the study ranged from 40 to 67 mm in total length and from 1.0 to 6.5 g in mass; the PIT tag: body weight ratios were 1.0–6.1%. Fish were held for 41 d in live cages within a small, warm desert stream. Survival did not differ between untagged control fish (94.5%) and tagged fish (95.6%). Survival did not appear to be influenced by fish size or PIT tag: body weight ratio, but the small number of fish that died precluded a detailed analysis. Tag retention was 100% among the 86 fish that survived over the 41 d. Our results suggest that surgically implanting 9-mm PIT tags into Moapa White River springfish as small as 40 mm is an effective method for marking them because it has minimal impacts on survival and tag retention is high. More work is needed on the effects of PIT tagging on growth and other performance metrics of springfish and other small desert fishes.

  3. Survival and tag retention of Pacific lamprey larvae and macrophthalmia marked with coded wire tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeuwig, M.H.; Puls, A.L.; Bayer, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the survival, tag retention, and growth of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata larvae and macrophthalmia marked with standard-length decimal coded wire tags and exposed to two levels of handling stress. The survival of marked individuals did not differ from that of unmarked individuals at either life stage for the duration of the experiment (56 d). Tag retention was 100% for all treatment combinations except larvae that were handled frequently (93 ?? 3%). The majority of tag loss occurred within 28 d of marking, and no tag loss was observed between 42 and 56 d after marking. The individuals that lost tags were among the smallest marked, and a logistic regression model indicated a relationship between larva length and the probability of tag retention. Size of larvae (length and mass) and macrophthalmia (mass) decreased over the duration of the experiment; however, changes in size were systematic among treatment combinations, indicating that factors other than tagging or handling affected growth. These data indicate that coded wire tags may be useful for field-based studies of Pacific lamprey larvae and macrophthalmia.

  4. TagSmart: analysis and visualization for yeast mutant fitness data measured by tag microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chulyun; Kim, Sangkyum; Dorer, Russell; Xie, Dan; Han, Jiawei; Zhong, Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Background A nearly complete collection of gene-deletion mutants (96% of annotated open reading frames) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been systematically constructed. Tag microarrays are widely used to measure the fitness of each mutant in a mutant mixture. The tag array experiments can have a complex experimental design, such as time course measurements and drug treatment with multiple dosages. Results TagSmart is a web application for analysis and visualization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant fitness data measured by tag microarrays. It implements a robust statistical approach to assess the concentration differences among S. cerevisiae mutant strains. It also provides an interactive environment for data analysis and visualization. TagSmart has the following advantages over previously described analysis procedures: 1) it is user-friendly software rather than merely a description of analytical procedure; 2) It can handle complicated experimental designs, such as multiple time points and treatment with multiple dosages; 3) it has higher sensitivity and specificity; 4) It allows users to mask out "bad" tags in the analysis. Two biological tests were performed to illustrate the performance of TagSmart. First, we generated titration mixtures of mutant strains, in which the relative concentration of each strain was controlled. We used tag microarrays to measure the numbers of tag copies in each titration mixture. The data was analyzed with TagSmart and the result showed high precision and recall. Second, TagSmart was applied to a dataset in which heterozygous deletion strain mixture pools were treated with a new drug, Cincreasin. TagSmart identified 53 mutant strains as sensitive to Cincreasin treatment. We individually tested each identified mutant, and found 52 out of the 53 predicted mutants were indeed sensitive to Cincreasin. Conclusion TagSmart is provided "as is" to analyze tag array data produced by Affymetrix and Agilent arrays. TagSmart web

  5. Purification of GST-Tagged Proteins.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Frank; Seip, Nicole; Maertens, Barbara; Block, Helena; Kubicek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This protocol describes the purification of recombinant proteins fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST, GST-tagged proteins) by Glutathione Affinity purification. The GST tag frequently increases the solubility of the fused protein of interest and thus enables its purification and subsequent functional characterization. The GST-tagged protein specifically binds to glutathione immobilized to a matrix (e.g., agarose) and can be easily separated from a cell lysate by a bind-wash-elute procedure. GST-tagged proteins are often used to study protein-protein interactions, again making use of glutathione affinity in a procedure called a GST pull-down assay. The protocol is designed to process 200 ml of E. coli culture expressing intermediate to high amounts of a GST-tagged protein (~25 mg l(-1)). Depending on the expression rate or the available culture volume, the scale can be increased or decreased linearly. The protocol can also be used to purify GST-tagged proteins from other expression systems, such as insect or mammalian cells. Tips are provided to aid in modifying certain steps if proteins shall be recovered from alternative expression systems. PMID:26096507

  6. Microstructure and Crystal Structure in TAGS Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A. J.; Sharp, J; Rawn, Claudia J

    2009-01-01

    GeTe, a small bandgap semiconductor that has native p-type defects due to Ge vacancies, is an important constituent in the thermoelectric material known as TAGS. TAGS is an acronym for alloys of GeTe with AgSbTe{sub 2}, and compositions are normally designated as TAGS-x, where x is the fraction of GeTe. TAGS-85 is the most important with regard to applications, and there is also commercial interest in TAGS-80. The crystal structure of GeTe{sub 1+{delta}} has a composition-dependent phase transformation at a temperature ranging from 430 C ({delta} = 0) to {approx}400 C ({delta} = 0.02). The high-temperature form is cubic. The low-temperature form is rhombohedral for {delta} < 0.01, as is the case for good thermoelectric performance. Addition of AgSbTe{sub 2} shifts the phase transformation to lower temperatures, and one of the goals of this work is a systematic study of the dependence of transformation temperature on the parameter x. We present results on phase transformations and associated instabilities in TAGS compositions in the range of 70 at.% to 85 at.% GeTe.

