Science.gov

Sample records for active beam spectroscopy

  1. Active Beam Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hellermann, M. G.; Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Biel, W.; Marchuk, O.; Summers, H. P.; Whiteford, A.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2008-03-01

    Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) plays a pivotal role in the diagnostics of hot fusion plasmas and is implemented currently in most of the operating devices. In the present report the main features of CXRS are summarized and supporting software packages encompassing "Spectral Analysis Code CXSFIT", "Charge Exchange Analysis Package CHEAP", and finally "Forward Prediction of Spectral Features" are described. Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) is proposed as indispensable cross-calibration tool for absolute local impurity density measurements and also for the continuous monitoring of the neutral beam power deposition profile. Finally, a full exploitation of the `Motional Stark Effect' pattern is proposed to deduce local pitch angles, total magnetic fields and possibly radial electric fields. For the proposed active beam spectroscopy diagnostic on ITER comprehensive performance studies have been carried out. Estimates of expected spectral signal-to-noise ratios are based on atomic modelling of neutral beam stopping and emissivities for CXRS, BES and background continuum radiation as well as extrapolations from present CXRS diagnostic systems on JET, Tore Supra, TEXTOR and ASDEX-UG. Supplementary to thermal features a further promising application of CXRS has been proposed recently for ITER, that is a study of slowing-down alpha particles in the energy range up to 2 MeV making use of the 100 keV/amu DNB (Diagnostic Neutral Beam) and the 500 keV/amu HNB (Heating Neutral Beam). Synthetic Fast Ion Slowing-Down spectra are evaluated in terms of source rates and slowing-down parameters

  2. Beams, brightness, and background: Using active spectroscopy techniques for precision measurements in fusion plasma research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dan M.

    2012-05-15

    The use of an injected neutral beam-either a dedicated diagnostic beam or the main heating beams-to localize and enhance plasma spectroscopic measurements can be exploited for a number of key physics issues in magnetic confinement fusion research, yielding detailed profile information on thermal and fast ion parameters, the radial electric field, plasma current density, and turbulent transport. The ability to make these measurements has played a significant role in much of our recent progress in the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas. The measurements can utilize emission from excited state transitions either from plasma ions or from the beam atoms themselves. The primary requirement is that the beam 'probe' interacts with the plasma in a known fashion. Advantages of active spectroscopy include high spatial resolution due to the enhanced localization of the emission and the use of appropriate imaging optics, background rejection through the appropriate modulation and timing of the beam and emission collection/detection system, and the ability of the beam to populate emitter states that are either nonexistent or too dim to utilize effectively in the case of standard or passive spectroscopy. In addition, some active techniques offer the diagnostician unique information because of the specific quantum physics responsible for the emission. This paper will describe the general principles behind a successful active spectroscopic measurement, emphasize specific techniques that facilitate the measurements and include several successful examples of their implementation, briefly touching on some of the more important physics results. It concludes with a few remarks about the relevance and requirements of active spectroscopic techniques for future burning plasma experiments.

  3. Beam-foil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Hass, M.

    1982-01-01

    A brief survey of some applications of beam-foil spectroscopy is presented. Among the topics covered are lifetime and magnetic moment measurements, nuclear alignment, and polarized light production. (AIP)

  4. Optimizing 50kV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam performance for active spectroscopy in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Boguski, J.; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Munaretto, S.; Nornberg, M. D.; Olivia, S.

    2015-11-01

    The 50 kV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam on MST provides local measurements of impurity ion emission through charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) and of core-localized magnetic field through the motional Stark effect (MSE). The beam, which was designed to provide 5A of neutral current at 50 kV to meet these needs, is currently on a test stand to accommodate diagnosis, in order to increase the reliability of beam formation, sustain a steady current of 5 amps for 20ms, and optimize the primary energy fraction. The reliability of arc formation was increased from 40% to 80% success rate with increase of cathode gas pressure from 150kPa to 200kPa, and the stability of the arc current is improved with a decrease of the insulation magnetic field. A calorimeter with 5 thermocouples is installed to measure the horizontal and vertical beam profiles as well as beam divergence. Beam energy components are quantified through Doppler-shift spectroscopy. Preliminary simulation results of the beam using the ALCBEAM code as well as a description of how changes to the beam performance can affect CHERS and MSE measurements are presented. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE.

  5. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed.

  6. Active fiber-based retroreflector providing phase-retracing anti-parallel laser beams for precision spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Beyer, A; Maisenbacher, L; Matveev, A; Pohl, R; Khabarova, K; Chang, Y; Grinin, A; Lamour, T; Shi, T; Yost, D C; Udem, Th; Hänsch, T W; Kolachevsky, N

    2016-07-25

    We present an active fiber-based retroreflector providing high quality phase-retracing anti-parallel Gaussian laser beams for precision spectroscopy of Doppler sensitive transitions. Our design is well-suited for a number of applications where implementing optical cavities is technically challenging and corner cubes fail to match the demanded requirements, most importantly retracing wavefronts and preservation of the laser polarization. To illustrate the performance of the system, we use it for spectroscopy of the 2S-4P transition in atomic hydrogen and demonstrate an average suppression of the first order Doppler shift to 4 parts in 106 of the full collinear shift. This high degree of cancellation combined with our cryogenic source of hydrogen atoms in the metastable 2S state is sufficient to enable determinations of the Rydberg constant and the proton charge radius with competitive uncertainties. Advantages over the usual Doppler cancellation based on corner cube type retroreflectors are discussed as well as an alternative method using a high finesse cavity. PMID:27464193

  7. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    We are requesting support for a postdoctoral person to participate in H{sup -} studies at Los Alamos. In addition, we are requesting funding for a state-of-the-art YAG laser system that would allow us to obtain data at three times our present rate with improved beam quality.

  8. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D.; Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Cristofaro, S.

    2015-04-08

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H{sub α} light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H{sub α} spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  9. PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERSONIC MOLECULAR BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, J.E.; Trevor, D.J.; Lee, Y.T.; Shirley, D.A.

    1981-06-01

    We report the development of an instrument for gas-phase ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy which opens several new areas for study through use of the supersonic molecular beam technique. The key features in which we have sought an improvement on earlier spectrometer designs are (1) the optimization of electron energy resolution and sensitivity, (2) vacuum isolation, and (3) the capability for mass spectrometric analysis. Our principal interests are in the high resolution spectroscopy of small molecules and in studies of weakly bound complexes formed under collisionless conditions. As shown in Fig. 1 the apparatus is essentially a molecular beam chamber with allowance for access by a beam source, an electron energy analyzer, and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. These three plug-in units are equipped with individual differential pumping systems. The photon source is a rare-gas resonance lamp which may be directed toward the molecular beam either 90{sup o} or 54.7{sup o} from the direction of electron collection. Electrons which pass through entrance aperture are transported by a series of electrostatic lenses to a 90{sup o} spherical sector pre-analyzer (R{sub 0} = 3.8 cm) and then on to a 180{sup o} hemispherical analyzer (R{sub 0} = 10.2 cm). The detector consists of a microchannel plate electron multiplier (40 mm diam.) with a resistive-anode position encoder. The function of the pre-analyzer is to improve the signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the background of scattered electrons incident upon the microchannel plate. The electron optical system is designed such that the energy bandpass (FWHN) leaving the pre-analyzer just fills the energy window presented by the multichannel detector. The multichannel capability of this analyzer is very advantageous for working with the rather low number density (< 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) of molecular beam samples, since the data collection rate is improved by more than an order of magnitude over single channel operation. To

  10. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R., LLNL

    1998-03-18

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center, the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques would play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of stockpile stewardship. The Livermore facilities now include the world`s highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. It was concluded that the positron microprobe under development at LLNL and other new instruments that would be relocated at LLNL at the high current keV source are an exciting step forward in providing results for the positron technique. These new data will impact a wide variety of applications.

  11. Equilibrium and Stability Measurements via Neutral Beam Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinecke, E. A.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Olig, A. D.; Thorson, T. A.

    2000-10-01

    An optical neutral beam spectroscopy system is being designed to provide plasma density, local temperature, internal structure of large-scale MHD instabilities, and magnetic field structure for the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment. Time resolved, spatially localized measurements of the plasma density are determined by the intensity gradient of the beam fluorescence. Ratios of line intensities of a helium beam provide the electron temperature profile. Spectrally resolved measurements of the charge-exchange recombination emission of impurities determine the local ion temperature. Plasma stability is studied with localized MHD measurements via the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) technique. Motional Stark broadening of deuterium beam emission provide the magnitude (mod-B) and direction of the total field by analyzing the amplitude and phase delay of an oscillating spectral linewidth driven by a rotating polarizer. Present efforts are focused on refurbishing the beam hardware (25 kV, 4 A) and exploring the feasibility of a compact pencil beam.

  12. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy at the RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Doornenbal, Pieter

    2015-10-15

    At the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory stable primary beams are accelerated up to 345 MeV/u and incident on a primary target to produce secondary cocktail beams with the fragment separator BigRIPS ranging from the lightest nuclei up to the uranium region. For in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy, the secondary beam impinge on a reaction target at energies between 100 and 300 MeV/u. Reaction residues are identified with the ZeroDegree spectrometer and γ-rays detected with the NaI(Tl) based DALI2 array. This conference paper outlines the experimental setup and presents recent exemplary results.

  13. Positron annihilation spectroscopy with magnetically analyzed beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Lifetime measurements with magnetically analyzed positron beams were made in condensed media with uniform and non-uniform properties. As expected, the lifetime values with magnetically analyzed positron beams in uniform targets are similar to those obtained with conventional positron sources. The lifetime values with magnetically analyzed beams in targets which have non-uniform properties vary with positron energy and are different from the conventional positron source derived lifetime values in these targets.

  14. NAIS: Nuclear activation-based imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Günther, M. M.; Britz, A.; Harres, K.; Hoffmeister, G.; Nürnberg, F.; Otten, A.; Pelka, A.; Roth, M.; Clarke, R. J.; Vogt, K.

    2013-07-15

    In recent years, the development of high power laser systems led to focussed intensities of more than 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} at high pulse energies. Furthermore, both, the advanced high power lasers and the development of sophisticated laser particle acceleration mechanisms facilitate the generation of high energetic particle beams at high fluxes. The challenge of imaging detector systems is to acquire the properties of the high flux beam spatially and spectrally resolved. The limitations of most detector systems are saturation effects. These conventional detectors are based on scintillators, semiconductors, or radiation sensitive films. We present a nuclear activation-based imaging spectroscopy method, which is called NAIS, for the characterization of laser accelerated proton beams. The offline detector system is a combination of stacked metal foils and imaging plates (IP). After the irradiation of the stacked foils they become activated by nuclear reactions, emitting gamma decay radiation. In the next step, an autoradiography of the activated foils using IPs and an analysis routine lead to a spectrally and spatially resolved beam profile. In addition, we present an absolute calibration method for IPs.

  15. Molecular-beam spectroscopy of interhalogen molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrow, S.A.

    1983-08-01

    A molecular-beam electric-resonance spectrometer employing a supersonic nozzle source has been used to obtain hyperfine spectra of /sup 79/Br/sup 35/Cl. Analyses of these spectra and of microwave spectra published by other authors have yielded new values for the electric dipole moment and for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants in this molecule. The new constants are significantly different from the currently accepted values. Van der Waals clusters containing chlorine monofluoride have been studied under various expansion conditions by the molecular-beam electric-deflection method. The structural possibilities indicated by the results are discussed, and cluster geometries are proposed.

  16. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  17. Polarization Studies in Fast-Ion Beam Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2001-12-20

    In a historical review, the observations and the insight gained from polarization studies of fast ions interacting with solid targets are presented. These began with J. Macek's recognition of zero-field quantum beats in beam-foil spectroscopy as indicating alignment, and D.G. Ellis' density operator analysis that suggested the observability of orientation when using tilted foils. Lastly H. Winter's studies of the ion-beam surface interaction at grazing incidence yielded the means to produce a high degree of nuclear orientation in ion beams.

  18. Two-beam interferometer for fourier spectroscopy with rigid pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, P.

    1983-05-17

    A two-beam interferometer for fourier spectroscopy includes a rigid pendulum structure mounting at least one of the movable retroreflectors in a fully compensated optical system immune to tilt and lateral movement distortions. The swing of the rotatably journaled pendulum accurately confines the retroreflector(s) to movement in a single plane during scanning and, due to the low heat generated in the pendulum bearings, the simple and compact structure is well adapted to be housed in a cryostat aboard a spacecraft.

  19. The Collinear Fast Beam laser Spectroscopy (CFBS) experiment at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, A.; Procter, T. J.; Shelbaya, O.; Amaudruz, P.; Buchinger, F.; Crawford, J. E.; Daviel, S.; Mané, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Tamimi, W. Al

    2016-03-01

    Laser spectroscopy experiments at radioactive ion beam facilities around the world investigate properties of exotic nuclei for scientific endeavours such as, but not limited to, the investigation of nuclear structure. Advancements in experimental sensitivity and performance are continuously needed in order to extend the reach of nuclei that can be measured. The collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy (CFBS) setup at TRIUMF, coupled to an out-of-plane radio-frequency quadrupole Paul trap, enables measurements of some of the most fundamental nuclear properties for long-lived ground and isomeric states. The first comprehensive overview of the CFBS experiment is provided along with descriptions of key developments that extend the reach of laser spectroscopy experiments. A novel data acquisition technique structured around three-dimensional spectra is presented, where the integration of a custom multi-channel-scalar provides photon counts correlated with arrival time and acceleration voltage for post-experiment analysis. In addition, new rapid light manipulation techniques are discussed that suppress undesirable hyperfine pumping effects and regain losses in experimental efficiency.

  20. Density fluctuation measurements using beam emission spectroscopy on Heliotron J

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, S.; Ohshima, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Mizuuchi, T.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Konoshima, S.; Toushi, K.; Sano, F.; Kado, S.; Oishi, T.; Kagawa, T.; Nagae, Y.; Lee, H. Y.; Minami, T.; Harada, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Estrada, T.; Murakami, S.

    2012-10-15

    This paper describes the measurement of the density fluctuation using beam emission spectroscopy in Heliotron J, having the non-symmetrical helical-magnetic-axis configuration. In order to optimize the sightlines, the numerical calculations are carried out to estimate the spatial resolution and the observation location. When a tangential neutral beam is used as diagnostic one, suitable sightlines from the newly installed diagnostic port are selected whose spatial resolution {Delta}{rho} is less than {+-}0.07 over the entire plasma region. Modification of the interference filter and the detection systems enables us to measure the radial profile of the density fluctuation. Each of the three coherent modes due to the fast-ion-driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities has different radial structure of the density fluctuation.

  1. Evaluation of two-beam spectroscopy as a plasma diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Billard, B.D.

    1980-04-01

    A two-beam spectroscopy (TBS) system is evaluated theoretically and experimentally. This new spectroscopic technique uses correlations between components of emitted light separated by a small difference in angle of propagation. It is thus a non-perturbing plasma diagnostic which is shown to provide local (as opposed to line-of-sight averaged) information about fluctuations in the density of light sources within a plasma - information not obtainable by the usual spectroscopic methods. The present design is an improvement on earlier systems proposed in a thesis by Rostler.

  2. Development of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and the beam emission spectroscopy on the EAST tokamak.

    PubMed

    Li, Y Y; Fu, J; Lyu, B; Du, X W; Li, C Y; Zhang, Y; Yin, X H; Yu, Y; Wang, Q P; von Hellermann, M; Shi, Y J; Ye, M Y; Wan, B N

    2014-11-01

    Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics based on a heating neutral beam have recently been installed on EAST to provide local measurements of ion temperature, velocity, and density. The system design features common light collection optics for CXRS and BES, background channels for the toroidal views, multi-chord viewing sightlines, and high throughput lens-based spectrometers with good signal to noise ratio for high time resolution measurements. Additionally, two spectrometers each has a tunable grating to observe any wavelength of interest are used for the CXRS and one utilizes a fixed-wavelength grating to achieve higher diffraction efficiency for the BES system. A real-time wavelength correction is implemented to achieve a high-accuracy wavelength calibration. Alignment and calibration are performed. Initial performance test results are presented. PMID:25430335

  3. Modeling and simulation of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for the ITER prototype neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Barbisan, M. Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-11-15

    A test facility for the development of the neutral beam injection system for ITER is under construction at Consorzio RFX. It will host two experiments: SPIDER, a 100 keV H{sup −}/D{sup −} ion RF source, and MITICA, a prototype of the full performance ITER injector (1 MV, 17 MW beam). A set of diagnostics will monitor the operation and allow to optimize the performance of the two prototypes. In particular, beam emission spectroscopy will measure the uniformity and the divergence of the fast particles beam exiting the ion source and travelling through the beam line components. This type of measurement is based on the collection of the H{sub α}/D{sub α} emission resulting from the interaction of the energetic particles with the background gas. A numerical model has been developed to simulate the spectrum of the collected emissions in order to design this diagnostic and to study its performance. The paper describes the model at the base of the simulations and presents the modeled H{sub α} spectra in the case of MITICA experiment.

  4. In-beam spectroscopy of 215Rn86

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debray, M. E.; Davidson, M.; Davidson, J.; Kreiner, A. J.; Cardona, M. A.; Hojman, D.; Napoli, D. R.; Lenzi, S.; de Angelis, G.; De Poli, M.; Gadea, A.; Bazzacco, D.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Medina, N.; Ur, C. A.

    2012-07-01

    The yrast level structure of 215Rn has been studied by means of in-beam spectroscopy α-γ-γ coincidence techniques through the 207Pb(18O,2α2n) reaction at 93 MeV bombarding energy, using the 8π GASP-ISIS spectrometer at Legnaro. New spectroscopic information has been obtained. The deduced low-lying level scheme of 215Rn does not exhibit the alternating parity structure observed in the heavier known isotones 216Fr, 217Ra, 218Ac, and 219Th. From this result, the lightest nucleus showing evidence for octupole collectivity is 216Fr, defining the lowest-mass corner for this kind of phenomenon as N≥129 and Z≥87.

  5. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy: appendix a

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R. H., LLNL

    1997-11-05

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory jointly sponsored by the DOE-Division of Materials Science, The Materials Research Institute at LLNL and the University of California Presidents Office. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques will play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. There were general discussions lead by review talks on positron analysis techniques, and their applications to problems in semiconductors, polymers and composites, metals and engineering materials, surface analysis and advanced techniques. These were followed by focus sessions on positron analysis opportunities in these same areas. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of science based stockpile stewardship. There was a detailed discussion of the LLNL capabilities and a tour of the facilities. The Livermore facilities now include the worlds highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. This document is a supplement to the written summary report. It contains a complete schedule, list of attendees and the vuegraphs for the presentations in the review and focus sessions.

  6. Avalanche photodiode based detector for beam emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunai, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Sarkoezi, J.; Field, A. R.

    2010-10-15

    An avalanche photodiode based (APD) detector for the visible wavelength range was developed for low light level, high frequency beam emission spectroscopy (BES) experiments in fusion plasmas. This solid state detector has higher quantum efficiency than photomultiplier tubes, and unlike normal photodiodes, it has internal gain. This paper describes the developed detector as well as the noise model of the electronic circuit. By understanding the noise sources and the amplification process, the optimal amplifier and APD reverse voltage setting can be determined, where the signal-to-noise ratio is the highest for a given photon flux. The calculations are compared to the absolute calibration results of the implemented circuit. It was found that for a certain photon flux range, relevant for BES measurements ({approx_equal}10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} photons/s), the new detector is superior to both photomultipliers and photodiodes, although it does not require cryogenic cooling of any component. The position of this photon flux window sensitively depends on the parameters of the actual experimental implementation (desired bandwidth, detector size, etc.) Several detector units based on these developments have been built and installed in various tokamaks. Some illustrative results are presented from the 8-channel trial BES system installed at Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) and the 16-channel BES system installed at the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR).

  7. Overview of in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy at the RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornenbal, Pieter

    2016-07-01

    At the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory stable primary beams are accelerated up to 345 MeV/u and incident on a primary target to produce cocktail secondary beams with the fragment separator BigRIPS ranging from the lightest nuclei up to the lead region. For in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy, the secondary beams impinge on a reaction target at energies between 100 and 300 MeV/u. Reaction residues are identified with the ZeroDegree spectrometer and γ-rays detected with the NaI(Tl) based DALI2 array. This conference paper outlines the experimental setup and presents recent exemplary results.

  8. Electron beam imaging and spectroscopy of plasmonic nanoantenna resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesseur, E. J. R.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoantennas are metal structures that provide strong optical coupling between a nanoscale volume and the far field. This coupling is mediated by surface plasmons, oscillations of the free electrons in the metal. Increasing the control over the resonant plasmonic field distribution opens up a wide range of applications of nanoantennas operating both in receiving and transmitting mode. This thesis presents how the dispersion and confinement of surface plasmons in nanoantennas are resolved and further engineered. Fabrication of nanostructures is done using focused ion beam milling (FIB) in metallic surfaces. We demonstrate that patterning in single-crystal substrates allows us to precisely control the geometry in which plasmons are confined. The nanoscale properties of the resonant plasmonic fields are resolved using a new technique developed in this thesis: angle- and polarization controlled cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging spectroscopy. The use of a tightly focused electron beam allows us to probe the optical antenna properties with deep subwavelength resolution. We show using this technique that nanoantennas consisting of 500-1200 nm long polycrystalline Au nanowires support standing plasmon waves. We directly observe the plasmon wavelengths which we use to derive the dispersion relation of guided nanowire plasmons. A 590-nm-long ridge-shaped nanoantenna was fabricated using FIB milling on a single-crystal Au substrate, demonstrating a level of control over the fabrication impossible with polycrystalline metals. CL experiments show that the ridge supports multiple-order resonances. The confinement of surface plasmons to the ridge is confirmed by boundary-element-method (BEM) calculations. The resonant modes in plasmonic whispering gallery cavities consisting of a FIB-fabricated circular groove are resolved. We find an excellent agreement between boundary element method calculations and the measured CL emission from the ring-shaped cavities. The calculations show

  9. Water Structure Studied by Far Infrared Spectroscopy in FTIR Beam Line of MIRRORCLE 20

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Nobuhiro; Moon, Ahsa; Kitagawa, Toshimichi; Yamada, Hironari

    2007-03-30

    Far infrared vibrational Spectroscopy for distilled water was performed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) in the FTIR beam line of MIRRORCLE 20. Synchrotron radiation was utilized as a light source for the absorption Spectroscopy in the frequency range from 100cm-1 to 20cm-1. Off-line measurements by black body radiation of ceramic heater were also examined in the range from 400cm-1 to 50cm-1. Wide range spectrum was obtained after the SR data merged the off-line data. We report the recent development in the beam line and the examples of spectra related to the water structure.

  10. Water Structure Studied by Far Infrared Spectroscopy in FTIR Beam Line of MIRRORCLE 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Nobuhiro; Moon, Ahsa; Yamada, Hironari; Kitagawa, Toshimichi

    2007-03-01

    Far infrared vibrational Spectroscopy for distilled water was performed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) in the FTIR beam line of MIRRORCLE 20. Synchrotron radiation was utilized as a light source for the absorption Spectroscopy in the frequency range from 100cm-1 to 20cm-1. Off-line measurements by black body radiation of ceramic heater were also examined in the range from 400cm-1 to 50cm-1. Wide range spectrum was obtained after the SR data merged the off-line data. We report the recent development in the beam line and the examples of spectra related to the water structure.

  11. Investigation of {sup 246}Fm : in-beam spectroscopy at the limits

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, J.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B. J.-P.; Rubert, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Grahn, T.; Herzan, A.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nieminen, P.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Saren, J.

    2011-10-28

    The structure of {sup 246}Fm has been investigated using in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The experiment was performed at the University of Jyvaeskylae using JUROGAM 2 coupled to RITU and GREAT. The {sup 246}Fm nuclei were produced using a 186 MeV beam of {sup 40}Ar impinging on a target of {sup 208}Pb. JUROGAM 2 was fully instrumented with TNT2D digital acquisition cards. The use of digital acquisition cards and a rotating target allowed for unprecedented beam intensities up to 71 particle-nanoamperes for prompt {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. With all these major advances for spectroscopy a rotational band is observed for the first time in {sup 246}Fm and discussed here.

  12. Spectroscopy of ions using fast beams and ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnington, E H; Trabert, E

    2004-10-01

    A knowledge of the spectra of ionized atoms is of importance in many fields. They can be studied in a wide variety of light sources. In recent years techniques coming under the broad heatings of fast beams and ion traps have been used extensively for such investigations. This article considers the advantages that various techniques have for particular applications.

  13. Ultra-sensitive high-precision spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew A.; Siller, Brian M.; Porambo, Michael W.; Perera, Manori; Kreckel, Holger; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2011-12-14

    Direct spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam offers many advantages over competing techniques, including the generality of the approach to any molecular ion, the complete elimination of spectral confusion due to neutral molecules, and the mass identification of individual spectral lines. The major challenge is the intrinsic weakness of absorption or dispersion signals resulting from the relatively low number density of ions in the beam. Direct spectroscopy of an ion beam was pioneered by Saykally and co-workers in the late 1980s, but has not been attempted since that time. Here, we present the design and construction of an ion beam spectrometer with several improvements over the Saykally design. The ion beam and its characterization have been improved by adopting recent advances in electrostatic optics, along with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer that can be used simultaneously with optical spectroscopy. As a proof of concept, a noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) setup with a noise equivalent absorption of {approx}2 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2} has been used to observe several transitions of the Meinel 1-0 band of N{sub 2}{sup +} with linewidths of {approx}120 MHz. An optical frequency comb has been used for absolute frequency calibration of transition frequencies to within {approx}8 MHz. This work represents the first direct spectroscopy of an electronic transition in an ion beam, and also represents a major step toward the development of routine infrared spectroscopy of rotationally cooled molecular ions.

  14. Ultrafast spectroscopy of super high frequency mechanical modes of doubly clamped beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristow, Oliver; Merklein, Moritz; Grossmann, Martin; Hettich, Mike; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Grebing, Jochen; Erbe, Artur; Mounier, Denis; Gusev, Vitalyi; Scheer, Elke; Dekorsy, Thomas; Barretto, Elaine C. S.

    2013-12-01

    We use ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to study the mechanical vibrations in the time domain of doubly clamped silicon nitride beams. Beams with two different clamping conditions are investigated. Finite element method calculations are performed to analyse the mode spectra of both structures. By calculating the strain integral on the surface of the resonators, we are able to reproduce the effect of the detection mechanism and identify all the measured modes. We show that our spectroscopy technique combined with our modelling tools allow the investigation of several different modes in the super high frequency range (3-30 GHz) and above, bringing more information about the vibration modes of nanomechanical resonators.

  15. Neutral beam spectroscopy for equilibrium and stability measurements for the PEGASUS toroidal experiment (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorson, T.; Fonck, R.; Lewicki, B.

    1999-01-01

    An optical neutral beam spectroscopy system is being designed to provide equilibrium and stability measurements for the PEGASUS toroidal experiment. Spatially localized measurements of the electron temperature and plasma density are possible by observing the intensity of the collisionally induced neutral beam fluorescence. In a helium beam, the population of the singlet levels are relatively independent of the plasma temperature compared to the triplet levels. Therefore, the ratio of intensities of a triplet transition (e.g., 33S→23P, λ=706.5 nm) to a singlet transition (e.g., 31P→21S, λ=501.6 nm) provides a measure of the local plasma temperature for the range 10 eVbeam fluorescence signal as the beam passes through the plasma. Additionally in a deuterium beam, the local plasma density can be directly inferred from the local radial gradient in the observed beam fluorescence signal. Plasma stability will be studied with localized magnetohydrodynamics measurements via beam emission spectroscopy, which otherwise is problematic for low-field spherical plasmas.

  16. Neutral beam spectroscopy for equilibrium and stability measurements for the PEGASUS toroidal experiment (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Thorson, T.; Fonck, R.; Lewicki, B.

    1999-01-01

    An optical neutral beam spectroscopy system is being designed to provide equilibrium and stability measurements for the PEGASUS toroidal experiment. Spatially localized measurements of the electron temperature and plasma density are possible by observing the intensity of the collisionally induced neutral beam fluorescence. In a helium beam, the population of the singlet levels are relatively independent of the plasma temperature compared to the triplet levels. Therefore, the ratio of intensities of a triplet transition (e.g., 3{sup 3}S{r_arrow}2{sup 3}P, {lambda}=706.5 nm) to a singlet transition (e.g., 3{sup 1}P{r_arrow}2{sup 1}S, {lambda}=501.6 nm) provides a measure of the local plasma temperature for the range 10 eV{lt}T{sub e}{lt}1.0 keV. The plasma density profile can be inferred from the attenuation of the beam fluorescence signal as the beam passes through the plasma. Additionally in a deuterium beam, the local plasma density can be directly inferred from the local radial gradient in the observed beam fluorescence signal. Plasma stability will be studied with localized magnetohydrodynamics measurements via beam emission spectroscopy, which otherwise is problematic for low-field spherical plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Expansion Discharge Source for Ion Beam Laser Spectroscopy of Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porambo, Michael; Pearson, Jessica; Riccardo, Craig; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2013-06-01

    Molecular ions are important in several fields of research, and spectroscopy acts as a key tool in the study of these ions. However, problems such as low ion abundance, ion-neutral confusion, and spectral congestion due to high internal temperatures can hinder effective spectroscopic studies. To circumvent these problems, we are developing a technique called Sensitive, Cooled, Resolved, Ion BEam Spectroscopy (SCRIBES). This ion beam spectrometer will feature a continuous supersonic expansion discharge source to produce cold molecular ions, electrostatic ion optics to focus the ions into an ion beam and bend the beam away from co-produced neutral molecules, an overlap region for cavity enhanced spectroscopy, and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. When completed, SCRIBES will be an effective tool for the study of large, fluxional, and complex molecular ions that are difficult to study with other means. The ion beam spectrometer has been successfully implemented with a hot ion source. This talk will focus on the work of integrating a supersonic expansion discharge source into the instrument. To better understand how the source would work in the whole ion beam instrument, characterization studies are being performed with spectroscopy of HN_2^+ in a section of the system to ascertain the rotational temperature of the ion expansion. Attempts are also underway to measure the ion current from a beam formed from the expansion. Once the source in this environment is properly understood, we will reintegrate it to the rest of the ion beam system, completing SCRIBES. A. A. Mills, B. M. Siller, M. W. Porambo, M. Perera, H. Kreckel and B. J. McCall J. Chem. Phys., 135, 224201, (2011). K. N. Crabtree, C. A. Kauffman and B. J. McCall Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 086103, (2010).

  18. Precision Fast Ion Beam Laser Spectroscopy of Ar{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Lioubimov, V.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Schuessler, H. A.; Wada, M.; Nakamura, T.; Schury, P.; Ogawa, M.; Takamine, A.; Yamazaki, Y.; Iimura, H.; Okada, K.

    2009-03-17

    Absolute measurements of spectral lines of Ar{sup +} ions using collinear and anticollinear geometries were performed. To provide a precise reference for the laser wavelength, iodine saturation spectroscopy was applied. The precision of this reference is effected by observing the beat node between the spectroscopy laser and the corresponding mode of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Laser-induced fluorescence allowed to perform precision frequency measurements of an Ar{sup +} transition in collinear and anticollinear geometries simultaneously; then an exact relativistic formula for the absolute transition frequency V{sub 0} = {radical}(V{sub c}V{sub a}) was used. In this geometry the influence of ion source instabilities due to pressure and anode voltage fluctuations was minimized. The result is v{sub 0} = 485,573,619.7(3) MHz, which corresponds to {delta}v/v = 6*10{sup -10}. This represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude over the previous NIST published value.

  19. Precision Fast Ion Beam Laser Spectroscopy of Ar+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioubimov, V.; Wada, M.; Ogawa, M.; Takamine, A.; Nakamura, T.; Schury, P.; Iimura, H.; Okada, K.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Schuessler, H. A.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2009-03-01

    Absolute measurements of spectral lines of Ar+ ions using collinear and anticollinear geometries were performed. To provide a precise reference for the laser wavelength, iodine saturation spectroscopy was applied. The precision of this reference is effected by observing the beat node between the spectroscopy laser and the corresponding mode of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Laser-induced fluorescence allowed to perform precision frequency measurements of an Ar+ transition in collinear and anticollinear geometries simultaneously; then an exact relativistic formula for the absolute transition frequency V0= √VcVa was used. In this geometry the influence of ion source instabilities due to pressure and anode voltage fluctuations was minimized. The result is v0 = 485,573,619.7(3) MHz, which corresponds to Δv/v = 6*10-10. This represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude over the previous NIST published value.

  20. Spectroscopy of Argon Excited in an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2005-04-18

    Argon is one of the gases best investigated and most widely used in plasma discharge devices for a multitude of applications that range from wavelength reference standards to controlled fusion experiments. Reviewing atomic physics and spectroscopic problems in various ionization stages of Ar, the past use and future options of employing an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) for better and more complete Ar data in the x-ray, EUV and visible spectral ranges are discussed.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Progress in laser spectroscopy at radioactive ion beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheal, B.; Flanagan, K. T.

    2010-11-01

    In the last decade there has been a renaissance in laser spectroscopy at on-line facilities. This has included the introduction of ion traps and the use of laser ion sources to study the hyperfine structure of exotic nuclei far from stability and produce selective enhancement of isomeric beams. In-source spectroscopy has allowed the study of rare isotopes with yields as low as 0.1 atoms per second. In the case of high-resolution spectroscopy, cooling and trapping the ions has dramatically improved the sensitivity. Some elements that were previously inaccessible to laser spectroscopy are now available for study through the technique of in-trap optical pumping. This paper reviews the field of laser spectroscopy at on-line facilities, with an emphasis on new techniques. A summary of experimental data is presented.

  2. Molecular Beam Optical Stark Spectroscopy of Magnesium Deuteride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimle, Timothy; Zhang, Ruohan; Wang, Hailing

    2014-06-01

    Light polar, paramagnetic molecules, such as magnesium hydride, MgH, are attractive for slowing and trapping experiments because these molecules have both non-zero permanent electric dipole, μel, and magnetic dipole, μm moments. The permanent electric dipole moment is particularly relevant to Stark deceleration which depends on the ratio of the Stark shift to molecular mass. Here we report on the Stark effect in the (0,0) A2Π - X 2Σ+ band system of a cold molecular beam sample of magnesium deuteride, MgD. The lines associated with the lowest rotational levels are detected for the first time. The field-free spectrum was analyzed to produce an improved set of fine structure parameters for the A2Π(v = 0) state. The observed electric field induced splittings and shifts were analyzed to produce permanent electric dipole moments, μel,of 2.561(10)D and 1.34(8)D for A2Π(v = 0) and X2Σ+(v=0)states, respectively. This is the first molecular beam study of MgD.

  3. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Levine, M.A.; Schneider, M.B.; Scofield, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U.

    2011-11-01

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  5. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    SciTech Connect

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U.; Collaboration: RITU-Gamma Gollaboration

    2011-11-30

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  6. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  7. Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

  8. Supersonic Molecular Beam Optical Stark Spectroscopy of MnH.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gengler, Jamie; Ma, Tongmei; Harrison, Jeremy; Steimle, Timothy

    2006-03-01

    The large moment of inertia, large magnetic moment, and possible large permanent electric dipole moment of manganese monohydride, MnH, makes it a prime candidate for ultra-cold molecule production via Stark deceleration and magnetic trapping. Here we report the first molecular beam production of MnH and the analysis of the Stark effect in the (0,0) A^7 π -- X^ 7σ^+ band. The sample was prepared by laser ablation of solid Mn in an H2 supersonic expansion. The low rotational temperature (<50 K) and near natural linewidth resolution (˜50 MHz) facilitated analysis of the ^55Mn (I=5/2) and ^1H (I=1/2) hyperfine structure. A comparison of the derived field-free parameters with those obtained from sub- Doppler optical measurements will be made. Progress on the analysis of the Stark effect will be given. J.R. Bochinski, E.R. Hudson, H.J. Lewandowski, and J. Ye, Phys. Rev. A 70, 043410 (2004). S.Y.T. van de Meerakker, R.T. Jongma, H.L. Bethlem, and G. Meijer, Phys. Rev. A 64, 041401(R) (2001) report the first molecular beam production of MnH and the analysis of T.D. Varberg, J.A. Gray, R.W. Field, and A.J. Merer, J. Mol. Spec. 156, 296-318 (1992). I.E. Gordon, D.R.T. Appadoo, A. Shayesteh, K.A. Walker, and P.F. Bernath, J. Mol. Spec., 229, 145-149 (2005).

  9. Design of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for negative ions radio frequency source SPIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.; Barbisan, M.

    2012-04-15

    A facility will be built in Padova (Italy) to develop, commission, and optimize the neutral beam injection system for ITER. The full scale prototype negative ion radio frequency source SPIDER, featuring up to 100 kV acceleration voltage, includes a full set of diagnostics, required for safe operation and to measure and optimize the beam performance. Among them, beam emission spectroscopy (BES) will be used to measure the line integrated beam uniformity, divergence, and neutralization losses inside the accelerator (stripping losses). In the absence of the neutralization stage, SPIDER beam is mainly composed by H{sup -} or D{sup -} particles, according to the source filling gas. The capability of a spectroscopic diagnostic of an H{sup -} (D{sup -}) beam relies on the interaction of the beam particles with the background gas particles. The BES diagnostic will be able to acquire the H{sub {alpha}} (D{sub {alpha}}) spectrum from up to 40 lines of sight. The system is capable to resolve stripping losses down to 2 keV and to measure beam divergence with an accuracy of about 10%. The design of this diagnostic is reported, with discussion of the layout and its components, together with simulations of the expected performance.

  10. Self-calibrating magnetic field diagnostics in beam emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Voslamber, D.

    1995-04-01

    Magnetic field diagnostics in tokamaks using the motional Stark effect in fast neutral beams have been based on two kinds of polarimetry which we call ``static`` and ``dynamic.`` A detailed analysis shows that static polarimetry presents a number of advantages over dynamic polarimetry, provided it is made complete in the sense that a sufficient number of polarization analyzers are installed and different parts of the spectrum are explored to yield full information on the set of unknowns inherent in the problem. A detailed scheme of complete static polarimetry is proposed, including the case where an in-vessel mirror with changing characteristics (coating by impurities) is placed in front of the optical detection system. The main merit of this scheme relies on the fact that it is self-calibrating with respect to both the characteristics of the mirror and the transmission of the different polarization channels, the latter item implying that it is uniquely based on relative measurements of spectra. Further advantages are a greater flexibility with regard to different kinds of diagnostics and the circumstance that the technical equipment is less involved. The above scheme is based on a detection system of moderate etendue exploiting a large spectral domain, which is the regime where static polarimetry usually operates. It is also possible, however, to work with large etendue and a small spectral domain, such as commonly adopted in dynamic polarimetry. Using such a regime, static polarimetry loses the advantages mentioned above but gains, as a new advantage, the benefit of a comparatively lower level of photon noise. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  12. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams. Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-12-31

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  13. Deconvolution-based correction of alkali beam emission spectroscopy density profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pusztai, I.; Pokol, G.; Refy, D.; Por, G.; Dunai, D.; Anda, G.; Zoletnik, S.; Schweinzer, J.

    2009-08-15

    A deconvolution-based correction method of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) density profile measurement is demonstrated by its application to simulated measurements of the COMPASS and TEXTOR tokamaks. If the line of sight is far from tangential to the flux surfaces, and the beam width is comparable to the scale length on which the light profile varies, the observation may cause an undesired smoothing of the light profile, resulting in a non-negligible underestimation of the calculated density profile. This effect can be reduced significantly by the emission reconstruction method, which gives an estimate of the emissivity along the beam axis from the measured light profile, taking the finite beam width and the properties of the measurement into account in terms of the transfer function of the observation. Characteristics and magnitude of the mentioned systematic error and its reduction by the introduced method are studied by means of the comprehensive alkali BES simulation code RENATE.

  14. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus.

    PubMed

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-02-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s(2)(1)S0↔ 6s7s (1)S0) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm(3) and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s(1)S0 state via the intercombination 6s6p(3)P1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle. PMID:23464193

  15. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research.

    PubMed

    Lampert, M; Anda, G; Czopf, A; Erdei, G; Guszejnov, D; Kovácsik, Á; Pokol, G I; Réfy, D; Nam, Y U; Zoletnik, S

    2015-07-01

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera's measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties. PMID:26233377

  16. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, M.; Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Czopf, A.; Erdei, G.; Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I.; Nam, Y. U.

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  17. Towards combining in-beam {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, P.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Pakarinen, J.; Butler, P. A.; Cresswell, J. R.; Page, R. D.; Parr, E.; Seddon, D. A.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Simpson, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.

    2009-01-28

    The SAGE spectrometer will combine a segmented Si-detector with a Ge-detector array aiming to take the simultaneous in-beam {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy to the next level. It will be coupled with the GREAT focal plane spectrometer and the RITU gas-filled recoil separator at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. Its high efficiency and resolution will open the door to a new era of complete spectroscopy directed, amongst others, at the study of superheavy nuclei aiming to investigate the properties of the next spherical proton shell above Z = 82.

  18. Ultra high resolution molecular beam cars spectroscopy with application to planetary atmospheric molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of high resolution pulsed and continuous wave (CW) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements in pulsed and steady state supersonic expansions were demonstrated. Pulsed molecular beam sources were characterized, and saturation of a Raman transition and, for the first time, the Raman spectrum of a complex molecular cluster were observed. The observation of CW CARS spectra in a molecular expansion and the effects of transit time broadening is described. Supersonic expansion is established as a viable technique for high resolution Raman spectroscopy of cold molecules with resolutions of 100 MH2.

  19. Trace-Gas Detection with Off-Beam Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-06-01

    Trace-gas sensors have a wide range of potential applications such as environmental monitoring, climate research, agriculture, workplace safety, medical diagnostics, and industrial process control. A recently introduced technique called quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is described. QEPAS use a quartz tuning fork as an acoustic transducer for a photoacoustic signal induced in an absorbing gas by modulated optical radiation. Advantages of the QEPAS compared to conventional photoacoustic spectroscopy include immunity to environmental acoustic noise and ultra-small sample volume. Trace gases of , and were monitored with a novel off-beam QEPAS approach and are described in detail.

  20. Active control of buckling of flexible beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Tampe, L.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using the rapidly growing technology of the shape memory alloys actuators in actively controlling the buckling of large flexible structures is investigated. The need for such buckling control systems is becoming inevitable as the design trends of large space structures have resulted in the use of structural members that are long, slender, and very flexible. In addition, as these truss members are subjected mainly to longitudinal loading they become susceptible to structural instabilities due to buckling. Proper control of such instabilities is essential to the effective performance of the structures as stable platforms for communication and observation. Mathematical models are presented that simulate the dynamic characteristics of the shape memory actuator, the compressive structural members, and the associated active control system. A closed-loop computer-controlled system is designed, based on the developed mathematical models, and implemented to control the buckling of simple beams. The performance of the computer-controlled system is evaluated experimentally and compared with the theoretical predictions to validate the developed models. The obtained results emphasize the importance of buckling control and suggest the potential of the shape memory actuators as attractive means for controlling structural deformation in a simple and reliable way.

  1. Ultrafast spectroscopy of super high frequency mechanical modes of doubly clamped beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ristow, Oliver; Merklein, Moritz; Grossmann, Martin; Hettich, Mike; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Scheer, Elke; Dekorsy, Thomas; Barretto, Elaine C. S.; Grebing, Jochen; Erbe, Artur; Mounier, Denis; Gusev, Vitalyi

    2013-12-02

    We use ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to study the mechanical vibrations in the time domain of doubly clamped silicon nitride beams. Beams with two different clamping conditions are investigated. Finite element method calculations are performed to analyse the mode spectra of both structures. By calculating the strain integral on the surface of the resonators, we are able to reproduce the effect of the detection mechanism and identify all the measured modes. We show that our spectroscopy technique combined with our modelling tools allow the investigation of several different modes in the super high frequency range (3-30 GHz) and above, bringing more information about the vibration modes of nanomechanical resonators.

  2. Dual-beam wavelength modulation spectroscopy for sensitive detection of water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Chang, Jun; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Cunguang; Tian, Changbin

    2014-09-01

    A technique was reported for sensitive detection of water vapor based on dual-beam wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). Particular attention was focused on the problem of laser power variation (LPV) and residual amplitude modulation (RAM), which accounted for the absorption profile's distortion during application of WMS. Impact from LPV and RAM was eliminated by photocurrent normalization through a balanced ratiometric detector, which was a dual-beam technique with shot noise-level performance. When consideration of distortion was required, this could enormously simplify the spectra analysis procedure. In the experiment symmetry of the WMS, profile had gotten an improvement by a factor of about 102 compared with traditional single-beam method. During the application test of water vapor detection, the detected amplitude of WMS was well proportional to water vapor concentration ranging from 25 to 1,048 ppmv and the sensitivity was achieved to be 52 ppbv for just a 10-cm optical path length.

  3. Dual-beam wavelength modulation spectroscopy for sensitive detection of water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Chang, Jun; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Cunguang; Tian, Changbin

    2014-12-01

    A technique was reported for sensitive detection of water vapor based on dual-beam wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). Particular attention was focused on the problem of laser power variation (LPV) and residual amplitude modulation (RAM), which accounted for the absorption profile's distortion during application of WMS. Impact from LPV and RAM was eliminated by photocurrent normalization through a balanced ratiometric detector, which was a dual-beam technique with shot noise-level performance. When consideration of distortion was required, this could enormously simplify the spectra analysis procedure. In the experiment symmetry of the WMS, profile had gotten an improvement by a factor of about 102 compared with traditional single-beam method. During the application test of water vapor detection, the detected amplitude of WMS was well proportional to water vapor concentration ranging from 25 to 1,048 ppmv and the sensitivity was achieved to be 52 ppbv for just a 10-cm optical path length.

  4. Polarization spectroscopy of x-ray transitions from beam-excited highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.C.; Decaux, V.; Widmann, K.; Neill, P.

    1997-01-01

    Polarization spectroscopy of x-ray lines represents a diagnostic tool to ascertain the presence of electron beams in high-temperature plasmas. Making use of the Livermore electron beam ion trap, which optimizes the linear x-ray line polarization by exciting highly charged ions with a monoenergetic electron beam, we have begun to develop polarization diagnostics and test theoretical models. Our measurement relies on the sensitivity of crystal spectrometers to the linear polarization of x-ray lines which depends on the value of the Bragg angle. We employed two spectrometers with differing analyzing crystals and simultaneously recorded the K-shell emission from heliumlike Fe{sup 24+} and lithiumlike Fe{sup 23+} ions at two different Bragg angles. A clear difference in the relative intensities of the dominant transitions is observed, which is attributed to the amount of linear polarization of the individual lines. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Single-tube on-beam quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huadan; Dong, Lei; Sampaolo, Angelo; Wu, Hongpeng; Patimisco, Pietro; Yin, Xukun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Jia, Suotang; Tittel, Frank K

    2016-03-01

    Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) with a single-tube acoustic microresonator (AmR) inserted between the prongs of a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) was developed, investigated, and optimized experimentally. Due to the high acoustic coupling efficiency between the AmR and the QTF, the single-tube on-beam QEPAS spectrophone configuration improves the detection sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude compared to a bare QTF. This approach significantly reduces the spectrophone size with respect to the traditional on-beam spectrophone configuration, thereby facilitating the laser beam alignment. A 1σ normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 1.21×10(-8) cm(-1)·W/√Hz was obtained for dry CO2 detection at normal atmospheric pressure. PMID:26974095

  6. Characterization and control of tunable quantum cascade laser beam parameters for stand-off spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, Christopher A.; Papantonakis, Michael R.; Nguyen, Viet; McGill, R. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Infrared active stand-off detection techniques often employ high power tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) for target illumination. Due to the distances involved, any fluctuation of the laser beam direction and/or beam profile is amplified at the sample position. If not accounted for, this leads to diminished performance (both sensitivity and selectivity) of the detection technique as a direct result of uncertainties in laser irradiance at each imaged pixel of the sample. This is especially true for detection approaches which illuminate a relatively small footprint at the target since the laser beam profile spatial fluctuations are often comparable to the (focused) laser spot size. Also, there is often a necessary trade-off between high output QCL power and beam quality. Therefore, precise characterization of the laser beam profile and direction as a function of laser properties (tuning wavelength, current and operating mode: pulsed or CW) is imperative. We present detailed measurements of beam profiles, beam wander and power fluctuations and their reproducibility as function of laser wavelength and stand-off distance for a commercially available tunable quantum cascade laser. We present strategies for improving beam quality by compensating for fluctuations using a motorized mirror and a pair of motorized lenses. We also investigate QCL mode hops and how they affect laser beam properties at the sample. Detailed mode-hop stability maps were measured.

  7. Rydberg Spectroscopy of Zeeman-Decelerated Beams of Metastable Helium Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Paul; Motsch, Michael; Sprecher, Daniel; Merkt, Frederic

    2014-06-01

    Having three and four electrons, respectively, He_2^+ and He_2 represent systems for which highly accurate ab-initio calculations might become feasible in the near future. With the goal of performing accurate measurements of the rovibrational energy-level structure of He_2^+ by Rydberg spectroscopy of He_2 and multichannel quantum-defect theory extrapolation techniques, we have produced samples of helium molecules in the a ^3Σu^+ state in supersonic beams with velocities tunable down to 100 m/s by combining a cryogenic supersonic-beam source with a multistage Zeeman decelerator. The molecules are formed at an initial velocity of 500 m/s by striking a discharge in the pulsed expansion of helium gas from a reservoir kept at a cryogenic temperature of 10 K. Using rotationally-resolved PFI-ZEKE (pulsed-field-ionization zero-kinetic-energy) photoelectron spectroscopy, we have probed the rotational-state distribution of the molecules produced in the discharge and found vibrational levels up to ν" = 2 and rotational levels up to N"=21 to be populated. The molecular beam is coupled to a multistage Zeeman decelerator that employs pulsed inhomogeneous magnetic fields to further reduce the beam velocity. By measuring the quantum-state distribution of the decelerated sample using photoelectron and photoionization spectroscopy we observed no rotational or vibrational state-selectivity of the deceleration process, but found that one of the three spin-rotation components of the He_2 a ^3Σu^+ rotational levels is eliminated. W.-C. Tung, M. Pavanello, L. Adamowicz, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 104309 (2012). D. Sprecher, J. Liu, T. Krähenmann, M. Schäfer, and F. Merkt, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 064304 (2014). M. Motsch, P. Jansen, J. A. Agner, H. Schmutz, and F. Merkt, arXiv:1401.7774. N. Vanhaecke, U. Meier, M. Andrist, B. H. Meier, and F. Merkt, Phys. Rev. A 75, 031402(R) (2007).

  8. Cylindrical Illumination Confocal Spectroscopy: Rectifying the Limitations of Confocal Single Molecule Spectroscopy through One-Dimensional Beam Shaping

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kelvin J.; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2008-01-01

    Cylindrical illumination confocal spectroscopy (CICS) is a new implementation of single molecule detection that can be generically incorporated into any microfluidic system and allows highly quantitative and accurate analysis of single fluorescent molecules. Through theoretical modeling of confocal optics and Monte Carlo simulations, one-dimensional beam shaping is used to create a highly uniform sheet-like observation volume that enables the detection of digital fluorescence bursts while retaining single fluorophore sensitivity. First, we theoretically show that when used to detect single molecules in a microchannel, CICS can be optimized to obtain near 100% mass detection efficiency, <10% relative SD in burst heights, and a high signal/noise ratio. As a result, CICS is far less sensitive to thresholding artifacts than traditional single molecule detection and significantly more accurate at determining both burst rate and burst parameters. CICS is then experimentally implemented, optically characterized, and integrated into separate two microfluidic devices for the analysis of fluorescently stained plasmid DNA and single Cy5 labeled oligonucleotides. CICS rectifies the limitations of traditional confocal spectroscopy-based single molecule detection without the significant operational complications of competing technologies. PMID:18515376

  9. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  10. A design procedure for active control of beam vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, S. L.; Jarocki, G.

    1983-01-01

    The transverse vibrations of beams is discussed and a methodology for the design of an active damping device is given. The Bernoulli-Euler equation is used to derive a transcendental transfer function, which relates a torque applied at one end of the beam to the rotational position and velocity at that point. The active damping device consists of a wire, a linear actuator and a short torque arm attached to one end of the beam. The action of the actuator varies a tension in the wire and creates a torque which opposes the rotation of the beam and thus damps vibration. A design procedure for such an active damper is given. This procedure shows the relationships and trade-offs between the actuator stroke, power required, stress levels in the wire and beam and the geometry of the beam and wire. It is shown that by consideration of the frequency response at the beam natural frequencies, the aforementioned relationships can be greatly simplified. Similarly, a simple way of estimating the effective damping ratios and eigenvalue locations of actively controlled beams is presented.

  11. Electron beam injection during active experiments. II - Collisional effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    During active beam experiments, the presence of high neutral densities at low altitudes and/or during thruster firings has been observed to modify the spacecraft charging and the properties of the beam. Two-dimensional (three-velocity) electromagnetic particle simulations with ionizing collisions incorporated are used to investigate the modification of the beam-plasma interaction as the neutral density is increased. It is shown that when the spacecraft is uniformly immersed in a neutral cloud, most of the ionization is produced by direct ionization by the beam and its secondaries, rather than via vehicle-induced or wave-induced ionization for the neutral densities considered.

  12. Active diaphragm rupture with laser beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Torikai, H.; Yang, Q. S.; Watanabe, K.; Sasoh, A.

    We performed shock tube operations with a layer of diaphragm being ruptured by laser beam irradiation. Mylar or Cellophane was examined as the diaphragm material. It has been demonstrated that shock tube can be operated with this new technique. The absorbed energy depends on the material and thickness of the diaphragm and is an important control parameter.

  13. Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lastras-Martínez, A. E-mail: alastras@gmail.com; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guevara-Macías, L. E.; Nuñez-Olvera, O.; Balderas-Navarro, R. E.; Lastras-Martínez, L. F.; Lastras-Montaño, L. A.; Lastras-Montaño, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD) spectroscopy of GaAs(001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

  14. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guszejnov, D.; Pokol, G. I.; Pusztai, I.; Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Nam, Y. U.

    2012-11-15

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  15. Monitoring laser cleaning of titanium alloys by probe beam reflection and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, D. J.; Crouse, P. L.; Schmidt, M. J. J.; Li, L.; Turner, M. W.; Smith, A. J. E.

    2008-10-01

    Studies have shown excimer laser cleaning to be an effective non-chemical alternative method for removing contaminants from surfaces of titanium alloys in preparation for electron beam welding and diffusion bonding, with reference to aerospace applications. Among several important criteria for process acceptability, is the absence of oxide formation. This paper investigates the viability of using a probe beam reflection (PBR) system and laser plume emission spectroscopy (PES) for detection of incipient oxide formation on three typical aerospace titanium alloys, viz. Ti64, Ti6246, and IMI834. These diagnostic techniques have been shown to be capable of sensing different components in the emission plume and yield quantitative results. Results from this work correlate closely with previously reported cleaning mechanisms. The oxidation threshold, as well as the operating window for successful decontamination, is discussed.

  16. Comb-assisted cavity ring-down spectroscopy of a buffer-gas-cooled molecular beam.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Luigi; Sarno, Valentina Di; Natale, Paolo De; Rosa, Maurizio De; Inguscio, Massimo; Mosca, Simona; Ricciardi, Iolanda; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Maddaloni, Pasquale

    2016-06-22

    We demonstrate continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy of a partially hydrodynamic molecular beam emerging from a buffer-gas-cooling source. Specifically, the (ν1 + ν3) vibrational overtone band of acetylene (C2H2) around 1.5 μm is accessed using a narrow-linewidth diode laser stabilized against a GPS-disciplined rubidium clock via an optical frequency comb synthesizer. As an example, the absolute frequency of the R(1) component is measured with a fractional accuracy of ∼1 × 10(-9). Our approach represents the first step towards the extension of more sophisticated cavity-enhanced interrogation schemes, including saturated absorption cavity ring-down or two-photon excitation, to buffer-gas-cooled molecular beams. PMID:27273337

  17. Ultrasensitive detection of atmospheric constituents by supersonic molecular beam, multiphoton ionization, mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Syage, J A; Pollard, J E; Cohen, R B

    1987-09-01

    An ultrasensitive detection method for atmospheric monitoring has been developed based on the technique of supersonic molecular beam, resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization, and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MB/REMPI/TOFMS). Several organophosphonate and organosulfide compounds, representing simulants to a class of toxic compounds, were studied. Detection levels as low as 300 ppt (dimethyl sulfide) were obtained. Single-vibronic-level REMPI of the cooled molecules in conjunction with TOFMS provided selectivity of ~10(4) against chemically similar compounds in humid air expansions. The fragment ions formed by REMPI excitation are shown for diisopropyl methylphosphonate to depend strongly on the resonant intermediate state of the neutral molecule. PMID:20490096

  18. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  19. TRACING ELECTRON BEAMS IN THE SUN'S CORONA WITH RADIO DYNAMIC IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Bastian, T. S.; White, S. M.; Gary, D. E.; Perley, R.; Rupen, M.; Carlson, B.

    2013-01-20

    We report observations of type III radio bursts at decimeter wavelengths (type IIIdm bursts)-signatures of suprathermal electron beams propagating in the low corona-using the new technique of radio dynamic imaging spectroscopy provided by the recently upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. For the first time, type IIIdm bursts were imaged with high time and frequency resolution over a broad frequency band, allowing electron beam trajectories in the corona to be deduced. Together with simultaneous hard X-ray and extreme ultraviolet observations, we show that these beams emanate from an energy release site located in the low corona at a height below {approx}15 Mm, and propagate along a bundle of discrete magnetic loops upward into the corona. Our observations enable direct measurements of the plasma density along the magnetic loops, and allow us to constrain the diameter of these loops to be less than 100 km. These overdense and ultra-thin loops reveal the fundamentally fibrous structure of the Sun's corona. The impulsive nature of the electron beams, their accessibility to different magnetic field lines, and the detailed structure of the magnetic release site revealed by the radio observations indicate that the localized energy release is highly fragmentary in time and space, supporting a bursty reconnection model that involves secondary magnetic structures for magnetic energy release and particle acceleration.

  20. Alternative method of using an electron beam for charge compensation during ultralow energy secondary-ion-mass spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman de la Mata, B.; Dowsett, M.G.; Morris, R.J.H.

