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Sample records for active giant pockmark

  1. Active methane venting observed at giant pockmarks along the U.S. mid-Atlantic shelf break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kori R.; Cormier, Marie-Helene; Weissel, Jeffrey K.; Driscoll, Neal W.; Kastner, Miriam; Solomon, Evan A.; Robertson, Gretchen; Hill, Jenna C.; Singh, Hanumant; Camilli, Richard; Eustice, Ryan

    2008-03-01

    Detailed near-bottom investigation of a series of giant, kilometer scale, elongate pockmarks along the edge of the mid-Atlantic continental shelf confirms that methane is actively venting at the site. Dissolved methane concentrations, which were measured with a commercially available methane sensor (METS) designed by Franatech GmbH mounted on an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV), are as high as 100 nM. These values are well above expected background levels (1-4 nM) for the open ocean. Sediment pore water geochemistry gives further evidence of methane advection through the seafloor. Isotopically light carbon in the dissolved methane samples indicates a primarily biogenic source. The spatial distribution of the near-bottom methane anomalies (concentrations above open ocean background), combined with water column salinity and temperature vertical profiles, indicate that methane-rich water is not present across the entire width of the pockmarks, but is laterally restricted to their edges. We suggest that venting is primarily along the top of the pockmark walls with some advection and dispersion due to local currents. The highest methane concentrations observed with the METS sensor occur at a small, circular pockmark at the southern end of the study area. This observation is compatible with a scenario where the larger, elongate pockmarks evolve through coalescing smaller pockmarks.

  2. Giant lacustrine pockmarks with subaqueous groundwater discharge and subsurface sediment mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, Anna; Loher, Markus; Bouffard, Damien; Moernaut, Jasper; Hellmich, Franziska; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Hilbe, Michael; Kopf, Achim; Lilley, Marvin D.; Meinecke, Gerrit; Strasser, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Subsurface fluid flow in oceans and lakes affects bathymetric morphology, sediment distribution, and water composition. We present newly discovered giant lacustrine pockmarks in Lake Neuchâtel (up to 160 m diameter and 30 m deep) that rank among the largest known pockmarks in lakes. Our multidisciplinary study reveals ~60 m of suspended sediment inside a pockmark. The sediment suspension is 2.6° warmer and isotopically lighter in δ18OH2O by 1.5‰ than the ambient lake water, documenting currently active fluid flow by karstic groundwater discharge from the Jura Mountain front into the Swiss Plateau hydrological system. Strikingly, the levees of the pockmarks comprise subsurface sediment mobilization deposits representing episodic phases of sediment expulsion during the past. They strongly resemble subsurface fluid flow features in the marine realm. Comparable processes are expected to also be relevant for other carbonate-dominated mountain front ranges, where karstic groundwater discharges into lacustrine or marine settings.

  3. Influence of seep emission on the non-symbiont-bearing fauna and vagrant species at an active giant pockmark in the Gulf of Guinea (Congo-Angola margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olu, K.; Caprais, J. C.; Galéron, J.; Causse, R.; von Cosel, R.; Budzinski, H.; Ménach, K. Le; Roux, C. Le; Levaché, D.; Khripounoff, A.; Sibuet, M.

    2009-12-01

    Detailed surveying with an ROV found that a dense and diverse cold-seep community colonises a giant pockmark located at 3200 m depth, 8 km north from the deep Congo channel. Several types of assemblages, either dominated by Mytilidae and Vesicomyidae bivalves or Siboglinidae polychaetes, are distributed on the 800-m diameter active area. The site is characterised by a most active central zone in a depression with abundant carbonate concretions and high methane fluxes where high-density clusters of mussels and siboglinids dominate. In contrast, the peripheral zones display large fields of dead and live vesicomyids on soft sediment, with a lower mean density and lower methane concentration in seawater. The associated megafauna includes Alvinocarididae shrimps, echinoids, holothurians of the family Synaptidae, several species of gastropods, two species of galatheids, and Zoarcidae and Ophidiidae fishes. Multivariate analyses of video transect data show that the distribution of these major megafauna species at the pockmark scale is influenced by the habitat heterogeneity due to fluid or gas emission, occurrence of hydrates, substratum variability and by the presence of large symbiont-bearing species. Several assemblages dominated either by mytilids, vesicomyids, or siboglinids have been sampled for megafauna densities and biomass estimations and stable isotope measurements ( δ13C and δ15N) of dominant species and food sources. The highest estimates of megafauna densities have been obtained in mytilid beds. According to their stable isotopes values, non-symbiont-bearing species mainly rely on chemosynthesis-originated carbon, either as primary consumers of chemoautotrophic microorganisms, or at higher trophic level recycling organic matter, or relying on bivalve and tubeworm production. Most of them likely feed on different sources like shrimps, but differences according to habitat have been evidenced. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of galatheids and benthic or

  4. ROV study of a giant pockmark on the Gabon continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondréas, H.; Olu, K.; Fouquet, Y.; Charlou, J. L.; Gay, A.; Dennielou, B.; Donval, J. P.; Fifis, A.; Nadalig, T.; Cochonat, P.; Cauquil, E.; Bourillet, J. F.; Moigne, M. Le; Sibuet, M.

    2005-11-01

    A giant, 800-m wide pockmark, called Regab, was discovered along the Equatorial African margin at 3160-m water depth and was explored by remote operated vehicle (ROV) as part of the Zaiango (1998-2000) and Biozaire (2001-2003) projects carried out conjointly by TOTAL and a number of French research institutes. A microbathymetric map obtained using the ROV sensors shows that the pockmark actually consists of a cluster of smaller pockmarks aligned N70 along a 15-m deep depression. Methane was recorded all over the pockmark, the highest values along the axis of the depression where massive carbonate crusts and dense seep communities were also found. Several faunal species belong to the Vesicomyidae and Mytilidae bivalve families, as well as to Siboglinidae (Vestimentifera) tubeworms. Preliminary analyses confirm their association with symbiotic bacteria, thus documenting their dependence on fluid seeps. The pockmark appears to be related to an infilled channel, visible on the seismic data 300 m below the seafloor, which may act as a reservoir for biogenic fluids supplied to the trap from the surrounding sediments.

  5. Geochemistry of pore-fluids related to the distribution of the biological communities on the giant Regab pockmark, off Gabon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Prunelé, A.; Caprais, J.; Ruffine, L.; Cassarino, L.; Guyader, V.; Bollinger, C.; Ondréas, H.; Donval, J.; Olu, K.; Geli, L. B.; Cunningham, K. L.; Cauquil, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Regab pockmark is a giant structure located at 3200 m water depth offshore Gabon and ~ 10 km north to the deep Congo channel (Zaïre canyon) (Gay et al. 2006; Ondréas et al. 2005). It has been visited for the first time in 2000 during the Zairov cruise. Since that time, several scientific cruises have allowed further investigations of this pockmark. The last cruise, WACS, for West Africa Cold Seeps, in January- February 2010, was undertaken on board the R/V ';Pourquoi Pas?' with the aim of identifying changes which can occur over time on this pockmark. Besides intensive ROV dives, three calypso cores and several push cores have been collected to better understand the relationships between the distribution of the living communities and the pore-fluids chemistry. In two calypso cores one collected within the pockmark and one outside, and both in areas without visible biological communities, pore-fluids profiles of dissolved elements (Alk, SO42-, Mn2+, Fe2+) show that degradation of organic matter is occurring and likely plays an important role in the sulfate reduction (Froelich et al. 1979). Methane was not detected. The Analysis of the pore-fluids by Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has shown the presence of alcohols, acid and phenol. These molecules are likely related to the degradation of organic matter and/or the production of the biological communities. Further investigations are ongoing to provide us with a clearer picture regarding the source of these molecules. The third calypso core collected in the northeast part of the pockmark containing gas hydrates. Sulfate profiles from the push cores show significant difference from one community to another. The analyses of both major and minor dissolved elements, along with molecular and isotopic methane concentration measurements are in progress for the push cores. The latter was done using a new analyzer G2201-i from Picarro for which new methods applied to pore-fluids has

  6. Subsurface sediment mobilization and active pockmarks from sublacustrine ground-water seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, A.; Moernaut, J.; Loher, M.; Hilbe, M.; Meinecke, G.; Kipfer, R.; Anselmetti, F.; Bouffard, D.; Strasser, M.

    2014-12-01

    Lakes can be used as "model basins" to study fluid-flow processes with a multi-method approach in a well-defined environment. We present unprecedented insight into newly discovered pockmarks and associated subsurface sediment-mobilization structures in Lake Neuchâtel, Switzerland. A geophysical approach using multiple tools provides precise high-resolution bathymetric data and subsurface information of the sedimentary infill. We combine geophysical (300 kHz Kongsberg EM2040 multibeam, 3.5 kHz pinger seismic, deep-towed multi-frequency chirp seismic, mounted on an AUV), sedimentological (piston cores), hydrological (CTD), geochemical (methane, δ18O) and visual (ROV survey) data and observations. The data show several circular, crater-shaped pockmarks of up to 160 m in diameter and up to 30 m depth. The pockmarks are partially filled with mud in a fluid-like state. It is hypothesized that this mud is a result of active fluid flow within the pockmark. The levees of the pockmarks are characterized by high-amplitude wedge-shaped seismic reflections being intercalated with the background sediments. They are interpreted as overflow deposits originating from episodic increases in fluid flow from inside the pockmarks, causing sediment to be spilled over the margin and deposited on the levees. Data show multiple phases of sediment expulsion during discrete periods throughout the Holocene. Geochemical sediment analyses of headspace methane indicate the presence of purely microbial methane at low concentrations, thus no indications of active gas seepage. Elevated temperature values and depleted δ18O signals within the pockmark, compared to the reference sites, hint towards different water sources. We interpret these data to show two water bodies: (i) lake bottom-water, and (ii) groundwater entering as focused fluid flow through the pockmark. This multi-proxy approach shows that the newly discovered pockmarks of Lake Neuchâtel are sublacustrine springs, possibly related to

  7. Diversity and distribution of methane-oxidizing microbial communities associated with different faunal assemblages in a giant pockmark of the Gabon continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambon-Bonavita, M. A.; Nadalig, T.; Roussel, E.; Delage, E.; Duperron, S.; Caprais, J. C.; Boetius, A.; Sibuet, M.

    2009-12-01

    A giant 800-m-diameter pockmark named REGAB was discovered on the Gabon continental margin actively emitting methane at a water depth of 3200 m. The microbial diversity in sediments from four different assemblages of chemosynthetic organisms, Mytilidae, Vesicomyidae, Siboglinidae and a bacterial mat, was investigated using comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Aggregates of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2) and bacteria of the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus cluster were found in all four chemosynthetic habitats. Fluorescence in situ hybridization targeting the ANME-2/ Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus aggregates showed their presence few centimeters (3-5 cm) below the surface of sediment. 16S rRNA gene sequences from all known marine ANME groups were detected in the pockmark sediments, as well as from both known bacterial partners. The archaeal diversity was limited to the ANME cluster for all investigated samples. The bacterial diversity included members of the Proteobacteria, Bacilliales, Cytophaga/Flavobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, JS1 and Actinobacteria clusters. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences related to those of known sulphide-oxidizing symbionts were recovered from tissues of several invertebrates including vesicomyid clams and siboglinid tubeworms of REGAB.

  8. Geophysical exploration of an active pockmark field in the Bay of Concarneau, southern Brittany, and implications for resident suspension feeders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, Agnès; Ehrhold, Axel; Rigolet, Carinne; Souron, Aurélie; Cordier, Céline; Clouet, Hélène; Dubois, Stanislas F.

    2014-06-01

    About a decade ago, a large field of pockmarks (individual features up to 30 m in diameter and <2 m deep) was discovered in water depths of 15-40 m in the Bay of Concarneau in southern Brittany along the French Atlantic coast, covering an overall area of 36 km2 and characterised by unusually high pockmark densities in places reaching 2,500 per square kilometre. As revealed by geophysical swath and subbottom profile data ground-truthed by sediment cores collected during two campaigns in 2005 and 2009, the confines of the pockmark field show a spectacular spatial association with those of a vast expanse of tube mats formed by a benthic community of the suspension-feeding amphipod Haploops nirae. The present study complements those findings with subbottom chirp profiles, seabed sonar imagery and ultrasonic backscatter data from the water column acquired in April 2011. Results show that pockmark distribution is influenced by the thickness of Holocene deposits covering an Oligocene palaeo-valley system. Two groups of pockmarks were identified: (1) a group of large (>10 m diameter), more widely scattered pockmarks deeply rooted (up to 8 ms two-way travel time, TWTT) in the Holocene palaeo-valley infills, and (2) a group of smaller, more densely spaced pockmarks shallowly rooted (up to 2 ms TWTT) in interfluve deposits. Pockmark pore water analyses revealed high methane concentrations peaking at ca. 400 μl/l at 22 and 30 cm core depth in silty sediments immediately above Haploops-bearing layers. Water column data indicate acoustic plumes above pockmarks, implying ongoing pockmark activity. Pockmark gas and/or fluid expulsion resulting in increased turbidity (resuspension of, amongst others, freshly settled phytoplankton) could at least partly account for the strong spatial association with the phytoplankton-feeding H. nirae in the Bay of Concarneau, exacerbating impacts of anthropogenically induced eutrophication and growing offshore trawling activities. Tidally driven

  9. Pockmarks: self-scouring seep features?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Laura L.; Kelley, Joseph T.; Belknap, Daniel F.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Koons, Peter O.

    2011-01-01

    Pockmarks, or seafloor craters, occur worldwide in a variety of geologic settings and are often associated with fluid discharge. The mechanisms responsible for pockmark preservation, and pockmarks? relation to active methane venting are not well constrained. Simple numerical simulations run in 2-and 3-dimensions, and corroborated by flume tank experiments, indicate turbulence may play a role in pockmark maintenance, and, potentially, in pockmark excavation. Morphological analysis of the pockmarks indicates an abundance of flat-bottomed and/or elongated pockmarks. Pockmarks transition into furrows as the bay narrows and tidal flow is enhanced, providing unmistakable evidence of post-formation evolution. We hypothesize that some pockmarks formed from seafloor perturbations (e.g., gas or methane discharge), are1 maintained and gradually modified by vortical flow. This hypothesis provides a mechanism for pockmark preservation and enlargement without active fluid venting, which has implications for the interpretation of seafloor seep features in gas hydrates areas.

  10. Does active gas seepage and dormant pockmarks indicate multiple episodes of focussed fluid escape along the SW Barents Sea?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, S.; Thorsnes, T.; Rise, L.; Brunstad, H.; Stoddart, D.; Bøe, R.; Lågstad, P.; Svolsbru, T.

    2012-12-01

    The SW Barents Sea is versatile in its evolution due to the effect of glaciations that have removed large thicknesses of sediments from the seabed. Unloading due to glacial erosion and deglaciation resulted in opening of pre-existing faults and creation of new ones facilitating fluid escape from the subsurface. The changes in ice load also altered the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) thicknesses causing accumulation of gas as gas hydrates within the GHSZ and free gas below it. Expressions of fluid escape, pockmarks, are widely distributed in the Barents Sea. Several gas flares, some of them 200 metre high, occur along a segment of the Ringvassøy Loppa Fault Complex (RLFC), indicating open fractures and still highly active fluid flow. Observation of gas flares along regional fault complexes outside the pockmark region indicate that the present gas escape activity occurs along these faults mainly. The relatively small thickness of sediments infilling the pockmarks and their penetration of the marine-glaciomarine sediment boundary indicate that they formed after deposition of glaciomarine sediments and were active in the Holocene and possibly some of them to the recent past. Methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ) modelling shows that by the deglaciation after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ca. 20 000 14C years ago, the MHSZ had thinned from 600 meters to zero in most parts of the SW Barents Sea. The fluid expulsion probably happened after the retreat of the grounded marine ice sheet causing the release of methane from melting methane hydrates through slow fluid escape process which lasted until recent creating pockmarks. Fluids are also leaking from deeper source rocks through formation pathways focussed by stratigraphic boundaries and open faults.

  11. Benthic foraminifera from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea): Assessing present-day and past activity of hydrate pockmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanier, C.; Koho, K. A.; Goñi-Urriza, M. S.; Deflandre, B.; Galaup, S.; Ivanovsky, A.; Gayet, N.; Dennielou, B.; Grémare, A.; Bichon, S.; Gassie, C.; Anschutz, P.; Duran, R.; Reichart, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    We present ecological and isotopic (δ18O and δ13C) data on benthic foraminifera sampled from 4 deep-sea stations in a pockmark field from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean). In addition, a series of sedimentological and (bio)geochemical data are shown to back up foraminiferal observations. All stations are located within 1.2 km of each other, so prevailing oceanographic conditions can be assumed to be similar at each site. Two of the sites (GMMC-01 and GMMC-02) are located in a pockmark (named "pockmark A") where current methane seepages were recorded by ROV observations. A third station (GMMC-03) is located in the topographic depression interpreted as a collapsed pockmark (named "pockmark B"). The fourth site (GMMC-04) is a reference station, without evidence of past or present seepages. Our observations show that degraded organic matter with low bio-availability is present at all stations with a preferential burial of organic compounds in topographic depressions (GMMC-03 station). Authigenic aragonite is abundant in surface sediments at stations GMMC-01 and -02. Its precipitation is likely related to high rates of methane oxidation during past seep events in episodically active pockmark A. In contrast, the absence of anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) during the sampling period (November 2011) suggests that only moderate sulphide and methane oxidation take place close to the sediment-water interface. Compared to the reference site GMMC-04, living foraminifera at the collapsed and episodically active pockmarks show minor changes in terms of diversity, standing stocks and faunal composition. However, the δ13C signal of living and dead (but well-preserved) foraminiferal species (Ceratobulimina contraria, Melonis barleeanus, Uvigerina peregrina) is depleted in the episodically active pockmark A compared to the other stations. Overgrowth of authigenic carbonate on altered foraminifera generates an important shift to lower

  12. Morphologies, classification and genesis of pockmarks, mud volcanoes and associated fluid escape features in the northern Zhongjiannan Basin, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiangxin; Song, Haibin; Guan, Yongxian; Yang, Shengxiong; Pinheiro, Luis M.; Bai, Yang; Liu, Boran; Geng, Minghui

    2015-12-01

    Based on new high-resolution multi-beam bathymetry and multichannel seismic reflection data, two new groups of numerous pockmarks and mud volcanoes were discovered in the northern Zhongjiannan Basin at water depths between 600 and 1400 m. Individual pockmarks are circular, elliptical, crescent-shaped or elongated, with diameters ranging from several hundreds to thousands of meters and tens or hundreds of meters in depth, and they often form groups or strings. Crescent pockmarks, approximately 500-1500 m wide in cross-section and 50-150 m deep, occur widely in the southern study area, both as individual features and in groups or curvilinear chains, and they are more widespread and unique in this area than anywhere else in the world. Conical mud volcanoes, mostly with kilometer-wide diameters and ca. 100 m high, mainly develop in the northern study area as individual features or in groups. Seismic data show that the observed pockmarks are associated with different kinds of fluid escape structures and conduits, such as gas chimneys, diapirs, zones of acoustic blanking, acoustic turbidity and enhanced reflections, inclined faults, small fractures and polygonal faults. The mapped mud volcanoes appear to be fed from deep diapirs along two main conduit types: the conventional conduits with downward tapering cones and another other conduit type with a narrow conduit in the lower half and emanative leakage passages in the upper half. Various types of pockmarks are found and a comprehensive pockmark classification scheme is proposed, according to: (a) their shape in plan view, which includes circular, elliptical, crescent, comet-shape, elongated and irregular; (b) their magnitude, which includes small, normal, giant and mega-pockmarks; and (c) their composite pattern, which includes composite pockmarks, pockmark strings and pockmark groups. For the genesis of the crescent pockmark (strings), a 5-stage speculative formation model is proposed, implying possible controlling

  13. Canyon-confined pockmarks on the western Niger Delta slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Uzochukwu; Huuse, Mads; Hodgetts, David

    2015-07-01

    Fluid flow phenomena in the deepwater Niger Delta are important for the safe and efficient exploration, development and production of hydrocarbons in the area. Utilizing 3D seismic data from the western Niger Delta slope, we have identified pockmarks that are confined within a NE-SW oriented submarine canyon system that has been active since the early Quaternary. The pockmarks, subdivided into 'canyon-margin' pockmarks and 'intra-canyon' pockmarks, on the basis of their plan-form distribution patterns, are found to be spatially and stratigraphically related to stratigraphic discontinuities created by erosion cuts associated with the submarine canyon system. We infer that stratigraphic discontinuities provided pathways for fluid migration within the buried canyon system, allowing fluids from deeper parts of the basin to reach the seafloor as indicated by abundant pockmarks above the partly buried canyon. The transportation of fluids from deeper parts of the basin into the buried segment of the canyon system was facilitated by carrier beds expressed as high amplitude reflection packages and by extensional normal faults. The prevalence of the 'canyon margin' pockmarks over the 'intra-canyon' pockmarks is attributed to the direct connection of the buried canyon margins with truncated reservoir facies in hydraulic connection with deeper reservoir facies. The formation of the 'intra-canyon' pockmarks is interpreted to have been limited by fluid flow disconnection often caused by stratigraphic alternation of sand-rich and shale-rich channel deposits that constitute the canyon fill. Muddy canyon fill units act as baffles to fluid flow, while connected sandy infill units constitute pathways for fluid migration. Occurrence of pockmarks throughout the length of the submarine canyon system is an indication of shallow fluid flow within buried reservoir facies. Systematic alignment of seafloor pockmarks are clues to buried reservoirs and provide insights into reservoir

  14. The significance of pockmarks to understanding fluid flow processes and geohazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hovland, M.; Gardner, J.V.; Judd, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    Underwater gas and liquid escape from the seafloor has long been treated as a mere curiosity. It was only after the advent of the side-scan sonar and the subsequent discovery of pockmarks that the scale of fluid escape and the moonlike terrain on parts of the ocean floor became generally known. Today, pockmarks ranging in size from the 'unit pockmark' (1-10 m wide, <0.6 m deep) to the normal pockmark (10-700 m wide, up to 45 m deep) are known to occur in most seas, oceans, lakes and in many diverse geological settings. In addition to indicating areas of the seabed that are 'hydraulically active', pockmarks are known to occur on continental slopes with gas hydrates and in association with slides and slumps. However, possibly their potentially greatest significance is as an indicator of deep fluid pressure build-up prior to earthquakes. Whereas only a few locations containing active (bubbling) pockmarks are known, those that become active a few days prior to major earthquakes may be important precursors that have been overlooked. Pockmark fields and individual pockmarks need to be instrumented with temperature and pressure sensors, and monitoring should continue over years. The scale of such research calls for a multinational project in several pockmark fields in various geological settings.

  15. Linking geology and microbiology: inactive pockmarks affect sediment microbial community structure.

    PubMed

    Haverkamp, Thomas H A; Hammer, Øyvind; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2014-01-01

    Pockmarks are geological features that are found on the bottom of lakes and oceans all over the globe. Some are active, seeping oil or methane, while others are inactive. Active pockmarks are well studied since they harbor specialized microbial communities that proliferate on the seeping compounds. Such communities are not found in inactive pockmarks. Interestingly, inactive pockmarks are known to have different macrofaunal communities compared to the surrounding sediments. It is undetermined what the microbial composition of inactive pockmarks is and if it shows a similar pattern as the macrofauna. The Norwegian Oslofjord contains many inactive pockmarks and they are well suited to study the influence of these geological features on the microbial community in the sediment. Here we present a detailed analysis of the microbial communities found in three inactive pockmarks and two control samples at two core depth intervals. The communities were analyzed using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA V3 region. Microbial communities of surface pockmark sediments were indistinguishable from communities found in the surrounding seabed. In contrast, pockmark communities at 40 cm sediment depth had a significantly different community structure from normal sediments at the same depth. Statistical analysis of chemical variables indicated significant differences in the concentrations of total carbon and non-particulate organic carbon between 40 cm pockmarks and reference sample sediments. We discuss these results in comparison with the taxonomic classification of the OTUs identified in our samples. Our results indicate that microbial communities at the sediment surface are affected by the water column, while the deeper (40 cm) sediment communities are affected by local conditions within the sediment. PMID:24475066

  16. Linking Geology and Microbiology: Inactive Pockmarks Affect Sediment Microbial Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Haverkamp, Thomas H. A.; Hammer, Øyvind; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.