  7. A hypergraph model of social tagging networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zi-Ke; Liu, Chuang

    2010-10-01

    The past few years have witnessed the great success of a new family of paradigms, so-called folksonomy, which allows users to freely associate tags with resources and efficiently manage them. In order to uncover the underlying structures and user behaviors in folksonomy, in this paper, we propose an evolutionary hypergraph model for explaining the emerging statistical properties. The present model introduces a novel mechanism that can not only assign tags to resources, but also retrieve resources via collaborative tags. We then compare the model with a real-world data set: Del.icio.us. Indeed, the present model shows considerable agreement with the empirical data in the following aspects: power-law hyperdegree distributions, negative correlation between clustering coefficients and hyperdegrees, and small average distances. Furthermore, the model indicates that most tagging behaviors are motivated by labeling tags on resources, and the tag plays a significant role in effectively retrieving interesting resources and making acquaintances with congenial friends. The proposed model may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the structure and function of folksonomy.

  8. Hypoxia-induced endothelial NO synthase gene transcriptional activation is mediated through the tax-responsive element in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiho; Jin, Yoon-Mi; Moon, Je-Sung; Sung, Min-Sun; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2006-06-01

    Although hypoxia is known to induce upregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) gene expression, the underlying mechanism is largely unclear. In this study, we show that hypoxia increases eNOS gene expression through the binding of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein (pCREB) to the eNOS gene promoter. Hypoxia (1% O2) increased both eNOS expression and NO production, peaking at 24 hours, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, and these increases were accompanied by increases in pCREB. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 or transfection with dominant-negative inhibitor of CREB reversed the hypoxia-induced increases in eNOS expression and NO production, with concomitant inhibition of the phosphorylation of CREB induced by hypoxia, suggesting an involvement of protein kinase A/pCREB-mediated pathway. To map the regulatory elements of the eNOS gene responsible for pCREB binding under hypoxia, we constructed an eNOS gene promoter (-1600 to +22 nucleotides) fused with a luciferase reporter gene [pGL2-eNOS(-1600)]. Hypoxia (for 24-hour incubation) increased the promoter activity by 2.36+/-0.18-fold in the bovine aortic endothelial cells transfected with pGL2-eNOS(-1600). However, progressive 5'-deletion from -1600 to -873 completely attenuated the hypoxia-induced increase in promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift, anti-pCREB antibody supershift, and site-specific mutation analyses showed that pCREB is bound to the Tax-responsive element (TRE) site, a cAMP-responsive element-like site, located at -924 to -921 of the eNOS promoter. Our data demonstrate that the interaction between pCREB and the Tax-responsive element site within the eNOS promoter may represent a novel mechanism for the mediation of hypoxia-stimulated eNOS gene expression. PMID:16651461

  9. Overview of past and current activities on fuels for fast reactors at the Institute for Transuranium Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, A.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.; Walter, M.

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear energy has the potential to provide a secure and sustainable electricity supply at a competitive price and to make a significant contribution to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The renewal of interest in fast neutron spectra reactors to meet more ambitious sustainable development criteria (i.e., resource maximisation and waste minimisation), opens a favourable framework for R&D activities in this area. The Institute for Transuranium Elements has extensive experience in the fabrication, characterization and irradiation testing (Phénix, Dounreay, Rapsodie) of fast reactor fuels, in oxide, nitride and carbide forms. An overview of these past and current activities on fast reactor fuels is presented.

  10. Surface-active element effects on the shape of GTA, laser, and electron-beam welds

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Roper, J.R.; Stagner, R.T.; Aden, R.J.

    1983-03-01

    Laser and electron-beam welds were passed across selenium-doped zones in 21-6-9 stainless steel. The depth/width (d/w) ratio of a defocused laser weld with a weld pool shape similar to a GTA weld increased by over 200% in a zone where 66 ppm selenium had been added. Smaller increases were observed in selenium-doped zones for a moderately defocused electron beam weld with a higher d/w ratio in undoped base metal. When laser or electron beam weld penetration was by a keyhole mechanism, no change in d/w ratio occurred in selenium-doped zones. The results confirm the surface-tension-driven fluid-flow model for the effect of minor elements on GTA weld pool shape. Other experimental evidence bearing on the effect of minor elements on GTA weld penetration is summarized.

  11. Nezha, a novel active miniature inverted-repeat transposable element in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Fengfeng; Tran Thao; Xu Ying

    2008-01-25

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) were first identified in plants and exerted extensive proliferations throughout eukaryotic and archaeal genomes. But very few MITEs have been characterized in bacteria. We identified a novel MITE, called Nezha, in cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 and Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Nezha, like most previously known MITEs in other organisms, is small in size, non-coding, carrying TIR and DR signals, and of potential to form a stable RNA secondary structure, and it tends to insert into A+T-rich regions. Recent transpositions of Nezha were observed in A. variabilis ATCC 29413 and Nostoc sp. PCC 7120, respectively. Nezha might have proliferated recently with aid from the transposase encoded by ISNpu3-like elements. A possible horizontal transfer event of Nezha from cyanobacteria to Polaromonas JS666 is also observed.

  12. Trace-element analysis of 1000 environmental samples per year using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    The technology and methods developed at the Plum Brook Reactor to analyze 1000 samples per year and report data on as many as 56 elements are described. The manpower for the complete analysis of 20 to 24 samples per week required only 3 to 3.5 hours per sample. The solutions to problems encountered in sample preparation, irradiation, and counting are discussed. The automation of data reduction is described. Typical data on various sample matrices are presented.