    2006-07-15

    Secondary-ion-mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis of insulators using positive primary beams is routinely performed by compensating the induced charge with a coincident electron beam. In the case of SIMS depth profiling, the established method consists of focusing an electron beam into the SIMS crater with a current well in excess of that of the primary ion beam. In this article we used both caesium and oxygen beams to bombard float glass, and intrinsic and doped diamond samples while varying the electron beam current and the area bombarded by electrons. We have studied how the electron beam to primary ion current density ratio modifies the charging conditions. We demonstrate that, for certain insulating and highly resistive materials, defocusing of the electron beam so as to cover the whole of the sample surface and part of the sample holder is extremely effective. It is also observed that the defocused electron beam works efficiently for an electron to primary ion current density ratio less than 1. We attribute this to the enhancement of surface conductivity through the creation of carriers in the conduction band, and observe similar effects when irradiating the surface with a laser diode. The ability to use a defocused electron beam will significantly aid profiling of insulating and highly resistive materials where alignment of the coincident electron and ion beams is problematic. Defocusing of the electron beam also offers the possible advantage of reducing or eliminating localized electron beam damage of certain material surfaces prior to and during profiling.

  1. Active control of buckling of flexible beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Tampe, L.

    1989-01-01

    Mathematical models are presented that simulate the dynamic characteristics of shape memory alloy actuators made of nickel-titanium alloy (Nitinol) controlling the buckling of compressive structural members. A closed-loop computer-controlled system has been designed, based on the proposed mathematical models, and has been implemented to control the buckling of simple beams. The performance of the computer-controlled system is evaluated experimentally and compared with the theoretical predictions to validate the developed models. The results emphasized the importance of buckling control and suggest the potential of shape memory alloy actuators as attractive means for controlling structural deformation in a simple and reliable way.

  2. Active control of flexural vibrations in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using piezoelectric actuators to control the flexural oscillations of large structures in space is investigated. Flexural oscillations are excited by impulsive loads. The vibratory response can degrade the pointing accuracy of cameras and antennae, and can cause high stresses at structural node points. Piezoelectric actuators have the advantage of exerting localized bending moments. In this way, vibration is controlled without exciting rigid body modes. The actuators are used in collocated sensor/driver pairs to form a feedback control system. The sensor produces a voltage that is proportional to the dynamic stress at the sensor location, and the driver produces a force that is proportional to the voltage applied to it. The analog control system amplifies and phase shifts the sensor signal to produce the voltage signal that is applied to the driver. The feedback control is demonstrated to increase the first mode damping in a cantilever beam by up to 100 percent, depending on the amplifier gain. The damping efficiency of the control system when the piezoelectrics are not optimally positioned at points of high stress in the beam is evaluated.

  3. Characterization of ion beam modified ceramic wear surfaces using Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, W.; Lankford, J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of the surface chemistry and morphology of the wear surfaces of ceramic material surfaces modified by ion beam mixing has been conducted using Auger electron spectroscopy and secondary electron microscopy. Studies have been conducted on ceramic/ceramic friction and wear couples made up of TiC and NiMo-bonded TiC cermet pins run against Si3N4 and partially stabilized zirconia disc surfaces modified by the ion beam mixing of titanium and nickel, as well as ummodified ceramic/ceramic couples in order to determine the types of surface changes leading to the improved friction and wear behavior of the surface modified ceramics in simulated diesel environments. The results of the surface analyses indicate that the formation of a lubricating oxide layer of titanium and nickel, is responsible for the improvement in ceramic friction and wear behavior. The beneficial effect of this oxide layer depends on several factors, including the adherence of the surface modified layer or subsequently formed oxide layer to the disc substrate, the substrate materials, the conditions of ion beam mixing, and the environmental conditions.

  4. Multiple track Doppler-shift spectroscopy system for TFTR neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kugel, H.W.; Reale, M.A.; Hayes, S.L.; Johnson, G.A.; Lowrance, J.L.; Shah, P.A.; Sichta, P.; Sleaford, B.W.; Williams, M.D.; Zucchino, P.M.

    1986-09-01

    A Doppler-shift spectroscopy system has been installed on the TFTR neutral beam injection system to measure species composition during both conditioning and injection pulses. Two intensified vidicon detectors and two spectrometers are utilized in a system capable of resolving data from up to twelve ion sources simultaneously. By imaging the light from six ion sources onto one detector, a cost-effective system has been achieved. Fiber optics are used to locate the diagnostic in an area remote from the hazards of the tokamak test cell allowing continuous access, and eliminating the need for radiation shielding of electronic components. Automatic hardware arming and interactive data analysis allow beam composition to be computed between tokamak shots for use in analyzing plasma heating experiments. Measurements have been made using lines of sight into both the neutralizer and the drift duct. Analysis of the data from the drift duct is both simpler and more accurate since only neutral particles are present in the beam at this location. Comparison of the data taken at these two locations reveals the presence of partially accelerated particles possessing an estimated 1/e half-angle divergence of 15/sup 0/ and accounting for up to 30% of the extracted power.

  5. Bayesian modelling of the emission spectrum of the Joint European Torus Lithium Beam Emission Spectroscopy system.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J; Brix, M; Ghim, Y-C

    2016-02-01

    A Bayesian model of the emission spectrum of the JET lithium beam has been developed to infer the intensity of the Li I (2p-2s) line radiation and associated uncertainties. The detected spectrum for each channel of the lithium beam emission spectroscopy system is here modelled by a single Li line modified by an instrumental function, Bremsstrahlung background, instrumental offset, and interference filter curve. Both the instrumental function and the interference filter curve are modelled with non-parametric Gaussian processes. All free parameters of the model, the intensities of the Li line, Bremsstrahlung background, and instrumental offset, are inferred using Bayesian probability theory with a Gaussian likelihood for photon statistics and electronic background noise. The prior distributions of the free parameters are chosen as Gaussians. Given these assumptions, the intensity of the Li line and corresponding uncertainties are analytically available using a Bayesian linear inversion technique. The proposed approach makes it possible to extract the intensity of Li line without doing a separate background subtraction through modulation of the Li beam. PMID:26931843

  6. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  7. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  8. Microwave spectroscopy of the active sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    In studies of solar active regions and bursts, the ability to obtain spatially resolved radio spectra (brightness temperature spectra) opens a whole new range of possibilities for study of the solar corona. For active regions, two-dimensional maps of brightness temperature over a wide range of frequencies allows one to determine temperature, column density, and magnetic field strength over the entire region in a straightforward, unambiguous way. For flares, the time-dependent electron energy distribution, number of accelerated electrons, and magnetic field strength and direction can be found. In practice, obtaining complete radio images at a large number of frequencies is a significant technical challenge, especially while keeping costs down. Our instrument at Owens Valley Radio Observatory provided the starting point for a modest attempt at meeting this goal. We proposed to build three additional, very low-cost 2-m antennas which, when combined with our existing two 27-m dishes, expands the array to 5 elements. This modest increase in number of solar dedicated antennas, from 2 to 5, increases our maximum number of physical baselines from 1 to 10 and allows the instrument to do true imaging of solar microwave sources, both bursts and active regions. Combined with the technique of frequency synthesis, the new array has up to 450 effective baselines, giving imaging capability that approaches that of a sub-arrayed VLA. The prototype antenna design was finalized and the antenna was put into operation in Nov. 1989.

  9. Active control of cantilever-beam vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbyn, M. Roman

    2002-11-01

    A bang-bang control system previously developed for the stabilization of a rigid platform [ISA Trans. 21, 55-59 (1982)] has been adapted to the problem of reducing flexural vibrations of a beam. The electromechanical system develops an appropriate control signal for the actuator from samples of the disturbance by analog and digital signal processing using integrated circuits. The effectiveness of this approach is predicated upon the sampling rate being much higher than the maximum vibration frequency to be silenced. It is also robust with respect to the waveform of the disturbance. Noise reductions of 10-20 dB have been achieved, depending on the bandwidth of the noise. The cantilever, chosen because of its mechanical and theoretical simplicity, provides a good foundation for the study of more complex structures, like airfoils and nonrigid platforms. In both experimental and analytical investigations the emphasis has been on the optimization of control parameters, particularly with regard to the application of the cancellation signal. Reduction in size and cost of the control unit is possible by incorporating the latest technological advances in electronic and electromechanical devices, such as FPGA boards and MEMS components.

  10. Diagnostic performance of the beam emission spectroscopy system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Thompson, D. S.

    2012-10-15

    The beam emission spectroscopy system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment measures localized density fluctuations on the ion gyroscale. Optical sightlines provide core to edge radial coverage, and the sightlines are aligned to typical pitch angles to maximize cross-field spatial resolution. Sightline images are 2-3 cm, and point spread function calculations indicate image distortion from pitch angle misalignment and atomic state finite lifetimes is minor with a 15% increase in the image size. New generation photodetectors achieve photon noise limited measurements at frequencies up to 400 kHz with refrigerant cooling at -20 Degree-Sign C. Measurements near the pedestal show broadband turbulence up to 100 kHz, and poloidal correlation lengths are about 10 cm. Plasma turbulence signals can be 2-3 orders of magnitude above photon noise and amplifier thermal noise.

  11. Diagnostic performance of the beam emission spectroscopy system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    PubMed

    Smith, D R; Fonck, R J; McKee, G R; Thompson, D S

    2012-10-01

    The beam emission spectroscopy system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment measures localized density fluctuations on the ion gyroscale. Optical sightlines provide core to edge radial coverage, and the sightlines are aligned to typical pitch angles to maximize cross-field spatial resolution. Sightline images are 2-3 cm, and point spread function calculations indicate image distortion from pitch angle misalignment and atomic state finite lifetimes is minor with a 15% increase in the image size. New generation photodetectors achieve photon noise limited measurements at frequencies up to 400 kHz with refrigerant cooling at -20 °C. Measurements near the pedestal show broadband turbulence up to 100 kHz, and poloidal correlation lengths are about 10 cm. Plasma turbulence signals can be 2-3 orders of magnitude above photon noise and amplifier thermal noise. PMID:23126846

  12. Analysis of edge density fluctuation measured by trial KSTAR beam emission spectroscopy system

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y. U.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Kovacsik, A.

    2012-10-15

    A beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system based on direct imaging avalanche photodiode (APD) camera has been designed for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) and a trial system has been constructed and installed for evaluating feasibility of the design. The system contains two cameras, one is an APD camera for BES measurement and another is a fast visible camera for position calibration. Two pneumatically actuated mirrors were positioned at front and rear of lens optics. The front mirror can switch the measurement between edge and core region of plasma and the rear mirror can switch between the APD and the visible camera. All systems worked properly and the measured photon flux was reasonable as expected from the simulation. While the measurement data from the trial system were limited, it revealed some interesting characteristics of KSTAR plasma suggesting future research works with fully installed BES system. The analysis result and the development plan will be presented in this paper.

  13. A trap-based pulsed positron beam optimised for positronium laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, B S; Alonso, A M; Deller, A; Wall, T E; Cassidy, D B

    2015-10-01

    We describe a pulsed positron beam that is optimised for positronium (Ps) laser-spectroscopy experiments. The system is based on a two-stage Surko-type buffer gas trap that produces 4 ns wide pulses containing up to 5 × 10(5) positrons at a rate of 0.5-10 Hz. By implanting positrons from the trap into a suitable target material, a dilute positronium gas with an initial density of the order of 10(7) cm(-3) is created in vacuum. This is then probed with pulsed (ns) laser systems, where various Ps-laser interactions have been observed via changes in Ps annihilation rates using a fast gamma ray detector. We demonstrate the capabilities of the apparatus and detection methodology via the observation of Rydberg positronium atoms with principal quantum numbers ranging from 11 to 22 and the Stark broadening of the n = 2 → 11 transition in electric fields. PMID:26520934

  14. In-Beam Gamma-ray Spectroscopy in the sdpf {sup 37}Ar Nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, M. A. G.; Medina, N. H.; Seale, W. A.; Ribas, R. V.; Oliveira, J. R. B. de; Zilio, S.; Lenzi, S. M.; Napoli, D. R.; Marginean, N.; Vedova, F. Della; Farnea, E.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.; Iordachescu, A.

    2007-10-26

    The nucleus {sup 37}Ar has been studied with {gamma}-ray spectroscopy in the {sup 24}Mg({sup 16}O,2pn) reaction at a beam energy of 70 MeV. Twenty two new excited states up to an excitation energy of 13 MeV have been observed. We compare the first negative and positive parity yrast states with large-scale-shell-model calculations using the Antoine code and the SDPF interaction, considering the excitation of the 1d{sub 5/2},2s{sub 1/2} and 1d{sub 3/2} nucleons to 1f{sub 7/2} and 2p{sub 3/2} in the sdpf valence space.

  15. A trap-based pulsed positron beam optimised for positronium laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B. S. Alonso, A. M.; Deller, A.; Wall, T. E.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2015-10-15

    We describe a pulsed positron beam that is optimised for positronium (Ps) laser-spectroscopy experiments. The system is based on a two-stage Surko-type buffer gas trap that produces 4 ns wide pulses containing up to 5 × 10{sup 5} positrons at a rate of 0.5-10 Hz. By implanting positrons from the trap into a suitable target material, a dilute positronium gas with an initial density of the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup −3} is created in vacuum. This is then probed with pulsed (ns) laser systems, where various Ps-laser interactions have been observed via changes in Ps annihilation rates using a fast gamma ray detector. We demonstrate the capabilities of the apparatus and detection methodology via the observation of Rydberg positronium atoms with principal quantum numbers ranging from 11 to 22 and the Stark broadening of the n = 2 → 11 transition in electric fields.

  16. 2D turbulence imaging in DIII-D via beam emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fenzi, C.; Fonck, R. J.; Jakubowski, M.; Mc Kee, G. R.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional measurements of density fluctuations have been performed in DIII-D using the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. The 32 spatial channels are arranged to image a 5x6cm{sup 2} (radialxpoloidal) region in the plasma cross section, at a nominal 1 cm spatial resolution and separation. The typical decorrelation time, poloidal and radial correlation lengths, as well as a time-averaged flow field plot are obtained from spatial and temporal correlation analyses. A biorthogonal decomposition algorithm is applied to expand the data set into a set of modes that are orthogonal in time and in space, thus providing a simultaneous analysis of the space and time dependencies of fluctuation data.

  17. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  18. Communication: Global minimum search of Ag{sub 10}{sup +} with molecular beam optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shayeghi, A. Schäfer, R.; Johnston, R. L.

    2014-11-14

    The present study is focused on the optical properties of the Ag{sub 10}{sup +} cluster in the photon energy range ℏω = 1.9–4.4 eV. Absorption spectra are recorded by longitudinal molecular beam depletion spectroscopy and compared to optical response calculations using time-dependent density functional theory. Several cluster isomers obtained by the new pool-based parallel implementation of the Birmingham Cluster Genetic Algorithm, coupled with density functional theory, are used in excited state calculations. The experimental observations, together with additional simulations of ion mobilities for the several geometries found within this work using different models, clearly identify the ground state isomer of Ag{sub 10}{sup +} to be composed of two orthogonal interpenetrating pentagonal bipyramids, having overall D{sub 2d} symmetry.

  19. Application of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei for therapeutic SOBP proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Recently, much research on imaging the clinical proton-irradiated volume using positron emitter nuclei based on target nuclear fragment reaction has been carried out. The purpose of this study is to develop an activity pencil beam (APB) algorithm for a simulation system for proton-activated positron-emitting imaging in clinical proton therapy using spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) beams.Methods: The target nuclei of activity distribution calculations are {sup 12}C nuclei, {sup 16}O nuclei, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei, which are the main elements in a human body. Depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were obtained from the material information of ridge filter (RF) and depth activity distributions of compounds of the three target nuclei measured by BOLPs-RGp (beam ON-LINE PET system mounted on a rotating gantry port) with mono-energetic Bragg peak (MONO) beam irradiations. The calculated data of depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were sorted in terms of kind of nucleus, energy of proton beam, SOBP width, and thickness of fine degrader (FD), which were verified. The calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were compared with the measured ones. APB kernels were made from the calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations to construct a simulation system using the APB algorithm for SOBP beams.Results: The depth activity distributions were prepared using the material information of RF and the measured depth activity distributions with MONO beam irradiations for clinical therapy using SOBP beams. With the SOBP width widening, the distal fall-offs of depth activity distributions and the difference from the depth dose distributions were large. The shapes of the calculated depth activity distributions nearly agreed with those of the measured ones upon comparison between the two. The APB kernels of SOBP beams were prepared by making use of the data on depth activity distributions with SOBP

  20. The Young Astrophysicist: A Very Inexpensive Activity to Discuss Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockington, Guilherme; Testoni, Leonardo André; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2015-01-01

    The continuing fascination of young people with celestial bodies leads them to pose challenging questions to their science teachers, such as how was the universe born? How were the stars formed? In this paper we present an extremely inexpensive but highly engaging activity to teach the basics of spectroscopy. Guided by the question "how do…

  1. [Study of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Copper Films Modified by Ion Beam].

    PubMed

    Ding, Liang-liang; Hong, Rui-jin; Tao, Chun-xian; Zhang, Da-wei

    2015-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) was a rapid non-destructive testing. It was based on detecting molecule vibrational spectrum which was adsorbed on the metallic surface. Now it was widely used in surface adsorption, electrochemical catalysis, sensors, bio-medical testing, trace amount analysis and other fields. In our experiment, copper metallic films were deposited 50 nm on BK7 glass substrates by direct current magnetron sputtering. And then the films were employed for the Ar ion beam etching modification. The structure, morphology and optical properties was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), spectrophotometer and Raman spectroscopy. In the XRD graph, the peak value of modify copper film were the same with the untreated film. So the structure of copper film was not change. With increasing the power of Ar ion, the surface roughness was changed, and scattered spectrum intensity was increased by surface roughness added. With Rhodamine B (Rh B) as a probe molecule, Raman scattered spectrum was detected on modify copper film. Compared with the different samples, we can find the Raman signal was enhanced by surface roughness added. It will have some value on study the principles of SERS. PMID:26978913

  2. Positron spectroscopy of 2D materials using an advanced high intensity positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, A.; Chirayath, V.; Lim, Z.; Gladen, R.; Chrysler, M.; Fairchild, A.; Koymen, A.; Weiss, A.

    An advanced high intensity variable energy positron beam(~1eV to 20keV) has been designed, tested and utilized for the first coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) measurements on 6-8 layers graphene on polycrystalline Cu sample. The system is capable of simultaneous Positron annihilation induced Auger electron Spectroscopy (PAES) and CDB measurements giving it unparalleled sensitivity to chemical structure at external surfaces, interfaces and internal pore surfaces. The system has a 3m flight path up to a micro channel plate (MCP) for the Auger electrons emitted from the sample. This gives a superior energy resolution for PAES. A solid rare gas(Neon) moderator was used for the generation of the monoenergetic positron beam. The positrons were successfully transported to the sample chamber using axial magnetic field generated with a series of Helmholtz coils. We will discuss the PAES and coincidence Doppler broadening measurements on graphene -Cu sample and present an analysis of the gamma spectra which indicates that a fraction of the positrons implanted at energies 7-60eV can become trapped at the graphene/metal interface. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR 1508719 and DMR 1338130.

  3. Photoelectron-photofragment coincidence spectroscopy in a cryogenically cooled linear electrostatic ion beam trap

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Shen, Ben B.; Poad, Berwyck L. J.; Continetti, Robert E.

    2011-10-15

    A cryogenically cooled linear electrostatic ion beam trap for use in photoelectron-photofragment coincidence (PPC) spectroscopy is described. Using this instrument, anions created in cold, low-duty-cycle sources can be stored for many seconds in a {approx}20 K environment to cool radiatively, removing energetic uncertainties due to vibrationally excited precursor anions. This apparatus maintains a well-collimated beam necessary for high-resolution fragment imaging and the high experimental duty cycle needed for coincidence experiments. Ion oscillation is bunched and phase-locked to a modelocked laser, ensuring temporal overlap between ion bunches and laser pulses and that ions are intersected by the laser only when travelling in one direction. An electron detector is housed in the field-free center of the trap, allowing PPC experiments to be carried out on ions while they are stored and permitting efficient detection of 3-dimensional electron and neutral recoil trajectories. The effects of trapping parameters on the center-of-mass trajectories in the laser-ion interaction region are explored to optimize neutral particle resolution, and the impact of bunching on ion oscillation is established. Finally, an initial demonstration of radiative cooling is presented.

  4. Singular value decomposition filtering for enhanced signal extraction from two-dimensional beam emission spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, M. W.; McKee, G. R.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2008-10-15

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of extracted turbulence features from beam emission spectroscopy (BES) data is significantly enhanced via application of singular value decomposition (SVD) methods. BES measures two-dimensional localized density fluctuations in DIII-D. The SNR of core turbulence characteristics is typically limited by noise arising from electronic noise, photon noise, and fluctuations in the observed neutral beam. SVD filtering has led to a significant enhancement in the SNR, reducing errors in time-resolved measurements of core turbulence characteristics, including correlation lengths, decorrelation rates, and group velocities. The SVD filtration technique is applied to BES data by combining multiple physically adjacent sampling locations to extract spatially correlated signals while partially removing unwanted incoherent noise. Using approximately half of the singular value weighted modes to reconstruct turbulence signals is found to improve SNR by up to a factor of 4, while maintaining the spatial structure of the turbulence. Unique aspects of application of SVD to broadband turbulence data are discussed.

  5. The X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    1985-01-01

    The scientific goals of X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei are discussed. The underlying energy source, the regions responsible for the optical emission lines, the different types of active galaxies, and cosmology are considered. The requirements for an X-ray mission of broad band width, large collecting area, modest spatial resolution and good spectral resolution are outlined. It is concluded that the ESA XMM mission meets these requirements.

  6. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Mitsutaka

    2007-05-01

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this requirement, design study of the facility and the R&D's of the key components in this design are promoted by NIRS. According successful results of these activities, the dedicated compact facility will be realized in Gunma University. In this facility, the established irradiation method is expected to use, which is passive irradiation method with wobbler magnets and ridge filter. In this presentation, above R&D's will be presented together with clinical results and basic research activities at HIMAC.

  7. Activation of cells using femtosecond laser beam (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Study of communication in cellular systems requires precise activation of targeted cell(s) in the network. In contrast to chemical, electrical, thermal, mechanical stimulation, optical stimulation is non-invasive and is better suited for stimulation of targeted cells. As compared to visible lasers, the near infrared (NIR) microsecond/nanosecond pulsed laser beams are being used as preferred stimulation tool as they provide higher penetration depth in tissues. Femotosecond (FS) laser beams in NIR are also being used for direct and indirect (i.e. via two-photon optogenetics) stimulation of cells. Here, we present a comparative evaluation of efficacy of NIR FS laser beam for direct (no optogenetic sensitization) and 2ph optogenetic stimulation of cells. Further, for the first time, we demonstrate the use of blue (~450 nm, obtained by second harmonic generation) FS laser beam for stimulation of cells with and without Channelrhodopisn-2 (ChR2) expression. Comparative analysis of photocurrent generated by blue FS laser beam and continuous wave blue light for optogenetics stimulation of ChR2 transfected HEK cells will be presented. The use of ultrafast laser micro-beam for focal, non-contact, and repeated stimulation of single cells in a cellular circuitry allowed us to study the communication between different cell types.

  8. Probing polymeric thin films using beam-based positronium annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Huagen

    Positrounium annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) utilizing a focused low energy beam of positrons to control implantation depth enables the analysis of very thin films. Beam-PALS was used to study confinement and interfacial effects on polymer mobility in ultra-thin polycarbonate films and to characterize nanoporous structures of polymeric low dielectric constant (low-k ) thin films. Three complementary techniques were used to address the apparent discrepancies in recent polymer film results. Beam-PALS (probing positronium nanovoid lifetime, tau), specular X-ray reflectivity (SXR, monitoring film thickness, h) and incoherent neutron scattering (INS, characterizing mean-square atomic displacements, ) were combined to study the thermophysical properties of Bisphenol-A polycarbonate (PC) ultra-thin films (60 A to ˜1000 A) supported on an oxidized silicon wafer surface. As h decreased the concomitant reduction in thermal expansion coefficients of h, tau and < u2>, as well as the decreased amplitudes of < u2>, indicated that thin film confinement produces suppressed molecular mobility in PC. These films were modeled with an immobile interface layer ranging from 38 A to 130 A, depending on the measurement technique and the temperature range. No clear trends in the apparent glass transition temperature (Tg) emerged from these techniques, thus rendering Tg shifts inconclusive and of less fundamental importance. Beam-PALS was also applied to characterize several generations of porous SiLK (Trade Mark of Dow Chemical) low-k films to reveal the size, size distribution, interconnectivity and possible morphology of the engineered nanopores. The dependence of these properties on porogen loading/porosity was carefully analyzed and compared, when possible, with results from other techniques such as small-angle X-ray scattering and AFM. Unique to the PALS technique is the ability to quantify the pore interconnection length. Porous SiLK (V9), U.2 and Y were found to have

  9. Improved spectral data unfolding for radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy of laser-accelerated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Sefkow, A. B.; Flippo, K. A.

    2014-04-15

    An improved method to unfold the space-resolved proton energy distribution function of laser-accelerated proton beams using a layered, radiochromic film (RCF) detector stack has been developed. The method takes into account the reduced RCF response near the Bragg peak due to a high linear energy transfer (LET). This LET dependence of the active RCF layer has been measured, and published data have been re-interpreted to find a nonlinear saturation scaling of the RCF response with stopping power. Accounting for the LET effect increased the integrated particle yield by 25% after data unfolding. An iterative, analytical, space-resolved deconvolution of the RCF response functions from the measured dose was developed that does not rely on fitting. After the particle number unfold, three-dimensional interpolation is performed to determine the spatial proton beam distribution for proton energies in-between the RCF data points. Here, image morphing has been implemented as a novel interpolation method that takes into account the energy-dependent, changing beam topology.

  10. Parameters Optimization of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Experimental Setup for the Case with Beam Expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Juanjuan; Li, Yufang; Gong, Yao; Dong, Lei; Ma, Weiguang; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2015-11-01

    Improvement of measurement precision and repeatability is one of the issues currently faced by the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, which is expected to be capable of precise and accurate quantitative analysis. It was found that there was great potential to improve the signal quality and repeatability by reducing the laser beam divergence angle using a suitable beam expander (BE). In the present work, the influences of several experimental parameters for the case with BE are studied in order to optimize the analytical performances: the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the relative standard deviation (RSD). We demonstrate that by selecting the optimal experimental parameters, the BE-included LIBS setup can give higher SNR and lower RSD values of the line intensity normalized by the whole spectrum area. For validation purposes, support vector machine (SVM) regression combined with principal component analysis (PCA) was used to establish a calibration model to realize the quantitative analysis of the ash content. Good agreement has been found between the laboratory measurement results from the LIBS method and those from the traditional method. The measurement accuracy presented here for ash content analysis is estimated to be 0.31%, while the average relative error is 2.36%. supported by the 973 Program of China (No. 2012CB921603), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61475093, 61127017, 61178009, 61108030, 61378047, 61275213, 61475093, and 61205216), the National Key Technology R&D Program of China (No. 2013BAC14B01), the Shanxi Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 2013021004-1 and 2012021022-1), the Shanxi Scholarship Council of China (Nos. 2013-011 and 2013-01), and the Program for the Outstanding Innovative Teams of Higher Learning Institutions of Shanxi, China

  11. Work on an Atomic Beam Apparatus for Precision Laser Spectroscopy of Tritium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, David; Khademian, Ali; Shiner, David

    2004-05-01

    An apparatus for precision spectroscopy of tritium is being constructed. One goal is to measure the nuclear size of tritium using the 1S to 2S transition. The apparatus is designed to reduce the amount of radioactive atoms required and minimize hydrogen background. Storing and releasing tritium in an active getter will help to reuse tritium atoms while minimizing contamination. We have investigated the use of several materials such as uranium, titanium and palladium for storing hydrogen isotopes. Preliminary results for tritium storage and hydrogen outgassing in the vacuum chamber will be presented.

  12. Standoff spectroscopy via remote generation of a backward-propagating laser beam

    PubMed Central

    Hemmer, Philip R.; Miles, Richard B.; Polynkin, Pavel; Siebert, Torsten; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Sprangle, Phillip; Scully, Marlan O.

    2011-01-01

    In an earlier publication we demonstrated that by using pairs of pulses of different colors (e.g., red and blue) it is possible to excite a dilute ensemble of molecules such that lasing and/or gain-swept superradiance is realized in a direction toward the observer. This approach is a conceptual step toward spectroscopic probing at a distance, also known as standoff spectroscopy. In the present paper, we propose a related but simpler approach on the basis of the backward-directed lasing in optically excited dominant constituents of plain air, N2 and O2. This technique relies on the remote generation of a weakly ionized plasma channel through filamentation of an ultraintense femtosecond laser pulse. Subsequent application of an energetic nanosecond pulse or series of pulses boosts the plasma density in the seed channel via avalanche ionization. Depending on the spectral and temporal content of the driving pulses, a transient population inversion is established in either nitrogen- or oxygen-ionized molecules, thus enabling a transient gain for an optical field propagating toward the observer. This technique results in the generation of a strong, coherent, counterpropagating optical probe pulse. Such a probe, combined with a wavelength-tunable laser signal(s) propagating in the forward direction, provides a tool for various remote-sensing applications. The proposed technique can be enhanced by combining it with the gain-swept excitation approach as well as with beam shaping and adaptive optics techniques. PMID:21297033

  13. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of Dα or Hα lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ˜106 s-1 per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of Dα light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  14. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-15

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D{sub α} or H{sub α} lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10{sup 6} s{sup −1} per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D{sub α} light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  15. Overview of the current spectroscopy effort on the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.C.; Brown, G.

    1995-06-29

    An overview is given of the current spectroscopic effort on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facilities. The effort focuses on four aspects: spectral line position, line intensity, temporal evolution, and line shape. Examples of line position measurements include studies of the K-shell transitions in heliumlike Kr{sup 34+} and the 2s-2p intrashell transitions in lithiumlike Th{sup 87+} and U{sup 89+}, which provide benchmark values for testing the theory of relativistic and quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions. Examples of line intensity measurements are provided by measurements of the electron-impact excitation and dielectronic recombination cross sections of heliumlike transition-metal ions Ti{sup 20+} through CO{sup 25+}. A discussion of radiative lifetime measurements of metastable levels in heliumlike ions is given to illustrate the time-resolved spectroscopy techniques in the microsecond range. The authors also present a measurement of the spectral lineshape that illustrates the very low ion temperatures that can be achieved in an EBIT.

  16. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Lizunov, A; Khilchenko, A; Khilchenko, V; Kvashnin, A; Zubarev, P

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D(α) or H(α) lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10(6) s(-1) per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D(α) light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented. PMID:26724090

  17. An atomic beam of 6Li — 7Li for high resolution spectroscopy from matrix isolation sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. N.; Sacramento, R. L.; Silva, B. A.; Uhlmann, F. O.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose the Matrix Isolation Sublimation (MlSu) technique for generating cold lithium atoms for the measurement of the 6Li - 7Li isotope shift in D1 and D2 transitions. The technique is capable of generating cold 6Li and 7Li beams at 4 K with forward velocity of 125 m/s. Using this beam we offer a distinguished source of lithium atoms for transitions measurements, adding a new possibility to make high resolution spectroscopy towards improving the experimental checks of the theory.

  18. Electron-beam-activated zinc selenide and diamond switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; Kennedy, Mark R.; Joshi, Ravindra P.; Brinkmann, Ralf P.; Ho, Ping-Tong

    1992-05-01

    Zinc Selenide, in polycrystalline and single crystal form, and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown diamond films were studied with respect to their application as materials for electron-beam activated switches. The hold-off fields of the three materials were found to exceed that of semi-insulating gallium arsenide by at least an order of magnitude. Highest hold-off fields for pulsed voltage operation were recorded for diamond at 1.8 MV/cm. The electron-beam induced conductance in the 1 mm thick single crystal zinc selenide switches reached values of 0.5 (Ωcm2)-1 with an electron-beam current density of 20 mA/cm2 at electron-energies of 150 keV. This corresponds to an electron-beam induced reduction of switch resistance from 108 Ω to 2 Ω per square centimeter. The dominant carrier loss mechanism in the single crystal zinc selenide switch was found to be direct recombination of electron-hole pairs. In this material, the current, after electron-beam turn-off, decays hyperbolically with 90% to 10% falitimes in the range of hundreds of nanoseconds. The electron-beam induced conductivity in CVD grown diamond films of 1 micrometer thickness is due to the subnanosecond carrier lifetime less than three orders lower than that of single crystal zinc selenide. Both materials, single crystal zinc selenide and diamond, showed a lock-on effect in current. For diamond it could be demonstrated, as before for gaffium arsenide, that this effect can be suppressed by proper choice of contacts.

  19. Using Ambient Ion Beams to Write Nanostructured Patterns for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Anyin; Baird, Zane; Bag, Soumabha; Sarkar, Depanjan; Prabhath, Anupama; Pradeep, Thalappil; Cooks, Robert G.

    2014-11-10

    Electrolytic spray deposition was used to pattern surfaces with 2D metallic nanostructures. Spots that contain silver nanoparticles (AgNP) were created by landing solvated silver ions at desired locations using electrically floated masks to focus the metal ions to an area as little as 20 mm in diameter. The AgNPs formed are unprotected and their aggregates can be used for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The morphology and SERS activity of the NP structures were controlled by the surface coverage of landed silver ions. The NP structures created could be used as substrates onto which SERS samples were deposited or prepared directly on top of predeposited samples of interest. The evenly distributed hot spots in the micron-sized aggregates had an average SERS enhancement factor of 108. The surfaces showed SERS activity when using lasers of different wavelengths (532, 633, and 785 nm) and were stable in air.

  20. Laser-ablated active doping technique for visible spectroscopy measurements on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Matthew Robert

    2013-09-01

    Visible spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic, allowing plasma parameters ranging from temperature and density to electric and magnetic fields to be measured. Spectroscopic dopants are commonly introduced to make these measurements. On Z, dopants are introduced passively (i.e. a salt deposited on a current-carrying surface); however, in some cases, passive doping can limit the times and locations at which measurements can be made. Active doping utilizes an auxiliary energy source to disperse the dopant independently from the rest of the experiment. The objective of this LDRD project was to explore laser ablation as a method of actively introducing spectroscopic dopants. Ideally, the laser energy would be delivered to the dopant via fiber optic, which would eliminate the need for time-intensive laser alignments in the Z chamber. Experiments conducted in a light lab to assess the feasibility of fibercoupled and open-beam laser-ablated doping are discussed.

  1. Universal Slow RI-Beam Facility at RIKEN RIBF for Laser Spectroscopy of Short-Lived Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Takamine, A.; Okada, K.; Sonoda, T.; Schury, P.; Kanai, Y.; Kojima, T. M.; Lioubimov, V.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, A.; Kubo, T.; Iimura, H.; Katayama, I.; Ohtani, S.; Wollnik, H.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2009-03-17

    A universal slow RI-beam facility (SLOWRI) for precision atomic spectroscopy is being built at the RIKEN RI-beam factory. The facility will provide a wide variety of low-energy nuclear ions of all elements produced by projectile fragmentation of high-energy heavy-ion beams and thermalized by an RF-carpet ion guide. At prototype SLOWRI, radioactive Be isotope ions produced at 1 GeV were decelerated and cooled in an ion trap down to 1 {mu}eV by employing laser cooling. The ground state hyperfine structures of {sup 7}Be{sup +} and {sup 11}Be{sup +} were measured accurately by laser microwave double resonance spectroscopy. Measurements of the S{sub 1/2}{yields}P{sub 1/2}, P{sub 3/2} transition frequencies of {sup 7,9,10,11}Be{sup +} ions are also in progress aiming at the study of the nuclear charge radii. Other possible experiment at SLOWRI, such as mass spectroscopy, are also discussed.

  2. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-04-24

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  3. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Li, G.

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  4. Photon detection system for laser spectroscopy experiments with cooled/bunched beams at BECOLA facility at NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Maximilian; Minamisono, Kei; Mantica, Paul; Rossi, Dominic; Ryder, Caleb; Klose, Andrew; Tarazona, David; Strum, Ryan; Bollen, Georg; Ringle, Ryan; Barquest, Brad; Geppert, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    The BEam COoler and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at NSCL is designed to determine fundamental properties of the atomic nucleus such as the charge radii, the spin and electromagnetic moments. Commissioning tests of BECOLA has been completed using a stable 39K beam produced from an offline ion source. The 39K beam was cooled and bunched and propagated collinearly with laser light. The resulting fluorescence was detected in a photomultiplier tube (PMT)sensitive to the wavelength of D1 transition of 39K The PMT was cooled to minimize background due to dark counts. The resulting fluorescence light was measured as a function of laser frequency and time relative to the 39K beam bunch. An EPICS-based Control Systems Studio (CSS) was used for data acquisition and the software package Root was used for data analysis. The performance characteristics of the photon detection system as well as the laser spectroscopy of bunched 39K will be discussed. Work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation, Grant PHY-11-02511.

  5. Passive and active plasma deceleration for the compact disposal of electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-08-15

    Plasma-based decelerating schemes are investigated as compact alternatives for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). Analytical solutions for the energy loss of electron beams propagating in passive and active (laser-driven) schemes are derived. These solutions, along with numerical modeling, are used to investigate the evolution of the electron distribution, including energy chirp and total beam energy. In the active beam dump scheme, a laser-driver allows a more homogeneous beam energy extraction and drastically reduces the energy chirp observed in the passive scheme. These concepts could benefit applications requiring overall compactness, such as transportable light sources, or facilities operating at high beam power.

  6. The young astrophysicist: a very inexpensive activity to discuss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Guilherme; André Testoni, Leonardo; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2015-09-01

    The continuing fascination of young people with celestial bodies leads them to pose challenging questions to their science teachers, such as how was the universe born? How were the stars formed? In this paper we present an extremely inexpensive but highly engaging activity to teach the basics of spectroscopy. Guided by the question ‘how do scientists know what a star is made of?’, this simple activity allows a wide range of physical content to be taught, based on the analysis of the emission spectrum of a star’s light. It is possible to see the configuration of lines of each chemical element as a fingerprint, thereby inferring each one’s presence in the composition of the celestial body. As many countries do not have access to even inexpensive technologies, such as simple computers or digital cameras, this alternative could teach and motivate students of different ages to understand and enjoy the beauty of the nature of light.

  7. Active retrodirective arrays for SPS beam pointing. [phase conjugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1980-01-01

    The basic requirement of the SPS beam pointing system is that it deliver a certain amount of S-band (lambda = 12.5 cm) power to a 9.6 km diameter receiving rectenna on the ground. The power is transmitted from a 1.0 km diameter antenna array on the SPS, which is, for a rectenna at about plus or minus 40 deg. latitude, some 37.5x10 to the 6th power km distant. At the present time ARA's appear to be the best bet to realize this very stringent beam pointing requirement. An active retrodirective array (ARA) transmits a beam towards the apparent source of an illuminating signal called the pilot. The array produces, not merely reflects, RF power. Retrodirectivity is achieved by retransmitting from each element of the array a signal whose phase is the "conjugate" of that received by the element. Phase conjugate circuits and pointing errors in ARA's are described. Results obtained using a 2-element X-band ARA and an 8-element S-band ARA are included.

  8. A field programmable gate array-based time-resolved scaler for collinear laser spectroscopy with bunched radioactive potassium beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, D. M. Davis, M.; Ringle, R.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Ryder, C. A.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Zhao, S.; Minamisono, K. Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Hughes, M.; Strum, R.; Tarazona, D.; Cooper, K.; Hammerton, K.; Mantica, P. F.; Morrissey, D. J.

    2014-09-15

    A new data acquisition system including a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based time-resolved scaler was developed for laser-induced fluorescence and beam bunch coincidence measurements. The FPGA scaler was tested in a collinear laser-spectroscopy experiment on radioactive {sup 37}K at the BEam COoler and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. A 1.29 μs bunch width from the buncher and a bunch repetition rate of 2.5 Hz led to a background suppression factor of 3.1 × 10{sup 5} in resonant photon detection measurements. The hyperfine structure of {sup 37}K and its isotope shift relative to the stable {sup 39}K were determined using 5 × 10{sup 4} s{sup −1} {sup 37}K ions injected into the BECOLA beam line. The obtained hyperfine coupling constants A({sup 2}S{sub 1/2}) = 120.3(1.4) MHz, A({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) = 15.2(1.1) MHz, and A({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) = 1.4(8) MHz, and the isotope shift δν{sup 39,} {sup 37} = −264(3) MHz are consistent with the previously determined values, where available.

  9. Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy of - CH Activation Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2013-06-01

    Despite the rather simple composition of alkanes the strength of their C-C and C-H bonds has made controlled, selective reaction of these compounds an unrealized goal of synthetic chemistry. The field was pioneered by Shilov and coworkers in 1969 when they observed the exchange of H and D in methane that was bubbled into an acidic solution of K_2PtCl_4. The Shilov reaction has since been extended to induce oxidation of methane selectively to methanol and has become the standard bearer of CH activation despite its limitations. The mechanism for the reaction, while inferred from kinetics studies, is still largely uncharacterized. Here, we present our work towards applying cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) to capture the intermediate species of this reaction with a focus on the σ-CH adduct formed between methane and Pt(II) complexes that is believed to be crucial to the selectivity and rate of this reaction.

  10. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for ion beam etch monitoring and end-point detection of multilayer structures.

    PubMed

    Tao, L; Yalin, A P; Yamamoto, N

    2008-11-01

    This contribution reports on the development of in situ sputter monitoring and end-point detection for ion beam etch systems using continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS). The demonstrated system is based on the detection of sputtered manganese atoms using a tunable external cavity diode laser in the vicinity of 403.07 nm. The cw-CRDS system is described and measurements from a manganese-iron target are presented. End-point detection is demonstrated by monitoring the time dependence of manganese concentration for a multilayer target comprised of alternating layers of manganese/iron and titanium. Detection limits are shown to be adequate for today's commercial ion beam sputter systems. PMID:19045913

  11. Two-beam ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for high resolution gas-phase multiplex imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2014-01-20

    We propose and develop a method for wideband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in the gas phase and demonstrate the single-shot measurement of N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4}. Pure-rotational and vibrational O-, Q-, and S- branch spectra are collected simultaneously, with high spectral and spatial resolution, and within a single-laser-shot. The relative intensity of the rotational and vibrational signals can be tuned arbitrarily using polarization techniques. The ultrashort 7 fs pump and Stokes pulses are automatically overlapped temporally and spatially using a two-beam CARS technique, and the crossed probe beam allows for excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location.

  12. Sub-Doppler direct infrared laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams: The fluorine hyperfine structure of HF +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, J. V.; Owrutsky, J. C.; Keim, E. R.; Agman, N. V.; Hovde, D. C.; Saykally, R. J.

    1989-04-01

    We report the development of a new general technique for measuring vibration-rotation spectra of molecular ions with sub-Doppler resolution and with accurate determination of the mass and number density of the carriers of all spectral features. With this method, called direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams (DLASFIB), we have carried out the first observation of direct absorption of photons by ions in a fast ion beam. Hyperfine-resolved vibration-rotation transitions of HF+ have been measured, and along with optical combination differences and laser magnetic resonance data, have been analyzed to yield the fluorine hyperfine parameters a, b, c and d for both v=0 and v=1 in the X 2Π state. Comparisons with many-body perturbation theory results are presented.

  13. Investigations of the Zeeman effect of some 142Nd ionic levels, using collinear laser ion beam spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbowy, S.; Hühnermann, H.; Kwela, J.; Windholz, L.

    2015-11-01

    By performing laser excitation from the even 4f45d lower levels to the odd 4f46p and 4f35d2 upper levels of the neodymium ion 142Nd+, we have observed Zeeman splitting in an external magnetic field up to 330 G. We applied the high resolution spectroscopic method of collinear laser ion beam spectroscopy (CLIBS). With this method (unconventional for studying the Zeeman effect) we recorded very well-resolved Zeeman structure patterns with line widths of order of 100 MHz, which is only sometimes the natural line width. The obtained experimental Landé factors are compared with earlier measurements and with theoretical calculations.

  14. The design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, J. A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R. P.

    1981-10-01

    To test neutral beam sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam on times, actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles are required. The dumps should be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/sq cm anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on two different panel designs. The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  15. {gamma}-Spectroscopy and Radioactive Beams: How To Perform Channel Selection ?

    SciTech Connect

    Rosse, B.; Redon, N.; Stezowski, O.; Schmitt, Ch.; Guinet, D.; Meyer, M.; Lautesse, Ph.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2006-04-26

    An experiment has been performed using a SPIRAL 76Kr radioactive beam at GANIL to investigate rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The EXOGAM gamma array was coupled with the DIAMANT light charged-particle detector and the VAMOS spectrometer. We report here on the powerful of this setup to extract fusion-evaporation {gamma}-rays from a large beam contamination.

  16. Oxidation study by Auger electron spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy of GaSb(001) surfaces grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Raisin, C.; Da Silva, F.W.O.; Lassabatere, L. , Place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier-Cedex 5, France )

    1990-01-01

    GaSb (001) surfaces were prepared by molecular-beam epitaxy. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) are reported for clean surfaces exposed to oxygen, and during the process the ionization gauge of the vacuum system is turned on. Successive stages of chemisorption can be distinguished. For oxygen coverage up to 0.5 monolayer, the surface states are saturated by bonding of the oxygen with Ga and Sb atoms. Sb atoms desorb causing significant Sb depletion in the first layer. Larger exposures further increase the coverage and induce, in the EELS spectra, losses related to O(2{ital p}) and O(2{ital s}) atomic states and new plasmon excitations. In the AES spectra the shift of Auger emission lines which are characteristic of Sb and Ga oxide forms appear; at coverages of about one monolayer back bonds break forming Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Further exposures to oxygen result in thicker oxide layers of Ga and Sb.

  17. High-power continuous-wave tunable 544- and 272-nm beams based on a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier for calcium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Kwang-Hoon; Kim, Yonghee; Park, Hyunmin; Cha, Yong-Ho; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Lim; Lim, Gwon; Han, Jaemin; Ko, Kwang-Hee; Jeong, Do-Young

    2015-08-01

    Continuous-wave single-frequency tunable 544- and 272-nm beams have been demonstrated by the second- and fourth-harmonic conversions of a 1088-nm fundamental beam from a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier. The single-pass second-harmonic generation with a MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystal and the external-cavity frequency-doubling technique with a bulk BBO crystal were employed to achieve an approximately 6-W 544-nm beam and a 1.5-W 272-nm beam, respectively. We characterized the second- and fourth-harmonic generations and discussed their applications to calcium spectroscopy.

  18. EUV and X-ray Spectroscopy of the Active Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftery, Claire L.

    2012-10-01

    This thesis strives to improve our understanding of solar activity, specifically the behaviour of solar flares and coronal mass ejections. An investigation into the hydrodynamic evolution of a confined solar flare was carried out using RHESSI, CDS, GOES and TRACE. Evidence for pre-flare heating, explosive and gentle chromospheric evaporation and loop draining were observed in the data. The observations were compared to a 0-D hydrodynamic model, EBTEL, to aid interpretation. This led to the conclusion that the flare was not heated purely by non-thermal beam heating as previously believed, but also required direct heating of the plasma. An observational investigation in to the initiation mechanism of a coronal mass ejection and eruptive flare was then carried out, again utilising observations from a wide range of spacecraft: MESSENGER/SAX, RHESSI, EUVI, Cor1 and Cor2. Observations provided evidence of CME triggering by internal tether-cutting and not by breakout reconnection. A comparison of the confined and eruptive flares suggests that while they have different characteristics, timescales and topologies, these two phenomena are the result of the same fundamental processes. Finally, an investigation into the sensitivity of EUV imaging telescopes was carried out. This study established a new technique for calculating the sensitivity of EUV imagers to plasmas of different temperatures for four different types of plasma: coronal hole, quiet sun, active region and solar flare. This was carried out for six instruments: Proba-2/SWAP, TRACE, SOHO/EIT, STEREO A/EUVI, STEREO B/EUVI and SDO/AIA. The importance of considering the multi-thermal nature of these instruments was then put into the context of investigating explosive solar activity.

  19. Radiative interaction of a focused relativistic electron beam in energy-loss spectroscopy of nanoscopic platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Itskovsky, M. A.; Maniv, T.; Cohen, H.

    2008-07-15

    A quantum-mechanical scattering theory for relativistic, highly focused electron beams in the vacuum near nanoscopic platelets is presented, revealing an excitation mechanism due to the electron wave scattering from the platelet edges. Radiative electromagnetic excitations within the light cone are shown to arise, allowed by the breakdown of momentum conservation along the beam axis in the inelastic-scattering process. Calculated for metallic (silver and gold) and insulating (SiO{sub 2} and MgO) nanoplatelets, radiative features are revealed above the main surface-plasmon-polariton peak, and dramatic enhancements in the electron-energy-loss probability at gaps of the 'classical' spectra are found. The corresponding radiation should be detectable in the vacuum far-field zone, with e beams exploited as sensitive 'tip detectors' of electronically excited nanostructures.

  20. Active plasma resonance spectroscopy: eigenfunction solutions in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, J.; Brinkmann, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    The term active plasma resonance spectroscopy denotes a class of related techniques which utilize, for diagnostic purposes, the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency ωpe: a radio frequent signal (in the GHz range) is coupled into the plasma via an antenna or probe, the spectral response is recorded, and a mathematical model is used to determine plasma parameters like the electron density. The mathematical model of an arbitrarily shaped probe-plasma system can be written in an abstract but very compact equation. It contains an appropriate operator, which describes the dynamical behavior and can be split into a conservative and a dissipative part. Based on the cold plasma model, this manuscript provides a solution strategy to determine the electrical admittance of a specific probe-plasma system derived from the abstract dynamical equation. Focusing on probes with a spherical-shaped probe tip the general admittance can be derived analytically. Therefore, the matrix representation of the resolvent of the dynamical operator is determined. This matrix representation is derived by means of the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the conservative operator. It can be shown that these eigenvalues represent the resonance frequencies of the probe-plasma system which are simply connected to the electron density. As an example, the result is applied to established probe designs: the spherical impedance probe and the multipole resonance probe.

  1. Initial Active MHD Spectroscopy Experiments on Alcator C-MOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittdiel, D. A.; Snipes, J. A.; Granetz, R. S.; Parker, R. R.; Wolfe, S. M.; Fasoli, A.

    2002-11-01

    The Active MHD Spectroscopy system is a new diagnostic on C-MOD that will be used to study low frequency MHD modes and TAE's present at high B_tor, n_e, and Te ˜= T_i. The present system consists of two antennas, power amplifiers, and an impedance matching network. Each antenna is 15 × 25 cm with five turns, an inductance of ˜10 μH, and is covered by boron nitride tiles. The two antennas are placed at the same toroidal location, symmetrically above and below the midplane. Each antenna is driven by a ˜1 kW power amplifier in the range of 1 kHz - 1 MHz with an expected antenna current ˜10 A, which will produce a vacuum field of ˜0.5 G at the q = 1.5 surface. This diagnostic is designed to excite high n ( ˜20) stable TAE's and initial results regarding their frequency, mode structure, and damping rate will be presented. Evolution of these modes could also provide information on the q profile to compare with MSE measurements, which will be important for planned lower hybrid current drive operation in 2003.

  2. Computational and experimental characterization of high-brightness beams for femtosecond electron imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Tao, Z.; Makino, K.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M.; Ruan, C.-Y.

    2013-12-16

    Using a multilevel fast multipole method, coupled with the shadow imaging of femtosecond photoelectron pulses for validation, we quantitatively elucidate the photocathode, space charge, and virtual cathode physics, which fundamentally limit the spatiotemporal and spectroscopic resolution and throughput of ultrafast electron microscope (UEM) systems. We present a simple microscopic description to capture the nonlinear beam dynamics based on a two-fluid picture and elucidate an unexpected dominant role of image potential pinning in accelerating the emittance growth process. These calculations set theoretical limits on the performance of UEM systems and provide useful guides for photocathode design for high-brightness electron beam systems.

  3. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths.

    PubMed

    Huppert, M; Jordan, I; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids. PMID:26724005

  4. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, M.; Jordan, I.; Wörner, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids.

  5. In-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy in the vicinity of {sup 100}Sn.

    SciTech Connect

    Seweryniak, D.

    1998-09-29

    In recent years, in-beam x-ray experiments supplied a vast amount of data on high-spin states in nuclei in the vicinity of {sup 100}Sn. The present contribution reviews spectroscopic information obtained recently for N {ge} 50 nuclei around {sup 100}Sn, with emphasis on isomer studies, and discusses selected results in the frame of the shell model.

  6. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This NASA grant covered EUVE observing and data analysis programs during EUVE Cycle 5 GO observing. The research involved a single Guest Observer project 97-EUVE-061 "Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars". The grant provided funding that covered 1.25 months of the PI's salary. The activities undertaken included observation planning and data analysis (both temporal and spectral). This project was awarded 910 ksec of observing time to study seven active binary stars, all but one of which were actually observed. Lambda-And was observed on 1997 Jul 30 - Aug 3 and Aug 7-14 for a total of 297 ksec; these observations showed two large complex flares that were analyzed by Osten & Brown (1999). AR Psc, observed for 350 ksec on 1997 Aug 27 - Sep 13, showed only relatively small flares that were also discussed by Osten & Brown (1999). EUVE observations of El Eri were obtained on 1994 August 24-28, simultaneous with ASCA X-ray spectra. Four flares were detected by EUVE with one of these also observed simultaneously, by ASCA. The other three EUVE observations were of the stars BY Dra (1997 Sep 22-28), V478 Lyr (1998 May 18-27), and sigma Gem (1998 Dec 10-22). The first two stars showed a few small flares. The sigma Gem data shows a beautiful complete flare with a factor of ten peak brightness compared to quiescence. The flare rise and almost all the decay phase are observed. Unfortunately no observations in other spectral regions were obtained for these stars. Analysis of the lambda-And and AR Psc observations is complete and the results were published in Osten & Brown (1999). Analysis of the BY Dra, V478 Lyr and sigma Gem EUVE data is complete and will be published in Osten (2000, in prep.). The El Eri EUV analysis is also completed and the simultaneous EUV/X-ray study will be published in Osten et al. (2000, in prep.). Both these latter papers will be submitted in summer 2000. All these results will form part of Rachel Osten's PhD thesis.

  7. High temperature and high resolution uv photoelectron spectroscopy using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai-Sheng; Reutt-Robey, J.E.; Niu, B.; Lee, Y.T.; Shirley, D.A.; Maryland Univ., College Park, MD . Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-07-01

    A high temperature molecular beam source with electron bombardment heating has been built for high resolution photoelectron spectroscopic studies of high temperature species and clusters. This source has the advantages of: producing an intense, continuous, seeded molecular beam, eliminating the interference of the heating mechanism from the photoelectron measurement. Coupling the source with our hemispherical electron energy analyzer, we can obtain very high resolution HeI{alpha} (584{angstrom}) photoelectron spectra of high temperature species. Vibrationally-resolved photoelectron spectra of PbSe, As{sub 2}, As{sub 4}, and ZnCl{sub 2} are shown to demonstrate the performance of the new source. 25 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Tunable diode lasers and their application in cold molecular beam spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Xu, Songlin; McDowell, Robin; Blake, Thomas A.

    1996-10-01

    Supersonic molecular expansions provide a unique environment in which to acquire the infrared spectra of many molecular systems. Tunable diode lasers offer high spectral brightness, low noise, rapid tuning, and contiguous spectral coverage in the infrared, from 3000 to 500 cm-1. Molecular beams combined with tunable diode lasers represents a powerful tool for reducing or removing spectral congestion arising from both pressure broadening and rotational excitation. Depending on expansion conditions, rotational temperatures on the order of 10K can be routinely obtained. With the appropriate pulsed slit nozzle, Doppler broadening is reduced six-fold or more over that of room temperature, static cells. In addition, by employing modified White cell optics, effective optical path lengths of 3 meters can be realized. A description of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's beam-diode laser spectrometer will be given along with recent results for studies involving the fully rotationally resolved spectra of several molecules of atmospheric interest including chlorine nitrate and carbon tetrachloride.

  9. Observation of conformers with laser electronic spectroscopy in supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philis, John G.; Kosmidis, Constantine E.; Tsekeris, Pericles

    1998-07-01

    We discuss the ability and effectiveness of electronic spectroscopy to reveal rotational isomerism by presenting some examples of the S1 implied by S0 electronic spectra of non-rigid molecules. One or two photon electronic spectra have multiple features when the molecule has more than one conformational preference. Torsional bands showing up in the spectrum complicate the assignment of conformers. Hole burning experiments give definite conclusions on the existence of rotational isomerism and an example from the literature is given.

  10. In situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy study of the oxidation of the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface by supersonic molecular oxygen beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Teraoka, Yuden; Okada, Ryuta; Yamada, Yoichi; Sasaki, Masahiro

    2014-11-07

    In situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy was performed during the oxidation of the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface induced by a molecular oxygen beam with various incident energies up to 2.2 eV from the initial to saturation coverage of surface oxides. The saturation coverage of oxygen on the clean Ge(100) surface was much lower than one monolayer and the oxidation state of Ge was +2 at most. This indicates that the Ge(100) surface is so inert toward oxidation that complete oxidation cannot be achieved with only pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) gas, which is in strong contrast to Si surfaces. Two types of dissociative adsorption, trapping-mediated and direct dissociation, were confirmed by oxygen uptake measurements depending on the incident energy of O{sub 2}. The direct adsorption process can be activated by increasing the translational energy, resulting in an increased population of Ge{sup 2+} and a higher final oxygen coverage. We demonstrated that hyperthermal O{sub 2} beams remarkably promote the room-temperature oxidation with novel atomic configurations of oxides at the Ge(100) surface. Our findings will contribute to the fundamental understanding of oxygen adsorption processes at 300 K from the initial stages to saturated oxidation.

  11. Working group report on beam plasmas, electronic propulsion, and active experiments using beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, J. M.; Eastman, T.; Gabriel, S.; Hawkins, J.; Matossian, J.; Raitt, J.; Reeves, G.; Sasaki, S.; Szuszczewicz, E.; Winkler, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The JPL Workshop addressed a number of plasma issues that bear on advanced spaceborne technology for the years 2000 and beyond. Primary interest was on the permanently manned space station with a focus on identifying environmentally related issues requiring early clarification by spaceborne plasma experimentation. The Beams Working Group focused on environmentally related threats that platform operations could have on the conduct and integrity of spaceborne beam experiments and vice versa. Considerations were to include particle beams and plumes. For purposes of definition it was agreed that the term particle beams described a directed flow of charged or neutral particles allowing single-particle trajectories to represent the characteristics of the beam and its propagation. On the other hand, the word plume was adopted to describe a multidimensional flow (or expansion) of a plasma or neutral gas cloud. Within the framework of these definitions, experiment categories included: (1) Neutral- and charged-particle beam propagation, with considerations extending to high powers and currents. (2) Evolution and dynamics of naturally occurring and man-made plasma and neutral gas clouds. In both categories, scientific interest focused on interactions with the ambient geoplasma and the evolution of particle densities, energy distribution functions, waves, and fields.