    2014-01-01

    Pockmarks are geological features that are found on the bottom of lakes and oceans all over the globe. Some are active, seeping oil or methane, while others are inactive. Active pockmarks are well studied since they harbor specialized microbial communities that proliferate on the seeping compounds. Such communities are not found in inactive pockmarks. Interestingly, inactive pockmarks are known to have different macrofaunal communities compared to the surrounding sediments. It is undetermined what the microbial composition of inactive pockmarks is and if it shows a similar pattern as the macrofauna. The Norwegian Oslofjord contains many inactive pockmarks and they are well suited to study the influence of these geological features on the microbial community in the sediment. Here we present a detailed analysis of the microbial communities found in three inactive pockmarks and two control samples at two core depth intervals. The communities were analyzed using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA V3 region. Microbial communities of surface pockmark sediments were indistinguishable from communities found in the surrounding seabed. In contrast, pockmark communities at 40 cm sediment depth had a significantly different community structure from normal sediments at the same depth. Statistical analysis of chemical variables indicated significant differences in the concentrations of total carbon and non-particulate organic carbon between 40 cm pockmarks and reference sample sediments. We discuss these results in comparison with the taxonomic classification of the OTUs identified in our samples. Our results indicate that microbial communities at the sediment surface are affected by the water column, while the deeper (40 cm) sediment communities are affected by local conditions within the sediment. PMID:24475066

  17. Diversity and Distribution of Prokaryotes within a Shallow-Water Pockmark Field

    PubMed Central

    Giovannelli, Donato; d'Errico, Giuseppe; Fiorentino, Federica; Fattorini, Daniele; Regoli, Francesco; Angeletti, Lorenzo; Bakran-Petricioli, Tatjana; Vetriani, Costantino; Yücel, Mustafa; Taviani, Marco; Manini, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Pockmarks are crater-like depression on the seafloor associated with hydrocarbon ascent through muddy sediments in continental shelves around the world. In this study, we examine the diversity and distribution of benthic microbial communities at shallow-water pockmarks adjacent to the Middle Adriatic Ridge. We integrate microbial diversity data with characterization of local hydrocarbons concentrations and sediment geochemistry. Our results suggest these pockmarks are enriched in sedimentary hydrocarbons, and host a microbial community dominated by Bacteria, even in deeper sediment layers. Pockmark sediments showed higher prokaryotic abundance and biomass than surrounding sediments, potentially due to the increased availability of organic matter and higher concentrations of hydrocarbons linked to pockmark activity. Prokaryotic diversity analyses showed that the microbial communities of these shallow-water pockmarks are unique, and comprised phylotypes associated with the cycling of sulfur and nitrate compounds, as well as numerous know hydrocarbon degraders. Altogether, this study suggests that shallow-water pockmark habitats enhance the diversity of the benthic prokaryotic biosphere by providing specialized environmental niches. PMID:27379070

  18. Diversity and Distribution of Prokaryotes within a Shallow-Water Pockmark Field.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Donato; d'Errico, Giuseppe; Fiorentino, Federica; Fattorini, Daniele; Regoli, Francesco; Angeletti, Lorenzo; Bakran-Petricioli, Tatjana; Vetriani, Costantino; Yücel, Mustafa; Taviani, Marco; Manini, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Pockmarks are crater-like depression on the seafloor associated with hydrocarbon ascent through muddy sediments in continental shelves around the world. In this study, we examine the diversity and distribution of benthic microbial communities at shallow-water pockmarks adjacent to the Middle Adriatic Ridge. We integrate microbial diversity data with characterization of local hydrocarbons concentrations and sediment geochemistry. Our results suggest these pockmarks are enriched in sedimentary hydrocarbons, and host a microbial community dominated by Bacteria, even in deeper sediment layers. Pockmark sediments showed higher prokaryotic abundance and biomass than surrounding sediments, potentially due to the increased availability of organic matter and higher concentrations of hydrocarbons linked to pockmark activity. Prokaryotic diversity analyses showed that the microbial communities of these shallow-water pockmarks are unique, and comprised phylotypes associated with the cycling of sulfur and nitrate compounds, as well as numerous know hydrocarbon degraders. Altogether, this study suggests that shallow-water pockmark habitats enhance the diversity of the benthic prokaryotic biosphere by providing specialized environmental niches. PMID:27379070

  19. Pockmarks of the eastern Gulf of Finland (Baltic Sea) - geology, morphology and genesis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhamoida, Vladimir; Grigoriev, Andrey; Ryabchuk, Darya; Amantov, Alexey; Pimenov, Nikolay; Kropachev, Yury; Neevin, Igor; Sergeev, Alexandr; Kanapatsky, Timur

    2014-05-01

    Geological and acoustic survey carried out during last decade in the eastern Gulf of Finland allowed discovering widespread occurrence of pockmarks. It was found that pockmarks, located within the areas of Holocene silty-clayey sedimentation in the central part of the gulf are formed by gas-seepage because of active transformation of organic matter by microbiological processes. The pockmarks of other type were found in Kopora and Vyborg bays within the areas where the Holocene mud thickness does not exceeds 20-40 cm, that exclude the possibility of pockmarks formation as a result of recent biogenic gas-seepage. The sediments, outcropping here are represented mainly by clays of the Baltic Ice Lake covered by thin layer of unsorted silty sand. These clays are usually characterized by absence or very low content of organic matter. However in some samples of glacial-lacustrine clays collected within pockmarks rings the methane content risen sharply reaching 10840 mkl/dm3 that supposed gas methane inflow from underlying sediment horizons. Seismic profiling revealed a number of reflecting boundaries, the character of which suggests that they are possibly associated with gas accumulations in the geological section. Side-scan sonar and multibeam profiling undertaken by VSEGEI in 2012-2013 allowed finding within relatively small area in the Kopora Bay more than 150 pockmarks of different size. The average pockmark's diameter is in the range of 10-20 m, relative depth can achieves 1 m. Morphology of pockmarks indicates the different age (relict, not active, active) and pulsating character of the fluid emission. Hydrochemical analysis of bottom waters in the area of pockmarks occurrence showed significant variations in the concentrations of some major elements. Concentrations of Ca, Mg, K and Na in the bottom waters sampled at the various sites within the pockmarks field differ sometimes more than twice and essentially higher than their background values for the surrounding

  20. Chromospheric activity of cool giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiman-Cameron, T. Y.

    1986-01-01

    During the seventh year of IUE twenty-six spectra of seventeen cool giant stars ranging in spectral type from K3 thru M6 were obtained. Together with spectra of fifteen stars observed during the sixth year of IUE, these low-resolution spectra have been used to: (1) examine chromospheric activity in the program stars and late type giants in general, and (2) evaluate the extent to which nonradiative heating affects the upper levels of cool giant photospheres. The stars observed in this study all have well determined TiO band strengths, angular diameters (determined from lunar occulations), bolometric fluxes, and effective temperatures. Chromospheric activity can therefore be related to effective temperatures providing a clearer picture of activity among cool giant stars than previously available. The stars observed are listed.

  1. Constraints on the Dynamics of Seabed Pockmarks: an Integrated Sedimentological, Biostratigraphic, Geophysical, Oceanographic and Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pau, M.; Hammer, Ø.; Chand, S.; Gisler, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Pockmarks are crater-like seabed depressions commonly resulting from focused fluid escape from soft, fine-grained sediments. Typically measuring 20-50 m across with depths of 2-10 m, these features often occur in extensive fields containing hundreds of them per square kilometre. They are prominent hazards for offshore installations such as oil rigs and pipelines, affecting vast areas worldwide. Besides, they represent a major geological source of methane, and their importance has been pointed out as contributors to the global climate variability.Sedimentological and biostratigraphic analyses of sediment cores were coupled with shallow seismic images to investigate the origin and evolution of a pockmark field in the southwestern Barents Sea, an epicontinental sea part of the Arctic Ocean. The pockmarks formed as a result of reduced sedimentation above active gas seeps near the retreating edge of the Barents Sea ice sheet about 15,000 years ago. The seepage is ascribed to climate change-induced dissociation of methane hydrates. These findings strengthen the case that pockmarks, worldwide, recorded the release of massive quantities of methane from the seafloor into the ocean during the last deglaciation. No evidence was found for current upward methane flux, so the pockmarks in the study area appear as inactive seabed features. Field measurements of currents and sediment fluxes in pockmarks in the Oslofjord, Norway, along with an experimental hydrodynamics study, provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for the long-term maintenance of inactive pockmarks. Near-bed currents may control the net sedimentation rate in these depressions by inhibiting the sedimentation from suspended transport. Enhanced turbulence and more intense biological activity suggest that the suspended fines are supported in the water column more easily in the pockmarks than on the surrounding bed, and can be transported away before settling. Moreover, upwelling generated by flow deflection

  2. More than a century of bathymetric observations and present-day shallow sediment characterization in Belfast Bay, Maine, USA: implications for pockmark field longevity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Laura L.; Kelley, Joseph T.; Belknap, Daniel F.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Andrews, Brian D.; Maynard, Melissa Landon

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms and timescales responsible for pockmark formation and maintenance remain uncertain, especially in areas lacking extensive thermogenic fluid deposits (e.g., previously glaciated estuaries). This study characterizes seafloor activity in the Belfast Bay, Maine nearshore pockmark field using (1) three swath bathymetry datasets collected between 1999 and 2008, complemented by analyses of shallow box-core samples for radionuclide activity and undrained shear strength, and (2) historical bathymetric data (report and smooth sheets from 1872, 1947, 1948). In addition, because repeat swath bathymetry surveys are an emerging data source, we present a selected literature review of recent studies using such datasets for seafloor change analysis. This study is the first to apply the method to a pockmark field, and characterizes macro-scale (>5 m) evolution of tens of square kilometers of highly irregular seafloor. Presence/absence analysis yielded no change in pockmark frequency or distribution over a 9-year period (1999–2008). In that time pockmarks did not detectably enlarge, truncate, elongate, or combine. Historical data indicate that pockmark chains already existed in the 19th century. Despite the lack of macroscopic changes in the field, near-bed undrained shear-strength values of less than 7 kPa and scattered downcore 137Cs signatures indicate a highly disturbed setting. Integrating these findings with independent geophysical and geochemical observations made in the pockmark field, it can be concluded that (1) large-scale sediment resuspension and dispersion related to pockmark formation and failure do not occur frequently within this field, and (2) pockmarks can persevere in a dynamic estuarine setting that exhibits minimal modern fluid venting. Although pockmarks are conventionally thought to be long-lived features maintained by a combination of fluid venting and minimal sediment accumulation, this suggests that other mechanisms may be equally active in

  3. More than a century of bathymetric observations and present-day shallow sediment characterization in Belfast Bay, Maine, USA: Implications for pockmark field longevity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, L.L.; Kelley, J.T.; Belknap, D.F.; Barnhardt, W.A.; Andrews, B.D.; Maynard, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms and timescales responsible for pockmark formation and maintenance remain uncertain, especially in areas lacking extensive thermogenic fluid deposits (e.g., previously glaciated estuaries). This study characterizes seafloor activity in the Belfast Bay, Maine nearshore pockmark field using (1) three swath bathymetry datasets collected between 1999 and 2008, complemented by analyses of shallow box-core samples for radionuclide activity and undrained shear strength, and (2) historical bathymetric data (report and smooth sheets from 1872, 1947, 1948). In addition, because repeat swath bathymetry surveys are an emerging data source, we present a selected literature review of recent studies using such datasets for seafloor change analysis. This study is the first to apply the method to a pockmark field, and characterizes macro-scale (>5 m) evolution of tens of square kilometers of highly irregular seafloor. Presence/absence analysis yielded no change in pockmark frequency or distribution over a 9-year period (1999-2008). In that time pockmarks did not detectably enlarge, truncate, elongate, or combine. Historical data indicate that pockmark chains already existed in the 19th century. Despite the lack of macroscopic changes in the field, near-bed undrained shear-strength values of less than 7 kPa and scattered downcore 137Cs signatures indicate a highly disturbed setting. Integrating these findings with independent geophysical and geochemical observations made in the pockmark field, it can be concluded that (1) large-scale sediment resuspension and dispersion related to pockmark formation and failure do not occur frequently within this field, and (2) pockmarks can persevere in a dynamic estuarine setting that exhibits minimal modern fluid venting. Although pockmarks are conventionally thought to be long-lived features maintained by a combination of fluid venting and minimal sediment accumulation, this suggests that other mechanisms may be equally active in

  4. Pockmark Current Flow Patterns in Belfast Bay, Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandel, C. L.; Lippmann, T. C.; Foster, D. L.; Irish, J. D.; Brothers, L.

    2012-12-01

    Pockmarks are large, circular or elongate depressions in the seafloor that are globally distributed in a wide range of geologic settings including shallow, estuarine environments like Belfast Bay, Maine. The primary mechanism of pockmark formation in Belfast Bay is attributed to episodic methane venting of shallow, natural gas in the area. Recent models suggest pockmarks may be further maintained by the reduction or prevention of fine-grained sediment deposition due to inner-pockmark upwelling events induced by near-bed current flow and flow separation over the depressions. Fluid dynamics around these features may be similar to flow around dimples or cavities. In 2011, we tested this hypothesis by deploying two ADCP moorings at the rim and center of two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine over a two day period. The sampled pockmarks consist of a circular, shallow (33 m) pockmark and a more elongated, deeper (42 m) pockmark, each with a length-to-depth ratio of 2.8. Time-varying current profiles indicate a complex rotational structure with depth, often exceeding 180°. Multiple upwelling and downwelling events extend throughout the water column with vertical velocities reaching up to 0.02 m/s. The shallow pockmark shows greater temporal and spatial variability in rotational structure that may be attributed to the converging tidal flows entering Belfast Bay. Current flow patterns in the deep pockmark are more directionally consistent with the tide and exhibit greater spatial alignment in the upper water column between the rim and center of the pockmark. Both pockmarks exhibit a counter-clockwise rotational pattern on the rising tide as current flow rotates nearly 100° from surface and into the pockmark. As the tide ebbs, a sub-division of flow is observed with a southerly-directed flow in the upper two-thirds of the water column and a northeasterly-directed flow within 10 m of the bottom. This circulation pattern resembles open cavity (L/D < 6) flow explained by

  5. Sedimentary and structural control on pockmark development—evidence from the Nyegga pockmark field, NW European margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjelstuen, Berit Oline; Haflidason, Haflidi; Sejrup, Hans Petter; Nygård, Atle

    2010-06-01

    The Nyegga region, located at water depths of about 600-800 m on the NW European continental margin, contains more than 200 pockmarks. Recently collected TOPAS seismic profiles and EM1002 bathymetric records now provide high-resolution information on their seabed and shallow sub-seabed geological setting. The identified pockmarks are up to 15 m deep, between 30 m and 600 m across and reach a maximum area of ca. 315,000 m2. The pockmarks are sediment-empty features. They do not have any preferred direction of orientation and show large variations in their shape. The pockmarks are restricted to a <16.2 cal. ka old sediment unit. This unit comprises sandy mud and is characterised by sedimentation rates of ca. 1 mm/year. The pockmarks are localised over a thick late Plio-Pleistocene prograding sediment package and a polygonal faulted Miocene-Oligocene ooze-rich unit. The late Plio-Plistocene deposits host bottom simulating reflectors, indicative of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. Inspection of the newly collected high-resolution dataset, combined with previously analysed sediment cores and 2D multichannel seismic profiles, reveals that the Nyegga pockmark field does not show any strong relationship between seabed features, sub-seabed structures and the sedimentary setting. This suggests a more complex evolution history of the Nyegga pockmark field then previously thought.

  6. Seafloor pockmarks as possible indicators of paleoseismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, J.T.; Dickson, S.M. ); Belknap, D.F.; Barnhardt, W.A.; Henderson, M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Large fields (> 40 km[sup 2]) of seafloor pockmarks (PM's) were identified in Oak-Passamaquoddy Bay and Belfast Bay, Maine, and may provide evidence of paleoseismicity analogous to liquefaction phenomena on land. The Oak Bay area is associated with dozens of historic earthquakes, and a bedrock fault cuts Quaternary sediment near Belfast Bay. As evaluated by seismic and side-scan sonar methods, the PM's are circular in plan view and up to 350 m wide and 35 m deep in Holocene mud. Volume of the PM's exceeds 5 million m[sup 3] in each bay. Holocene mud surrounding the PM's is charged with natural gas which is absent beneath the PM's. Slopes measured by submersible on sides of the PM's range up to 30[degree], and imply recent or ongoing formation, as does the lack of recent filling of the features. Cores from areas adjacent to the PM's are structureless and appear disturbed by gas. The authors envision formation of the PM's beginning with gas accumulation in muddy sediment between 5 and 10 KA. Shaking associated with local earthquakes led to gas and pore water escape in bays with PM's, while many other similar, gas-charged muddy bays in the region were unaffected by seismicity and lack PM's. Muddy sediment suspended with the escaping fluids was transported out of the area by strong tidal currents. Continued power fluid escape has maintained wall slopes and enlarged some PM's which are kept clean of new mud by current scouring. Pockmark fields represent the largest areas of disturbed Holocene sediment in the nearshore region and are most widespread in Oak-Passamaquoddy Bay and Belfast Bays, which are otherwise distinguished only by their paleoseismicity. A small PM field was recently mapped in Blue Hill Bay, ME, and PM's have been reported from the outer Gulf of Maine and may be indicative of unrecognized seismic events.

  7. Chromospheric Activity in Red Giants of M67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Whitney, B. A.; Pasquini, L.

    1994-12-01

    Red giants in the old open cluster M67 present a well-studied, homogeneous group of 1.27Msun stars with which to determine the evolution of chromospheric activity and mass loss. Echelle spectra of the Ca II H and K line region (lambda 3950) have been obtained with the 4-m telescope at KPNO, the MMT of the F. L. Whipple Observatory (K only), and the 3.6-m ESO telescope at La Silla, Chile. Spectra of 16 red giant stars down to V ~ 11 were obtained; five of the sample are identified as clump giants. The flux of the emission reversal in the Ca II K core has been calibrated using normalization based on the narrow-band absolute spectrophotometry of Gunn &\\ Stryker (1983, ApJS, 52, 121). A new spectral synthesis of the Calcium line region for radiative models of the M67 giants based on Kurucz atmospheres provides the correction necessary to extract the chromospheric component of the flux. The Ca K emission reversals display asymmetries indicative of outward motions for giants more luminous than M_V ~ +0.5. The chromospheric emission flux in Ca II K decreases with increasing stellar luminosity. Clump giants, which are thought to be in a core-helium burning stage, show Ca II emission comparable to the stars on the red giant branch. Evidence for chromospheric variability is found from multiple observations of several objects. Implications of these results upon the evolution of chromospheres and presence of mass loss in giants will be discussed.

  8. Monitoring of a methane-seeping pockmark by cabled benthic observatory (Patras Gulf, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinaro, Giuditta; Etiope, Giuseppe; Bue, Nadia Lo; Favali, Paolo; Papatheodorou, George; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Furlan, Flavio; Gasparoni, Francesco; Ferentinos, George; Masson, Michel; Rolin, Jean-François

    2006-11-01

    A new seafloor observatory, the gas monitoring module (GMM), has been developed for continuous and long-term measurements of methane and hydrogen sulphide concentrations in seawater, integrated with temperature (T), pressure (P) and conductivity data at the seafloor. GMM was deployed in April 2004 within an active gas-bearing pockmark in the Gulf of Patras (Greece), at a water depth of 42 m. Through a submarine cable linked to an onshore station, it was possible to remotely check, via direct phone connection, GMM functioning and to receive data in near-real time. Recordings were carried out in two consecutive campaigns over the periods April July 2004, and September 2004 January 2005, amounting to a combined dataset of ca. 6.5 months. This represents the first long-term monitoring ever done on gas leakage from pockmarks by means of CH4+H2S+T+P sensors. The results show frequent T and P drops associated with gas peaks, more than 60 events in 6.5 months, likely due to intermittent, pulsation-like seepage. Decreases in temperature in the order of 0.1 1°C (up to 1.7°C) below an ambient T of ca. 17°C (annual average) were associated with short-lived pulses (10 60 min) of increased CH4+H2S concentrations. This seepage “pulsation” can either be an active process driven by pressure build-up in the pockmark sediments, or a passive fluid release due to hydrostatic pressure drops induced by bottom currents cascading into the pockmark depression. Redundancy and comparison of data from different sensors were fundamental to interpret subtle proxy signals of temperature and pressure which would not be understood using only one sensor.

  9. Automated feature extraction and spatial organization of seafloor pockmarks, Belfast Bay, Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, B.D.; Brothers, L.L.; Barnhardt, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seafloor pockmarks occur worldwide and may represent millions of m3 of continental shelf erosion, but few numerical analyses of their morphology and spatial distribution of pockmarks exist. We introduce a quantitative definition of pockmark morphology and, based on this definition, propose a three-step geomorphometric method to identify and extract pockmarks from high-resolution swath bathymetry. We apply this GIS-implemented approach to 25km2 of bathymetry collected in the Belfast Bay, Maine USA pockmark field. Our model extracted 1767 pockmarks and found a linear pockmark depth-to-diameter ratio for pockmarks field-wide. Mean pockmark depth is 7.6m and mean diameter is 84.8m. Pockmark distribution is non-random, and nearly half of the field's pockmarks occur in chains. The most prominent chains are oriented semi-normal to the steepest gradient in Holocene sediment thickness. A descriptive model yields field-wide spatial statistics indicating that pockmarks are distributed in non-random clusters. Results enable quantitative comparison of pockmarks in fields worldwide as well as similar concave features, such as impact craters, dolines, or salt pools. ?? 2010.

  10. Pockmarks on either side of the Strait of Gibraltar: formation from overpressured shallow contourite gas reservoirs and internal wave action during the last glacial sea-level lowstand?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Ricardo; Somoza, Luis; Medialdea, Teresa; González, Francisco Javier; Gimenez-Moreno, Carmen Julia; Pérez-López, Raúl

    2014-06-01

    Integrating novel and published swath bathymetry (3,980 km2), as well as chirp and high-resolution 2D seismic reflection profiles (2,190 km), this study presents the mapping of 436 pockmarks at water depths varying widely between 370 and 1,020 m on either side of the Strait of Gibraltar. On the Atlantic side in the south-eastern Gulf of Cádiz near the Camarinal Sill, 198 newly discovered pockmarks occur in three well localized and separated fields: on the upper slope ( n=14), in the main channel of the Mediterranean outflow water (MOW, n=160), and on the huge contourite levee of the MOW main channel ( n=24) near the well-known TASYO field. These pockmarks vary in diameter from 60 to 919 m, and are sub-circular to irregularly elongated or lobate in shape. Their slope angles on average range from 3° to 25°. On the Mediterranean side of the strait on the Ceuta Drift of the western Alborán Basin, where pockmarks were already known to occur, 238 pockmarks were identified and grouped into three interconnected fields, i.e. a northern ( n=34), a central ( n=61) and a southern field ( n=143). In the latter two fields the pockmarks are mainly sub-circular, ranging from 130 to 400 m in diameter with slope angles averaging 1.5° to 15°. In the northern sector, by contrast, they are elongated up to 1,430 m, probably reflecting MOW activity. Based on seismo-stratigraphic interpretation, it is inferred that most pockmarks formed during and shortly after the last glacial sea-level lowstand, as they are related to the final erosional discontinuity sealed by Holocene transgressive deposits. Combining these findings with other existing knowledge, it is proposed that pockmark formation on either side of the Strait of Gibraltar resulted from gas and/or sediment pore-water venting from overpressured shallow gas reservoirs entrapped in coarse-grained contourites of levee deposits and Pleistocene palaeochannel infillings. Venting was either triggered or promoted by hydraulic pumping

  11. Activity on a Li-rich giant: DI Psc revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriskovics, Levente; Kővári, Zsolt; Vida, Krisztián; Oláh, Katalin

    2014-08-01

    We present a new Doppler imaging study for the Li-rich single K-giant DI Psc. Surface temperature maps are reconstructed for two subsequent rotation cycles. From the time evolution of the spot distribution antisolar-type differential rotation pattern is revealed. We show marks of non-uniform Li-abundance as well. The possible connection between the current evolutionary phase of the star and its magnetic activity is briefly discussed.

  12. Computation on free gas seepage and associated seabed pockmark formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Cathles, Lawrence M.; Chen, D. F.; Wu, N. Y.

    2010-03-01

    Seabed pockmarks formed by seepage of subsurface fluids are very commonly located in areas where gas is present in near-surface sediments. Especially, they are widely observed on the seafloor at hydrate regions around the world. In this paper we consider that capillary sealing is the crucial mechanism for gas entrapment, gas escape, and pockmark formation. In the hydrate system, free gas is trapped beneath the hydrate layer. The gas overpressure increases as the gas accumulates beneath the hydrate. the hydrate layer is a capillary seal. Capillary seals have the property that they fail completely when the gas pressure reaches the point that they are invaded by gas. The release of gas is thus episodic and sudden. We imagine in our model that when it occurs the venting gas will push the overlying water upward at increasingly higher velocities as the gas pipe approaches the seafloor. As the water velocity increases, the near surface sediments will become quick at a depth that is a function of the thickness of free gas column under the hydrate seal and the depth of hydrate seal, leaving a pockmark on the seafloor. The model shows that at least a 22-m-thick free gas layer beneath the hydrate at Blake Ridge is needed to form the 4-m-deep pockmark at the seabed.

  13. Experimental investigation of the hydrodynamics in pockmarks using particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pau, Mauro; Gisler, Galen; Hammer, Øyvind

    2014-02-01

    Water tank experiments were performed in order to investigate the behaviour of currents in pockmarks. A particle-seeded flow was visualised and quantified with the aid of the particle tracking velocimetry technique. The employed analogue pockmark is a 1:100 idealised scale model of a natural pockmark, while the highest Reynolds number in the experiments was one order of magnitude smaller than in nature. Interaction of the flow with the pockmark geometry resulted in an upwelling current downstream of the pockmark centre, along with enhanced water turbulence in the depression. Scaling-up the experimental measurements, it is found that the upwelling would be capable of preventing the settling of particles as large as very fine sand. Furthermore, the increased turbulence would support the suspended fine material, which can thus be transported away before settling. The net effect for a variable-direction near-bed current over long periods of time would be to winnow the settling sediments and reduce the sedimentation rate in pockmarks. These mechanisms may be responsible for the observed lack of sediment infill and the typical presence of relatively coarser sediments inside pockmarks compared to the surrounding bed. In contrast, sediments transported as bedload are likely to be deposited in pockmarks because of the weakening of near-bed currents as well as lateral flow convergence associated with the upwelling. Bedload, however, may not be the dominant mode of sediment transport in areas covered by cohesive sediments, where pockmarks are found.

  14. Chromospheric Activity TIO Strength and Spectral Types in M Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeycutt, R. Kent

    The IUE satellite will be used to study the ultraviolet spectra of cool giant stars that have well determined angular diameters and effective temperatures. The stars to be observed have spectral classes ranging from F5 through M6 and are of luminosity class III. Low resolution observations in the long wavelength region will be made in order to study the photospheric continuum radiation in the UV and to determine the level of chromospheric activity in these stars. The absolute flux as well as the slope of the continuum in the wavelength region 22003000 A should be a sensitive probe of the extent of non-radiative heating in the upper photosphere. Chromospheric activity will be examined for the range of spectral subclasses observed to determine if the degree of chromospheric activity differs for stars of the same effective temperature. The possibility exists that such a differential level of chromospheric activity could lead to the inhibition of TiO formation in the upper photosphere. This possibility will be examined along with the resultant consequences for comparisons of observed TiO bandstrengths with model predictions.