  13. A consensus insulin response element is activated by an Ets-related transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Jacob, K K; Ouyang, L; Stanley, F M

    1995-11-17

    Insulin increases expression of somatostatin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) constructs 10-fold and thymidine kinase-CAT constructs 5-fold in GH4 cells. These responses are similar to our previously reported data on insulin-increased prolactin-CAT expression. They are also observed in HeLa cells and are thus not cell type specific. The evidence suggests that the insulin responsiveness of these genes is mediated by an Ets-related transcription factor. First, linker-scanning mutations and/or deletions of the prolactin, somatostatin, and thymidine kinase promoters suggest that their insulin responsiveness is mediated by the sequence CGGA. This sequence is identical with the response element of the Ets-related transcription factors. Second, CGGA-containing sequences placed at -88 in the delta MTV-CAT reporter plasmid conferred insulin responsiveness to the mammary tumor virus promoter. Third, expression of the DNA-binding domain of c-Ets-2, which acts by blocking effects mediated by Ets-related transcription factors, inhibits the response of these promoters to insulin. Finally, the Ets-related proteins Sap and Elk-1 bind to the prolactin, somatostatin, and thymidine kinase insulin-response elements. An Ets-like element was found in all insulin-sensitive promoters examined and may serve a similar function in those promoters. PMID:7499246

  14. Size-spectra of trace elements in urban aerosol particles by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ondov, J.M.; Divita, F. Jr.; Suarez, A.

    1994-12-31

    Knowledge of composition and size of atmospheric aerosol particles is needed to elucidate their sources, atmospheric transformation processes, contributions to visibility reduction, and respiratory and environmental deposition. In a previous communication, we described size spectra and hygroscopic growth of arsenic, selenium, antimony, and zinc in College Park, Maryland, an urban, nonindustrial area located near Washington, D.C., wherein, concentrations of these elements are influenced largely by sulfate-containing aerosol transported from the Ohio River valley region, more than 200 km west of the area, and local coal utility plants and incinerators located 20 to 50 km from the sampling site. At College Park, mass median aerodynamic diameters (mmad) versus relative humidity (RH) data for these elements fell along different curves for samples influenced by local and distant aerosols; i.e., the curve for distant sources lay below the curve for local sources, at larger mmads for the same RH. In this paper we discuss size spectra, distribution parameters, and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles bearing trace elements in aerosol collected in Camden, New Jersey, a heavily industrial area in which major sources, including an antimony roaster and municipal incinerator, lie in close proximity (i.e., 5 to 15 km) to the site.

  15. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Phase II Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Bose

    2013-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Simulator

  16. Discovery and analysis of an active long terminal repeat-retrotransposable element in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Jie Jin, Feng; Hara, Seiichi; Sato, Atsushi; Koyama, Yasuji

    2014-01-01

    Wild-type Aspergillus oryzae RIB40 contains two copies of the AO090005001597 gene. We previously constructed A. oryzae RIB40 strain, RKuAF8B, with multiple chromosomal deletions, in which the AO090005001597 copy number was found to be increased significantly. Sequence analysis indicated that AO090005001597 is part of a putative 6,000-bp retrotransposable element, flanked by two long terminal repeats (LTRs) of 669 bp, with characteristics of retroviruses and retrotransposons, and thus designated AoLTR (A. oryzae LTR-retrotransposable element). AoLTR comprised putative reverse transcriptase, RNase H, and integrase domains. The deduced amino acid sequence alignment of AoLTR showed 94% overall identity with AFLAV, an A. flavus Tf1/sushi retrotransposon. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed that AoLTR gene expression was significantly increased in the RKuAF8B, in accordance with the increased copy number. Inverse PCR indicated that the full-length retrotransposable element was randomly integrated into multiple genomic locations. However, no obvious phenotypic changes were associated with the increased AoLTR gene copy number. PMID:24646755

  17. Bottlenose dolphins modify behavior to reduce metabolic effect of tag attachment.

    PubMed

    van der Hoop, Julie M; Fahlman, Andreas; Hurst, Thomas; Rocho-Levine, Julie; Shorter, K Alex; Petrov, Victor; Moore, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Attaching bio-telemetry or -logging devices ('tags') to marine animals for research and monitoring adds drag to streamlined bodies, thus affecting posture, swimming gaits and energy balance. These costs have never been measured in free-swimming cetaceans. To examine the effect of drag from a tag on metabolic rate, cost of transport and swimming behavior, four captive male dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were trained to swim a set course, either non-tagged (n=7) or fitted with a tag (DTAG2; n=12), and surface exclusively in a flow-through respirometer in which oxygen consumption VO₂ and carbon dioxide production (VO₂; ml kg(-1) min(-1)) rates were measured and respiratory exchange ratio (VO₂/resting VO₂) was calculated. Tags did not significantly affect individual mass-specific oxygen consumption, physical activity ratios (exercise /resting ), total or net cost of transport (COT; J m(-1) kg(-1)) or locomotor costs during swimming or two-minute recovery phases. However, individuals swam significantly slower when tagged (by ~11%; mean ± s.d., 3.31±0.35 m s(-1)) than when non-tagged (3.73±0.41 m s(-1)). A combined theoretical and computational fluid dynamics model estimating drag forces and power exertion during swimming suggests that drag loading and energy consumption are reduced at lower swimming speeds. Bottlenose dolphins in the specific swimming task in this experiment slowed to the point where the tag yielded no increases in drag or power, while showing no difference in metabolic parameters when instrumented with a DTAG2. These results, and our observations, suggest that animals modify their behavior to maintain metabolic output and energy expenditure when faced with tag-induced drag. PMID:25324344