  12. Energetic Beam Processing of Silicon to Engineer Optoelectronically Active Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recht, Daniel

    This thesis explores ways to use ion implantation and nanosecond pulsed laser melting, both energetic beam techniques, to engineer defects in silicon. These defects are chosen to facilitate the use of silicon in optoelectronic applications for which its indirect bandgap is not ideal. Chapter 2 develops a kinetic model for the use of point defects as luminescence centers for light-emitting diodes and demonstrates an experimental procedure capable of high-throughput screening of the electroluminescent properties of such defects. Chapter 3 discusses the dramatic change in optical absorption observed in silicon highly supersaturated (i.e., hyperdoped) with the chalcogens sulfur, selenium, and tellurium and reports the first measurements of the optical absorption of such materials for photon energies greater than the bandgap of silicon. Chapter 3 examines the use of silicon hyperdoped with chalcogens in light detectors and concludes that while these devices display strong internal gain that is coupled to a particular type of surface defect, hyperdoping with chalcogens does not lead directly to measurable sub-bandgap photoconductivity. Chapter 4 considers the potential for Silicon to serve as the active material in an intermediate-band solar cell and reports experimental progress on two proposed approaches for hyperdoping silicon for this application. The main results of this chapter are the use of native-oxide etching to control the surface evaporation rate of sulfur from silicon and the first synthesis of monocrystalline silicon hyperdoped with gold.

  13. Design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R.P.

    1981-10-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility will test Neutral Beam Sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam-on times. For this application actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles will be required. The dumps will be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/cm/sup 2/ anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on a prototype panel. The prototype tests were performed on two different panel designs, one manufactured by Mc Donnell Douglas (MDAC) the other by United Technologies (UT). The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  14. Determination of thermooptical and transport parameters of ε iron(III) oxide-based nanocomposites by beam deflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, Dorota; Carraro, Giorgio; Maccato, Chiara; Franko, Mladen

    2015-04-01

    In this work, photothermal beam deflection (PBD) experiments have been used to characterize the thermooptical and transport properties of ε-Fe2O3-based nanocomposites. In particular, iron(III) nanostructures have been functionalized with Au, Ag and Cu nanoparticles, tailoring both their nano-organization and their chemical state. In order to elucidate the correlation between the thermooptical and transport parameters, the structural, compositional and morphological properties of Fe2O3-based systems were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was observed that the optothermal and transport parameters were influenced by the nature and oxidation state of the nanoparticles, which can serve as a key tool to master the material properties for their application in light-assisted processes.

  15. Edge electron density profiles and fluctuations measured by two-dimensional beam emission spectroscopy in the KSTAR.

    PubMed

    Nam, Y U; Zoletnik, S; Lampert, M; Kovácsik, Ákos; Wi, H M

    2014-11-01

    Beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) has recently been upgraded. The background intensity was reduced from 30% to 2% by suppressing the stray lights. This allows acquisition of the relative electron density profiles on the plasma edge without background subtraction from the beam power modulation signals. The KSTAR BES system has its spatial resolution of 1 cm, the temporal resolution of 2 MHz, and a total 32 channel (8 radial × 4 poloidal) avalanche photo diode array. Most measurements were done on the plasma edge, r/a ∼ 0.9, with 8 cm radial measurement width that covers the pedestal range. High speed density profile measurements reveal temporal behaviors of fast transient events, such as the precursors of edge localized modes and the transitions between confinement modes. Low background level also allows analysis of the edge density fluctuation patterns with reduced background fluctuations. Propagation of the density structures can be investigated by comparing the phase delays between the spatially distributed channels. PMID:25430341

  16. Edge electron density profiles and fluctuations measured by two-dimensional beam emission spectroscopy in the KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y. U. Wi, H. M.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Kovácsik, Ákos

    2014-11-15

    Beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) has recently been upgraded. The background intensity was reduced from 30% to 2% by suppressing the stray lights. This allows acquisition of the relative electron density profiles on the plasma edge without background subtraction from the beam power modulation signals. The KSTAR BES system has its spatial resolution of 1 cm, the temporal resolution of 2 MHz, and a total 32 channel (8 radial × 4 poloidal) avalanche photo diode array. Most measurements were done on the plasma edge, r/a ∼ 0.9, with 8 cm radial measurement width that covers the pedestal range. High speed density profile measurements reveal temporal behaviors of fast transient events, such as the precursors of edge localized modes and the transitions between confinement modes. Low background level also allows analysis of the edge density fluctuation patterns with reduced background fluctuations. Propagation of the density structures can be investigated by comparing the phase delays between the spatially distributed channels.

  17. Automatic laser beam alignment using blob detection for an environment monitoring spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khidir, Jarjees; Chen, Youhua; Anderson, Gary

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes a fully automated system to align an infra-red laser beam with a small retro-reflector over a wide range of distances. The component development and test were especially used for an open-path spectrometer gas detection system. Using blob detection under OpenCV library, an automatic alignment algorithm was designed to achieve fast and accurate target detection in a complex background environment. Test results are presented to show that the proposed algorithm has been successfully applied to various target distances and environment conditions.

  18. Visible light active TiO 2 films prepared by electron beam deposition of noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xing-Gang; Ma, Jun; Liu, An-Dong; Li, De-Jun; Huang, Mei-Dong; Deng, Xiang-Yun

    2010-03-01

    TiO 2 films prepared by sol-gel method were modified by electron beam deposition of noble metals (Pt, Pd, and Ag). Effects of noble metals on the chemical and surface characteristics of the films were studied using XPS, TEM and UV-Vis spectroscopy techniques. Photocatalytic activity of modified TiO 2 films was evaluated by studying the degradation of methyl orange dye solution under visible light UV irradiation. The result of TEM reveals that most of the surface area of TiO 2 is covered by tiny particles of noble metals with diameter less than 1 nm. Broad red shift of UV-Visible absorption band of modified photocatalysts was observed. The catalytic degradation of methyl orange in aqueous solutions under visible light illumination demonstrates a significant enhancement of photocatalytic activity of these films compared with the un-loaded films. The photocatalytic efficiency of modified TiO 2 films by this method is affected by the concentration of impregnating solution.

  19. Extended set of activation monitors for NCT beam characterization and spectral conditions of the beam after reactor fuel conversion.

    PubMed

    Marek, Milan; Vins, Miroslav; Lahodova, Zdena; Viererbl, Ladislav; Koleska, Michal

    2014-06-01

    Since 2010 the LVR-15 reactor has been gradually converted from highly enriched fuel (36wt% (235)U) to low enriched fuel with the enrichment of 19.75wt% (235)U. Paper presents influence of the core pattern changes on the neutron characteristics of the epithermal beam. The determination of neutron spectrum free in the beam was done with a set of neutron activation monitors. After the reactor conversion the change in neutron spectrum is not provable as differences are in the range of measurement errors. PMID:24369892

  20. High accuracy laboratory spectroscopy to support active greenhouse gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D. A.; Bielska, K.; Cygan, A.; Havey, D. K.; Okumura, M.; Miller, C. E.; Lisak, D.; Hodges, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Recent carbon dioxide (CO2) remote sensing missions have set precision targets as demanding as 0.25% (1 ppm) in order to elucidate carbon sources and sinks [1]. These ambitious measurement targets will require the most precise body of spectroscopic reference data ever assembled. Active sensing missions will be especially susceptible to subtle line shape effects as the narrow bandwidth of these measurements will greatly limit the number of spectral transitions which are employed in retrievals. In order to assist these remote sensing missions we have employed frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FS-CRDS) [2], a high-resolution, ultrasensitive laboratory technique, to measure precise line shape parameters for transitions of O2, CO2, and other atmospherically-relevant species within the near-infrared. These measurements have led to new HITRAN-style line lists for both 16O2 [3] and rare isotopologue [4] transitions in the A-band. In addition, we have performed detailed line shape studies of CO2 transitions near 1.6 μm under a variety of broadening conditions [5]. We will address recent measurements in these bands as well as highlight recent instrumental improvements to the FS-CRDS spectrometer. These improvements include the use of the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme, a high bandwidth servo which enables measurements to be made at rates greater than 10 kHz [6]. In addition, an optical frequency comb will be utilized as a frequency reference, which should allow for transition frequencies to be measured with uncertainties below 10 kHz (3×10-7 cm-1). [1] C. E. Miller, D. Crisp, P. L. DeCola, S. C. Olsen, et al., J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos. 112, D10314 (2007). [2] J. T. Hodges, H. P. Layer, W. W. Miller, G. E. Scace, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 849-863 (2004). [3] D. A. Long, D. K. Havey, M. Okumura, C. E. Miller, et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 111, 2021-2036 (2010). [4] D. A. Long, D. K. Havey, S. S. Yu, M. Okumura, et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc

  1. Status of LHC crab activity simulations and beam studies

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga,R.; Assman, R.; Barranco, J.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Caspers, F.; Ciapala, E.; De-Maria, R.; Koutchouk, J. P.; Linnecar, T.; Metral, E.; Morita, A.; Solyak, N.; Sun, Y.; Tomas, R.; Tuckmantel, J.; Weiler, T.; Zimmermann, F.

    2009-05-04

    The LHC crab cavity program is advancing rapidly towards a first prototype which is anticipated to be tested during the early stages of the LHC phase I upgrade and commissioning. The general project status and some aspects related to crab optics, collimation, aperture constraints, impedances, noise effects. beam transparency and machine protection critical for a safe and robust operation of LHC beams with crab cavities are addressed here.

  2. Investigation of reactions relevant for the γ process using in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netterdon, L.; Endres, J.; Mayer, J.; Sauerwein, A.; Scholz, P.; Zilges, A.

    2016-01-01

    The reaction 89Y(p, γ)90Zr was studied at five proton energies close to the Gamow window. This reaction is of astrophysical importance, since it is located in a mass region, where the p-nuclei abundances are not well reproduced by network calculations. For this purpose, the in-beam technique utilizing the high-efficiency high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector array HORUS at the Tandem ion accelerator at the University of Cologne was used. The excellent agreement of the measured total cross sections with previous data shows, that the setup in Cologne is well suited for such measurements. An additional interesting outcome of this measurement are partial cross sections of the de-excitation of the 90 Zr compund nucleus up to the 15th excited state, an observable only accessible in this kind of high-resolution inbeam experiments. The experimental setup and preliminary results of the total and partial cross sections obtained for the 89Y(p, γ) reaction are presented. Additionally, we show results of a first test measurement of the a-capture reaction on the p-nucleus 92Mo using the in-beam technique with HPGe detectors.

  3. Tunable diode lasers and their application in cold molecular beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.W.; Xu, S.; McDowell, R.; Blake, T.

    1996-12-31

    Supersonic molecular expansions provide a unique environment in which to acquire the infrared spectra of many molecular systems. Tunable diode lasers offer high spectral brightness, low noise, rapid tuning, and contiguous spectral coverage in the infrared, from 3,000 to 500 cm{sup {minus}1}. Molecular beams combined with tunable diode lasers represent a powerful tool for reducing or removing spectral congestion arising from both pressure broadening and rotational excitation. Depending on expansion conditions, rotational temperatures on the order of 10 K can be routinely obtained. With the appropriate pulsed slit nozzle (12 cm x 50 microns), Doppler broadening is reduced six-fold or more over that of room temperature, static cells. In addition, by employing modified White cell optics, effective optical path lengths of 3 meters can be realized. A description of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s beam-diode laser spectrometer will be given along with recent results for studies involving the fully rotationally resolved spectra of several molecules of atmospheric interest including chlorine nitrate and carbon tetrachloride.

  4. Inferring deep-brain activity from cortical activity using functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning; Cui, Xu; Bryant, Daniel M.; Glover, Gary H.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly popular technology for studying brain function because it is non-invasive, non-irradiating and relatively inexpensive. Further, fNIRS potentially allows measurement of hemodynamic activity with high temporal resolution (milliseconds) and in naturalistic settings. However, in comparison with other imaging modalities, namely fMRI, fNIRS has a significant drawback: limited sensitivity to hemodynamic changes in deep-brain regions. To overcome this limitation, we developed a computational method to infer deep-brain activity using fNIRS measurements of cortical activity. Using simultaneous fNIRS and fMRI, we measured brain activity in 17 participants as they completed three cognitive tasks. A support vector regression (SVR) learning algorithm was used to predict activity in twelve deep-brain regions using information from surface fNIRS measurements. We compared these predictions against actual fMRI-measured activity using Pearson’s correlation to quantify prediction performance. To provide a benchmark for comparison, we also used fMRI measurements of cortical activity to infer deep-brain activity. When using fMRI-measured activity from the entire cortex, we were able to predict deep-brain activity in the fusiform cortex with an average correlation coefficient of 0.80 and in all deep-brain regions with an average correlation coefficient of 0.67. The top 15% of predictions using fNIRS signal achieved an accuracy of 0.7. To our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the feasibility of using cortical activity to infer deep-brain activity. This new method has the potential to extend fNIRS applications in cognitive and clinical neuroscience research. PMID:25798327

  5. Actively triggered 4d cone-beam CT acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Martin F.; Wisotzky, Eric; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: 4d cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are usually reconstructed by extracting the motion information from the 2d projections or an external surrogate signal, and binning the individual projections into multiple respiratory phases. In this “after-the-fact” binning approach, however, projections are unevenly distributed over respiratory phases resulting in inefficient utilization of imaging dose. To avoid excess dose in certain respiratory phases, and poor image quality due to a lack of projections in others, the authors have developed a novel 4d CBCT acquisition framework which actively triggers 2d projections based on the forward-predicted position of the tumor.Methods: The forward-prediction of the tumor position was independently established using either (i) an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system based on implanted EM-transponders which act as a surrogate for the tumor position, or (ii) an external motion sensor measuring the chest-wall displacement and correlating this external motion to the phase-shifted diaphragm motion derived from the acquired images. In order to avoid EM-induced artifacts in the imaging detector, the authors devised a simple but effective “Faraday” shielding cage. The authors demonstrated the feasibility of their acquisition strategy by scanning an anthropomorphic lung phantom moving on 1d or 2d sinusoidal trajectories.Results: With both tumor position devices, the authors were able to acquire 4d CBCTs free of motion blurring. For scans based on the EM tracking system, reconstruction artifacts stemming from the presence of the EM-array and the EM-transponders were greatly reduced using newly developed correction algorithms. By tuning the imaging frequency independently for each respiratory phase prior to acquisition, it was possible to harmonize the number of projections over respiratory phases. Depending on the breathing period (3.5 or 5 s) and the gantry rotation time (4 or 5 min), between ∼90 and 145

  6. Provenance studies of Central European Neolithic obsidians using external beam milli-PIXE spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Cristea-Stan, D.; Kovács, I.; Szőkefalvi-Nagy, Z.

    2014-01-01

    External beam milli-PIXE technique was used for the determination of the elemental concentration ratios in some Prehistoric obsidian tools found in Transylvania, in the Iron Gates region near Danube, as well as on a few relevant geological obsidian samples from Slovak Tokaj Mountains, Lipari, Armenia. As provenance "fingerprints" the Ti to Mn and Rb to Zr ratios were used. The results confirm that the Transylvanian Neolithic samples have a Slovak Tokaj Mountains provenance. For Iron Gates samples, there are at least two different geological sources: for Late Neolithic tools, the origin is also the Slovak Tokaj Mountains but for Late Mesolithic-Early Neolithic samples, the sources are clearly different, possibly of the Hungarian Tokaj Mountains or the Balkan-Aegean origin.

  7. A new X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for extraterrestrial materials using a muon beam

    PubMed Central

    Terada, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Osawa, T.; Tachibana, S.; Miyake, Y.; Kubo, M. K.; Kawamura, N.; Higemoto, W.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Ebihara, M.; Uesugi, M.

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of the intense pulsed muon source at J-PARC MUSE, Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex/MUon Science Establishment (106 s−1 for a momentum of 60 MeV/c), enabled us to pioneer a new frontier in analytical sciences. Here, we report a non-destructive elemental analysis using µ− capture. Controlling muon momentum from 32.5 to 57.5 MeV/c, we successfully demonstrate a depth-profile analysis of light elements (B, C, N, and O) from several mm-thick layered materials and non-destructive bulk analyses of meteorites containing organic materials. Muon beam analysis, enabling a bulk analysis of light to heavy elements without severe radioactivation, is a unique analytical method complementary to other non-destructive analyses. Furthermore, this technology can be used as a powerful tool to identify the content and distribution of organic components in future asteroidal return samples. PMID:24861282

  8. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, B.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution He I[alpha] photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and ketene and their deuterated compounds, are reported. The combination of a (H2CO) double-pass high-resolution electron-energy analyzer and effective rotational cooling of the sample by supersonic expansion enable the spectroscopy of these molecular cations. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra, shedding light on the ultrafast intramolecular dynamics of the molecular cations. This study reveals much more vibrational structural detail in the first electronic excited state of H2CO cations. The first electronic excited state of H2CO cations may have nonplanar equilibrium geometry. Strong isotope effects on vibronic (vibrational) coupling are observed in the second electronic excited state of H2CO. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for all four observed electronic states of H2CO. The correlation function of the first electronic excited state of H2CO shows a slow decay rate on the femtosecond time scale. The ultrafast decay of the H2CO cations in the third electronic excited state implies that dissociation and intramolecular processes are the main decay pathways. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations have more fine structure than before. The AIEs of the first and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously more accurately. The doublet-like fine structures present in the lint excited state of ketene implies the excitation of a soft'' mode not observed before. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for 4 of the 6 observed electronic states. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum on the upper PES. The decay dynamics of the first and the fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultra-fast intramolecular processes like predissociation.

  9. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, B.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution He I{alpha} photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and ketene and their deuterated compounds, are reported. The combination of a (H2CO) double-pass high-resolution electron-energy analyzer and effective rotational cooling of the sample by supersonic expansion enable the spectroscopy of these molecular cations. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra, shedding light on the ultrafast intramolecular dynamics of the molecular cations. This study reveals much more vibrational structural detail in the first electronic excited state of H2CO cations. The first electronic excited state of H2CO cations may have nonplanar equilibrium geometry. Strong isotope effects on vibronic (vibrational) coupling are observed in the second electronic excited state of H2CO. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for all four observed electronic states of H2CO. The correlation function of the first electronic excited state of H2CO shows a slow decay rate on the femtosecond time scale. The ultrafast decay of the H2CO cations in the third electronic excited state implies that dissociation and intramolecular processes are the main decay pathways. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations have more fine structure than before. The AIEs of the first and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously more accurately. The doublet-like fine structures present in the lint excited state of ketene implies the excitation of a ``soft`` mode not observed before. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for 4 of the 6 observed electronic states. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum on the upper PES. The decay dynamics of the first and the fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultra-fast intramolecular processes like predissociation.

  10. Extreme-ultraviolet beam-foil spectroscopy of highly ionized neon and argon. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Demarest, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    A study of the extreme-ultraviolet radiation emitted by ion beams of highly ionized neon and argon after passage through thin foils was conducted. A grazing-incidence spectrometer was equipped with a position-sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detector, which improved the detection efficiency by two orders of magnitude. The position information of the MCP was determined to be linear over 90% of the 50-mm-wide detector. Spectra spanning regions of over 100 A were accumulated at a resolution of less than 1 A. A wavelength calibration based on a second order equation of spectrometer position was found to result in an accuracy of - 0.1 A. Over 40 transitions of Ne VIII, Ne IX, and Ne X were observed in the wavelength region from 350 to 30 A from n=2-3,4,5; n=3-4,5,6,7,8; n=4-6,7; and n=5-9. An intensity calibration of the detection system allowed the determination of the relative populations of n=3 states of Ne VIII and Ne IX. An overpopulation of states with low orbital angular momenta support electron-capture predictions by the first-order Born approximation. The argon beam-foil data confirmed the wavelength predictions of 30 previously unobserved transitions in the wavlength region from 355 to 25 A from n=2-2; n=3-4; n=4-5,6,7; and n=6-8. Lifetime determinations were made by the simultaneous measurement of 26 argon lines in the spectral region from 295-180 A. Many of the n=2-2 transitions agreed well with theory.

  11. Active beam shaping in multiple laser guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katharine J.

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive beam shaping is a critical part of multiple Laser Guide Stars (LGS) for Multiple Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) for ground-based astronomical telescopes. There are two kinds of Laser Guide Stars: Na Laser Guide Stars (at 589 nm and 92 km altitude) and Rayleigh Laser Guide Stars (at 532 nm and 20 km altitude). Multiple Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) corrects for each "layer" of atmosphere independently. Multiple Laser Guide Stars are being developed to achieve a measure of tilt and increase the isoplanatic patch. Multiple Laser Guide Stars are being combined with Multiple Conjugate Optics in the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT): more than one Laser Guide Star (4-5) and two different wavelengths: 589 nm and 532 nm. Other observatories have multiple Laser Guide Stars but only one wavelength: 589 nm or 532 nm. Because Laser Guide Stars are launched into the atmosphere, adaptive beam shaping will be carried out before the laser is launched and will be different depending on which laser is being used, presumably to effect the tightest beam which can be achieved at the power level which is required to provide the requisite return to gound-based wavefront sensors. A complete range of devices are used. Beam attenuation and divergnece will take place. Multiple Laser Guide Stars of major observatories (SOR, LBT, MMT, ESO VLT and Gemini South) will be evaluated for effective adaptive beam shaping and impact on performance

  12. Defect study of molecular beam epitaxy grown undoped GaInNAsSb thin film using junction-capacitance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2013-02-18

    Defects in undoped GaInNAsSb thin film (i-GaInNAsSb) were investigated by junction-capacitance technique using admittance and transient photocapacitance (TPC) spectroscopy. An electron trap D2 was identified at 0.34 eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}) of i-GaInNAsSb using admittance spectroscopy. Optical transition of valance band (E{sub V}) electrons to a localized state OH1 (E{sub V} + 0.75 eV) was manifested in negative TPC signal. Combined activation energy of OH1 and D2 defect corresponds to the band-gap of i-GaInNAsSb, suggesting that OH1/D2 acts as an efficient recombination center. TPC signal at {approx}1.59 eV above E{sub V} was attributed to the nitrogen-induced localized state in GaInNAsSb.

  13. Identification of active fluorescence stained bacteria by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Mario; Beyer, Beatrice; Pietsch, Christian; Radt, Benno; Harz, Michaela; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2008-04-01

    Microorganisms can be found everywhere e.g. in food both as useful ingredients or harmful contaminations causing food spoilage. Therefore, a fast and easy to handle analysis method is needed to detect bacteria in different kinds of samples like meat, juice or air to decide if the sample is contaminated by harmful microorganisms. Conventional identification methods in microbiology require always cultivation and therefore are time consuming. In this contribution we present an analysis approach to identify fluorescence stained bacteria on strain level by means of Raman spectroscopy. The stained bacteria are highlighted and can be localized easier against a complex sample environment e.g. in food. The use of Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometrical methods allows the identification of single bacteria within minutes.

  14. INFRARED VIBRATIONAL PREDISSOCIATION SPECTROSCOPY OF WATER CLUSTERS BY THE CROSSED LASER MOLECULAR BEAM TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, M.F.; Krajnovich, D.J.; Kwok, H.S.; Lisy, J.M.; Shen, Y.R.; Lee, Y.T.

    1981-11-01

    Water clusters formed in a molecular beam are predissociated by tunable, pulsed, infrared radiation in the frequency range 2900~3750 cm{sup -1}. The recoiling fragments are detected off axis from the molecular beam using a rotatable mass spectrometer. Arguments are presented which show that the measured frequency dependent signal at a fixed detector angle is proportional to the absorption spectrum of the clusters. It is found that the spectra of clusters containing three or more water molecules are remarkably similar to the liquid phase spectrum. Dynamical information on the predissociation process is obtained from the velocity distribution of the fragments. An upper limit to the excited vibrational state lifetime of ~1 microsecond is observed for the results reported here. The most probable dissociation process concentrates the available excess energy into the internal motions of the fragment molecules. Both the time scale and translational energy distribution are consistent with the qualitative predictions of current theoretical models for cluster predissociation. From adiabatic dissociation trajectories and Monte Carlo simulations it is seen that the strong coupling present in the water polymers probably invalidates the simpler "diatomic" picture formulations of cluster predissociation. Instead, the energy can be extensively shared among the intermolecular motions in the polymer before dissociation. Comparison between current intermolecular potentials describing liquid water and the observed frequencies is made in the normal mode approximation. The inability of any potential to predict the gross spectral features (the number of bands and their observed frequency shift from the gas phase monomer) suggests that substantial improvement in the potential energy functions are possible, but that more accurate methods of solving the vibrational wave equation are necessary before a proper explanation of the spectral fine structure is possible. The observed differences

  15. Spectroscopy in the extreme ultraviolet on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Springer, P.; Utter, S.B.; Wong, K.L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact grazing-incidence spectrometer was implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility for spectral measurements in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region. The spectrometer employed a 1200 scr(l)/mm grating designed for flat-field focusing and a charge coupled device camera for readout. The instrument was used to measure line emission in the range from 25 to 220 {Angstrom} with a resolving power as high as 600. The performance and calibration of the instrument is described and spectra from highly charged nitrogen and iron ions are presented. Measurements of the {ital K}-shell spectrum of He-like N{sup 5+} are presented that confirm earlier wavelength determinations and illustrate the accuracy achievable with the instrument. Our measurement suggests a change in the line identifications of the forbidden He-like N{sup 5+} transition 1s2sthinsp{sup 3}S{sub 1}{r_arrow}1s{sup 2}thinsp{sup 1}S{sub 0} and of the Li-like N{sup 4+} collisional satellite transition 1s2s2pthinsp{sup 2}P{sub 3/2}{r_arrow}1s{sup 2}2sthinsp{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} observed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. A new X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for extraterrestrial materials using a muon beam.

    PubMed

    Terada, K; Ninomiya, K; Osawa, T; Tachibana, S; Miyake, Y; Kubo, M K; Kawamura, N; Higemoto, W; Tsuchiyama, A; Ebihara, M; Uesugi, M

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of the intense pulsed muon source at J-PARC MUSE, Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex/MUon Science Establishment (10(6) s(-1) for a momentum of 60 MeV/c), enabled us to pioneer a new frontier in analytical sciences. Here, we report a non-destructive elemental analysis using µ(-) capture. Controlling muon momentum from 32.5 to 57.5 MeV/c, we successfully demonstrate a depth-profile analysis of light elements (B, C, N, and O) from several mm-thick layered materials and non-destructive bulk analyses of meteorites containing organic materials. Muon beam analysis, enabling a bulk analysis of light to heavy elements without severe radioactivation, is a unique analytical method complementary to other non-destructive analyses. Furthermore, this technology can be used as a powerful tool to identify the content and distribution of organic components in future asteroidal return samples. PMID:24861282

  17. Progress of the spectroscopy research platform at the Shanghai electron beam ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Roger; Yao, Ke; Xiao, Jun; Yang, Yang; Lu, Di; Shen, Yang; Fu, Yunqing; Zhang, Xuemei; Zou, Yaming

    2009-04-01

    In this report we will focus on spectrometer development, spectroscopic studies and a few other recent developments at the Shanghai Electron Beam Ion Trap, EBIT laboratory. Currently the Shanghai EBIT has three spectrometers covering totally the wavelength region of 1 to 10000 Å. Two of these instruments are home made. A flat crystal spectrometer covers the wavelength range of around 1 - 20 Å while a flat field instrument covers the range of around 20 - 400 Å. The 3rd instrument is a commercial McPherson 225 normal incidence spectrometer. All spectrometers employ CCD cameras for photon detection. The Shanghai EBIT is also equipped with high purity Germanium detectors for, amongst other things, dielectronic recombination studies and time evolution studies of ion distributions. To back up these experimental studies computer codes have been developed for calculation of charge state balances etc. Parallel to the experimental program we have also developed experience at running a number of atomic structure codes (MCHF, MCDF, FAC) for various systems, e.g. the M3 decay of the 3d94s 3D3 for Ni-like ions.

  18. Active fault tolerant control of a flexible beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yuanqiang; Grigoriadis, Karolos M.; Song, Gangbing

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents the development and application of an H∞ fault detection and isolation (FDI) filter and fault tolerant controller (FTC) for smart structures. A linear matrix inequality (LMI) formulation is obtained to design the full order robust H∞ filter to estimate the faulty input signals. A fault tolerant H∞ controller is designed for the combined system of plant and filter which minimizes the control objective selected in the presence of disturbances and faults. A cantilevered flexible beam bonded with piezoceramic smart materials, in particular the PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate), in the form of a patch is used in the validation of the FDI filter and FTC controller design. These PZT patches are surface-bonded on the beam and perform as actuators and sensors. A real-time data acquisition and control system is used to record the experimental data and to implement the designed FDI filter and FTC. To assist the control system design, system identification is conducted for the first mode of the smart structural system. The state space model from system identification is used for the H∞ FDI filter design. The controller was designed based on minimization of the control effort and displacement of the beam. The residuals obtained from the filter through experiments clearly identify the fault signals. The experimental results of the proposed FTC controller show its e effectiveness for the vibration suppression of the beam for the faulty system when the piezoceramic actuator has a partial failure.

  19. Plasma effects of active ion beam injections in the ionosphere at rocket altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, R. L.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Kintner, P. M.; Moore, T. E.; Pollock, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Data from ARCS rocket ion beam injection experiments are primarily discussed. There are three results from this series of active experiments that are of particular interest in space plasma physics. These are the transverse acceleration of ambient ions in the large beam volume, the scattering of beam ions near the release payload, and the possible acceleration of electrons very close to the plasma generator which produce intense high frequency waves. The ability of 100 ma ion beam injections into the upper E and F regions of the ionosphere to produce these phenomena appear to be related solely to the process by which the plasma release payload and the ion beam are neutralized. Since the electrons in the plasma release do not convect with the plasma ions, the neutralization of both the payload and beam must be accomplished by large field-aligned currents (milliamperes/square meter) which are very unstable to wave growth of various modes.

  20. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1990-01-01

    After a brief review of the principal problems of AGN research, selected potential high-resolution observations are discussed with a view toward assessing their scientific value and the degree of resolution they will require. Two classes of observations pertaining directly to AGNs are discussed. Fe K-alpha spectroscopy relevant to the dynamical and thermal character of the emission line zones; and measurement of resonance line absorption by highly-ionized species in BL Lac objects, which should provide information about entrainment of interstellar material by relativistic jets. A third class of potentially important observations uses AGNs as background light sources in order to directly measure the distance to clusters of galaxies.

  1. High Active Nitrogen Flux Growth of (Indium) Gallium Nitride by Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSkimming, Brian Matthew

    Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) has evolved over the past two decades due to progress in growth science and in the active nitrogen plasma source hardware. The transition from electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma sources to radio frequency (RF) plasma sources has enabled higher growth rates, reduced ion damage and improved operation at higher growth chamber pressures. Even with further improvements in RF plasma sources, PAMBE has remained primarily a research tool partially due to limitations in material growth rates. This dissertation presents results based upon two modifications of a commercially available nitrogen plasma source. These modifications have resulted in record active nitrogen fluxes, and therefore record growth rates of more than 7.6 mum/h. For optimized growth conditions in the standard metal-rich growth regime, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 mumx3 mum) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) impurity analysis demonstrates unintentional oxygen incorporation of ˜1x1016, comparable to the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown template layer. Additionally, a revised universal growth diagram is proposed allowing the rapid determination of the metal flux needed to grow in a specific growth regime for any and all active nitrogen fluxes available. High temperature nitrogen rich PAMBE growth of GaN has been previously demonstrated as a viable alternative to the challenges presented in maintaining the Ga bilayer required by metal rich growth of GaN. This dissertation also present results demonstrating PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ˜100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. Finally, a revised growth diagram is proposed highlighting a large growth window available at high temperatures.

  2. A mask for high-intensity heavy-ion beams in the MAYA active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Pancin, J.; Damoy, S.; Roger, T.; Babo, M.; Caamaño, M.; Farget, F.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jacquot, B.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Ramos, D.; Suzuki, D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of high-intensity and/or heavy-ion beams in active targets and time-projection chambers is often limited by the strong ionization produced by the beam. Besides the difficulties associated with the saturation of the detector and electronics, beam-related signals may hide the physical events of interest or reduce the detector performance. In addition, space-charge effects may deteriorate the homogeneity of the electric drift field and distort the subsequent reconstruction of particle trajectories. In anticipation of future projects involving such conditions, a dedicated beam mask has been developed and tested in the MAYA active target. Experimental results with a 136Xe beam are presented.

  3. Microwave and Beam Activation of Nanostructured Catalysts for Environmentally Friendly, Energy Efficient Heavy Crude Oil Processing

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose goal is initial evaluation and development of energy efficient processes which take advantage of the benefits offered by nanostructured catalysts which can be activated by microwave, RF, or radiation beams.

  4. Electron-beam activated thermal sputtering of thermoelectric materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; He, J.; Han, M-K.; Sootsman, J. R.; Girard, S.; Arachchige, I. U.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Dravid, V. P.

    2011-08-01

    Thermoelectricity and Seebeck effect have long been observed and validated in bulk materials. With the development of advanced tools of materials characterization, here we report the first observation of such an effect in the nanometer scale: in situ directional sputtering of several thermoelectric materials inside electron microscopes. The temperature gradient introduced by the electron beam creates a voltage-drop across the samples, which enhances spontaneous sputtering of specimen ions. The sputtering occurs along a preferential direction determined by the direction of the temperature gradient. A large number of nanoparticles form and accumulate away from the beam location as a result. The sputtering and re-crystallization are found to occur at temperatures far below the melting points of bulk materials. The sputtering occurs even when a liquid nitrogen cooling holder is used to keep the overall temperature at -170 C. This unique phenomenon that occurred in the nanometer scale may provide useful clues to understanding the mechanism of thermoelectric effect.

  5. Electron-beam activated thermal sputtering of thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jinsong; Dravid, Vinayak P.; He Jiaqing; Han, Mi-Kyung; Sootsman, Joseph R.; Girard, Steven; Arachchige, Indika U.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2011-08-15

    Thermoelectricity and Seebeck effect have long been observed and validated in bulk materials. With the development of advanced tools of materials characterization, here we report the first observation of such an effect in the nanometer scale: in situ directional sputtering of several thermoelectric materials inside electron microscopes. The temperature gradient introduced by the electron beam creates a voltage-drop across the samples, which enhances spontaneous sputtering of specimen ions. The sputtering occurs along a preferential direction determined by the direction of the temperature gradient. A large number of nanoparticles form and accumulate away from the beam location as a result. The sputtering and re-crystallization are found to occur at temperatures far below the melting points of bulk materials. The sputtering occurs even when a liquid nitrogen cooling holder is used to keep the overall temperature at -170 deg. C. This unique phenomenon that occurred in the nanometer scale may provide useful clues to understanding the mechanism of thermoelectric effect.

  6. Comparison of beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging edge fluctuation measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T.; Smith, D.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the close physical proximity of the Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) is leveraged to directly compare fluctuation measurements, and to study the local effects of the GPI neutral deuterium puff during H-mode plasmas without large Edge Localized Modes. The GPI and BES views on NSTX provide partially overlapping coverage of the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) regions above the outboard midplane. The separation in the toroidal direction is 16°, and field lines passing through diagnostic views are separated by ∼20 cm in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. Strong cross-correlation is observed, and strong cross-coherence is seen for frequencies between 5 and 15 kHz. Also, probability distribution functions of fluctuations measured ∼3 cm inside the separatrix exhibit only minor deviations from a normal distribution for both diagnostics, and good agreement between correlation length estimates, decorrelation times, and structure velocities is found at the ±40% level. While the two instruments agree closely in many respects, some discrepancies are observed. Most notably, GPI normalized fluctuation levels exceed BES fluctuations by a factor of ∼9. BES mean intensity is found to be sensitive to the GPI neutral gas puff, and BES normalized fluctuation levels for frequencies between 1 and 10 kHz are observed to increase during the GPI puff.

  7. Photodissociation dynamics of the methyl perthiyl radical at 248 and 193 nm using fast-beam photofragment translational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Aaron W.; Ryazanov, Mikhail; Sullivan, Erin N.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-07-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of the methyl perthiyl radical (CH3SS) have been investigated using fast-beam coincidence translational spectroscopy. Methyl perthiyl radicals were produced by photodetachment of the CH3SS- anion followed by photodissociation at 248 nm (5.0 eV) and 193 nm (6.4 eV). Photofragment mass distributions and translational energy distributions were measured at each dissociation wavelength. Experimental results show S atom loss as the dominant (96%) dissociation channel at 248 nm with a near parallel, anisotropic angular distribution and translational energy peaking near the maximal energy available to ground state CH3S and S fragments, indicating that the dissociation occurs along a repulsive excited state. At 193 nm, S atom loss remains the major fragmentation channel, although S2 loss becomes more competitive and constitutes 32% of the fragmentation. The translational energy distributions for both channels are very broad at this wavelength, suggesting the formation of the S2 and S atom products in several excited electronic states.

  8. Optical Spectroscopy Results for the Self-Magnetic Pinch Electron Beam Diode on the ITS-6 Accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Mark D.; Oliver, Bryan V.; Hahn, Kelly; Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.; Welch, Dale R.; Yitzhak, Maron

    2012-06-01

    Experiments have been conducted at Sandia National Laboratories' RITS-6 accelerator facility [1] (operating at 7.5 MV and 180 kA) investigating plasma formation and propagation in relativistic electron beam diodes used for flash x-ray radiography. High resolution, visible and ultraviolet spectra were collected in the anode-cathode (A-K) vacuum gap of the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode [2-4]. Time and space resolved spectra are compared with time-dependent, collisional-radiative (CR) calculations [5-7] and Lsp, hybrid particle-in-cell code simulations [8,9]. Results indicate the presence of a dense (>1x1017cm-3), low temperature (few eV), on-axis plasma, composed of hydrocarbon and metal ion species, which expands at a rate of several cm/s from the anode to the cathode. In addition, cathode plasmas are observed which extend several millimeters into the A-K gap [10]. It is believed that the interaction of these electrode plasmas cause premature impedance collapse of the diode and subsequent reduction in the total radiation output. Diagnostics include high speed imaging and spectroscopy using nanosecond gated ICCD cameras, streak cameras, and photodiode arrays.

  9. Pseudo-single beam FM spectroscopy for fast, minimally destructive, high SNR detection of Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertig, Chad; Locke, Mary; Kansky, Ken

    2009-05-01

    Frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) is a sensitive method of detecting dilute atomic gases. In FMS, the refractive index of an atomic cloud is sensed by an interferometric measurement of the differential phase shift between upper and lower sidebands of a frequency modulated probe laser. In the standard configuration, the probe beam's carrier component acts as both phase reference and amplifier---the electronic beat signal being proportional to √Icarrier. This creates a dilemma for using FMS for minimally destructive measurements: a brighter carrier produces a larger signal, but at the cost of greater spontaneous heating. We have developed a new method of FMS which solves the dilemma with an optical analog of a PLL FM-radio receiver. We extract the atomic density information encoded in the probe sidebands by beating the probe against a separately synthesized ``local-oscillator'' (LO) laser that is optically phase-locked to the probe's carrier component. Here, we report a demonstration of this scheme using an optical cavity as a stable, tunable, stand-in for cold atoms.

  10. Investigation of the reaction 90Zr(p,γ) with in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbacher, Philipp; Endres, A.; Glorius, J.; Netterdon, L.; Sonnabend, K.; Thomas, B.; Zilges, A.

    2015-05-01

    The p nucleus 92Mo is believed to be mainly produced through photodisintegration reactions in type II supernovae. However, this production scenario cannot solely account for the observed solar relative isotopic abundance of 92Mo. Additional production scenarios have been suggested to explain this discrepancy. One of these scenarios could be the production of 92Mo in type Ia supernovae via a chain of proton-capture reactions. To verify this scenario, an accurate knowledge of the involved reaction rates is important. We measured the cross section of 90Zr(p,γ) reaction using an enriched 90Zr target by means of in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy in the energy range between 3.6MeV and 5.1MeV. Since the reactions 90Zr(p,γ) and 91Zr(p,n) produce the same nucleus, the contributions of both reactions have to be disentangled. This procedure is explained in this contribution in detail.

  11. SU-E-J-49: Distal Edge Activity Fall Off Of Proton Therapy Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Elmekawy, A; Ewell, L; Butuceanu, C; Zhu, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify the distal edge activity fall off, created in a phantom by a proton therapy beam Method and Materials: A 30x30x10cm polymethylmethacrylate phantom was irradiated with a proton therapy beam using different ranges and beams. The irradiation volume is approximated by a right circular cylinder of diameter 7.6cm and varying lengths. After irradiation, the phantom was scanned via a Philips Gemini Big Bore™ PET-CT for isotope activation. Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system as well as ImageJ™ were used to analyze the resulting PET and CT scans. The region of activity within the phantom was longitudinally measured as a function of PET slice number. Dose estimations were made via Monte Carlo (GATE) simulation. Results: For both the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and the mono-energetic pristine Bragg peak proton beams, the proximal activation rise was steep: average slope −0.735 (average intensity/slice number) ± 0.091 (standard deviation) for the pristine beams and −1.149 ± 0.117 for the SOBP beams. In contrast, the distal fall offs were dissimilar. The distal fall off in activity for the pristine beams was fit well by a linear curve: R{sup 2} (Pierson Product) was 0.9968, 0.9955 and 0.9909 for the 13.5, 17.0 and 21.0cm range beams respectively. The good fit allows for a slope comparison between the different ranges. The slope varied as a function of range from 1.021 for the 13.5cm beam to 0.8407 (average intensity/slice number) for the 21.0cm beam. This dependence can be characterized: −0.0234(average intensity/slice number/cm range). For the SOBP beams, the slopes were significantly less and were also less linear: average slope 0.2628 ± 0.0474, average R{sup 2}=0.9236. Conclusion: The distal activation fall off edge for pristine proton beams was linear and steep. The corresponding quantities for SOBP beams were shallower and less linear. Philips has provided support for this work.

  12. High active nitrogen flux growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McSkimming, Brian M. Speck, James S.; Chaix, Catherine

    2015-09-15

    In the present study, the authors report on a modified Riber radio frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma source that provides active nitrogen fluxes more than 30 times higher than those commonly used for plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) and thus a significantly higher growth rate than has been previously reported. GaN films were grown using N{sub 2} gas flow rates between 5 and 25 sccm while varying the plasma source's RF forward power from 200 to 600 W. The highest growth rate, and therefore the highest active nitrogen flux, achieved was ∼7.6 μm/h. For optimized growth conditions, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 × 3 μm) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy impurity analysis demonstrates oxygen and hydrogen incorporation of 1 × 10{sup 16} and ∼5 × 10{sup 17}, respectively. In addition, the authors have achieved PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ∼100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. This growth temperature corresponds to GaN decomposition in vacuum of more than 20 nm/min; a regime previously unattainable with conventional nitrogen plasma sources. Arrhenius analysis of the decomposition rate shows that samples with a flux ratio below stoichiometry have an activation energy greater than decomposition of GaN in vacuum while samples grown at or above stoichiometry have decreased activation energy. The activation energy of decomposition for GaN in vacuum was previously determined to be ∼3.1 eV. For a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼1.5, this activation energy was found to be ∼2.8 eV, while for a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼0.5, it was found to be ∼7.9 eV.

  13. Active vibration control of a flexible cantilever beam using shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kagawa, Y.

    2010-08-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of using shape memory alloys (SMAs) as actuators to control the vibration of a flexible cantilever beam. In a tendon mechanism, SMAs are controlled in a push-pull fashion based on H-infinity theory and taking into account the uncertainty in the actuator performance. Using this mechanism, the four vibrational modes (three bending and one torsional) of the cantilever beam can be simultaneously damped. To control bending and torsional vibrational modes of a flexible beam, we install SMAs obliquely in a beam-SMA structure, then measure and theoretically model the properties of an actuator consisting of an SMA and a spring. Using the properties of the actuator, we introduce the state equations based on the dynamic model of the proposed beam-SMA structure and design the active control system according to H-infinity theory. Finally, we experimentally verify the functioning of the system.

  14. Fuzzy-logic-based active vibration control of beams using piezoelectric patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manu; Singh, S. P.; Sachdeva, B. L.

    2003-10-01

    The present work presents a fuzzy logic based controller with a compact rule base, for active vibration control of beams. The controller was implemented experimentally on a test beam and the results were found satisfactory. The test system consists of a cantilevered beam with two piezoelectric patches mounted near its root in collocated fashion. This piezo-beam system was modelled using Finite Element Method. To derive the equations of motion, Hamilton's principle was used. Electro-mechanical interaction of the piezoelectric patch with the beam was modelled using linear constitutive equations for piezoceramics, which relate strain and electric displacement to stress and electric field. The fuzzy logic controller is based on modal velocity of the beam. The basis for generating the fuzzy logic rule base of this controller is obtained from negative velocity feedback control. Modal velocity of the beam acts as an input to the fuzzy controller and actuation force is the output from the inference engine. Linear decay of vibratory amplitude is observed in case of fuzzy logic controller as opposed to logarithmic decay in case of negative velocity feedback control Present controller has just three rules. This is an important achievement because bulky fuzzy logic controllers for active vibration control require fast processors for real time implementation (Kwak and Sciulli and Mayhan and Washington).

  15. Activities of the Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizewski, J. A.

    2006-10-01

    The Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science is a consortium of universities, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, led by Rutgers University. The purpose of this project, funded by the NNSA/DP Academic Alliance for Stewardship Science program, is to use radioactive ion beams to study low-energy nuclear reactions of importance to stewardship science, as well as to prepare future researchers in applied nuclear science. These studies are enabled by the plethora of unstable accelerated beams available at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge. The initial measurements use neutron-rich beams of uranium fission fragments to study the neutron-transfer (d,p) reaction, a possible surrogate of neutron capture reactions. We also develop new radioactive ion beams of interest to nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, and stewardship science. This talk will present an overview of the activities of the Center and the available facilities, describe initial results of a (d,p) reaction with a fission fragment beam, and outline activities proposed for the near term. In collaboration with H.K. Carter, ORAU.

  16. Broadband active tuning of unidirectional scattering from nanoantenna using combined radially and azimuthally polarized beams.

    PubMed

    Xi, Z; Wei, L; Adam, A J L; Urbach, H P

    2016-01-01

    We propose an approach to actively tune the scattering pattern of a Mie-type spherical antenna. The scheme is based on separate control over the induced electric dipole and induced magnetic dipole using two coherent focused beams of radial polarization and azimuthal polarization, respectively. By carefully tuning the amplitude and phase relation of the two beams, a broadband unidirectional scattering can be achieved, even at the antenna's resonant wavelength where the antenna scatters efficiently. By moving the focus of one beam, a drastic switch of the unidirectional scattering can be observed. Such a scheme enables the design of ultra-compact optical switches and directional couplers based on nanoantennas. PMID:26696151

  17. Active Plasma Lensing for Relativistic Laser-Plasma-Accelerated Electron Beams.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, J; Steinke, S; Geddes, C G R; Matlis, N H; Shaw, B H; Gonsalves, A J; Huijts, J V; Nakamura, K; Daniels, J; Schroeder, C B; Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Bulanov, S S; Bobrova, N A; Sasorov, P V; Leemans, W P

    2015-10-30

    Compact, tunable, radially symmetric focusing of electrons is critical to laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) applications. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of a discharge-capillary active plasma lens to focus 100-MeV-level LPA beams. The lens can provide tunable field gradients in excess of 3000 T/m, enabling cm-scale focal lengths for GeV-level beam energies and allowing LPA-based electron beams and light sources to maintain their compact footprint. For a range of lens strengths, excellent agreement with simulation was obtained. PMID:26565471

  18. Characterization of ion-irradiated ODS Fe-Cr alloys by doppler broadening spectroscopy using a positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parente, P.; Leguey, T.; de Castro, V.; Gigl, T.; Reiner, M.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Pareja, R.

    2015-09-01

    The damage profile of oxide dispersion strengthened steels after single-, or simultaneous triple-ion irradiation at different conditions has been characterized using a low energy positron beam in order to provide information on microstructural changes induced by irradiation. Doppler broadening and coincident Doppler broadening measurements of the positron annihilation line have been performed on different Fe-Cr-(W,Ti) alloys reinforced with Y2O3, to identify the nature and stability of irradiation-induced open-volume defects and their possible association with the oxide nanoparticles. It was found that irradiation induced vacancy clusters are associated with Cr atoms. The results are of highest interest for modeling the damage induced by 14 MeV neutrons in reduced activation Fe-Cr alloys relevant for fusion devices.

  19. The eclipse of Epsilon Aurigae visible spectroscopy and ultraviolet activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferluga, S.; Hack, M.

    1985-01-01

    The preliminary results of the study of several high resolution spectrograms (lambda 3500 - lambda 7000 A), obtained at the Haute Provence Observatory (OHP) in France, at different epochs before, during and after the eclipse are reported. Some of these spectrograms are compared with corresponding IUE high resolution observations, in order to study the effects of the intrinsic UV activity, towards the longer wavelengths.

  20. Analysis and Parametric Investigation of Active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, James

    The static behaviour of active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams (OCSTWB) with embedded Active/Macro Fibre Composites (AFCs/MFCs) has been investigated for the purpose of advancing the fundamental theory needed in the development of advanced smart structures. An efficient code that can analyze active OCSTWB using analytical equations has been studied. Various beam examples have been investigated in order to verify this recently developed analytical active OCSTWB analysis tool. The cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force, moments and bimoment predicted by this analytical code have been compared with those predicted by the 2-D finite element beam cross section analysis codes called the Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional (VABS) analysis and the University of Michigan VABS (UM/VABS). Good agreement was observed between the results obtained from the analytical tool and VABS. The calculated cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force/moments, the constitutive relation and the six intrinstic static equilibrium equations for OCSTWB were all used together in a first-order accurate forward difference scheme in order to determine the average twist and deflections along the beam span. In order to further verify the analytical code, the static behaviour of a number of beam examples was investigated using 3-D Finite Element Analysis (FEA). For a particular cross section, the rigid body twist and displacements were minimized with the displacements of all the nodes in the 3-D FEA model that compose the cross section. This was done for a number of cross sections along the beam span in order to recover the global beam twist and displacement profiles from the 3-D FEA results. The global twist and deflections predicted by the analytical code agreed closely with those predicted by UM/VABS and 3-D FEA. The study was completed by a parametric investigation to determine the boundary conditions and the composite ply lay-ups of the active and passive plies that

  1. Magnetic activity on V889 Herculis. Combining photometry and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, S. P.; Korhonen, H.; Berdyugina, S. V.; Ilyin, I.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.; Savanov, I.; Tuominen, I.

    2008-09-01

    Aims: In this paper we analyse photometric and spectroscopic observations of the young active dwarf V889 Her. We present new surface temperature maps, and compare them to earlier published Doppler maps, as well as to the results obtained from long-term photometry. Methods: The light curve inversions and surface temperature maps were obtained using the Occamian approach inversion technique. Results: The 12 years of photometric records on V889 Her suggest a possible photometric cycle of approximately 9 years. Variability on this time scale is detected in the maximum, minimum, and mean photometric magnitudes. The spots prefer to concentrate on two active longitudes that are approximately 180° apart. Furthermore, one flip-flop event, i.e., a sudden change of the dominant active longitude by 180°, is detected at the time of the global maximum activity. The wings of the Ca II 8662 Å indicate that the quiet photosphere of the V889 Her is similar to the one of the present Sun supporting earlier determined atmospheric parameters, while the chromosphere of V889 Her shows signs of much stronger activity. The temperature maps reveal that the polar regions are covered by spots, which are about 1500 K cooler than the quiet photosphere. The mean spot latitude varies slightly with time. It appears that the spot latitudes from our Doppler images and the spot migration rates revealed by photometry indicate a weaker differential rotation than reported earlier, but in the same (solar-like) direction. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Table [see full textsee full textsee full text] and Figs. [see full textsee full textsee full text]-[see full textsee full textsee full text] are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements in the extreme ultraviolet region of central carbon concentrations during high power neutral beam heating in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Ramsey, A.T.; Synakowski, E.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Taylor, G.; Valanju, P.M. . Plasma Physics Lab.; Texas Univ., Austin, TX . Fusion Research Center)

    1989-09-01

    The carbon concentration in the central region of TFTR discharges with high power neutral beam heating has been measured by charge-extracted recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) of the C{sup +5} n = 3--4 transition in the extreme ultraviolet region. The carbon concentrations were deduced from absolute measurements of the line brightness using a calculation of the beam attenuation and the appropriate cascade-corrected line excitation rates. As a result of the high ion temperatures in most of the discharges, the contribution of beam halo neutrals to the line brightness was significant and therefore had to be included in the modeling of the data. Carbon concentrations have been measured in discharges with I{sub p} = 1.0-1.6 MA and beam power in the range of 2.6-30 MW, including a number of supershots. The results are in good agreement with carbon concentrations deduced from the visible bremsstrahlung Z{sub eff} and metallic impurity concentrations measured by x-ray pulse-height analysis, demonstrating the reliability of the atomic rates used in the beam attenuation and line excitation calculations. Carbon is the dominant impurity species in these discharges; the oxygen concentration measured via CXRS in a high beam power case was 0.0006 of n{sub e}, compard to 0.04 for carbon. Trends with I{sub p} and beam power in the carbon concentration and the inferred deuteron concentration are presented. The carbon concentration is independent of I{sub p} and decreases from 0.13 at 2.6 MW beam power to 0.04 at 30 MW, while the deuteron concentration increases from 0.25 to 0.75 over the same range of beam power. These changes are primarily the result of beam particle fueling, as the carbon density did not vary significantly with beam power. The time evolutions of the carbon and deuteron concentrations during two high power beam pulses, one which exhibited a carbon bloom and one which did not, are compared. 30 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Application of a passive/active autoparametric cantilever beam absorber with PZT actuator for Duffing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.; Vazquez-Gonzalez, B.

    2013-04-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out on a cantilever-type passive/active autoparametric vibration absorber, with a PZT patch actuator, to be used in a primary damped Duffing system. The primary system consists of a mass, viscous damping and a cubic stiffness provided by a soft helical spring, over which is mounted a cantilever beam with a PZT patch actuator actively controlled to attenuate harmonic and resonant excitation forces. With the PZT actuator on the cantilever beam absorber, cemented to the base of the beam, the auto-parametric vibration absorber is made active, thus enabling the possibility to control the effective stiffness and damping associated to the passive absorber and, as a consequence, the implementation of an active vibration control scheme able to preserve, as possible, the autoparametric interaction as well as to compensate varying excitation frequencies and parametric uncertainty. This active vibration absorber employs feedback information from a high resolution optical encoder on the primary Duffing system and an accelerometer on the tip beam absorber, a strain gage on the base of the beam, feedforward information from the excitation force and on-line computations from the nonlinear approximate frequency response, parameterized in terms of a proportional gain provided by a voltage input to the PZT actuator, thus modifying the closed-loop dynamic stiffness and providing a mechanism to asymptotically track an optimal, robust and stable attenuation solution on the primary Duffing system. Experimental results are included to describe the dynamic and robust performance of the overall closed-loop system.

  4. Use of an active wire Bθ cell for electron beam conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D. P.; Myers, M. C.; Weidman, D. J.; Antoniades, J. A.; Fernsler, R. F.; Meger, R. A.

    1996-10-01

    The propagation of intense, relativistic electron beams in air is subject to the resistive hose instability. Conditioning the beam prior to injecting it into the air can extend its range by reducing the hose growth rate and by reducing the initial spatial perturbations that seed the hose instability. Experiments have been performed using the SuperIBEX accelerator (Ipeak=10-30 kA, E=4.5 MeV, 40 ns full width at half-maximum) to develop conditioning cells that suppress the hose. This paper describes the performance of an active wire Bθ cell that is used in conjunction with an ion focused regime (IFR) cell. The IFR cell detunes the instability by producing a head-to-tail radius taper on the beam. The wire cell maintains this radius taper while producing an emittance taper that is necessary to suppress the hose growth. In addition, the wire cell reduces the initial beam perturbations through the anharmonic centering force associated with the wire current and its azimuthal magnetic field Bθ. The ability of the Bθ cell to reduce the beam offset with a minimal increase in the beam radius gives it several advantages over the use of a simple, thick scattering foil to perform the radius taper to emittance taper conversion. The SuperIBEX beam propagation distance, in terms of the betatron oscillation scale length, was extended to ˜10λβ using these cells.

  5. Near Infrared Spectroscopy of Active Galactic Nuclei Using FSpec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frechem, Joshua; Pessev, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the 2.3 meter Bok telescope on Kitt Peak and the FRANKENSpec spectrograph, we aim to investigate the circumnuclear region of over twenty active galaxies in the J, H, and K passbands in order to obtain high signal to noise spectra with reasonable investment of observing time. The sample is selected to cover a wide range of AGN types of activity in luminous nearby galaxies. The primary goal of this project was to sort and process the 9,000+ spectra, including dark subtraction, flat fielding, and creation of and application of bad pixel masks. The 2-D spectra were processed to a 1-D spectra and wavelength calibrated to reveal the exact wavelength of each peak in the spectra. Using standard stars is of utmost importance so the atmospheric lines can be corrected for and the data can be used for precise analysis. With the reduced and calibrated spectra, we measure the Paschen α, β, and γ Hydrogen lines, the Brackett γ Hydrogen line and the FeII line in the near infrared emitted from the circumnuclear regions of the galaxies. These data unveil details of what the environment is like in the area surrounding the supermassive black holes that are found in the heart of each of these galaxies.

  6. Anti-angiogenic activity in metastasis of human breast cancer cells irradiated by a proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu-Shik; Shin, Jin-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Soo; Shon, Yun-Hee

    2012-07-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process of metastasis in human breast cancer. We investigated the effects of proton beam irradiation on angiogenic enzyme activities and their expressions in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The regulation of angiogenic regulating factors, of transforming growth factor- β (TGF- β) and of vesicular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in breast cancer cells irradiated with a proton beam was studied. Aromatase activity and mRNA expression, which is correlated with metastasis, were significantly decreased by irradiation with a proton beam in a dose-dependent manner. TGF- β and VEGF transcriptions were also diminished by proton beam irradiation. In contrast, transcription of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), also known as biological inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), was dose-dependently enhanced. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of TIMPs caused th MMP-9 activity to be diminished and the MMP-9 and the MMP-2 expressions to be decreased. These results suggest that inhibition of angiogenesis by proton beam irradiation in breast cancer cells is closely related to inhibitions of aromatase activity and transcription and to down-regulation of TGF- β and VEGF transcription.