  15. Chromospheric Activity, Tio Strength and Spectral Types in M Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.

    1984-07-01

    In an continuation of a study begun during the 6th year of the IUE guest observer program the IUE satellite will be used to study the ultraviolet spectra of cool giant stars that have well-determined angular diameters and effective temperatures. The stars to be observed have spectral classes ranging from K3 through M6 and are of luminosity class III. Low resolution observations in the long wavelength region will be made in order to study the photospheric continuum radiation in the UV and to determine the level of chromospheric activity in these stars. The absolute flux, as well as the slope of the continuum in the wavelength region 2200-3000 A, should be a sensitive probe of the extent of nonradiative heating in the upper photosphere. Chromospheric activity will be examined for the range of spectral subclasses observed to determine if the degree of chromospheric activity differs for stars of the same effective temperature. The Possibility exists that such a differential level of chromospheric activity could lead to the inhibition of TiO formation in the upper photosphere. Preliminary results from IUE observations made during this past year appear to support this hypothesis. This possibility will be examined along with the resultant consequences for comparisons of observed TiO bandstrengths with model predictions.

  16. Active control of the Chinese Giant Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yichun; Yang, Dehua; Jin, Zhenyu; Liu, Zhong; Qin, Wei

    2014-07-01

    The Chinese Giant Solar Telescope (CGST) is the next generation solar telescope of China with diameter of 8 meter. The unique feature of CGST is that its primary is a ring, which facilitates the polarization detection and thermal control. In its present design and development phase, two primary mirror patterns are considered. For one thing, the primary mirror is expected to construct with mosaic mirror with 24 trapezoidal (or petal) segments, for another thing, a monolithic mirror is also a candidate for its primary mirror. Both of them depend on active control technique to maintain the optical quality of the ring mirror. As a solar telescope, the working conditions of the CGST are quite different from those of the stellar telescopes. To avoid the image deterioration due to the mirror seeing and dome seeing, especially in the case of the concentration of flux in a solar telescope, large aperture solar projects prefer to adopt open telescopes and open domes. In this circumstance, higher wind loads act on the primary mirror directly, which will cause position errors and figure errors of the primary with matters worse than those of the current 10-meter stellar telescopes with dome protect. Therefore, it gives new challenges to the active control capability, telescope structure design, and wind shielding design. In this paper, the study progress of active control of CGST for its mosaic and monolithic mirror are presented, and the wind effects on such two primary mirrors are also investigated.

  17. Widespread Mega-Pockmarks Imaged Along the Western Edge of the Cocos Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. C.; Kluesner, J. W.; Silver, E. A.; Bangs, N. L.; McIntosh, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    A large field (245km2) of 31 seabed mega-pockmarks was imaged between the Cocos ridge and the Quepos plateau on ~16.5 Ma oceanic crust generated at the Cocos-Nazca spreading center. The imaged pockmarks represent only a fraction of the much larger pockmark field evident in 100 m grid cell bathymetry data secured from MGDS. The pockmarks are clustered around 1800-2100 mbsl and were mapped using EM122 multibeam sonar, a 3.5 kHz sub-bottom profiler, and 3D Multi-Channel Seismic (MCS) aboard R/V Marcus G. Langseth during the CRISP seismic survey (2011). Using a constrained swath width of 1.4 km, the increased sounding density facilitated bathymetry/backscatter to be gridded at 10m and 8m respectively. The diameter of the pockmarks varies from ~1 km to ~2 km with a relief range of ~30-80 m, and average slopes of 15°. The MCS data also reveal older buried pockmarks in trench adjacent sediments. Small high-backscatter mounds occur within a subset of the pockmarks, which may indicate bioherms or carbonate banks above focused fluid flow conduits. Based on drilling results of DSDP Site 158 and ODP Site 1381, the pockmarks appear to be the result of paleo-differential advancement of a silica diagenetic front (opal-A to opal-CT). Although, the pockmarks may be erosional features sourced at depth from dewatering of sediments inter-bedded with igneous layers.

  18. Origin of pockmarks and chimney structures on the flanks of the Storegga Slide, offshore Norway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W., III; Holbrook, W.S.; Hill, T.M.; Keaten, R.; Mienert, J.; Haflidason, H.; Johnson, J.E.; Winters, W.J.; Lorenson, T.D.

    2008-01-01

    Seafloor pockmarks and subsurface chimney structures are common on the Norwegian continental margin north of the Storegga Slide scar. Such features are generally inferred to be associated with fluid expulsion, and imply overpressures in the subsurface. Six long gravity and piston cores taken from the interior of three pockmarks were compared with four other cores taken from the same area but outside the pockmarks, in order to elucidate the origins and stratigraphy of these features and their possible association with the Storegga Slide event. Sulfate gradients in cores from within pockmarks are less steep than those in cores from outside the pockmarks, which indicates that the flux of methane to the seafloor is presently smaller within the pockmarks than in the adjacent undisturbed sediments. This suggests that these subsurface chimneys are not fluid flow conduits lined with gas hydrate. Methane-derived authigenic carbonates and Bathymodiolus shells obtained from a pockmark at >6.3 m below the seafloor indicate that methane was previously available to support a chemosynthetic community within the pockmark. AMS 14C measurements of planktonic Foraminifera overlying and interlayered with the shell-bearing sediment indicate that methane was present on the seafloor within the pockmark prior to 14 ka 14C years B.P., i.e., well before the last major Storegga Slide event (7.2 ka 14C years B.P., or 8.2 ka calendar years B.P.). These observations provide evidence that overpressured fluids existed within the continental margin sediments off Norway during the last major advance of Pleistocene glaciation. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  19. Observed temporal hydrate-pingo alteration at pockmark G11, Nyegga, - an important climate-change signal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, M. T.

    2010-12-01

    Complex pockmark G11 at Nyegga, occurs adjacent to the northern flank of the Storegga Slide, off mid-Norway. It is a 12 m deep and 200 - 250 m wide oval-shaped depression at ~750 m water depth. The crater-like depression contains at least six up to 4 m wide and 2 m high hydrate-pingoes in addition to large, rugged methane-derived carbonate rock ridges. Despite an ambient sub-zero water temperature (~ - 0.7 °C), the pockmark teems with life, ranging from primary producers, e.g., chemosynthetic bacteria to higher trophic animals, including filter-feeders, stalked crinoids, large pycnogonids, and various kinds of teleostei, mainly skate and eel pout. One of the circular, cylinder-shaped hydrate pingoes (‘Ice1’, Hovland and Svensen, 2006), was measured in 2004 to be about 1 m in diameter and 25 cm high. It was re-visited with ROV (remotely operated vehicle) in 2009 and was found to have slightly altered its shape and become slightly smaller. The features of the G11-pockmark, including bacterial mats, sampled gas hydrates, high biodiversity, and hydrate-pingoes documents that active fluid flow (seepage) occurs through the seafloor. Although the currently observed activity at G11 seems to be in a mode of slow, steady-state flux, e.g., ‘micro-seepage’, slightly warmer bottom water expected as a consequence of the global warming trend may induce a ‘galloping melting’ or dramatically increased seepage flux in the near future. During the last few years, there has been a trend of ocean bottom water warming along most of the 1500 km long western Norwegian coastline with up to 0.8°C above normal (www.imr.no). If this same trend also occurs at 750 m water depth at Nyegga, about 170 km west of the coastline, then there is a danger of escalating pingo-alteration at G11. Because of its easy access for research vessels and its well-documented near-surface features, G11/Nyegga represents an ideal location for the early-warning documentation of incipient hydrate

  20. ELECTRIC IMPEDANCE OF THE SQUID GIANT AXON DURING ACTIVITY.

    PubMed

    Cole, K S; Curtis, H J

    1939-05-20

    Alternating current impedance measurements have been made over a wide frequency range on the giant axon from the stellar nerve of the squid, Loligo pealii, during the passage of a nerve impulse. The transverse impedance was measured between narrow electrodes on either side of the axon with a Wheatstone bridge having an amplifier and cathode ray oscillograph for detector. When the bridge was balanced, the resting axon gave a narrow line on the oscillograph screen as a sweep circuit moved the spot across. As an impulse passed between impedance electrodes after the axon had been stimulated at one end, the oscillograph line first broadened into a band, indicating a bridge unbalance, and then narrowed down to balance during recovery. From measurements made during the passage of the impulse and appropriate analysis, it was found that the membrane phase angle was unchanged, the membrane capacity decreased about 2 per cent, while the membrane conductance fell from a resting value of 1000 ohm cm.(2) to an average of 25 ohm cm.(2) The onset of the resistance change occurs somewhat after the start of the monophasic action potential, but coincides quite closely with the point of inflection on the rising phase, where the membrane current reverses in direction, corresponding to a decrease in the membrane electromotive force. This E.M.F. and the conductance are closely associated properties of the membrane, and their sudden changes constitute, or are due to, the activity which is responsible for the all-or-none law and the initiation and propagation of the nerve impulse. These results correspond to those previously found for Nitella and lead us to expect similar phenomena in other nerve fibers. PMID:19873125

  1. Morphology, spatial distribution and formation mechanisms of pockmarks in Isfjorden, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Senger, K.; Noormets, R.; Hovland, M.; Olaussen, S.

    2012-12-01

    High resolution swath bathymetry data and GIS have been used to systematically map the pockmarks, seabed morphology and glacial landforms in the Isfjorden fjord system. The most commonly accepted theory for their formation is attributed to episodic expulsion or continuous venting of fluid (including gas) through the seabed. As there is no evidence confirming the source and composition of the fluid leaking in the Isfjorden area so far, the spatial correlation of pockmark distribution with the bedrock geology and structures, submarine glacial landforms and modelled permafrost and gas hydrate distribution presented in this study will help to shed light on the origin and formation mechanisms of pockmarks in Isfjorden. Numerous pockmarks (855 in total) have been recorded at a water depth of 40-420m. Their shape varies from circular to elongate and they occur as singular and string pockmarks. Their edges are sharply defined with the slope changing from near-horizontal to 20-30 degrees within a distance of 1m. The average relief of pockmarks is 2.52m (±1.75), diameter 66.19m (±41.26) and cover a total area of 4.5 sq. km. Their diameter and depth are relatively uniform in any particular area, possibly due to a particular thickness of underlying stratigraphic layers. Shallow gas hydrate deposits in the Arctic regions can undergo rapid dissociation as a result of rising temperatures and/or decreasing pressure due to thawing permafrost seal releasing large amounts of methane through the pockmarks. The maximum water depth in Isfjorden is 428 m and sea-bottom temperature ranges between -2 to 5 degree C. Spatial mapping of pockmarks, extent and thickness of hydrate stability zone modelling results suggest that, in addition to the potential deep sources for the past seeps, the distribution of pockmarks in Isfjorden could result partly from the dissociation of gas hydrates due to warming of fjord waters. More than 400 pockmarks are located within the potential gas hydrate

  2. The magnetic fields at the surface of active single G-K giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurière, M.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Charbonnel, C.; Wade, G. A.; Tsvetkova, S.; Petit, P.; Dintrans, B.; Drake, N. A.; Decressin, T.; Lagarde, N.; Donati, J.-F.; Roudier, T.; Lignières, F.; Schröder, K.-P.; Landstreet, J. D.; Lèbre, A.; Weiss, W. W.; Zahn, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: We investigate the magnetic field at the surface of 48 red giants selected as promising for detection of Stokes V Zeeman signatures in their spectral lines. In our sample, 24 stars are identified from the literature as presenting moderate to strong signs of magnetic activity. An additional 7 stars are identified as those in which thermohaline mixing appears not to have occured, which could be due to hosting a strong magnetic field. Finally, we observed 17 additional very bright stars which enable a sensitive search to be performed with the spectropolarimetric technique. Methods: We use the spectropolarimeters Narval and ESPaDOnS to detect circular polarization within the photospheric absorption lines of our targets. We treat the spectropolarimetric data using the least-squares deconvolution method to create high signal-to-noise ratio mean Stokes V profiles. We also measure the classical S-index activity indicator for the Ca ii H&K lines, and the stellar radial velocity. To infer the evolutionary status of our giants and to interpret our results, we use state-of-the-art stellar evolutionary models with predictions of convective turnover times. Results: We unambiguously detect magnetic fields via Zeeman signatures in 29 of the 48 red giants in our sample. Zeeman signatures are found in all but one of the 24 red giants exhibiting signs of activity, as well as 6 out of 17 bright giant stars. However no detections were obtained in the 7 thermohaline deviant giants. The majority of the magnetically detected giants are either in the first dredge up phase or at the beginning of core He burning, i.e. phases when the convective turnover time is at a maximum: this corresponds to a "magnetic strip" for red giants in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. A close study of the 16 giants with known rotational periods shows that the measured magnetic field strength is tightly correlated with the rotational properties, namely to the rotational period and to the Rossby number Ro

  3. Biogeochemical and microbiological characteristic of the pockmark sediments, the Gdansk Deep, The Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenov, Nikolay; Kanapatskiy, Timur; Sivkov, Vadim; Toshchakov, Stepan; Korzhenkov, Aleksei; Ulyanova, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Comparison of the biogeochemical and microbial features was done for the gas-bearing and background sediments as well as near-bottom water of the Gdansk Deep, The Baltic Sea. Data were received in October, 2015 during 64th cruise of the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh. Gas-bearing sediments were sampled within the known pockmark (Gas-Point, depth 94 m). Background sediments area (BG-Point, depth 86 m) was located several km off the pockmark area. The sulphate concentration in the pore water of the surface sediment layer (0-5 cm) of Gas-Point was 9,7 mmol/l, and sharply decreased with depth (did not exceed 1 mmol/l deeper than 50 cm). The sulphate concentration decrease at BG-Point also took place but was not so considerable. Sulphate concentration decrease is typical for the organic rich sediments of the high productive areas, both as for the methane seep areas. Fast sulphate depletion occurs due to active processes of its microbial reduction by consortium of the sulphate-reduction bacteria, which may use low-molecular organic compounds or hydrogen, formed at the different stages of the organic matter destruction; as well as within the process of the anaerobic methane oxidation by consortium of the methane-trophic archaea and sulphate-reduction bacteria. Together with sulphate concentration decrease the methane content increase, typical for the marine sediments, occurred. At the Gas-Point the methane concentration varied within 10 μmol/dm3 in the surface layer till its maximum at sediment horizon of 65 cm (5 mmol/dm3), and decreased to 1.5 mmol/dm3 at depth of 300 cm. The BG-Point maximum values were defined at sediment horizon 6 cm (2,6 μmol/dm3). Methane sulfate transition zone at the Gas-Point sediments was at 25-35 cm depth; whereas it was not defined at the BG-Point mud. High methane concentration in the gas-bearing sediments results in the formation of the methane seep from the sediments to the near-bottom water. So the Gas-Point near-bottom waters were

  4. Geological and paleogeographic implications of late Cretaceous pockmarks: a 3D seismic study onshore South Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Ole R.; Andresen, Katrine J.; Lisager, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this presentation is to introduce hereto not described elongated pockmarks observed at an intra-Chalk Group (Late Cretaceous) surface and to present the geological and paleogeographic significance of the observations. The study utilizes an onshore 3D seismic survey, located at the southern flank of the Ringkøbing-Fyn High (RFH) at the Sundeved peninsular in southern Denmark to perform the detailed analysis of the Chalk Group in the area. The top of the Chalk Group, which do not feature any pockmarks, is located at 200-400mbsl and dips smoothly towards the SSW. It is offset by arrays of normal faults, which detach at the top of the Zechstein. The Chalk Group in the study area shows two distinct seismic facies. A lower facies with relatively high intensity coherent reflections and an upper facies with much less pronounced and diffuse internal reflectivity. The surface separating the two facies, features abundant circular (c. 0.3km wide) to elongated (0.3km x 2km) NW-SE striking depressions, which we interpret as pockmarks. The N-S striking faults in the study area offset the elongate pockmarks and thus clearly post-date the pockmark formation. However, the E-W striking faults appear to have formed at the same time as the pockmarks which adjacent and parallel to the E-W striking faults are mainly circular and only observed in the hangingwall block. No significant faulting or other evidence of vertical migration routes directly beneath the pockmarks has been observed. Borehole information, however, indicates a slightly increased clay-content in the sediments filling the pockmarks, as well as an increase in seismic velocity at the pockmarked surface indicative of hard ground development. Thus fluid expulsion and initial pockmark formation apparently coincided with a period of ceased sedimentation. The pockmarks were later excavated by submarine currents controlled by the orientation of the underlying RFH, very similar to elongated pockmarks reported in

  5. Initiation of gas-hydrate pockmark in deep-water Nigeria: Geo-mechanical analysis and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riboulot, V.; Sultan, N.; Imbert, P.; Ker, S.

    2016-01-01

    A review of recent literature shows that two geomorphologically different types of pockmarks, contribute to gas seepage at the seafloor. Type-1 pockmarks are defined as seafloor craters associated to fluid seepage and are the most classical type referred to as "pockmarks" in the literature. In contrast, Type-2 pockmarks reveal a complex seafloor morphology that may result from the formation/decomposition of gas hydrates in underlying sedimentary layers. Interpretation of very-high-resolution seismic data, sedimentological analyses and geotechnical measurements acquired from the Eastern Niger Submarine Delta reveal that Type-2 pockmarks are associated to the presence at depth of a conical body of massive gas hydrates. Based on acquired data, theoretical analysis and numerical modelling, it was possible to propose a novel geo-mechanical mechanism controlling the irregular seafloor deformations associated to Type-2 pockmark and to show that pockmark shapes and sizes are directly linked to the initial growth and distribution of sub-seafloor gas hydrates. The study illustrates the role of gas hydrates formation in the fracturation, deformation of the subsurface sediment and the formation of Type-2 pockmarks.

  6. The Hertzsprung-gap giant 31 Comae in 2013: Magnetic field and activity indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ana P.; Konstantinova-Antova, Renada; Aurière, Michel; Petit, Pascal; Charbonnel, Corinne

    2014-08-01

    We have observed the giant star 31 Comae in April and May 2013 with the spectropolarimeter Narval at Pic du Midi Observatory, France. 31 Comae is a single, rapidly rotating giant with rotational period ~6.8 d and vsini ~ 67 km/s. We present measurements and discuss variability of the longitudinal magnetic field (Bl), spectral activity indicators Hα, CaII H&K, Ca II IR triplet and evolutionary status. Our future aim is to perform a Zeeman-Doppler imaging study for the star.

  7. Pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria: Rapid hydrate growth versus slow hydrate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, N.; Bohrmann, G.; Ruffine, L.; Pape, T.; Riboulot, V.; Colliat, J.-L.; De Prunelé, A.; Dennielou, B.; Garziglia, S.; Himmler, T.; Marsset, T.; Peters, C. A.; Rabiu, A.; Wei, J.

    2014-04-01

    In previous works, it has been suggested that dissolution of gas hydrate can be responsible for pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria. It was shown that those pockmarks which are at different stages of maturation are characterized by a common internal architecture associated to gas hydrate dynamics. New results obtained by drilling into gas hydrate-bearing sediments with the MeBo seafloor drill rig in concert with geotechnical in situ measurements and pore water analyses indicate that pockmark formation and evolution in the study area are mainly controlled by rapid hydrate growth opposed to slow hydrate dissolution. On one hand, positive temperature anomalies, free gas trapped in shallow microfractures near the seafloor and coexistence of free gas and gas hydrate indicate rapid hydrate growth. On the other hand, slow hydrate dissolution is evident by low methane concentrations and almost constant sulfate values 2 m above the Gas Hydrate Occurrence Zone.

  8. Evaluation of shallow sediment methane cycling in a pockmark field on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, R. B.; Rose, P. S.; Klaucke, I.; Bialas, J.; Pecher, I. A.; Gorman, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic studies have identified an extensive field (>20,000 km2) of seafloor depressions, or pockmarks, on the southwestern flank of the Chatham Rise, New Zealand. It has been suggested that these pockmarks result from gas hydrate dissociation linked to sea-level changes during glacial-interglacial cycles. Gas hydrates are predominately composed of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas. Surface sediment cores (~ 8 m) were collected from the pockmark field on the Chatham Rise during a research cruise in February 2013 to evaluate the association of the features with CH4 releases. A suite of geochemical parameters are interpreted to determine the methane contribution to solid phase sediment and pore water. The upward flux of CH4 in sediments is often quantified using pore water sulfate (SO42-) profiles, assuming steady-state consumption of SO42- and CH4 by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM): CH4 + SO42- → HCO3- + HS- + H2O. This reaction is one of the primary controls on CH4 distributions in sediments. This work will present pore water SO42-, sulfide (HS-) and chloride (Cl-) depth profiles in sediment collected from the pockmark field. Theoretical SO42- distributions in the absence of AOM are compared to observed SO42- profiles as a preliminary assessment of the influence of CH4 on sediment geochemistry in and around the seafloor depressions. In addition isotopically-light CH4 is incorporated into sediment carbon pools via AOM and subsequent CO2 fixation. Stable carbon isotope distributions in the organic and inorganic carbon pools are presented to determine the influence of CH4 in sediments in the vicinty of the pockmarks. Collectively, the geochemical data are used to assess the role of gas hydate dissociation in pockmark formation on the Chatham Rise. Despite sesimic data interpretation in this region there is no modern day contribution of CH4 to shallow sediment carbon cycling and data are presented to assess paleogeochemical methane cycling.

  9. What Makes Red Giants Tick? Linking Tidal Forces, Activity, and Solar-Like Oscillations via Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawls, Meredith L.; Gaulme, Patrick; McKeever, Jean; Jackiewicz, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to advances in asteroseismology, red giants have become astrophysical laboratories for studying stellar evolution and probing the Milky Way. However, not all red giants show solar-like oscillations. It has been proposed that stronger tidal interactions from short-period binaries and increased magnetic activity on spotty giants are linked to absent or damped solar-like oscillations, yet each star tells a nuanced story. In this work, we characterize a subset of red giants in eclipsing binaries observed by Kepler. The binaries exhibit a range of orbital periods, solar-like oscillation behavior, and stellar activity. We use orbital solutions together with a suite of modeling tools to combine photometry and spectroscopy in a detailed analysis of tidal synchronization timescales, star spot activity, and stellar evolution histories. These red giants offer an unprecedented opportunity to test stellar physics and are important benchmarks for ensemble asteroseismology.

  10. Surface activity and oscillation amplitudes of red giants in eclipsing binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Gaulme, P.; Jackiewicz, J.; Appourchaux, T.; Mosser, B.

    2014-04-10

    Among the 19 red-giant stars belonging to eclipsing binary systems that have been identified in Kepler data, 15 display solar-like oscillations. We study whether the absence of mode detection in the remaining 4 is an observational bias or possibly evidence of mode damping that originates from tidal interactions. A careful analysis of the corresponding Kepler light curves shows that modes with amplitudes that are usually observed in red giants would have been detected if they were present. We observe that mode depletion is strongly associated with short-period systems, in which stellar radii account for 16%-24% of the semi-major axis, and where red-giant surface activity is detected. We suggest that when the rotational and orbital periods synchronize in close binaries, the red-giant component is spun up, so that a dynamo mechanism starts and generates a magnetic field, leading to observable stellar activity. Pressure modes would then be damped as acoustic waves dissipate in these fields.

  11. Chromospherically active stars. 6: Giants with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromospherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (K0 III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (K0 III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white-dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white-dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  12. Chromospherically active stars. 11: Giant with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromsopherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (KO III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (KO III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35,000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  13. Metagenomic and geochemical characterization of pockmarked sediments overlaying the Troll petroleum reservoir in the North Sea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pockmarks (depressions in the seabed) have been discovered throughout the world’s oceans and are often related to hydrocarbon seepage. Although high concentrations of pockmarks are present in the seabed overlaying the Troll oil and gas reservoir in the northern North Sea, geological surveys have not detected hydrocarbon seepage in this area at the present time. In this study we have used metagenomics to characterize the prokaryotic communities inhabiting the surface sediments in the Troll area in relation to geochemical parameters, particularly related to hydrocarbon presence. We also investigated the possibility of increased potential for methane oxidation related to the pockmarks. Five metagenomes from pockmarks and plain seabed sediments were sequenced by pyrosequencing (Roche/454) technology. In addition, two metagenomes from seabed sediments geologically unlikely to be influenced by hydrocarbon seepage (the Oslofjord) were included. The taxonomic distribution and metabolic potential of the metagenomes were analyzed by multivariate analysis and statistical comparisons to reveal variation within and between the two sampling areas. Results The main difference identified between the two sampling areas was an overabundance of predominantly autotrophic nitrifiers, especially Nitrosopumilus, and oligotrophic marine Gammaproteobacteria in the Troll metagenomes compared to the Oslofjord. Increased potential for degradation of hydrocarbons, especially aromatic hydrocarbons, was detected in two of the Troll samples: one pockmark sample and one from the plain seabed. Although presence of methanotrophic organisms was indicated in all samples, no overabundance in pockmark samples compared to the Oslofjord samples supports no, or only low level, methane seepage in the Troll pockmarks at the present time. Conclusions Given the relatively low content of total organic carbon and great depths of hydrocarbon containing sediments in the Troll area, it is possible that

  14. Sulfate reduction in a pockmark field on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Paula; Coffin, Richard; Millholland, Lewis; Klaucke, Ingo; Bialas, Joerg; Pecher, Ingo; Gorman, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Seismic studies have identified an extensive field (>20,000 km2) of seafloor depressions, or pockmarks, on the southwestern flank of the Chatham Rise, New Zealand. It has been suggested that these pockmarks result from gas hydrate dissociation linked to sea-level changes during glacial-interglacial cycles. Gas hydrates are predominately composed of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas. The upward flux of CH4 in sediments is often quantified using pore water sulfate (SO42-) profiles, assuming steady-state consumption of SO42- and CH4 by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM): CH4 + SO42- ? HCO3- + HS- + H2O. This reaction is one of the primary controls on CH4 distributions in sediments. Surface sediment cores (~ 8 m) will be collected from the pockmark field on the Chatham Rise during a research cruise in February 2013 to evaluate the association of the features with CH4 releases. A suite of geochemical parameters will be determined in both solid phase sediment and pore water. This work will present pore water SO42-, sulfide (HS-) and chloride (Cl-) depth profiles in sediments collected from the pockmark field. Theoretical SO42- distributions in the absence of AOM will be compared to observed SO42-profiles as a preliminary assessment of the influence of CH4 on sediment geochemistry in and around the seafloor depressions. Chloride and HS- distributions will further elucidate the role of gas hydrate dissociation at these sites and its possible role in the formation of the pockmarks on the Chatham Rise. These data will provide the foundation for interpreting CH4 profiles in the same sediments and will generally lead to a better understanding of sediment CH4geochemistry.