  18. Binding of TFIIIC to SINE Elements Controls the Relocation of Activity-Dependent Neuronal Genes to Transcription Factories

    PubMed Central

    Crepaldi, Luca; Policarpi, Cristina; Coatti, Alessandro; Sherlock, William T.; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Down, Thomas A.; Riccio, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, the timely and accurate expression of genes in response to synaptic activity relies on the interplay between epigenetic modifications of histones, recruitment of regulatory proteins to chromatin and changes to nuclear structure. To identify genes and regulatory elements responsive to synaptic activation in vivo, we performed a genome-wide ChIPseq analysis of acetylated histone H3 using somatosensory cortex of mice exposed to novel enriched environmental (NEE) conditions. We discovered that Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs) located distal to promoters of activity-dependent genes became acetylated following exposure to NEE and were bound by the general transcription factor TFIIIC. Importantly, under depolarizing conditions, inducible genes relocated to transcription factories (TFs), and this event was controlled by TFIIIC. Silencing of the TFIIIC subunit Gtf3c5 in non-stimulated neurons induced uncontrolled relocation to TFs and transcription of activity-dependent genes. Remarkably, in cortical neurons, silencing of Gtf3c5 mimicked the effects of chronic depolarization, inducing a dramatic increase of both dendritic length and branching. These findings reveal a novel and essential regulatory function of both SINEs and TFIIIC in mediating gene relocation and transcription. They also suggest that TFIIIC may regulate the rearrangement of nuclear architecture, allowing the coordinated expression of activity-dependent neuronal genes. PMID:23966877

  19. 48 CFR 952.208-7 - Tagging of leased vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for periods in excess of 60 days: Tagging of Leased Vehicles (APR 1984) (a) DOE intends to use U.S... Federal tags, the DOE reserves the right to utilize State tags if necessary to accomplish its mission. Should State tags be required, the Contractor shall furnish the DOE the documentation required by...

  20. 48 CFR 952.208-7 - Tagging of leased vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for periods in excess of 60 days: Tagging of Leased Vehicles (APR 1984) (a) DOE intends to use U.S... Federal tags, the DOE reserves the right to utilize State tags if necessary to accomplish its mission. Should State tags be required, the Contractor shall furnish the DOE the documentation required by...

  1. Dynamics and distributed control of geometrically nonlinear active piezothermoelastic structronic systems using the finite element technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongwei

    Recent research and development of adaptive materials, smart structures and structronic systems have opened a new era to aerospace and structural engineering. Effective control of these intelligent structures and systems using piezoelectric materials can enhance operation precision, accuracy and reliability. This research is to investigate the dynamics, vibration sensing and control of the geometrically nonlinear distributed piezothermoelastic structures subjected to the combined mechanical, electrical, and thermal excitations by the finite element method. Based on the layerwise constant shear angle theory, the curved hexahedral and triangular piezothermoelastic shell elements are proposed. The generic finite element formulations for vibration sensing and control analysis of nonlinear piezothermoelastic shell structures are derived based on the total Lagrangian virtual work principle. Dynamic system equations, equations of electric potential outputs, and feedback control forces are derived and discussed. The modified Newton-Raphson method is used for efficient dynamic analysis of the nonlinear piezothermoelastic structural systems. Different control algorithms are implemented. The feedback control forces generated from the distributed actuator can effectively enhance system damping and suppress system vibration via proper feedback control techniques. Comprehensive case studies are performed to evaluate the accuracy of the newly developed piezothermoelastic shell elements and to validate the finite element code. Dynamics and vibration sensing/control of nonlinear piezothermoelastic beam and plate systems are analyzed. Distributed piezoelectric films placed on the beam and plate structures respectively serving as sensor and actuators are discussed. The effect of geometric nonlinearity is to stiffen the beam and plate structures and the control effect becomes worse when geometric nonlinearity becomes significant. It shows that negative velocity control scheme is

  2. A Novel Peroxisome Proliferator Response Element Modulates Hepatic Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Transcription in Response to PPARδ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Vikram R.; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    The hepatic expression of LDLR gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative PPAR-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at −768 to −752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin mediated transactivation. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression. PMID:26443862

  3. Assessment and Accommodation of Thermal Expansion of the Internal Active Thermal Control System Coolant During Launch to On-Orbit Activation of International Space Station Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. Darryl; Ungar, Eugene K.; Holt, James M.; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) employs an Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) comprised of several single-phase water coolant loops. These coolant loops are distributed throughout the ISS pressurized elements. The primary element coolant loops (i.e., US Laboratory module) contain a fluid accumulator to accommodate thermal expansion of the system. Other element coolant loops are parasitic (i.e., Airlock), have no accumulator, and require an alternative approach to insure that the system Maximum Design Pressure (MDP) is not exceeded during the Launch to Activation phase. During this time the element loop is a stand alone closed individual system. The solution approach for accommodating thermal expansion was affected by interactions of system components and their particular limitations. The mathematical solution approach was challenged by the presence of certain unknown or not readily obtainable physical and thermodynamic characteristics of some system components and processes. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of a few of the solutions that evolved over time, a novel mathematical solution to eliminate some of the unknowns or derive the unknowns experimentally, and the testing and methods undertaken.