  7. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  8. Chromospherically active stars. X - Spectroscopy and photometry of HD 212280

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Browning, Jared C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Morton, Mary D.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1993-01-01

    The system HD 212280 is a chromospherically active double lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of 45.284 days and an eccentricity of 0.50. The spectrum is composite with spectral types of G8 IV and F5-8 V for the components. An estimated inclination of 78 +/- 8 deg results in masses of 1.7 and 1.4 solar mass for the G subgiant and mid-F star, respectively. The distance to the system is estimated to be 112 pc. Photometric observations obtained between 1987 November and 1992 June reveal that HD 212280 is a newly identified variable star with a V amplitude of about 0.15 mag and a mean period of 29.46 days. Our V data were divided into 11 sets and in all but one case two spots were required to fit the data. Lifetimes of 650 days and a minimum of 1350 days have been determined for two of the four spots. The differential rotation coefficient of 0.05 is relatively small. The age of the system is about 1.9 X 10 exp 9 yrs. The G subgiant is rotating slower than pseudosynchronously while the F-type star is rotating faster.

  9. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsang, Nuananong; Yu, LiangDeng

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29-60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 1016 ions cm-2. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  10. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of strontium lanthanum copper oxide thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, John Wallace

    Among the multitude of known cuprate material families and associated structures, the archetype is "infinite-layer" ACuO2, where perfectly square and flat CuO2 planes are separated by layers of alkaline earth atoms. The infinite-layer structure is free of magnetic rare earth ions, oxygen chains, orthorhombic distortions, incommensurate superstructures, ordered vacancies, and other complications that abound among the other material families. Furthermore, it is the only cuprate that can be made superconducting by both electron and hole doping, making it a potential platform for decoding the complex many-body interactions responsible for high-temperature superconductivity. Research on the infinite-layer compound has been severely hindered by the inability to synthesize bulk single crystals, but recent progress has led to high-quality superconducting thin film samples. Here we report in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of epitaxially-stabilized Sr1-chiLa chiCuO2 thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. At low doping, the material exhibits a dispersive lower Hubbard band typical of other cuprate parent compounds. As carriers are added to the system, a continuous evolution from Mott insulator to superconducting metal is observed as a coherent low-energy band develops on top of a concomitant remnant lower Hubbard band, gradually filling in the Mott gap. For chi = 0.10, our results reveal a strong coupling between electrons and (pi,pi) anti-ferromagnetism, inducing a Fermi surface reconstruction that pushes the nodal states below the Fermi level and realizing nodeless superconductivity. Electron diffraction measurements indicate the presence of a surface reconstruction that is consistent with the polar nature of Sr1-chiLachiCuO2. Most knowledge about the electron-doped side of the cuprate phase diagram has been deduced by generalizing from a single material family, Re2-chi CechiCuO4, where robust antiferromagnetism has been observed past chi

  11. Pulsed electron-beam-sustained discharge in oxygen-containing gas mixtures: electrical characteristics, spectroscopy,and singlet oxygen yield

    SciTech Connect

    Vagin, Nikolai P; Ionin, Andrei A; Klimachev, Yu M; Kotkov, A A; Podmar'kov, Yu P; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Frolov, M P; Yuryshev, Nikolai N; Kochetov, Igor' V; Napartovich, A P; Hager, G D

    2004-09-30

    The electrical and spectroscopic characteristics of electron-beam-sustained discharge (EBSD) in oxygen and oxygen-containing gas mixtures are studied experimentally under gas pressures up to 100 Torr in a large excitation volume ({approx}18 L). It is shown that the EBSD in pure oxygen and its mixtures with inert gases is unstable and is characterised by a small specific energy contribution. The addition of small amounts ({approx}1%-10%) of carbon monoxide or hydrogen to oxygen or its mixtures with inert gases considerably improves the stability of the discharge, while the specific energy contribution W increases by more then an order of magnitude, achieving {approx}6.5 kJ L{sup -1} atm{sup -1} per molecular component of the gas mixture. A part of the energy supplied to the EBSD is spent to excite vibrational levels of molecular additives. This was demonstrated experimentally by the initiation of a CO laser based on the O{sub 2} : Ar : CO = 1 : 1 : 0.1 mixture. Experimental results on spectroscopy of the excited electronic states O{sub 2}(a{sup 1{Delta}}{sub g}) and O{sub 2}(b{sup 1{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +}), of oxygen formed in the EBSD are presented. A technique was worked out for measuring the concentration of singlet oxygen in the O{sub 2}(a{sup 1{Delta}}{sub g}) state in the afterglow of the pulsed EBSD by comparing with the radiation intensity of singlet oxygen of a given concentration produced in a chemical generator. Preliminary measurements of the singlet-oxygen yield in the EBSD show that its value {approx}3% for W {approx} 1.0 kJ L{sup -1} atm{sup -1} is in agreement with the theoretical estimate. Theoretical calculations performed for W {approx} 6.5 kJ L{sup -1} atm{sup -1} at a fixed temperature show that the singlet-oxygen yield may be {approx}20%, which is higher than the value required to achieve the lasing threshold in an oxygen-iodine laser at room temperature. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. Residual activity induced by heavy ions and beam-loss criteria for heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strašík, I.; Mustafin, E.; Pavlovič, M.

    2010-07-01

    The paper presents results of FLUKA simulations of the residual activity induced by heavy ions in two target configurations representing: (1) a beam pipe of an accelerator and (2) a bulky accelerator structure like a magnet yoke or a coil. The target materials were stainless steel and copper representing the most common construction materials used for basic accelerator components. For these two materials, the inventory of the induced isotopes depends mainly on the target material and much less on the projectile species. Time evolution of the induced activity can be described by means of a generic curve that is independent from the projectile mass. Dependence of the induced residual activity on selected ion beam parameters was studied. The main goal of the study was establishing a scaling law expanding the existing proton beam-loss tolerance to heavy-ion beams. This scaling law enables specifying beam-loss criteria for projectile species from proton up to uranium at energies from 200MeV/u up to 1GeV/u.

  13. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gangbing; Qiao, Pizhong; Sethi, Vineet; Prasad, A.

    2002-06-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results of active vibration control of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. PZT (Lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface-bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensator, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000 percent with a positive position feedback control.

  14. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Qiao, P.; Sethi, V.; Prasad, A.

    2004-08-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results on active vibration control of pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. The PZT (lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensation, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000% with positive position feedback control.

  15. Total and partial cross sections of the 112Sn(α ,γ ) 116Te reaction measured via in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netterdon, L.; Mayer, J.; Scholz, P.; Zilges, A.

    2015-03-01

    Background: The nucleosynthesis of the neutron-deficient p nuclei remains an open question in nuclear astrophysics. Beside uncertainties on the astrophysical side, the nuclear-physics input parameters entering Hauser-Feshbach calculations for the nucleosynthesis of the p nuclei must be put on a firm basis. Purpose: An extended database of experimental data is needed to address uncertainties of the nuclear-physics input parameters for Hauser-Feshbach calculations. Especially α + nucleus optical model potentials at low energies are not well known. The in-beam technique with an array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors was successfully applied to the measurement of absolute cross sections of an (α ,γ ) reaction on a heavy nucleus at sub-Coulomb energies. Method: The total and partial cross-section values were measured by means of in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy. For this purpose, the absolute reaction yield was measured using the HPGe detector array HORUS at the FN tandem accelerator at the University of Cologne. Total and partial cross sections were measured at four different α -particle energies from Eα=10.5 MeV to Eα=12 MeV . Results: The measured total cross-section values are in excellent agreement with previous results obtained with the activation technique, which proves the validity of the applied method. With the present measurement, the discrepancy between two older data sets is removed. The experimental data was compared to Hauser-Feshbach calculations using the nuclear reaction code talys. With a modification of the semi-microscopic α + nucleus optical model potential OMP 3, the measured cross-section values are reproduced well. Moreover, partial cross sections could be measured for the first time for an (α ,γ ) reaction. Conclusions: A modified version of the semimicroscopic α + nucleus optical model potential OMP3, as well as modified proton and γ widths, are needed in order to obtain a good agreement between experimental data and theory. It

  16. Formation of amorphous and crystalline phases in the ion beam modified boron-iron system studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hans, M.; Frech, G.; Wolf, G. K.; Wagner, F. E.

    1991-02-01

    Modifications of α-iron by ion implantation of boron ions and ion beam mixing (IBM) at the B-Fe interface were studied by transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS) and conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). Different fluences of 30 keV B + ions were implanted at both room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature. For comparison, ion implantation at room temperature was performed with an ion energy of 60 keV. The Mössbauer spectra revealed the formation of amorphous phases with a composition similar to that of amorphous films obtained by sputter deposition. Ion implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature increased the amorphous fraction. The annealing behaviour was studied from liquid nitrogen temperature up to about 700 K. Crystallization of the amorphous phases occurred between 373 and 573 K. Deposition of boron layers onto iron samples followed by 120 keV Ar + ion beam mixing at room temperature was studied by CEMS. The spectra again showed the formation of amorphous iron-boron phases but with a higher boron concentration than after ion implantation with the same fluence. The results contribute to the understanding of wear reduction in iron and steels by boron ion implantation and ion beam mixed boron films.

  17. Radioactivity of Potassium Solutions: A Comparison of Calculated Activity to Measured Activity from Gross Beta Counting and Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, R F

    2005-07-26

    In order to determine if the measured beta activity for a solution containing potassium was exactly as predicted, particularly since the CES gas counter is not calibrated specifically with K-40, an experiment was conducted to compare measured activities from two radioanalytical methods (gamma spectroscopy and gas proportional counting) to calculated activities across a range of potassium concentrations. Potassium, being ubiquitous and naturally radioactive, is a well-known and common interference in gross beta counting methods. By measuring the observed beta activity due to K-40 in potassium-containing solutions across a wide range of concentrations, it was found that the observed beta activity agrees well with the beta activity calculated from the potassium concentration measured by standard inorganic analytical techniques, such as ICP-OES, and that using the measured potassium concentration to calculate the expected beta activity, and comparing this to the observed beta activity to determine if potassium can account for all the observed activity in a sample, is a valid technique. It was also observed that gamma spectroscopy is not an effective means of measuring K-40 activity below approximately 700 pCi/L, which corresponds to a solution with approximately 833 mg/L total potassium. Gas proportional counting for gross beta activity has a much lower detection limit, typically 20-50 picoCi/L for a liquid low in total dissolved solids, which corresponds to a potassium concentration of approximately 30-70 ppm K.

  18. Active terahertz beam steering by photo-generated graded index gratings in thin semiconductor films.

    PubMed

    Steinbusch, T P; Tyagi, H K; Schaafsma, M C; Georgiou, G; Gómez Rivas, J

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate active beam steering of terahertz radiation using a photo-excited thin layer of gallium arsenide. A constant gradient of phase discontinuity along the interface is introduced by an spatially inhomogeneous density of free charge carriers that are photo-generated in the GaAs with an optical pump. The optical pump has been spatially modulated to form the shape of a planar blazed grating. The phase gradient leads to an asymmetry between the +1 and -1 transmission diffracted orders of more than a factor two. Optimization of the grating structure can lead to an asymmetry of more than one order of magnitude. Similar to metasurfaces made of plasmonic antennas, the photo-generated grating is a planar structure that can achieve large beam steering efficiency. Moreover, the photo-generation of such structures provides a platform for active THz beam steering. PMID:25401807

  19. Pulsed supersonic molecular beam for characterization of chemically active metal-organic complexes at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lear, Amanda M.

    Metal-organic coordination networks (MOCNs) at surfaces consist of a complex of organic ligands bound to an atomic metal center. The MOCNs, when chosen appropriately, can form highly-ordered arrays at surfaces. Ultra-high vacuum surface studies allow control of surface composition and provide 2D growth restrictions, which lead to under-coordinated metal centers. These systems provide an opportunity to tailor the chemical function of the metal centers due to the steric restrictions imposed by the surface. Tuning the adsorption/desorption energy at a metal center and developing a cooperative environment for catalysis are the key scientific questions that motivate the construction of a molecular beam surface analysis system. Characterization of the created systems can be performed utilizing a pulsed supersonic molecular beam (PSMB) in unison with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A PSMB allows for the highly controlled delivery of reactants with well-defined energy to a given platform making it possible to elucidate detailed chemical tuning information. In this thesis, a summary of prior theoretical molecular beam derivations is provided. Design considerations and an overview of the construction procedure for the current molecular beam apparatus, including initial characterization experiments, are presented. By impinging an Ar beam on a Ag(111) surface, the location of the specular angle (˜65°) and rough sample perimeter coordinates were determined. Additionally, surface analysis experiments, mainly Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), were performed to investigate the oxidation of epitaxial graphene on the SiC(0001) surface utilizing an oxygen cracking method. The AES experiments are described in detail and highlight the challenges that were faced when several different graphene samples were used for the oxygen adsorption/desorption experiments.

  20. Activators of photoluminescence in calcite: evidence from high-resolution, laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedone, V.A.; Cercone, K.R.; Burruss, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy of a red-algal, biogenic calcite and a synthetic Mn-calcite can make the distinction between organic and trace-element activators of photoluminescence. Organic-activated photoluminescence in biogenic calcite is characterized by significant peak shifts and increasing intensity with shorter-wavelength excitation and by significant decreases in intensity after heating to ??? 400??C. In contrast, Mn-activated photoluminescence shows no peak shift, greatest intensity under green excitation and limited changes after heating. Examination of samples with a high-sensitivity spectrometer using several wavelengths of exciting light is necessary for identification of photoluminescence activators. ?? 1990.

  1. Structure-Activity Relations In Enzymes: An Application Of IR-ATR Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fringeli, Urs P.; Ahlstrom, Peter; Vincenz, Claudius; Fringeli, Marianna

    1985-12-01

    Relations between structure and specific activity in immobilized acetylcholinesterase (ACNE) have been studied by means of pH- and Ca++-modulation technique combined with attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy and enzyme activity measurement. Periodic modulation of pH and Ca++-concentration enabled a periodic on-off switching of about 40% of the total enzyme activity. It was found that about 0.5 to 1% of the amino acids were involved in this process. These 15 to 30 amino acids assumed antiparallel pleated sheet structure in the inhibited state and random and/or helical structure in the activated state.

  2. Identifying water on our Moon and organics in the outer Solar System with active reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbitts, C. A.; Spiers, G. D.; Hansen, G. B.

    2005-08-01

    Infrared reflectance spectroscopy has successfully characterized H2O and identified organic molecules on many Solar System objects. However, passive reflectance spectroscopy cannot detect water in the permanently shadowed regions of the Moon. Similarly, the mid-IR fingerprints of organics on the surfaces of outer solar system objects cannot be detected passively because the sunlight is too dim and the surfaces are too cold. The strongest absorption band for condensed water and ice is near 3 microns. Organic molecules have strong absorptions near 3.4 microns, with spectral fingerprints necessary for unique identification present from approximately 5 to 10 microns. Given a sufficiently strong source of illumination, water hidden in shadows on the Moon and organic molecules in the outer solar system would be detectable and identifiable. Quantum Cascade (QC) laser technology is now becoming sufficiently capable to support reflectance spectroscopy at some of these wavelengths from orbit. Conceived under the HCIPE program in support of Prometheus missions, this technique is intrinsically very scalable. For instance, water can be detected using only two wavelengths and its physical state can be characterized with only five. Requiring an optical power of 2W per wavelength for sufficient signal-to-noise, the total power consumption by the lasing system would be approximately 80 and 200W, respectively. Currently, a continuous power output at 3 μm of 200 mWatts has been demonstrated. With beam combining, an optical power of 2 Watts is currently achievable. On the Moon, this would enable the detection of as little as 100ppm water. Radar and neutron spectroscopy measurements suggest there may be > 1000 ppm of water-ice present in permanent crater shadows on the Moon [Feldman et al., 1998; 2000; Nozette et al., 1996] which, if present the surface regolith would stabily exist adsorbed on the grains [Hodges, 2002; Cocks et al., 2002].

  3. Minimal-effort planning of active alignment processes for beam-shaping optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Schranner, Matthias; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel; Schlette, Christian; Losch, Daniel; Brecher, Christian; Roßmann, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    In science and industry, the alignment of beam-shaping optics is usually a manual procedure. Many industrial applications utilizing beam-shaping optical systems require more scalable production solutions and therefore effort has been invested in research regarding the automation of optics assembly. In previous works, the authors and other researchers have proven the feasibility of automated alignment of beam-shaping optics such as collimation lenses or homogenization optics. Nevertheless, the planning efforts as well as additional knowledge from the fields of automation and control required for such alignment processes are immense. This paper presents a novel approach of planning active alignment processes of beam-shaping optics with the focus of minimizing the planning efforts for active alignment. The approach utilizes optical simulation and the genetic programming paradigm from computer science for automatically extracting features from a simulated data basis with a high correlation coefficient regarding the individual degrees of freedom of alignment. The strategy is capable of finding active alignment strategies that can be executed by an automated assembly system. The paper presents a tool making the algorithm available to end-users and it discusses the results of planning the active alignment of the well-known assembly of a fast-axis collimator. The paper concludes with an outlook on the transferability to other use cases such as application specific intensity distributions which will benefit from reduced planning efforts.

  4. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  5. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; et al

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only inmore » the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.« less

  6. Liquid crystal alignment on ion-beam-treated polyimide with a long alkyl side chain: near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Joo-Hong; Hwang, Soo Won; Song, Dong Han; Shin, Jae Hoon; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Jae Chang; Yi, Mi Hye

    2009-02-19

    Liquid crystal alignment on ion-beam-treated polyimides with a long alkyl side chain was investigated using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The long alkyl side chains and the asymmetric distribution and orientational order of the pi-bonds of the polyimide surface can be determined by analyzing the angular dependent resonance intensities of the NEXAFS measurements. Herein, we demonstrate that the pretilt angle of the LC cell made by our method decreases as more long alkyl side chains are destroyed. Additionally, the tilt direction of the LC molecules can be determined from the asymmetric distribution of pi-bonds of the polyimide created by the ion beam irradiation. PMID:19161281

  7. Ultratrace detection of chemical warfare agent simulants using supersonic-molecular-beam, resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization, time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Syage, J.A.; Pollard, J.E.; Cohen, R.B.

    1988-02-15

    An ultratrace detection method that offers exceptional selectivity has been developed based on the technique of supersonic molecular beam, resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization, time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MB/REMPI/TOFMS). Single ion detection capability has given detection limits as low as 300 ppt (dimethyl sulfide). Single vibronic level REMPI of the supercooled molecules in conjunction with TOFMS provides selectivity of 10,000 against chemically similar compounds. Studies were carried out using moist air expansions for a variety of organophosphonate and sulfide chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulant molecules. The preparation of molecules in single vibronic levels by laser excitation in supersonic molecular beams has enabled us to record high resolution spectra of higher excited electronic states showing fully resolved vibrational structure for diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS). VUV absorption spectra have also been recorded for several CWA molecules at ambient temperature, revealing several new electronic states extending up to the ionization threshold.

  8. Low-energy operation of the Livermore electron beam ion traps: Atomic spectroscopy of Si V, S VII, and Ar IX

    SciTech Connect

    Lepson, J K; Beiersdorfer, P

    2004-01-02

    As part of a project to compile a comprehensive catalog of astrophysically relevant emission lines, we used the low-energy capability of the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps to extend the spectroscopy of neon-like ions and the neighboring charge states to silicon, sulfur, and argon. They present wavelength data of Si V and demonstrate the effect of collisional deexcitation of electric dipole forbidden lines on the 2-3 L-shell spectra of Si V, S VII, and Ar IX.

  9. Structural properties of rutile TiO2 nanoparticles accumulated in a model of gastrointestinal epithelium elucidated by micro-beam x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronesi, G.; Brun, E.; Fayard, B.; Cotte, M.; Carrière, M.

    2012-05-01

    Micro-beam x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used to investigate rutile TiO2 nanoparticles internalized into gastrointestinal cells during their crossing of a gut model barrier. Nanoparticles diluted in culture medium tend to accumulate in cells after 48 h exposure; however, no spectral differences arise between particles in cellular and in acellular environments, as corroborated by quantitative analysis. This finding establishes that no modification of the lattice properties of the nanoparticles occurs upon interaction with the barrier. These measurements demonstrate the possibility of interrogating nanoparticles in situ within cells, suggesting a way to investigate their fate when incorporated in biological hosts.

  10. Control of flexible beams using a free-free active truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. W.; Kimiavi, B.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study involving controlling flexible beams using a free-free active truss is presented. This work extends previous work in controlling flexible continua with active trusses which were configured with fixed-free boundary conditions. The following describes the Lagrangian approach used to derive the equations of motion for the active truss and the beams attached to it. A partial-state feedback control law is derived for this system based on a full-state feedback Linear Quadratic Regulator method. The analytical model is examined via numerical simulations and the results are compared to a similar experimental apparatus described herein. The results show that control of a flexible continua is possible with a free-free active truss.

  11. Preliminary results, obtained by using a proton beam, for an active scanning system to installed on the KHIMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Hyeuk; Lee, Hwa-Ryun; Jang, Sea Duk; Kim, Hyunyong; Hahn, Garam; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Jang, Hong Suk; Park, Dong Wook; Hwang, Won Taek; Yang, Tae-Keun

    2015-08-01

    The active scanning technique is a pencil beam delivery method in particle therapy. The active scanning beam delivery system consists of a beam scanner, beam monitor, energy modulator, and related programs, such as the irradiation control and planning programs. A proposed prototype active scanning system was designed and installed on MC-50 at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS) with a 45-MeV proton beam. The laminated magnetic yoke of the scanning magnet supported fast ramping. The beam intensity and the beam profile monitors were designed for measuring the beam's properties. Both the range shifter and the ridge filter modulate the incoming beam energy. The LabVIEW®-based beam-irradiation-control program operates the system in a sequential operation manner for use with the MC-50 cyclotron. In addition, an in-housecoded irradiation-planning program generates an optimal irradiation path. A scanning experiment was successfully completed to print the logo of the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) on GaF film. Moreover, the beam's position accuracy was measured as 0.62 mm in the x-direction and as 0.83 mm in the y-direction.

  12. Low activation energy, high-quality oxidation of Si and Ge using neutral beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Akira; Endo, Kazuhiko; Masahara, Meishoku; Huang, Chi-Hsien; Samukawa, Seiji

    2011-05-01

    In this letter, we investigated the mechanism that forms thin silicon and germanium oxide films with a high-quality interface using a low-temperature neutral beam oxidation (NBO) process. Because NBO has high reactivity due to bombardment by energetic oxygen-neutral beams even at low substrate temperatures, we found that an extremely low activation energy for the atomic layer oxidation reaction could be achieved during the process itself. As a result, there was little suboxide at the interface between the oxide films and the semiconductor, and device characteristics with a high performance were observed.

  13. Development of CNS Active Target for Deuteron Induced Reactions with High Intensity Exotic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Shinsuke; Tokieda, H.; Lee, C. S.; Kojima, R.; Watanabe, Y. N.; Corsi, A.; Dozono, M.; Gibelin, J.; Hashimoto, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kawase, S.; Kubono, S.; Kubota, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Michimasa, S.; Nakao, T.; Nishi, T.; Obertelli, A.; Otsu, H.; Santamaria, C.; Sasano, M.; Takaki, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Leung, T.; Uesaka, T.; Yako, K.; Yamaguchi, H.; Zenihiro, J.; Takada, E.

    An active target system called CAT, has been developed aiming at the measurement of deuteron induced reactions with high intensity beams in inverse kinematics. The CAT consists of a time projection chamber using THGEM and an array of Si detectors or NaI scintilators. The effective gain for the recoil particle is deisgned to be 5 - 10 × 103, while one for the beam is reduced by 102 using mesh grid to match the amplified signal to the dynamic range same as the one for recoil particle. The structure of CAT and the effect of the mesh grid are reported.

  14. Observations of the plasma environment during an active ionospheric ion beam injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, R. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Erlandson, R. E.; Kintner, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    Several sounding rocket flights have been used to clarify the electrodynamics of neutral beam releases of Ar ions in the upper ionosphere, by varying the Ar's point of release with respect to the diagnostic payload. A volume of 10-m radius centered on the Ar release payload is measured for broadband wave activity; the superthermal neutralizing beam electrons become magnetized in this volume for across-field plasma releases, and ambient electrons are accelerated to energies of several hundred eV. This is speculated to be due to wave turbulence rather than payload-neutralization.

  15. Active and passive compensation of APPLE II-introduced multipole errors through beam-based measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Huang, Szu-Jung; Fu, Huang-Wen; Chang, Ho-Ping; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2016-08-01

    The effect of an APPLE II-type elliptically polarized undulator (EPU) on the beam dynamics were investigated using active and passive methods. To reduce the tune shift and improve the injection efficiency, dynamic multipole errors were compensated using L-shaped iron shims, which resulted in stable top-up operation for a minimum gap. The skew quadrupole error was compensated using a multipole corrector, which was located downstream of the EPU for minimizing betatron coupling, and it ensured the enhancement of the synchrotron radiation brightness. The investigation methods, a numerical simulation algorithm, a multipole error correction method, and the beam-based measurement results are discussed.

  16. Stark spectroscopy of a probe lithium beam excited with two dye lasers as a technique to study a high-power ion-beam diode.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, B A; An, W; Bluhm, H

    2012-03-01

    A non-disturbing measurement of electric field distributions is a subject of special interest in plasma physics and high-voltage devices. In this paper we describe a diagnostic technique for remote sensing of electric fields via injection of a probe beam of lithium atoms and cascade excitation of resonance fluorescence with two broadband dye lasers. The fluorescence spectrum was recorded using a monochromator equipped with an optical multi-channel analyser. The magnitude of the local electric field was retrieved from the Stark-shifted components of the 3d-2p lithium spectral line. The technique was applied to measurements of the electric field in the applied-B-field high-voltage diode of the 1 TW KALIF ion-beam accelerator. PMID:22462900

  17. Fragmentation of positively-charged biological ions activated with a beam of high-energy cations.

    PubMed

    Chingin, Konstantin; Makarov, Alexander; Denisov, Eduard; Rebrov, Oleksii; Zubarev, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    First results are reported on the fragmentation of multiply protonated polypeptide ions produced in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with a beam of high-energy cations as a source of activation. The ion beam is generated with a microwave plasma gun installed on a benchtop Q Exactive mass spectrometer. Precursor polypeptide ions are activated when trapped inside the collision cell of the instrument (HCD cell), and product species are detected in the Orbitrap analyzer. Upon exposure to the beam of air plasma cations (∼100 μA, 5 s), model precursor species such as multiply protonated angiotensin I and ubiquitin dissociated across a variety of pathways. Those pathways include the cleavages of C-CO, C-N as well as N-Cα backbone bonds, accordingly manifested as b/y, a, and c/z fragment ion series in tandem mass spectra. The fragmentation pattern observed includes characteristic fragments of collision-induced dissociation (CID) (b/y/a fragments) as well as electron capture/transfer dissociation (ECD, ETD) (c/z fragments), suggesting substantial contribution of both vibrational and electronic excitation in our experiments. Besides backbone cleavages, notable amounts of nondissociated precursor species were observed with reduced net charge, formed via electron or proton transfer between the colliding partners. Peaks corresponding to increased charge states of the precursor ions were also detected, which is the major distinctive feature of ion beam activation. PMID:24236851

  18. Non-mechanical optical path switching and its application to dual beam spectroscopy including gas filter correlation radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor); Wang, Liang-Guo (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A non-mechanical optical switch is developed for alternately switching a monochromatic or quasi-monochromatic light beam along two optical paths. A polarizer polarizes light into a single, e.g., vertical component which is then rapidly modulated into vertical and horizontal components by a polarization modulator. A polarization beam splitter then reflects one of these components along one path and transmits the other along the second path. In the specific application of gas filter correlation radiometry, one path is directed through a vacuum cell and one path is directed through a gas correlation cell containing a desired gas. Reflecting mirrors cause these two paths to intersect at a second polarization beam splitter which reflects one component and transmits the other to recombine them into a polarization modulated beam which can be detected by an appropriate single sensor.

  19. Isoconversion effective activation energy profiles by variable temperature diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    White, Daniel R; White, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    Thermal process characterization based on calculating effective activation energies from variable temperature diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy (VT-DRIFTS) measurements is demonstrated. Experimental factors that affect the accuracies of activation energy values are outlined. Infrared radiation scattering efficiency, thermal conductivity, and inertness towards chemical reactions are factors that should be considered when selecting an appropriate diluent for preparing samples. The Kubelka-Munk representation is superior to apparent absorbance when baseline variations in spectra measured at different temperatures can be minimized. Variable-temperature infrared spectral features, such as integrated absorption band area, can be used to compute isoconversion effective activation energies, provided that measured quantities are proportional to species concentrations. PMID:18230216

  20. Active control and experiment study of a flexible hub-beam system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guoping; Teng, Youyou; Lim, C. W.

    2010-05-01

    The first-order approximation coupling (FOAC) model was proposed recently for dynamics and control of flexible hub-beam systems. This model may deal with system dynamics for both low and high rotation speed, while the classical zeroth-order approximation coupling (ZOAC) model is only available for low rotation speed. This paper assumes the FOAC model to present experimental study of active positioning control of a flexible hub-beam system. Linearization and nonlinear control strategies are both considered. An experiment system based on a DSP TMS320F2812 board is introduced. The difference between linearization and nonlinear control strategies are studied both numerically and experimentally. Simulation and experimental results indicate that, linearized controller can make the system reach an expected position with suppressed vibration of flexible beam, but the time taken to position is longer than expected, whereas nonlinear controller works well with precise positioning, suppression of vibration and time control.

  1. Active laser radar systems with stochastic electromagnetic beams in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yangjian; Korotkova, Olga; Eyyuboğlu, Halil T; Baykal, Yahya

    2008-09-29

    Propagation of stochastic electromagnetic beams through paraxial ABCD optical systems operating through turbulent atmosphere is investigated with the help of the ABCD matrices and the generalized Huygens-Fresnel integral. In particular, the analytic formula is derived for the cross-spectral density matrix of an electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model (EGSM) beam. We applied our analysis for the ABCD system with a single lens located on the propagation path, representing, in a particular case, the unfolded double-pass propagation scenario of active laser radar. Through a number of numerical examples we investigated the effect of local turbulence strength and lens' parameters on spectral, coherence and polarization properties of the EGSM beam. PMID:18825220

  2. Active Target detectors for studies with exotic beams: Present and next future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittig, W.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Fritsch, A.; Abu-Nimeh, F.; Bazin, D.; Ahn, T.; Lynch, W. G.; Montes, F.; Shore, A.; Suzuki, D.; Usher, N.; Yurkon, J.; Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A.; Roberts, A. L.; Tang, X. D.; Becchetti, F. D.

    2015-06-01

    Reaccelerated radioactive beams near the Coulomb barrier, which are starting to be available from the ReA3 accelerator at NSCL and in next future at FRIB, will open up new opportunities for the study of nuclear structure near the drip lines. Efficient measurement techniques must be developed to compensate for the limited intensity of the most exotic beams. The Active-Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC) constructed at MSU solves this problem by providing the increased luminosity of a thick target while maintaining a good energy resolution by tracking the reaction vertex over an essentially 4 π solid angle. The AT-TPC and similar detectors allow us to take full advantage of the radioactive ion beams at present and future nuclear physics facilities to explore the frontier of rare isotopes.

  3. Active control of the forced and transient response of a finite beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Structural vibrations from a point force are modelled on a finite beam. This research explores the theoretical limit on controlling beam vibrations utilizing another point source as an active controller. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. For harmonic excitation, control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam. Control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the required interval, is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. The form of the controller is specified as either one or two delayed pulses, thus constraining the controller to be casual. The best possible control is examined while varying the region of control and the controller location. It is found that control is always possible using either one or two control pulses.

  4. Electron-Beam Atomic Spectroscopy for In Situ Measurements of Melt Composition for Refractory Metals: Analysis of Fundamental Physics and Plasma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasper, Paul Joseph; Apelian, Diran

    2015-04-01

    Electron-beam (EB) melting is used for the processing of refractory metals, such as Ta, Nb, Mo, and W. These metals have high value and are critical to many industries, including the semiconductor, aerospace, and nuclear industries. EB melting can also purify secondary feedstock, enabling the recovery and recycling of these materials. Currently, there is no method for measuring melt composition in situ during EB melting. Optical emission spectroscopy of the plasma generated by EB impact with vapor above the melt, a technique here termed electron-beam atomic spectroscopy, can be used to measure melt composition in situ, allowing for analysis of melt dynamics, facilitating improvement of EB melting processes and aiding recycling and recovery of these critical and high-value metals. This paper reviews the physics of the plasma generation by EB impact by characterizing the densities and energies of electrons, ions, and neutrals, and describing the interactions between them. Then several plasma models are introduced and their suitability to this application analyzed. Lastly, a potential method for calibration-free composition measurement is described and the challenges for implementation addressed.

  5. Remarkable improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio of 57Mn/ 57Fe in-beam Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kubo, M. K.; Yamada, Y.; Mihara, M.; Sato, W.; Miyazaki, J.; Sato, S.; Kitagawa, A.

    2011-02-01

    In-beam Mössbauer spectroscopy utilizing unstable 57Mn beams is a powerful method to extract physical and chemical properties at the atomic scale. A parallel plate avalanche counter (PPAC), optimized to detect conversion electrons generated by the Mössbauer effect, can be employed to suppress higher-energy background γ rays. However, β rays are emitted by the 57Mn parent nuclei of 57Fe, which can significantly degrade the spectrum quality. In the present work, we have developed a new anti-coincidence-detection system with a thin plastic scintillation counter (0.5 mmt), which can be used to detect β rays and reject them from the recorded PPAC events. To demonstrate the anti-coincidence system, we carried out Mössbauer spectroscopy utilizing 57Mn nuclei that were implanted into a non-magnetic aluminum metal plate at room temperature. Using the anti-coincidence method, we obtained a typical Mössbauer spectrum of high quality, despite a very low number of implanted 57Mn atoms, of ˜5 × 10 9. The signal to noise ratio of the obtained spectrum was increased remarkably, and the relative peak height above the baseline increased from 10% to 220% using the anti-coincidence method. The developed detection system is applicable to investigation of in situ properties, and avoids the potentially problematic agglomeration of probes in a sample.

  6. Deep level transient spectroscopy in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy grown Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/GaN interface and the rapid thermal annealing effect

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Young S.; Lee, Minyoung; Jeon, Kiyoung; Im, Hyunsik; Yoon, Im T.; Shon, Yoon; Park, C. J.; Cho, Hoon Y.; Han, Myung-Soo

    2010-09-13

    We investigated deep-level traps formed in Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/GaN heterostructures grown using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and by performing deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Two electron traps with activation energies of E{sub c}-150 meV and E{sub c}-250 meV were observed, and their capture cross-sections ({sigma}{sub T}) were estimated to be 2.0x10{sup -18} cm{sup 2} and 1.1x10{sup -17} cm{sup 2}, respectively. Different behaviors in the dependence of DLTS on filling pulse length confirm that the traps originated from N vacancies and dislocations. The amplitude of the dislocation-induced DLTS signal was reduced significantly by high-temperature rapid thermal annealing under N{sub 2} ambient after hydrogen treatment due to the reduction in dislocation density.

  7. Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre amplifiers with active phase control

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X L; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Y X; Ma, H T; Xu, X J; Liu, Z J; Zhao, Y J

    2011-12-31

    Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre lasers is a promising method for power scaling while simultaneously maintaining good beam quality. We propose and demonstrate a scalable architecture for coherent beam combining of all-fibre pulsed amplifiers with active phase control using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. A low-pass filter is introduced to eliminate the fluctuation of the metric function caused by pulsed lasers and to extract the exact phase noise signal. Active control is thereby based on the SPGD algorithm, resulting in stable coherent beam combining at the receiving plane even in a turbulent environment. Experimental results show that the fringe visibility of the long exposure pattern increases from 0 to 0.4, and the power encircled in the main-lobe increases by 1.6 times when the system evolves from the open-loop phase-locking scheme to the closed-loop scheme. This architecture can be easily scaled up to a higher power by increasing the number of amplifying channels and the power of a single amplifier.

  8. Active and passive coherent beam combining of thulium-doped fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Ma, Yanxing; Ma, Haotong; Han, Kai; Xu, Xiaojun; Liu, Zejin

    2010-11-01

    Thulium-doped fiber laser (TFL), which emitted near 2 μm laser beam, has become the latest revolution in highpower fiber laser technology. Further increasing the output power will face great challenges induced by nonlinear effects; coherent beam combining of TFL can increase laser output power while simultaneously maintaining beam quality. In this manuscript, we will present our detailed investigation on coherent beam combining of TFLs. Three different approaches, i.e., interferometric array, mutual injection locking and active phasing based on multi-dithering technique, are employed. In the interferometric array scheme, coherent combining is realized by using an intracavity fiber coupler in an all-fiber laser array configuration. Efficient coherent combining can be achieved by providing sufficient loss discrimination. High combining efficiency of 85% for two fiber laser has been obtained. In mutual injection locking scheme, mutual coherence between the two fiber lasers is established by means of mutual coupling through two 3dB couplers. High combining efficiency of 99% for two fiber laser has been obtained, and the fringe contrast of the intensity pattern at the receiving plane is as high as 93%. In active phasing scheme, when the phase control system is in the closed loop, the fringe contrast of far-field intensity pattern is improved by more than 75 % from 10 % in open loop, and the residual phase error is less than λ/20.

  9. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  10. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  11. Active Control of the Forced and Transient Response of a Finite Beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John Theodore

    1989-01-01

    When studying structural vibrations resulting from a concentrated source, many structures may be modelled as a finite beam excited by a point source. The theoretical limit on cancelling the resulting beam vibrations by utilizing another point source as an active controller is explored. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. In each case, a cost function is defined and minimized for numerous parameter variations. For the case of harmonic excitation, the cost function is obtained by integrating the mean squared displacement over a region of the beam in which control is desired. A controller is then found to minimize this cost function in the control interval. The control interval and controller location are continuously varied for several frequencies of excitation. The results show that control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam, but control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, the cost function is realized by integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the interval of the beam in which control is desired. This is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. A cost function representative of the beam vibration is obtained by integrating the transient displacement squared over a region of the beam and over all time. The form of the controller is chosen a priori as either one or two delayed pulses. Delays

  12. Active twist rotor blade modelling using particle-wake aerodynamics and geometrically exact beam structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesnik, C. E. S.; Opoku, D. G.; Nitzsche, F.; Cheng, T.

    2004-06-01

    An active aeroelastic and aeroacoustic analysis of helicopter rotor systems is presented in this paper. It is a tightly coupled computational aeroelastic code that interfaces a particle-wake panel method code with an active nonlinear mixed variational intrinsic beam element code. In addition, a Ffowcs-Williams-Hawkings equation-based acoustic component is incorporated to complete the numerical implementation. The theory behind each component is summarized here as well as the method for coupling the aerodynamic and structural components. Sample acoustic and aeroelastic results are given for different model-scale rotors. Comparisons with available (passive) results show very good agreement. Preliminary study with an active twist rotor is also shown.

  13. Nonlinear Dielectric Spectroscopy as an Indirect Probe of Metabolic Activity in Thylakoid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Palanisami, Akilan; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Widger, William R.; Miller, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy (NDS) is a non-invasive probe of cellular metabolic activity with potential application in the development of whole-cell biosensors. However, the mechanism of NDS interaction with metabolic membrane proteins is poorly understood, partly due to the inherent complexity of single cell organisms. Here we use the light-activated electron transport chain of spinach thylakoid membrane as a model system to study how NDS interacts with metabolic activity. We find protein modification, as opposed to membrane pump activity, to be the dominant source of NDS signal change in this system. Potential mechanisms for such protein modifications include reactive oxygen species generation and light-activated phosphorylation. PMID:25586698

  14. Actively mode-locked all fiber laser with cylindrical vector beam output.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Sun, Biao; Xu, Lixin; Li, Feng; Chung, Dick; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser that emits a cylindrical vector beam. An intra-cavity few-mode fiber Bragg grating inscribed in a short section of four-mode fiber is employed to provide mode selection and spectrum filtering functions. Mode coupling is achieved by offset splicing between the single-mode fiber and the four-mode fiber in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode-locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547 nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.2 nm. The mode-locked pulses have a duration of 2 ns and repetition of 12.06 MHz. Through adjusting the polarization state in the laser cavity, both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with high mode purity. PMID:26907420

  15. A new single crystal diamond dosimeter for small beam: comparison with different commercial active detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsolat, F.; Tromson, D.; Tranchant, N.; Pomorski, M.; Le Roy, M.; Donois, M.; Moignau, F.; Ostrowsky, A.; De Carlan, L.; Bassinet, C.; Huet, C.; Derreumaux, S.; Chea, M.; Cristina, K.; Boisserie, G.; Bergonzo, P.

    2013-11-01

    Recent developments of new therapy techniques using small photon beams, such as stereotactic radiotherapy, require suitable detectors to determine the delivered dose with a high accuracy. The dosimeter has to be as close as possible to tissue equivalence and to exhibit a small detection volume compared to the size of the irradiation field, because of the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium in small beam. Characteristics of single crystal diamond (tissue equivalent material Z = 6, high density) make it an ideal candidate to fulfil most of small beam dosimetry requirements. A commercially available Element Six electronic grade synthetic diamond was used to develop a single crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) with a small detection volume (0.165 mm3). Long term stability was studied by irradiating the SCDDo in a 60Co beam over 14 h. A good stability (deviation less than ± 0.1%) was observed. Repeatability, dose linearity, dose rate dependence and energy dependence were studied in a 10 × 10 cm2 beam produced by a Varian Clinac 2100 C linear accelerator. SCDDo lateral dose profile, depth dose curve and output factor (OF) measurements were performed for small photon beams with a micro multileaf collimator m3 (BrainLab) attached to the linac. This study is focused on the comparison of SCDDo measurements to those obtained with different commercially available active detectors: an unshielded silicon diode (PTW 60017), a shielded silicon diode (Sun Nuclear EDGE), a PinPoint ionization chamber (PTW 31014) and two natural diamond detectors (PTW 60003). SCDDo presents an excellent spatial resolution for dose profile measurements, due to its small detection volume. Low energy dependence (variation of 1.2% between 6 and 18 MV photon beam) and low dose rate dependence of the SCDDo (variation of 1% between 0.53 and 2.64 Gy min-1) are obtained, explaining the good agreement between the SCDDo and the efficient unshielded diode (PTW 60017) in depth dose curve measurements. For

  16. Following [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Intermediates by Time-Resolved Mid-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mirmohades, Mohammad; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Lomoth, Reiner; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-08-18

    Time-resolved nanosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy is for the first time employed to study the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and to investigate relevant intermediates of the enzyme active site. An actinic 355 nm, 10 ns laser flash triggered photodissociation of a carbonyl group from the CO-inhibited state Hox-CO to form the state Hox, which is an intermediate of the catalytic proton reduction cycle. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy allowed us to directly follow the subsequent rebinding of the carbonyl, re-forming Hox-CO, and determine the reaction half-life to be t1/2 ≈ 13 ± 5 ms at room temperature. This gives direct information on the dynamics of CO inhibition of the enzyme. PMID:27494400

  17. Monolithic crystalline cladding microstructures for efficient light guiding and beam manipulation in passive and active regimes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yuechen; Cheng, Chen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Castillo, Gabriel R.; Rabes, Blanca del Rosal; Tan, Yang; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Miniature laser sources with on-demand beam features are desirable devices for a broad range of photonic applications. Lasing based on direct-pump of miniaturized waveguiding active structures offers a low-cost but intriguing solution for compact light-emitting devices. In this work, we demonstrate a novel family of three dimensional (3D) photonic microstructures monolithically integrated in a Nd:YAG laser crystal wafer. They are produced by the femtosecond laser writing, capable of simultaneous light waveguiding and beam manipulation. In these guiding systems, tailoring of laser modes by both passive/active beam splitting and ring-shaped transformation are achieved by an appropriate design of refractive index patterns. Integration of graphene thin-layer as saturable absorber in the 3D laser structures allows for efficient passive Q-switching of tailored laser radiations which may enable miniature waveguiding lasers for broader applications. Our results pave a way to construct complex integrated passive and active laser circuits in dielectric crystals by using femtosecond laser written monolithic photonic chips. PMID:25100561

  18. Modeling activities on the negative-ion-based Neutral Beam Injectors of the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Chitarin, G.; Pilan, N.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.

    2011-09-26

    At the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) large-scaled negative ion sources have been widely used for the Neutral Beam Injectors (NBIs) mounted on the Large Helical Device (LHD), which is the world-largest superconducting helical system. These injectors have achieved outstanding performances in terms of beam energy, negative-ion current and optics, and represent a reference for the development of heating and current drive NBIs for ITER.In the framework of the support activities for the ITER NBIs, the PRIMA test facility, which includes a RF-drive ion source with 100 keV accelerator (SPIDER) and a complete 1 MeV Neutral Beam system (MITICA) is under construction at Consorzio RFX in Padova.An experimental validation of the codes has been undertaken in order to prove the accuracy of the simulations and the soundness of the SPIDER and MITICA design. To this purpose, the whole set of codes have been applied to the LHD NBIs in a joint activity between Consorzio RFX and NIFS, with the goal of comparing and benchmarking the codes with the experimental data. A description of these modeling activities and a discussion of the main results obtained are reported in this paper.

  19. Monolithic crystalline cladding microstructures for efficient light guiding and beam manipulation in passive and active regimes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuechen; Cheng, Chen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Castillo, Gabriel R; Rabes, Blanca del Rosal; Tan, Yang; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Miniature laser sources with on-demand beam features are desirable devices for a broad range of photonic applications. Lasing based on direct-pump of miniaturized waveguiding active structures offers a low-cost but intriguing solution for compact light-emitting devices. In this work, we demonstrate a novel family of three dimensional (3D) photonic microstructures monolithically integrated in a Nd:YAG laser crystal wafer. They are produced by the femtosecond laser writing, capable of simultaneous light waveguiding and beam manipulation. In these guiding systems, tailoring of laser modes by both passive/active beam splitting and ring-shaped transformation are achieved by an appropriate design of refractive index patterns. Integration of graphene thin-layer as saturable absorber in the 3D laser structures allows for efficient passive Q-switching of tailored laser radiations which may enable miniature waveguiding lasers for broader applications. Our results pave a way to construct complex integrated passive and active laser circuits in dielectric crystals by using femtosecond laser written monolithic photonic chips. PMID:25100561

  20. Uncovering the triggers for GPCR activation using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Naoki; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2015-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) span cell membranes with seven transmembrane helices and respond to a diverse array of extracellular signals. Crystal structures of GPCRs have provided key insights into the architecture of these receptors and the role of conserved residues. However, the question of how ligand binding induces the conformational changes that are essential for activation remains largely unanswered. Since the extracellular sequences and structures of GPCRs are not conserved between receptor subfamilies, it is likely that the initial molecular triggers for activation vary depending on the specific type of ligand and receptor. In this article, we describe NMR studies on the rhodopsin subfamily of GPCRs and propose a mechanism for how retinal isomerization switches the receptor to the active conformation. These results suggest a general approach for determining the triggers for activation in other GPCR subfamilies using NMR spectroscopy.

  1. Defects in silicon after B+ implantation: A study using a positron-beam technique, Rutherford backscattering, secondary neutral mass spectroscopy, and infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, S.; Gebauer, J.; Börner, F.; Polity, A.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Wendler, E.; Weber, B.; Wesch, W.; Börner, H.

    1997-07-01

    The distribution of defects in Si (100), (110), and (111) after boron implantation and annealing processes was measured by means of different methods. Boron implantation was carried out at 300 K with three energies (50, 150, and 300 keV or 30, 90, and 180 keV) in multiple mode to obtain a homogeneously damaged layer. Ion fluences ranged from 1014 to 1016 B+ cm-2. The profile of vacancy-type defects was detected by variable-energy positron annihilation spectroscopy (VEPAS). The defect concentration increases proportionally to Φ, where Φ is the ion fluence. It was found that the line-shape parameter S of the positron-electron annihilation peak in the implanted layer increases with Φ. The divacancy (2v) concentration observed by infrared absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) was nearly constant in all samples (about 1.8×1019 cm-3). It can be concluded that divacancies are not the main vacancy-type defect and the increasing S parameter must be attributed to additional defects of larger open volume. A value Sdefect/Sbulk=1.048 was fitted for the dominating defect, where S2v/Sbulk=1.04. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) measurements were carried out to detect the distribution of displaced lattice atoms. The defect-production rate was proportional to Φ again. The concentration profiles of implanted ions were measured with sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS). In addition, Monte Carlo calculations were done with the TRIM code. The nearly homogenous defect distributions up to a depth of 1 μm found by VEPAS, TRIM, and RBS are in very good accordance. The samples were annealed up to 1150 K. It was found that the annealing behavior of vacancylike defects depends on the implantation dose and on the sample material under investigation. The divacancies are annealed at 470 K as measured by IRAS. An annealing stage of vacancy clusters at 725 K was observed in all samples by VEPAS. In Czochralski material, a decrease of the S parameter below the value of defect-free Si was

  2. Defects in silicon after B{sup +} implantation: A study using a positron-beam technique, Rutherford backscattering, secondary neutral mass spectroscopy, and infrared absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, S.; Gebauer, J.; Boerner, F.; Polity, A.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Wendler, E.; Weber, B.; Wesch, W.; Boerner, H.

    1997-07-01

    The distribution of defects in Si (100), (110), and (111) after boron implantation and annealing processes was measured. Boron implantation was carried out at 300 K with three energies (50, 150, and 300 keV or 30, 90, and 180 keV) in multiple mode to obtain a homogeneously damaged layer. Ion fluences ranged from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 16}B{sup +}cm{sup {minus}2}. The profile of vacancy-type defects was detected by variable-energy positron annihilation spectroscopy (VEPAS). The defect concentration increases proportionally to {radical}({Phi}), where {Phi} is the ion fluence. The line-shape parameter S of the positron-electron annihilation peak in the implanted layer increases with {Phi}. The divacancy (2v) concentration observed by infrared absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) was nearly constant in all samples (about 1.8{times}10{sup 19}cm{sup {minus}3}). It can be concluded that divacancies are not the main vacancy-type defect and the increasing S parameter must be attributed to additional defects of larger open volume. A value S{sub defect}/S{sub bulk}=1.048 was fitted for the dominating defect, where S{sub 2v}/S{sub bulk}=1.04. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) measurements were carried out to detect the distribution of displaced lattice atoms. The defect-production rate was proportional to {radical}({Phi}) again. The concentration profiles of implanted ions were measured with sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS). In addition, Monte Carlo calculations were done with the TRIM code. The nearly homogenous defect distributions up to a depth of 1 {mu}m found by VEPAS, TRIM, and RBS are in very good accordance. The samples were annealed up to 1150 K. It was found that the annealing behavior of vacancylike defects depends on the implantation dose and on the sample material under investigation. The divacancies are annealed at 470 K as measured by IRAS. An annealing stage of vacancy clusters at 725 K was observed in all samples by VEPAS. (Abstract Truncated)

  3. Improvement of the gas cluster ion beam-(GCIB)-based molecular secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profile with O2(+) cosputtering.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yi-Hsuan; Liao, Hua-Yang; Lin, Kang-Yi; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Kao, Wei-Lun; Kuo, Ding-Yuan; You, Yun-Wen; Chu, Kuo-Jui; Wu, Chen-Yi; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2016-04-21

    Over the last decade, cluster ion beams have displayed their capability to analyze organic materials and biological specimens. Compared with atomic ion beams, cluster ion beams non-linearly enhance the sputter yield, suppress damage accumulation and generate high mass fragments during sputtering. These properties allow successful Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis of soft materials beyond the static limit. Because the intensity of high mass molecular ions is intrinsically low, enhancing the intensity of these secondary ions while preserving the sample in its original state is the key to highly sensitive molecular depth profiles. In this work, bulk poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was used as a model material and analyzed using Time-of-Flight SIMS (ToF-SIMS) with a pulsed Bi3(2+) primary ion. The optimized hardware of a 10 kV Ar2500(+) Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) with a low kinetic energy (200-500 V) oxygen ion (O2(+)) as a cosputter beam was employed for generating depth profiles and for examining the effect of beam parameters. The results were then quantitatively analyzed using an established erosion model. It was found that the ion intensity of the PET monomer ([M + H](+)) and its large molecular fragment ([M - C2H4O + H](+)) steadily declined during single GCIB sputtering, with distortion of the distribution information. However, under an optimized GCIB-O2(+) cosputter, the secondary ion intensity quickly reached a steady state and retained >95% intensity with respect to the pristine surface, although the damage cross-section was larger than that of single GCIB sputtering. This improvement was due to the oxidation of molecules and the formation of -OH groups that serve as proton donors to particles emitted from the surface. As a result, the ionization yield was enhanced and damage to the chemical structure was masked. Although O2(+) is known to alter the chemical structure and cause damage accumulation, the concurrently used GCIB could

  4. Active vibration reduction by optimally placed sensors and actuators with application to stiffened plates by beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    This study concerns new investigation of active vibration reduction of a stiffened plate bonded with discrete sensor/actuator pairs located optimally using genetic algorithms based on a developed finite element modeling. An isotropic plate element stiffened by a number of beam elements on its edges and having a piezoelectric sensor and actuator pair bonded to its surfaces is modeled using the finite element method and Hamilton’s principle, taking into account the effects of piezoelectric mass, stiffness and electromechanical coupling. The modeling is based on the first order shear deformation theory taking into account the effects of bending, membrane and shear deformation for the plate, the stiffening beam and the piezoelectric patches. A Matlab finite element program has been built for the stiffened plate model and verified with ANSYS and also experimentally. Optimal placement of ten piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs and optimal feedback gain for active vibration reduction are investigated for a plate stiffened by two beams arranged in the form of a cross. The genetic algorithm was set up for optimization of sensor/actuator placement and feedback gain based on the minimization of the optimal linear quadratic index as an objective function to suppress the first six modes of vibration. Comparison study is presented for active vibration reduction of a square cantilever plate stiffened by crossed beams with two sensor/actuator configurations: firstly, ten piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs are located in optimal positions; secondly, a piezoelectric layer of single sensor/actuator pair covering the whole of the stiffened plate as a SISO system.

  5. Dual-beam, second-derivative tunable diode-laser infrared spectroscopy applied to trace-gas measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D. R.; Jungst, R. G.

    1981-04-01

    A dual beam diode laser spectrometer has been constructed using off-axis reflective optics. The spectrometer can be amplitude modulated for direct absorption measurements or frequency modulated to obtain derivative spectra. The spectrometer has high throughput, is easy to operate and align, provides good dual beam compensation, and has no evidence of the interference effects that have been observed in diode laser spectrometers using refractive optics. Unpurged, using second derivative techniques, the instrument has measured 108 parts-per-million CO (10 cm absorption cell, atmospheric pressure-broadened) with good signal/noise. With the replacement of marginal instrumental components, the signal/noise should be substantially increased. This instrument was developed to monitor the evolution of decomposition gases in sealed containers of small volume at atmospheric pressure.

  6. {gamma}-ray Spectroscopy of Proton Drip-Line Nuclei in the A{approx}130 Region using SPIRAL beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stezowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Rosse, B.; Schmitt, Ch.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2008-11-11

    A fusion-evaporation experiment has been performed with a SPIRAL {sup 76}Kr radioactive beam in order to study the deformation of rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The experimental setup consisted in the EXOGAM {gamma}-array, coupled to the light-charged particles (LCP) DIAMANT detector and to the VAMOS heavy-ion spectrometer. The difficulties inherent to such measurements are enlightened. The coupling between EXOGAM and DIAMANT has been used to decrease the huge background caused by the radioactivity of the beam. It further permits assigning new {gamma}-ray transitions to specific residual nuclei. A {gamma}-ray belonging to the {sup 130}Pm level scheme has thus been observed for the first time.

  7. Bipolar Mood Tendency and Frontal Activation Using a Multichannel Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Toru; Ishige, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the association of frontal functioning with subclinical bipolar spectrum by a newly developed convenient method. We investigated subclinical bipolar tendency and frontal lobe activation during word productions using multi-channel near infrared spectroscopy. Participants: 44 healthy university students (mean ages 20.5 years old, and 29 female) gave their written informed consent, and we strictly protected privacy and anonymity was carefully preserved. A 13-items self-report questionnaire (Mood Disorders Questionnaire; MDQ) and a 16-channel near-infrared spectroscopy were used to compare frontal activations between two samples divided by median (4 points) of the total MDQ scores and to analyze correlations between relative changes of cerebral blood volume and bipolarity levels. There was no case suspected as bipolar disorders by MDQ screening (mean 3.4, max 10). Significant differences in lower activations were noted in the right and left pre-frontal cortex (PFC) with higher bipolarity scores using the specific software to analyze the NIRS waveform (P<0.05). Total MDQ were correlated significantly with frontal activation negatively in many channels; therefore, we conducted multiple linear regression to select significant frontal activations using the MDQ as a dependent variable. Stepwise method revealed that activation in left lateral PFC was negatively associated to bipolar tendency, and this regression model was significant (R2=0.10, F=4.5, P=0.04). Differences in frontal functioning suggest that subclinical bipolar tendencies might be related to left lateral PFC activations. It should be confirmed whether the identical pattern can be identified for clinical subjects with bipolar disorders. PMID:26605032

  8. Beam Damage of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) [PVC] Film as Observed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Krishna, Abhilash; Kulkarni, Pranita B.; Lee, Chi-Ying M.; Baer, Donald R.

    2003-03-08

    XPS spectra of a spin-coated film poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) were collected over a period of 243 minutes at 303 K to determine specimen damage during long exposures to monochromatic Al Ka x-rays. For this PVC film we measured the loss of chlorine as a function of time by rastering a focused 104.6 w 100 um diameter x-ray beam over a 1.4 mm x 0.2 mm area on the sample.

  9. Studies of transition metal and overlayers dynamics and magnetism by HE and spin-polarized metastable HE beam spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    El-Batanouny, M.

    1992-01-16

    Experimental results for the investigation of quantum delocalization of hydrogen on the Pd(111) surface; the investigation of the structural and dynamical trends in the growth of Cu overlayers on Pd(111) surface; and the investigation of the magnetic structure of the NiO(111) surface using spin-polarized metastable He beam scattering are included in this paper. Planned research is also discussed.

  10. ACTIVE MEDIA: Nonlinear thermally induced distortions of a laser beam in a cryogenic disk amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyatkin, A. G.; Khazanov, Efim A.