  15. Overabundance of s-process elements in the atmosphere of the active red giant PZ Mon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Yu. V.

    2015-11-01

    Based on high-resolution ( R = 60 000) spectra taken with the NES spectrograph (the 6-m BTA telescope, the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences), we have determined the abundances of 26 elements, from lithium to europium, in the atmosphere of the active red giant PZ Mon, which belongs to the class of RS CVn variable stars, by the method of model stellar atmospheres. We have taken into account the hyperfine splitting, the isotopic shift, and the departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium. Analysis of our data has revealed an overabundance of lithium and neutron-capture elements compared to normal red giants. For lithium, this is explained by the activity of the star, while the overabundance of s-elements is presumably similar in nature to that inmild bariumstars.

  16. Giant optical activity of sugar in thin soap films.

    PubMed

    Emile, Janine; Emile, Olivier; Ghoufi, Aziz; Moréac, Alain; Casanova, Federico; Ding, Minxia; Houizot, Patrick

    2013-10-15

    We report on enhanced experimental optical activity measurements of thin soap films in the presence of sugar. This unusual optical activity is linked to the intramolecular chiral conformation of the glucose molecules at the air/liquid interface. Choosing sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) as a model surfactant and glucose as model sugar, favorable interactions between the anionic group -OSO3(-)- and the glucose molecules are highlighted. This induces an interfacial anchoring of glucose molecules leading to a perturbing influence of the asymmetric chiral environment. PMID:23932406

  17. Expelled subsalt fluids form a pockmark field in the eastern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldens, P.; Schmidt, M.; Mücke, I.; Augustin, N.; Al-Farawati, R.; Orif, M.; Faber, E.

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to constrain the source area of fluids responsible for the formation of a pockmark field in the eastern Red Sea. The newly discovered field extends over an area of at least 1,000 km2 at a water depth of ~400 m. The pockmarks have modal diameters of 140-150 m and are either randomly distributed on the seafloor or aligned within valleys approximately 25 m deep and several kilometres in length. Seismic data show that chimneys and/or regions of acoustic turbidity prevail beneath the pockmark field down to the top of Miocene evaporites, which are widespread in the Red Sea. Four gravity cores were taken from the pockmark field. For most of the cores, geochemical analyses show that porewater has a higher Cl concentration than the local seawater and increased Cl/Br ratios, which indicate an origin from evaporites. The adsorbed hydrocarbons are of thermal origin, with C1/(C2+C3) ratios between 4 and 23 and stable carbon isotope data for methane varying from δ13C of -34 to -36.4‰ with respect to Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite. On the basis of the calculated maturity of the source rock of 1.2-1.4 Ro, local thermal gradients and sedimentation rates, its deeper depth boundary is approximated at 2,000 to 2,200 m. The results indicate that the adsorbed hydrocarbons sampled at the seafloor had to pass through an evaporite sequence of potentially several hundred metres to a few km in thickness. The most likely explanation for the increased permeability of the evaporite sequence is brittle deformation triggered by extensive local tectonic movements and supported by high fluid overpressure within the evaporite sequence.

  18. Pockforms: an evaluation of pockmark-like seabed features on the Landes Plateau, Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Jorge; Ercilla, Gemma; García-Gil, Soledad; Judd, Alan G.

    2010-06-01

    Pockmark-like seabed features located on the Landes Plateau, Bay of Biscay, are depressions up to 1 km across and 50 m deep according to multibeam echo sounder data. Seismic (airgun and TOPAS) profiles show that each feature comprises a stack of identical features which extend down to 300 ms (twt). Three types of depressions, elongate, irregular and circular, appear as non-truncating V-shaped features in the Plio-Quaternary sediments. These features are located above the Parentis Basin where deep faults, basement ridges and diapiric bodies extend upwards across the sedimentary cover, providing ideal migration pathways for any buoyant fluids. Initial inspection suggests that these are classic pockmarks; however, the absence of reflection truncation and the absence of indications of shallow gas beneath the features indicate that they were not formed by the removal of sediment. These are "pockforms" but not "pockmarks". This paper presents an explanation for the formation of these features, involving collapse and subsidence, sedimentary erosion, and only in some cases the erosion of seabed sediments by probable escaping fluids. These origins are mainly conducted through tectonic fluid dynamics which acted in the area up to the Late Miocene. It might be expected that these features would have been infilled by subsequent sedimentation, but their shape has been preserved because sedimentation in the area mainly comprised muds deposited from low-energy transportation (diluted gravity flows) and settling from hemipelagic suspension.

  19. Destruction of giant cluster-like vesicles by an ultrasonically activated device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahagi, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Kenji; Zhang, Yiting; Ebata, Masahiko; Toyota, Taro; Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Hayashi, Hideki

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a technically simple method of destroying a tissue marker composed of giant cluster-like vesicles (GCVs) to facilitate laparoscopic surgeries; the method releases various biological tracers contained in GCVs. An ultrasonically activated device (USAD) emitting 55.5 kHz ultrasound was employed for this purpose. Optical microscopy and fluorospectrophotometry revealed the destruction of GCVs after ultrasound irradiation when the blade tip was set 1.0 mm or closer to, but not directly in contact with, a GCV-containing cell. This means that USAD could be safely used for destroying this GCV tissue marker in clinical settings.

  20. Magnetic Field Structure and Activity of the He-burning Giant 37 Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkova, S.; Petit, P.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Aurière, M.; Wade, G. A.; Charbonnel, C.; Drake, N. A.

    2014-08-01

    We present the first magnetic map of the late-type giant 37 Com. The Least Squares Deconvolution (LSD) method and Zeeman Doppler Imaging (ZDI) inversion technique were applied. The chromospheric activity indicators Hα, S-index, Ca ii IRT and the radial velocity were also measured. The evolutionary status of the star has been studied on the basis of state-of-the-art stellar evolutionary models and chemical abundance analysis. 37 Com appears to be in the core Helium-burning phase.

  1. Pockmark development in the Petrel Sub-basin, Timor Sea, Northern Australia: Seabed habitat mapping in support of CO2 storage assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, W. A.; Nichol, S. L.; Howard, F. J. F.; Picard, K.; Dulfer, H.; Radke, L. C.; Carroll, A. G.; Tran, M.; Siwabessy, P. J. W.

    2014-07-01

    The extent to which fluids may leak from sedimentary basins to the seabed is a critical issue for assessing the potential of a basin for carbon capture and storage. The Petrel Sub-basin, located beneath central and eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf in tropical northern Australia, was identified as potentially suitable for the geological storage of CO2 because of its geological characteristics and proximity to offshore gas and petroleum resources. In May 2012, a multidisciplinary marine survey (SOL5463) was undertaken to collect data in two targeted areas of the Petrel Sub-basin to facilitate an assessment of its CO2 storage potential. This paper focuses on Area 1 of that survey, a 471 km2 area of sediment-starved shelf (water depths of 78 to 102 m), characterised by low-gradient plains, low-lying ridges, palaeo-channels and shallow pockmarks. Three pockmark types are recognised: small shallow unit pockmarks 10-20 m in diameter (generally <1 m, rarely to 2 m deep), composite pockmarks of 150-300 m diameter formed from the co-location of several cross-cutting pockmarks forming a broad shallow depression (<1 m deep), and pockmark clusters comprised of shallow unit pockmarks co-located side by side (150-300 m width overall, <1 m deep). Pockmark distribution is non-random, focused within and adjacent to palaeo-channels, with pockmark clusters also located adjacent to ridges. Pockmark formation is constrained by AMS 14C dating of in situ mangrove deposits and shells to have begun after 15.5 cal ka BP when a rapid marine transgression of Bonaparte Shelf associated with meltwater pulse 1A drowned coastal mangrove environments. Pockmark development is likely an ongoing process driven by fluid seepage at the seabed, and sourced from CO2 produced in the shallow sub-surface (<2 m) sediment. No evidence for direct connection to deeper features was observed.

  2. Are seafloor pockmarks on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand, linked to CO2 hydrates? Gas hydrate stability considerations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecher, I. A.; Davy, B. W.; Rose, P. S.; Coffin, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Vast areas of the Chatham Rise east of New Zealand are covered by seafloor pockmarks. Pockmark occurrence appears to be bathymetrically controlled with a band of smaller pockmarks covering areas between 500 and 700 m and large seafloor depressions beneath 800 m water depth. The current depth of the top of methane gas hydrate stability in the ocean is about 500 m and thus, we had proposed that pockmark formation may be linked to methane gas hydrate dissociation during sealevel lowering. However, while seismic profiles show strong indications of fluid flow, geochemical analyses of piston cores do not show any evidence for current or past methane flux. The discovery of Dawsonite, indicative of significant CO2 flux, in a recent petroleum exploration well, together with other circumstantial evidence, has led us to propose that instead of methane hydrate, CO2 hydrate may be linked to pockmark formation. We here present results from CO2 hydrate stability calculations. Assuming water temperature profiles remain unchanged, we predict the upper limit of pockmark occurrence to coincide with the top of CO2 gas hydrate stability during glacial-stage sealevel lowstands. CO2 hydrates may therefore have dissociated during sealevel lowering leading to gas escape and pockmark formation. In contrast to our previous model linking methane hydrate dissociation to pockmark formation, gas hydrates would dissociate beneath a shallow base of CO2 hydrate stability, rather than on the seafloor following upward "grazing" of the top of methane hydrate stability. Intriguingly, at the water depths of the larger seafloor depressions, the base of gas hydrate stability delineates the phase boundary between CO2 hydrates and super-saturated CO2. We caution that because of the high solubility of CO2, dissociation from hydrate to free gas or super-saturated CO2 would imply high concentrations of CO2 and speculate that pockmark formation may be linked to CO2 hydrate dissolution rather than dissociation

  3. FUSE Cycle 3 Program CO22: Chromospheric Activity in Population II Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Graham M.

    2004-01-01

    One of the mysteries of Population II giants is that they still show chromospheric emission despite their great age. The global dynamo which was active during their main-sequence lifetimes is expected to become extremely weak through magnetic rotational braking. The nature of the observed emission is not understood; although acoustic shock waves might provide the heating, acoustic waves are not predicted to drive the observed mass loss - which in turn requires the dissipation of magneto-hydrodynamic waves. This program was designed to search for the faint stellar H Ly(beta) emission wings and the fluorescent Fe II and H2 emission from one of the brightest, metal poor, Population II stars. These FUSE diagnostics, when combined with existing UV and optical spectra, help determine the major radiative cooling channels for the chromosphere. This observation was to complement that previously planned for the mildly metal deficient giant alpha Boo (K2 III). However, a Boo has yet to be observed with FUSE.

  4. Benthic Community Composition and Seabed Characteristics of a Chukchi Sea Pockmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Bluhm, B.; Iken, K.; Gagaev, S.; Robinson, S.

    2005-12-01

    Several dozen seafloor features were mapped by Larry Mayer and his colleagues using swath bathymetry during a 2003 cruise with the USCGC HEALY near the eastern edge of the Chukchi Plateau (Chukchi Sea 76.6N, 163.9W). These were sub-circular depressions ranging from approximately 250 to over 1000m in width, with depths of up to 50m below the surrounding seabed, and situated in water depths from 500 to 950m. The origin of these features was undetermined, but one possibility was that they were pockmarks formed as a result of gas or fluid expulsion processes. We report here on benthic sampling undertaken at one of these pockmarks on 18 July 2005, also from USCGC HEALY. This elongated feature had maximum water depth of approximately 940m, was 1200m in maximum width, and was depressed approximately 40m below the surrounding seabed. The ocean in the vicinity of the pockmark was heavily ice-covered, which tightly restricted the ship's mobility during sampling operations. We used an ROV to collect and photograph the benthic epifauna during a 6h transit that crossed from the outside of the pockmark to near the center over a distance of 900m. We used a down-looking digital camera to collect over 800 pictures of the benthos at altitudes of 2 to 3m above the seabed. We also collected three cores with a 25x25cm box corer. Our investigations did not provide any direct evidence for gas or fluid flux through the seabed of this feature. Neither did we see any secondary indications of methane flux such as authigenic carbonates or bacterial mats. The abundance and diversity of benthic epifauna at this station was the highest among 8 stations sampled using similar methods during a 30 day cruise. The ROV observed brittle stars, various types of anemones, shrimps, eel pouts, stalked crinoids, benthic ctenophore (likely new species), burrows and mounts, gooseneck barnacles, mysids. Holothurians (c.f. Peneagone sp.) were the single most abundant group and were often photographed in

  5. Facilitation of polymer looping and giant polymer diffusivity in crowded solutions of active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Kim, Won Kyu; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of polymer chains in a bath of self-propelled particles (SPP) by extensive Langevin dynamics simulations in a two-dimensional model system. Specifically, we analyse the polymer looping properties versus the SPP activity and investigate how the presence of the active particles alters the chain conformational statistics. We find that SPPs tend to extend flexible polymer chains, while they rather compactify stiffer semiflexible polymers, in agreement with previous results. Here we show that higher activities of SPPs yield a higher effective temperature of the bath and thus facilitate the looping kinetics of a passive polymer chain. We explicitly compute the looping probability and looping time in a wide range of the model parameters. We also analyse the motion of a monomeric tracer particle and the polymer’s centre of mass in the presence of the active particles in terms of the time averaged mean squared displacement, revealing a giant diffusivity enhancement for the polymer chain via SPP pooling. Our results are applicable to rationalising the dimensions and looping kinetics of biopolymers at constantly fluctuating and often actively driven conditions inside biological cells or in suspensions of active colloidal particles or bacteria cells.

  6. Near Infrared Activity Close to the Crab Pulsar Correlated with Giant Gamma-ray Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, Alexander R.; Max, Claire E.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe activity observed in the near-infrared correlated with a giant gamma-ray flare in the Crab Pulsar. The Crab Pulsar has been observed by the Fermi and AGILE satellites to flare for a period of 3 to 7 days, once every 1-1.5 years, increasing in brightness by a factor of 3-10 between 100MeV and 1GeV. We used Keck NIRC2 laser guide star adaptive optics imaging to observe the Crab Pulsar and environs before and during the March 2013 flare. We discuss the evidence for the knot as the location of the flares, and the theoretical implications of these observations. Ongoing target-of-opportunity programs hope to confirm this correlation for future flares.

  7. Morphosedimentary expression of the Giant Pock Mark structure known as the "Gran Burato" (Transitional Zone, Galicia continental margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Angel Enrique; Rubio, Belén; Rey, Daniel; Mohamed, Kais; Alvarez, Paula; Plaza-Morlote, Maider; Bernabeu, Ana; Druet, Maria; Martins, Virginia

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the sedimentary environment and other sedimentological features of the Transitional Zone of the Galicia continental margin, in the vicinity of the giant pock -mark structure known as the Gran Burato. The area is characterized by marginal platforms and a horst-graben system controlled by NW-SE oriented normal faults. In this zone, three giant pockmark structures, one of them known as the Gran Burato, were reported as associated to large-scale fluid escapes. The study area is located on the Transitional Zone (TZ) of the Galicia passive continental margin, which extends from Cape Finisterre (43o N) in the North to around 40oN in the South. This margin shows a complex structural configuration, which is reflected in the seabed, owing to tectonic movements from Mesozoic rifting phases and Eocene compression (Pyrennean Orogeny). Sedimentological, geochemical and physical properties analysis and 14C AMS-dating of a 4 m piston core extracted in the vicinity of the Gran Burato complemented by multibeam and TOPAS surveys allowed characterizing of the sedimentary environment in the study area. The interpretation of these data showed that the sedimentary and tectonic evolution of the area controlled by the activity of fluid dynamics.

  8. A giant local interneuron modulates the rhythmic activities of the antennal lobe in Pupae Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanyang; Yan, Ying; He, Mintong; Liao, Zhiheng; Ran, Dongzhi; Sun, Xicui; Liu, Yulou; Wang, Xutian; Huang, Yingcheng; Xu, Hanhong; Gu, Huaiyu

    2015-10-01

    In Drosophila, olfaction is tightly related to feeding and reproduction. There are three classes of neurons forming synapses in the olfactory circuit: the olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), projection neurons (PNs), and local interneurons (LNs). Here, we showed that giant local interneurons named GLNs, which were different from the classical neurons in the olfactory circuits, displayed distinctive rhythmic activities in the dorsolateral side of antennal lobe (AL) in Drosophila Pupae. Anatomically, GLNs were much larger than ipsilateral LNs and extended arborizations throughout the AL. Electrophysiologically, GLN exhibited typical 4-phased rhythmic spontaneous membrane activities, and the surrounding cells were dye-coupled when biocytin was injected into the cell body of GLN. Our study demonstrated that spontaneous activities of GLNs correlated with that of LNs and PNs. After the GLNs were damaged, the membrane activities of ipsilateral LNs and PNs became smaller, but faster. By depressing the firing frequencies of PNs and LNs, GLNs modulated the synchronization of AL and might play an important role as a "modulator" in the local circuit. PMID:26200249

  9. Wave-induced seepage and its possible contribution to the formation of pockmarks in the Huanghe (Yellow) River delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Liu, Hongjun; Zhang, Minsheng; Wang, Xiuhai

    2016-01-01

    Wave-induced seepage and its possible contribution to the formation of pockmarks in the Huanghe (Yellow) River delta were investigated experimentally and numerically. Laboratory experiments were carried out to explore the response of a layered silty seabed with various saturation conditions under cyclic wave loads, in which the pore pressure and seepage-related phenomena were particularly monitored. Numerical models to simulate wave-induced seepage in the seabed were presented and evaluated, then applied to the Huanghe River delta. The experimental results show that the excess pore pressure decreases more rapidly at the surface layer, while the seepage-related phenomena are more pronounced when large cyclic loads are applied and the underlying layer is less saturated. The proposed numerical models were verified by comparing with the experiments. The calculated seepage depth agreed well with the depth of the pockmarks in the Huanghe River delta. The experimental and numerical results and the existing insitu investigations indicate that the wave-induced seepage may be a direct cause of the pockmarks in the Huanghe River delta. Extreme storm waves and the dual-layered structure of hard surface layer and weak underlying layer are essential external and internal factors, respectively. Wave- or current-induced scour and transport are possible contributors to the reformation of pockmarks at a later stage.

  10. Submarine Dissolution During the Late-Miocene Carbonate Crash and Subsequent Mega-Pockmark Formation on the Cocos Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluesner, J.; Silver, E. A.; Bangs, N. L.; McIntosh, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    A large field (245km2) seabed mega-pockmarks (~1 km to 4 km in diameter) was recently imaged on the western edge of the Cocos Ridge near the Middle American Trench. The pockmarks are part of a vast mega-pockmark field (~10x150 km) and were imaged using high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and backscatter and 3D seismic reflection data. On the seafloor, multiple pockmarks exhibit a two-tiered geomorphology, some of which contain small high-backscatter mounds, possibly indicating recent seafloor seepage. 3D seismic data reveal that the two-tiered morphology is caused by collapse structures at depth with large pockmarks above the walls of the former. Observed collapse structures are characterized by steep walls that truncate surrounding strata, apparent normal "ring" faults, chaotic internal reflections interpreted as infill, and circular morphologies. Younger pockmarks located above the walls of the collapse structures are larger in diameter, have gently dipping walls that do not truncate surrounding strata, and typically show elliptical morphologies. Physical properties results at IODP Site U1414 that intersects the 3D seismic volume suggest that observed reverse polarity lens-shaped zones, which are truncated by the deeper collapse structures, represent anomalous regions of high porosity and low density. In addition, a rapid drop in Ca concentrations observed within this interval at Site U1414 suggests a relationship with possible carbonate dissolution. Correlation of the collapse structures stratigraphic timing with nanno-fossil data at Site U1414 suggests formation occurred ~8-10 Ma, approximately during the Late Miocene eastern Pacific carbonate crash. Based on 3D seismic analysis and recent drilling results, we propose a two-stage formation process that consists of initial collapse caused by carbonate dissolution during the late Miocene, followed by sustained fluid-flow along the walls of established collapse features, resulting in pockmark formation. This

  11. Synthesis of extremely large mesoporous activated carbon and its unique adsorption for giant molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hisashi; Kakii, Takuhiro; Hirota, Yoshifumi

    1996-02-01

    The steam invigoration of pitches (softening points 85 and 280{degrees}C) homogenized with 1-3 wt% of organo rare0earth metal complexes such as Ln(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3} or Ln(acac) (Ln=Y, Yb) at 930{degrees}C provided activated carbons with an extremely high mesopore ration, >70%. The resulted activated carbon selectively adsorbs giant molecules such as Vitamin B{sub 12}, blue acid 90 dye, dextran, nystatin, and humic acid, reflecting their large mesopore volumes. To understand what kind of carbon skeleton in pitch is suited for generation of high mesopore ration, the steam invigoration of a series of condensed polynuclear aromatics (COPNA) resins prepared from naphthlene, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene, or perylene and p-xylene-{alpha},{alpha}{prime}-diol were conducted in the presence of rare-earth metal complexes. As a result, COPNA resins containing phenanthrene, perylene, and pyrene generated large mesopore volume. 35 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. A new strategy to prepare giant vesicles from surface active ionic liquids (SAILs): a study of protein dynamics in a crowded environment using a fluorescence correlation spectroscopic technique.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Chiranjib; Roy, Arpita; Kundu, Niloy; Banik, Debasis; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-06-01

    A simple procedure for the preparation of giant vesicles using surface active ionic liquids (SAILs) has been provided in this paper. SAILs, used to form vesicles, were synthesized by replacing the cationic part of Aerosol OT (AOT) with cations having alkyl chains of different lengths (ammonium and imidazolium cations). The number of carbons in the alkyl chains of the cations was varied from eight to sixteen. From the observed results, the formation of giant vesicles is found to be dependent on the alkyl chain length as well as the organic moieties of the respective cations. These giant vesicles were characterized using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The conformational dynamics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) inside these giant vesicles was determined using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to get an idea about the protein dynamics in a constrained environment. The interaction of the giant vesicles with the protein was confirmed by the change in the diffusion coefficient and the conformational fluctuation time. PMID:27173474

  13. Control of the active site structure of giant bilayer hemoglobin from the Annelid Eisenia foetida using hierarchic assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Girasole, Marco; Arcovito, Alessandro; Marconi, Augusta; Davoli, Camilla; Congiu-Castellano, Agostina; Bellelli, Andrea; Amiconi, Gino

    2005-12-05

    The active site structure of the oxygenated derivative of the main subassemblies (whole protein, dodecamers, and trimers) of the giant haemoglobin from Eisenia foetida has been characterized by x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The data revealed a remarkable effect of the hierarchic assemblies on the active site of the subunit. Specifically, the whole protein has the same site structure of the dodecamer, while a sharp conformational transition occurs when the dodecamer is disassembled into trimers (and monomers) revealing that constraints due to the protein matrix determine the active site geometry and, consequently, the protein function in these large complexes.