  4. Assessment and Accommodation of Thermal Expansion of the Internal Active Thermal Control System Coolant During Launch to On-Orbit Activation of International Space Station Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Darryl; Ungar, Eugene K.; Holt, James M.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) employs an Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) comprised of several single-phase water coolant loops. These coolant loops are distributed throughout the ISS pressurized elements. The primary element coolant loops (i.e. U.S. Laboratory module) contain a fluid accumulator to accomodate thermal expansion of the system. Other element coolant loops are parasitic (i.e. Airlock), have no accumulator, and require an alternative approach to insure that the system maximum design pressure (MDP) is not exceeded during the Launch to Activation (LTA) phase. During this time the element loops is a stand alone closed system. The solution approach for accomodating thermal expansion was affected by interactions of system components and their particular limitations. The mathematical solution approach was challenged by the presence of certain unknown or not readily obtainable physical and thermodynamic characteristics of some system components and processes. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of a few of the solutions that evolved over time, a novel mathematical solution to eliminate some of the unknowns or derive the unknowns experimentally, and the testing and methods undertaken.

  5. Preliminary results of trace elements mobility in soils and plants from the active hydrothermal area of Nisyros island (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalopoulou, Kyriaki; Calabrese, Sergio; Milazzo, Silvia; Brusca, Lorenzo; D'Alessandro, Walter; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos; Tassi, Franco; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Trace elements, i.e. chemical constituents of rocks with concentration <1000 ppm, play a structural role in the organisms and use proteins as a carrier to their target site. Their toxicity depends on their concentration, speciation and reactions with other elements. In volcanic environments, significant amounts of trace elements discharged from gas emissions, contribute to produce air particulate. Nisyros Island is a stratovolcano located at the South Aegean active Volcanic Arc. Intense hydrothermal activity characterise the Lakki caldera. In particular, the fumaroles located in the craters of Stefanos, Kaminakia, Lofos Dome and the area comprising Phlegeton, Polyvotes Micros and Polyvotes Megalos discharge hydrothermal fluids rich in H2O (91- 99%), SO2 and H2S. Their temperatures are almost 100o C and H2S is highly abundant accounting for 8-26 % of the released dry gas phase. On June 2013, during a multidisciplinary field trip on Nisyros island, 39 samples of top soils and 31 of endemic plants (Cistus Creticus and Salvifolius and Erica Arborea and Manipuliflora) were collected in the caldera area, with the aim to investigate the distribution of concentrations of trace elements related to the contribution of deep originated fluids. Moreover, one sample of plant and soil was collected outside the caldera as local background, for comparison. All the soil samples were powdered avoiding metal contamination and they were extracted twice, using HNO3 + HCl for one extraction (closed microwave digestion) and ultrapure de- ionized water for the other one (leaching extraction). The leaves of plants were gently isolated, dried and powdered for acid microwave extraction (HNO3 + H2O2). All the solutions were analysed for major and trace elements contents by using ionic chromatography (IC) and inductively plasma spectrometry (ICP-MS and ICP-OES). The preliminary results showed high enrichment of many trace elements both in plant and soils respect to the local background, in

  6. The Hermes transposable element from the house fly, Musca domestica, is a short inverted repeat-type element of the hobo, Ac, and Tam3 (hAT) element family.

    PubMed

    Warren, W D; Atkinson, P W; O'Brochta, D A

    1994-10-01

    The genome of the house fly, Musca domestica, contains an active transposable element system, called Hermes. Using PCR and inverse PCR we amplified and sequenced overlapping segments of several Hermes elements and from these data we have constructed a 2749 bp consensus Hermes DNA sequence. Hermes termini are composed of 17 bp imperfect inverted repeats that are almost identical to the inverted terminal repeats of the hobo element of Drosophila melanogaster. Full length Hermes elements contain a single long ORF capable of encoding a protein of 612 amino acids which is 55% identical to the amino acid sequence of the hobo transposase. Comparison of the ends of the Hermes and hobo elements to those of the Ac element of Zea mays, and the Tam3 element of Antirrhinum majus, as well as several other plant and insect elements, revealed a conserved terminal sequence motif. Thus Hermes is clearly a member of the hobo, Ac and Tam3 (hAT) transposable element family, other members of which include the Tag1 element from Arabidopsis thaliana and the Bg element from Zea mays. The evolution of this class of transposable elements and the potential utility of Hermes as a genetic tool in M. domestica and related species are discussed. PMID:7813905

  7. A discrete element 3' of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 mRNA initiation sites mediates transcriptional activation by an HIV trans activator

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobovits, A.; Smith, D.H.; Jakobovits, E.B.; Capon, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    An important point of regulation in the reproductive growth and latency of the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, respectively) is provided by virally encoded trans-activators (tat), proteins capable of dramatically increasing viral gene expression. The mechanism of this autostimulatory pathway has remained unclear, however, with substantial effects having been reported at the level of either mRNA accumulation, translational efficiency, or both. The authors' previous findings indicated that trans-activation results primarily from induction of RNA levels but could not distinguish between the roles of transcriptional rate, RNA stabilization, and RNA transport in this event. In addition, the boundaries of tat-responding elements, which would be valuable in elucidating the mode of tat action, are not precisely known. In this study, HIV-1 and HIV-2 long terminal repeat-directed expression was characterized by using in an vitro nuclear transcription assay to clarify this mechanism, and a detailed mutational analysis was undertaken to localize precisely the sequences participating in this process. Two key findings were revealed: an increased transcription rate was the primary event in tat-mediated activation of HIV-1 and HIV-2, and trans-activation was impaired by mutations in two regions, the TATA box and sequences between +19 to +42, a region lacking enhancer activity. These results implicate a discrete 3' regulatory element in the transcriptional activation of the HIVs.