    2009-09-01

    Taking into account the temperature dependences of the heat conductivity, the refractive index, and the thermal expansion coefficient, we calculated the temperature, elastic stresses, a thermally induced lens and depolarisation of a beam in a cryogenic disk amplifier (an Yb:YAG disk placed between a copper cylinder and a sapphire disk cooled by liquid nitrogen). When the active element (the thickness is 0.6 mm, the orientation is [001], the atomic concentration of Yb is 10%) is pumped by radiation from a diode laser (the beam diameter is 6 mm), the temperature does not exceed 140 K for the heat release power of 100 W. In this case, elastic stresses in the active element are six times lower than the maximum permissible value. The focal distance of the thermally induced lens is 5.5 m and the depolarisation rate is 0.038% per two passes through the active element. Although the heat conductivity of the active element rapidly decreases with temperature, the thermal load can be increased by 1.5-2 times when the dimensions of the active element remain constant.

  11. Observation of radial phase shift of the edge harmonic oscillation in the edge transport barrier discharges in the Compact Helical System using beam emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, T.; Kado, S.; Yoshinuma, M.; Ida, K.; Akiyama, T.; Minami, T.; Nagaoka, K.; Shimizu, A.; Okamura, S.; Tanaka, S.

    2006-10-15

    In the present study, a coherent density fluctuation similar to the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO) in tokamaks was observed in the edge transport barrier discharge in the Compact Helical System (CHS) [K. Matsuoka et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1988 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1989), Vol. 2, pp. 441] using beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The fluctuation had both fundamental (f=4.5 kHz) and second-harmonic (2f=9 kHz) frequencies. EHO in CHS had a peak amplitude at approximately {rho}=0.95. The mode has a continuous phase shift in the radial direction. If this is interpreted as the radial propagation, the mode propagates in the outer radial direction at an apparent phase velocity of several hundreds of meters per second, which is a characteristic similar to the radial phase shift of EHO in tokamaks.

  12. Analysis of the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions by optical spectroscopy in an electron-beam ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windberger, A.; Torretti, F.; Borschevsky, A.; Ryabtsev, A.; Dobrodey, S.; Bekker, H.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U.; Ubachs, W.; Hoekstra, R.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Versolato, O. O.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally re-evaluate the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions. These ions are essential in bright extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) plasma-light sources for next-generation nanolithography, but their complex electronic structure is an open challenge for both theory and experiment. We combine optical spectroscopy of magnetic dipole M 1 transitions, in a wavelength range covering 260 to 780 nm, with charge-state selective ionization in an electron beam ion trap. Our measurements confirm the predictive power of ab initio calculations based on Fock space coupled cluster theory. We validate our line identification using semiempirical cowan calculations with adjustable wave-function parameters. Available Ritz combinations further strengthen our analysis. Comparison with previous work suggests that line identifications in the EUV need to be revisited.

  13. In-beam γ-ray Spectroscopy of {sup 30}P via the {sup 28}Si({sup 3}He,pγ){sup 30}P Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mcneice, E.; Setoodehnia, K.; Singh, B.; Abe, Y.; Binh, D.N.; Chen, A.A.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Fukuoka, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Ishibashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Kahl, D.; Komatsubara, T.; Kubono, S.; Moriguchi, T.; Nagae, D.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; and others

    2014-06-15

    The level structure of {sup 30}P up to 8.25 MeV was investigated via in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy using the {sup 28}Si({sup 3}He,pγ){sup 30}P reaction at 9 MeV at the University of Tsukuba Tandem Accelerator Complex in Japan. An energy level scheme was deduced from γ-γ coincidence measurements. 47 new transitions have been observed from the previously known states (mostly resonances), thereby reducing the uncertainties in the excitation energies of 17 states from 3 to 10 keV to values of < 1 keV. Furthermore, spin assignments based on measurements of γ-ray angular distributions and γ-γ directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO ratios) were made for several observed levels of {sup 30}P.

  14. Auger electron nanoscale mapping and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with gas cluster ion beam sputtering to study an organic bulk heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Heon Kim, Seong; Heo, Sung; Ihn, Soo-Ghang; Yun, Sungyoung; Hwan Park, Jong; Chung, Yeonji; Lee, Eunha; Park, Gyeongsu; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2014-06-16

    The lateral and vertical distributions of organic p/n bulk heterojunctions for an organic solar cell device are, respectively, investigated using nanometer-scale Auger electron mapping and using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering. The concentration of sulfur, present only in the p-type material, is traced to verify the distribution of p-type (donor) and n-type (acceptor) materials in the blended structure. In the vertical direction, a considerable change in atomic sulfur concentration is observed using XPS depth profiling with Ar GCIB sputtering. In addition, Auger electron mapping of sulfur reveals the lateral 2-dimensional distribution of p- and n-type materials. The combination of Auger electron mapping with Ar GCIB sputtering should thereby allow the construction of 3-dimensional distributions of p- and n-type materials in organic photovoltaic cells.

  15. Combination of time of flight direct recoiled spectroscopy and ion scattering trajectory simulations of (Ga,Mn)N growth by chemical beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Carreno, Luz Angela; Bensaoula, Abdelhak

    2005-01-10

    In situ direct recoiled spectroscopy combined with scattering-recoiling trajectory simulations were applied to characterization of (Ga,Mn)N thin films grown by chemical beam epitaxy. Relative intensities of the scattering and recoiling signals recorded as a function of the sample azimuthal rotation allowed determination of the surface composition and periodicity. Models locating the Mn atoms at Ga sites and interstitial positions and the presence of N vacancies at percent levels were simulated. We find that most Mn atoms are located at Ga sites with a nonnegligible level going to interstitial positions; inclusion of N vacancies is also necessary to duplicate some experimental features. This agrees with the samples free carrier concentrations and photoluminescence measurements.

  16. A Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction-Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy Study of Silicon Growth Dynamics During Gas Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy from Silanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, B. A.; Zhang, J.; Taylor, A. G.; Lees, A. K.

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) provides an ideal experimental vehicle for the in situ study of thin film growth dynamics. By using a combination of reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflectance anisotropy (difference) spectroscopy [RA(D)S], it is possible to separate morphological (long range order) and local electronic structure effects, which we demonstrate with the growth of silicon films from disilane (Si2H6) on Si(001) (2 × 1)+(1 × 2) reconstructed surfaces. The rate-limiting step in Si growth from both monosilane (SiH4) and disilane is the desorption of molecular hydrogen and we have found using RAS that, over a significant range of temperature and coverage, hydrogen desorption follows zeroth order kinetics as the result of a step-mediated process. Finally, we show how this influences the growth rate on substrates of differing degrees of vicinality.

  17. High-resolution spectroscopy of He2+ using Rydberg-series extrapolation and Zeeman-decelerated supersonic beams of metastable He2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Paul; Semeria, Luca; Merkt, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Recently, high-resolution spectroscopy of slow beams of metastable helium molecules (He2∗) generated by multistage Zeeman deceleration was used in combination with Rydberg-series extrapolation techniques to obtain the lowest rotational interval in the molecular helium ion at a precision of 18 MHz (Jansen et al., 2015), limited by the temporal width of the Fourier-transform-limited laser pulses used to record the spectra. We present here an extension of these measurements in which we have (1) measured higher rotational intervals of He2+, (2) replaced the pulsed UV laser by a cw UV laser and improved the resolution of the spectra by a factor of more than five, and (3) studied MJ redistribution processes in regions of low magnetic fields of the Zeeman decelerator and shown how these processes can be exploited to assign transitions originating from specific spin-rotational levels (N″,J″) of He2∗ .

  18. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of GaAs (001) and InP (001) Cleaning Procedures Prior to Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contour, J. P.; Massies, J.; Saletes, A.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of chemical etching by H2S04/H202/H20 (5/1/1) mixtures and of mechanopolishing by bromine-methanol diluted solution on GaAs (001) and InP (001) substrates for molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The final rinse in running deionized water does not produce any passivating oxide layer on the substrate surface. Oxidation observed on GaAs and InP after these cleaning procedures occurs during substrate handling in air. The H2S04/H202/H20 mixture produces arsenic rich surface layers having an atomic ratio As/Ga of 1.15, whereas the bromine-methanol mechanopolishing leads to an arsenic or phosphorus depleted surface with atomic ratios As/Ga=0.7 and P/In=0.65.

  19. Semi-active damping strategy for beams system with pneumatically controlled granular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajkowski, Jacek M.; Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej; Bajer, Czesław I.

    2016-03-01

    The paper deals with a control method for semi-active damping of a double beam system with a smart granular structure placed in a thin silicone envelope. The damping properties of the system are controlled pneumatically, by subjecting the granular material to underpressure at particular moments. A mathematical model of the layered beam with a granular damping structure is represented by the two degrees of freedom, modified Kelvin-Voigt model of two masses, a spring with controllable stiffness, and a viscous damper with a variable damping coefficient. The optimal control problem is posed, using the concept of switching of the parameters to increase the efficiency of suppressing the displacement's amplitude. The resulting control strategy was verified experimentally for free vibrations of a cantilever system. The research proved that the appropriate, periodic switching of the properties of the considered structure enables reducing the vibration more effectively than if the material is treated passively.

  20. Active differential optical absorption spectroscopy for NO2 gas pollution using blue light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljalal, Abdulaziz; Gasmi, Khaled; Al-Basheer, Watheq

    2015-05-01

    Availability of high intensity light emitting diodes in the blue region offer excellent opportunity for using them in active Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to detect air pollution. Their smooth and relatively broad spectral emissions as well as their long life make them almost ideal light sources for active DOAS. In this study, we report the usage of a blue light emitting diode in an active DOAS setup to measure traces of NO2 gas and achieving few parts per billion detection limit for a path length of 300 m. Details of the setup will be presented along with the effects on measurement accuracy due to shifts in the measured spectra calibration and due to using theoretical instrument Gaussian function instead of the measured instrument function.

  1. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  2. Very high resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy and imagery of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M.; Brown, W. A.; Haisch, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    A scientific investigation of the physics of the solar atmosphere, which uses the techniques of high resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution UV imagery, is described. The experiments were conducted during a series of three sounding rocket flights. All three flights yielded excellent images in the UV range, showing unprecedented spatial resolution. The second flight recorded the X-ray spectrum of a solar flare, and the third that of an active region. A normal incidence multi-layer mirror was used during the third flight to make the first astronomical X-ray observations using this new technique.

  3. A 2-Tesla active shield magnet for whole body imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, F.J.; Elliott, R.T.; Hawksworth, D.G. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on the development and testing of a 2T superconducting Active Shield magnet, with a 0.99m diameter warm bore for whole-body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy. The magnet and cryostat were designed to meet the same performance standards as existing MRI magnets, but with the volume of the stray field region reduced to less than 4% of that for an unshielded magnet. The 0.5 mT stray field contour is within 5m axially and 3m radially of the magnet center. The system weight is only 14 tonnes.

  4. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of the activation of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. I. Hydrogen activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G. )

    1993-03-01

    Activation procedures can have a dramatic effect on the activity of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. CO conversion over a 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst (parts by weight) can vary by nearly a factor of 3, depending on activation. In contrast, a 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst displays only minor variations in activity with activation conditions. An ultra-high vacuum surface analysis chamber coupled to an atmospheric pressure reactor has been used to measure the surface compositions of these catalysts following various hydrogen activation procedures. Activation of the 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst in H[sub 2] results in rapid reduction of iron to the metallic state, and segregation of sulfur to the catalyst surface. The sulfur arises from bulk sulfate impurities present in the metal nitrates used to prepare the catalyst. Sulfur coverage increases with both activation time and temperature, due to an increase in the rate of sulfur diffusion with temperature. F-T activity of this catalyst varies inversely with sulfur coverage, consistent with the well-known poisoning effect of sulfur on F-T synthesis. For the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst no significant variations in surface composition are observed as a function of hydrogen activation temperature, consistent with the absence of any variations in catalyst activity. Only partial reduction of iron to a mixture of Fe[sub x]O and Fe[sub 3]O[sub 4] is observed for this catalyst for all activation conditions investigated. Using electron beam effects to remove potassium and silica shows that one or both of these components inhibits reduction of iron to the metallic state in the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst. 48 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Wakefields Generated by Electron Beams Passing through a Waveguide Loaded with an Active Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Tyukhtin, Andrey; Kanareykin, Alexei; Schoessow, Paul

    2006-11-27

    The wakefields of a relativistic electron beam passing through a waveguide loaded with an active medium with weak resonant dispersion have been considered. For the calculations in this paper the parameters of the medium are those of a solution of fullerene (C60) in a nematic liquid crystal that exhibits activity in the X-band. It was shown that several of the TM accelerating modes can be amplified for the geometries under consideration; structures in which higher order modes are amplified exhibit essential advantages as PASERs. In particular, the amplification of the highest mode occurs in a structure loaded with a rather thick active medium layer that maximizes the energy stored by the active medium.

  6. Determination of the geometric and electronic structure of activated bleomycin using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Westre, T.E.; Loeb, K.E.; Zaleski, J.M.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Solomon, E.I. )

    1995-02-01

    Activated Bleomycin (BLM) is the first mononuclear non-heme iron oxygen intermediate stable enough for detailed spectroscopic study. DNA degradation by activated BLM involves C-H bond cleavage at the C4[prime] position of deoxyribose moieties and results in the production of base propenals. It has been postulated that activated BLM is an oxo-ferryl intermediate on the basis of its reactivity and analogy with cytochrome P-450 chemistry. Alternatively, spectroscopic and model studies have indicated activated BLM to have an iron(III)-peroxide site. In this study, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to directly probe the oxidation and spin states of the iron in activated BLM and to determine if a short iron-oxo bond is present, which would be characteristic of the oxo-ferryl species of heme iron. Both the pre-edge and edge regions of the Fe K-edge spectra indicate that activated BLM is a low spin ferric complex. The pre-edge intensity of activated BLM is also similar to that of low spin ferric BLM and does not show the intensity enhancement which would be present if there were a short Fe-O bond. Furthermore, bond distances obtained from EXAFS are similar to those in low spin Fe[sup III]BLM and show no evidence for a short iron-oxo bond. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Polarization dependence of n = 2 positronium transition rates to Stark-split n = 30 levels via crossed-beam spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. C. L.; Hisakado, T. H.; Goldman, H. J.; Tom, H. W. K.; Mills, A. P., Jr.

    2016-03-01

    We produce Rydberg Ps by a two-step laser excitation from {1}3S\\to {2}3P and from {2}3P to states of principal quantum level n=30+/- 1 that are Stark split by a motionally induced electric field. Our measurements are largely free of first-order Doppler shifts such that we are able to investigate the impact of laser polarization on the population of the closely spaced Stark levels. We find a variation in the distribution that is primarily dependent on the IR laser polarization with respect to the direction of the motionally induced electric field. With the IR light polarized parallel to the electric field F, the ratio of excitation probability to the levels of maximal Stark splitting compared to that of excitation to the states of minimal Stark splitting is found to be 3.37 ± 0.51, whereas with the IR light polarized perpendicular to F, the excitation ratio is 0.87 ± 0.64. Our results agree with those of Wall et al (2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 173001) obtained with n = 11 and will be useful in the preparation of high-n states of Ps for a variety of experiments, including measuring the interaction of Ps with gravity, in precision time-of-flight (TOF) energy spectroscopy, and precision optical spectroscopy of Ps.

  8. Development of a multipurpose beam foil spectroscopy set-up for the low cross-section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Nandi, T.; Berry, H. G.; Puri, Nitin K.

    2016-08-01

    A multipurpose facility for low cross section measurements has been developed at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The facility consists of a multipurpose miniature chamber equipped with 1 m focal length normal incidence Monochromator and charge coupled device based detection system which has been aligned to realize the best resolution of the spectrometer. The chamber in this facility collects radiation 100 times more efficiently from the older system, without using any extra focusing mirror assembly. It is ensured to have the provision of mounting an X-ray detector and the spectrometer transverse to the beam direction simultaneously in the same chamber. The atomic spectroscopic studies can be performed by interaction of ions beams with both thin foil and gas targets. Provision for using photomultiplier tube instead of charge coupled device, is employed in the system depending on the condition of the source strength or other detection issues. We observed the essence of a very weak atomic phenomenon, a triply excited autoionizing forbidden transition, using the above facility to demonstrate its capability for measuring such low cross section phenomena. The present developed facility covers a large spectroscopic region from X-rays to the near infrared (0.1-10,000 Å).

  9. Mapping Inhibitor Binding Modes on an Active Cysteine Protease via NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gregory M.; Balouch, Eaman; Goetz, David H.; Lazic, Ana; McKerrow, James H.; Craik, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Cruzain is a member of the papain/cathepsin-L family of cysteine proteases, and the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. We report an auto-induction methodology that provides soluble-cruzain at high yields (> 30 mg per liter in minimal media). These increased yields provide sufficient quantities of active enzyme for use in NMR-based ligand mapping. Using CD and NMR spectroscopy, we also examined the solution-state structural dynamics of the enzyme in complex with a covalently bound vinyl sulfone inhibitor (K777). We report the backbone amide and side chain carbon chemical shift assignments of cruzain in complex with K777. These resonance assignments were used to identify and map residues located in the substrate binding pocket, including the catalytic Cys25 and His162. Selective 15N-Cys, 15N-His, and 13C-Met labeling was performed to quickly assess cruzain-ligand interactions for a set of eight low molecular weight compounds exhibiting micromolar binding or inhibition. Chemical shift perturbation mapping verifies that six of the eight compounds bind to cruzain at the active site. Three different binding modes were delineated for the compounds, namely covalent, non-covalent, and non-interacting. These results provide examples of how NMR spectroscopy can be used to screen compounds for fast evaluation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions in order to facilitate lead compound identification and subsequent structural studies. PMID:23181936

  10. Experimental studies on active vibration control of a smart composite beam using a PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, Miroslav M.; Simonović, Aleksandar M.; Zorić, Nemanja D.; Lukić, Nebojša S.; Stupar, Slobodan N.; Ilić, Slobodan S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents experimental verification of the active vibration control of a smart cantilever composite beam using a PID controller. In order to prevent negative occurrences in the derivative and integral terms in a PID controller, first-order low-pass filters are implemented in the derivative action and in the feedback of the integral action. The proposed application setup consists of a composite cantilever beam with a fiber-reinforced piezoelectric actuator and strain gage sensors. The beam is modeled using a finite element method based on third-order shear deformation theory. The experiment considers vibration control under periodic excitation and an initial static deflection. A control algorithm was implemented on a PIC32MX440F256H microcontroller. Experimental results corresponding to the proposed PID controller are compared with corresponding results using proportional (P) control, proportional-integral (PI) control and proportional-derivative (PD) control. Experimental results indicate that the proposed PID controller provides 8.93% more damping compared to a PD controller, 14.41% more damping compared to a PI controller and 19.04% more damping compared to a P controller in the case of vibration under periodic excitation. In the case of free vibration control, the proposed PID controller shows better performance (settling time 1.2 s) compared to the PD controller (settling time 1.5 s) and PI controller (settling time 2.5 s).

  11. Measurement of polyphenol oxidase activity using optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy-based immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namsoo; Kim, Woo-Yeon

    2015-02-15

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is an important quality index during food processing involving heat-treatment and sensitive determination of PPO activity has been a critical concern in the food industry. In this study, a new measurement of PPO activity exploiting an optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy-based immunosensor is presented using a polyclonal anti-PPO antibody that was immobilized in situ to the surface of a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane-treated optical grating coupler activated with glutaraldehyde. When analysed with a purified PPO fraction from potato tubers, a linear relationship was found between PPO activities of 0.0005607-560.7U/mL and the sensor responses obtained. The sensor was applicable to measurement of PPO activity in real samples that were prepared from potato tubers, grapes and Kimchi cabbage, and the analytical results were compared with those obtained by a conventional colorimetric assay measuring PPO activity. When tested for long-term stability, the sensor was reusable up to 10th day after preparation. PMID:25236218

  12. Improvement of chaperone activity of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin using electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Hyun; An, Byung Chull; Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Jae Taek; Cho, Jae-Hyun; Jung, Hyun Suk; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2012-08-01

    The peroxiredoxin protein expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaPrx) is a typical 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin that has dual functions as both a thioredoxin-dependent peroxidase and molecular chaperone. As the function of PaPrx is regulated by its structural status, in the present study, we examined the effects of electron beam radiation on the structural modifications of PaPrx, as well as changes to PaPrx peroxidase and chaperone functions. It was found that the chaperone activity of PaPrx was increased approximately 3- to 4-fold at 2 kGy when compared to non-irradiated PaPrx, while its peroxidase activity decreased. This corresponded to a shift from the low molecular weight PaPrx species that acts as a peroxidase to the high molecular weight complex that functions as a chaperone, as detected using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We also investigated the influence of the electron beam on physical protein properties such as hydrophobicity and secondary structure. The exposure of the PaPrx hydrophobic domains in response to irradiation reached a peak at 2 kGy and then decreased in a dose-dependent manner at higher doses. In addition, the exposure of β-sheet and random coil elements on the surface of PaPrx was significantly increased following irradiation with an electron beam, whereas exposure of α-helix and turn elements was decreased. These results suggest that irradiated PaPrx may be a potential candidate for use in bio-engineering systems and various industrial applications, due to its enhanced chaperone activity.

  13. Hetgs Spectroscopy of the Long-Period Active Binary, im Pegasi.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David

    2001-09-01

    RS CVn binary systems are well known for their activity, interpreted as large-scale versions of Solar phenomena: spots, prominences, coronae, all with dynamic behavior. Stellar X-ray luminosity is well known to correlate with rotation and RS CVn stars are among the most luminous of late-type sources; they are prime candidates for X-ray spectroscopy. IM Peg is a long-period system (25d), and relatively X-ray luminous. We propose to obtain 8 HETGS spectra sampled several times during 2-3 rotations. Each exposure will well expose strong lines and also provide an integrated flux. Summed spectra will be used for deriviation of emission measure and abundances. Both long and short-term variability will be examined and correlated with activity diagnostics.

  14. DFT calculations, spectroscopy and antioxidant activity studies on (E)-2-nitro-4-[(phenylimino)methyl]phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Ersin; Alaşalvar, Can; Gökçe, Halil; Güder, Aytaç; Albayrak, Çiğdem; Alpaslan, Yelda Bingöl; Alpaslan, Gökhan; Dilek, Nefise

    2015-02-01

    We have reported synthesis and characterization of (E)-2-nitro-4-[(phenylimino)methyl]phenol by using X-ray crystallographic method, FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopies and density functional theory (DFT). Optimized geometry and vibrational frequencies of the title compound in the ground state have been computed by using B3LYP with the 6-311G+(d,p) basis set. HOMO-LUMO energy gap, Non-linear optical properties and NBO analysis of the compound are performed at B3LYP/6-311G+(d,p) level. Additionally, as remarkable properties, antioxidant activity of the title compound (CMPD) has been determined by using different antioxidant test methods i.e. ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), hydrogen peroxide scavenging (HPSA), free radical scavenging (FRSA) and ferrous ion chelating activities (FICA). When compared with standards (BHA, BHT, and α-tocopherol), we have concluded that CPMD has effective FRAP, HPSA, FRSA and FICA.

  15. Aromatic C-H bond activation revealed by infrared multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jašíková, Lucie; Hanikýřová, Eva; Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, Jana

    2012-04-01

    Metal-oxide cations are models of catalyst mediating the C-H bond activation of organic substrates. One of the most powerful reagents suggested in the gas phase is based on CuO(+) . Here, we describe the activation of the aromatic C-H bonds of phenanthroline in its complex with CuO(+) . The reaction sequence starts with a hydrogen atom abstraction by the oxygen atom from the 2-position of the phenanthroline ring, followed by OH migration to the ring. Using infrared multiphoton spectroscopy, it is shown that the reaction can be energetically facilitated by additional coordination of a water ligand to the copper ion. As the reaction is intramolecular, a spectroscopic characterization of the product is mandatory in order to unambiguously address the reaction mechanism. PMID:22689621

  16. Active-passive correlation spectroscopy - A new technique for identifying ocean color algorithm spectral regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    A new active-passive airborne data correlation technique has been developed which allows the validation of existing in-water oceoan color algorithms and the rapid search, identification, and evaluation of new sensor band locations and algorithm wavelength intervals. Thus far, applied only in conjunction with the spectral curvature algorithm (SCA), the active-passive correlation spectroscopy (APCS) technique shows that (1) the usual 490-nm (center-band) chlorophyll SCA could satisfactorily be placed anywhere within the nominal 460-510-nm interval, and (2) two other spectral regions, 645-660 and 680-695 nm, show considerable promise for chlorophyll pigment measurement. Additionally, the APCS method reveals potentially useful wavelength regions (at 600 and about 670 nm) of very low chlorophyll-in-water spectral curvature into which accessory pigment algorithms for phycoerythrin might be carefully positioned. In combination, the APCS and SCA methods strongly suggest that significant information content resides within the seemingly featureless ocean color spectrum.

  17. Infrared spectroscopy as a rapid tool to detect methylglyoxal and antibacterial activity in Australian honeys.

    PubMed

    Sultanbawa, Yasmina; Cozzolino, Daniel; Fuller, Steve; Cusack, Andrew; Currie, Margaret; Smyth, Heather

    2015-04-01

    Methylglyoxal (2-oxopropanal) is a compound known to contribute to the non-peroxide antimicrobial activity of honeys. The feasibility of using infrared spectroscopy as a predictive tool for honey antibacterial activity and methylglyoxal content was assessed. A linear relationship was found between methylglyoxal content (279-1755 mg/kg) in Leptospermum polygalifolium honeys and bacterial inhibition for Escherichiacoli (R(2) = 0.80) and Staphylococcusaureus (R(2) = 0.64). A good prediction of methylglyoxal (R(2) 0.75) content in honey was achieved using spectroscopic data from the mid infrared (MIR) range in combination with partial least squares regression. These results indicate that robust predictive equations could be developed using MIR for commercial application where the prediction of bacterial inhibition is needed to 'value' honeys with methylglyoxal contents in excess of 200mg/kg. PMID:25442544

  18. How to produce high specific activity tin-117m using alpha particle beam.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, C; Essayan, M; Guertin, A; Haddad, F; Michel, N; Métivier, V

    2016-09-01

    Tin-117m is an interesting radionuclide for both diagnosis and therapy, thanks to the gamma-ray and electron emissions, respectively, resulting from its decay to tin-117g. The high specific activity of tin-117m is required in many medical applications, and it can be obtained using a high energy alpha particle beam and a cadmium target. The experiments performed at the ARRONAX cyclotron (Nantes, France) using an alpha particle beam delivered at 67.4MeV provide a measurement of the excitation function of the Cd-nat(α,x)Sn-117m reaction and the produced contaminants. The Cd-116(α,3n)Sn-117m production cross section has been deduced from these experimental results using natural cadmium. Both production yield and specific activity as a function of the projectile energy have been calculated. These informations help to optimize the irradiation conditions to produce tin-117m with the required specific activity using α particles with a cadmium target. PMID:27344526

  19. Towards using a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for in vivo beam monitoring of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, R. F.; Abbott, N. L.; Davies, J.; Dyke, E. L.; Randles, H. J.; Velthuis, J. J.; Fletcher, S.; Gregory, S. D.; Hall, C.; John, A.; Lawrence, H.; Stevens, P. H.; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Tunbridge, V.

    2013-12-01

    The use of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for cancer treatments is entering wider use. These treatments involve using a complex configuration of field modifying components, known as Multileaf Collimators (MLC), to dynamically shape the beam. A treatment consists of a sequence of irregular shaped fields, which means real time monitoring and verification is essential. In the current framework the treatment plans are verified before the patient is treated, but not during. The aim of our collaboration is to monitor the treatment being given to the patient. This is achieved by placing a camera system using an ultra-thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) upstream of the patient.

  20. Active Microwave Pulse Compressor Using an Electron-Beam Triggered Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, O. A.; Lobaev, M. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Isaev, V. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Gold, S. H.; Kinkead, A. K.

    2013-03-01

    A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that operates by modulating the quality factor of an energy storage cavity by means of mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge across a switch cavity. This Letter describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch cavity, the configuration used for the tests, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140-165 MW peak power, record peak power gains of 16∶1-20∶1, and FWHM pulse duration of 16-20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz.

  1. Active microwave pulse compressor using an electron-beam triggered switch.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, O A; Lobaev, M A; Vikharev, A L; Gorbachev, A M; Isaev, V A; Hirshfield, J L; Gold, S H; Kinkead, A K

    2013-03-15

    A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that operates by modulating the quality factor of an energy storage cavity by means of mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge across a switch cavity. This Letter describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch cavity, the configuration used for the tests, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140-165 MW peak power, record peak power gains of 16∶1-20∶1, and FWHM pulse duration of 16-20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz. PMID:25166547

  2. Analysis of Chuanxiong Rhizoma and its active components by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy combined with two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yizhen; Lv, Beiran; Wang, Jingjuan; Liu, Yang; Sun, Suqin; Xiao, Yao; Lu, Lina; Xiang, Li; Yang, Yanfang; Qu, Lei; Meng, Qinghong

    2016-01-01

    As complicated mixture systems, active components of Chuanxiong Rhizoma are very difficult to identify and discriminate. In this paper, the macroscopic IR fingerprint method including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), the second derivative infrared spectroscopy (SD-IR) and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2DCOS-IR), was applied to study and identify Chuanxiong raw materials and its different segmented production of HPD-100 macroporous resin. Chuanxiong Rhizoma is rich in sucrose. In the FT-IR spectra, water eluate is more similar to sucrose than the powder and the decoction. Their second derivative spectra amplified the differences and revealed the potentially characteristic IR absorption bands and combined with the correlation coefficient, concluding that 50% ethanol eluate had more ligustilide than other eluates. Finally, it can be found from 2DCOS-IR spectra that proteins were extracted by ethanol from Chuanxiong decoction by HPD-100 macroporous resin. It was demonstrated that the above three-step infrared spectroscopy could be applicable for quick, non-destructive and effective analysis and identification of very complicated and similar mixture systems of traditional Chinese medicines.

  3. Spectroscopy of strongly correlated systems: Resonant x-ray scattering without energy resolution in the scattered beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braicovich, L.; Tagliaferri, A.; Annese, E.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Dallera, C.; Fracassi, F.; Palenzona, A.; Brookes, N. B.

    2007-02-01

    The total emission of photons excited by x rays (90° between incident and detected photons) is measured vs the incident photon energy at the CeM4,5 edges in CeIn3 , CeSnIn2 , CeAl2 , CePd3 , and CeRh2 , and at the NiL2,3 edges in NiO. The results show the signature of a second-order process; these experiments must be interpreted as genuine resonant inelastic scattering (though without energy resolution of the emitted photons) and not as absorption spectroscopy measured by the total fluorescence yield. In Ce compounds, information on bulk hybridization can thus be obtained simply and with high sensitivity. The branching ratio between the different scattering channels is also measured. This approach opens innovative perspectives in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

  4. Diagnostics of reactive pulsed plasmas by UV and VUV absorption spectroscopy and by modulated beam Mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, Gilles

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed plasmas are promising for etching applications in the microelectronic industry. However, many new phenomena are involved when a high density discharge is pulsed. To better understand these processes it is necessary to probe the radicals' kinetics with a microsecond resolution. We have developed several diagnostics to reach this goal including broad band absorption spectroscopy with UV LEDs to detect small polyatomic radicals and with a deuterium VUV source to detect larger closed shell molecules and the modulated mass spectrometry to monitor atomic species. We will discuss the impact of the plasma pulsing frequency and duty cycle on the radical densities in Cl2 based plasmas, and the consequences on plasma processes. Work done in collaboration with Paul Bodart, Melisa Brihoum, Maxime Darnon, Erwin Pargon, Olivier Joubert, and Nader Sadeghi, CNRS/LTM.

  5. Cross-Section Measurements for (n,xn) Reactions by In-Beam Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlik, A.; Baumann, P.; Borcea, C.; Jericha, E.; Jokić, S.; Kerveno, M.; Lukić, S.; Meulders, J. P.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Nolte, R.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Raškinytė, I.; N Tof Collaboration

    2005-05-01

    The nuclear reactions 207Pb(n,2n)206Pb and 232Th(n,5n)228Th were studied by measuring prompt gamma-ray emission spectra from the interaction of neutrons with an enriched 207Pb sample and a natTh sample. For 207Pb the measurements were performed at the white neutron beam of the GELINA neutron source at IRMM Geel in the neutron energy range up to 20 MeV. The Th measurements were done at the quasi-monoenergetic 7Li(p,n)7Be neutron source at the Université Catholique de Louvain for five peak neutron energies in the range 29 MeV to 42 MeV. The measurements were complemented by model calculations using the code system EMPIRE-II.

  6. Study of heavy element structure with in-beam. cap alpha. /sup -/,. beta. /sup -/ and. gamma. -ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.; Decman, D.J.; Henry, E.A.; Hoff, R.W.; Mann, L.G.; Struble, G.L.; Ussery, L.E.

    1984-05-10

    We describe our in-beam superconducting conversion electron spectrometer and its use in a (t,p) proton-conversion electron coincidence mode. Several examples of completed and on-going investigations are presented. These include: E0 strength from the /sup 238/U fission isomer; electromagnetic properties of the J/sup ..pi../ = 6/sup +/ and 8/sup +/ states of /sup 210/Pb; single particle and cluster states of /sup 213/Fr; the J/sup ..pi../ = 21/2/sup +/ isomer in /sup 197/Au and /sup 199/Au; and the cluster states of /sup 199/Au. Results of the study of odd-odd deformed /sup 244/Am are presented. The latter results performed using neutron-capture gamma-ray and conversion electron techniques are compared to recent developments in the modeling of deformed odd-odd nuclei. 23 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Excited state spectroscopy of para di-substituted benzenes in a supersonic beam using resonant two photon ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tembreull, R.; Dunn, T. M.; Lubman, D. M.

    Excited state vibronic spectra of p-aminophenol, p-cresol, p-fluoroaniline, p-fluorophenol, hydroquinone and p-toluidine have been obtained using resonant two photon ionization supersonic beam mass spectrometry. Despite marked similarities in the spectra, notable differences exist and different para polyatomic substituents in the same molecule show vibronic evidence of their real molecular symmetry of C2ν. Expansion of the ring is also noted upon excitation in all cases. Further, it is now evident that the assignment of some vibronic bands historically interpreted as sequence structure must be reconsidered since molecules like hydroquinone are mixtures of cis and trans and others have a vibronic structure arising from the polyatomic nature of the substituents ( cƒ. CH 3).

  8. Cross-Section Measurements for (n,xn) Reactions by In-Beam Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlik, A.; Baumann, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Borcea, C.; Mihailescu, L.C.; Jericha, E.; Raskinyte, I.; Jokic, S.; Lukic, S.; Meulders, J.P.; Nolte, R.; Plompen, A.J.M.

    2005-05-24

    The nuclear reactions 207Pb(n,2n)206Pb and 232Th(n,5n)228Th were studied by measuring prompt gamma-ray emission spectra from the interaction of neutrons with an enriched 207Pb sample and a natTh sample. For 207Pb the measurements were performed at the white neutron beam of the GELINA neutron source at IRMM Geel in the neutron energy range up to 20 MeV. The Th measurements were done at the quasi-monoenergetic 7Li(p,n)7Be neutron source at the Universite Catholique de Louvain for five peak neutron energies in the range 29 MeV to 42 MeV. The measurements were complemented by model calculations using the code system EMPIRE-II.

  9. 100-MeV proton beam intensity measurement by Au activation analysis using 197Au(p, pn)196Au and 197Au(p, p3n)194Au reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari Oranj, Leila; Jung, Nam-Suk; Oh, Joo-Hee; Lee, Hee-Seock

    2016-05-01

    The proton beam intensity of a 100-MeV proton linac at the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) was measured by an Au activation analysis using 197Au(p, pn)196Au and 197Au(p, p3n)194Au reactions to determine the accuracy and precision of beam intensity measurement using Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The target, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, was arranged in a stack consisting of Au, Al foils and Pb plates. The yields of produced radio-nuclei in Au foils were obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The FLUKA code was employed to calculate the energy spectrum of protons onto the front surface of Au foils located at three different depth points of the target and also to investigate the condition of incident beam on the target. A good agreement was found between the beam intensity measurements using the activation analysis method at three different depth points of the target. An excellent agreement was also observed between the beam intensity measurements using the Au activation analysis method and the dosimetry method using Gafchromic film.

  10. Effects of Mandibular Retrusive Deviation on Prefrontal Cortex Activation: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Takero; Yamasaki, Ryuichi; Shimazaki, Tateshi; Sasaguri, Kenichi; Kawata, Toshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate occlusal condition by assessing brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, which is associated with emotion. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to detect changes in cerebral blood flow in the prefrontal cortex of 12 healthy volunteers. The malocclusion model was a custom-made splint that forced the mandible into retrusion. A splint with no modification was used as a control. The cortical activation during clenching was compared between the retrusive position condition and the control condition. A visual analog scale score for discomfort was also obtained during clenching and used to evaluate the interaction between fNIRS data and psychiatric changes. Activation of the prefrontal cortex was significantly greater during clenching in the mandibular retrusive condition than during clenching in the control condition. Furthermore, Spearman rank-correlation coefficient revealed a parallel relation between prefrontal cortex activation and visual analog scale score for discomfort. These results indicate that fNIRS can be used to objectively evaluate the occlusal condition by evaluating activity in the prefrontal cortex. PMID:26075235

  11. Electron beam/γ-ray irradiation synthesis of gold nanoparticles and investigation of antioxidant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duy Nguyen, Ngoc; Phu Dang, Van; Le, Anh Quoc; Hien Nguyen, Quoc

    2014-12-01

    Colloidal solutions of 1 mM gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized by γ-ray Co-60 and electron beam irradiation using 1% water soluble chitosan (WSC) with different molecular weight (Mw) as stabilizer. The AuNPs size measured from TEM images was of 7.1 and 15.1 nm for electron beam and γ-ray Co-60, respectively. The AuNPs sizes of 9.8, 15.1 and 22.4 nm stabilized by different WSC Mw of 155 × 103, 78 × 103 and 29 × 103 g mol-1, respectively, were also synthesized by γ-ray Co-60 irradiation. Antioxidant activity of AuNPs with different size from 7.1 to 20.0 nm was investigated using free radical 2,2‧-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS•+). Results indicated that the smaller size of AuNPs exhibited higher antioxidant activity. In particular, the antioxidant efficiency was of nearly 100, 75, 65, 52 and 30% for 7.1, 9.8, 15.1, 20.0 nm AuNPs and WSC 0.1%, respectively, at the same reaction time of 270 min. Thus, due to the compatibility of WSC and the unique property of AuNPs, the pure colloidal AuNPs/WSC solutions synthesized by irradiation method can be potentially applied in biomedicine, cosmetics and in other fields as well.

  12. Semi-active control of a sandwich beam partially filled with magnetorheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej; Bajkowski, Jacek M.; Bajer, Czesław I.

    2015-08-01

    The paper deals with the semi-active control of vibrations of structural elements. Elastomer composites with ferromagnetic particles that act as magnetorheological fluids are used. The damping coefficient and the shear modulus of the elastomer increases when it is exposed to an electro-magnetic field. The control of this process in time allows us to reduce vibrations more effectively than if the elastomer is permanently exposed to a magnetic field. First the analytical solution for the vibrations of a sandwich beam filled with an elastomer is given. Then the control problem is defined and applied to the analytical formula. The numerical solution of the minimization problem results in a periodic, perfectly rectangular control function if free vibrations are considered. Such a temporarily acting magnetic field is more efficient than a constantly acting one. The surplus reaches 20-50% or more, depending on the filling ratio of the elastomer. The resulting control was verified experimentally in the vibrations of a cantilever sandwich beam. The proposed semi-active control can be directly applied to engineering vibrating structural elements, for example helicopter rotors, aircraft wings, pads under machines, and vehicles.

  13. Effects of Cycling Conditions of Active Material From Discharged Ni Positive Plates Studied by Inelastic Neutron Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, Juergen; Varma, Ravi; Diebolt, Lisa; Reid, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this presentation are: identify atomic-level signatures of electrochemical activity of the active material on the Ni positive plates of Ni-H2 batteries, relate finding to cycling conditions and histories, and develop INS spectroscopy as a non-destructive testing technique for the evaluation of Ni-positive plates of Ni-H2 batteries.

  14. Investigations of electron helicity in optically active molecules using polarized beams of electrons and positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gidley, D. W.; Rich, A.; Van House, J. C.; Zitzewitz, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    A positronium-formation experiment with a high sensitivity to a possible relation between the helicity of beta particles emitted in nuclear beta decay and the optical asymmetry of biological molecules is presented. The experiment is based on a mechanism in which the electrons in optically active molecules possess a helicity of less than 0.001, too weak to detect in radiolysis experiments, the sign of which depends on the chirality of the isomer. A helicity-dependent asymmetry is sought in the formation of the triplet ground state of positronium when a low-energy beam of polarized positrons of reversible helicity interacts with an optically active substance coating a channel electron multiplier. Asymmetries between positronium decays observed at positive and negative helicities for the same substance can thus be determined with a sensitivity of 0.0001, which represents a factor of 100 improvement over previous positronium experiments.

  15. Force Spectroscopy of Substrate Molecules En Route to the Proteasome's Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Classen, Mirjam; Breuer, Sarah; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Guckenberger, Reinhard; Witt, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    We used an atomic force microscope to study the mechanism underlying the translocation of substrate molecules inside the proteasome. Our specific experimental setup allowed us to measure interaction forces between the 20S proteasome and its substrates. The substrate (β-casein) was covalently bound either via a thiol-Au bond or by a PEG-based binding procedure to the atomic force microscope cantilever tip and offered as bait to proteasomes from Methanosarcina mazei. The proteasomes were immobilized densely in an upright orientation on mica, which made their upper pores accessible for substrates to enter. Besides performing conventional single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments, we developed a three-step procedure that allows the detection of specific proteasome-substrate single-molecule events without tip-sample contact. Using the active 20S wild type and an inactive active-site mutant, as well as two casein mutants bound with opposite termini to the microscope tip, we detected no directional preference of the proteasome-substrate interactions. By comparing the distribution of the measured forces for the proteasome-substrate interactions, were observed that a significant proportion of interaction events occurred at higher forces for the active versus the inactive proteasome. These forces can be attributed to the translocation of substrate en route to the active sites that are harbored deep inside the proteasome. PMID:21244845

  16. Active versus passive listening to auditory streaming stimuli: a near-infrared spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remijn, Gerard B.; Kojima, Haruyuki

    2010-05-01

    We use near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to assess listeners' cortical responses to a 10-s series of pure tones separated in frequency. Listeners are instructed to either judge the rhythm of these ``streaming'' stimuli (active-response listening) or to listen to the stimuli passively. Experiment 1 shows that active-response listening causes increases in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) in response to all stimuli, generally over the (pre)motor cortices. The oxy-Hb increases are significantly larger over the right hemisphere than over the left for the final 5 s of the stimulus. Hemodynamic levels do not vary with changes in the frequency separation between the tones and corresponding changes in perceived rhythm (``gallop,'' ``streaming,'' or ``ambiguous''). Experiment 2 shows that hemodynamic levels are strongly influenced by listening mode. For the majority of time windows, active-response listening causes significantly larger oxy-Hb increases than passive listening, significantly over the left hemisphere during the stimulus and over both hemispheres after the stimulus. This difference cannot be attributed to physical motor activity and preparation related to button pressing after stimulus end, because this is required in both listening modes.

  17. Measurement of Brain Activation During an Upright Stepping Reaction Task Using Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Theodore; Schmidt, Benjamin; Beluk, Nancy; Furman, Joseph; Sparto, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive brain imaging technology that uses light to measure changes in cortical hemoglobin concentrations. FNIRS measurements are recorded through fiber optic cables, which allow the participant to wear the fNIRS sensors while standing upright. Thus, fNIRS technology is well suited to study cortical brain activity during upright balance, stepping, and gait tasks. In this study, fNIRS was used to measure changes in brain activation from the frontal, motor, and premotor brain regions during an upright step task that required subjects to step laterally in response to visual cues that required executive function control. We hypothesized that cognitive processing during complex stepping cues would elicit brain activation of the frontal cortex in areas involved in cognition. Our results show increased prefrontal activation associated with the processing of the stepping cues. Moreover, these results demonstrate the potential to use fNIRS to investigate cognitive processing during cognitively demanding balance and gait studies. Hum Brain Mapp 34:2817–2828, 2013. VC 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23161494

  18. Electron Beam Damage in Poly(Vinyl Chloride) and Poly(Acrylonitrile) as Observed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, Alan S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.

    2003-03-07

    AES spectra of spun-cast films of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) were collected over a period of time to determine specimen damage during exposure to a 10kV electron beam. For the PVC, loss of chlorine was observed over a period of 203 minutes to the extent that the final chlorine concentration was only 20% of its original value. PAN exhibited a loss in nitrogen content over a period of 120 minutes, but the rate of damage to the polymer was significantly less than PVC. Figure 1 shows the atomic concentration in the PVC film as a function of dose (time). It takes a dose of approximately 7.0x10-5 Ccm-5 for the chlorine concentration to fall from its original value by 10% (one definition of critical dose). Figure 2 shows a similar drop in nitrogen concentration in the PAN film as a function of dose. For this polymer, it takes a dose of 1.3x10-3 Ccm-2 for the nitrogen concentration to fall by 10%.

  19. EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF Fe VI-Fe XV AND ITS DIAGNOSTIC APPLICATION FOR ELECTRON BEAM ION TRAP PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, G. Y.; Baumann, T. M.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Epp, S. W.; Tawara, H.; Gonchar, A.; Mokler, P. H.; Ullrich, J.; Zhao, G. E-mail: gyliang@bao.ac.cn

    2009-05-10

    Extreme-ultraviolet spectra of intermediately ionized iron ions (Fe VI-Fe XIV) in the wavelength range of 125.0-265.0 A have been measured at the Heidelberg electron beam ion trap. Emission spectra were recorded sequentially while varying the electron energy over the range of 75-544 eV in steps of 5 eV. The observed spectra clearly show the evolution of each ionic stage as a function of the electron energy, allowing to distinguish the emission lines from neighboring ion charge species and helping to disentangle possible line blends. The collisional-radiative modeling satisfactorily reproduces the measurement. A comparison with previous astrophysical observations (Sun) reveals that some weak emissions may originate from Fe VI and Fe VII, resulting in incorrect assignment of transition lines. The calculated polarization effects due to nonthermal (monoenergetic) electrons are found to be negligible for most of the emission lines at low-energy electron impact, except for a few lines whose polarization can be over 20%. By line ratio technique, the effective electron density in the trap was estimated to be 7.1{sup +2.4} {sub -3.0} x 10{sup 9}-3.4{sup +0.5} {sub -0.5} x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, slightly depending on the ion charge state.

  20. Active suppression of a beam under a moving mass using a pointwise fiber Bragg grating displacement sensing system.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kuo-Chih; Ma, Chien-Ching; Wu, Rong-Hua

    2012-10-01

    This paper investigates active vibration control of a beam under a moving mass using a pointwise fiber Bragg grating (FBG) displacement sensing system. Dynamic responses of the proposed FBG displacement sensor are demodulated with an FBG filter and verified with measurement results obtained from a noncontact fiber-optic displacement sensor. System identification of the beam is first performed with a piezoceramic actuator and positive position feedback (PPF) controllers are designed based on the identified results. Then, transient responses of the beam under a moving mass with different moving conditions are measured using the FBG displacement sensor. A high-speed camera is used to detect the speed of the moving mass for further discussions about its influence on the transient response. Finally, active vibration control of the beam under the moving mass is performed and fast Fourier transform (FFT) as well as short-time Fourier transform (STFT) are employed to demonstrate control performances. For the case in which a rolling steel ball is directed from a slide to the beam to generate the moving mass, reductions of the vibration up to 50% and 60% are achieved in the frequency domain for the first and second modes of the beam, respectively. Based on the control experiments on the smallscale beam, results in this work show that the proposed FBG displacement sensing system can be used in research on the moving mass problem. PMID:23143564

  1. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  2. X-ray spectroscopy of AGN with the AXAF 'Microcalorimeter'. [Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    A novel technique for X-ray spectroscopy has been configured as part of the definition payload of the AXAF Observatory. It is basically a calorimeter which, operating at 0.1 K, senses the total conversion of single photoelectrically absorbed X-rays via the differential temperature rise of the absorber. The technique promises to achieve less than 10 eV FWHM with near-unit efficiency simultaneously over the entire AXAF bandpass. This combination of high resolution and high efficiency allows for the possibility of investigating thermal, fluorescent and absorption X-ray line features in many types of X-ray source, including a large sample of active galactic nuclei.

  3. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics.

    PubMed

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J; Lu, H Peter

    2015-09-22

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  4. Antioxidant Activity of Some Types of White Wines and Juices Investigated by EPR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrisor, Dina; Damian, Grigore; Simon, Simion; Hosu, Anamaria; Miclaus, Vasile

    Two types of white wines with different places of provenience, and a few types of commercial and natural juices were chosen for preliminary studies of their antioxidant characteristics by using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Antioxidant capacity of these samples was assessed using stable free radicals such as nitroxide radical Tempol (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxypiperidine-oxyl), as a paramagnetic agent. The inhibition by antioxidants of the absorbance of the paramagnetic species was found to decrease in time with different rates, and was correlated to the antioxidant activity of the studied samples. The obtained results permit us to make a brief evaluation of the main antioxidative characteristics of the studied wines and juices samples.

  5. Characterizing Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Binding to Human Serum Albumin by Spin-Labeling and EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hauenschild, Till; Reichenwallner, Jörg; Enkelmann, Volker; Hinderberger, Dariush

    2016-08-26

    Drug binding to human serum albumin (HSA) has been characterized by a spin-labeling and continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectroscopic approach. Specifically, the contribution of functional groups (FGs) in a compound on its albumin-binding capabilities is quantitatively described. Molecules from different drug classes are labeled with EPR-active nitroxide radicals (spin-labeled pharmaceuticals (SLPs)) and in a screening approach CW-EPR spectroscopy is used to investigate HSA binding under physiological conditions and at varying ratios of SLP to protein. Spectral simulations of the CW-EPR spectra allow extraction of association constants (KA ) and the maximum number (n) of binding sites per protein. By comparison of data from 23 SLPs, the mechanisms of drug-protein association and the impact of chemical modifications at individual positions on drug uptake can be rationalized. Furthermore, new drug modifications with predictable protein binding tendency may be envisaged. PMID:27460503

  6. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  7. New Digital Control System for the JET Alfv'en Eigenmode Active Spectroscopy Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P. P.; Stillerman, J.; Porkolab, M.; Fasoli, A.; Testa, D.; Galvao, R.; Pires Dos Resis, A.; Pires de Sa, W.; Ruchko, L.; Blanchard, P.; Figueiredo, J.; Dorling, S.; Farthing, J.; Graham, M.; Dowson, S.; Yu, L.; Concezzi, S.

    2012-10-01

    The state-of-the-art JET Alfv'en active spectroscopy diagnostic with eight internal inductive antennas is being upgraded from a single 5 kW tube amplifier to eight parallel, 10 -- 1000 kHz, 4 kW solid state class D power switching amplifiers. A new digital control system has been designed with arbitrary constant phase controlled frequency sweeps for traveling mode studies, amplifier gain control through a feedback loop referenced to programmed antenna current profiles, and integration with CODAS for synchronization, triggering, gating, and fault tripping. A combination of National Instruments Real Time LabView software and FPGA circuits is used to achieve the multiple control requirements with better than 1 ms response. System specifications and digital-analog design trade offs for sweep rates, response times, frequency resolution, and voltage levels will be presented.

  8. Mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of an actively stabilized beam-column with circular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffner, Maximilian; Enss, Georg C.; Platz, Roland

    2014-04-01

    Buckling of axially loaded beam-columns represents a critical design constraint for light-weight structures. Besides passive solutions to increase the critical buckling load, active buckling control provides a possibility to stabilize slender elements in structures. So far, buckling control by active forces or bending moments has been mostly investigated for beam-columns with rectangular cross-section and with a preferred direction of buckling. The proposed approach investigates active buckling control of a beam-column with circular solid cross-section which is fixed at its base and pinned at its upper end. Three controlled active lateral forces are applied near the fixed base with angles of 120° to each other to stabilize the beam-column and allow higher critical axial loads. The beam-column is subject to supercritical static axial loads and lateral disturbance forces with varying directions and offsets. Two independent modal state space systems are derived for the bending planes in the lateral y- and z-directions of the circular cross-section. These are used to design two linear-quadratic regulators (LQR) that determine the necessary control forces which are transformed into the directions of the active lateral forces. The system behavior is simulated with a finite element model using one-dimensional beam elements with six degrees of freedom at each node. With the implemented control, it is possible to actively stabilize a beam-column with circular cross-section in arbitrary buckling direction for axial loads significantly above the critical axial buckling load.

  9. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy of Air Exposure Effects on Molecular Beam Epitaxy Grown WSe2 Monolayers and Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Hong; Vishwanath, Suresh; Liu, Xinyu; Zhou, Huawei; Eichfeld, Sarah M; Fullerton-Shirey, Susan K; Robinson, Joshua A; Feenstra, Randall M; Furdyna, Jacek; Jena, Debdeep; Xing, Huili Grace; Kummel, Andrew C

    2016-04-26

    The effect of air exposure on 2H-WSe2/HOPG is determined via scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). WSe2 was grown by molecular beam epitaxy on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and afterward, a Se adlayer was deposited in situ on WSe2/HOPG to prevent unintentional oxidation during transferring from the growth chamber to the STM chamber. After annealing at 773 K to remove the Se adlayer, STM images show that WSe2 layers nucleate at both step edges and terraces of the HOPG. Exposure to air for 1 week and 9 weeks caused air-induced adsorbates to be deposited on the WSe2 surface; however, the band gap of the terraces remained unaffected and nearly identical to those on decapped WSe2. The air-induced adsorbates can be removed by annealing at 523 K. In contrast to WSe2 terraces, air exposure caused the edges of the WSe2 to oxidize and form protrusions, resulting in a larger band gap in the scanning tunneling spectra compared to the terraces of air-exposed WSe2 monolayers. The preferential oxidation at the WSe2 edges compared to the terraces is likely the result of dangling edge bonds. In the absence of air exposure, the dangling edge bonds had a smaller band gap compared to the terraces and a shift of about 0.73 eV in the Fermi level toward the valence band. However, after air exposure, the band gap of the oxidized WSe2 edges became about 1.08 eV larger than that of the WSe2 terraces, resulting in the electronic passivation of the WSe2. PMID:26991824

  10. Measurement of Electrical Activation Energy in Black CVD Diamond Using Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Haitao; Williams, Oliver A.; Jackman, Richard B.

    Dc current-voltage (I-V) measurement, Hall measurement, Deep-level transient-spectroscopy (DLTS), and flatband capacitance measurement have been used to investigate electrical activation energies in diamond. However, the deviations still exist in the published activation energies obtained by these methods. In this paper, we report the first measurement of impedance on free-standing diamond films from 0.1Hz to 10MHz up to 300°C. A wide range of CVD materials have been investigated, but here we concentrate on `black' diamond grown by MWPECVD. The Cole-Cole (Z' via Z'') plots are well fitted to a RC parallel circuit model and the equivalent Resistance and Capacitance for the diamond films have been estimated using the Zview curve fitting. The results show only one single semicircle response at each temperature measured. It was found that the resistance decreases from 62 MΩ at room temperature to 4 KΩ at 300°C, with an activation energy around 0.15eV. The equivalent capacitance is maintained at the level of 102 pF up to 300°C suggesting that the diamond grain boundaries are dominating the conduction. At 400°C, the impedance at low frequencies shows a linear tail, which can be explained that the AC polarization of diamond/Au interface occurs.

  11. Brain activity during the flow experience: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazuki; Sawamura, Daisuke; Inagaki, Yuji; Ogawa, Keita; Ikoma, Katsunori; Sakai, Shinya

    2014-06-24

    Flow is the holistic experience felt when an individual acts with total involvement. Although flow is likely associated with many functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), such as attention, emotion, and reward processing, no study has directly investigated the activity of the PFC during flow. The objective of this study was to examine activity in the PFC during the flow state using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Twenty right-handed university students performed a video game task under conditions designed to induce psychological states of flow and boredom. During each task and when completing the flow state scale for occupational tasks, change in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) concentration in frontal brain regions was measured using fNIRS. During the flow condition, oxy-Hb concentration was significantly increased in the right and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. Oxy-Hb concentration tended to decrease in the boredom condition. There was a significant increase in oxy-Hb concentration in the right and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right and left frontal pole areas, and left ventrolateral PFC when participants were completing the flow state scale after performing the task in the flow condition. In conclusion, flow is associated with activity of the PFC, and may therefore be associated with functions such as cognition, emotion, maintenance of internal goals, and reward processing. PMID:24836375

  12. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of four active galaxies - Probing the intercloud medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Markert, Thomas H.; Arnaud, Keith A.

    1990-01-01

    The focal plane crystal spectrometer (FPCS) on the Einstein Observatory has been used to perform a high-resolution spectroscopic search for oxygen X-ray line emission from four active galaxies: Fairall 9, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and PKS 0548 - 322. Specifically, O VIII Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, whose unredshifted energies are 653 and 775 eV, respectively, were sought. No narrow-line emission was detected within the energy bands searched. Upper limits are calculated on the line flux from these sources of 30 eV equivalent width and use a photoionization model to place corresponding upper limits on the densities of diffuse gas surrounding the active nuclei. The upper limits on gas density range from about 0.02-50/cu cm and probe various radial distances from the central source. This is the first time high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has been used to place constraints on the intercloud medium in active galaxies.

  13. 100 s extraction of negative ion beams by using actively temperature-controlled plasma grid

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, A. Hanada, M.; Yoshida, M.; Tobari, H.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Watanabe, K.; Grisham, L. R.

    2014-02-15

    Long pulse beam extraction with a current density of 120 A/m{sup 2} for 100 s has been achieved with a newly developed plasma grid (PG) for the JT-60SA negative ion source which is designed to produce high power and long pulse beams with a negative ion current of 130 A/m{sup 2} (22 A) and a pulse length of 100 s. The PG temperature is regulated by fluorinated fluids in order to keep the high PG temperature for the cesium-seeded negative ion production. The time constant for temperature controllability of the PG was measured to be below 10 s, which was mainly determined by the heat transfer coefficient of the fluorinated fluid. The measured decay time of the negative ion current extracted from the actively temperature-controlled PG was 430 s which was sufficient for the JT-60SA requirement, and much longer than that by inertial-cooling PG of 60 s. Obtained results of the long pulse capability are utilized to design the full size PG for the JT-60SA negative ion source.

  14. Exposure and analysis of microparticles embedded in silica aerogel keystones using NF3-mediated electron beam-induced etching and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Aiden A.; Lin, Ting; Toth, Milos; Westphal, Andrew J.; Vicenzi, Edward P.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Silver, Eric H.