  14. Rotation and magnetic activity of the Hertzsprung-gap giant 31 Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Granzer, T.; Kopf, M.; Weber, M.; Küker, M.; Reegen, P.; Rice, J. B.; Matthews, J. M.; Kuschnig, R.; Rowe, J. F.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The single rapidly-rotating G0 giant 31 Comae has been a puzzle because of the absence of photometric variability despite its strong chromospheric and coronal emissions. As a Hertzsprung-gap giant, it is expected to be at the stage of rearranging its moment of inertia, hence likely also its dynamo action, which could possibly be linked with its missing photospheric activity. Aims: Our aim is to detect photospheric activity, obtain the rotation period, and use it for a first Doppler image of the star's surface. Its morphology could be related to the evolutionary status. Methods: We carried out high-precision, white-light photometry with the MOST satellite, ground-based Strömgren photometry with automated telescopes, and high-resolution optical echelle spectroscopy with the new STELLA robotic facility. Results: The MOST data reveal, for the first time, light variations with a full amplitude of 5 mmag and an average photometric period of 6.80 ± 0.06 days. Radial-velocity variations with a full amplitude of 270 m s-1 and a period of 6.76 ± 0.02 days were detected from our STELLA spectra, which we also interpret as due to stellar rotation. The two-year constancy of the average radial velocity of +0.10 ± 0.33 km s-1 confirms the star's single status, as well as the membership in the cluster Melotte 111. A spectrum synthesis gives Teff = 5660 ± 42 K, log g = 3.51 ± 0.09, and [Fe/H] = -0.15 ± 0.03, which together with the revised Hipparcos distance, suggests a mass of 2.6 ± 0.1 M_⊙ and an age of ≈540 Myr. The surface lithium abundance is measured to be nearly primordial. A detection of a strong He i absorption line indicates nonradiative heating processes in the atmosphere. Our Doppler images show a large, asymmetric polar spot, cooler than Teff by ≈1600 K, and several small low-to-mid latitude features that are warmer by ≈300-400 K and are possibly of chromospheric origin. We computed the convective turnover time for 31 Com as a function of depth

  15. Transcriptional activity of the giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta Holobiont: molecular evidence for metabolic interchange

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Cara L.; Labrie, Micheline; Jarett, Jessica K.; Lesser, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to our understanding of the taxonomic composition of the symbiotic microbes in marine sponges, the functional diversity of these symbionts is largely unknown. Furthermore, the application of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic techniques to functional questions on sponge host-symbiont interactions is in its infancy. In this study, we generated a transcriptome for the host and a metatranscriptome of its microbial symbionts for the giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, from the Caribbean. In combination with a gene-specific approach, our goals were to (1) characterize genetic evidence for nitrogen cycling in X. muta, an important limiting nutrient on coral reefs (2) identify which prokaryotic symbiont lineages are metabolically active and, (3) characterize the metabolic potential of the prokaryotic community. Xestospongia muta expresses genes from multiple nitrogen transformation pathways that when combined with the abundance of this sponge, and previous data on dissolved inorganic nitrogen fluxes, shows that this sponge is an important contributor to nitrogen cycling biogeochemistry on coral reefs. Additionally, we observed significant differences in gene expression of the archaeal amoA gene, which is involved in ammonia oxidation, between coral reef locations consistent with differences in the fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen previously reported. In regards to symbiont metabolic potential, the genes in the biosynthetic pathways of several amino acids were present in the prokaryotic metatranscriptome dataset but in the host-derived transcripts only the catabolic reactions for these amino acids were present. A similar pattern was observed for the B vitamins (riboflavin, biotin, thiamin, cobalamin). These results expand our understanding of biogeochemical cycling in sponges, and the metabolic interchange highlighted here advances the field of symbiont physiology by elucidating specific metabolic pathways where there is high potential for host

  16. Giant cavernous hemangioma of the liver and multiple primary malignant tumors in a patient with suspected familial inhibition of natural killer cell activity--a case report.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, T; Uchida, K; Yoshida, K; Muto, T; Saito, H; Nemoto, K; Inoue, Z; Morita, T; Miyakoshi, H; Tamura, K

    1989-03-01

    A woman was operated on for a nonepithelial malignant tumor of the left leg and subsequently, for an epithelial carcinoma of the right breast and a borderline malignant tumor of the right ovary. She also developed a giant cavernous hemangioma that caused disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome, which necessitated a left trisegmentectomy of the liver. Her family history suggested a hereditary predisposition to diverse malignant neoplasms, and also to giant cavernous hemangioma of the liver. Immunological evaluation disclosed selective inhibition of natural killer cell activity. Hormonal and hereditary factors are discussed in relation to the development of multiple primary tumors and giant cavernous hemangioma of the liver. PMID:2724721

  17. Interstitial and adsorbed light hydrocarbons in shallow sediments at coral reefs and pockmarks on the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, M.; Ferriday, I.

    2009-04-01

    Judging from the visual and acoustic documentation of visible seepage of light hydrocarbons (methane - butane) through the seafloor, they apparently only occur at very few, specific locations on the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS). However, since 1983, Statoil and StatoilHydro have conducted numerous local geochemical sediment sampling studies for investigating links with surface features, such as pockmarks, carbonate crusts, bacterial mats, and coral reefs. The results show that even in shallow, oxic muddy sediments, low, but significant concentrations of light hydrocarbons are found, both interstitially and adsorbed to clay also probably carbonate particles. Because light hydrocarbons will be oxidized rapidly in an oxic environment, this fact alone demonstrates that there must be a continuous net flux of such hydrocarbons to the surface sediments, probably mainly from local buried source rock formations. Thus many basins of the world have geographically widespread microseepages of thermogenic hydrocarbons, as gas and as heavier hydrocarbons, up to ~ C20. The results in the case of our study areas reveal that the concentrations vary locally, more-or-less in harmony with topographical and surface organic and inorganic features. These hydrocarbon concentrations correlate with topographical features such as normal and 'unit' pockmarks, with the location of bacterial mats, carbonate crusts, and, to some degree, with the location of coral reefs. The highest hydrocarbon concentrations have consistently been found inside pockmark craters, proving that they have been and probably still are sites of varying scales of seepage. Although some of the investigated deep-water coral reefs correlate with geochemical concentration trends, there are still too few results to make this into a statistically valid conclusion. Geochemical results are presented from the following locations: North Sea: Gullfaks and Tommeliten; Norwegian Sea: Haltenpipe, Nyegga, and Morvin. There are

  18. Methane-generated( ) pockmarks on young, thickly sedimented oceanic crust in the Arctic. Vestnesa ridge, Fram strait

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, P.R.; Crane, K. ); Sundvor, E. ); Max, M.D. ); Pfirman, S.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Acoustic backscatter imagery in the Farm strait (between Greenland and Spitzbergen) reveals a 1-3-km-wide, 50-km-long belt of -50 pointlike backscatter objects decorating the -1300-m-deep crest of Vestnesa Ridge, a 1 [minus]> 2 km thick sediment drift possibly underlain by a transform-parallel oceanic basement ridge (crustal ages approximately 3-14 Ma). A 3.5 kHz seismic-reflection profile indicates that at least some objects are pockmarks approximately 100-200 m in diameter and 10-20 m deep. The pockmarks (possibly also mud dipairs) may have been formed by evolution of methane generated by the decomposition of marine organic matter in the Vestnesa ridge sediment drift. The ridge may be underlain by an anticlinical carapace of methane-hydrate calculated to be 200-300 m thick, comparable to the hydrate thickness measured just to the south. The rising methane would collect in the ridge-crest trap, intermittently escaping to the sea floor. This hypothesis is supported by multichannel evidence for bright spots and bottom-simulating reflectors in the area. The pockmark belt may also be located above a transcurrent fault. Sediment slumps on the flanks of Vestnesa ridge and northeast of Molloy ridge may have been triggered by plate-boundary earthquakes and facilitated by methane hydrates. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  19. EUV-driven ionospheres and electron transport on extrasolar giant planets orbiting active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadney, J. M.; Galand, M.; Koskinen, T. T.; Miller, S.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Unruh, Y. C.; Yelle, R. V.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are affected by the high-energy spectrum of their host stars from soft X-rays to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). This emission depends on the activity level of the star, which is primarily determined by its age. In this study, we focus upon EGPs orbiting K- and M-dwarf stars of different ages - ɛ Eridani, AD Leonis, AU Microscopii - and the Sun. X-ray and EUV (XUV) spectra for these stars are constructed using a coronal model. These spectra are used to drive both a thermospheric model and an ionospheric model, providing densities of neutral and ion species. Ionisation - as a result of stellar radiation deposition - is included through photo-ionisation and electron-impact processes. The former is calculated by solving the Lambert-Beer law, while the latter is calculated from a supra-thermal electron transport model. We find that EGP ionospheres at all orbital distances considered (0.1-1 AU) and around all stars selected are dominated by the long-lived H+ ion. In addition, planets with upper atmospheres where H2 is not substantially dissociated (at large orbital distances) have a layer in which H3+ is the major ion at the base of the ionosphere. For fast-rotating planets, densities of short-lived H3+ undergo significant diurnal variations, with the maximum value being driven by the stellar X-ray flux. In contrast, densities of longer-lived H+ show very little day/night variability and the magnitude is driven by the level of stellar EUV flux. The H3+ peak in EGPs with upper atmospheres where H2 is dissociated (orbiting close to their star) under strong stellar illumination is pushed to altitudes below the homopause, where this ion is likely to be destroyed through reactions with heavy species (e.g. hydrocarbons, water). The inclusion of secondary ionisation processes produces significantly enhanced ion and electron densities at altitudes below the main EUV ionisation peak, as

  20. Pockmarks, fluid flow, and sediments outboard of the deformation front at the Cascadia Subduction Zone from analysis of multi-channel seismic and multi-beam sonar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. C.; Carbotte, S. M.; Han, S.; Carton, H. D.; Canales, P.; Nedimovic, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence of active fluid flow and the nature of the sediment section near the Cascadia deformation front are explored using multi-channel (MCS) seismic and multi-beam sonar data collected in summer 2012 using the R/V Marcus G. Langseth during the Juan de Fuca Ridge to Trench Survey. The MCS data were collected along two full plate transects (the 'Oregon' and 'Washington' transects) and one trench parallel line using a 6600 cubic inch source, and an 8 km streamer with 636 channels (12.5 m spacing). The MCS data pre-stack processing sequence includes geometry definition, trace editing, F-K filter, and deconvolution. Velocity analysis is performed via semblance and constant velocity stacks in order to create a velocity model of the sediments and upper oceanic crust. The traces are then stacked, and post-stack time migrated. The sonar data were collected using the R/V Langseth's Kongsberg EM122 1°x1° multi-beam sonar with 288 beams and 432 total soundings across track. Using MB-system the sonar data are cleaned, and the bathymetry data are then gridded at 35 m, while the backscatter data are gridded at 15 m. From the high-resolution mapping data 48 pockmarks varying in diameter from 50 m - 1 km are identified within 60 km outboard of the deformation front. The surface expression of these large features in an area of heavy sedimentation is likely indicative of active fluid flow. In order to gain sub-seafloor perspective on these features the MCS data are draped below the bathymetry/backscatter grids using QPS Fledermaus. From this perspective, specific locations for detailed velocity and attribute analysis of the sediment section are chosen. Sediment velocity and attribute analysis also provide insight into apparent differences in the sediment section and décollement formation along the Oregon and Washington plate transects. While both lines intersect areas of dense pockmark concentration, the area around the Oregon transect has been shown to contain a continuous

  1. Neotectonic activity at the Giant Gjallar Vent (Norwegian Sea) indicates a future phase of active fluid venting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumke, Ines; Berndt, Christian; Crutchley, Gareth; Couillard, Mélanie; Gay, Aurélien

    2013-04-01

    The Giant Gjallar Vent (GGV) is a hydrothermal vent complex that formed during the opening of the North Atlantic at about 55 Ma. Sill intrusions into Cretaceous organic-rich sediments led to the production and subsequent vigorous seafloor venting of methane. A later phase of fluid escape occurred in mid-Oligocene times. The GGV is characterised by two pipes of 440 m and 480 m in diameter that reach up to the Base Late Pliocene Unconformity (BLPU) between the Kai and Naust formations. The unconformity is strongly deformed over an area of c. 18,000 km² across the vent, with a positive relief of up to 38 m above the surrounding paleo-seafloor. The overlying sediments of the Naust Formation conformally drape this deformation, smoothing its relief to a maximum of 15 m at the modern seafloor. The sediment drape indicates present inactivity of the vent system, as does the absence of indicators of active fluid escape in the water column during RV METEOR cruise M87-2 in 2012. However, high-resolution 2D seismic and Parasound data from the same cruise, and exploration-type 3D seismic data acquired by Norsk Hydro, show several indications for recent to ongoing activity at the GGV. Beneath the BLPU, strong frequency attenuation and chaotic reflections indicate the presence of free gas. At the edges of the extent of chaotic reflections, subvertical faults cut the unconformity as well as horizons of the lower and middle Naust Formation, suggesting tectonic activity after deposition of these horizons. Neotectonic activity is further indicated by the extensive occurrence of shallow faults apparent in Parasound records in the immediate vicinity of the vent and up to 16 km away. Some of these faults reach the seafloor. The observed deformation and faults may be the result of fluids accumulating beneath the BLPU due to increased loading of the oozy Kai Formation by denser glacigenic Naust sediments. Because of the lower permeability of the Naust Formation, the unconformity acts as a

  2. Foreign Body Giant Cell Formation Is Preceded by Lamellipodia Formation and Can Be Attenuated by Inhibition of Rac1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Steven M.; Skokos, Eleni; Laiwalla, Farah; Krady, Marie-Marthe; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2007-01-01

    Macrophages that are recruited to the site of implanted biomaterials undergo fusion to form surface-damaging foreign body giant cells. Exposure of peripheral blood monocytes to interleukin-4 can recapitulate the fusion process in vitro. In this study, we used interleukin-4 to induce multinucleation of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and observed changes in cell shape, including elongation and lamellipodia formation, before fusion. Because cytoskeletal rearrangements are regulated by small GTPases, we examined the effects of inhibitors of Rho kinase (Y-32885) and Rac activation (NSC23766) on fusion. Y-32885 did not prevent cytoskeletal changes or fusion but limited the extent of multinucleation. NSC23766, on the other hand, inhibited lamellipodia formation and fusion in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we found that in control cells, these changes were preceded by Rac1 activation. However, NSC23766 did not block the uptake of polystyrene microspheres. Likewise, short interfering RNA knockdown of Rac1 limited fusion without limiting phagocytosis. Thus, phagocytosis and fusion can be partially decoupled based on their susceptibility to NSC23766. Furthermore, poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) scaffolds containing NSC23766 attenuated foreign body giant cell formation in vivo. These observations suggest that targeting Rac1 activation could protect biomaterials without compromising the ability of macrophages to perform beneficial phagocytic functions at implantation sites. PMID:17556592

  3. Magnetic fields in single late-type giants in the Solar vicinity: How common is magnetic activity on the giant branches?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova-Antova, Renada; Aurière, Michel; Charbonnel, Corinne; Drake, Natalia; Wade, Gregg; Tsvetkova, Svetla; Petit, Pascal; Schröder, Klaus-Peter; Lèbre, Agnes

    2014-08-01

    We present our first results on a new sample containing all single G, K and M giants down to V = 4 mag in the Solar vicinity, suitable for spectropolarimetric (Stokes V) observations with Narval at TBL, France. For detection and measurement of the magnetic field (MF), the Least Squares Deconvolution (LSD) method was applied (Donati et al. 1997) that in the present case enables detection of large-scale MFs even weaker than the solar one (the typical precision of our longitudinal MF measurements is 0.1-0.2 G). The evolutionary status of the stars is determined on the basis of the evolutionary models with rotation (Lagarde et al. 2012; Charbonnel et al., in prep.) and fundamental parameters given by Massarotti et al. (1998). The stars appear to be in the mass range 1-4 M ⊙, situated at different evolutionary stages after the Main Sequence (MS), up to the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB). The sample contains 45 stars. Up to now, 29 stars are observed (that is about 64% of the sample), each observed at least twice. For 2 stars in the Hertzsprung gap, one is definitely Zeeman detected. Only 5 G and K giants, situated mainly at the base of the Red Giant Branch (RGB) and in the He-burning phase are detected. Surprisingly, a lot of stars ascending towards the RGB tip and in early AGB phase are detected (8 of 13 observed stars). For all Zeeman detected stars v sin i is redetermined and appears in the interval 2-3 km/s, but few giants with MF possess larger v sin i.

  4. Biological assessment of the effects of petroleum production activities, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, on the endangered giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1987-09-01

    This Biological Assessment evaluates the potential adverse effects that production activities conducted on the Naval Petroleum Reserveys in California may have on the endangered giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens). DOE concluded that the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of the proposed activities will not jeopardize the continued existence of the species because results of surveys indicated that giant kangaroo rat burrow systems and habitat was initiated; a habitat restoration program was developed and implemented; and administrative policies to reduce vehicle speeds, contain oil and waste water spills, restrict off-road vehicle travel, and to regulate public access, livestock grazing, and agricultural activities were maintained. 33 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Direct detection of a magnetic field at the surface of V390 Aurigae - an effectively single active giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Aurière, M.; Iliev, I. Kh.; Cabanac, R.; Donati, J.-F.; Mouillet, D.; Petit, P.

    2008-03-01

    Aims:We have studied the active giant V390 Aur using spectropolarimetry to obtain direct and simultaneous measurements of the magnetic field and the activity indicators in order to infer the origin of the activity. Methods: We used the new spectropolarimeter NARVAL at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (Observatoire du Pic du Midi, France) to obtain a series of Stokes I and Stokes V profiles. Using the LSD technique we were able to detect the Zeeman signature of the magnetic field in each of our 5 observations and to measure its longitudinal component. Using the wide wavelength range of the spectra we could monitor the CaII K&H and IR triplet, as well as the Hα lines which are activity indicators. The Stokes I LSD profiles enabled us to detect and measure the profiles of two weak stellar companions. Results: From five observations obtained from November 2006 to March 2007, we deduce that the magnetic field has a complex structure which evolves with time and is reminiscent of a dynamo-induced magnetic field. The activity indicators also present day to day variations, but their behaviour does not completely follow the magnetic field variations, because their longitudinal component can cancel the contribution of complex magnetic features. There is a significant difference between the magnetic field observed on November 27, 2006 and on March 15, 2007, at the same rotational phase, but with an interval of 10 rotations. The behaviour of the activity indicators together with the measured enhanced magnetic field on March 15, 2007 support the idea of a change in the field topology. Analysis (RV and EW) of the absorption components of the Stokes I LSD profile shows that the secondary of the visual wide orbit binary ADS 3812 is itself a spectroscopic binary, and suggests that the synchronization effect does not play role for V390 Aur (the primary), and that the giant should be considered as effectively single with regard to its fast rotation and activity. Based on data obtained

  6. Lithium enrichment on the single active K1-giant DI Piscium. Possible joint origin of differential rotation and Li enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriskovics, L.; Kővári, Zs.; Vida, K.; Granzer, T.; Oláh, K.

    2014-11-01

    Aims: We investigate the surface spot activity of the rapidly rotating, lithium-rich active single K-giant DI Psc to measure the surface differential rotation and understand the mechanisms behind the Li-enrichment. Methods: Doppler imaging was applied to recover the surface temperature distribution of DI Psc in two subsequent rotational cycles using the individual mapping lines Ca i 6439, Fe i 6430, Fe i 6421, and Li i 6708. Surface differential rotation was derived by cross-correlation of the subsequent maps. Difference maps are produced to study the uniformity of Li-enrichment on the surface. These maps are compared with the rotational modulation of the Li i 6708 line equivalent width. Results: Doppler images obtained for the Ca and Fe mapping lines agree well and reveal strong polar spottedness, as well as cool features at lower latitudes. Cross-correlating the consecutive maps yields antisolar differential rotation with a shear coefficient α = -0.083 ± 0.021. The difference of the average and the Li maps indicates that the lithium abundance is non-activity related. There is also a significant rotational modulation of the Li equivalent width. Data were gathered via OPTICON FP7 in semester 2012B.

  7. Methane release from sediment seeps to the atmosphere is counteracted by highly active Methylococcaceae in the water column of deep oligotrophic Lake Constance.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Maren; Bussmann, Ingeborg; Tichy, Lucas; Deutzmann, Jörg; Schink, Bernhard; Pester, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Methane emissions from freshwater environments contribute substantially to global warming but are under strong control of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria. Recently discovered methane seeps (pockmarks) in freshwater lake sediments have the potential to bypass this control by their strong outgassing activity. Whether this is counteracted by pelagic methanotrophs is not well understood yet. We used a (3)H-CH4-radiotracer technique and pmoA-based molecular approaches to assess the activity, abundance and community structure of pelagic methanotrophs above active pockmarks in deep oligotrophic Lake Constance. Above profundal pockmarks, methane oxidation rates (up to 458 nmol CH4 l(-1) d(-1)) exceeded those of the surrounding water column by two orders of magnitude and coincided with maximum methanotroph abundances of 0.6% of the microbial community. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a dominance of members of the Methylococcaceae in the water column of both, pockmark and reference sites, with most of the retrieved sequences being associated with a water-column specific clade. Communities at pockmark and reference locations also differed in parts, which was likely caused by entrainment of sediment-hosted methanotrophs at pockmark sites. Our results show that the release of seep-derived methane to the atmosphere is counteracted by a distinct methanotrophic community with a pronounced activity throughout bottom waters. PMID:27267930

  8. Steroid-induced protein synthesis in giant-toad (Bufo marinus) urinary bladders. Correlation with natriferic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Geheb, M; Alvis, R; Owen, A; Hercker, E; Cox, M

    1984-01-01

    We have identified a group of proteins (Mr approximately 70 000-80 000; pI approximately 5.5-6.0) in giant-toad (Bufo marinus) urinary bladders whose synthesis appears to be related to aldosterone-stimulated Na+ transport. Spironolactone, a specific mineralocorticoid antagonist in renal epithelia, inhibits the synthesis of these proteins as well as the natriferic effect of the hormone. Since a variety of other steroids (some of which are traditionally considered to be glucocorticoids) also stimulate Na+ transport in toad urinary bladders, we examined whether their natriferic activity was expressed in a fashion similar to that of aldosterone. Short-circuit current was used to measure Na+ transport, and epithelial-cell protein synthesis was detected with high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. At a concentration of approximately 100 nM, dexamethasone, corticosterone and aldosterone were equinatriferic. Dexamethasone and aldosterone had identical dose-response curves, maximal and half-maximal activity being evident at concentrations of approximately 100 nM and 10 nM respectively. In contrast, at a concentration of approximately 10 nM, corticosterone had no effect on Na+ transport. The natriferic activities of these three steroids correlate with their known affinities for the putative mineralocorticoid receptor in toad urinary bladders. Natriferic concentrations of dexamethasone and corticosterone (140 nM) induced the synthesis of proteins with characteristics identical with those induced by aldosterone. Spironolactone, at an antagonist/agonist ratio of 2000:1, inhibited steroid-induced Na+ transport and the synthesis of these proteins. Thus it appears that all natriferic steroids share a common mechanism of action in toad urinary bladders. Natriferic activity can be correlated not only with relative steroid-receptor affinity but also with the induction of a specific group of epithelial-cell proteins. Images Fig. 1. Fig

  9. STRONG VARIABLE ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM Y GEM: ACCRETION ACTIVITY IN AN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR WITH A BINARY COMPANION?

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Neill, James D.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen

    2011-10-20

    Binarity is believed to dramatically affect the history and geometry of mass loss in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stars, but observational evidence of binarity is sorely lacking. As part of a project to look for hot binary companions to cool AGB stars using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer archive, we have discovered a late-M star, Y Gem, to be a source of strong and variable UV emission. Y Gem is a prime example of the success of our technique of UV imaging of AGB stars in order to search for binary companions. Y Gem's large and variable UV flux makes it one of the most prominent examples of a late-AGB star with a mass accreting binary companion. The UV emission is most likely due to emission associated with accretion activity and a disk around a main-sequence companion star. The physical mechanism generating the UV emission is extremely energetic, with an integrated luminosity of a few x L{sub sun} at its peak. We also find weak CO J = 2-1 emission from Y Gem with a very narrow line profile (FWHM of 3.4 km s{sup -1}). Such a narrow line is unlikely to arise in an outflow and is consistent with emission from an orbiting, molecular reservoir of radius 300 AU. Y Gem may be the progenitor of the class of post-AGB stars which are binaries and possess disks but no outflows.

  10. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: a lesion with activated mTOR pathway and constant expression of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Caporalini, Chiara; Giordano, Flavio; Mussa, Federico; Scagnet, Mirko; Moscardi, Selene; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant-cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). TSC mainly involves the central nervous system (CNS) where SEGA, subependymal nodules, and cortical tubers may be present. First studies suggested the astrocytic nature of SEGA while successive studies demonstrated the mixed glio-neuronal nature. There are similarities between TSC-associated CNS lesions and type IIb focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). In all these pathologies, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation has been demonstrated. Recent data evidenced that balloon cells in FCD IIb express glutamine synthetase (GS). GS is involved in the clearance of glutamate. Cells expressing GS might exert an antiepileptic role. We evaluated by immunohistochemistry the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), neurofilaments (NF), and GS expression and the mTOR status (mTOR and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6) in 16 SEGAs and 2 cortical tubers. Our purpose was to emphasize the mixed nature of SEGA and to further investigate the similarities between TSC-related CNS lesions (in particular SEGA) and FCD IIb. We confirm the glio-neuronal nature and the common activation of the mTOR pathway in SEGAs. In addition, we report for the first time that these tumors, analogously to FCD IIb, commonly express GS. Notably, the expression of mTOR, phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6, and GS was restricted to gemistocytic-like GFAP-negative cells. GS expression and mTOR pathway activation were also documented in cortical tubers. Further studies are necessary to understand the significance of GS expression in SEGAs as well as in cortical tubers. PMID:27390104

  11. Endopolyploidy in irradiated p53-deficient tumour cell lines: Persistence of cell division activity in giant cells expressing Aurora B- kinase

    PubMed Central

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Ivanov, Andrei; Wheatley, Sally P; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A; Ianzini, Fiorenza; Anisimov, Alim P; Mackey, Michael; Davis, Paul J; Plakhins, Grigorijs; Illidge, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings including computerized live imaging suggest that polyploidy cells transiently emerging after severe genotoxic stress (and named ‘endopolyploid cells’) may have a role in tumour regrowth after anti-cancer treatment. Until now, mostly the factors enabling metaphase were studied in them. Here we investigate the mitotic activities and the role of Aurora B, in view of potential de-polyploidisation of these cells, because Aurora B- kinase is responsible for coordination and completion of mitosis. We observed that endopolyploid giant cells are formed in irradiated p53 tumours in several ways: (1) by division/fusion of daughter cells creating early multi-nucleated cells; (2) by asynchronous division/fusion of sub-nuclei of these multinucleated cells; (3) by a series of polyploidising mitoses reverting replicative interphase from aborted metaphase and forming giant cells with a single nucleus; (4) by micronucleation of arrested metaphases enclosing genome fragments; or (5) by incomplete division in the multipolar mitoses forming late multi-nucleated giant cells. We also observed that these activities are able to release para-diploid cells, although they do so infrequently. Although after a substantial delay, apoptosis typically occurs in these cells, we also found that roughly 2% of endopolyploid cells evade apoptosis and senescence arrest and continue mitotic activities. In this article we describe that catalytically active aurora B-kinase is expressed in the nuclei of many interphase endopolyploid cells, as well as being present at the centromeres, mitotic spindle and cleavage furrow during their mitotic efforts. The totally micronucleated giant cells (containing subgenomic fragments in multiple micronuclei) represented the only minor fraction, which failed to undergo mitosis and Aurora B was absent from it. These observations suggest that most endopolyploid tumour cells are not reproductively inert and that aurora B may contribute to the establishment

  12. Effect of steam activation of biochar produced from a giant Miscanthus on copper sorption and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shim, Taeyong; Yoo, Jisu; Ryu, Changkook; Park, Yong-Kwon; Jung, Jinho

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the physiochemical properties, sorption characteristics, and toxicity effects of biochar (BC) produced from Miscanthus sacchariflorus via slow pyrolysis at 500°C and its steam activation product (ABC). Although BC has a much lower surface area than ABC (181 and 322m(2)g(-1), respectively), the Cu sorption capacities of BC and ABC are not significantly different (p>0.05). A two-compartment model successfully explains the sorption of BC and ABC as being dominated by fast and slow sorption processes, respectively. In addition, both BC and ABC efficiently eliminate the toxicity of Cu towards Daphnia magna. However, ABC itself induced acute toxicity to D. magna, which is possibly due to increased aromaticity upon steam activation. These findings suggest that activation of BC produced from M. sacchariflorus at a pyrolytic temperature of 500°C may not be appropriate in terms of Cu sorption and toxicity reduction. PMID:26318926

  13. Giant stellar arcs in the Large Magellanic Cloud: a possible link with past activity of the Milky Way nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Yuri N.