  8. De Novo-Designed Enzymes as Small-Molecule-Regulated Fluorescence Imaging Tags and Fluorescent Reporters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-based tags attached to a protein-of-interest (POI) that react with a small molecule, rendering the conjugate fluorescent, are very useful for studying the POI in living cells. These tags are typically based on endogenous enzymes, so protein engineering is required to ensure that the small-molecule probe does not react with the endogenous enzyme in the cell of interest. Here we demonstrate that de novo-designed enzymes can be used as tags to attach to POIs. The inherent bioorthogonality of the de novo-designed enzyme–small-molecule probe reaction circumvents the need for protein engineering, since these enzyme activities are not present in living organisms. Herein, we transform a family of de novo-designed retroaldolases into variable-molecular-weight tags exhibiting fluorescence imaging, reporter, and electrophoresis applications that are regulated by tailored, reactive small-molecule fluorophores. PMID:25209927

  9. TaGS5-3A, a grain size gene selected during wheat improvement for larger kernel and yield.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Li, Tian; Hao, Chenyang; Wang, Yuquan; Chen, Xinhong; Zhang, Xueyong

    2016-05-01

    Grain size is a dominant component of grain weight in cereals. Earlier studies have shown that OsGS5 plays a major role in regulating both grain size and weight in rice via promotion of cell division. In this study, we isolated TaGS5 homoeologues in wheat and mapped them on chromosomes 3A, 3B and 3D. Temporal and spatial expression analysis showed that TaGS5 homoeologues were preferentially expressed in young spikes and developing grains. Two alleles of TaGS5-3A, TaGS5-3A-T and TaGS5-3A-G were identified in wheat accessions, and a functional marker was developed to discriminate them. Association analysis revealed that TaGS5-3A-T was significantly correlated with larger grain size and higher thousand kernel weight. Biochemical assays showed that TaGS5-3A-T possesses a higher enzymatic activity than TaGS5-3A-G. Transgenic rice lines overexpressing TaGS5-3A-T also exhibited larger grain size and higher thousand kernel weight than TaGS5-3A-G lines, and the transcript levels of cell cycle-related genes in TaGS5-3A-T lines were higher than those in TaGS5-3A-G lines. Furthermore, systematic evolution analysis in diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid wheat showed that TaGS5-3A underwent strong artificial selection during wheat polyploidization events and the frequency changes of two alleles demonstrated that TaGS5-3A-T was favoured in global modern wheat cultivars. These results suggest that TaGS5-3A is a positive regulator of grain size and its favoured allele TaGS5-3A-T exhibits a larger potential application in wheat high-yield breeding. PMID:26480952

  10. A brief examination of optical tagging technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Cahill, Paul A. (Aspecular Optics, Dayton, OH); Drummond, Timothy J.; Wilcoxon, Jess Patrick

    2003-07-01

    Presented within this report are the results of a brief examination of optical tagging technologies funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was performed during the summer months of 2002 with total funding of $65k. The intent of the project was to briefly examine a broad range of approaches to optical tagging concentrating on the wavelength range between ultraviolet (UV) and the short wavelength infrared (SWIR, {lambda} < 2{micro}m). Tagging approaches considered include such things as simple combinations of reflective and absorptive materials closely spaced in wavelength to give a high contrast over a short range of wavelengths, rare-earth oxides in transparent binders to produce a narrow absorption line hyperspectral tag, and fluorescing materials such as phosphors, dies and chemically precipitated particles. One technical approach examined in slightly greater detail was the use of fluorescing nano particles of metals and semiconductor materials. The idea was to embed such nano particles in an oily film or transparent paint binder. When pumped with a SWIR laser such as that produced by laser diodes at {lambda}=1.54{micro}m, the particles would fluoresce at slightly longer wavelengths, thereby giving a unique signal. While it is believed that optical tags are important for military, intelligence and even law enforcement applications, as a business area, tags do not appear to represent a high on return investment. Other government agencies frequently shop for existing or mature tag technologies but rarely are interested enough to pay for development of an untried technical approach. It was hoped that through a relatively small investment of laboratory R&D funds, enough technologies could be identified that a potential customers requirements could be met with a minimum of additional development work. Only time will tell if this proves to be correct.

  11. Transcriptional read-through is not sufficient to induce an epigenetic switch in the silencing activity of Polycomb response elements

    PubMed Central

    Erokhin, Maksim; Elizar’ev, Pavel; Parshikov, Aleksander; Schedl, Paul; Georgiev, Pavel; Chetverina, Darya

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, Polycomb (PcG) and Trithorax (TrxG) group proteins are assembled on Polycomb response elements (PREs) to maintain tissue and stage-specific patterns of gene expression. Critical to coordinating gene expression with the process of differentiation, the activity of PREs can be switched “on” and “off.” When on, the PRE imposes a silenced state on the genes in the same domain that is stably inherited through multiple rounds of cell division. When the PRE is switched off, the domain is in a state permissive for gene expression that can be stably inherited. Previous studies have suggested that a burst of transcription through a PRE sequence displaces PcG proteins and provides a universal mechanism for inducing a heritable switch in PRE activity from on to off; however, the evidence favoring this model is indirect. Here, we have directly tested the transcriptional read-through mechanism. Contrary to previous suggestions, we show that transcription through the PRE is not sufficient for inducing an epigenetic switch in PRE activity. In fact, even high levels of continuous transcription through a PRE fails to dislodge the PcG proteins, nor does it remove repressive histone marks. Our results indicate that other mechanisms involving adjacent DNA regulatory elements must be implicated in heritable switch of PRE activity. PMID:26504232