    2016-07-01

    In 2006, NASA's Stardust spacecraft delivered to Earth dust particles collected from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2, with the goal of furthering the understanding of solar system formation. Stardust cometary samples were collected in a low-density, nanoporous silica aerogel making their study technically challenging. This article demonstrates the identification, exposure, and elemental composition analysis of particles analogous to those collected by NASA's Stardust mission using in-situ SEM techniques. Backscattered electron imaging is shown by experimental observation and Monte Carlo simulation to be suitable for locating particles of a range of sizes relevant to Stardust (down to submicron diameters) embedded within silica aerogel. Selective removal of the silica aerogel encapsulating an embedded particle is performed by cryogenic NF3-mediated electron beam-induced etching. The porous, low-density nature of the aerogel results in an enhanced etch rate compared with solid material, making it an effective, nonmechanical method for the exposure of particles. After exposure, elemental composition of the particle was analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using a high spectral resolution microcalorimeter. Signals from fluorine contamination are shown to correspond to nonremoved silica aerogel and only in residual concentrations.

  15. A differential optical absorption spectroscopy method for retrieval from ground-based Fourier transform spectrometers measurements of the direct solar beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Yanfeng; Duan, Minzheng; Tian, Wenshou; Min, Qilong

    2015-08-01

    A differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS)-like algorithm is developed to retrieve the column-averaged dryair mole fraction of carbon dioxide from ground-based hyper-spectral measurements of the direct solar beam. Different to the spectral fitting method, which minimizes the difference between the observed and simulated spectra, the ratios of multiple channel-pairs—one weak and one strong absorption channel—are used to retrieve from measurements of the shortwave infrared (SWIR) band. Based on sensitivity tests, a super channel-pair is carefully selected to reduce the effects of solar lines, water vapor, air temperature, pressure, instrument noise, and frequency shift on retrieval errors. The new algorithm reduces computational cost and the retrievals are less sensitive to temperature and H2O uncertainty than the spectral fitting method. Multi-day Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) measurements under clear-sky conditions at two sites (Tsukuba and Bremen) are used to derive xxxx for the algorithm evaluation and validation. The DOAS-like results agree very well with those of the TCCON algorithm after correction of an airmass-dependent bias.

  16. Molecular-beam epitaxy of monolayer and bilayer WSe2: a scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy study and deduction of exciton binding energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. J.; Jiao, L.; Xie, L.; Yang, F.; Chen, J. L.; Ho, W. K.; Gao, C. L.; Jia, J. F.; Cui, X. D.; Xie, M. H.

    2015-09-01

    Interest in two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) has prompted some recent efforts to grow ultrathin layers of these materials epitaxially using molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). However, growths of monolayer (ML) and bilayer (BL) WSe2—an important member of the TMD family—by the MBE method remain uncharted, probably because of the difficulty in generating tungsten fluxes from the elemental source. In this work, we present a scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/S) study of MBE-grown WSe2 ML and BL, showing atomically flat epifilm with no domain boundary (DB) defect. This contrasts epitaxial MoSe2 films grown by the same method, where a dense network of the DB defects is present. The STS measurements of ML and BL WSe2 domains of the same sample reveal not only the bandgap narrowing upon increasing the film thickness from ML to BL, but also a band-bending effect across the boundary (step) between ML and BL domains. This band-bending appears to be dictated by the edge states at steps of the BL islands. Finally, comparison is made between the STS-measured electronic bandgaps with the exciton emission energies measured by photoluminescence, and the exciton binding energies in ML and BL WSe2 (and MoSe2) are thus estimated.

  17. Design of an ultrahigh vacuum transfer mechanism to interconnect an oxide molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber and an x-ray photoemission spectroscopy analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, M. M.; Zeng Zhaoquan; McNicholas, K. M.; Brillson, L. J.

    2013-06-15

    We designed a mechanism and the accompanying sample holders to transfer between a VEECO 930 oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and a PHI Versa Probe X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) chamber within a multiple station growth, processing, and analysis system through ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The mechanism consists of four parts: (1) a platen compatible with the MBE growth stage, (2) a platen compatible with the XPS analysis stage, (3) a sample coupon that is transferred between the two platens, and (4) the accompanying UHV transfer line. The mechanism offers a robust design that enables transfer back and forth between the growth chamber and the analysis chamber, and yet is flexible enough to allow transfer between standard sample holders for thin film growth and masked sample holders for making electrical contacts and Schottky junctions, all without breaking vacuum. We used this mechanism to transfer a barium strontium titanate thin film into the XPS analysis chamber and performed XPS measurements before and after exposing the sample to the air. After air exposure, a thin overlayer of carbon was found to form and a significant shift ({approx}1 eV) in the core level binding energies was observed.

  18. Raman spectroscopy characterization of actinide oxides (U 1-yPu y)O 2: Resistance to oxidation by the laser beam and examination of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jégou, C.; Caraballo, R.; Peuget, S.; Roudil, D.; Desgranges, L.; Magnin, M.

    2010-10-01

    Structural changes in four (U 1-yPu y)O 2 materials with very different plutonium concentrations (0 ⩽ y ⩽ 1) and damage levels (up to 110 dpa) were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The novel experimental approach developed for this purpose consisted in using a laser beam as a heat source to assess the reactivity and structural changes of these materials according to the power supplied locally by the laser. The experiments were carried out in air and in water with or without hydrogen peroxide. As expected, the material response to oxidation in air depends on the plutonium content of the test oxide. At the highest power levels U 3O 8 generally forms with UO 2 whereas no significant change in the spectra indicating oxidation is observed for samples with high plutonium content ( 239PuO 2). Samples containing 25 wt.% plutonium exhibit intermediate behavior, typified mainly by a higher-intensity 632 cm -1 peak and the disappearance of the 1LO peak at 575 cm -1. This can be attributed to the presence of anion sublattice defects without any formation of higher oxides. The range of materials examined also allowed us to distinguish partly the chemical effects of alpha self-irradiation. The results obtained with water and hydrogen peroxide (a water radiolysis product) on a severely damaged 238PuO 2 specimen highlight a specific behavior, observed for the first time.

  19. Exposure and analysis of microparticles embedded in silica aerogel keystones using NF3-mediated electron beam-induced etching and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Aiden A.; Lin, Ting; Toth, Milos; Westphal, Andrew J.; Vicenzi, Edward P.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Silver, Eric H.

    2016-04-01

    In 2006, NASA's Stardust spacecraft delivered to Earth dust particles collected from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2, with the goal of furthering the understanding of solar system formation. Stardust cometary samples were collected in a low-density, nanoporous silica aerogel making their study technically challenging. This article demonstrates the identification, exposure, and elemental composition analysis of particles analogous to those collected by NASA's Stardust mission using in-situ SEM techniques. Backscattered electron imaging is shown by experimental observation and Monte Carlo simulation to be suitable for locating particles of a range of sizes relevant to Stardust (down to submicron diameters) embedded within silica aerogel. Selective removal of the silica aerogel encapsulating an embedded particle is performed by cryogenic NF3-mediated electron beam-induced etching. The porous, low-density nature of the aerogel results in an enhanced etch rate compared with solid material, making it an effective, nonmechanical method for the exposure of particles. After exposure, elemental composition of the particle was analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using a high spectral resolution microcalorimeter. Signals from fluorine contamination are shown to correspond to nonremoved silica aerogel and only in residual concentrations.

  20. Three-dimensional analysis of optical forces generated by an active tractor beam using radial polarization.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Luis; Acebal, Pablo; Blaya, Salvador

    2014-02-10

    We theoretically study the three-dimensional behavior of nanoparticles in an active optical conveyor. To do this, we solved the Langevin equation when the forces are generated by a focusing system at the near field. Analytical expressions for the optical forces generated by the optical conveyor were obtained by solving the Richards and Wolf vectorial diffraction integrals in an approximated form when a mask of two annular pupils is illuminated by a radially polarized Hermite-Gauss beam. Trajectories, in both the transverse plane and the longitudinal direction, are analyzed showing that the behavior of the optical conveyor can be optimized by conveniently choosing the configuration of the mask of the two annular pupils (inner and outer radius of the two rings) in order to trap and transport all particles at the focal plane. PMID:24663619

  1. Design of active temperature compensated composite free-free beam MEMS resonators in a standard process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xereas, George; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.

    2014-03-01

    Frequency references are used in almost every modern electronic device including mobile phones, personal computers, and scientific and medical instrumentation. With modern consumer mobile devices imposing stringent requirements of low cost, low complexity, compact system integration and low power consumption, there has been significant interest to develop batch-manufactured MEMS resonators. An important challenge for MEMS resonators is to match the frequency and temperature stability of quartz resonators. We present 1MHz and 20MHz temperature compensated Free-Free beam MEMS resonators developed using PolyMUMPS, which is a commercial multi-user process available from MEMSCAP. We introduce a novel temperature compensation technique that enables high frequency stability over a wide temperature range. We used three strategies: passive compensation by using a structural gold (Au) layer on the resonator, active compensation through using a heater element, and a Free-Free beam design that minimizes the effects of thermal mismatch between the vibrating structure and the substrate. Detailed electro-mechanical simulations were performed to evaluate the frequency response and Quality Factor (Q). Specifically, for the 20MHz device, a Q of 10,000 was obtained for the passive compensated design. Finite Element Modeling (FEM) simulations were used to evaluate the Temperature Coefficient of frequency (TCf) of the resonators between -50°C and 125°C which yielded +0.638 ppm/°C for the active compensated, compared to -1.66 ppm/°C for the passively compensated design and -8.48 ppm/°C for uncompensated design for the 20MHz device. Electro-thermo-mechanical simulations showed that the heater element was capable of increasing the temperature of the resonators by approximately 53°C with an applied voltage of 10V and power consumption of 8.42 mW.

  2. Estimation of defect activation energy around pn interfaces of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells using impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakura, Hidenori; Itagaki, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Mutsumi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the defect activation energy around the pn interface of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS)-based solar cells using a simple electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. By applying AC and DC voltages to the solar cells, we observed an “inductive” element around the pn interface, which is ignored in conventional deep-level transient spectroscopy or admittance spectroscopy. A defect model is evaluated by proposing an equivalent circuit that includes a positive/negative constant phase element (CPE) to represent the area around the CdS/CIGS interface. By fitting the impedance data, the CPE index and CPE constant show a relationship with the defect activation energy or defect concentration. This result is significant because it may help reveal the defect properties of CIGS solar cells or any other semiconductor devices.

  3. Biological effects of passive versus active scanning proton beams on human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Daila S; Pecaut, Michael J; Mao, Xiao W; Wroe, Andrew J; Luo-Owen, Xian

    2015-02-01

    The goal was to characterize differences in cell response after exposure to active beam scanning (ABS) protons compared to a passive delivery system. Human lung epithelial (HLE) cells were evaluated at various locations along the proton depth dose profile. The dose delivered at the Bragg peak position was essentially identical (∼4 Gy) with the two techniques, but depth dose data showed that ABS resulted in lower doses at entry and more rapid drop-off after the peak. Average dose rates for the passive and ABS beams were 1.1 Gy/min and 5.1 Gy/min, respectively; instantaneous dose rates were 19.2 Gy/min and 2,300 Gy/min (to a 0.5 × 0.5 mm(2) voxel). Analysis of DNA synthesis was based on (3)H-TdR incorporation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was done to determine expression of genes related to p53 signaling and DNA damage; a total of 152 genes were assessed. Spectral karyotyping and analyses of the Golgi apparatus and cytokines produced by the HLE cells were also performed. At or near the Bragg peak position, ABS protons resulted in a greater decrease in DNA synthesis compared to passively delivered protons. Genes with >2-fold change (P < 0.05 vs. 0 Gy) after passive proton irradiation at one or more locations within the Bragg curve were BTG2, CDKN1A, IFNB1 and SIAH1. In contrast, many more genes had >2-fold difference with ABS protons: BRCA1, BRCA2, CDC25A, CDC25C, CCNB2, CDK1, DMC1, DNMT1, E2F1, EXO1, FEN1, GADD45A, GTSE1, IL-6, JUN, KRAS, MDM4, PRC1, PTTG1, RAD51, RPA1, TNF, WT1, XRCC2, XRCC3 and XRCC6BP1. Spectral karyotyping revealed numerous differences in chromosomal abnormalities between the two delivery systems, especially at or near the Bragg peak. Percentage of cells staining for the Golgi apparatus was low after exposure to passive and active proton beams. Studies such as this are needed to ensure patient safety and make modifications in ABS delivery, if necessary. PMID:24325134

  4. Applicability of light-emitting diodes as light sources for active differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Kern, Christoph; Trick, Sebastian; Rippel, Bernhard; Platt, Ulrich

    2006-03-20

    We present what is to our knowledge the first use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements of trace gases in the open atmosphere. Modern LEDs represent a potentially advantageous alternative to thermal light sources, in particular to xenon arc lamps, which are the most common active DOAS light sources. The radiative properties of a variety of LEDs were characterized, and parameters such as spectral shape, spectral range, spectral stability, and ways in which they can be influenced by environmental factors were analyzed. The spectra of several LEDs were found to contain Fabry-Perot etalon-induced spectral structures that interfered with the DOAS evaluation, in particular when a constant temperature was not maintained. It was shown that LEDs can be used successfully as light sources in active DOAS experiments that measure NO2 and NO3 near 450 and 630 nm, respectively. Average detection limits of 0.3 parts in 10(9) and 16 parts in 10(12) respectively, were obtained by use of a 6 km light path in the open atmosphere. PMID:16579579

  5. The Interaction between tRNALys3 and the Primer Activation Signal Deciphered by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brachet, Franck; Tisne, Carine

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of reverse transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires the opening of the three-dimensional structure of the primer tRNALys3 for its annealing to the viral RNA at the primer binding site (PBS). Despite the fact that the result of this rearrangement is thermodynamically more stable, there is a high-energy barrier that requires the chaperoning activity of the viral nucleocapsid protein. In addition to the nucleotide complementarity to the PBS, several regions of tRNALys3 have been described as interacting with the viral genomic RNA. Among these sequences, a sequence of the viral genome called PAS for “primer activation signal” was proposed to interact with the T-arm of tRNALys3, this interaction stimulating the initiation of reverse transcription. In this report, we investigate the formation of this additional interaction with NMR spectroscopy, using a simple system composed of the primer tRNALys3, the 18 nucleotides of the PBS, the PAS (8 nucleotides) encompassed or not in a hairpin structure, and the nucleocapsid protein. Our NMR study provides molecular evidence of the existence of this interaction and highlights the role of the nucleocapsid protein in promoting this additional RNA-RNA annealing. This study presents the first direct observation at a single base-pair resolution of the PAS/anti-PAS association, which has been proposed to be involved in the chronological regulation of the reverse transcription. PMID:23762248

  6. Reconsidering the activation entropy for anomerization of glucose and mannose in water studied by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Ami; Aida, Misako; Katsumoto, Yukiteru

    2015-08-01

    The anomerization of monosaccharides is a very important process to understand how their stereoisomers are stabilized in aqueous solutions. For glucose and mannose, it has been known that α- and β-anomers of hexopyranose exist as the major components. In order to examine the anomerization pathway for glucose and mannose in aqueous solutions, it is indispensable to determine the thermodynamic parameters such as the activation energy, the activation Gibbs free energy (ΔG‡), enthalpy (ΔH‡), and entropy (ΔS‡). Although several research groups reported these quantities in aqueous solution, they have still been controversial especially for ΔS‡. In this paper, we employ 1H NMR spectroscopy for monitoring the population of both α- and β-anomers of glucose and mannose. The contribution of ΔS‡ to ΔG‡ for glucose in water is estimated to be ca. 30%, while that for mannose is 8.0%. The large difference in ΔS‡ suggests that the anomerization pathway is not the same for glucose and mannose.

  7. A Study of the Effect of Preschool Children's Participation in Sensorimotor Activities on Their Understanding of the Mechanical Equilibrium of a Balance Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Anastasiou, Leonidas; Konsolas, Manos; Prevezanou, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether participation in sensorimotor activities by preschool children involving their own bodily balance while walking on a beam over the floor has an effect on their understanding of the mechanical equilibrium of a balance beam. The balance beam consisted of a horizontal stick balancing around its…

  8. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitive, intense-ion beam for active spectroscopic measurements on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Bartsch, R.R.; Barnes, C.W.

    1996-06-01

    The authors describe the design of an intense, pulsed, repetitive, neutral beam based on magnetically insulated diode technology for injection into ITER for spectroscopic measurements of thermalizing alpha particle and thermal helium density profiles, ion temperature, plasma rotation, and low Z impurity concentrations in the confinement region. The beam is being developed to enhance low signal-to-noise ratios expected with conventional steady-state ion beams because of severe beam attenuation and intense bremstrahlung emission. A 5 GW (e.g., 100 keV, 50 kA) one-microsecond-duration beam would increase the signal by 10{sup 3} compared to a conventional 5 MW beam with signal-to-noise ratios comparable to those from a chopped conventional beam in one second.

  9. Asymmetrical Brain Activity Induced by Voluntary Spatial Attention Depends on the Visual Hemifield: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harasawa, Masamitsu; Shioiri, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the visual hemifield to which spatial attention was oriented on the activities of the posterior parietal and occipital visual cortices was examined using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in order to investigate the neural substrates of voluntary visuospatial attention. Our brain imaging data support the theory put forth in a…

  10. Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy as an Optical Marker of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity and Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Eladio; Atkinson, Christopher; Jepeal, Lisa I.; Berg, Adam; Huang, Christopher S.; Cerda, Sandra R.; O’Brien, Michael J.; Bigio, Irving J.; Farraye, Francis A.; Singh, Satish K.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 10% to 15% of individuals, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is difficult to classify as ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD). Previous work has demonstrated that probe-based elastic scattering spectroscopy (ESS) can produce spectra, informed by parameters like tissue ultrastructure and hemoglobin content, capable of differentiating pathologies. This study investigates whether ESS is an in vivo optical biomarker for the presence, activity, and type of IBD in the colon. Methods Pilot study, a retrospective data analysis. ESS spectra of endoscopically normal and inflamed colon were obtained from 48 patients with IBD and 46 non-IBD controls. Measurements from patients with IBD were categorized as CD or UC based on clinical diagnosis. Spectra were analyzed using high-dimensional methods. Leave-one-patient-out cross-validation was used to obtain diagnostic performance estimates. Results Patients with IBD were distinguishable from non-IBD controls with a sensitivity of 0.93 and specificity of 0.91 based on readings from endoscopically normal mucosa, and 0.94 and 0.93 from inflamed mucosa. In patients with IBD, histologically normal and inflamed colon were distinguishable with per-class accuracies of 0.83 and 0.89, respectively; histologically normal from inactive inflammation with accuracies of 0.73 and 0.89, respectively; and inactive from active colitis with accuracies of 0.87 and 0.84, respectively. The diagnosis of CD versus UC was made with per-class accuracies of 0.92 and 0.87 in normal and 0.87 and 0.85 in inflamed mucosa, respectively. Conclusions ESS, a simple, low-cost clinically friendly optical biopsy modality, has the potential to enhance the endoscopic assessment of IBD and its activity in real time and may help to distinguish CD from UC. PMID:24798637

  11. Using near-infrared spectroscopy to assess neural activation during object processing in infants.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Teresa; Bortfeld, Heather; Woods, Rebecca; Wruck, Eric; Boas, David A

    2005-01-01

    The capacity to represent the world in terms of numerically distinct objects (i.e., object individuation) is a milestone in early cognitive development and forms the foundation for more complex thought and behavior. Over the past 10 to 15 yr, infant researchers have expended a great deal of effort to identify the origins and development of this capacity. In contrast, relatively little is known about the neural mechanisms that underlie the ability to individuate objects, in large part because there are a limited number of noninvasive techniques available to measure brain functioning in human infants. Recent research suggests that near-IR spectroscopy (NIRS), an optical imaging technique that uses relative changes in total hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation as an indicator of neural activation, may be a viable procedure for assessing the relation between object processing and brain function in human infants. We examine the extent to which increased neural activation, as measured by NIRS, could be observed in two neural areas known to be involved in object processing, the primary visual cortex and the inferior temporal cortex, during an object processing task. Infants aged 6.5 months are presented with a visual event in which two featurally distinct objects emerge successively to opposite sides of an occluder and neuroimaging data are collected. As predicted, increased neural activation is observed in both the primary visual and inferior cortex during the visual event, suggesting that these neural areas support object processing in the young infant. The outcome has important implications for research in cognitive development, developmental neuroscience, and optical imaging. PMID:15847576

  12. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  13. Countering beam divergence effects with focused segmented scintillators for high DQE megavoltage active matrix imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Langechuan; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Jiang, Hao

    2012-08-01

    The imaging performance of active matrix flat-panel imagers designed for megavoltage imaging (MV AMFPIs) is severely constrained by relatively low x-ray detection efficiency, which leads to a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of only ∼1%. Previous theoretical and empirical studies by our group have demonstrated the potential for addressing this constraint through the utilization of thick, two-dimensional, segmented scintillators with optically isolated crystals. However, this strategy is constrained by the degradation of high-frequency DQE resulting from spatial resolution loss at locations away from the central beam axis due to oblique incidence of radiation. To address this challenge, segmented scintillators constructed so that the crystals are individually focused toward the radiation source are proposed and theoretically investigated. The study was performed using Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport to examine the modulation transfer function and DQE of focused segmented scintillators with thicknesses ranging from 5 to 60 mm. The results demonstrate that, independent of scintillator thickness, the introduction of focusing largely restores spatial resolution and DQE performance otherwise lost in thick, unfocused segmented scintillators. For the case of a 60 mm thick BGO scintillator and at a location 20 cm off the central beam axis, use of focusing improves DQE by up to a factor of ∼130 at non-zero spatial frequencies. The results also indicate relatively robust tolerance of such scintillators to positional displacements, of up to 10 cm in the source-to-detector direction and 2 cm in the lateral direction, from their optimal focusing position, which could potentially enhance practical clinical use of focused segmented scintillators in MV AMFPIs.

  14. Room temperature GaN-GaAs direct bonding by argon-beam surface activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higurashi, Eiji; Tokuda, Yuichiro; Akaike, Masatake; Suga, Tadatomo

    2007-10-01

    A room temperature direct bonding using surface activation by argon (Ar)-beam sputtering was applied to the bonding between gallium nitride (GaN) and gallium arsenide (GaAs). The silicon doped n-type GaN films used in this experiment were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on (0001) sapphire substrates. The GaN film thickness is 3 μm with a surface roughness of approximately 0.22 nm (R a) as measured by atomic force microscopy. The silicon doped n-type GaAs (100) wafers with a surface roughness of approximately 0.34 nm (R a) were used as GaAs substrates. The GaN and GaAs samples were cleaned by sputtering with a 1.5 keV Ar-fast atom beam with 15 mA in the vacuum chamber (background pressure: 1.3×10 -5~4.0×10 -4 Pa). Then, the samples were brought into contact as quickly as possible with a load of 735 N at room temperature. After this process, GaN films were successfully bonded to GaAs substrates without any heat treatment. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy showed that most of the interface area was well bonded. The bonding strength was evaluated by die-shear tests. Although all samples were visibly separated from the interface rather than in the bulk region after die-shear tests, the estimated die-shear strength of GaN/GaAs structures was 1.5 -7 MPa. The advantage of our process is free from the various problems caused by the large thermal expansion mismatch during heat treatment in the conventional fusion bonding.

  15. Countering Beam Divergence Effects with Focused Segmented Scintillators for High DQE Megavoltage Active Matrix Imagers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Langechuan; Antonuk, Larry E; Zhao, Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Jiang, Hao

    2012-01-01

    The imaging performance of active matrix flat-panel imagers designed for megavoltage imaging (MV AMFPIs) is severely constrained by relatively low x-ray detection efficiency, which leads to a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of only ~1%. Previous theoretical and empirical studies by our group have demonstrated the potential for addressing this constraint through utilization of thick, two-dimensional, segmented scintillators with optically isolated crystals. However, this strategy is constrained by degradation of high-frequency DQE resulting from spatial resolution loss at locations away from the central beam axis due to oblique incidence of radiation. To address this challenge, segmented scintillators constructed so that the crystals are individually focused toward the radiation source are proposed and theoretically investigated. The study was performed using Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport to examine the modulation transfer function and DQE of focused segmented scintillators with thicknesses ranging from 5 to 60 mm. The results demonstrate that, independent of scintillator thickness, the introduction of focusing largely restores spatial resolution and DQE performance otherwise lost in thick, unfocused segmented scintillators. For the case of a 60 mm thick BGO scintillator and at a location 20 cm off the central beam axis, use of focusing improves DQE by up to a factor of ~130 at non-zero spatial frequencies. The results also indicate relatively robust tolerance of such scintillators to positional displacements, of up to 10 cm in the source-to-detector direction and 2 cm in the lateral direction, from their optimal focusing position, which could potentially enhance practical clinical use of focused segmented scintillators in MV AMFPIs. PMID:22854009

  16. A practical fan-beam design and reconstruction algorithm for Active and Passive Computed Tomography of radioactive waste barrels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tushar; More, M. R.; Ratheesh, Jilju; Sinha, Amar

    2015-09-01

    Active and Passive CT (A&PCT) of waste barrels is mostly carried out in parallel beam configuration due to its relative ease of implementation. This necessitates either using a single detector-source pair and translating the barrel or using multiple detector-source pairs for increasing the scanning speed. Additionally, because the use of bulky HPGe detectors may limit the number of detectors used in both active and passive modes, we propose to use 1″×1″ LaBr3(Ce) scintillators. This paper describes a practical fan-beam reconstruction for A&PCT imaging of waste barrels. A fan beam system model has been computed analytically and reconstruction done using MLEM algorithm. The results are compared with analytical reconstruction.

  17. Activation of Nanoscale Allosteric Protein Domain Motion Revealed by Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Farago, Bela; Li, Jianquan; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Callaway, David J.E.; Bu, Zimei

    2010-01-01

    NHERF1 is a multidomain scaffolding protein that assembles signaling complexes, and regulates the cell surface expression and endocytic recycling of a variety of membrane proteins. The ability of the two PDZ domains in NHERF1 to assemble protein complexes is allosterically modulated by the membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, whose binding site is located as far as 110 Ångstroms away from the PDZ domains. Here, using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, selective deuterium labeling, and theoretical analyses, we reveal the activation of interdomain motion in NHERF1 on nanometer length-scales and on submicrosecond timescales upon forming a complex with ezrin. We show that a much-simplified coarse-grained model suffices to describe interdomain motion of a multidomain protein or protein complex. We expect that future NSE experiments will benefit by exploiting our approach of selective deuteration to resolve the specific domain motions of interest from a plethora of global translational and rotational motions. Our results demonstrate that the dynamic propagation of allosteric signals to distal sites involves changes in long-range coupled domain motions on submicrosecond timescales, and that these coupled motions can be distinguished and characterized by NSE. PMID:21081097

  18. Neonatal hemodynamic response to visual cortex activity: high-density near-infrared spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Steve M.; Gregg, Nick M.; White, Brian R.; Zeff, Benjamin W.; Bjerkaas, Katelin A.; Inder, Terrie E.; Culver, Joseph P.

    2010-03-01

    The neurodevelopmental outcome of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants is a major clinical concern with many infants displaying neurobehavioral deficits in childhood. Functional neuroimaging may provide early recognition of neural deficits in high-risk infants. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has the advantage of providing functional neuroimaging in infants at the bedside. However, limitations in traditional NIRS have included contamination from superficial vascular dynamics in the scalp. Furthermore, controversy exists over the nature of normal vascular, responses in infants. To address these issues, we extend the use of novel high-density NIRS arrays with multiple source-detector distances and a superficial signal regression technique to infants. Evaluations of healthy term-born infants within the first three days of life are performed without sedation using a visual stimulus. We find that the regression technique significantly improves brain activation signal quality. Furthermore, in six out of eight infants, both oxy- and total hemoglobin increases while deoxyhemoglobin decreases, suggesting that, at term, the neurovascular coupling in the visual cortex is similar to that found in healthy adults. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using high-density NIRS arrays in infants to improve signal quality through superficial signal regression, and provide a foundation for further development of high-density NIRS as a clinical tool.

  19. Activity of the human visual cortex measured non-invasively by diffusing-wave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaillon, Franck; Li, Jun; Dietsche, Gregor; Elbert, Thomas; Gisler, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Activity of the human visual cortex, elicited by steady-state flickering at 8Hz, is non-invasively probed by multi-speckle diffusingwave spectroscopy (DWS). Parallel detection of the intensity fluctuations of statistically equivalent, but independent speckles allows to resolve stimulation-induced changes in the field autocorrelation of multiply scattered light of less than 2%. In a group of 9 healthy subjects we find a faster decay of the field autocorrelation function during the stimulation periods for data measured with a long-distance probe (30mm source-receiver distance) at 2 positions over the occipital cortex (t-test: t(8) = -2.672, p = 0.028 < 0.05 for position 1, t(8) = -2.874, p = 0.021 < 0.05 for position 2). In contrast, no statistically significant change is seen when a short-distance probe (16mm source-receiver distance) is used (t-test: t(8) = -2.043, p = 0.075 > 0.05 for position 1, t(8) = -2.146, p = 0.064 > 0.05 for position 2). The enhanced dynamics observed with DWS is positively correlated with the functional increase of blood volume in the visual cortex, while the heartbeat rate is not affected by stimulation. Our results indicate that the DWS signal from the visual cortex is governed by the regional cerebral blood flow velocity.

  20. Purposeful Co-Curricular Activities Designed to Increase Engagement: A Practice Brief Based on BEAMS Project Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazeur, Camille

    2008-01-01

    One of a series highlighting key practices undertaken by some of the many successful BEAMS (Building Engagement and Attainment for Minority Students) schools during the project's five years of data collection and action plan implementation, this practice brief demonstrates how emphasis on co-curricular activities can ultimately result in increased…

  1. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The negative ion of H is one of the simplest 3-body atomic systems. The techniques we have developed for experimental study of atoms moving near speed of light have been productive. This proposal request continuing support for experimental studies of the H{sup -} system, principally at the 800 MeV linear accelerator (LAMPF) at Los Alamos. Four experiments are currently planned: photodetachment of H{sup -} near threshold in electric field, interaction of relativistic H{sup -} ions with matter, high excitations and double charge escape in H{sup -}, and multiphoton detachment of electrons from H{sup -}.

  2. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Signals Measure Neuronal Activity in the Cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrivel, Angela; Hearn, Tristan

    2013-01-01

    Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging optical neuroimaging technology that indirectly measures neuronal activity in the cortex via neurovascular coupling. It quantifies hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) and thus measures the same hemodynamic response as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), but is portable, non-confining, relatively inexpensive, and is appropriate for long-duration monitoring and use at the bedside. Like fMRI, it is noninvasive and safe for repeated measurements. Patterns of [Hb] changes are used to classify cognitive state. Thus, fNIRS technology offers much potential for application in operational contexts. For instance, the use of fNIRS to detect the mental state of commercial aircraft operators in near real time could allow intelligent flight decks of the future to optimally support human performance in the interest of safety by responding to hazardous mental states of the operator. However, many opportunities remain for improving robustness and reliability. It is desirable to reduce the impact of motion and poor optical coupling of probes to the skin. Such artifacts degrade signal quality and thus cognitive state classification accuracy. Field application calls for further development of algorithms and filters for the automation of bad channel detection and dynamic artifact removal. This work introduces a novel adaptive filter method for automated real-time fNIRS signal quality detection and improvement. The output signal (after filtering) will have had contributions from motion and poor coupling reduced or removed, thus leaving a signal more indicative of changes due to hemodynamic brain activations of interest. Cognitive state classifications based on these signals reflect brain activity more reliably. The filter has been tested successfully with both synthetic and real human subject data, and requires no auxiliary measurement. This method could be implemented as a real-time filtering option or bad channel

  3. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF SDSS J0952+2552: A CONFIRMED DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, R. C.; Max, C. E.; Rosario, D. J.; Shields, G. A.; Smith, K. L.; Wright, S. A. E-mail: max@ucolick.org E-mail: shieldsga@mail.utexas.edu E-mail: saw@astro.berkeley.edu

    2011-09-01

    Most massive galaxies contain supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in their cores. When galaxies merge, gas is driven to nuclear regions and can accrete onto the central black hole. Thus, one expects to see dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a fraction of galaxy mergers. Candidates for galaxies containing dual AGNs have been identified by the presence of double-peaked narrow [O III] emission lines and by high spatial resolution images of close galaxy pairs. Spatially resolved spectroscopy is needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems with spatially separated double SMBHs. With the Keck 2 Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the OH Suppressing InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph near-infrared integral field spectrograph, we obtained spatially resolved spectra for SDSS J09527.62+255257.2, a radio-quiet quasar shown by previous imaging to consist of a galaxy and its close (1.''0) companion. We find that the main galaxy is a Type 1 AGN with both broad and narrow AGN emission lines in its spectrum, while the companion galaxy is a Type 2 AGN with narrow emission lines only. The two AGNs are separated by 4.8 kpc, and their redshifts correspond to those of the double peaks of the [O III] emission line seen in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum. Line diagnostics indicate that both components of the double emission lines are due to AGN photoionization. These results confirm that J0952+2552 contains two spatially separated AGNs. As one of the few confirmed dual AGNs at an intermediate separation of <10 kpc, this system offers a unique opportunity to study galaxy mergers and their effect on black hole growth.

  4. Thermal effect on E/M impedance spectroscopy of piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamas, Tuncay; Frankforter, Erik; Yu, Lingyu Lucy; Lin, Bin; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents theoretical predictive modeling and experimental evaluation of the structural health monitoring capability of piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) at elevated temperatures. Electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) method is first qualified using circular PWAS resonators under traction-free boundary condition and in an ambience with increasing temperature. The theoretical study is conducted regarding temperature dependence of the electrical parameters, the capacitance C0, d31 and g31; and the elastic parameters, the in-plane compliance s11 and Young's modulus c11, of piezoelectric materials. The Curie transition temperature must be well above the operating temperature; otherwise, the piezoelectric material may depolarize under combined temperature and pressure conditions. The material degradation is investigated by introducing the temperature effects on the material parameters that are obtained from experimental observations as well as from related work in literature. The preliminary results from the analytical 2-D circular PWAS-EMIS simulations are presented and validated by the experimental PWAS-EMIS measurements at elevated temperatures. Temperature variation may produce pyro-electric charges, which may interfere with the piezoelectric effect. Therefore, analytical simulations are carried out to simulate the pyro-electric response from the temperature effects on a free circular PWAS-EMIS in in-plane mode. For the experimental validation, PWAS transducers are placed in a fixture that provides the traction-free boundary condition. The fixture is then located in an oven integrated with PID temperature controller. The EMIS measurement is conducted during the temperature increase and the first resonance frequency peak in admittance and impedance spectra was acquired.

  5. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y.; Onoda, S.; Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y.; Shikata, S.; Makino, T.; Koka, M.; Hanaizumi, O.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  6. Active optics for dynamical correction of fluctuations of atmospheric refraction on a differential optical absorption spectroscopy device.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Inzunza, Rodrigo A; Gutiérrez, Javier; Saavedra, Carlos

    2012-10-20

    We have designed and developed a feedback mechanism for continuous monitoring in a long-pass differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) setup. This allows one to correct photo-thermal deflection due to the local fluctuations refraction index of the air. For this purpose, using an unbalanced beam splitter, a small fraction of the collected DOAS signal is imaged onto a low-cost CCD camera using a biconvex lens, while the other portion of the signal is coupled into a fiber optic for trace gas detection. By monitoring the registered signal at the CCD camera, a feedback mechanism acting on the transversal position of the lens is able to compensate an arbitrary transversal displacement of the collected signal at the focal plane of the receiver telescope, allowing an optimal coupling into the optical fiber. PMID:23089775

  7. Beam-beam instability

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-08-01

    The subject of beam-beam instability has been studied since the invention of the colliding beam storage rings. Today, with several colliding beam storage rings in operation, it is not yet fully understood and remains an outstanding problem for the storage ring designers. No doubt that good progress has been made over the years, but what we have at present is still rather primitive. It is perhaps possible to divide the beam-beam subject into two areas: one on luminosity optimization and another on the dynamics of the beam-beam interaction. The former area concerns mostly the design and operational features of a colliding beam storage ring, while the later concentrates on the experimental and theoretical aspects of the beam-beam interaction. Although both areas are of interest, our emphasis is on the second area only. In particular, we are most interested in the various possible mechanisms that cause the beam-beam instability.

  8. Nondestructive testing of electron beam sterilization by means of an optically active marker material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härtling, Thomas; Reitzig, Manuela; Mayer, Anton; Wetzel, Christiane; Röder, Olaf; Schreiber, Jürgen; Opitz, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Secure proof of sterilization processes on packaging materials is an important issue in many economic sectors. In this context, electron beam sterilization is a highly effective low temperature technique. However, verifying the application of a sufficient electron dose is still difficult - especially on products with complex geometry. Here we report on an optical, hence fast and contactless approach which gives reliable evidence of a successful e-beam treatment. The technique is based on placing a suitable marker material (rare-earth based particles) inside or as a coating on the packaging material. By electron irradiation these particles change their optical properties and thus indicate the successful application of the electron beam.

  9. Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

  10. Evaluation of the removal of antiestrogens and antiandrogens via ozone and granular activated carbon using bioassay and fluorescent spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dehua; Chen, Lujun; Wu, Yuchao; Liu, Rui

    2016-06-01

    Antiestrogens and antiandrogens are relatively rarely studied endocrine disrupting chemicals which can be found in un/treated wastewaters. Antiestrogens and antiandrogens in the wastewater treatment effluents could contribute to sexual disruption of organisms. In this study, to assess the removal of non-specific antiestrogens and antiandrogens by advanced treatment processes, ozonation and adsorption to granular activated carbon (GAC), the biological activities and excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy of wastewater were evaluated. As the applied ozone dose increased to 12 mg/L, the antiestrogenic activity dramatically decreased to 3.2 μg 4-hydroxytamoxifen equivalent (4HEQ)/L, with a removal efficiency of 84.8%, while the antiandrogenic activity was 23.1 μg flutamide equivalent (FEQ)/L, with a removal efficiency of 75.5%. The removal of antiestrogenic/antiandrogenic activity has high correlation with the removal of fulvic acid-like materials and humic acid-like organics, suggesting that they can be used as surrogates for antiestrogenic/antiandrogenic activity during ozonation. The adsorption kinetics of antiestrogenic activity and antiandrogenic activity were well described by pseudo-second-order kinetics models. The estimated equilibrium concentration of antiestrogenic activity is 7.9 μg 4HEQ/L with an effective removal efficiency of 70.5%, while the equilibrium concentration of antiandrogenic activity is 33.7 μg FEQ/L with a removal efficiency of 67.0%. Biological activity evaluation of wastewater effluents is an attractive way to assess the removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals by different treatment processes. Fluorescence spectroscopy can be used as a surrogate measure of bioassays during ozonation. PMID:27027562

  11. Quality and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography gated by active breathing control

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Bria P.; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2008-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) gated by active breathing control (ABC), which may be useful for image guidance in the presence of respiration. Comparisons were made between conventional ABC-CBCT (stop and go), fast ABC-CBCT (a method to speed up the acquisition by slowing the gantry instead of stopping during free breathing), and free breathing respiration correlated CBCT. Image quality was assessed in phantom. Accuracy of reconstructed voxel intensity, uniformity, and root mean square error were evaluated. Registration accuracy (bony and soft tissue) was quantified with both an anthropomorphic and a quality assurance phantom. Gantry angle accuracy was measured with respect to gantry speed modulation. Conventional ABC-CBCT scan time ranged from 2.3 to 5.8 min. Fast ABC-CBCT scan time ranged from 1.4 to 1.8 min, and respiratory correlated CBCT scans took 2.1 min to complete. Voxel intensity value for ABC gated scans was accurate relative to a normal clinical scan with all projections. Uniformity and root mean square error performance degraded as the number of projections used in the reconstruction of the fast ABC-CBCT scans decreased (shortest breath hold, longest free breathing segment). Registration accuracy for small, large, and rotational corrections was within 1 mm and 1 degree sign . Gantry angle accuracy was within 1 degree sign for all scans. For high-contrast targets, performance for image-guidance purposes was similar for fast and conventional ABC-CBCT scans and respiration correlated CBCT.

  12. Quality and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography gated by active breathing control

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Bria P.; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) gated by active breathing control (ABC), which may be useful for image guidance in the presence of respiration. Comparisons were made between conventional ABC-CBCT (stop and go), fast ABC-CBCT (a method to speed up the acquisition by slowing the gantry instead of stopping during free breathing), and free breathing respiration correlated CBCT. Image quality was assessed in phantom. Accuracy of reconstructed voxel intensity, uniformity, and root mean square error were evaluated. Registration accuracy (bony and soft tissue) was quantified with both an anthropomorphic and a quality assurance phantom. Gantry angle accuracy was measured with respect to gantry speed modulation. Conventional ABC-CBCT scan time ranged from 2.3 to 5.8 min. Fast ABC-CBCT scan time ranged from 1.4 to 1.8 min, and respiratory correlated CBCT scans took 2.1 min to complete. Voxel intensity value for ABC gated scans was accurate relative to a normal clinical scan with all projections. Uniformity and root mean square error performance degraded as the number of projections used in the reconstruction of the fast ABC-CBCT scans decreased (shortest breath hold, longest free breathing segment). Registration accuracy for small, large, and rotational corrections was within 1 mm and 1°. Gantry angle accuracy was within 1° for all scans. For high-contrast targets, performance for image-guidance purposes was similar for fast and conventional ABC-CBCT scans and respiration correlated CBCT. PMID:19175117

  13. Optical impedance spectroscopy with single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Mendes, Sergio B

    2014-02-01

    An optical impedance spectroscopy (OIS) technique based on a single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguide (EA-IOW) was developed to investigate electron-transfer processes of redox adsorbates. A highly sensitive single-mode EA-IOW device was used to optically follow the time-dependent faradaic current originated from a submonolayer of cytochrome c undergoing redox exchanges driven by a harmonic modulation of the electric potential at several dc bias potentials and at several frequencies. To properly retrieve the faradaic current density from the ac-modulated optical signal, we introduce here a mathematical formalism that (i) accounts for intrinsic changes that invariably occur in the optical baseline of the EA-IOW device during potential modulation and (ii) provides accurate results for the electro-chemical parameters. We are able to optically reconstruct the faradaic current density profile against the dc bias potential in the working electrode, identify the formal potential, and determine the energy-width of the electron-transfer process. In addition, by combining the optically reconstructed faradaic signal with simple electrical measurements of impedance across the whole electrochemical cell and the capacitance of the electric double-layer, we are able to determine the time-constant connected to the redox reaction of the adsorbed protein assembly. For cytochrome c directly immobilized onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, we measured a reaction rate constant of 26.5 s(-1). Finally, we calculate the charge-transfer resistance and pseudocapacitance associated with the electron-transfer process and show that the frequency dependence of the redox reaction of the protein submonolayer follows as expected the electrical equivalent of an RC-series admittance diagram. Above all, we show here that OIS with single-mode EA-IOW's provide strong analytical signals that can be readily monitored even for small surface-densities of species involved in the redox

  14. Optical Impedance Spectroscopy with Single-Mode Electro-Active-Integrated Optical Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An optical impedance spectroscopy (OIS) technique based on a single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguide (EA-IOW) was developed to investigate electron-transfer processes of redox adsorbates. A highly sensitive single-mode EA-IOW device was used to optically follow the time-dependent faradaic current originated from a submonolayer of cytochrome c undergoing redox exchanges driven by a harmonic modulation of the electric potential at several dc bias potentials and at several frequencies. To properly retrieve the faradaic current density from the ac-modulated optical signal, we introduce here a mathematical formalism that (i) accounts for intrinsic changes that invariably occur in the optical baseline of the EA-IOW device during potential modulation and (ii) provides accurate results for the electro-chemical parameters. We are able to optically reconstruct the faradaic current density profile against the dc bias potential in the working electrode, identify the formal potential, and determine the energy-width of the electron-transfer process. In addition, by combining the optically reconstructed faradaic signal with simple electrical measurements of impedance across the whole electrochemical cell and the capacitance of the electric double-layer, we are able to determine the time-constant connected to the redox reaction of the adsorbed protein assembly. For cytochrome c directly immobilized onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, we measured a reaction rate constant of 26.5 s–1. Finally, we calculate the charge-transfer resistance and pseudocapacitance associated with the electron-transfer process and show that the frequency dependence of the redox reaction of the protein submonolayer follows as expected the electrical equivalent of an RC-series admittance diagram. Above all, we show here that OIS with single-mode EA-IOW’s provide strong analytical signals that can be readily monitored even for small surface-densities of species involved in the redox

  15. A magnetic resonance spectroscopy driven initialization scheme for active shape model based prostate segmentation.

    PubMed

    Toth, Robert; Tiwari, Pallavi; Rosen, Mark; Reed, Galen; Kurhanewicz, John; Kalyanpur, Arjun; Pungavkar, Sona; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-04-01

    Segmentation of the prostate boundary on clinical images is useful in a large number of applications including calculation of prostate volume pre- and post-treatment, to detect extra-capsular spread, and for creating patient-specific anatomical models. Manual segmentation of the prostate boundary is, however, time consuming and subject to inter- and intra-reader variability. T2-weighted (T2-w) magnetic resonance (MR) structural imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) have recently emerged as promising modalities for detection of prostate cancer in vivo. MRS data consists of spectral signals measuring relative metabolic concentrations, and the metavoxels near the prostate have distinct spectral signals from metavoxels outside the prostate. Active Shape Models (ASM's) have become very popular segmentation methods for biomedical imagery. However, ASMs require careful initialization and are extremely sensitive to model initialization. The primary contribution of this paper is a scheme to automatically initialize an ASM for prostate segmentation on endorectal in vivo multi-protocol MRI via automated identification of MR spectra that lie within the prostate. A replicated clustering scheme is employed to distinguish prostatic from extra-prostatic MR spectra in the midgland. The spatial locations of the prostate spectra so identified are used as the initial ROI for a 2D ASM. The midgland initializations are used to define a ROI that is then scaled in 3D to cover the base and apex of the prostate. A multi-feature ASM employing statistical texture features is then used to drive the edge detection instead of just image intensity information alone. Quantitative comparison with another recent ASM initialization method by Cosio showed that our scheme resulted in a superior average segmentation performance on a total of 388 2D MRI sections obtained from 32 3D endorectal in vivo patient studies. Initialization of a 2D ASM via our MRS-based clustering scheme resulted in an average

  16. Probing the Structures of Seyfert Galaxies which Exhibit Jets and Maser Activity Using X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotter, J. T.; Hess, C. J.

    1997-12-01

    We studied three Seyfert galaxies with unusual morphologies through X-ray spectroscopy and plasma modeling, in order to determine the temperatures, elemental abundances, and spatial distributions of the X-ray emitting gas contained therein. NGC 4258 is known to have maser activity in the region surrounding its warped accretion disk, and it also emits jets. NGC 1097 and NGC 1068 exhibit these observational traits, jets and maser activity, respectively. Their unusual geometries and the significant reprocessing of the continuum and jets by the accretion disks make these three galaxies excellent candidates for modeling and spectroscopic interpretation which accounts for thermal instability.

  17. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: A Discovery-Based Activity for the General Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgsmiller, Karen L.; O'Connell, Dylan J.; Klauenberg, Kathryn M.; Wilson, Peter M.; Stromberg, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    A discovery-based method is described for incorporating the concepts of IR and Raman spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum. Students use three sets of springs to model the properties of single, double, and triple covalent bonds. Then, Gaussian 03W molecular modeling software is used to illustrate the relationship between bond…

  18. Germanium detectors for nuclear spectroscopy: Current research and development activity at LNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, D. R.; Maggioni, G.; Carturan, S.; Eberth, J.; Gelain, M.; Grimaldi, M. G.; Tatí, S.; Riccetto, S.; Mea, G. Della

    2016-07-01

    High-purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors have reached an unprecedented level of sophistication and are still the best solution for high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. In the present work, we will show the results of the characterization of new surface treatments for the production of these detectors, studied in the framework of our multidisciplinary research program in HPGe detector technologies.

  19. The Clusters-in-a-Liquid Approach for Solvation: New Insights from the Conformer Specific Gas Phase Spectroscopy and Vibrational Optical Activity Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Angelo S.; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad R.; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as powerful spectroscopic tools for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed in the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones that contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed “clusters-in-a-liquid” approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, VCD, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with

  20. The clusters-in-a-liquid approach for solvation: New insights from the conformer specific gas phase spectroscopy and vibrational optical activity spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yunjie; Perera, Angelo; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as a powerful spectroscopic tool for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed at the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones who contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed “clusters-in-a-liquid” approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with the

  1. The Clusters-in-a-Liquid Approach for Solvation: New Insights from the Conformer Specific Gas Phase Spectroscopy and Vibrational Optical Activity Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Perera, Angelo S; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad R; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as powerful spectroscopic tools for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed in the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones that contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed "clusters-in-a-liquid" approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, VCD, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with the

  2. Fusion studies with low-intensity radioactive ion beams using an active-target time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A. M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Chajecki, Z.; Febbrarro, M.; Fritsch, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Roberts, A.; Shore, A.; Torres-Isea, R. O.

    2016-09-01

    The total fusion excitation function for 10Be+40Ar has been measured over the center-of-momentum (c.m.) energy range from 12 to 24 MeV using a time-projection chamber (TPC). The main purpose of this experiment, which was carried out in a single run of duration 90 h using a ≈100 particle per second (pps) 10Be beam, was to demonstrate the capability of an active-target TPC to determine fusion excitation functions for extremely weak radioactive ion beams. Cross sections as low as 12 mb were measured with acceptable (50%) statistical accuracy. It also proved to be possible to separate events in which charged particles were emitted from the fusion residue from those in which only neutrons were evaporated. The method permits simultaneous measurement of incomplete fusion, break-up, scattering, and transfer reactions, and therefore fully exploits the opportunities presented by the very exotic beams that will be available from the new generation of radioactive beam facilities.

  3. A compact neutron beam generator system designed for prompt gamma nuclear activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Mostacci, D

    2011-08-01

    In this work a compact system was designed for bulk sample analysis using the technique of PGNAA. The system consists of (252)Cf fission neutron source, a moderator/reflector/filter assembly, and a suitable enclosure to delimit the resulting neutron beam. The moderator/reflector/filter arrangement has been optimised to maximise the thermal neutron component useful for samples analysis with a suitably low level of beam contamination. The neutron beam delivered by this compact system is used to irradiate the sample and the prompt gamma rays produced by neutron reactions within the sample elements are detected by appropriate gamma rays detector. Neutron and gamma rays transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP5). PMID:21129990

  4. Active suppression of nonlinear composite beam vibrations by selected control algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warminski, Jerzy; Bochenski, Marcin; Jarzyna, Wojciech; Filipek, Piotr; Augustyniak, Michal

    2011-05-01

    This paper is focused on application of different control algorithms for a flexible, geometrically nonlinear beam-like structure with Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) actuator. Based on the mathematical model of a geometrically nonlinear beam, analytical solutions for Nonlinear Saturation Controller (NSC) are obtained using Multiple Scale Method. Effectiveness of different control strategies is evaluated by numerical simulations in Matlab-Simulink software. Then, the Digital Signal Processing (DSP) controller and selected control algorithms are implemented to the physical system to compare numerical and experimental results. Detailed analysis for the NSC system is carried out, especially for high level of amplitude and wide range of frequencies of excitation. Finally, the efficiency of the considered controllers is tested experimentally for a more complex autoparametric " L-shape" beam system.

  5. Surface-active element effects on the shape of GTA, laser, and electron-beam welds

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Roper, J.R.; Stagner, R.T.; Aden, R.J.

    1983-03-01

    Laser and electron-beam welds were passed across selenium-doped zones in 21-6-9 stainless steel. The depth/width (d/w) ratio of a defocused laser weld with a weld pool shape similar to a GTA weld increased by over 200% in a zone where 66 ppm selenium had been added. Smaller increases were observed in selenium-doped zones for a moderately defocused electron beam weld with a higher d/w ratio in undoped base metal. When laser or electron beam weld penetration was by a keyhole mechanism, no change in d/w ratio occurred in selenium-doped zones. The results confirm the surface-tension-driven fluid-flow model for the effect of minor elements on GTA weld pool shape. Other experimental evidence bearing on the effect of minor elements on GTA weld penetration is summarized.

  6. Highly Active Titanocene Catalysts for Epoxide Hydrosilylation: Synthesis, Theory, Kinetics, EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Dina Schwarz G; Zimmer, Katharina; Klare, Sven; Meyer, Andreas; Rojo-Wiechel, Elena; Bauer, Mirko; Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan; Schiemann, Olav; Flowers, Robert A; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-06-27

    A catalytic system for titanocene-catalyzed epoxide hydrosilylation is described. It features a straightforward preparation of titanocene hydrides that leads to a reaction with low catalyst loading, high yields, and high selectivity of radical reduction. The mechanism was studied by a suite of methods, including kinetic studies, EPR spectroscopy, and computational methods. An unusual resting state leads to the observation of an inverse rate order with respect to the epoxide. PMID:27125466

  7. Investigation of biochemical property changes in activation-induced CD 8 + T cell apoptosis using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ju; Ahn, Hyung Joon; Lee, Gi-Ja; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Lee, Gihyun; Kim, Dohyun; Shin, Jae-Ho; Jin, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-07-01

    The study was to investigate the changes in biochemical properties of activated mature CD8+ T cells related to apoptosis at a molecular level. We confirmed the activation and apoptosis of CD8+ T cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and atomic force microscopy and then performed Raman spectral measurements on activated mature CD8+ T cells and cellular deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA). In the activated mature CD8+ T cells, there were increases in protein spectra at 1002 and 1234 cm-1. In particular, to assess the apoptosis-related DNA spectral signatures, we investigated the spectra of the cellular DNA isolated from resting and activated mature CD8+ T cells. Raman spectra at 765 to 786 cm-1 and 1053 to 1087 cm-1 were decreased in activated mature DNA. In addition, we analyzed Raman spectrum using the multivariate statistical method including principal component analysis. Raman spectra of activated mature DNA are especially well-discriminated from those of resting DNA. Our findings regarding the biochemical and structural changes associated with apoptosis in activated mature T cells and cellular DNA according to Raman spectroscopy provide important insights into allospecific immune responses generated after organ transplantation, and may be useful for therapeutic manipulation of the immune response.

  8. Crossed Molecular Beam Studies and Dynamics of Decomposition of Chemically Activated Radicals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, Y. T.

    1973-09-01

    The power of the crossed molecular beams method in the investigation of the dynamics of chemical reactions lies mainly in the direct observation of the consequences of single collisions of well controlled reactant molecules. The primary experimental observations which provide information on reaction dynamics are the measurements of angular and velocity distributions of reaction products.

  9. Modeling energy transport in a cantilevered Euler-Bernoulli beam actively vibrating in Newtonian fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, Cassio T.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2014-04-01

    When a mechanical and/or structural component is immersed in a fluid and it vibrates, the reasonable assumption is that part of the energy is transmitted to the adjacent media. For some engineering applications the energy transport between these two domains, i.e., structure and fluid, plays a central role. The work presented in this paper is focused on discussing the energy transport in beam-like structures as they can be used to represent flexible swimmers (fish-like pulsating mechanisms) in their simplest form. In order to expose the role of each of the fluid and beam properties effecting the energy transfer process, a simplified analytical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is derived. After analysis of the resulting coupled-systems' damping coefficient, a new energy transport component is added to the initial Euler-Bernoulli beam equation; a term associated with diffusion (fluid viscosity). In addition our modeling results in an added mass term, a characteristic consistent with previous literature. While deriving the model, an important assumption is made: beam mode shapes are not significantly affected by the domains' interaction. This hypothesis is experimentally tested in two different fluid media and confirmed to be reasonable for the first three vibration mode shapes.

  10. The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber used with TwinSol radioactive-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, T.; Bardayan, D. W.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Becchetti, F. D.; Bradt, J.; Brodeur, M.; Carpenter, L.; Chajecki, Z.; Cortesi, M.; Fritsch, A.; Hall, M. R.; Hall, O.; Jensen, L.; Kolata, J. J.; Lynch, W.; Mittig, W.; O'Malley, P.; Suzuki, D.

    2016-06-01

    The study of low-energy reactions with radioactive-ion beams has been greatly enhanced by the recent use of active-target detectors, which have high efficiency and low thresholds to detect low-energy charged-particle decays. Both of these features have been used in experiments with the Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber to study α -cluster structure in unstable nuclei and 3-body charged-particle decays after implantation. Predicted α -cluster structures in 14 C were probed using resonant α scattering and the nature of the 3- α breakup of the 02+ Hoyle state in 12 C after the beta decay of 12 N and 12 B was studied. These experiments used in-flight radioactive-ion beams that were produced using the dual superconducting solenoid magnets TwinSol at the University of Notre Dame. Preliminary results from these experiments as well as the development of future radioactive beams to be used in conjunction with the PAT-TPC are presented.

  11. New defect spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beling, C. D.

    2002-06-01

    This paper will review progress being made on developing more defect selective forms of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) at the University of Hong Kong. The first of these, positron deep-level transient spectroscopy (PDLTS), parallels conventional deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) except that the positron is used as the probe, either to tell if the defects have vacancies attached to their microstructure (type I PDLTS) or as a simple electric field probe (type II PDLTS). It is shown the more important type I PDLTS has an intrinsic problem brought about by the high donor densities required to operate electrical trap filling. The problem—namely fast positron drift out of the active deep-level region into the reverse biased junction—is suggested as having two solutions. The first is to move to higher positron beam intensities and take spectra of 10 9 events. The second is that by using lower dopant densities (<10 15 cm -3) deep levels may be filled by inter-band optical excitation thus forming the workable technique positron optical (PO)-DLTS. Other techniques briefly considered in this paper are deconvoluted-coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) and Fourier transform (FT)-CDBS. Such are seen from a different perspective than most contemporary works, which tend to concentrate on the high momentum region. It is pointed out that the additional root-of-two improvement in hardware resolution and the factor of three improvement gained through deconvolution, can produce final effective resolutions similar to ACAR. Moreover, since in deconvolution, the natural space for regularized solutions is "real crystal space"—it is suggested that the autocorrelation function B2 γ( r) be taken as the experimental CDBS data—not just because it provides easier visualization,—but because data in this form lies directly on the crystal lattice.