    2013-02-01

    The origin of the giant stellar arcs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remains a controversial issue, one that has been discussed since 1966. No other star/cluster arc is so perfect a segment of a circle; moreover, there is another similar arc nearby. Many hypotheses were advanced to explain these arcs and all but one of these was disproved. It was proposed in 2004 that the origin of these arcs was a bow shock from the jet that is intermittently fired by the Milky Way nucleus; during its last episode of activity the jet was pointed toward the LMC. Quite recently, evidence for such a jet indeed appeared. We suggest that it was once energetic enough to trigger star formation in the LMC, and if the jet opening angle was about 2° then it could push out H i gas from a region of about 2 kpc in size, forming a cavity LMC4, but also squeeze two dense clouds that occurred in the same area, causing the formation of stars along their surfaces facing the core of the Milky Way. As a result, spherical segments of stellar shells might arise, visible now as the arcs named the Quadrant and Sextant, the apexes of which point towards the centre of the Milky Way. The orientation of both arcs could be the key to unlocking their origin. Here we give data that confirm the above hypothesis, amongst which are the radial velocities of stars inside and outside the larger of the LMC arcs. The probability is low that a jet from an active galactic nucleus (AGN) points towards a nearby galaxy and triggers star formation there, but a few other examples are now known or suspected.

  14. A maximum entropy approach to detect close-in giant planets around active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, P.; Donati, J.-F.; Hébrard, E.; Morin, J.; Folsom, C. P.; Böhm, T.; Boisse, I.; Borgniet, S.; Bouvier, J.; Delfosse, X.; Hussain, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Barnes, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The high spot coverage of young active stars is responsible for distortions of spectral lines that hamper the detection of close-in planets through radial velocity methods. Aims: We aim to progress towards more efficient exoplanet detection around active stars by optimizing the use of Doppler imaging in radial velocity measurements. Methods: We propose a simple method to simultaneously extract a brightness map and a set of orbital parameters through a tomographic inversion technique derived from classical Doppler mapping. Based on the maximum entropy principle, the underlying idea is to determine the set of orbital parameters that minimizes the information content of the resulting Doppler map. We carry out a set of numerical simulations to perform a preliminary assessment of the robustness of our method, using an actual Doppler map of the very active star HR 1099 to produce a realistic synthetic data set for various sets of orbital parameters of a single planet in a circular orbit. Results: Using a simulated time series of 50 line profiles affected by a peak-to-peak activity jitter of 2.5 km s-1, in most cases we are able to recover the radial velocity amplitude, orbital phase, and orbital period of an artificial planet down to a radial velocity semi-amplitude of the order of the radial velocity scatter due to the photon noise alone (about 50 m s-1 in our case). One noticeable exception occurs when the planetary orbit is close to co-rotation, in which case significant biases are observed in the reconstructed radial velocity amplitude, while the orbital period and phase remain robustly recovered. Conclusions: The present method constitutes a very simple way to extract orbital parameters from heavily distorted line profiles of active stars, when more classical radial velocity detection methods generally fail. It is easily adaptable to most existing Doppler imaging codes, paving the way towards a systematic search for close-in planets orbiting young, rapidly

  15. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  16. Secretly Eccentric: The Giant Planet and Activity Cycle of GJ 328

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Boss, Alan P.

    2013-09-01

    We announce the discovery of a ~2 Jupiter-mass planet in an eccentric 11 yr orbit around the K7/M0 dwarf GJ 328. Our result is based on 10 years of radial velocity (RV) data from the Hobby-Eberly and Harlan J. Smith telescopes at McDonald Observatory, and from the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea. Our analysis of GJ 328's magnetic activity via the Na I D features reveals a long-period stellar activity cycle, which creates an additional signal in the star's RV curve with amplitude 6-10 m s-1. After correcting for this stellar RV contribution, we see that the orbit of the planet is more eccentric than suggested by the raw RV data. GJ 328b is currently the most massive, longest-period planet discovered around a low-mass dwarf.

  17. SECRETLY ECCENTRIC: THE GIANT PLANET AND ACTIVITY CYCLE OF GJ 328

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Boss, Alan P.

    2013-09-10

    We announce the discovery of a {approx}2 Jupiter-mass planet in an eccentric 11 yr orbit around the K7/M0 dwarf GJ 328. Our result is based on 10 years of radial velocity (RV) data from the Hobby-Eberly and Harlan J. Smith telescopes at McDonald Observatory, and from the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea. Our analysis of GJ 328's magnetic activity via the Na I D features reveals a long-period stellar activity cycle, which creates an additional signal in the star's RV curve with amplitude 6-10 m s{sup -1}. After correcting for this stellar RV contribution, we see that the orbit of the planet is more eccentric than suggested by the raw RV data. GJ 328b is currently the most massive, longest-period planet discovered around a low-mass dwarf.

  18. Giant Optical Activity of Quantum Dots, Rods, and Disks with Screw Dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Noskov, Roman E.; Ginzburg, Pavel; Gun'Ko, Yurii K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2015-10-01

    For centuries mankind has been modifying the optical properties of materials: first, by elaborating the geometry and composition of structures made of materials found in nature, later by structuring the existing materials at a scale smaller than the operating wavelength. Here we suggest an original approach to introduce optical activity in nanostructured materials, by theoretically demonstrating that conventional achiral semiconducting nanocrystals become optically active in the presence of screw dislocations, which can naturally develop during the nanocrystal growth. We show the new properties to emerge due to the dislocation-induced distortion of the crystal lattice and the associated alteration of the nanocrystal’s electronic subsystem, which essentially modifies its interaction with external optical fields. The g-factors of intraband transitions in our nanocrystals are found comparable with dissymmetry factors of chiral plasmonic complexes, and exceeding the typical g-factors of chiral molecules by a factor of 1000. Optically active semiconducting nanocrystals—with chiral properties controllable by the nanocrystal dimensions, morphology, composition and blending ratio—will greatly benefit chemistry, biology and medicine by advancing enantiomeric recognition, sensing and resolution of chiral molecules.

  19. Giant Optical Activity of Quantum Dots, Rods, and Disks with Screw Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Noskov, Roman E.; Ginzburg, Pavel; Gun’ko, Yurii K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2015-01-01

    For centuries mankind has been modifying the optical properties of materials: first, by elaborating the geometry and composition of structures made of materials found in nature, later by structuring the existing materials at a scale smaller than the operating wavelength. Here we suggest an original approach to introduce optical activity in nanostructured materials, by theoretically demonstrating that conventional achiral semiconducting nanocrystals become optically active in the presence of screw dislocations, which can naturally develop during the nanocrystal growth. We show the new properties to emerge due to the dislocation-induced distortion of the crystal lattice and the associated alteration of the nanocrystal’s electronic subsystem, which essentially modifies its interaction with external optical fields. The g-factors of intraband transitions in our nanocrystals are found comparable with dissymmetry factors of chiral plasmonic complexes, and exceeding the typical g-factors of chiral molecules by a factor of 1000. Optically active semiconducting nanocrystals—with chiral properties controllable by the nanocrystal dimensions, morphology, composition and blending ratio—will greatly benefit chemistry, biology and medicine by advancing enantiomeric recognition, sensing and resolution of chiral molecules. PMID:26424498

  20. Functional roles of Na+/K+-ATPase in active ammonia excretion and seawater acclimation in the giant mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Shit F.; Hiong, Kum C.; Lam, Sock P.; Ong, Seow W.; Wee, Wei L.; Wong, Wai P.; Ip, Yuen K.

    2014-01-01

    The giant mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri, is an amphibious fish that builds burrows in the mudflats. It can actively excrete ammonia through its gills, and tolerate high environmental ammonia. This study aimed to examine the effects of seawater (salinity 30; SW) acclimation and/or environmental ammonia exposure on the kinetic properties of Na+/K+-ATPase (Nka) from, and mRNA expression and protein abundance of nka/Nka α–subunit isoforms in, the gills of P. schlosseri pre-acclimated to slightly brackish water (salinity 3; SBW). Our results revealed that the Nka from the gills of P. schlosseri pre-acclimated to SBW for 2 weeks had substantially higher affinity to (or lower Km for) K+ than NH+4, and its affinity to NH+4 decreased significantly after 6-days exposure to 75 mmol l−1 NH4Cl in SBW. Hence, Nka transported K+ selectively to maintain intracellular K+ homeostasis, instead of transporting NH+4 from the blood into ionocytes during active NH+4 excretion as previously suggested. Two nkaα isoforms, nkaα1 and nkaα3, were cloned and sequenced from the gills of P. schlosseri. Their deduced amino acid sequences had K+ binding sites identical to that of Nkaα1c from Anabas testudineus, indicating that they could effectively differentiate K+ from NH+4. Six days of exposure to 75 mmol l−1 NH4Cl in SBW, or to SW with or without 50 mmol l−1 NH4Cl led to significant increases in Nka activities in the gills of P. schlosseri. However, a significant increase in the comprehensive Nkaα protein abundance was observed only in the gills of fish exposed to 50 mmol l−1 NH4Cl in SW. Hence, post-translational modification could be an important activity modulator of branchial Nka in P. schlosseri. The fast modulation of Nka activity and concurrent expressions of two branchial nkaα isoforms could in part contribute to the ability of P. schlosseri to survive abrupt transfer between SBW and SW or abrupt exposure to ammonia. PMID:24795653

  1. A Series of Jets that Drove Streamer-Puff CMEs from Giant Active Region of 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate characteristics of solar coronal jets that originated from active region NOAA 12192 and produced coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This active region produced many non­-jet major flare eruptions (X and M class) that made no CME. A multitude of jets occurred from the southeast edge of the active region, and in contrast to the major-­flare eruptions in the core, six of these jets resulted in CMEs. Our jet observations are from SDO/AIA EUV channels and from Hinode/XRT, and CME observations are from the SOHO/LASCO C2 coronograph. Each jet-­driven CME was relatively slow-­moving (approx. 200 - 300 km/s) compared to most CMEs; had angular width (20deg - 50deg) comparable to that of the streamer base; and was of the "streamer­-puff" variety, whereby a pre-existing streamer was transiently inflated but not removed (blown out) by the passage of the CME. Much of the chromospheric-­temperature plasma of the jets producing the CMEs escaped from the Sun, whereas relatively more of the chromospheric plasma in the non-CME-producing jets fell back to the solar surface. We also found that the CME-producing jets tended to be faster in speed and longer in duration than the non-CME-­producing jets. We expect that the jets result from eruptions of mini-filaments. We further propose that the CMEs are driven by magnetic twist injected into streamer-­base coronal loops when erupting twisted mini-filament field reconnects with the ambient field at the foot of those loops.

  2. A Series of Jets that Drove Streamer-Puff CMEs from Giant Active Region of 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate characteristics of solar coronal jets that originated from active region NOAA 12192 and produced coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This active region produced many non-jet major flare eruptions (X and M class) that made no CME. A multiitude of jets occurred from the southeast edge of the active region, and in contrast to the major-flare eruptions in the core, six of these jets resulted in CMEs. Our jet observations are from multiple SDO/AIA EUV channels, including 304, 171 and 193 Angstrom, and CME observations are taken from SOHO/LASCO C2 coronograph. Each jet-driven CME was relatively slow-moving (approximately 200 - 300 km s(sup-1) compared to most CMEs; had angular width (20deg - 50deg) comparable to that of the streamer base; and was of the "streamer-puff" variety, whereby a preexisting streamer was transiently inflated but not removed (blown out) by the passage of the CME. Much of the chromospheric-temperature plasma of the jets producing the CMEs escaped from the Sun, whereas relatively more of the chromospheric plasma in the non-CME-producing jets fell back to the solar surface. We also found that the CME-producing jets tended to be faster in speed and longer in duration than the non-CME-producing jets. We expect that the jets result from eruptions of mini-filaments. We further propose that the CMEs are driven by magnetic twist injected into streamer-base coronal loops when erupting twisted mini-filament field reconnects with the ambient field at the foot of those loops.

  3. Giant optical activity from the radiative electromagnetic interactions in plasmonic nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Li; Wang, Rongyao; Ji, Yinglu; Zhai, Dawei; Wu, Xiaochun; Liu, Yu; Chen, Keqiu; Xu, Hongxing

    2013-04-01

    We fabricate the linear chains of twisted gold nanorods by a facile chiral molecular templating method. In such a chiral plasmonic system, particle-particle separation distances are in the order of the light wavelength and are much larger than the sizes of individual particles. As a result, the inter-particle interactions in this chiral system are mediated mainly by a relatively weak far-field plasmonic coupling, rather than a strong near-field coupling. However, such a chiral system of twisted gold nanorods show a huge surface plasmon based circular dichroism response, with the highest anisotropy factor around 0.027. This is in contrast to the previous studies in which near-field plasmonic coupling is an indispensable prerequisite to obtain strong optical activity from a chiral plasmonic nanostructure. Our study demonstrates here an alternative strategy for achieving huge chiroptical response of a chiral plasmonic nanostructure based on far-field, radiative electromagnetic interactions of metallic nanoparticles. Theoretical simulations show a satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. This study may provide more flexible ways to design chiral plasmon nanostructures with strong CD responses for various applications.We fabricate the linear chains of twisted gold nanorods by a facile chiral molecular templating method. In such a chiral plasmonic system, particle-particle separation distances are in the order of the light wavelength and are much larger than the sizes of individual particles. As a result, the inter-particle interactions in this chiral system are mediated mainly by a relatively weak far-field plasmonic coupling, rather than a strong near-field coupling. However, such a chiral system of twisted gold nanorods show a huge surface plasmon based circular dichroism response, with the highest anisotropy factor around 0.027. This is in contrast to the previous studies in which near-field plasmonic coupling is an indispensable prerequisite to obtain

  4. Giant and switchable surface activity of liquid metal via surface oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Rashed; Eaker, Collin B.; Bowden, Edmond F.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to control the interfacial tension of a liquid alloy of gallium via electrochemical deposition (or removal) of the oxide layer on its surface. In sharp contrast with conventional surfactants, this method provides unprecedented lowering of surface tension (∼500 mJ/m2 to near zero) using very low voltage, and the change is completely reversible. This dramatic change in the interfacial tension enables a variety of electrohydrodynamic phenomena. The ability to manipulate the interfacial properties of the metal promises rich opportunities in shape-reconfigurable metallic components in electronic, electromagnetic, and microfluidic devices without the use of toxic mercury. This work suggests that the wetting properties of surface oxides—which are ubiquitous on most metals and semiconductors—are intrinsic “surfactants.” The inherent asymmetric nature of the surface coupled with the ability to actively manipulate its energetics is expected to have important applications in electrohydrodynamics, composites, and melt processing of oxide-forming materials. PMID:25228767

  5. Anti-solar differential rotation on the active sub-giant HU Virginis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, G.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Künstler, A.; Carroll, T. A.; Weber, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Measuring surface differential rotation (DR) on different types of stars is important when characterizing the underlying stellar dynamo. It has been suggested that anti-solar DR laws can occur when strong meridional flows exist. Aims: We aim to investigate the differential surface rotation on the primary star of the RS CVn binary, HU Vir, by tracking its starspot distribution as a function of time. We also aim to recompute and update the values for several system parameters of the triple system HU Vir (close and wide orbits). Methods: Time-series high-resolution spectroscopy for four continuous months was obtained with the 1.2-m robotic STELLA telescope. Nine consecutive Doppler images were reconstructed from these data, using our line-profile inversion code iMap. An image cross-correlation method was applied to derive the surface differential-rotation law for HU Vir. New orbital elements for the close and the wide orbits were computed using our new STELLA radial velocities (RVs) combined with the RV data available in the literature. Photometric observations were performed with the Amadeus Automatic Photoelectric Telescope (APT), providing contemporaneous Johnson-Cousins V and I data for approximately 20 yrs. This data was used to determine the stellar rotation period and the active longitudes. Results: We confirm anti-solar DR with a surface shear parameter α of -0.029 ± 0.005 and -0.026 ± 0.009, using single-term and double-term differential rotation laws, respectively. These values are in good agreement with previously claimed results. The best fit is achieved assuming a solar-like double-term law with a lap time of ≈400 d. Our orbital solutions result in a period of 10.387678 ± 0.000003 days for the close orbit and 2726 ± 7 d (≈7.5 yr) for the wide orbit. A Lomb-Scarge (L-S) periodogram of the pre-whitened V-band data reveals a strong single peak providing a rotation period of 10.391 ± 0.008 d, well synchronized to the short orbit. Based on

  6. The Gela Basin pockmark field in the strait of Sicily (Mediterranean Sea): chemosymbiotic faunal and carbonate signatures of postglacial to modern cold seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taviani, M.; Angeletti, L.; Ceregato, A.; Foglini, F.; Froglia, C.; Trincardi, F.

    2013-07-01

    The geo-biological exploration of a pockmark field located at ca. 800 m below sea level in the Gela basin (Strait of Sicily, Central Mediterranean) provided a relatively diverse chemosymbiotic community and methane-imprinted carbonates. To date, this is the first occurrence of such a type of specialised deep-water cold-seep communities recorded from this key region, before documented in the Mediterranean as rather disjunct findings in its eastern and westernmost basins. The thiotrophic chemosymbiotic organisms recovered from this area include empty tubes of the vestimentiferan Lamellibrachia sp., loose and articulated shells of lucinids (Lucinoma kazani, Myrtea amorpha), vesicomyids (Isorropodon perplexum), and gastropods (Taranis moerchii). A callianassid decapod (Calliax sp.) was consistently found alive in large numbers in the pockmark mud. Their post-mortem calcified parts mixed with molluscs and subordinately miliolid foraminifers form a distinct type of skeletal assemblage. Carbonate concretions display δ13C values as low as -40‰ PDB suggesting the occurrence of light hydrocarbons in the seeping fluids. Since none of the truly chemosymbiotic organisms was found alive, although their skeletal parts appear at times very fresh, some specimens have been AMS-14C dated to shed light on the historical evolution of this site. Lamellibrachiav and Lucinoma are two of the most significant chemosymbiotic taxa reported from various Mediterranean cold seep sites (Alboran Sea and Eastern basin). Specimens from station MEDCOR78 (pockmark #1, Lat. 36°46´10.18" N, Long. 14°01´31.59" E, 815 m below sea level) provided ages of 11736 ± 636 yr cal BP (Lamellibrachia sp.), and 9609.5 ± 153.5 yr cal BP (L. kazani). One shell of M. amorpha in core MEDCOR81 (pockmark #6, Lat 36°45´38.89" N, Long 14°00´07.58" E, 822 m below sea level) provided a sub-modern age of 484 ± 54 yr cal BP. These ages document that fluid seepage at this pockmark site has been episodically

  7. The Gela Basin pockmark field in the strait of Sicily (Mediterranean Sea): chemosymbiotic faunal and carbonate signatures of postglacial to modern cold seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taviani, M.; Angeletti, L.; Ceregato, A.; Foglini, F.; Froglia, C.; Trincardi, F.

    2013-01-01

    The geo-biological exploration of a pockmark field located at ca. -800 m in the Gela basin (Strait of Sicily, Central Mediterranean) provided a relatively diverse chemosymbiotic community and methane-imprinted carbonates. To date, this is the first occurrence of such type of specialized deep-water cold-seep communities recorded from this key region, before documented in the Mediterranean as rather disjunct findings in its eastern and westernmost basins. The thiotrophic chemosymbiotic organisms recovered from this area include empty tubes of the vestimentiferan Lamellibrachia sp., loose and articulated shells of lucinids (Lucinoma kazani, Myrtea amorpha), vesicomyids (Isorropodon perplexum), and gastropods (Taranis moerchi). A callianassid decapod (Calliax sp.) was consistently found alive in large numbers in the pockmark mud. Their post-mortem calcified parts mixed with molluscs and subordinately miliolid foraminifers form a distinct type of skeletal assemblage (named DECAMOL). Carbonate concretions display δ13C values as low as -40 ‰ PDB suggesting the occurrence of light hydrocarbons in the seeping fluids. Since none of the truly chemosymbiotic organisms was found alive, although their skeletal parts appear at times very fresh, some specimens have been AMS-14C dated to shed light on the historical evolution of this site. Lamellibrachia and Lucinoma are two of the most significant chemosymbiotic taxa reported from various Mediterranean cold seep sites (Alboran Sea and Eastern basin). Specimens from station MEDCOR78 (pockmark#1, Lat 36°46´10.18´´ N, Long 14°01´31.59´´ E, -815 m) provided ages of 11 736 ± 636 yr cal BP (Lamellibrachia sp.), and 9609.5 ± 153.5 yr cal BP (L. kazani). One shell of M. amorpha in core MEDCOR81 (pockmark#6, Lat 36°45´38.89´´ N, Long 14°00´07.58´´ E, -822 m) provided a sub-modern age of 484 ± 54 yr cal BP. These ages document that fluid seepage at this pockmark site has been episodically sustaining thiotrophic

  8. News from the "blowout", a man-made methane pockmark in the North Sea: chemosynthetic communities and microbial methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle, Lea I.; Wilfert, Philipp; Schmidt, Mark; Bryant, Lee; Haeckel, Matthias; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Linke, Peter; Sommer, Stefan; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2013-04-01

    The accidental penetration of a base-Quaternary shallow gas pocket by a drilling rig in 1990 caused a "blowout" in the British sector of the North Sea (57°55.29' N, 01°37.86' E). Large quantities of methane have been seeping out of this man-made pockmark ever since. As the onset of gas seepage is well constrained, this site can be used as a natural laboratory to gain information on the development of methane oxidizing microbial communities at cold seeps. During an expedition with the R/V Celtic Explorer in July and August 2012, we collected sediments by video-guided push-coring with an ROV (Kiel 6000) along a gradient from inside the crater (close to where a jet of methane bubbles enters the water column) outwards. We also sampled the water column in a grid above the blowout at three different depths. In this presentation, we provide evidence for the establishment of methanotrophic communities in the sediment (AOM communities) on a time scale of decades. Furthermore, we will report data on methane concentrations and anaerobic methane oxidation rates in the sediment. Finally, we will also discuss the spatial distribution of methane and aerobic methane oxidation rates in the water column.

  9. Overexpression, purification, and pharmacologic evaluation of anticancer activity of ribosomal protein L24 from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Hou, Y L; Ding, X; Hou, W; Song, B; Wang, T; Wang, F; Li, J; Zhong, J; Xu, T; Ma, B X; Zhu, H Q; Li, J H; Zhong, J C

    2013-01-01

    The ribosomal protein L24 (RPL24) belongs to the L24E family of ribosomal proteins and is located in the cytoplasm. The purpose of this study was to investigate the structure and anti-cancer function of RPL24 of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The complementary DNA of RPL24 was cloned successfully using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technology. We constructed a recombinant expression vector containing RPL24 complementary DNA and overexpressed it in Escherichia coli using pET28a plasmids. The expression product obtained was purified using Ni-chelating affinity chromatography. The results indicated that the length of the fragment cloned is 509 bp, and it contains an open-reading frame of 474 bp encoding 157 amino acids. Primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative RPL24 protein is 17.78 kDa with a theoretical isoelectric point of 11.86. The RPL24 gene is readily expressed in E. coli, and the RPL24 fused with the N-terminal histidine-tagged protein to give rise to the accumulation of an expected 23.51-kDa polypeptide. The inhibitory rate in mice treated with 0.1 mg/mL RPL24, the highest of 3 doses administered, can reach 67.662%, which may be comparable to the response to mannatide. The histology of organs with tumors showed that the tissues in the RPL24 group displayed a looser arrangement compared with that in the control group. Furthermore, no obvious damage was apparent in other organs, such as heart, lung, and kidney. The data showed that the recombinant RPL24 had time and dose dependency on the cell growth inhibition rate. Human laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cells treated with 0.3125-10 µg/mL RPL24 for 24 h displayed significant cell growth inhibition (P < 0.05; N = 6) in assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide compared with that in control (untreated) cells. By contrast, human hepatoma Hep G-2 cells displayed no significant change (P > 0.05; N = 6) from control

  10. The p in p-T is for pressure: Movement of the gas hydrate stability field during glacial sealevel lowering and its possible link to pockmark formation on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecher, I. A.; Davy, B. W.; Wood, R.; Carter, L.; Gohl, K.