  12. Improving the Thermostability and Activity of a Thermophilic Subtilase by Incorporating Structural Elements of Its Psychrophilic Counterpart

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bi-Lin; Dai, Meihong; Chen, Yuanhao; Meng, Dongheng; Wang, Yasi; Fang, Nan; Tang, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of the structural elements of thermostable enzymes into their less stable counterparts is generally used to improve enzyme thermostability. However, the process of engineering enzymes with both high thermostability and high activity remains an important challenge. Here, we report that the thermostability and activity of a thermophilic subtilase were simultaneously improved by incorporating structural elements of a psychrophilic subtilase. There were 64 variable regions/residues (VRs) in the alignment of the thermophilic WF146 protease, mesophilic sphericase, and psychrophilic S41. The WF146 protease was subjected to systematic mutagenesis, in which each of its VRs was replaced with those from S41 and sphericase. After successive rounds of combination and screening, we constructed the variant PBL5X with eight amino acid residues from S41. The half-life of PBL5X at 85°C (57.1 min) was approximately 9-fold longer than that of the wild-type (WT) WF146 protease (6.3 min). The substitutions also led to an increase in the apparent thermal denaturation midpoint temperature (Tm) of the enzyme by 5.5°C, as determined by differential scanning calorimetry. Compared to the WT, PBL5X exhibited high caseinolytic activity (25 to 95°C) and high values of Km and kcat (25 to 80°C). Our study may provide a rational basis for developing highly stable and active enzymes, which are highly desired in industrial applications. PMID:26150464

  13. Piperine Induces Hepatic Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression through Proteolytic Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Ayasa; Miyata, Shingo; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is considered as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Because the hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR) uptakes plasma lipoproteins and lowers plasma LDL cholesterol, the activation of LDLR is a promising drug target for atherosclerosis. In the present study, we identified the naturally occurring alkaloid piperine, as an inducer of LDLR gene expression by screening the effectors of human LDLR promoter. The treatment of HepG2 cells with piperine increased LDLR expression at mRNA and protein levels and stimulated LDL uptake. Subsequent luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that the mutation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-binding element abolished the piperine-mediated induction of LDLR promoter activity. Further, piperine treatments increased mRNA levels of several SREBP targets and mature forms of SREBPs. However, the piperine-mediated induction of the mature forms of SREBPs was not observed in SRD–15 cells, which lack insulin-induced gene–1 (Insig–1) and Insig–2. Finally, the knockdown of SREBPs completely abolished the piperine-meditated induction of LDLR gene expression in HepG2 cells, indicating that piperine stimulates the proteolytic activation of SREBP and subsequent induction of LDLR expression and activity. PMID:26431033

  14. Evaluation of radioisotope tracer and activation analysis techniques for contamination monitoring in space environment simulation chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smathers, J. B.; Kuykendall, W. E., Jr.; Wright, R. E., Jr.; Marshall, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Radioisotope measurement techniques and neutron activation analysis are evaluated for use in identifying and locating contamination sources in space environment simulation chambers. The alpha range method allows the determination of total contaminant concentration in vapor state and condensate state. A Cf-252 neutron activation analysis system for detecting oils and greases tagged with stable elements is described. While neutron activation analysis of tagged contaminants offers specificity, an on-site system is extremely costly to implement and provides only marginal detection sensitivity under even the most favorable conditions.

  15. ATGL is a major hepatic lipase that regulates TAG turnover and fatty acid signaling and partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Kuok Teong; Mashek, Mara T.; Bu, So Young; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Mashek, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances into our understanding of how nutrient oversupply and triacylglycerol (TAG) anabolism contribute to hepatic steatosis, little is known about the lipases responsible for regulating hepatic TAG turnover. Recent studies have identified adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) as a major lipase in adipose tissue although its role in the liver is largely unknown. Thus, we tested the contribution of ATGL to hepatic lipid metabolism and signaling. Adenoviral-mediated knockdown of hepatic ATGL resulted in steatosis in mice and decreased hydrolysis of TAG in primary hepatocyte cultures and in vitro assays. In addition to altering TAG hydrolysis, ATGL is shown to play a significant role in partitioning hydrolyzed fatty acids between metabolic pathways. Whereas ATGL gain- and loss-of-function did not alter hepatic TAG secretion, fatty acid oxidation was increased by ATGL overexpression and decreased by ATGL knockdown. The effects on fatty acid oxidation coincided with decreased expression of PPAR-α and its target genes in mice with suppressed hepatic ATGL expression. However, PPAR-α agonism was unable to normalize the effects of ATGL knockdown on PPAR-α target gene expression suggesting that ATGL influences PPAR-α activity independent of ligand-induced activation. Taken together, these data show that ATGL is a major hepatic TAG lipase that plays an integral role in fatty acid partitioning and signaling to control energy metabolism. PMID:20967758

  16. Active moss biomonitoring of small-scale spatial distribution of airborne major and trace elements in the Belgrade urban area.