  12. Photon Activation Analysis Of Light Elements Using 'Non-Gamma' Radiation Spectroscopy - The Instrumental Determination Of Phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Christian; Goerner, Wolf

    2011-06-01

    Unlike metal determinations the analysis of light elements (e.g., carbon, oxygen, phosphorus) is frequently problematic, in particular if analysed instrumentally. In photon activation analysis (PAA) the respective activation products do not emit gamma radiation in the most cases. Usually, annihilation quanta counting and subsequent decay curve analysis have been used for determinations of C, N, O, and F. However, radiochemical separation of the respective radioisotopes mostly is indispensable. For several reasons, some of the light elements cannot be analysed following this procedure, e.g. phosphorus. In this contribution the instrumental PAA of phosphorus in organic matrix by activation with bremsstrahlung of an electron linear accelerator and subsequent beta spectroscopy is described. The accuracy of the results was excellent as obtained by analysis of a BCR Reference Material.

  13. An investigation of catalytic active phase-support interactions by IR, NMR and x-ray absorption spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.L.

    1992-09-01

    Active catalytic phases (metal, mixed metals, oxide or mixed oxides) interacting with oxide support on which the active phase is dispersed can affect the percentage exposed, the morphology of supported particles, the degree of reducibility of cations, etc., in a variety of ways. Our objective is to characterize the physical chemistry of the active phase-oxide support interaction by spectroscopic methods and to correlate this structure with catalytic function. Two catalytic systems and their associated techniques (x-ray absorption and NMR) are discussed in this progress report. Firstly, the interaction of Pt-Ni supported on silica and L-zeolite are characterized and compared by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). Secondly, we present both experimental and calculational developments of NMR for the investigation of amorphous silica-alumina catalysts and/or supports.

  14. Site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of the active site of porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.I.; Roessner, C.A.; Stolowich, N.J.; Karuso, P.; Williams, H.J.; Grant, S.K.; Gonzalez, M.D.; Hoshino, T. )

    1988-10-18

    The active site of porphobilinogen (PBG){sup 1} deaminase from Escherichia coli has been found to contain an unusual dipyrromethane derived from four molecules of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) covalently linked to Cys-242, one of the two cysteine residues conserved in E. coli and human deaminase. By use of a hemA{sup {minus}} strain of E. coli the enzyme was enriched from (5-{sup 13}C)ALA and examined by {sup 1}H-detected multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy, which revealed all of the salient features of a dipyrromethane composed of two PBG units linked heat to tail and terminating in a CH{sub 2}-S bond to a cysteine residue. Site-specific mutagenesis of Cys-99 and Cys-242, respectively, has shown that substitution of Ser for Cys-99 does not affect the enzymatic activity, whereas substitution of Ser for Cys-242 removes essentially all of the catalytic activity as measured by the conversion of the substrate PBG to uro'gen I. The NMR spectrum of the covalent complex of deaminase with the suicide inhibitor 2-bromo-(2,11-{sup 13}C{sub 2})PBG reveals that the aminomethyl terminus of the inhibitor reacts with the enzyme's cofactor at the {alpha}-free pyrrole. NMR spectroscopy of the ES{sub 2} complex confirmed a PBG-derived head-to-tail dipyrromethane attached to the {alpha}-free pyrrole position of the enzyme. A mechanistic rationale for deaminase is presented.

  15. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy and detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W. B.; Amer, Nabil M.; Boccara, A. C.; Fournier, D.

    1981-04-15

    The theory for a sensitive spectroscopy based on the photothermal deflection of a laser beam is developed. We consider cw and pulsed cases of both transverse and collinear photothermal deflection spectroscopy for solids, liquids, gases, and thin films. The predictions of the theory are experimentally verified, its implications for imaging and microscopy are given, and the sources of noise are analyzed. The sensitivity and versatility of photothermal deflection spectroscopy are compared with thermal lensing and photoacoustic spectroscopy.

  16. Mathematical modelling of postbuckling in a slender beam column for active stabilisation control with respect to uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enss, Georg C.; Platz, Roland; Hanselka, Holger

    2012-04-01

    Buckling is an important design constraint in light-weight structures as it may result in the collapse of an entire structure. When a mechanical beam column is loaded above its critical buckling load, it may buckle. In addition, if the actual loading is not fully known, stability becomes highly uncertain. To control uncertainty in buckling, an approach is presented to actively stabilise a slender flat column sensitive to buckling. For this purpose, actively controlled forces applied by piezoelectric actuators located close to the column's clamped base stabilise the column against buckling at critical loading. In order to design a controller to stabilise the column, a mathematical model of the postcritically loaded system is needed. Simulating postbuckling behaviour is important to study the effect of axial loads above the critical axial buckling load within active buckling control. Within this postbuckling model, different kinds of uncertainty may occur: i) error in estimation of model parameters such as mass, damping and stiffness, ii) non-linearities e. g. in the assumption of curvature of the column's deflection shapes and many more. In this paper, numerical simulations based on the mathematical model for the postcritically axially loaded column are compared to a mathematical model based on experiments of the actively stabilised postcritically loaded real column system using closed loop identification. The motivation to develop an experimentally validated mathematical model is to develop of a model based stabilising control algorithm for a real postcritically axially loaded beam column.

  17. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  18. Recent Activities at the Low-Energy Beam and Ion Trap Facility at NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustabad, Scott; Bollen, Georg; Brodeur, Maxime; Lincoln, David; Novario, Samuel; Redshaw, Matthew; Ringle, Ryan; Schwarz, Stefan; Valverde, Adrian

    2013-10-01

    The Low-Energy Beam and Ion Trap (LEBIT) facility, for high precision Penning trap mass measurements, has been relocated and upgraded for the expansion of the thermalized beam program at NSCL. I will summarize the changes to the facility and will focus on recent atomic mass measurements of candidates for neutrinoless double- β decay experiments including 82Se and 48Ca. I will also present the first results from the recent successful LEBIT commissioning experiment and will conclude by discussing the exciting future opportunities with the upgraded facility. This work was supported by Michigan State University, the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY-1102511, and the Office of Science US Dept of Energy under Grant 03ER-41268.

  19. Identification of abnormal motor cortex activation patterns in children with cerebral palsy by functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Bilal; Tian, Fenghua; Behbehani, Khosrow; Romero, Mario I.; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Reid, Dahlia; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the utility of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a tool for physicians to study cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Motor cortex activation patterns were studied in five healthy children and five children with CP (8.4+/-2.3 years old in both groups) performing a finger-tapping protocol. Spatial (distance from center and area difference) and temporal (duration and time-to-peak) image metrics are proposed as potential biomarkers for differentiating abnormal cortical activation in children with CP from healthy pediatric controls. In addition, a similarity image-analysis concept is presented that unveils areas that have similar activation patterns as that of the maximum activation area, but are not discernible by visual inspection of standard activation images. Metrics derived from the images presenting areas of similarity are shown to be sensitive identifiers of abnormal activation patterns in children with CP. Importantly, the proposed similarity concept and related metrics may be applicable to other studies for the identification of cortical activation patterns by fNIRS.

  20. Identification of abnormal motor cortex activation patterns in children with cerebral palsy by functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Bilal; Tian, Fenghua; Behbehani, Khosrow; Romero, Mario I.; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Reid, Dahlia; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a tool for physicians to study cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Motor cortex activation patterns were studied in five healthy children and five children with CP (8.4±2.3years old in both groups) performing a finger-tapping protocol. Spatial (distance from center and area difference) and temporal (duration and time-to-peak) image metrics are proposed as potential biomarkers for differentiating abnormal cortical activation in children with CP from healthy pediatric controls. In addition, a similarity image-analysis concept is presented that unveils areas that have similar activation patterns as that of the maximum activation area, but are not discernible by visual inspection of standard activation images. Metrics derived from the images presenting areas of similarity are shown to be sensitive identifiers of abnormal activation patterns in children with CP. Importantly, the proposed similarity concept and related metrics may be applicable to other studies for the identification of cortical activation patterns by fNIRS. PMID:20615010

  1. Proton beam simulation with MCNPX/CINDER'90: Germanium metal activation estimates below 30MeV relevant to the bulk production of arsenic radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Fassbender, M; Taylor, W; Vieira, D; Nortier, M; Bach, H; John, K

    2012-01-01

    Germanium metal targets encapsulated in Nb shells were irradiated in a proton beam. Proton and secondary neutron beam fluences as well as radionuclide activity formation were modeled using MCNPX in combination with CINDER90. Targets were chemically processed using distillation and anion exchange. Good agreement between the measured radiochemical yields and MCNPX/CINDER90 estimates was observed. A target of pentavalent (73,74)As radioarsenic for neutron activation studies was prepared. PMID:21890369

  2. Range degradation and distal edge behavior of proton radiotherapy beams using 11C activation and Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmekawy, Ahmed Farouk

    The distal edge of therapeutic proton radiation beams was investigated by different methods. Proton beams produced at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute (HUPTI) were used to irradiate a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom for three different ranges (13.5, 17.0 and 21.0 cm) to investigate the distal slope dependence of the Bragg peak. The activation of 11 C was studied by scanning the phantom less than 10 minutes post-irradiation with a Philips Big Bore Gemini(c) PET/CT. The DICOM images were imported into the Varian Eclipse(c) Treatment Planning System (TPS) for analysis and then analyzed by ImageJ(c) . The distal slope ranged from ?0.1671 +/- 0.0036 to -0.1986 +/- 0.0052 (pixel intensity/slice number) for ranges 13.5 to 21.0 cm respectively. A realistic description of the setup was modeled using the GATE 7.0 Monte Carlo simulation tool and compared to the experiment data. The results show the distal slope ranged from -0.1158+/-0.0133 to -0.0787+/-0.002 (Gy/mm). Additionally, low activity, 11C were simulated to study the 11C reconstructed half-life dependence versus the initial activity for six ranges chosen around the previous activation study. The results of the expected/nominal half-life vs. activity ranged from -5 x 10-4 +/- 2.8104 x 10-4 to 1.6 x 10-3 +/- 9.44 x 10-4 (%diff./Bq). The comparison between two experiments with proton beams on a PMMA phantom and multi-layer ion chamber, and two GATE simulations of a proton beam incident on a water phantom and 11C PET study show that: (i) the distal fall-off variation of the steepness of the slopes are found to be similar thus validating the sensitivity of the PET technique to the range degradation and (ii) the average of the super-ratios difference between all studies observed is primarily due to the difference in the dose deposited in the media.

  3. Star-like gold nanoparticles as highly active substrate for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morasso, Carlo; Mehn, Dora; Vanna, Renzo; Bedoni, Marzia; Pascual García, César; Prosperi, Davide; Gramatica, Furio

    2013-02-01

    Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a popular method in bio-analytical chemistry and a potentially powerful enabling technology for in vitro diagnostics. SERS combines the excellent chemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy with the good sensitivity provided by enhancement of the signal that is observed when a molecule is located on (or very close to) the surface of nanostructured metallic materials. Star-like gold nanoparticles (SGN) are a new class of multibranched nanoparticles that in the last few years have attracted the attention of SERS community for their plasmonic properties. In this work we present a new method to prepare star-like gold nanoparticles with a simple one step protocol at room temperature using hydroquinone as reducing agent. Besides we compare the enhancement of Raman signal of malachite green, a dye commonly employed as label in biological studies, by star-like gold nanoparticles having different size, directly in liquid. This study shows that SGN provide good enhancement of Raman signal and that the effect of their dimension is strongly dependent on the wavelength used. Moreover preliminary results suggest that SGN produced using this method are characterized by good physical-chemical properties and they can be functionalized using the standard thiol chemistry. Overall, these results suggest that star-like gold nanoparticles produced through this method could be used for the further development of highly specific and sensitive SERS-based bio-analytical tests.

  4. Runaway electron generation as possible trigger for enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic plasma activity and fast changes in runaway beam behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Pankratov, I. M. E-mail: rjzhou@ipp.ac.cn; Zhou, R. J. E-mail: rjzhou@ipp.ac.cn; Hu, L. Q.

    2015-07-15

    Peculiar phenomena were observed during experiments with runaway electrons: rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal (cyclotron radiation of suprathermal electrons). These phenomena were initially observed in TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research), where these events only occurred in the current decay phase or in discharges with thin stable runaway beams at a q = 1 drift surface. These rapid changes in the synchrotron spot were interpreted by the TEXTOR team as a fast pitch angle scattering event. Recently, similar rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the non-thermal ECE signal were observed in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) runaway discharge. Runaway electrons were located around the q = 2 rational magnetic surface (ring-like runaway electron beam). During the EAST runaway discharge, stepwise ECE signal increases coincided with enhanced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. This behavior was peculiar to this shot. In this paper, we show that these non-thermal ECE step-like jumps were related to the abrupt growth of suprathermal electrons induced by bursting electric fields at reconnection events during this MHD plasma activity. Enhancement of the secondary runaway electron generation also occurred simultaneously. Local changes in the current-density gradient appeared because of local enhancement of the runaway electron generation process. These current-density gradient changes are considered to be a possible trigger for enhancement of the MHD plasma activity and the rapid changes in runaway beam behavior.

  5. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of the activation of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. II. Carbon monoxide activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G. ); Datye, A.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Activation procedures can have a dramatic effect on the activity of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. CO conversion over a 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst (parts by weight) can vary by nearly a factor of 3, depending on activation treatment. In contrast, a 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst displays little dependence of F-T activity on activation treatment. An ultra-high vacuum surface analysis chamber coupled to an atmospheric reactor has been used to measure the surface composition of these catalysts following activation in carbon monoxide at 280[degrees]C, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and BET surface area measurements have been used to investigate catalyst morphology. CO activation of the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst at 280[degrees]C results in partial reduction of iron to a mixture of Fe[sub x]O and Fe[sub 3]O[sub 4], and an overall surface composition very similar to that obtained following hydrogen activation at 220 or 280[degrees]C, consistent with the invariance of F-T activity with activation treatment for this catalyst. Activation of the 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst in CO at 280[degrees]C results in the formation of iron carbide particles, growth of graphitic carbon (C[sub g]) filaments, and formation of a thick, porous, C[sub g] layer covering the carbide particles. Differences in F-T activity between the hydrogen- and CO-activated 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst are discussed in terms of surface composition and catalyst morphology. The difference in sensitivity of the two catalysts to activation conditions is related to differences in the extent of reduction of the catalysts. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Maintaining Gait Performance by Cortical Activation during Dual-Task Interference: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yea-Ru; Wu, Yu-Te; Wang, Ray-Yau

    2015-01-01

    In daily life, mobility requires walking while performing a cognitive or upper-extremity motor task. Although previous studies have evaluated the effects of dual tasks on gait performance, few studies have evaluated cortical activation and its association with gait disturbance during dual tasks. In this study, we simultaneously assessed gait performance and cerebral oxygenation in the bilateral prefrontal cortices (PFC), premotor cortices (PMC), and supplemental motor areas (SMA), using functional near-infrared spectroscopy, in 17 young adults performing dual tasks. Each participant was evaluated while performing normal-pace walking (NW), walking while performing a cognitive task (WCT), and walking while performing a motor task (WMT). Our results indicated that the left PFC exhibited the strongest and most sustained activation during WCT, and that NW and WMT were associated with minor increases in oxygenation levels during their initial phases. We observed increased activation in channels in the SMA and PMC during WCT and WMT. Gait data indicated that WCT and WMT both caused reductions in walking speed, but these reductions resulted from differing alterations in gait properties. WCT was associated with significant changes in cadence, stride time, and stride length, whereas WMT was associated with reductions in stride length only. During dual-task activities, increased activation of the PMC and SMA correlated with declines in gait performance, indicating a control mechanism for maintaining gait performance during dual tasks. Thus, the regulatory effects of cortical activation on gait behavior enable a second task to be performed while walking. PMID:26079605

  7. X-ray diffractometry of AlN/c-sapphire templates obtained by plasma-activated molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnikov, V. V.; Nechaev, D. V.; Jmerik, V. N.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The structure of AlN/c-sapphire templates obtained by plasma-activated molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) has been studied by X-ray diffractometry techniques. The results show the advantages of using coarse-grained AlN nucleation layers prepared by high-temperature (780°C) adatom-migration-enhanced epitaxy. Using 3.5-nm-thick GaN inserts (obtained by three-dimensional growth under N-rich conditions), it is possible to obtain templates with insignificant residual macrostresses and relatively narrow widths (FWHM) of 0002 and 10bar 15 diffraction reflections.

  8. Thermal activation at moderate-to-high and high damping: finite barrier effects and force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mazo, J J; Fajardo, O Y; Zueco, D

    2013-03-14

    We study the thermal escape problem in the moderate-to-high and high damping regime of a system with a parabolic barrier. We present a formula that matches our numerical results accounting for finite barrier effects, and compare it with previous works. We also show results for the full damping range. We quantitatively study some aspects on the relation between mean first passage time and the definition of an escape rate. To finish, we apply our results and considerations in the framework of force spectroscopy problems. We study the differences on the predictions using the different theories and discuss the role of γF[over dot] as the relevant parameter at high damping. PMID:23514463

  9. Thermal activation at moderate-to-high and high damping: Finite barrier effects and force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazo, J. J.; Fajardo, O. Y.; Zueco, D.

    2013-03-01

    We study the thermal escape problem in the moderate-to-high and high damping regime of a system with a parabolic barrier. We present a formula that matches our numerical results accounting for finite barrier effects, and compare it with previous works. We also show results for the full damping range. We quantitatively study some aspects on the relation between mean first passage time and the definition of an escape rate. To finish, we apply our results and considerations in the framework of force spectroscopy problems. We study the differences on the predictions using the different theories and discuss the role of γ dot{F} as the relevant parameter at high damping.

  10. Application of EPR spectroscopy to the examination of pro-oxidant activity of coffee.

    PubMed

    Krakowian, Daniel; Skiba, Dominik; Kudelski, Adam; Pilawa, Barbara; Ramos, Paweł; Adamczyk, Jakub; Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna

    2014-05-15

    Free radicals present in coffee may be responsible for exerting toxic effects on an organism. The objectives of this work were to compare free radicals properties and concentrations in different commercially available coffees, in solid and liquid states, and to determine the effect of roasting on the formation of free radicals in coffee beans of various origins. The free radicals content of 15 commercially available coffees (solid and liquid) was compared and the impact of processing examined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at X-band (9.3 GHz). First derivative EPR spectra were measured at microwave power in the range of 0.7-70 mW. The following parameters were calculated for EPR spectra: amplitude (A), integral intensity (I), and line-width (ΔBpp); g-Factor was obtained from resonance condition. Our study showed that free radicals exist in green coffee beans (10(16) spin/g), roasted coffee beans (10(18) spin/g), and in commercially available coffee (10(17)-10(18) spin/g). Free radical concentrations were higher in solid ground coffee than in instant or lyophilised coffee. Continuous microwave saturation indicated homogeneous broadening of EPR lines from solid and liquid commercial coffee samples as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes were found to be present in all coffee samples tested, solid and liquid commercial coffees as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Higher free radicals concentrations were obtained for both the green and roasted at 240 °C coffee beans from Peru compared with those originating from Ethiopia, Brazil, India, or Colombia. Moreover, more free radicals occurred in Arabica coffee beans roasted at 240 °C than Robusta. EPR spectroscopy is a useful method of examining free radicals in different types of coffee. PMID:24423509

  11. Electronically controlled optical beam-steering by an active phased array of metallic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    DeRose, C T; Kekatpure, R D; Trotter, D C; Starbuck, A; Wendt, J R; Yaacobi, A; Watts, M R; Chettiar, U; Engheta, N; Davids, P S

    2013-02-25

    An optical phased array of nanoantenna fabricated in a CMOS compatible silicon photonics process is presented. The optical phased array is fed by low loss silicon waveguides with integrated ohmic thermo-optic phase shifters capable of 2π phase shift with ∼ 15 mW of applied electrical power. By controlling the electrical power to the individual integrated phase shifters fixed wavelength steering of the beam emitted normal to the surface of the wafer of 8° is demonstrated for 1 × 8 phased arrays with periods of both 6 and 9 μm. PMID:23482053

  12. Investigation of the binding modes between AIE-active molecules and dsDNA by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Ma, Ke; Hu, Ting; Jiang, Bo; Xu, Bin; Tian, Wenjing; Sun, Jing Zhi; Zhang, Wenke

    2015-05-01

    AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active molecules hold promise for the labeling of biomolecules as well as living cells. The study of the binding modes of such molecules to biomolecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, will shed light on a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of molecular interactions and eventually facilitate the design/preparation of new AIE-active bioprobes. Herein, we studied the binding modes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with two types of synthetic AIE-active molecules, namely, tetraphenylethene-derived dicationic compounds (cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy) and anthracene-derived dicationic compounds (DSAI and DSABr-C6) using single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The experimental data indicate that DSAI can strongly intercalate into DNA base pairs, while DSABr-C6 is unable to intercalate into DNA due to the steric hindrance of the alkyl side chains. Cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy can also intercalate into DNA base pairs, but the binding shows strong ionic strength dependence. Multiple binding modes of TPEDPy with dsDNA have been discussed. In addition, the electrostatic interaction enhanced intercalation of cis-TPEDPy with dsDNA has also been revealed.AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active molecules hold promise for the labeling of biomolecules as well as living cells. The study of the binding modes of such molecules to biomolecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, will shed light on a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of molecular interactions and eventually facilitate the design/preparation of new AIE-active bioprobes. Herein, we studied the binding modes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with two types of synthetic AIE-active molecules, namely, tetraphenylethene-derived dicationic compounds (cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy) and anthracene-derived dicationic compounds (DSAI and DSABr-C6) using single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The

  13. Effect of chlorine activation treatment on electron beam induced current signal distribution of cadmium telluride thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zywitzki, Olaf; Modes, Thomas; Morgner, Henry; Metzner, Christoph; Siepchen, Bastian; Späth, Bettina; Drost, Christian; Krishnakumar, Velappan; Frauenstein, Sven

    2013-10-01

    We have investigated CdTe thin film solar cells without activation treatment and with CdCl2 activation treatment at temperatures between 370 and 430 °C using a constant activation time of 25 min. For this purpose, CdS/CdTe layers were deposited by closed-space-sublimation on FTO coated float glass. The solar cells were characterized by measurements of the JV characteristics and quantum efficiencies. In addition, ion polished cross sections of the solar cells were prepared for high-resolution FE-SEM imaging of the microstructure and the simultaneous registration of electron beam induced current (EBIC) signal distribution. By measurement of the EBIC signal distribution, it can be shown that without activation treatment the CdTe grain boundaries itself and grain boundary near regions exhibit no EBIC signal, whereas centres of some singular grains already show a distinct EBIC signal. In contrast, after the chlorine activation treatment, the grain boundary near regions exhibit a significant higher EBIC signal than the centre of the grains. The results can be discussed as a direct evidence for defect passivation of grain boundary near regions by the chlorine activation treatment. At activation temperature of 430 °C, additionally, a significant grain growth and agglomeration of the CdS layer can be recognized, which is linked with the formation of voids within the CdS layer and a deterioration of pn junction properties.

  14. Synchronous activity of two people's prefrontal cortices during a cooperative task measured by simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funane, Tsukasa; Kiguchi, Masashi; Atsumori, Hirokazu; Sato, Hiroki; Kubota, Kisou; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-07-01

    The brain activity during cooperation as a form of social process is studied. We investigate the relationship between coinstantaneous brain-activation signals of multiple participants and their cooperative-task performance. A wearable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system is used for simultaneously measuring the brain activities of two participants. Each pair of participants perform a cooperative task, and their relative changes in cerebral blood are measured with the NIRS system. As for the task, the participants are told to count 10 s in their mind after an auditory cue and press a button. They are also told to adjust the timing of their button presses to make them as synchronized as possible. Certain information, namely, the ``intertime interval'' between the two button presses of each participant pair and which of the participants was the faster, is fed back to the participants by a beep sound after each trial. When the spatiotemporal covariance between the activation patterns of the prefrontal cortices of each participant is higher, the intertime interval between their button-press times was shorter. This result suggests that the synchronized activation patterns of the two participants' brains are associated with their performance when they interact in a cooperative task.

  15. Experiments with active phase matching of parallel-amplified multiline HF laser beams by a phase-locked Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffer, J. G.; Bernard, J. M.; Chodzko, R. A.; Turner, E. B.; Gross, R. W. F.; Warren, W. R.

    1983-01-01

    Active phase matching of multiline HF laser beams by means of a phase-locked Mach-Zehnder interferometer was demonstrated by locking the interferometer to the central interference fringe at zero optical path length difference. The central fringe could be found by varying the spectral content of the input beam. Laser amplification in one leg of the interferometer decreased fringe visibility without adversely affecting locking. Single-line fringe patterns produced by an array spectrometer (while the interferometer was operated in its scanning mode) were analyzed to show that no significant dispersion occurred in the amplifier. The techniques developed have potential for measuring dispersion mismatch between larger parallel amplifiers. These experiments demonstrated in principle that a number of multiline HF amplified beams can be recombined and phase-matched to produce a high beam quality output beam.

  16. Direct comparative study on the energy level alignments in unoccupied/occupied states of organic semiconductor/electrode interface by constructing in-situ photoemission spectroscopy and Ar gas cluster ion beam sputtering integrated analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Dong-Jin Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, Yongsu; Park, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Heon; Heo, Sung

    2014-10-21

    Through the installation of electron gun and photon detector, an in-situ photoemission and damage-free sputtering integrated analysis system is completely constructed. Therefore, this system enables to accurately characterize the energy level alignments including unoccupied/occupied molecular orbital (LUMO/HOMO) levels at interface region of organic semiconductor/electrode according to depth position. Based on Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS), Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPES), and reflective electron energy loss spectroscopy, the occupied/unoccupied state of in-situ deposited Tris[4-(carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]amine (TCTA) organic semiconductors on Au (E{sub LUMO}: 2.51 eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.35 eV) and Ti (E{sub LUMO}: 2.19 eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.69 eV) electrodes are investigated, and the variation of energy level alignments according to work function of electrode (Au: 4.81 eV and Ti: 4.19 eV) is clearly verified. Subsequently, under the same analysis condition, the unoccupied/occupied states at bulk region of TCTA/Au structures are characterized using different Ar gas cluster ion beam (Ar GCIB) and Ar ion sputtering processes, respectively. While the Ar ion sputtering process critically distorts both occupied and unoccupied states in UPS/IPES spectra, the Ar GCIB sputtering process does not give rise to damage on them. Therefore, we clearly confirm that the in-situ photoemission spectroscopy in combination with Ar GCIB sputtering allows of investigating accurate energy level alignments at bulk/interface region as well as surface region of organic semiconductor/electrode structure.

  17. Electron Beam-Induced Writing of Nanoscale Iron Wires on a Functional Metal Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Electron beam-induced surface activation (EBISA) has been used to grow wires of iron on rutile TiO2(110)-(1 × 1) in ultrahigh vacuum. The wires have a width down to ∼20 nm and hence have potential utility as interconnects on this dielectric substrate. Wire formation was achieved using an electron beam from a scanning electron microscope to activate the surface, which was subsequently exposed to Fe(CO)5. On the basis of scanning tunneling microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy measurements, the activation mechanism involves electron beam-induced surface reduction and restructuring. PMID:24159366

  18. Similar Age-Related Decline in Cortical Activity Over Frontotemporal Regions in Schizophrenia: A Multichannel Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Po-Han; Koike, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Yukika; Satomura, Yoshihiro; Kinoshita, Akihide; Takizawa, Ryu; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Although recent studies have demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls did not differ in the speed of age-related decline in cortical thickness and performances on cognitive tests, hemodynamic changes assessed by functional neuroimaging remain unclear. This study investigated age effects on regional brain cortical activity to determine whether there is similar age-related decline in cortical activity as those observed in cortical thickness and cognitive test performance. Method: A total of 109 patients with schizophrenia (age range: 16–59 y) and 106 healthy controls (age range: 16–59 y) underwent near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while performing a verbal fluency test (VFT). Group comparison of cortical activity was examined using 2-tailed t tests, adopting the false discovery rate method. The relationship between age and cortical activity was investigated using correlational and multiple regression analyses, adjusting for potential confounding variables. A 2-way ANOVA was conducted to investigate differences in the age effects between diagnostic groups. Results: The patient group exhibited significantly decreased cortical activity in several regions of the frontotemporal cortices. However, slopes of age-dependent decreases in cortical activity were similar between patients and healthy individuals at the bilateral frontotemporal regions. Conclusions: Our study showed no significant between-group differences in the age-related decline in cortical activity, as measured by NIRS, over the frontotemporal regions during a VFT. The results of our study may indicate a decrease in cortical activity in a relatively limited period around illness onset rather than continuously progressing over the course of the illness. PMID:24948388

  19. Active buckling control of a beam-column with circular cross-section using piezo-elastic supports and integral LQR control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffner, Maximilian; Götz, Benedict; Platz, Roland

    2016-06-01

    Buckling of slender beam-columns subject to axial compressive loads represents a critical design constraint for light-weight structures. Active buckling control provides a possibility to stabilize slender beam-columns by active lateral forces or bending moments. In this paper, the potential of active buckling control of an axially loaded beam-column with circular solid cross-section by piezo-elastic supports is investigated experimentally. In the piezo-elastic supports, lateral forces of piezoelectric stack actuators are transformed into bending moments acting in arbitrary directions at the beam-column ends. A mathematical model of the axially loaded beam-column is derived to design an integral linear quadratic regulator (LQR) that stabilizes the system. The effectiveness of the stabilization concept is investigated in an experimental test setup and compared with the uncontrolled system. With the proposed active buckling control it is possible to stabilize the beam-column in arbitrary lateral direction for axial loads up to the theoretical critical buckling load of the system.

  20. Measurement of active content in escitalopram tablets by a near-infrared transmission spectroscopy model that encompasses batch variability.

    PubMed

    Warnecke, Solveig; Rinnan, Åsmund; Allesø, Morten; Engelsen, Søren Balling

    2013-04-01

    Near-infrared transmission (NIT) spectroscopy, with high-performance liquid chromatography as reference method, was used to study the variation of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), escitalopram, in five tablet batches (4%-12%, w/w) manufactured by direct compression. This study investigates the influence of sample orientation, powder segregation, and compression force on the NIT spectra. For this purpose, tablet samples were taken at six different production time points, at three different compression forces, and presented to the spectrometer in four different orientations and in three spectroscopic replicates. A total set of 2160 NIT spectra was recorded. The variances between the spectra at each level of API content were thoroughly investigated by partial least squares regression using theory of sampling. The results show that a minimum of 18 tablets from each level of API content is required to establish a robust NIT calibration. The identified number of spectra is required for covering small differences in the spatial heterogeneity of the API as well as minor variations in optical properties, due to variations in the tablet compression force. NIT spectroscopy is demonstrated to be a powerful technique not only for measuring the API content in escitalopram tablets but also for routine content uniformity analysis. PMID:23381884

  1. Chiral sensing of amino acids and proteins chelating with Eu(III) complexes by Raman optical activity spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Kessler, Jiří; Bouř, Petr

    2016-09-14

    Chiroptical spectroscopy of lanthanides sensitively reflects their environment and finds various applications including probing protein structures. However, the measurement is often hampered by instrumental detection limits. In the present study circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) of a europium complex induced by amino acids is monitored by Raman optical activity (ROA) spectroscopy, which enables us to detect weak CPL bands invisible to conventional CPL spectrometers. In detail, the spectroscopic response to the protonation state could be studied, e.g. histidine at pH = 2 showed an opposite sign of the strongest CPL band in contrast to that at pH = 7. The spectra were interpreted qualitatively on the basis of the ligand-field theory and related to CPL induced by an external magnetic field. Free energy profiles obtained by molecular dynamic simulations for differently charged alanine and histidine forms are in qualitative agreement with the spectroscopic data. The sensitivity and specificity of the detection promise future applications in probing peptide and protein side chains, chemical imaging and medical diagnosis. This potential is observed for human milk and hen egg-white lysozymes; these proteins have a similar structure, but very different induced CPL spectra. PMID:27523964

  2. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy and vibronic activity of benzo[ghi]perylene.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaofeng; Salama, Farid

    2005-07-01

    Gas-phase cavity ring-down spectroscopy of jet-cooled benzo[ghi]perylene (C22H12) in the 26 950-28 600-cm(-1) spectral range is reported for the first time. This study is part of our extensive laboratory astrophysics program for the study of interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The observed spectrum shows an intermediate level structure and significant broadening and is associated with the vibronically coupled S1(1A1)<--S0(1A1) and S2(1B1)<--S0(1A1) electronic transitions. Time-dependent density-functional calculations were performed to calculate the energetics, vibrational frequencies, and normal coordinates of the S1 and S2 states. A simple vibronic model was employed to account for the vibronic interaction between the vibronic levels of the S1 and S2 states. The calculated vibronic spectrum is found to be in good agreement with the experimental spectrum. PMID:16035840

  3. Nanoscale Concentration Quantification of Pharmaceutical Actives in Amorphous Polymer Matrices by Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ricarte, Ralm G; Lodge, Timothy P; Hillmyer, Marc A

    2016-07-26

    We demonstrated the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to evaluate the composition of phenytoin:hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) spin-coated solid dispersions (SDs). To overcome the inability of bright-field and high-angle annular dark-field TEM imaging to distinguish between glassy drug and polymer, we used the π-π* transition peak in the EELS spectrum to detect phenytoin within the HPMCAS matrix of the SD. The concentration of phenytoin within SDs of 10, 25, and 50 wt % drug loading was quantified by a multiple least-squares analysis. Evaluating the concentration of 50 different regions in each SD, we determined that phenytoin and HPMCAS are intimately mixed at a length scale of 200 nm, even for drug loadings up to 50 wt %. At length scales below 100 nm, the variance of the measured phenytoin concentration increases; we speculate that this increase is due to statistical fluctuations in local concentration and chemical changes induced by electron irradiation. We also performed EELS analysis of an annealed 25 wt % phenytoin SD and showed that the technique can resolve concentration differences between regions that are less than 50 nm apart. Our findings indicate that EELS is a useful tool for quantifying, with high accuracy and sub-100 nm spatial resolution, the composition of many pharmaceutical and soft matter systems. PMID:27419264

  4. Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy as a measure of nociceptive evoked activity in critically ill infants.

    PubMed

    Ranger, Manon; Johnston, Celeste C; Limperopoulos, Catherine; Rennick, Janet E; du Plessis, Adre J

    2011-01-01

    Signs of pain may be subtle or absent in a critically ill infant. The complex nature of pain may further obscure its identification and measurement. Because the use of monitoring and neuroimaging techniques has become more common in pain research, an understanding of these specialized technologies is important. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive technique for monitoring tissue hemodynamics and oxygenation. There are indications that NIRS is capable of detecting the cerebral hemodynamic changes associated with sensory stimuli, including pain, in infants. These developments suggest that NIRS may play an important role in research focusing on pain perception in critically ill infants. The present review briefly describes the cortical responses to noxious stimuli, which parallel cerebral hemodynamic responses to various stimuli. This is followed by an overview of NIRS technology including a summary of the literature on functional studies that have used NIRS in infants. Current NIRS techniques have well-recognized limitations that must be considered carefully during the measurement and interpretation of the signals. Nonetheless, until more advanced NIRS techniques emerge, the current devices have strengths that should be exploited. PMID:22059205

  5. Defect study in molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe films with activated and unactivated arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Izhnin, I. I.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Varavin, V. S.; Mynbaev, K. D.; Fitsych, O. I.; Pociask-Bialy, M.; Sheregii, E.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.

    2014-04-28

    A defect study was performed on molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe films in situ doped with arsenic. Doping was performed from either effusion cell or cracker cell, and studied were both as-grown samples and samples subjected to arsenic activation annealing. Electrical properties of the films were investigated with the use of ion milling as a means of “stirring” defects in the material. As a result of the study, it was confirmed that the most efficient incorporation of electrically active arsenic occurs at the cracking zone temperature of 700 °C. Interaction between arsenic and tellurium during the growth was observed and is discussed in the paper.

  6. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  7. Prefrontal Brain Activation During Emotional Processing: A Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy Study (fNIRS)

    PubMed Central

    Glotzbach, Evelyn; Mühlberger, Andreas; Gschwendtner, Kathrin; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Pauli, Paul; Herrmann, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    The limbic system and especially the amygdala have been identified as key structures in emotion induction and regulation. Recently research has additionally focused on the influence of prefrontal areas on emotion processing in the limbic system and the amygdala. Results from fMRI studies indicate that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved not only in emotion induction but also in emotion regulation. However, studies using fNIRS only report prefrontal brain activation during emotion induction. So far it lacks the attempt to compare emotion induction and emotion regulation with regard to prefrontal activation measured with fNIRS, to exclude the possibility that the reported prefrontal brain activation in fNIRS studies are mainly caused by automatic emotion regulation processes. Therefore this work tried to distinguish emotion induction from regulation via fNIRS of the prefrontal cortex. 20 healthy women viewed neutral pictures as a baseline condition, fearful pictures as induction condition and reappraised fearful pictures as regulation condition in randomized order. As predicted, the view-fearful condition led to higher arousal ratings than the view-neutral condition with the reappraise-fearful condition in between. For the fNIRS results the induction condition showed an activation of the bilateral PFC compared to the baseline condition (viewing neutral). The regulation condition showed an activation only of the left PFC compared to the baseline condition, although the direct comparison between induction and regulation condition revealed no significant difference in brain activation. Therefore our study underscores the results of previous fNIRS studies showing prefrontal brain activation during emotion induction and rejects the hypothesis that this prefrontal brain activation might only be a result of automatic emotion regulation processes. PMID:21673974

  8. Functional near infrared spectroscopy study of age-related difference in cortical activation patterns during cycling with speed feedback.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Lin, Sang-I; Chen, Jia-Jin J

    2012-01-01

    Functional decline of lower-limb affects the ability of locomotion and the age-related brain differences have been elucidated among the elderly. Cycling exercise is a common training program for restoring motor function in the deconditioned elderly or stroke patients. The provision of speed feedback has been commonly suggested to clinical therapists for facilitating learning of controlled cycling performance and maintaining motivation in training programs with elderly participants. However, the cortical control of pedaling movements and the effect of external feedback remain poorly understanding. This study investigated the regional cortical activities detected by functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in 12 healthy young and 13 healthy elderly subjects under conditions of cycling without-(free cycling) and with feedback (target cycling). The elderly exhibited predominant activation of the sensorimotor cortex during free cycling similar to young subjects but with poorer cycling performance. The cycling performance improved in both groups, and the elderly showed increased brain activities of the supplementary motor area and premotor cortex under target cycling condition. These findings demonstrated age-related changes in the cortical control in processing external feedback and pedaling movements. Use of fNIRS to evaluate brain activation patterns after training may facilitate brain-based design of tailored therapeutic rehabilitation strategies. PMID:21984524

  9. 207Pb(n,2n{gamma})206Pb Cross-Section Measurements by In-Beam Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Borcea, C.; Jericha, E.; Jokic, S.; Lukic, S.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Pavlik, A.

    2006-03-13

    207Pb(n,2n{gamma})206Pb cross section were measured for incident neutron energies between 6 and 20 MeV with the white neutron beam produced at GELINA. The {gamma}-ray production cross section for the main transition (803 keV, 2+{yields} 0+) in 206Pb is compared to results obtained at Los Alamos and to the TALYS and EMPIRE-II code predictions.

  10. Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, H.; Yoneda, H.; Nakagawa, K.; Shimizu, F.

    2010-02-01

    .] -- Ultracold Ytterbium atoms in optical lattices / S. Sugawa ... [et al.] -- Ultracold polar molecules in the rovibrational ground state / J. Deiglmayr ... [et al.] -- Polar molecules near quantum degeneracy / J. Ye and D. S. Jin -- Production of a quantum gas of rovibronic ground-state molecules in an optical lattice / J. G. Danzl ... [et al.] -- Recent progress in x-ray nonlinear optics / K. Tamasaku, K. Sawada, and T. Ishikawa -- Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy - laser spectroscopy in unconventional environments / S. Svanberg -- Laser spectroscopy on relativistic ion beams / S. Reinhardt ... [et al.] -- Single frequency microcavity lasers and applications / L. Xu ... [et al.].

  11. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. In-situ Moessbauer Spectroscopy of Supported Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts During Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Motjope, Thato R.; Dlamini, Thulani H.

    2005-04-26

    The behavior of Fe based catalysts supported on ZrO2, SiO2, {gamma}-Al2O3, CeO2 and TiO2 during calcination, reduction and FT synthesis have been studied via in situ Moessbauer spectroscopy. It was found that the type of metal support interaction i.e. surface migration or bulk diffusion during calcination was dependant on the type of support used. Surface migration of Fe3+ during calcination was dominant for ZrO2, CeO2 and {gamma}-Al2O3 and this resulted in the sintering of {alpha}-Fe2O3 crystallites. Whereas bulk diffusion was observed mainly for the catalysts prepared using SiO2 and TiO2, causing a stabilization of the small crystallites of Fe3+ that interacted strongly with the support. Upon reduction, the large crystallites of {alpha}-Fe2O3 were found to reduce readily compared to the small crystallites of Fe3+, except for the catalyst prepared using {gamma}-Al2O3, as a support, where the presence of Al3+ resulted in the formation of spinel like species with the formula (Fe{sup 3+}{sub 2-x}Al{sup 3+}{sub x}Fe{sup 2+})O{sub 4} which are resistant to reduction. Upon exposure to synthesis gas, it was found that catalysts supported on ZrO2 and CeO2 carburized readily resulting in the formation of circa 80% {chi}-Fe2.5C. From this study it was observed that {gamma}-Al2O3 is not the preferred support for Fe based FT catalysts, as it forms the least amount of Fe carbides during FT synthesis.

  13. Predominant endothelial vasomotor activity during human sleep: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-11-01

    Vasomotion is important in the study of vascular disorders, including stroke. Spontaneous low and very low hemodynamic oscillations (3-150 mHz) measured with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) reflect the endothelial (3-20 mHz), neurogenic (20-40 mHz) and myogenic (40-150 mHz) components of vasomotion. We investigated sleep-specific patterns of vasomotion by characterizing hemodynamic oscillations with NIRS in healthy subjects, and tested the feasibility of NIRS as a bedside tool for monitoring vasomotion during whole-night sleep. To characterize local cerebral vasomotion, we compared cerebral NIRS measurements with muscular NIRS measurements and peripheral arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) during different sleep stages in 14 healthy volunteers. Spectral powers of hemodynamic oscillations in the frequency range of endothelial vasomotion were systemically predominant in every sleep stage, and the powers of endothelial and neurogenic vasomotion decreased in deep sleep as compared with light sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in brain, muscle, and SpO2 . The decrease in the powers of myogenic vasomotion in deep sleep only occurred in brain, and not in muscle. These results point to a predominant role of endothelial function in regulating vasomotion during sleep. The decline in cerebral endothelial and neurogenic vasomotion during progression to deeper non-REM sleep suggests that deep sleep may play a protective role for vascular function. NIRS can be used to monitor endothelial control of vasomotion during nocturnal sleep, thus providing a promising non-invasive bedside tool with which to study the sleep-relevant pathological mechanisms in vascular diseases and stroke. PMID:25156240

  14. Antioxidant activity of grape skin aqueous extracts from pressurized hot water extraction combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sťavíková, Lenka; Polovka, Martin; Hohnová, Barbora; Karásek, Pavel; Roth, Michal

    2011-09-30

    Pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) was employed to prepare extracts from dried grape skin of two wine grape varieties (St. Laurent and Alibernet) at various temperatures (from 40 up to 120°C) and amounts of sample (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 g). To assess the antioxidant activity of the extracts, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was applied involving DPPH and ABTS(+) assays. Other extract characteristics including HPLC profile of anthocyanins and total phenolic compound content were obtained as well. PHWE has also been compared with earlier results of extractions of the same grape skin samples with compressed methanol and compressed ethanol under the conditions of pressurized fluid extraction (PFE). From this comparison, PHWE emerges as the more benign and efficient extraction method to recover valuable phenolic antioxidants from grape skins for the prospective use in functional food supplements. PMID:21872083

  15. Active content determination of pharmaceutical tablets using near infrared spectroscopy as Process Analytical Technology tool.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Pierre-François; Sacré, Pierre-Yves; De Bleye, Charlotte; Netchacovitch, Lauranne; Mantanus, Jérôme; Motte, Henri; Schubert, Martin; Hubert, Philippe; Ziemons, Eric

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop Near infrared (NIR) methods to determine the active content of non-coated pharmaceutical tablets manufactured from a proportional tablet formulation. These NIR methods intend to be used for the monitoring of the active content of tablets during the tableting process. Firstly, methods were developed in transmission and reflection modes to quantify the API content of the lowest dosage strength. Secondly, these methods were fully validated for a concentration range of 70-130% of the target active content using the accuracy profile approach based on β-expectation tolerance intervals. The model using the transmission mode showed a better ability to predict the right active content compared to the reflection one. However, the ability of the reflection mode to quantify the API content in the highest dosage strength was assessed. Furthermore, the NIR method based on the transmission mode was successfully used to monitor at-line the tablet active content during the tableting process, providing better insight of the API content during the process. This improvement of control of the product quality provided by this PAT method is thoroughly compliant with the Quality by Design (QbD) concept. Finally, the transfer of the transmission model from the off-line to an on-line spectrometer was efficiently investigated. PMID:26452969

  16. In-beam Mössbauer spectroscopy of {sup 57}Fe/{sup 57}Mn in MgO and NaF at Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, M. K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Mihara, M.; Nagatomo, T.; Sato, W.; Miyazaki, J.; Sato, S.; Kitagawa, A.

    2014-02-15

    Development of efficient ion supply of {sup 58}Fe from {sup 58}Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, and quick switching between therapy and material science at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba realized a new {sup 57}Mn in-beam emission Mössbauer spectroscopy measurement system. Application to simple binary chemical compounds, MgO and NaF, proved the usefulness of the system to probe chemical and physical behaviors of trace impurities in solids. Annealing of lattice defects produced by the implantation and β-decay of {sup 57}Mn and/or γ-ray emission recoil was observed by a local probe.

  17. Direct analytical method of contact position effects on the energy-level alignments at organic semiconductor/electrode interfaces using photoemission spectroscopy combined with Ar gas cluster ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, Seong Heon; Kim, Yongsu; Park, SungHoon; Seol, Minsu; Heo, Sung

    2015-11-01

    Poly(3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) polymerized with poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) is one of the most widely used conducting organic electrodes owing to its outstanding optical/electrical properties and high work function. Because its work function depends significantly on the molecular arrangements between PEDOT and PSS molecules on the surface, the contact position of PEDOT:PSS films on organic semiconductors (OSCs) must also be an essential consideration. However, existing analysis methods based on in situ deposition/analysis are limited in their ability to accurately investigate the electronic structures of the buried interface regions under the solution-processed electrode or OSC layer in organic devices. Therefore, to overcome such limitations, we propose a top-down method based on photoemission spectroscopy analysis combined with Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering. Through this method, both energy-level alignments and molecular distributions at various OSC/electrode interfaces can be successfully characterized without reference to any deposition process.

  18. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of topmost surface for LaNiO 3 thin film grown on SrTiO 3 substrate by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Xu, S. Y.; Lin, J.; Ong, C. K.; Cui, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    The LaNiO 3 thin film was grown on SrTiO 3 (001) substrate by computer-controlled laser molecular beam epitaxy (laser MBE). In situ monitoring of the growing film surface was performed with a reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) indicated that the terminating plane of the LaNiO 3 film was the LaO atomic plane, and the SrTiO 3 (001) surfaces of as-supplied substrate as well as HF-pretreated substrate were predominantly terminated with TiO atomic plane. The structural conversion of the topmost atomic layer from NiO to LaO occurred during the LaNiO 3 epitaxial growth process.

  19. Fast crystallization of amorphous Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} induced by thermally activated electron-beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhangyi; Qi, Jianqi Zhou, Li; Feng, Zhao; Yu, Xiaohe; Gong, Yichao; Yang, Mao; Wei, Nian; Shi, Qiwu; Lu, Tiecheng

    2015-12-07

    We investigate the ionization and displacement effects of an electron-beam (e-beam) on amorphous Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} synthesized by the co-precipitation and calcination methods. The as-received amorphous specimens were irradiated under electron beams at different energies (80 keV, 120 keV, and 2 MeV) and then characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. A metastable fluorite phase was observed in nanocrystalline Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} and is proposed to arise from the relatively lower surface and interface energy compared with the pyrochlore phase. Fast crystallization could be induced by 120 keV e-beam irradiation (beam current = 0.47 mA/cm{sup 2}). The crystallization occurred on the nanoscale upon ionization irradiation at 400 °C after a dose of less than 10{sup 17} electrons/cm{sup 2}. Under e-beam irradiation, the activation energy for the grain growth process was approximately 10 kJ/mol, but the activation energy was 135 kJ/mol by calcination in a furnace. The thermally activated ionization process was considered the fast crystallization mechanism.

  20. In Vitro Antimicrobial Bioassays, DPPH Radical Scavenging Activity, and FTIR Spectroscopy Analysis of Heliotropium bacciferum.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sohail; AbdEl-Salam, Naser M; Ullah, Riaz

    2016-01-01

    The present study deals with the antimicrobial, antioxidant, and functional group analysis of Heliotropium bacciferum extracts. Disc diffusion susceptibility method was followed for antimicrobial assessment. Noteworthy antimicrobial activities were recorded by various plant extracts against antibiotic resistant microorganisms. Plant flower extracts antioxidant activity was investigated against 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical by ultraviolet spectrophotometer (517 nm). Plant extracts displayed noteworthy radical scavenging activities at all concentrations (25-225 μg/mL). Notable activities were recorded by crude, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts up to 88.27% at 225 μg/mL concentration. Compounds functional groups were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies. Alkanes, alkenes, alkyl halides, amines, carboxylic acids, amides, esters, alcohols, phenols, nitrocompounds, and aromatic compounds were identified by FTIR analysis. Thin layer chromatography bioautography was carried out for all plant extracts. Different bands were separated by various solvent systems. The results of the current study justify the use of Heliotropium bacciferum in traditional remedial herbal medicines. PMID:27597961

  1. Using Proton Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy to Understand Brain "Activation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baslow, Morris H.; Guilfoyle, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Upon stimulation, areas of the brain associated with specific cognitive processing tasks may undergo observable physiological changes, and measures of such changes have been used to create brain maps for visualization of stimulated areas in task-related brain "activation" studies. These perturbations usually continue throughout the period of the…

  2. In Vitro Antimicrobial Bioassays, DPPH Radical Scavenging Activity, and FTIR Spectroscopy Analysis of Heliotropium bacciferum

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The present study deals with the antimicrobial, antioxidant, and functional group analysis of Heliotropium bacciferum extracts. Disc diffusion susceptibility method was followed for antimicrobial assessment. Noteworthy antimicrobial activities were recorded by various plant extracts against antibiotic resistant microorganisms. Plant flower extracts antioxidant activity was investigated against 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical by ultraviolet spectrophotometer (517 nm). Plant extracts displayed noteworthy radical scavenging activities at all concentrations (25–225 μg/mL). Notable activities were recorded by crude, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts up to 88.27% at 225 μg/mL concentration. Compounds functional groups were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies. Alkanes, alkenes, alkyl halides, amines, carboxylic acids, amides, esters, alcohols, phenols, nitrocompounds, and aromatic compounds were identified by FTIR analysis. Thin layer chromatography bioautography was carried out for all plant extracts. Different bands were separated by various solvent systems. The results of the current study justify the use of Heliotropium bacciferum in traditional remedial herbal medicines. PMID:27597961

  3. Evaluation of redox-active iron sites in smectites using middle and near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Anke; Petit, Sabine; Hofstetter, Thomas B.

    2011-05-01

    Redox processes of structural Fe in clay minerals play an important role in biogeochemical cycles and for the dynamics of contaminant transformation in soils and aquifers. Reactions of Fe(II)/Fe(III) in clay minerals depend on a variety of mineralogical and environmental factors, which make the assessment of Fe redox reactivity challenging. Here, we use middle and near infrared (IR) spectroscopy to identify reactive structural Fe(II) arrangements in four smectites that differ in total Fe content, octahedral cationic composition, location of the negative excess charge, and configuration of octahedral hydroxyl groups. Additionally, we investigated the mineral properties responsible for the reversibility of structural alterations during Fe reduction and re-oxidation. For Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2), a smectite of low structural Fe content (2.8 wt%), we identified octahedral AlFe(II)-OH as the only reactive Fe(II) species, while high structural Fe content (>12 wt%) was prerequisite for the formation of multiple Fe(II)-entities (dioctahedral AlFe(II)-OH, MgFe(II)-OH, Fe(II)Fe(II)-OH, and trioctahedral Fe(II)Fe(II)Fe(II)-OH) in iron-rich smectites Ölberg montmorillonite, and ferruginous smectite (SWa-1), as well as in synthetic nontronite. Depending on the overall cationic composition and the location of excess charge, different reactive Fe(II) species formed during Fe reduction in iron-rich smectites, including tetrahedral Fe(II) groups in synthetic nontronite. Trioctahedral Fe(II) domains were found in tetrahedrally charged ferruginous smectite and synthetic nontronite in their reduced state while these Fe(II) entities were absent in Ölberg montmorillonite, which exhibits an octahedral layer charge. Fe(III) reduction in iron-rich smectites was accompanied by intense dehydroxylation and structural rearrangements, which were only partially reversible through re-oxidation. Re-oxidation of Wyoming montmorillonite, in contrast, restored the original mineral structure

  4. Ventrolateral prefrontal activation during a N-back task assessed with multichannel functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan; Zhu, Ye; Jiang, Tianzi

    2007-05-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) has been used to investigate the changes in the concentration of oxygenated (O2Hb) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin in brain issue during several cognitive tasks. In the present study, by means of multichannel dual wavelength light-emitting diode continuous-wave (CW) NIRS, we investigated the blood oxygenation changes of prefrontal cortex in 18 healthy subjects while performing a verbal n-back task (0-back and 2-back), which has been rarely investigated by fNIRS. Compared to the 0-back task (control task), we found a significant increase of O2Hb and total amount of hemoglobin (THb) in left and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) during the execution of the 2-back task compared to the 0-back task (p<0.05, FDR corrected). This result is consistent with the previous functional neuroimaging studies that have found the VLPFC activation related to verbal working memory. However, we found no significant hemisphere dominance. In addition, the effects of gender and its interaction with task performance on O2Hb concentration change were suggested in the present study. Our findings not only confirm that multichannel fNIRS is suitable to detect spatially specific activation during the performance of cognitive tasks; but also suggest that it should be cautious of gender-dependent difference in cerebral activation when interpreting the fNIRS data during cognitive tasks.

  5. Prefrontal cortex activity during motor tasks with additional mental load requiring attentional demand: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Mandrick, Kevin; Derosiere, Gérard; Dray, Gérard; Coulon, Denis; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Perrey, Stéphane

    2013-07-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is suitable for investigating cerebral oxygenation changes during motor and/or mental tasks. In the present study, we investigated how an additional mental load during a motor task at two submaximal loadings affects the fNIRS-measured brain activation over the right prefrontal cortex (PFC). Fifteen healthy males performed isometric grasping contractions at 15% and 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) with or without an additional mental (i.e., arithmetic) task. Mental performance, force variability, fNIRS and subjective perception responses were measured in each condition. The performance of the mental task decreased significantly while the force variability increased significantly at 30% MVC as compared to 15% MVC, suggesting that performance of dual-task required more attentional resources. PFC activity increased significantly as the effort increased from 15% to 30% MVC (p<.001). Although a larger change in the deoxyhemoglobin was observed in dual-task conditions (p=.051), PFC activity did not change significantly as compared to the motor tasks alone. In summary, participants were unable to invest more attention and effort in performing the more difficult levels in order to maintain adequate mental performance. PMID:23665138

  6. A DAQ-Device-Based Continuous Wave Near-Infrared Spectroscopy System for Measuring Human Functional Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoli; Liu, Xiaomin

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is getting more and more popular as a neuroimaging technique. The fNIRS instrument can be used to measure local hemodynamic response, which indirectly reflects the functional neural activities in human brain. In this study, an easily implemented way to establish DAQ-device-based fNIRS system was proposed. Basic instrumentation components (light sources driving, signal conditioning, sensors, and optical fiber) of the fNIRS system were described. The digital in-phase and quadrature demodulation method was applied in LabVIEW software to distinguish light sources from different emitters. The effectiveness of the custom-made system was verified by simultaneous measurement with a commercial instrument ETG-4000 during Valsalva maneuver experiment. The light intensity data acquired from two systems were highly correlated for lower wavelength (Pearson's correlation coefficient r = 0.92, P < 0.01) and higher wavelength (r = 0.84, P < 0.01). Further, another mental arithmetic experiment was implemented to detect neural activation in the prefrontal cortex. For 9 participants, significant cerebral activation was detected in 6 subjects (P < 0.05) for oxyhemoglobin and in 8 subjects (P < 0.01) for deoxyhemoglobin. PMID:25180044

  7. Auditory cortex activation to natural speech and simulated cochlear implant speech measured with functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pollonini, Luca; Olds, Cristen; Abaya, Homer; Bortfeld, Heather; Beauchamp, Michael S; Oghalai, John S

    2014-03-01

    The primary goal of most cochlear implant procedures is to improve a patient's ability to discriminate speech. To accomplish this, cochlear implants are programmed so as to maximize speech understanding. However, programming a cochlear implant can be an iterative, labor-intensive process that takes place over months. In this study, we sought to determine whether functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), a non-invasive neuroimaging method which is safe to use repeatedly and for extended periods of time, can provide an objective measure of whether a subject is hearing normal speech or distorted speech. We used a 140 channel fNIRS system to measure activation within the auditory cortex in 19 normal hearing subjects while they listed to speech with different levels of intelligibility. Custom software was developed to analyze the data and compute topographic maps from the measured changes in oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentration. Normal speech reliably evoked the strongest responses within the auditory cortex. Distorted speech produced less region-specific cortical activation. Environmental sounds were used as a control, and they produced the least cortical activation. These data collected using fNIRS are consistent with the fMRI literature and thus demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique to objectively detect differences in cortical responses to speech of different intelligibility. PMID:24342740

  8. A DAQ-device-based continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy system for measuring human functional brain activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Li, Xiaoli; Li, Duan; Liu, Xiaomin

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is getting more and more popular as a neuroimaging technique. The fNIRS instrument can be used to measure local hemodynamic response, which indirectly reflects the functional neural activities in human brain. In this study, an easily implemented way to establish DAQ-device-based fNIRS system was proposed. Basic instrumentation components (light sources driving, signal conditioning, sensors, and optical fiber) of the fNIRS system were described. The digital in-phase and quadrature demodulation method was applied in LabVIEW software to distinguish light sources from different emitters. The effectiveness of the custom-made system was verified by simultaneous measurement with a commercial instrument ETG-4000 during Valsalva maneuver experiment. The light intensity data acquired from two systems were highly correlated for lower wavelength (Pearson's correlation coefficient r = 0.92, P < 0.01) and higher wavelength (r = 0.84, P < 0.01). Further, another mental arithmetic experiment was implemented to detect neural activation in the prefrontal cortex. For 9 participants, significant cerebral activation was detected in 6 subjects (P < 0.05) for oxyhemoglobin and in 8 subjects (P < 0.01) for deoxyhemoglobin. PMID:25180044

  9. Cortico-cortical activity between the primary and supplementary motor cortex: An intraoperative near-infrared spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masafumi; Takao, Tetsuro; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ogura, Ryosuke; Sato, Yosuke; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: The supplementary motor area (SMA) makes multiple reciprocal connections to many areas of the cerebral cortices, such as the primary motor cortex (PMC), anterior cingulate cortex, and various regions in the parietal somatosensory cortex. In patients with SMA seizures, epileptic discharges from the SMA rapidly propagate to the PMC. We sought to determine whether near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is able to intraoperatively display hemodynamic changes in epileptic network activities between the SMA and the PMC. Case Descriptions: In a 60-year-old male with SMA seizures, we intraoperatively delivered a 500 Hz, 5-train stimulation to the medial cortical surface and measured the resulting hemodynamic changes in the PMC by calculating the oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) concentration changes during stimulation. No hemodynamic changes in the lateral cortex were observed during stimulation of the medial surface corresponding to the foot motor areas. In contrast, both HbO2 and HbR increased in the lateral cortex corresponding to the hand motor areas when the seizure onset zone was stimulated. In the premotor cortex and the lateral cortex corresponding to the trunk motor areas, hemodynamic changes showed a pattern of increased HbO2 with decreased HbR. Conclusions: This is the first reported study using intraoperative NIRS to characterize the epileptic network activities between the SMA and PMC. Our intraoperative NIRS procedure may thus be useful in monitoring the activities of cortico-cortical neural pathways such as the language system. PMID:25883836

  10. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) of brain function during active balancing using a video game system.