    2010-12-01

    The discussion on a possible destabilization of gas hydrates caused by climate fluctuations has in recent years focused on the role of a sub-seafloor temperature increase following bottom-water warming. We here revisit the scenario that a pressure drop during glacial sealevel lowering could lead to gas hydrate dissociation. A >20,000 km2 field of seafloor depressions that we interpret as pockmarks has been identified on the southern flanks of the Chatham Rise. Three classes of pockmarks are present in two distinct water-depth ranges. The shallowest class of pockmarks with a diameter of ~150 m are present in a water-depth range of 500-700 m, close to the current top of the gas hydrate stability field. Sub-bottom profiler data show evidence for a bottom simulating reflection making it likely that gas hydrates are present beneath the seafloor. Furthermore, buried pockmarks are identified on horizons that we correlate with sealevel lowstands suggesting that pockmark formation is linked to sealevel lowering. Assuming constant bottom-water temperatures, a glacial sealevel drop by 120 m would move much of the seafloor that is covered with these pockmarks out of the gas hydrate stability field. We therefore suggest these pockmarks were formed by gas from dissociating gas hydrate due to depressurization following sealevel lowering. Two larger classes of pockmarks with diameters of 1-5 and ~10 km, respectively, are present in water depths of 800-1100 m. Here, the seafloor has probably remained within the gas hydrate stability field during sealevel lowstands. However, the associated pressure drop has moved the base of gas hydrate stability upwards by ~30 m. It is unclear whether bottom-water temperatures have changed significantly in our study area during glacial cycles - changes of 1-3° C would be required to have a similar effect on gas hydrate stability as sealevel fluctuations. The boundary between warmer subtropical and cold subantarctic waters, the subtropical front

  11. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  12. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  13. Coexpression of interleukin-6 and -2 from giant panda in Escherichia coli and the biological activity of the fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Y; Nian, Y-Y; Ji, H-W; Zhang, H; Zhu, L; Xu, Z-W

    2013-01-01

    To construct a fusion cytokine protein with more and stronger bioactivities to enhance the immunity of the cytokine alone, we expressed interleukin (IL)-6/(IL)-2 from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in Escherichia coli as a 59.4-kDa fusion protein. Subsequently, the inclusion bodies were solubilized with 8 M urea and applied onto a Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid column. The final production of IL-6/IL-2 reached 6 mg/L in soluble form, and the purified final product was >96% pure. In Western blot assays, the recombinant IL-6/IL-2 was recognized by polyclonal antibodies against IL-6 and IL-2 of giant panda. The results demonstrated that the protein mixture contained correctly folded IL-2 and IL-6 proteins. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay demonstrated that IL-6/IL-2 can promote lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation. These data suggest that the fusion protein could be used to develop a novel immunoadjuvant to enhance the immunity of animals against infectious diseases. PMID:23913382

  14. Molecular Profiling of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone and the Osteoclastic Localization of Ligand for Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κB

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Teresa; Atkins, Gerald J.; Trivett, Melanie K.; Johnson, Sandra A.; Kansara, Maya; Schlicht, Stephen L.; Slavin, John L.; Simmons, Paul; Dickinson, Ian; Powell, Gerald; Choong, Peter F.M.; Holloway, Andrew J.; Thomas, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a generally benign, osteolytic neoplasm comprising stromal cells and osteoclast-like giant cells. The osteoclastic cells, which cause bony destruction, are thought to be recruited from normal monocytic pre-osteoclasts by stromal cell expression of the ligand for receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANKL). This model forms the foundation for clinical trials in GCTs of novel cancer therapeutics targeting RANKL. Using expression profiling, we identified both osteoblast and osteoclast signatures within GCTs, including key regulators of osteoclast differentiation and function such as RANKL, a C-type lectin, osteoprotegerin, and the wnt inhibitor SFRP4. After ex vivo generation of stromal- and osteoclast-enriched cultures, we unexpectedly found that RANKL mRNA and protein were more highly expressed in osteoclasts than in stromal cells, as determined by expression profiling, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The expression patterns of molecules implicated in signaling between stromal cells and monocytic osteoclast precursors were analyzed in both primary and fractionated GCTs. Finally, using array-based comparative genomic hybridization, neither GCTs nor the derived stromal cells demonstrated significant genomic gains or losses. These data raise questions regarding the role of RANKL in GCTs that may be relevant to the development of molecularly targeted therapeutics for this disease. PMID:15972958

  15. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2012-10-01

    The 2009 impact on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a Target of Opportunity program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  16. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  17. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  18. Lipid biomarkers for anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulphate reduction in cold seep sediments of Nyegga pockmarks (Norwegian margin): discrepancies in contents and carbon isotope signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Stadnitskaia, Alina; Taphanel, Marie-Hélène; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2014-06-01

    Distributions and carbon isotopic compositions of microbial lipid biomarkers were investigated in sediment cores from the G11 and G12 pockmarks in the Nyegga sector of the Storegga Slide on the mid-Norwegian margin to explore differences in depth zonation, type and carbon assimilation mode of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANMEs) and associated sulphate-reducing bacteria responsible for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in these cold seep environments. While the G11 site is characterised by black reduced sediments colonized by gastropods and Siboglinidae tubeworms, the G12 site has black reduced sediments devoid of fauna but surrounded by a peripheral occurrence of gastropods and white filamentous microbial mats. At both sites, bulk sediments contained abundant archaeal and bacterial lipid biomarkers substantially depleted in 13C, consisting mainly of isoprenoidal hydrocarbons and dialkyl glycerol diethers, fatty acids and non-isoprenoidal monoalkylglycerol ethers. At the G11 site, down-core profiles revealed that lipid biomarkers were in maximum abundance from 10 cm depth to the core bottom at 16 cm depth, associated with δ13C values of -57 to -136‰. At the G12 site, by contrast, lipid biomarkers were in high abundance in the upper 5 cm sediment layer, associated with δ13C values of -43 to -133‰. This suggests that, as expected from the benthic fauna characteristics of the sites, AOM takes place mainly at depth in the G11 pockmark but just below the seafloor in the G12 pockmark. These patterns can be explained largely by variable fluid flow rates. Furthermore, at both sites, a dominance of ANME-2 archaea accompanied by their bacterial partners is inferred based on lipid biomarker distributions and carbon isotope signatures, which is in agreement with recently published DNA analyses for the G11 pockmark. However, the present data reveal high discrepancies in the contents and δ13C values for both archaeal and bacterial lipid profiles, implying the

  19. EUVE Observations of the Hyades Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The contractor describes EUVE and ROSAT observations of the Hyades K0 III giants theta(sup 1(vB 71 = HR 1411) and gamma$ (vB 28 = HR 1346) Tau, and ASCA observations of theta(sup 1) Tau. The coronal activity of these "clump" giants is intermediate between that of the Sun and of high-activity stars such as RS CVn systems. There is no evidence for significant short or long term variability up to several years. Modeling of the individual and combined spectra suggest that these two X-ray and EUV- bright Hyades giants resemble in their activity levels another clump giant, beta Cet, with a peak in the emission measure distribution near log T approx. 6.8, reminiscent of the Capella emission measure "bump."

  20. EUVE Observations of the Hyades Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    We describe EUVE and ROSAT observations of the Hyades K0 III giants theta(sup 1) (vB 71 = HR1411) and gamma (vB 28 = HR1346) Tau. We also discuss ASCA observations of theta(sup 1)Tau. The coronal activity of these "clump" giants is intermediate between that of the Sun and of high activity stars such as RS CVn systems. There is no evidence for significant short or long term variability up to several years. Modeling of the individual and combined spectra suggest that these two X-ray and EUV-bright Hyades giants resemble in their activity levels another clump giant, beta Cet, with a peak in the emission measure distribution near log T approx. 6.8, reminiscent of the Capella emission measure "bump."

  1. Comparative study on the sensitivity of turions and active fronds of giant duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schleiden) to heavy metal treatments.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Viktor; Hepp, Anna; Mészáros, Ilona

    2015-08-01

    Standard ecotoxicological test procedures use only active forms of aquatic plants. The potential effects of toxicants on vegetative propagules, which play an important role in the survival of several aquatic plant species, is not well understood. Because turion-like resting propagules overwinter on the water bottom in temperate regions, they could be exposed to contaminants for longer periods than active plants. Due to its turion producing capability, giant duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza) is widely used in studying morphogenesis, dormancy, and activation mechanisms in plants. It is also suitable for ecotoxicological purposes. The present work aims to compare the growth inhibition sensitivity of active (normal frond) and overwintering (turion) forms of S. polyrhiza to concentrations of nickel (Ni), cadmium (Cd) and hexavalent chromium (Cr) ranging from 0 to 100mgL(-1). The results indicated that in general, resting turions have higher heavy metal tolerance than active fronds. Cd proved to be the most toxic heavy metal to S. polyrhiza active frond cultures because it induced rapid turion formation. In contrast, the toxicity of Ni and Cr were found to be similar but lower than the effects of Cd. Cr treatments up to 10mgL(-1) did not result in any future negative effects on turion activation. Turions did not survive heavy metal treatments at higher concentrations of Cr. Cd and Ni treatments affected both the floating-up and germination of turions but did not significantly affect the vigor of sprouts. Higher concentrations (of 100mgL(-1)) Cd completely inhibited germination. PMID:25777504

  2. The impact of increased sedimentation rates associated with the decay of the Fennoscandian ice-sheet on gas hydrate stability and focused fluid flow at the Nyegga pockmark field, offshore mid-Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karstens, Jens; Haflidason, Haflidi; Becker, Lukas; Petter Sejrup, Hans; Berndt, Christian; Planke, Sverre; Dahlgreen, Torbjørn

    2016-04-01

    Climatic changes since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) have affected the stability of gas hydrate systems on glaciated margins by sea-level changes, bottom water temperature changes, isostatic uplift or subsidence and variability in sedimentation rates. While subsidence and sea-level rise stabilize gas hydrate deposits, bottom water temperature warming, uplift and enhanced sedimentation have the opposite effect. The response of gas hydrate systems to post-glaciation warming is therefore a complex phenomenon and highly depends on the timing and magnitude of each of these processes. While the impact of bottom water warming on the dissociation of gas hydrates have been addressed in numerous studies, the potential of methane release due to basal gas hydrate dissociation during periods of warming has received less attention. Here, we present results from numerical simulations which show that rapid sedimentation associated with the decay of the Fennoscandian ice-sheet was capable of causing significant basal gas hydrate dissociation. The modeling is constrained by a high-resolution three-dimensional sedimentation rate reconstruction of the Nyegga pockmark field, offshore mid-Norway, obtained by integrating chrono-stratigraphic information derived from sediments cores and a seismo-stratigraphic framework. The model run covers the period between 28,000 and 15,000 calendar years before present and predict that the maximum sedimentation rate-related gas hydrate dissociation coincides temporally and spatially with enhanced focused fluid flow activity in the study area. Basal gas hydrate dissociation due to rapid sedimentation may have occurred as well in other glaciated continental margins after the LGM and may have caused the release of significant amounts of methane to the hydrosphere and atmosphere. The major post glaciation deposition centers are the location of some of the largest known submarine slide complexes. The release of free gas due to basal gas hydrate

  3. Peripheral giant cell granuloma.

    PubMed

    Adlakha, V K; Chandna, P; Rehani, U; Rana, V; Malik, P

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma is a benign reactive lesion of gingiva. It manifests as a firm, soft, bright nodule or as a sessile or pedunculate mass. This article reports the management of peripheral giant cell granuloma in a 12-year-old boy by surgical excision. PMID:21273719

  4. Overexpression, purification, molecular characterization and pharmacological evaluation for anticancer activity of ribosomal protein S23 from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Hou, Yiling; Ding, Xiang; Song, Bo; Wang, Fang; Hou, Wanru

    2013-06-01

    Ribosomal protein S23 (RPS23) is a component of the 40S small ribosomal subunit encoded by the RPS23 gene, which is specific to eukaryotes. The cDNA and genomic sequence of RPS23 were cloned from Ailuropoda melanoleuca (A. melanoleuca) using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology and touchdown PCR, respectively. The two sequences were analyzed preliminarily and the cDNA of the RPS23 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21. The cDNA of RPS23 cloned from giant panda was 472 bp, and it contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 432 bp encoding 142 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence of the coding sequence showed a high degree of homology to some mammals as determined by BLAST analysis, similar to the amino acid sequence. The genomic sequence was 2,105 bp in length, with 4 exons and 3 introns. The primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative RPS23 protein was 15.80 kDa with a theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of 11.23. The molecular weight of the recombinant protein RPS23 was 21.5 kDa with a theoretical pI of 10.57. Topology prediction showed that there are seven different patterns of functional sites in the RPS23 protein of giant panda. RPS23 was successfully expressed in E. coli and its protein fused with the N‑terminal His‑tagged protein triggered the accumulation of an expected 21.5‑kDa polypeptide. The inhibitory rate of tumor growth in mice treated with 0.1 µg/ml RPS23 protein was 49.45%, the highest in the three doses used, which may be comparable to mannatide treatment. Histology of immune organs showed that the tissues were characterized by a regular and tight arrangement, while tumor tissues of the mice in the RPS23 group exhibited a loose arrangement compared to the control group. However, there was no obvious damage to other organs, such as the heart, lung and kidney. Investigations are currently being conducted to determine the bioactive principles of the recombinant

  5. Time-series photometric spot modelling VI. A new computer code and its application to 23 years of photometry of the active giant IM Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribárik, G.; Oláh, K.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    We present and apply a new computer program named SpotModeL to analyze single and multiple bandpass photometric data of spotted stars. It is based on the standard analytical formulae from Budding and Dorren. The program determines the position, size, and temperature of up to three spots by minimizing the fit residuals with the help of the Marquardt-Levenberg non-linear least-squares algorithm. We also expand this procedure to full time-series analysis of differential data, just as real observations would deliver. If multi-bandpass data are available, all bandpasses can be treated simultaneously and thus the spot temperature is solved for implicitly. The program may be downloaded and used by anyone. In this paper, we apply our code to an ~23 year long photometric dataset of the spotted RS CVn giant IM Peg. We extracted and modelled 33 individual light curves, additionally, we fitted the entire V dataset in one run. The resulting spot parameters reflect the long term light variability and reveal two active longitudes on the substellar point and on the antipode. The radius and longitude of the dominant spot show variations with 29.8 and 10.4 years period, respectively. Our multicolour data suggests that the spot temperature is increasing with the brightening of the star. The average spot temperature from V,I_C is 3550+/- 150 K or approximately 900 K below the effective temperature of the star.

  6. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  7. Giant Subclavian Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Counts, Sarah; Zeeshan, Ahmad; Elefteriades, John

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old construction executive presenting with chest pain, shortness of breath, and dizziness on exertion secondary to a giant left subclavian artery aneurysm and aortic valvular disease. PMID:27231430

  8. Giant distal humeral geode.

    PubMed

    Maher, M M; Kennedy, J; Hynes, D; Murray, J G; O'Connell, D

    2000-03-01

    We describe the imaging features of a giant geode of the distal humerus in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, which presented initially as a pathological fracture. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in establishing this diagnosis is emphasized. PMID:10794554

  9. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  10. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Video Gallery

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  11. Investigation of antibacterial activity of Bacillus spp. isolated from the feces of Giant Panda and characterization of their antimicrobial gene distributions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ziyao; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Zhong, Zhijun; Wang, Chengdong; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; He, Tingmei; Li, Caiwu; Liu, Xuehan; Yuan, Hui; Ji, Hanli; Luo, Yongjiu; Gu, Wuyang; Fu, Hualin; Peng, Guangneng

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus group is a prevalent community of Giant Panda's intestinal flora, and plays a significant role in the field of biological control of pathogens. To understand the diversity of Bacillus group from the Giant Panda intestine and their functions in maintaining the balance of the intestinal microflora of Giant Panda, this study isolated a significant number of strains of Bacillus spp. from the feces of Giant Panda, compared the inhibitory effects of these strains on three common enteric pathogens, investigated the distributions of six universal antimicrobial genes (ituA, hag, tasA, sfp, spaS and mrsA) found within the Bacillus group by PCR, and analyzed the characterization of antimicrobial gene distributions in these strains using statistical methods. The results suggest that 34 strains of Bacillus spp. were isolated which has not previously been detected at such a scale, these Bacillus strains could be classified into five categories as well as an external strain by 16S rRNA; Most of Bacillus strains are able to inhibit enteric pathogens, and the antimicrobial abilities may be correlated to their categories of 16S rRNA; The detection rates of six common antimicrobial genes are between 20.58 %(7/34) and 79.41 %(27/34), and genes distribute in three clusters in these strains. We found that the antimicrobial abilities of Bacillus strains can be one of the mechanisms by which Giant Panda maintains its intestinal microflora balance, and may be correlated to their phylogeny. PMID:25228249

  12. Structure Elucidation and Activity of Kolossin A, the D-/L-Pentadecapeptide Product of a Giant Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Bode, Helge B; Brachmann, Alexander O; Jadhav, Kirtikumar B; Seyfarth, Lydia; Dauth, Christina; Fuchs, Sebastian W; Kaiser, Marcel; Waterfield, Nick R; Sack, Holger; Heinemann, Stefan H; Arndt, Hans-Dieter

    2015-08-24

    The largest continuous bacterial nonribosomal peptide synthetase discovered so far is described. It consists of 15 consecutive modules arising from an uninterrupted, fully functional gene in the entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. The identification of its cryptic biosynthesis product was achieved by using a combination of genome analysis, promoter exchange, isotopic labeling experiments, and total synthesis of a focused collection of peptide candidates. Although it belongs to the growing class of D-/ L-peptide natural products, the encoded metabolite kolossin A was found to be largely devoid of antibiotic activity and is likely involved in interspecies communication. A stereoisomer of this peculiar natural product displayed high activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, a recalcitrant parasite that causes the deadly disease African sleeping sickness. PMID:26118790

  13. Discovery of Ultra-steep Spectrum Giant Radio Galaxy with Recurrent Radio Jet Activity in Abell 449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunik, Dominika; Jamrozy, Marek

    2016-01-01

    We report a discovery of a 1.3 Mpc diffuse radio source with extremely steep spectrum fading radio structures in the vicinity of the Abell 449 cluster of galaxies. Its extended diffuse lobes are bright only at low radio frequencies and their synchrotron age is about 160 Myr. The parent galaxy of the extended relic structure, which is the dominant galaxy within the cluster, is starting a new jet activity. There are three weak X-rays sources in the vicinity of the cluster as found in the ROSAT survey, however it is not known if they are connected with this cluster of galaxies. Just a few radio galaxy relics are currently known in the literature, as finding them requires sensitive and high angular resolution low-frequency radio observations. Objects of this kind, which also are starting a new jet activity, are important for understanding the life cycle and evolution of active galactic nuclei. A new 613 MHz map as well as the archival radio data pertaining to this object are presented and analyzed.

  14. Long-term photometry of three active red giants in close binary systems: V2253 Oph, IT Com and IS Vir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, K.; Moór, A.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Borkovits, T.; Granzer, T.

    2013-08-01

    We present and analyze long-term optical photometric measurements of the three active stars V2253 Oph, IT Com and IS Vir. All three systems are single-lined spectroscopic binaries with an early K giant as primary component but in different stages of orbital-rotational synchronization. Our photometry is supplemented by 2MASS and WISE near-IR and mid-IR magnitudes and then used to obtain more accurate effective temperatures and extinctions. For V2253 Oph and IT Com, we found their spectral energy distributions consistent with pure photospheric emission. For IS Vir, we detect a marginal mid-IR excess which hints towards a dust disk. The orbital and rotational planes of IT Com appear to be coplanar, contrary to previous findings in the literature. We apply a multiple frequency analysis technique to determine photometric periods, and possibly changes of periods, ranging from days to decades. New rotational periods of 21.55±0.03 d, 65.1±0.3 d, and 23.50±0.04 d were determined for V2253 Oph, IT Com, and IS Vir, respectively. Splitting of these periods led to tentative detections of differential surface rotations of δ P/P≈0.02 for V2253 Oph and 0.07 for IT Com. Using a time-frequency technique based on short-term Fourier transforms we present evidence of cyclic light variations of length ≈ 10 yr for V2253 Oph and 5-6 yr for IS Vir. A single flip-flop event has been observed for IT Com of duration 2-3 yr. Its exchange of the dominant active longitude had happened close to a time of periastron passage, suggesting some response of the magnetic activity from the orbital dynamics. The 21.55-d rotational modulation of V2253 Oph showed phase coherence also with the orbital period, which is 15 times longer than the rotational period, thus also indicating a tidal feedback with the stellar magnetic activity.

  15. Method of making active magnetic refrigerant, colossal magnetostriction and giant magnetoresistive materials based on Gd-Si-Ge alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Alexandra O.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2003-07-08

    Method of making an active magnetic refrigerant represented by Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4 alloy for 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0 comprising placing amounts of the commercially pure Gd, Si, and Ge charge components in a crucible, heating the charge contents under subambient pressure to a melting temperature of the alloy for a time sufficient to homogenize the alloy and oxidize carbon with oxygen present in the Gd charge component to reduce carbon, rapidly solidifying the alloy in the crucible, and heat treating the solidified alloy at a temperature below the melting temperature for a time effective to homogenize a microstructure of the solidified material, and then cooling sufficiently fast to prevent the eutectoid decomposition and improve magnetocaloric and/or the magnetostrictive and/or the magnetoresistive properties thereof.

  16. Recombinant production of biologically active giant grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus) growth hormone from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli by fed-batch culture.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wen-Jen; Huang, Chi-Lung; Gong, Hong-Yi; Ou, Tsung-Yin; Hsu, Jue-Liang; Hu, Shao-Yang

    2015-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) performs important roles in regulating somatic growth, reproduction, osmoregulation, metabolism and immunity in teleosts, and thus, it has attracted substantial attention in the field of aquaculture application. Herein, giant grouper GH (ggGH) cDNA was cloned into the pET28a vector and expressed in Shuffle® T7 Competent Escherichia coli. Recombinant N-terminal 6× His-tagged ggGH was produced mainly in insoluble inclusion bodies; the recombinant ggGH content reached 20% of total protein. For large-scale ggGH production, high-cell density E. coli culture was achieved via fed-batch culture with pH-stat. After 30h of cultivation, a cell concentration of 41.1g/l dry cell weight with over 95% plasmid stability was reached. Maximal ggGH production (4.0g/l; 22% total protein) was achieved via mid-log phase induction. Various centrifugal forces, buffer pHs and urea concentrations were optimized for isolation and solubilization of ggGH from inclusion bodies. Hydrophobic interactions and ionic interactions were the major forces in ggGH inclusion body formation. Complete ggGH inclusion body solubilization was obtained in PBS buffer at pH 12 containing 3M urea. Through a simple purification process including Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and refolding, 5.7mg of ggGH was obtained from 10ml of fed-batch culture (45% recovery). The sequence and secondary structure of the purified ggGH were confirmed by LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry and circular dichroism analysis. The cell proliferation-promoting activity was confirmed in HepG2, ZFL and GF-1 cells with the WST-1 colorimetric bioassay. PMID:25703054

  17. The GIANT Encyclopedia of Science Activities for Children 3 to 6: More Than 600 Science Activities Written by Teachers for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charner, Kathy, Ed.

    This book presents science activities developed by teachers for children ages 3-6 years old. The activities aim to develop science skills including communication, observation, estimation, measurement, cause and effect, investigation, and evaluation in children by using their curiosity as a staring point. Activities include age suggestions, address…

  18. Bivalve Shell Horizons in Seafloor Pockmarks of the Last Glacial-interglacial Transition Suggest a Thousand Years of Methane Emissions in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, W. G., Jr.; Panieri, G.; Schneider, A.; Plaza-Faverola, A. A.; Carroll, M.; Åström, E. K. L.; Locke, W. L.; Carroll, J.

    2015-12-01

    We studied discrete bivalve shell horizons, in two gravity cores from seafloor pockmarks on the Vestnesa Ridge (ca. 1200 m water depth), western Svalbard (79° 00' N, 06° 55' W) to provide insight into the temporal and spatial dynamics of seabed methane seeps. The shell beds, are dominated by two genera of the family Vesicomyidae: Phreagena s.l. and Isorropodon sp. were 20-30cm thick centered at 250-400cm depth in the cores. The carbon isotope composition of inorganic (δ13C from -13.02‰ to +2.364‰) and organic (δ13C from -29.283‰ to -21.33‰) shell material indicates that these taxa derived their energy primarily from endosymbiotic chemosynthetic bacteria feeding on methane. In addition, negative δ13C values for planktonic foraminifera (-6.7‰ to -3.1‰), micritic concretions identified as methane-derived authigenic carbonates and pyrite encrusted fossil worm tubes at the shell horizons indicate a sustained paleo-methane seep environment. Combining sedimentation rates with 14C ages for bivalve material from the shell horizons, we estimate the horizons persisted for about 1000 years between approximately 17,707 to 16,680 yrs. BP (corrected). The major seepage event over a 1000 -year time interval was most likely triggered by tectonic stress and the subsequent release of over-pressurized fluids.

  19. Bivalve shell horizons in seafloor pockmarks of the last glacial-interglacial transition: a thousand years of methane emissions in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, William G.; Panieri, Giuliana; Schneider, Andrea; Plaza-Faverola, Andreia; Carroll, Michael L.; Åström, Emmelie K. L.; Locke, William L.; Carroll, JoLynn

    2015-12-01

    We studied discrete bivalve shell horizons in two gravity cores from seafloor pockmarks on the Vestnesa Ridge (˜1200 m water depth) and western Svalbard (79°00' N, 06°55' W) to provide insight into the temporal and spatial dynamics of seabed methane seeps. The shell beds, dominated by two genera of the family Vesicomyidae: Phreagena s.l. and Isorropodon sp., were 20-30 cm thick and centered at 250-400 cm deep in the cores. The carbon isotope composition of inorganic (δ13C from -13.02‰ to +2.36‰) and organic (δ13C from -29.28‰ to -21.33‰) shell material and a two-end member mixing model indicate that these taxa derived between 8% and 43% of their nutrition from chemosynthetic bacteria. In addition, negative δ13C values for planktonic foraminifera (-6.7‰ to -3.1‰), concretions identified as methane-derived authigenic carbonates, and pyrite-encrusted fossil worm tubes at the shell horizons indicate a sustained paleo-methane seep environment. Combining sedimentation rates with 14C ages for bivalve material from the shell horizons, we estimate the horizons persisted for about 1000 years between approximately 17,707 and 16,680 years B.P. (corrected). The seepage event over a 1000 year time interval was most likely associated with regional stress-related faulting and the subsequent release of overpressurized fluids.