    PubMed

    Vuković, Gordana; Aničić Urošević, Mira; Razumenić, Ivana; Goryainova, Zoya; Frontasyeva, Marina; Tomašević, Milica; Popović, Aleksandar

    2013-08-01

    In urban environments, human exposure to air pollutants is expected to be significantly increased, especially near busy traffic streets, street canyons, tunnels, etc. where urban topography and microclimate may additionally cause poor air conditions giving rise to pollution hotspots. As a practical and cost-effective approach, active moss biomonitoring survey of some major and trace element air pollution was performed in the Belgrade street canyons and city tunnel in 2011 with the aim to evaluate possibility of using Sphagnum girgensohnii moss bags for investigation of the small-scale vertical and horizontal distribution patterns of the elements. In five street canyons, the moss bags were hung at heights of about 4, 8 and 16 m, during 10 weeks, and also, for the same time, the moss bags were exposed in the tunnel, in front of and out of it. After the exposure period, the concentrations of Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in the moss were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. According to the results, in all street canyons, the vertical distribution patterns of the moss elements concentration (Al, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn) showed statistically significant decrease from the first to the third heights of bags exposure. In the tunnel experiment, from inner to out of the tunnel, for Al, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K and Zn, decreasing trend of concentrations was obtained. Significantly higher concentration of the elements was pronounced for the tunnel in comparison with the street canyons. The results indicate that the use of S. girgensohnii moss bags is a simple, sensitive and inexpensive way to monitor the small-scale inner city spatial distribution of airborne major and trace element content. PMID:23430735

  17. Experimental parameters optimization of instrumental neutron activation analysis in order to determine selected elements in some industrial soils in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haciyakupoglu, Sevilay; Nur Esen, Ayse; Erenturk, Sema

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is optimization of the experimental parameters for analysis of soil matrix by instrumental neutron activation analysis and quantitative determination of barium, cerium, lanthanum, rubidium, scandium and thorium in soil samples collected from industrialized urban areas near Istanbul. Samples were irradiated in TRIGA MARK II Research Reactor of Istanbul Technical University. Two types of reference materials were used to check the accuracy of the applied method. The achieved results were found to be in compliance with certified values of the reference materials. The calculated En numbers for mentioned elements were found to be less than 1. The presented data of element concentrations in soil samples will help to trace the pollution as an impact of urbanization and industrialization, as well as providing database for future studies.

  18. Sequence elements in the human osteocalcin gene confer basal activation and inducible response to hormonal vitamin D sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kerner, S.A.; Scott, R.A.; Pike, J.W. )

    1989-06-01

    Osteoblast-specific expression of the bone protein osteocalcin is controlled at the transcriptional level by the steroid hormone 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. As this protein may represent a marker for bone activity in human disease, the authors examined the regulation of its expression at the molecular level by evaluating human osteocalcin gene promoter function. They describe regions within the promoter that contribute to basal expression of the gene in osteoblast-like cells in culture. Further, they define a 21-base-pair DNA element with the sequence 5{prime}-GTGACTCACCGGGTGAACGGG-3{prime}, which acts in cis to mediate 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} inducibility of the osteocalcin gene. This response element bears sequence similarity with other short DNA segments, particularly those for estrogen and thyroid hormone, which act together with their respective trans-acting receptors to modulate gene transcription.

  19. Functional characterization of neural-restrictive silencer element in mouse pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hideki; Tominaga, Aiko; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamada, Katsushi; Miyata, Atsuro

    2014-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is predominantly localized in the nervous system, but the underlying mechanism in its neuron-specific expression remains unclear. In addition to two neural-restrictive silencer-like element (NRSLE1 and 2), as reported previously, we have identified the third element in -1,601 to -1,581 bp from the translational initiation site of mouse PACAP gene and termed it as NRSLE3, of which, the sequence and location were highly conserved among mouse, rat, and human PACAP genes. In luciferase reporter assay, the deletion or site-directed mutagenesis of NRSLE3 in the reporter gene construct, driven by heterologous SV40 promoter, cancelled the repression of luciferase activity in non-neuronal Swiss-3T3 cells. Furthermore, its promoter activity was significantly repressed in Swiss-3T3 cells, but not in neuronal-differentiated PC12 cells. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) with nuclear extracts of Swiss-3T3 cells demonstrated a specific complex with NRSLE3 probe that exhibited the same migration with the neural-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) probe of rat type II sodium channel gene. During neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells, the increment of PACAP mRNA exhibited the correlation with that of REST4 mRNA, which is a neuron-specific variant form of neural-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF). In undifferentiated PC12 cells, trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which indirectly inhibits NRSF-mediated gene silencing, increased PACAP mRNA level and attenuated the repression of promoter activity of 5' flanking region of mouse PACAP gene containing NRSLEs. These suggest that the NRSE-NRSF system implicates in the regulatory mechanism of neuron-specific expression of PACAP gene. PMID:24939248

  20. Finite element analyses of thin film active grazing incidence x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, William N.; Reid, Paul B.; Schwartz, Daniel A.

    2010-09-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory, with its sub-arc second resolution, has revolutionized X-ray astronomy by revealing an extremely complex X-ray sky and demonstrating the power of the X-ray window in exploring fundamental astrophysical problems. Larger area telescopes of still higher angular resolution promise further advances. We are engaged in the development of a mission concept, Generation-X, a 0.1 arc second resolution x-ray telescope with tens of square meters of collecting area, 500 times that of Chandra. To achieve these two requirements of imaging and area, we are developing a grazing incidence telescope comprised of many mirror segments. Each segment is an adjustable mirror that is a section of a paraboloid or hyperboloid, aligned and figure corrected in situ on-orbit. To that end, finite element analyses of thin glass mirrors are performed to determine influence functions for each actuator on the mirrors, in order to develop algorithms for correction of mirror deformations. The effects of several mirror mounting schemes are also studied. The finite element analysis results, combined with measurements made on prototype mirrors, will be used to further refine the correction algorithms.