    PubMed

    Karim, Helmet; Schmidt, Benjamin; Dart, Dwight; Beluk, Nancy; Huppert, Theodore

    2012-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a portable, non-invasive, brain imaging technology that uses low levels of non-ionizing light to record changes in cerebral blood flow in the brain through optical sensors placed on the surface of the scalp. These signals are recorded via flexible fiber optic cables, which allow neuroimaging experiments to be conducted on participants while performing tasks such as standing or walking. FNIRS has the potential to provide new insights into the evolution of brain activation during ambulatory motor learning tasks and standing tasks to probe balance and vestibular function. In this study, a 32 channel fNIRS system was used to record blood flow changes in the frontal, motor, sensory, and temporal cortices during active balancing associated with playing a video game simulating downhill skiing (Nintendo Wii™; Wii-fit™). Using fNIRS, we found activation of superior temporal gyrus, which was modulated by the difficulty of the balance task. This region had been previously implicated in vestibular function from other animal and human studies. PMID:22078300

  11. Temporal evolution of pump beam self-focusing at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, M. J.; Pedersen, T.; Mishin, E.; Starks, M.; Gerken-Kendall, E.; Sentman, D.; Oyama, S.; Watkins, B.

    2007-08-01

    On 4 February 2005 the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility was operated at 2.85 MHz to produce artificial optical emissions in the ionosphere while passing through the second electron gyroharmonic. All-sky optical recordings were performed with 15 s integration, alternating between 557.7 and 630 nm. We report the first optical observations showing the temporal evolution of large-scale pump wave self-focusing in the magnetic zenith, observed in the 557.7 nm images. These clearly show that the maximum intensity was not reached after 15 s of pumping, which is unexpected since the emission delay time is <1 s, and that the optical signature had intensified in a much smaller region within the beam after 45 s of pumping. In addition, adjacent regions within the beam lost intensity. Radar measurements indicate a plasma depletion of ~1% near the HF reflection altitude. Ray tracing of the pump wave through the plasma depletion region, which forms a concave reflecting radio wave mirror, reproduces the optical spatial morphology. A radio wave flux density gain of up to ~30 dB may occur. In addition, the ray trace is consistent with the observed artificial optical emissions for critical plasma frequencies down to ~0.5 MHz below the pump frequency.

  12. Beam Damage of HS (CH2)15 COOH Terminated Self Assembled Monolayer (SAM) as Observed by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Baer, Donald R.

    2011-10-25

    XPS spectra of HS(CH{sub 2}){sub 15} COOH terminated a self assembled monolayer (SAM)sample was collected over a period of 242 minutes to determine specimen damage during long exposures to monochromatic Al Ka x-rays. For this COOH terminated SAM we measured the loss of oxygen as a function of time by rastering a focused 100 W, 100 um diameter x-ray beam over a 1.4 mm x 0.2 mm area of the sample.

  13. Fishbone activity in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injection plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liqing; Zhang, Jizong; Chen, Kaiyun E-mail: lqhu@ipp.cas.cn; Hu, Liqun E-mail: lqhu@ipp.cas.cn; Li, Erzhong; Lin, Shiyao; Shi, Tonghui; Duan, Yanmin; Zhu, Yubao

    2015-12-15

    Repetitive fishbones near the trapped ion procession frequency were observed for the first time in the neutral beam injection high confinement plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) tokamak, and diagnosed using a solid-state neutral particle analyzer based on a compact silicon photodiode together with an upgraded high spatial-temporal-resolution multi-arrays soft X-ray (SX) system. This 1/1 typical internal kink mode propagates in the ion-diamagnetism direction with a rotation speed faster than the bulk plasma in the plasma frame. From the SX measurements, this mode frequency is typical of chirping down and the energetic particle effect related to the twisting mode structure. This ion fishbone was found able to trigger a multiple core sawtooth crashes with edge-2/1 sideband modes, as well as to lead to a transition from fishbone to long lived saturated kink mode to fishbone. Furthermore, using SX tomography, a correlation between mode amplitude and mode frequency was found. Finally, a phenomenological prey–predator model was found to reproduce the fishbone nonlinear process well.

  14. Evaluation of fine-particle catalysts: Activity testing results and phase identification using Mossbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.; Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine- particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Coal Liquefaction program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Previously reported results have described the standard test procedure that was developed at Sandia to evaluate fine-particle size iron catalysts being developed in DOE/PETC`s AR Coal Liquefaction Program. This test uses DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design that enables evaluation of a catalyst over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt% on a dmmf coal basis). Testing has been performed on Pacific Northwest Laboratories` (PNL) 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst. Results showed that this catalyst is more active than the University of Pittsburgh`s sulfated iron oxide catalyst that was evaluated previously. PNL has also produced two additional batches of catalyst in an effort to optimize their preparation procedures for larger batches. Sandia has observed significant differences in activities among these three catalysts; these differences might be due to particle size effects, the type of drying procedure, or the amount of moisture present. Mossbauer characterization of the iron phases in the coal, catalyst precursors, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) insoluble material from liquefaction reactions has been performed on the University of Pittsburgh`s catalyst and the first PNL catalyst that was tested at Sandia. The Mossbauer results were obtained at the University of Kentucky and will be presented. Future work will include testing additional catalysts being developed in the AR Coal Liquefaction Program, developing procedures to characterize reaction products, and determining the kinetics of the reactions.

  15. Disentangling AGN and Star Formation Activity at High Redshift Using Hubble Space Telescope Grism Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, Joanna S.; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Fox, Derek; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-08-01

    Differentiating between active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and star formation in z ∼ 2 galaxies is difficult because traditional methods, such as line-ratio diagnostics, change with redshift, while multi-wavelength methods (X-ray, radio, IR) are sensitive to only the brightest AGNs. We have developed a new method for spatially resolving emission lines using the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 G141 grism spectra and quantifying AGN activity through the spatial gradient of the [O iii]/Hβ line ratio. Through detailed simulations, we show that our novel line-ratio gradient approach identifies ∼40% more low-mass and obscured AGNs than obtained by classical methods. Based on our simulations, we developed a relationship that maps the stellar mass, star formation rate, and measured [O iii]/Hβ gradient to the AGN Eddington ratio. We apply our technique to previously studied stacked samples of galaxies at z ∼ 2 and find that our results are consistent with these studies. This gradient method will also be able to inform other areas of galaxy evolution science, such as inside-out quenching and metallicity gradients, and will be widely applicable to future spatially resolved James Webb Space Telescope data.

  16. [Synthesis, conformation, and spectroscopy of nucleoside analogues concerning their antiviral activity].

    PubMed

    Kuśmierek, Jarosław T; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Chemically modified analogues of nucleosides and nucleotides, have been thoroughly investigated since the discovery of DNA double helix by Watson and Crick in 1953 (Nature 171: 737). Chemical structures, first of all tautomerism, of the nucleic acid bases, as well as the conformations of the nucleic acids constituents, determine the secondary and tertiary structures of DNA and RNA polymers. Similarly, structural and dynamic parameters of nucleoside derivatives determine their biological activity in mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation, as well as antiviral or anticancer properties. In this review, a multidisciplinary approach of Prof. David Shugar's group is presented in the studies on nucleosides and nucleotides. It consists in chemical syntheses of suitable analogues, measurements of physicochemical and spectral parameters, conformational analysis by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray diffraction, as well as characteristics of the nucleoside analogues as inhibitors of some selected, target enzymes, crucial in respect to antiviral activity of the analogues. These long-lasting studies follows upon the line of the main paradigm of molecular biophysics, i. e. structure-activity relationship. PMID:26677575

  17. Disentangling AGN and Star Formation Activity at High Redshift Using Hubble Space Telescope Grism Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, Joanna S.; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Fox, Derek; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-08-01

    Differentiating between active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and star formation in z ˜ 2 galaxies is difficult because traditional methods, such as line-ratio diagnostics, change with redshift, while multi-wavelength methods (X-ray, radio, IR) are sensitive to only the brightest AGNs. We have developed a new method for spatially resolving emission lines using the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 G141 grism spectra and quantifying AGN activity through the spatial gradient of the [O iii]/Hβ line ratio. Through detailed simulations, we show that our novel line-ratio gradient approach identifies ˜40% more low-mass and obscured AGNs than obtained by classical methods. Based on our simulations, we developed a relationship that maps the stellar mass, star formation rate, and measured [O iii]/Hβ gradient to the AGN Eddington ratio. We apply our technique to previously studied stacked samples of galaxies at z ˜ 2 and find that our results are consistent with these studies. This gradient method will also be able to inform other areas of galaxy evolution science, such as inside-out quenching and metallicity gradients, and will be widely applicable to future spatially resolved James Webb Space Telescope data.

  18. Comparison of short-lived medical isotopes activation by laser thin target induced protons and conventional cyclotron proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joseph; Dudnikova, Galina; Liu, Tung-Chang; Papadopoulos, Dennis; Sagdeev, Roald; Su, J. J.; UMD MicroPET Team

    2014-10-01

    Production diagnostic or therapeutic nuclear medicines are either by nuclear reactors or by ion accelerators. In general, diagnostic nuclear radioisotopes have a very short half-life varying from tens of minutes for PET tracers and few hours for SPECT tracers. Thus supplies of PET and SPECT radiotracers are limited by regional production facilities. For example 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the most desired tracer for positron emission tomography because its 110 minutes half-life is sufficient long for transport from production facilities to nearby users. From nuclear activation to completing image taking must be done within 4 hours. Decentralized production of diagnostic radioisotopes will be idea to make high specific activity radiotracers available to researches and clinicians. 11 C, 13 N, 15 O and 18 F can be produced in the energy range from 10-20 MeV by protons. Protons of energies up to tens of MeV generated by intense laser interacting with hydrogen containing targets have been demonstrated by many groups in the past decade. We use 2D PIC code for proton acceleration, Geant4 Monte Carlo code for nuclei activation to compare the yields and specific activities of short-lived isotopes produced by cyclotron proton beams and laser driven protons.

  19. Three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy compared with permanent prostate implantation in low-risk prostate cancer based on endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging and prostate-specific antigen level

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, Barby . E-mail: pickett@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Kurhanewicz, John; Pouliot, Jean; Weinberg, Vivian; Shinohara, Katsuto; Coakley, Fergus; Roach, Mack

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the metabolic response by comparing the time to resolution of spectroscopic abnormalities (TRSA) and the time to prostate-specific antigen level in low-risk prostate cancer patients after treatment with three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) compared with permanent prostate implantation (PPI). Recent studies have suggested that the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer yields similar results for patients treated with 3D-CRT or PPI. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 patients, 25 in each group, who had been treated with 3D-CRT or PPI, had undergone endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging before and/or at varying times after therapy. The 3D-CRT patients had received radiation doses of {>=}72 Gy compared with 144 Gy for the PPI patients. The spectra from all usable voxels were examined for detectable levels of metabolic signal, and the percentages of atrophic and cancerous voxels were tabulated. Results: The median time to resolution of the spectroscopic abnormalities was 32.2 and 24.8 months and the time to the nadir prostate-specific antigen level was 52.4 and 38.0 months for the 3D-CRT and PPI patients, respectively. Of the 3D-CRT patients, 92% achieved negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 40% having complete metabolic atrophy. All 25 PPI patients had negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 60% achieving complete metabolic atrophy. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that metabolic and biochemical responses of the prostate are more pronounced after PPI. Our results have not proved PPI is more effective at curing prostate cancer, but they have demonstrated that it may be more effective at destroying prostate metabolism.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF ION CHARGE DISTRIBUTIONS, EFFECTIVE ELECTRON DENSITIES, AND ELECTRON-ION CLOUD OVERLAP IN ELECTRON BEAM ION TRAP PLASMA USING EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, G. Y.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Baumann, T. M.; Epp, S. W.; Gonchar, A.; Mokler, P. H.; Simon, M. C.; Tawara, H.; Maeckel, V.; Ullrich, J.; Lapierre, A.; Yao, K.; Zou, Y.; Zhao, G. E-mail: crespojr@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2009-09-10

    Spectra in the extreme ultraviolet range from 107 to 353 A emitted from Fe ions in various ionization stages have been observed at the Heidelberg electron beam ion trap (EBIT) with a flat-field grating spectrometer. A series of transition lines and their intensities have been analyzed and compared with collisional-radiative simulations. The present collisional-radiative model reproduces well the relative line intensities and facilitates line identification of ions produced in the EBIT. The polarization effect on the line intensities resulting from nonthermal unidirectional electron impact was explored and found to be significant (up to 24%) for a few transition lines. Based upon the observed line intensities, relative charge state distributions (CSD) of ions were determined, which peaked at Fe{sup 23+} tailing toward lower charge states. Another simulation on ion charge distributions including the ionization and electron capture processes generated CSDs which are in general agreement with the measurements. By observing intensity ratios of specific lines from levels collisionally populated directly from the ground state and those starting from the metastable levels of Fe XXI, Fe X and other ionic states, the effective electron densities were extracted and found to depend on the ionic charge. Furthermore, it was found that the overlap of the ion cloud with the electron beam estimated from the effective electron densities strongly depends on the charge state of the ion considered, i.e. under the same EBIT conditions, higher charge ions show less expansion in the radial direction.

  1. Optically active vacancies in GaN grown on Si substrates probed using a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uedono, Akira Zhang, Yang; Yoshihara, Nakaaki; Fujishima, Tatsuya; Palacios, Tomás; Cao, Yu; Laboutin, Oleg; Johnson, Wayne; Ishibashi, Shoji; Sumiya, Masatomo

    2014-02-24

    Native defects in GaN layers grown on Si substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition have been studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation for GaN layers showed that optically active vacancy-type defects were formed in the layers. Charge transition of the defects due to electron capture was found to occur when the layers were irradiated by photons with energy above 2.71 eV. The concentration of such defects increased after 600–800 °C annealing, but the defects have not been annealed out even at 1000 °C. They were identified as Ga-vacancy-type defects, such as complexes between Ga vacancies and carbon impurities, and the relationship between their charge transition and optical properties were discussed.

  2. Comparative Mutagenesis Studies of Retinal Release in Light-Activated Zebrafish Rhodopsin Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Morrow, J M; Chang, B S W

    2015-07-28

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment responsible for initiating scotopic (dim-light) vision in vetebrates. Once activated by light, release of all-trans-retinal from rhodopsin involves hydrolysis of the Schiff base linkage, followed by dissociation of retinal from the protein moiety. This kinetic process has been well studied in model systems such as bovine rhodopsin, but not in rhodopsins from cold-blooded animals, where physiological temperatures can vary considerably. Here, we characterize the rate of retinal release from light-activated rhodopsin in an ectotherm, zebrafish (Danio rerio), demonstrating in a fluorescence assay that this process occurs more than twice as fast as bovine rhodopsin at similar temperatures in 0.1% dodecyl maltoside. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found that differences in retinal release rates can be attributed to a series of variable residues lining the retinal channel in three key structural motifs: an opening in metarhodopsin II between transmembrane helix 5 (TM5) and TM6, in TM3 near E122, and in the "retinal plug" formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2). The majority of these sites are more proximal to the β-ionone ring of retinal than the Schiff base, indicating their influence on retinal release is more likely due to steric effects during retinal dissociation, rather than alterations to Schiff base stability. An Arrhenius plot of zebrafish rhodopsin was consistent with this model, inferring that the activation energy for Schiff base hydrolysis is similar to that of bovine rhodopsin. Functional variation at key sites identified in this study is consistent with the idea that retinal release might be an adaptive property of rhodopsin in vertebrates. Our study is one of the few investigating a nonmammalian rhodopsin, which will help establish a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms contributing to vision in cold-blooded vertebrates. PMID:26098991

  3. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis of bioactive petalostigma extracts: Toxicity, antibacterial and antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    Kalt, F. R.; Cock, I. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Petalostigma pubescens and Petalostigma triloculare were common components of pharmacopeia's of multiple Australian Aboriginal tribal groupings which traditionally inhabited the areas in which they grow. Among these groups, they had a myriad of medicinal uses in treating a wide variety of bacterial, fungal and viral infections. This study was undertaken to test P. pubescens and P. triloculare leaf and fruit extracts for the ability to inhibit bacterial and viral growth and thus validate Australian Aboriginal usage of these plants in treating bacterial and fungal diseases. Materials and Methods: P. pubescens, and P. triloculare leaves and fruit were extracted and tested for antimicrobial, antiviral activity and toxicity. The bioactive extracts were further examined by RP-HPLC and GC-MS to identify the component compounds. Results: The methanol, water and ethyl acetate leaf and fruit extracts of displayed potent antibacterial activity. The methanol and ethyl acetate extracts displayed the broadest specificity, inhibiting the growth of 10 of the 14 bacteria tested (71%) for the leaf extract and 9 of the 14 bacteria tested (64%) for the fruit extracts. The water extracts also had broad spectrum antibacterial activity, inhibiting the growth of 8 (57%) and 7 (50%) of the 14 bacteria tested, respectively. All antibacterial extracts were approximately equally effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, inhibiting the growth of 50-75% of the bacteria tested. The methanol, water and ethyl acetate extracts also displayed antiviral activity in the MS2 plaque reduction assay. The methanol and water extracts inhibited 26.6-49.0% and 85.4-97.2% of MS2 plaque formation, respectively, with the fruit extracts being more potent inhibitors. All ethyl acetate extracts inhibited 100% of MS2 plaque formation. All extracts were also non-toxic or of low toxicity. Analysis of these extracts by RP-HPLC showed that the P. triloculare ethyl acetate fruit extract was

  4. Nanoporous gold as a highly active substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kucheyev, S O; Hayes, J R; Biener, J; Hamza, A V

    2006-03-28

    Colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles are currently among most studied substrates for sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). However, such substrates often suffer from not being cost-effective, reusable, or stable. Here, we develop nanoporous Au as a highly active, tunable, a.ordable, stable, bio-compatible, and reusable SERS substrate. Nanoporous Au is prepared by a facile process of free corrosion of AgAu alloys followed by annealing. Results show that nanofoams with average pore sizes of {approx} 250 nm exhibit the largest SERS signal for 632.8 nm excitation. This is attributed to the electromagnetic SERS enhancement mechanism with additional field localization within pores.

  5. X-ray Spectroscopy of Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei with XMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiMatteo, Tiziana; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of black hole masses in nearby galaxies has transformed our understanding of these systems, allowing us to quantify the relevant scales of power, length and time and explore how the activity of black holes is linked to their environments and to the evolution of their host galaxies. In this project, Dr. Tiziana Di Matteo has the primary responsibility for developing and investigating theoretical models for the origin of the X-ray emission observed in low-luminosity AGN. Dr. Di Matteo has been involved in interpreting X-ray data and assessing accretion models throughout the project.

  6. Spectroscopy of infrared-active phonons in high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvinchuk, A. P.; Thomsen, C.; Cardona, M.; Borjesson, L.

    1995-01-01

    For a large variety of superconducting materials both experimental and theoretical lattice dynamical studies have been performed to date. The assignment of the observed infrared- and Raman-active phonon modes to the particular lattice eigenmodes is generally accepted. We will concentrate here upon the analysis of the changes of the infrared-phonon parameters (frequency and linewidth) upon entering the superconducting state which, as will be shown, may provide information on the magnitude of the superconductivity-related gap and its dependence on the superconducting transition temperature Tc.

  7. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of electrically conductive metal-organic frameworks doped with redox active species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberding, Brian G.; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2015-09-01

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are three-dimensional coordination polymers that are well known for large pore surface area and their ability to adsorb molecules from both the gaseous and solution phases. In general, MOFs are electrically insulating, but promising opportunities for tuning the electronic structure exist because MOFs possess synthetic versatility; the metal and organic ligand subunits can be exchanged or dopant molecules can be introduced into the pore space. Two such MOFs with demonstrated electrical conductivity are Cu3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2, a.k.a HKUST-1, and Cu[Ni(pyrazine-2,3-dithiolate)2]. Herein, these two MOFs have been infiltrated with the redox active species 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and iodine under solution phase conditions and shown to produce redox products within the MOF pore space. Vibrational bands assignable to TCNQ anion and triiodide anion have been observed in the Mid-IR and Terahertz ranges using FTIR Spectroscopy. The MOF samples have been further investigated by Time-Resolved Terehertz Spectroscopy (TRTS). Using this technique, the charge mobility, separation, and recombination dynamics have been followed on the picosecond time scale following photoexcitation with visible radiation. The preliminary results show that the MOF samples have small inherent photoconductivity with charge separation lifetimes on the order of a few picoseconds. In the case of HKUST-1, the MOF can also be supported by a TiO2 film and initial results show that charge injection into the TiO2 layer occurs with a comparable efficiency to the dye sensitizer N3, [cis-Bis(isothiocyanato)-bis(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylato ruthenium(II)], and therefore this MOF has potential as a new light absorbing and charge conducting material in photovoltaic devices.

  8. Molecular spectroscopy of CH Cygni in the 1998-2000 active phas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotnik-Karuza, D.; Jurdana-Sepic, R.; Majlinger, Z.

    The subject of this study is the very peculiar symbiotic binary CH Cygni, in particular the physical conditions in the photosphere of its cool component. The latter has been classified as an M late type giant due to its spectral appearance in the optical and near IR spectral region during quiescent and active phases. Several consecutive spectra obtained with different exposure times covering the region lambda 4800-9000 A were obtained on 24/25 November 1999 which means that they belong to the 1998-2000 active phase. We have concentrated our investigations on the TiO absorption bands which are the most outstanding feature in these spectra. The bands, some of which give evidence of a partly resolved rotational structure, have been identified as members of the alpha, gamma, gamma prim, beta, delta, phi and epsilon band systems. Measurement of the band head relative intensities and some other features in their structure have led to determination of temperatures of the coolest layers in the red giant's photosphere.

  9. Correlation between LIFG and autonomic activation during stressful tasks: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jie; Sakatani, Kaoru; Okamoto, Masako; Yamaguchi, Yui; Zuo, Huan-Cong

    2014-10-01

    It remains unclear whether language tasks in one's first (L1) or second (L2) language can cause stress responses and whether frontal, autonomic and behavioral responses to stressful tasks are correlated. In this study, we studied 22 Chinese subjects whose L2 was English and measured the cerebral blood oxygenation in their frontal lobe by using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as participants engaged in a mental arithmetic task (MAT) and verbal fluency tasks (VFTs) in L1 (Chinese) and L2 (English). To examine the activated cortical areas, we estimated the channel location based on Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) standard brain space by using a probabilistic estimation method. We evaluated heart rate (HR) changes to analyze autonomic nervous system (ANS) functioning. We found that the MAT and VFTs induced greater increases in HR than did the control (Ctrl) task. Furthermore, subjects developed greater increases in HR in the MAT and VFTL2 than they did in the VFTL1. Compared with the Ctrl task, the MAT and both VFTL1 and VFTL2 produced robust and widespread bilateral activation of the frontal cortex. Interestingly, partial correlation analysis indicated that the activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) [Brodmann's area (BA) 47] was consistently correlated with the increases in HR across the three tasks (MAT, VFTL2, and VFTL1), after controlling for the performance data. The present results suggested that a VFT in L2 may be more stressful than in L1. The LIFG may affect the activation of the sympathetic system induced by stressful tasks, including MATs and VFTs. PMID:25318875

  10. Precise quantification of cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Rachid; Blumer, Katy; Yeoh-Tan, Gilbert; Trexler, Adam J; Magzoub, Mazin

    2016-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as a potentially powerful tool for drug delivery due to their ability to efficiently transport a whole host of biologically active cargoes into cells. Although concerted efforts have shed some light on the cellular internalization pathways of CPPs, quantification of CPP uptake has proved problematic. Here we describe an experimental approach that combines two powerful biophysical techniques, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to directly, accurately and precisely measure the cellular uptake of fluorescently-labeled molecules. This rapid and technically simple approach is highly versatile and can readily be applied to characterize all major CPP properties that normally require multiple assays, including amount taken up by cells (in moles/cell), uptake efficiency, internalization pathways, intracellular distribution, intracellular degradation and toxicity threshold. The FACS-FCS approach provides a means for quantifying any intracellular biochemical entity, whether expressed in the cell or introduced exogenously and transported across the plasma membrane. PMID:27033412

  11. Raman spectroscopy-an innovative and versatile tool to follow the respirational activity and carbonate biomineralization of important cave bacteria.

    PubMed

    Keiner, Robert; Frosch, Torsten; Hanf, Stefan; Rusznyak, Anna; Akob, Denise M; Küsel, Kirsten; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-09-17

    Raman gas spectrometry is introduced as a unique tool for the investigation of the respiratory activity that is indicative for growth of bacteria involved in biomineralization. Growth of these bacteria cannot be monitored using conventional turbidity-based optical density measurements due to concomitant mineral formation in the medium. The respiratory activity of carbonate-precipitating Arthrobacter sulfonivorans , isolated from the recently discovered Herrenberg Cave, was investigated during its lifecycle by means of innovative cavity-enhanced Raman gas analysis. This method allowed rapid and nonconsumptive online quantification of CO2 and O2 in situ in the headspace of the bacterial culture. Carbon dioxide production rates of A. sulfonivorans showed two maxima due to its pleomorphic growth lifecycle. In contrast, only one maximum was observed in control organism Pseudomonas fluorescens with a one-stage lifecycle. Further insight into the biomineralization process over time was provided by a combination of Raman macro- and microspectroscopy. With the help of this spatially resolved chemical imaging of the different types of calcium carbonate minerals, it was elucidated that the surface of the A. sulfonivorans bacterial cells served as nuclei for biomineralization of initially spherical vaterite precipitates. These vaterite biominerals continued growing as chemically stable rock-forming calcite crystals with rough edges. Thus, the utilization of innovative Raman multigas spectroscopy, combined with Raman mineral analysis, provided novel insights into microbial-mediated biomineralization and, therefore, provides a powerful methodology in the field of environmental sciences. PMID:23972095

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy-active substrates: adapting the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles for different biological applications.

    PubMed

    Vitol, Elina A; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2014-04-01

    We discuss the relationship between the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles and the biological surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) applications which they can enable. As a step forward in developing SERS-active substrates adapted to a particular application, we demonstrate that a modification of the widely used protocol for the sodium citrate mediated reduction of chloroauric acid, which is typically employed only for obtaining spherical gold nanoparticles, can yield flat polygonal nanoparticles at room temperature and a decreased amount of the reducing agent. The significant advantage of the described approach is that it allows for synthesis of nanoparticles with different geometries using a well-established synthesis protocol without the need for any additional chemicals or special synthesis apparatus. By contrasting spherical and anisotropically shaped nanoparticles, we demonstrate that multifaceted nanoparticles with sharp edges are better suitable for SERS analysis of low concentration analytes requiring strong SERS enhancement. On the other hand, gold nanoparticles with isotropic shapes, while giving a smaller enhancement, can provide a more reproducible SERS signal. This is important for analytical applications of complex biological systems where large SERS enhancement may not always be required, whereas data reproducibility and minimal false positive rate are imperative. Using a SERS-active substrate comprising isotropically shaped gold nanoparticles, we demonstrate the differences between Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (S. aureus) bacteria, attributable to the outer membrane and peptidoglycan layer, with the level of detail which has not been previously reported with optical spectroscopic techniques. PMID:24734732

  13. Effects of Positive and Negative Mood Induction on the Prefrontal Cortex Activity Measured by Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Compare, A; Brugnera, Agostino; Adorni, R; Sakatani, K

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiological mechanism of positive versus negative emotions is insufficiently understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of event recall tasks on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Nine healthy adults were instructed to recall episodes of their life associated with positive (happiness) and negative (anger) emotion, both silently and verbally. Heart rate (HR) changes were simultaneously measured. NIRS showed an increased oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) in the bilateral PFC during silent and verbal recall of both positive and negative episodes. The changes of oxy-Hb in the bilateral PFC during silent recall of negative episodes were significantly larger than those during silent recall of positive episodes (p < 0.01). There was no difference in average changes of oxy-Hb between silent and verbal recall of negative episodes (p > 0.95), while changes of oxy-Hb during verbal recall of positive episodes were larger than those during silent recall of positive episodes (p < 0.05). Both verbal and silent recall of positive and negative episodes increased HR; however, verbal recall caused larger increases of HR than silent recall (p < 0.01). The present results suggest that recall of negative episodes affect the PFC activity, which plays a key role in cognitive control of emotions, more than positive episodes. PMID:27526137

  14. Developmental Changes of Prefrontal Activation in Humans: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study of Preschool Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kawakubo, Yuki; Kono, Toshiaki; Takizawa, Ryu; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Ishii-Takahashi, Ayaka; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2011-01-01

    Previous morphological studies indicated that development of the human prefrontal cortex (PFC) appears to continue into late adolescence. Although functional brain imaging studies have sought to determine the time course of functional development of the PFC, it is unclear whether the developmental change occurs after adolescence to adulthood and when it achieves a peak because of the narrow or discontinuous range in the participant's age. Moreover, previous functional studies have not focused on the anterior frontal region, that is, the frontopolar regions (BA9/10). Thus, the present study investigated the developmental change in frontopolar PFC activation associated with letter fluency task by using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), in subjects from preschool children to adults. We analyzed the relative concentration of hemoglobin (ΔHb) in the prefrontal cortex measured during the activation task in 48 typically-developing children and adolescents and 22 healthy adults. Consistent with prior morphological studies, we found developmental change with age in the children/adolescents. Moreover, the average Δoxy-Hb in adult males was significantly larger than that in child/adolescent males, but was not true for females. These data suggested that functional development of the PFC continues into late adolescence. Although the developmental change of the frontopolar PFC was independent of gender from childhood to adolescence, in adulthood a gender difference was shown. PMID:22022479

  15. Effect of a mirror-like illusion on activation in the precuneus assessed with functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehnert, Jan; Brunetti, Maddalena; Steinbrink, Jens; Niedeggen, Michael; Dohle, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Mirror therapy is a therapy to treat patients with pain syndromes or hemiparesis after stroke. However, the underlying neurophysiologic mechanisms are not clearly understood. In order to determine the effect of a mirror-like illusion (MIR) on brain activity using functional near-infrared spectroscopy, 20 healthy right-handed subjects were examined. A MIR was induced by a digital horizontal inversion of the subjects' filmed hand. Optodes were placed on the primary motor cortex (M1) and the occipito-parietal cortex (precuneus, PC). Regions of interest (ROI) were defined a priori based on previous results of similar studies and confirmed by the analysis of effect sizes. Analysis of variance of the ROI signal revealed a dissociated pattern: at the PC, the MIR caused a significant inversion of a hemispheric lateralization opposite to the perceived hand, independent of the moving hand. In contrast, activity in M1 showed lateralization opposite to the moving hand, but revealed no mirror effect. These findings extend our understanding on interhemispheric rivalry and indicate that a MIR is integrated into visuomotor coordination similar to normal view, irrespective of the hand that is actually performing the task.

  16. Beam damage of poly(vinyl chloride) [PVC] as observed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at 143 K, 303 K and 373 K.

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.; Lea, Alan S.

    2003-03-08

    X-ray beam damage is often observed during surface analysis of beam sensitive materials as indicated in the introduction to this issue and in a wide variety of references. While damage occurs in a wide range of materials, those that are most susceptible to damage are materials that contain low energy covalent bonds such as polymers or other organic materials. Even amongst the relatively easily damaged polymers, there is a wide range of damage rates. The data reported in this submission was collected in the interest of comparing the rates of damage produced by x-ray and electron irradiation of different materials. The focus of this submission is x-ray damage of bulk poly(vinyl chloride) PVC since it is a readily available material. The temperature of the sample holder was controlled during irradiation of the PVC in order to determine the extent to which localized sample heating affects the rate of damage. PVC degrades by photoionization, resulting in the production of HCl through H and Cl bond cleavage. Bulk PVC has previously been the focus of an x-ray damage study involving many laboratories throughout the world. For comparison to the bulk PVC data, damage rates for thin films of poly(2-chloroethyl methacrylate) (PCEMA) are also reported for the same three temperatures. Measurements of several relatively common materials on one instrument can provide a data base that allows damage rates on one instrument to be linked or compared to other damage data in the literature. In addition to the PCEMA films and bulk PVC, other data collected at the same x-ray parameters include thin films of PVC (for which damage rates are essentially identical to the bulk material) and of poly(acrylonitrile) PAN which is more stable that either PCEMA or PVC. An additional set of PVC data for a different instrument is also included in the volume. X-ray beams used for XPS produce less damage in materials than electrons used for AES analysis. This is due to both th e weaker interaction

  17. Nickel(II) complexes containing thiosemicarbazone and triphenylphosphine: Synthesis, spectroscopy, crystallography and catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyarega, S.; Kalaivani, P.; Prabhakaran, R.; Hashimoto, T.; Endo, A.; Natarajan, K.

    2011-09-01

    Four new Ni(II) complexes of the general formula [Ni(PPh 3)(L)] (L = dibasic tridentate ligand derived from 4-diethylamino-salicylaldehyde and thiosemicarbazide or 4-N-substituted thiosemicarbazide) have been reported. The new complexes have been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectroscopic (IR, electronic, 1H NMR and 31P NMR) techniques. Molecular structure of one of the complexes has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The complex, [Ni(PPh 3)(L4)] (H 2L4 = thiosemicarbazone prepared from 4-diethylamino-salicylaldehyde and 4-phenylthiosemicarbazide) crystallized in monoclinic space group with two molecules per unit cell and has the dimensions of a = 13.232(6) Å, b = 10.181(5) Å, c = 13.574(7) Å, α = 90°, β = 98.483(2)° and γ = 90°. Catalytic activity of the complexes has been explored for aryl-aryl coupling reaction.

  18. Impedance spectroscopy of micro-Droplets reveals activation of Bacterial Mechanosensitive Channels in Hypotonic Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Aida; Alam, Muhammad A.

    Rapid detection of bacterial pathogens is of great importance in healthcare, food safety, environmental monitoring, and homeland security. Most bacterial detection platforms rely on binary fission (i.e. cell growth) to reach a threshold cell population that can be resolved by the sensing method. Since cell division depends on the bacteria type, the detection time of such methods can vary from hours to days. In contrast, in this work, we show that bacteria cells can be detected within minutes by relying on activation of specific protein channels, i.e. mechanosensitive channels (MS channels). When cells are exposed to hypotonic solutions, MS channels allow efflux of solutes to the external solution which leads to release the excessive membrane tension. Release of the cytoplasmic solutes, in turn, results in increase of the electrical conductance measured by droplet-based impedance sensing. The approach can be an effective technique for fast, pre-screening of bacterial contamination at ultra-low concentration.

  19. Combined excitation-emission spectroscopy of bismuth active centers in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Firstov, S V; Khopin, V F; Bufetov, I A; Firstova, E G; Guryanov, A N; Dianov, E M

    2011-09-26

    For the first time, 3-dimensional luminescence spectra (luminescence intensity as a function of the excitation and emission wavelengths) have been obtained for bismuth-doped optical fibers of various compositions in a wide spectral range (450-1700 nm). The bismuth-doped fibers investigated have the following core compositions: SiO(2), GeO(2), Al-doped SiO(2), and P-doped SiO(2). The measurements are performed at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. Based on the experimental results, the positions of the low-lying energy-levels of the IR bismuth active centers in SiO(2)- and GeO(2)-core fibers have been determined. Similarity of the energy-level schemes for the two core compositions has been revealed. PMID:21996896

  20. Precipitation control and activation enhancement in boron-doped p+-BaSi2 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Ajmal; Nakamura, K.; Du, W.; Toko, K.; Usami, N.; Suemasu, T.

    2014-06-01

    Precipitation free boron (B)-doped as-grown p+-BaSi2 layer is essential for the BaSi2 p-n junction solar cells. In this article, B-doped p-BaSi2 layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates, and the influence of substrate growth temperature (TS) and B temperature (TB) in the Knudsen cell crucible were investigated on the formation of B precipitates and the activation efficiency. The hole concentration, p, reached 1.0 × 1019 cm-3 at room temperature for TS = 600 and TB = 1550 °C. However, the activation rate of B was only 0.1%. Furthermore, the B precipitates were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). When the TS was raised to 650 °C and the TB was decreased to 1350 °C, the p reached 6.8 × 1019 cm-3, and the activation rate increased to more than 20%. No precipitation of B was also confirmed by TEM.

  1. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  2. An active alignment method for post launch co-alignment of laser beam combiner systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, A. W.; Green, J. W.; Maynard, W. L.; Minott, P. O.; Krainak, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    A laser transmitter for high bandwidth geosynchronous satellite communications is described. High optical power is achieved by combining semiconductor laser diodes. An active alignment scheme is proposed for achieving the +/- 20 microrad post launch multiple laser angular co-alignment requirement.

  3. Active beam position stabilization of pulsed lasers for long-distance ion profile diagnostics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Robert A; Liu, Yun; Long, Cary D; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Blokland, Willem

    2011-01-01

    A high peak-power Q-switched laser has been used to monitor the ion beam profiles in the superconducting linac at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The laser beam suffers from position drift due to movement, vibration, or thermal effects on the optical components in the 250-meter long laser beam transport line. We have designed, bench-tested, and implemented a beam position stabilization system by using an Ethernet CMOS camera, computer image processing and analysis, and a piezo-driven mirror platform. The system can respond at frequencies up to 30 Hz with a high position detection accuracy. With the beam stabilization system, we have achieved a laser beam pointing stability within a range of 2 rad (horizontal) to 4 rad (vertical), corresponding to beam drifts of only 0.5 mm 1 mm at the furthest measurement station located 250 meters away from the light source.

  4. Beam damage of poly(2-chloroethyl methylacrylate) [PCEMA] films as observed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at 143 K, 303 K, and 373 K

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.; Lea, Alan S.

    2003-03-08

    X-ray beam damage is often observed during surface analysis of beam sensitive materials as indicated in the introduction to this issue and in a wide variety of references. While damage occurs in a wide range of materials, those that are most susceptible to damage are materials that contain low energy covalent bonds such as polymers or other organic materials. Even amongst the relatively easily damaged polymers, there is a wide range of damage rates. The focus of this submission is on poly(2-chloroethyl methylacrylate) [PCEMA] films. In order to determine the extent to which localized sample heating could influence damage rates the temperature of the substrate holding the PECMA was controlled during irradiation. PCEMA presumably degrades primarily by photo-ionization, resulting in the production of HCl through H and Cl bond cleavage. PCEMA has been recommended as a polymer for use as a reference for evaluating x-ray damage. PCEMA has been shown to be more sensitive to degradation than PVC which has also been used as a damage sensitive material useful for comparison of damage rates. Measurements of several relatively common materials on one instrument can provide a data base that allows damage rates on one instrument to be linked or compared to other damage data in the literature. Therefore for purposes of comparison, damage rates for bulk PVC at the same three different temperatures used for the PCEMA data have been collected and are also presented in this volume. Other data collected at the same x-ray parameters include thin films of PVC (for which damage rates are essentially identical to the bulk material) and of poly(acrylonitrile) PAN which is more stable that either PCEMA or PVC.

  5. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED FROM GALEX SPECTROSCOPY: THE IONIZING SOURCE SPECTRUM AT z {approx} 1 ,

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L. E-mail: cowie@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-08-01

    We use a complete sample of Ly{alpha}-emission-line-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) obtained from nine deep blank fields observed with the grism spectrographs on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite to measure the normalization and the spectral shape of the AGN contribution to the ionizing background (rest-frame wavelengths 700-900 A) at z {approx} 1. Our sample consists of 139 sources selected in the redshift range z = 0.65-1.25 in the near-ultraviolet (NUV; 2371 A central wavelength) channel. The area covered is 8.2 deg{sup 2} to a NUV magnitude of 20.5 (AB) and 0.92 deg{sup 2} at the faintest magnitude limit of 21.8. The GALEX AGN luminosity function agrees well with those obtained using optical and X-ray AGN samples, and the measured redshift evolution of the ionizing volume emissivity is similar to that previously obtained by measuring the GALEX far-ultraviolet (FUV; 1528 A central wavelength) magnitudes of an X-ray-selected sample. For the first time, we are able to construct the shape of the ionizing background at z {approx} 1 in a fully self-consistent way.

  6. The Study of Active Galactic Nuclei and Galaxy Structure Using SDSS Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Benjamin

    Two distinct projects involving spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are presented. Data from both the Legacy (SDSS-II) and BOSS (SDSS-III) surveys are used to study stellar populations and active galactic nuclei in old, red galaxies. In the first project, we infer stellar metallicity and abundance ratio gradients for a sample of red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Main galaxy sample. Because this sample does not have multiple spectra at various radii in a single galaxy, we measure these gradients statistically. This method is possible because for a fixed aperture size and a varying redshift range, the aperture will cover different physical sizes on each galaxy dependent on redshift. We stack galaxy spectra in relatively narrow redshift bins and calculate several absorption line indices in projected annuli by differencing spectra in neighboring redshift bins. After determining the line indices, we use stellar population modeling from the EZ_Ages software to calculate ages, metallicities, and abundance ratios within each annulus. Our data covers the central regions of these galaxies, out to slightly higher than 1 Re. We find detectable gradients in metallicity and relatively shallow gradients in abundance ratios, similar to results found for direct measurements of individual galaxies. We compare this data to previous observations and find general agreement, and then briefly to several theoretical studies simulating galaxy evolution models to see what the metallicity gradients and abundance ratios imply about the evolutionary track of these red galaxies. This project also involves developing a code framework to verify this method, with potential more generally applicable future uses. For the second project, we examine the sample of luminous galaxies in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We find a potentially new observational class of AGN, one with strong and broad MgII 2799A line emission, but very weak emission in

  7. Geant4 simulation for a study of a possible use of carbon ion pencil beams for the treatment of ocular melanomas with the active scanning system at CNAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, E.; Piersimoni, P.; Riccardi, C.; Rimoldi, A.; Tamborini, A.; Ciocca, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study a possible use of carbon ion pencil beams (delivered with active scanning modality) for the treatment of ocular melanomas at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO). The promising aspect of carbon ions radiotherapy for the treatment of this disease lies in its superior relative radio-biological effectiveness (RBE). The Monte Carlo (MC) Geant4 10.00 toolkit was used to simulate the complete CNAO extraction beamline, with the active and passive components along it. A human eye modeled detector, including a realistic target tumor volume, was used as target. Cross check with previous studies at CNAO using protons allowed comparisons on possible benefits on using such a technique with respect to proton beams. Experimental data on proton and carbon ion beams transverse distributions were used to validate the simulation.

  8. Activation caused by proton beam losses in Accelerator Production of Tritium LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.A.; Eaton, S.L.; Daemen, L.L.; Waters, L.S.; Wilson, W.B.

    1996-03-01

    A variety of accelerator designs are being considered for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project at Alamos National Laboratory. Because activation of the structural components of the accelerator is considered a major radiation protection issue, we have developed a computational methodology to estimate quantitatively radionuclide inventories and gamma dose rates resulting from accelerator operation. The work presented here illustrates the use of our computational methodology by focusing on the 20 and 100 MeV sections of the Bridge-Coupled Drift Tube LINAC (BCDTL), and the 100 and 1000 MeV sections of the Coupled Cavity LINAC (CCL).

  9. Optical and NIR spectroscopy of Mrk 1210: constraints and physical conditions of the active nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzalay, X.; Rodríguez-Ardila, A.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:Mrk 1210 is an outstanding Seyfert 2 galaxy because it displays signatures of recent circumnuclear star formation and a high level of X-ray activity, in addition to the classical spectral characteristics typical of an AGN. Here we investigate the extinction affecting the nuclear and extended emitting gas, the kinematics of the narrow-line region, and the physical properties and conditions of that gas. Methods: Near-infrared and optical spectra of the nuclear and extended emission region of Mrk 1210 are presented, covering the interval 0.4-2.4 μm. Emission and absorption lines were used to infer, respectively, the geometrical extension of the ionized gas and the contribution of the underlying stellar population to the observed integrated continuum. The emission line profiles were employed to study the kinematics in the NLR. The reddening and physical condition of the gas were investigated by means of flux ratios among permitted and forbidden lines. Results: The NIR nuclear spectrum is dominated by H I and He I recombination lines, as well as [S II], [S III], and [Fe II] forbidden lines. Coronal lines of [S VIII], [S IX], [Si VI], [Si X], and [Ca VIII], in addition to molecular H{2} lines, were also detected. The 12CO(6{-3)} 1.618 μm overtone bandhead helped to estimate the contribution of the stellar population to the continuum. It was found that 83±8% of the H-band continuum has a stellar origin. It improves previous estimates, which claimed that at least 50% of the observed continuum was attributed to the AGN. Analysis of the emission line profiles, both allowed and forbidden, shows a narrower ({FWHM} ˜ 500 km s-1) line on top of a broad ({FWHM} > 1000 km s-1) blue-shifted component. This seems to be associated to a nuclear outflow. This hypothesis is supported by 6 cm VLBI observations, which show a radio ejecta extending up to 30 pc from the nucleus. This result does not require the presence of the hidden BLR claimed to be present in previous NIR

  10. Activation energy of the growth of ion-beam-synthesized nano-crystalline 3C SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intarasiri, S.; Dangtip, S.; Hallén, A.; Jensen, J.; Yu, L. D.; Possnert, G.; Singkarat, S.

    2007-04-01

    In this experiment, carbon ions at 40 keV were implanted into (1 0 0) high-purity p-type silicon wafers at 400 °C to a fluence of 6.5 × 1017 ions/cm2. Subsequent thermal annealing of the implanted samples was performed in a vacuum furnace at 800-1000 °C. Glancing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) was used to characterize the crystalline quality and estimate the grain size of nano-crystalline 3C-SiC. Activation energy for the growth of 3C-SiC was evaluated following the annealing behaviour of the GIXRD-characteristic 3C-SiC (1 1 1) peaks. It was found that the 3C-SiC was directly formed during ion implantation at this substrate temperature and the activation energy of the process was about 0.05 eV. Such a low energy was explained in terms of ion beam induced precipitate formation.

  11. Local atomic structure of chromium bearing precipitates in chromia doped uranium dioxide investigated by combined micro-beam X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, G.; Mieszczynski, C.; Martin, M.; Bertsch, J.; Borca, C. N.; Delafoy, Ch.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental studies have evidenced the presence of some chromium oxide precipitates in chromia (Cr2O3) doped UO2 fuels, currently being used in many light water reactors. The main objective of this study was to analyze the atomic scale microstructure of these precipitates in a non-destructive way employing modern synchrotron-based X-ray radiation. To investigate UO2 microstructures and chemical compositions of the precipitates an industrial grade fresh Cr2O3-doped UO2 pellet (produced with an initial amount of 0.16 wt.% Cr2O3 powder) was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe micro analysis (EPMA). Average grain diameter of the UO2 matrix was measured by SEM image analysis method. Precipitates were detected by EPMA. For all precipitates of micrometer scale analyzed by EPMA the composition was determined to be very close to Cr2O3. The structural property and the next neighbor Cr atomic environment in these precipitates were studied by a combination of more sensitive tools such as micro-focused X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) and absorption spectroscopy (μ-XAS). According to the XRD data, the chromia precipitates contain structural disorder and have a somewhat distorted lattice structure as compared to that of standard and crystalline α-Cr2O3 hexagonal crystal unit cell. The μ-XAS results provide insight into the local atomic environment of chromium including the oxidation state assignment.

  12. Observation of high-j quasiparticle states in Cm249 by in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy using heavy-ion transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, T.; Makii, H.; Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Toyoshima, A.; Matsuda, M.; Makishima, A.; Shigematsu, S.; Kaneko, J.; Shizuma, T.; Toume, H.; Hossain, I.; Kohno, T.; Ogawa, M.

    2008-11-01

    We have measured de-excitation γ rays in Cm249 populated by one-neutron stripping reactions with a Cm248 target and 162-MeV O16, 162-MeV O18, and 120-MeV C13 beams. γ rays in Cm249 were identified by measuring kinetic energies of outgoing particles using Si ΔE-E detectors. It was demonstrated that high-j orbitals were selectively populated in the (O16, O15) reaction having a large negative Q value. We have observed eight quasiparticle states above the deformed shell gap of N=152. The 1/2+[620], 1/2-[750], and 7/2+[613] bands were extended up to 19/2+, 19/2-, and 13/2+ states, respectively. We have established the 9/29/2+[615] state at 526 keV, the 9/29/2+[604] state with a short life of T1/2≪2 ps at 1030 keV, and the 11/211/2-[725] state with T1/2=19(1) ns at 375 keV. Furthermore, the 17/21/2+[880] state, having a large component of the k17/2 spherical single-particle state, has been identified at 1505 keV. We discuss the properties of those quasiparticle states in the framework of a deformed shell model.

  13. Spectroscopy and structural characteristics of Eu3+-activated perovskite tungstate Ba2La2ZnW2O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Huang, Yanlin; Cheng, Han; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2015-11-01

    Eu3+-doped tungstate Ba2La2ZnW2O12 was prepared by the high-temperature solid-state reaction method. The x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns indicate that the matrix has a perovskite structure. The samples were characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM), by optical diffuse reflection, photoluminescence (PL) spectra and by their decay curves. Eu3+-activated Ba2La2ZnW2O12 shows red luminescence under the excitation of near-ultraviolet and blue light. Laser site-selective excitation and emission spectroscopy technology was applied to investigate the spectroscopic and microstructural properties. The excitation spectra were tested by monitoring the emission from 5D0  →  7F0-4 transitions. Accordingly the emission spectra and decay curves (lifetime) were measured by the excitation in the 5D0  →  7F0 wavelength region using a pulsed, tunable, and narrow-band dye laser. We have detected two Eu3+ sites in Ba2La2ZnW2O12 with the temperature region ranging from 10 K to below 300 K. On the spectra data of the site-selective emission and decay, the Stark energy levels of Eu3+ at two different sites were determined. The lifetimes of Eu3+ ions at the two sites were compared. The energy transfer and crystallographic assignments for the Eu3+ sites were discussed.

  14. Compartmentalization of trace elements in guinea pig tissues by INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis) and AAS (atomic absorption spectroscopy)

    SciTech Connect

    Chatt, A.; Holzbecher, J.; Katz, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Human scalp hair analysis has received considerable attention from a variety of disciplines over the last 20 yr or so. Trace element levels of hair have been used in environmental, epidemiological, forensic, nutritional, predictive, and preventive medicine studies. There still exist confusion, skepticism, and controversy, however, among the experts as well as lay persons in the interpretation of hair trace element data. Much of the criticism stems from the lack of quantitative and reliable data on the ability of hair to accurately reflect dose-response relationships. To better define the significance or hair trace element levels (under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency), the authors have undertaken a controlled set of animal experiments in which trace element levels in hair and other tissues have been measured after a mild state of systemic intoxication by chronic, low-does exposure to cadmium and selenium. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) methods have been developed for the determination of several elements with a high degree of precision and accuracy.

  15. Observation of halogen species in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, by active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pöhler, Denis; Vogel, Leif; Friess, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-04-13

    In the polar tropospheric boundary layer, reactive halogen species (RHS) are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. After polar sunrise, air masses enriched in reactive bromine cover areas of several million square kilometers. Still, the source and release mechanisms of halogens are not completely understood. We report measurements of halogen oxides performed in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, during spring 2008. Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements were set up offshore, several kilometers from the coast, directly on the sea ice, which was never done before. High bromine oxide concentrations were detected frequently during sunlight hours with a characteristic daily cycle showing morning and evening maxima and a minimum at noon. The, so far, highest observed average mixing ratio in the polar boundary layer of 41 pmol/mol (equal to pptv) was detected. Only short sea ice contact is required to release high amounts of bromine. An observed linear decrease of maximum bromine oxide levels with ambient temperature during sunlight, between -24 degrees C and -15 degrees C, provides indications on the conditions required for the emission of RHS. In addition, the data indicate the presence of reactive chlorine in the Arctic boundary layer. In contrast to Antarctica, iodine oxide was not detected above a detection limit of 0.3 pmol/mol. PMID:20160121

  16. Observation of halogen species in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, by active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pöhler, Denis; Vogel, Leif; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    In the polar tropospheric boundary layer, reactive halogen species (RHS) are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. After polar sunrise, air masses enriched in reactive bromine cover areas of several million square kilometers. Still, the source and release mechanisms of halogens are not completely understood. We report measurements of halogen oxides performed in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, during spring 2008. Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements were set up offshore, several kilometers from the coast, directly on the sea ice, which was never done before. High bromine oxide concentrations were detected frequently during sunlight hours with a characteristic daily cycle showing morning and evening maxima and a minimum at noon. The, so far, highest observed average mixing ratio in the polar boundary layer of 41 pmol/mol (equal to pptv) was detected. Only short sea ice contact is required to release high amounts of bromine. An observed linear decrease of maximum bromine oxide levels with ambient temperature during sunlight, between -24 °C and -15 °C, provides indications on the conditions required for the emission of RHS. In addition, the data indicate the presence of reactive chlorine in the Arctic boundary layer. In contrast to Antarctica, iodine oxide was not detected above a detection limit of 0.3 pmol/mol. PMID:20160121

  17. Active control for vibration suppression in a flexible beam using a modal domain optical fiber sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. E.; Lindner, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the use of a modal-domain (MD) fiber-optic sensor as an active control system component for vibration suppression, whose output is proportional to the integral of the axial strain along the optical fiber. When an MD sensor is attached to, or embedded in, a flexible structure, it senses the strain in the structure along its gage length. On the basis of the present integration of the sensor model into a flexible-structure model, it becomes possible to design a control system with a dynamic compensator which adds damping to the low-order modes of the flexible structure. This modeling procedure has been experimentally validated.

  18. PHYSICAL EFFECTS OCCURRING DURING GENERATION AND AMPLIFICATION OF LASER RADIATION: Kinetic model of the active medium of an XeCl laser pumped by an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boĭchenko, A. M.; Derzhiev, V. I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Yakovlenko, Sergei I.

    1989-02-01

    Kinetic models of active media of an XeCl laser are developed for the case when these media are diluted by various buffer gases (helium, neon, argon) and the laser is pumped by an electron beam. The results of the calculations are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  19. Development of a portable active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for volcanic gas measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vita, Fabio; Kern, Christoph; Inguaggiato, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) has been an effective tool for measuring atmospheric trace gases for several decades. However, instruments were large, heavy and power-inefficient, making their application to remote environments extremely challenging. Recent developments in fibre-coupling telescope technology and the availability of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) have now allowed us to design and construct a lightweight, portable, low-power LP-DOAS instrument for use at remote locations and specifically for measuring degassing from active volcanic systems. The LP-DOAS was used to measure sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from La Fossa crater, Vulcano, Italy, where column densities of up to 1.2 × 1018 molec cm−2 (~ 500 ppmm) were detected along open paths of up to 400 m in total length. The instrument's SO2 detection limit was determined to be 2 × 1016 molec cm−2 (~ 8 ppmm), thereby making quantitative detection of even trace amounts of SO2 possible. The instrument is capable of measuring other volcanic volatile species as well. Though the spectral evaluation of the recorded data showed that chlorine monoxide (ClO) and carbon disulfide (CS2) were both below the instrument's detection limits during the experiment, the upper limits for the X / SO2 ratio (X = ClO, CS2) could be derived, and yielded 2 × 10−3 and 0.1, respectively. The robust design and versatility of the instrument make it a promising tool for monitoring of volcanic degassing and understanding processes in a range of volcanic systems.

  20. Quantitative monitoring of an activated sludge reactor using on-line UV-visible and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarraguça, Mafalda C; Paulo, Ana; Alves, Madalena M; Dias, Ana M A; Lopes, João A; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2009-10-01

    The performance of an activated sludge reactor can be significantly enhanced through use of continuous and real-time process-state monitoring, which avoids the need to sample for off-line analysis and to use chemicals. Despite the complexity associated with wastewater treatment systems, spectroscopic methods coupled with chemometric tools have been shown to be powerful tools for bioprocess monitoring and control. Once implemented and optimized, these methods are fast, nondestructive, user friendly, and most importantly, they can be implemented in situ, permitting rapid inference of the process state at any moment. In this work, UV-visible and NIR spectroscopy were used to monitor an activated sludge reactor using in situ immersion probes connected to the respective analyzers by optical fibers. During the monitoring period, disturbances to the biological system were induced to test the ability of each spectroscopic method to detect the changes in the system. Calibration models based on partial least squares (PLS) regression were developed for three key process parameters, namely chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrate concentration (N-NO(3)(-)), and total suspended solids (TSS). For NIR, the best results were achieved for TSS, with a relative error of 14.1% and a correlation coefficient of 0.91. The UV-visible technique gave similar results for the three parameters: an error of approximately 25% and correlation coefficients of approximately 0.82 for COD and TSS and 0.87 for N-NO(3)(-) . The results obtained demonstrate that both techniques are suitable for consideration as alternative methods for monitoring and controlling wastewater treatment processes, presenting clear advantages when compared with the reference methods for wastewater treatment process qualification. PMID:19701801