  20. An Innocent Giant

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Lakhan Singh; Dhingra, Mandeep; Raghubanshi, Gunjan; Thami, Gurvinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    A cutaneous horn (cornu cutaneum) is a protrusion from the skin composed of a cornified material. It may be associated with a benign, premalignant, or malignant lesion at the base, masking numerous dermatoses. In a 24-year-old female, a giant cutaneous horn arising from a seborrheic keratosis located on the leg is presented. This case has been reported to emphasize that a giant cutaneous horn may also occur in young patients, even in photoprotected areas, and are not always associated with malignancy. PMID:25484426

  1. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Mishra, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a 59-year-old man. PMID:25657917

  2. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Mishra, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a 59-year-old man. PMID:25657917

  3. Sunspots and Giant-Cell Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron L.; Hathaway, David H.; Reichmann, Ed J.

    2000-01-01

    From analysis of Doppler velocity images from SOHO/MDI, Hathaway et al (2000, Solar Phys., in press) have found clear evidence for giant convection cells that fill the solar surface, have diameters 3 - 10 times that typical of supergranules, and have lifetimes approx. greater than 10 days. Analogous to the superposition of the granular convection on the supergranular convection, the approx. 30,000 km diameter supergranules are superposed on these still larger giant cells. Because the giant cells make up the large-scale end of a continuous power spectrum that peaks at the size scale of supergranules, it appears that the giant cells are made by the same mode of convection as the supergranules. This suggests that the giant cells are similar to supergranules, just longer-lived, larger in diameter, and deeper. Here we point out that the range of lengths of large bipolar sunspot groups is similar to the size range of giant cells. This, along with the long lives (weeks) of large sunspots, suggests that large sunspots sit in long-lived, deep downflows at the corners of giant cells, and that the distance from leader to follower sunspots in large bipolar groups is the distance from one giant-cell corner to the next. By this line of reasoning, an unusually large and strong downdraft might pull in both legs of a rising spot-group magnetic flux loop, resulting in the formation of a delta sunspot. This leads us to suggest that a large, strong giant-cell corner downdraft should be present at the birthplaces of large delta sunspots for some time (days to weeks) before the birth. Thus, early detection of such downdrafts by local helioscismology might provide an early warning for the formation of those active regions (large delta sunspot groups) that produce the Sun's most violent flares and coronal mass ejections. This work is supported by NASA's Office of Space Science through the Solar Physics Branch of its Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  4. Two New Long-period Giant Planets from the McDonald Observatory Planet Search and Two Stars with Long-period Radial Velocity Signals Related to Stellar Activity Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, Michael; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Robertson, Paul; Meschiari, Stefano; Ramirez, Ivan; Shetrone, Matthew; Gullikson, Kevin; Johnson, Marshall C.; Wittenmyer, Robert; Horner, Jonathan; Ciardi, David R.; Horch, Elliott; Simon, Attila E.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark; Caldwell, Caroline; Castanheira, Barbara G.

    2016-02-01

    We report the detection of two new long-period giant planets orbiting the stars HD 95872 and HD 162004 ({\\psi }1 Dra B) by the McDonald Observatory planet search. The planet HD 95872b has a minimum mass of 4.6 {M}{{Jup}} and an orbital semimajor axis of 5.2 AU. The giant planet {\\psi }1 Dra Bb has a minimum mass of 1.5 {M}{{Jup}} and an orbital semimajor axis of 4.4 AU. Both of these planets qualify as Jupiter analogs. These results are based on over one and a half decades of precise radial velocity (RV) measurements collected by our program using the McDonald Observatory Tull Coude spectrograph at the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope. In the case of {\\psi }1 Dra B we also detect a long-term nonlinear trend in our data that indicates the presence of an additional giant planet, similar to the Jupiter-Saturn pair. The primary of the binary star system, {\\psi }1 Dra A, exhibits a very large amplitude RV variation due to another stellar companion. We detect this additional member using speckle imaging. We also report two cases—HD 10086 and HD 102870 (β Virginis)—of significant RV variation consistent with the presence of a planet, but that are probably caused by stellar activity, rather than reflexive Keplerian motion. These two cases stress the importance of monitoring the magnetic activity level of a target star, as long-term activity cycles can mimic the presence of a Jupiter-analog planet.

  5. Electroluminescence of Giant Stretchability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Can Hui; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Chen, Yong Mei; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A new type of electroluminescent device achieves giant stretchability by integrating electronic and ionic components. The device uses phosphor powders as electroluminescent materials, and hydrogels as stretchable and transparent ionic conductors. Subject to cyclic voltage, the phosphor powders luminesce, but the ionic conductors do not electrolyze. The device produces constant luminance when stretched up to an area strain of 1500%. PMID:26610277

  6. A giant ureteric calculus

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Rajiv; Bansal, Prashant; Gutta, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Ureteric stones are usually small and symptomatic. We present a case of a 35-year old female who presented with minimally symptomatic right distal ureteric calculus with proximal hydroureteronephrosis. Laparoscopic right ureterolithotomy was performed and a giant ureteric calculus measuring 11 cm Χ 1.5 cm, weighing 40 g was retrieved. PMID:24082453

  7. Giant urethral calculus

    PubMed Central

    Kotkar, Kunal; Thakkar, Ravi; Songra, MC

    2011-01-01

    Primary urethral calculus is rarely seen and is usually encountered in men with urethral stricture or diverticulum. We present a case of giant urethral calculus secondary to a urethral stricture in a man. The patient was treated with calculus extraction with end to end urethroplasty. PMID:24950400

  8. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Yagnik, Vipul D.

    2011-01-01

    Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice. PMID:24765310

  9. A giant ureteric calculus.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Rajiv; Bansal, Prashant; Gutta, Srinivas

    2013-07-01

    Ureteric stones are usually small and symptomatic. We present a case of a 35-year old female who presented with minimally symptomatic right distal ureteric calculus with proximal hydroureteronephrosis. Laparoscopic right ureterolithotomy was performed and a giant ureteric calculus measuring 11 cm Χ 1.5 cm, weighing 40 g was retrieved. PMID:24082453

  10. Surface magnetism of cool giant and supergiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Heidi

    2014-08-01

    The existence of starspots on late-type giant stars in close binary systems, that exhibit rapid rotation due to tidal locking, has been known for more than five decades. Photometric monitoring spanning decades has allowed studying the long-term magnetic activity in these stars revealing complicated activity cycles. The development of observing and analysis techniques that has occurred during the past two decades has also enabled us to study the detailed starspot and magnetic field configurations on these active giants. In the recent years magnetic fields have also been detected on slowly rotating giants and supergiant stars. In this paper I review what is known of the surface magnetism in the cool giant and supergiant stars.

  11. A giant vesical calculus.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M; Uddin, A; Das, G C; Akanda, N I

    2007-07-01

    Massive or giant vesical calculus is a rare entity in the recent urological practice. Males are affected more than the females. Vesical calculi are usually secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. These patients present with recurrent urinary tract infection, haematuria or with retention of urine. We report a young male patient who presented with defaecatory problems along with other urinary symptoms. The patient having an average built, non diabetic but hypertensive. The stone could be palpated by physical examination. His urea levels were within normal limits but urine examination shows infection. USG reveals bilateral hydronephrosis with multiple stones in both kidneys along with a giant vesical calculus. After controlling urinary infection and hypertention he underwent an open cystolithotomy. During operation digital rectal help was needed to remove the stone as it was adherent with bladder mucosa. Post operative period was uneventful. His urinary output was quite normal and had no defaecatory problems. Patient left the hospital 10 days after operation. PMID:17917633

  12. Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Romero, J

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), temporal arteritis or Horton's arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis which involves large and medium sized vessels, especially the extracranial branches of the carotid arteries, in persons usually older than 50 years. Permanent visual loss, ischaemic strokes, and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms are feared complications of GCA. The treatment consists of high dose steroids. Mortality, with a correct treatment, in patients with GCA seems to be similar that of controls. PMID:13679546

  13. Giant dedifferentiated retroperitoneal liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Elias; Lopez de Cenarruzabeitia, Iñigo; Martinez, Manuel; Rueda, J C; Lede, A; Barreiro, Erica; Diz, Susana

    2008-01-01

    Liposarcoma tumors only represent 0.1% of all cancers, but they are the more common of retroperitoneal sarcomas. It has a great tendency for local recurrence, mainly the dedifferentiated variety, but its complete resection can provide a 5-year survival of 70%. In this report, we present a case of a giant dedifferentiated retroperitoneal liposarcoma that did not affect any neighboring organ and that was successfully treated by means of complete surgical resection. PMID:19731863

  14. Ice Giant Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  15. Giant thymic carcinoid.

    PubMed

    John, L C; Hornick, P; Lang, S; Wallis, J; Edmondson, S J

    1991-05-01

    Thymic carcinoid is a rare tumour. It may present with ectopic endocrine secretion or with symptoms of compression as a result of its size. A case is reported which presented with symptoms of compression where the size of the tumour was uniquely large such as to warrant the term giant thymic carcinoid. The typical histological features are described, together with its possible origin and its likely prognosis. PMID:1852667

  16. Giant rodlike reversed micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.J.; Neuman, R.D. )

    1994-05-04

    Herein we report that sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate, which is similar in structure to the classical surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), forms very large rodlike reversed micelles and that their size can be even much larger if water is removed from the apolar solution. We further suggest that long-range electrostatic interactions are the primary driving force for the formation of giant reversed micelles. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Red giants seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, B.; Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.

    2013-11-01

    The space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler are indiscreet. With their asteroseismic programs, they tell us what is hidden deep inside the stars. Waves excited just below the stellar surface travel throughout the stellar interior and unveil many secrets: how old is the star, how big, how massive, how fast (or slow) its core is dancing. This paper intends to paparazze the red giants according to the seismic pictures we have from their interiors.

  18. Giant radio pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratiev, Vladislav

    Rotation-powered radio pulsars exhibit a remarkably diverse spectrum of variability with characteristic time scales from days and even years (intermittent pulsars) to minutes-seconds (nulling) and (sub-)microseconds. The latter time scales are associated with the phenomenon of giant pulses (GPs) and micropulses. The story of GPs started in 1968, when Staelin and Reifenstein discovered the Crab pulsar through its spectacularly bright radio pulses. To date, only seven pulsars out of more than 2200 are known to show GP emission, namely the pulsars B0531+21, B1937+21, B0540-69, B1821-24, B1957+20, J0218+4232, and B1820-30A. Giant pulses are characterized by large energies (more than ten times of the energy of the average pulse), short durations, power-law energy distribution, specific rotational phase of occurrence, high degree of polarization, and accompanying high-energy radiation. Large energies of GPs and coincidence of their phase of occurrence with peaks of high-energy profiles hint at the same mechanism of radio GP and high-energy emission. The correlation of Crab pulsar GPs with optical, X-ray and gamma-ray photons was studied for the past 20 years, with only radio/optical link confirmed so far. In my talk I will present the summary of the observational evidence of radio GPs and give an overview of theoretical advances on giant-pulse emission mechanism.

  19. Generation of a Chiral Giant Micelle.

    PubMed

    Ito, Thiago H; Salles, Airton G; Priebe, Jacks P; Miranda, Paulo C M L; Morgon, Nelson H; Danino, Dganit; Mancini, Giovanna; Sabadini, Edvaldo

    2016-08-23

    Over the past few years, chiral supramolecular assemblies have been successfully used for recognition, sensing and enantioselective transformations. Several approaches are available to control chirality of discrete assemblies (e.g., cages and capsules), but few are efficient in assuring chirality for micellar aggregates. Optically active amino acid-derived surfactants are commonly used to generate chiral spherical micelles. To circumvent this limitation, we benefited from the uniaxial growth of spherical micelles into long cylindrical micelles usually called wormlike or giant micelles, upon the addition of cosolutes. This paper describes the unprecedented formation of chiral giant micelles in aqueous solutions of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) upon increasing addition of enantiopure sodium salt of 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (Na-binaphtholate) as a cosolute. Depending on the concentrations of CTAB and Na-binaphtholate, chiral gel-like systems are obtained. The transition from spherical to giant micellar structures was probed using rheology, cryo-transmission electron microscopy, polarimetry, and electronic circular dichroism (CD). CD can be effectively used to monitor the incorporation of Na-binaphtholate into the micelle palisade as well as to determine its transition to giant micellar structures. Our approach expands the scope for chirality induction in micellar aggregates bringing the possibility to generate "smart" chiral systems and an alternative asymmetric chiral environment to perform enantioselective transformations. PMID:27499127

  20. Unusual Giant Prostatic Urethral Calculus

    PubMed Central

    Bello, A.; Maitama, H. Y.; Mbibu, N. H.; Kalayi, G. D.; Ahmed, A.

    2010-01-01

    Giant vesico-prostatic urethral calculus is uncommon. Urethral stones rarely form primarily in the urethra, and they are usually associated with urethral strictures, posterior urethral valve or diverticula. We report a case of a 32-year-old man with giant vesico-prostatic (collar-stud) urethral stone presenting with sepsis and bladder outlet obstruction. The clinical presentation, management, and outcome of the giant prostatic urethral calculus are reviewed. PMID:22091328

  1. SPOON-FEEDING GIANT STARS TO SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES: EPISODIC MASS TRANSFER FROM EVOLVING STARS AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO THE QUIESCENT ACTIVITY OF GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Grady, Sean; Guillochon, James

    2013-11-10

    Stars may be tidally disrupted if, in a single orbit, they are scattered too close to a supermassive black hole (SMBH). Tidal disruption events are thought to power luminous but short-lived accretion episodes that can light up otherwise quiescent SMBHs in transient flares. Here we explore a more gradual process of tidal stripping where stars approach the tidal disruption radius by stellar evolution while in an eccentric orbit. After the onset of mass transfer, these stars episodically transfer mass to the SMBH every pericenter passage, giving rise to low-level flares that repeat on the orbital timescale. Giant stars, in particular, will exhibit a runaway response to mass loss and 'spoon-feed' material to the black hole for tens to hundreds of orbital periods. In contrast to full tidal disruption events, the duty cycle of this feeding mode is of order unity for black holes M{sub bh} ∼> 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}. This mode of quasi-steady SMBH feeding is competitive with indirect SMBH feeding through stellar winds, and spoon-fed giant stars may play a role in determining the quiescent luminosity of local SMBHs.

  2. Insights into the activity, formation and origin of seep systems on the seafloor in the SW Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangelsdorf, Kai; Nickel, Julia C.; di Primio, Rolando; Kallmeyer, Jens; Horsfield, Brian; Stoddart, Daniel; Brunstad, Harald

    2014-05-01

    The southwestern Loppa High region, being part of the Barents Sea located in the north of Norway, is a promising area for oil and gas exploration since hydrocarbon discoveries have been made in this area in recent time. Additionally, surface features for hydrocarbon seepage, so called "cold seeps" have been detected on the seafloor, comprising extensive pockmark fields, carbonate crusts bearing areas and fault related gas flares. Leaking hydrocarbons are of specific interest since they are potential indicators for hydrocarbon reservoirs in the subsurface and the emitting hydrocarbons such as the greenhouse gas methane can have significant impact on the evolution of global warming when reaching the atmosphere. In this study cold seep systems like huge pockmark areas and carbonate crust sites from the SW Loppa High region were examined in detail, in order to determine the activity, formation and spatial distribution of the different seepage structures as well as the origin and timing of the seeping hydrocarbon fluids. The sample material comprising sediment cores from pockmarks, reference sites and carbonate crust areas as well as carbonate crust samples have been analyzed applying a combined biogeochemical and microbiological approach. In the carbonate crust area diagnostic biomarkers for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) were detected in the sediments as well as in the corresponding carbonate crusts. Their depth profiles show a distinct interval of higher concentrations, which points towards a shallow AOM zone in the investigated core. The biomarkers were also characterized by very negative carbon isotope signatures, indicating the involvement of the source microorganisms in the process of AOM. These data and active gas bubbling during sampling indicate the presence of methane at the carbonate crust site. In contrast in the pockmark areas active release of gas from the sediment could not be observed, neither in the gas measurement nor in the biogeochemical

  3. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possessed the substitutions V26M, T213A, K281R, S300N, P340Q, and Y549H. The presence of the Y549H substitution is notable as it is found at the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor-binding site and has been implicated in the emergence of highly pathogenic CDV and host switching. These findings demonstrate that giant pandas are susceptible to CDV and suggest that surveillance and vaccination among all captive giant pandas are warranted to support conservation efforts for this endangered species. PMID:27310722

  4. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possessed the substitutions V26M, T213A, K281R, S300N, P340Q, and Y549H. The presence of the Y549H substitution is notable as it is found at the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor-binding site and has been implicated in the emergence of highly pathogenic CDV and host switching. These findings demonstrate that giant pandas are susceptible to CDV and suggest that surveillance and vaccination among all captive giant pandas are warranted to support conservation efforts for this endangered species. PMID:27310722

  5. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  6. Giant Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Wen, Z. C.; Wei, H. X.; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2010-01-01

    We show that the Coulomb blockade voltage can be made to depend strongly on the electron spin in a thin magnetic granular layer inserted in the middle of an insulating layer of a tunnel junction. This strong spin dependence is predicted from the spin-dependent inter-granular conductance through any of the following effects within the granular layer, giant magnetoresistance (GMR), tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), or GMR through a polymer spacer. The resulting Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance (CBMR) ratio can exceed the magnetoresistance ratio of the granular layer itself by orders of magnitude. Unlike other magenetoresistance effects, the CBMR effect does not require magnetic electrodes.

  7. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma.

    PubMed

    Teli, Bhavuray; Thrishuli, P B; Santhosh, R; Amar, D N; Rajpurohit, Shravan

    2015-01-01

    Adnexal tumors like giant solitary trichoepitheliomas are uncommon to most of us to permit a ready familiarity with them. Information regarding the genesis, clinical profile, behavior, and management options for this tumor is limited. There are 18 cases reported in the world literature till date. This review attempts to provide insight to this rare tumor. Our search included indexed literature from Pubmed, Directory of Open Access Journals, Health Inter Network Access to Research Initiative and Google databases in addition to standard dermatology texts. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma is a rare trichogenic tumor with potential for local recurrence. It has predilection for the older age, but may present at any age including at birth. It has close resemblance to basal cell carcinoma and other skin adnexal tumors - clinically, cytologically, and histologically. CD10, CD 34, PHLDA1 but not p75NTR are useful adjunct markers. Surgical excision is the standard treatment. Recurrence and possible transformation into BCC cautions follow up at regular intervals. PMID:25839021

  8. Giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C

    1994-01-01

    Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Nonionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses tend to produce less severe signs and symptoms than ionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses. Enzymatic treatment appears to lessen the severity of signs and symptoms. The association of an allergy appears to play a role in the onset of the severity of the signs and symptoms but does not appear to affect the final ability of the individual to wear contact lenses. Using multiple treatment options, such as changing the polymer to a glyceryl methyl methacrylate or a rigid lens, or utilizing a soft lens on a frequent-replacement basis, can result in a success rate of over 90%. In individuals who still have a return of symptoms, the use of topical mast cell stabilizers or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug as an adjunctive therapy offers the added possibility of keeping these patients in contact lenses. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D PMID:7886881

  9. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma

    PubMed Central

    Teli, Bhavuray; Thrishuli, P. B.; Santhosh, R.; Amar, D. N.; Rajpurohit, Shravan

    2015-01-01

    Adnexal tumors like giant solitary trichoepitheliomas are uncommon to most of us to permit a ready familiarity with them. Information regarding the genesis, clinical profile, behavior, and management options for this tumor is limited. There are 18 cases reported in the world literature till date. This review attempts to provide insight to this rare tumor. Our search included indexed literature from Pubmed, Directory of Open Access Journals, Health Inter Network Access to Research Initiative and Google databases in addition to standard dermatology texts. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma is a rare trichogenic tumor with potential for local recurrence. It has predilection for the older age, but may present at any age including at birth. It has close resemblance to basal cell carcinoma and other skin adnexal tumors - clinically, cytologically, and histologically. CD10, CD 34, PHLDA1 but not p75NTR are useful adjunct markers. Surgical excision is the standard treatment. Recurrence and possible transformation into BCC cautions follow up at regular intervals. PMID:25839021

  10. Rheology of giant micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, M. E.; Fielding, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Giant micelles are elongated, polymer-like objects created by the self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules (such as detergents) in solution. Giant micelles are typically flexible, and can become highly entangled even at modest concentrations. The resulting viscoelastic solutions show fascinating flow behaviour (rheology) which we address theoretically in this article at two levels. First, we summarize advances in understanding linear viscoelastic spectra and steady-state nonlinear flows, based on microscopic constitutive models that combine the physics of polymer entanglement with the reversible kinetics of self-assembly. Such models were first introduced two decades ago, and since then have been shown to explain robustly several distinctive features of the rheology in the strongly entangled regime, including extreme shear thinning. We then turn to more complex rheological phenomena, particularly involving spatial heterogeneity, spontaneous oscillation, instability and chaos. Recent understanding of these complex flows is based largely on grossly simplified models which capture in outline just a few pertinent microscopic features, such as coupling between stresses and other order parameters such as concentration. The role of ‘structural memory’ (the dependence of structural parameters such as the micellar length distribution on the flow history) in explaining these highly nonlinear phenomena is addressed. Structural memory also plays an intriguing role in the little-understood shear thickening regime, which occurs in a concentration regime close to but below the onset of strong entanglement, and which is marked by a shear-induced transformation from an inviscid to a gelatinous state.

  11. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  12. Giant magnetostrictive composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duenas, Terrisa Ann

    The limitation of magnetostrictive composites has been in their low magnetostrictive response when compared to their monolithic counterparts. In this dissertation research is presented describing the methods and analysis used to create a giant magnetostrictive composite (GMC) producing giant strains at low fields, exhibiting magnetization ``jumping'' and the ΔE effect. This composite combines the giant magnetostrictive material, Terfenol-D (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe2) in particle form, with a nonmetallic binder and is capable of producing strains (at room temperature) exceeding 1000 ppm at a nominal field of 1.5 kOe mechanically unloaded and 1200 ppm at 8 MPa preload (2.5 kOe). Several studies leading to the high response of this composite are presented. A connectivity study shows that a [1-3] connected composite produces 50% more strain than a [0-3] composite. A resin study indicates that the lower the viscosity of the resin, the greater the magnetostrictive response; this is attributed to the removal of voids during degassing. A void study correlates the increase in voids to the decrease in strain response. A model is used to correlate analysis with experimental results within 10% accuracy and shows that an optimal volume fraction exists based on the properties of the binder. Using a Polyscience Spurr low- viscosity (60 cps) binder this volume fraction is nominally 20%; this optimum is attributed to the balance of epoxy contracting on the particle (built-in preload) and the actuation delivered by the magnetostrictive material. In addition to the connectivity, resin, void, and volume-fraction study, particle size and gradation studies are presented. Widely dispersed (<106, <212, <300 μm), narrowly dispersed (<45, (90-106), (275-300) μm), and an optimized bimodal (18.7% of (45-90) μm with 81.3% of (250-300) μm) particle distributions are studied. Results show that the larger the particle size, the higher the magnetostrictive response; this is attributed to the reduction of

  13. Giant magnetofossils and hyperthermal events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Liao; Roberts, Andrew P.; Williams, Wyn; Fitz Gerald, John D.; Larrasoaña, Juan C.; Jovane, Luigi; Muxworthy, Adrian R.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize magnetic minerals with precisely controlled size, morphology, and stoichiometry. These cosmopolitan bacteria are widely observed in aquatic environments. If preserved after burial, the inorganic remains of magnetotactic bacteria act as magnetofossils that record ancient geomagnetic field variations. They also have potential to provide paleoenvironmental information. In contrast to conventional magnetofossils, giant magnetofossils (most likely produced by eukaryotic organisms) have only been reported once before from Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; 55.8 Ma) sediments on the New Jersey coastal plain. Here, using transmission electron microscopic observations, we present evidence for abundant giant magnetofossils, including previously reported elongated prisms and spindles, and new giant bullet-shaped magnetite crystals, in the Southern Ocean near Antarctica, not only during the PETM, but also shortly before and after the PETM. Moreover, we have discovered giant bullet-shaped magnetite crystals from the equatorial Indian Ocean during the Mid-Eocene Climatic Optimum (˜40 Ma). Our results indicate a more widespread geographic, environmental, and temporal distribution of giant magnetofossils in the geological record with a link to "hyperthermal" events. Enhanced global weathering during hyperthermals, and expanded suboxic diagenetic environments, probably provided more bioavailable iron that enabled biomineralization of giant magnetofossils. Our micromagnetic modelling indicates the presence of magnetic multi-domain (i.e., not ideal for navigation) and single domain (i.e., ideal for navigation) structures in the giant magnetite particles depending on their size, morphology and spatial arrangement. Different giant magnetite crystal morphologies appear to have had different biological functions, including magnetotaxis and other non-navigational purposes. Our observations suggest that hyperthermals provided ideal conditions for

  14. Two giant stellar complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Yu. N.; Efremov, E. Yu.

    Common star complexes are huge (0.3-1 kpc in diameter) groups of relatively young stars, associations and clusters. The complexes usually form regular chains along spiral arms of grand design galaxies, being evidently formed and supported by magneto- gravitational instability developing along an arm. Special attention is given to a few large complexes which have signatures of gravitational boundness, such as round shape and high central density. Concentrations of stars and clusters in such a complex in M51 galaxy were found in this paper; we concluded it is possible to suggest that the complex is gravitationally bound. It is also stressed that some properties of the giant complex in NGC 6946 (such as its semicircular and sharp Western edge) are still enigmatic.

  15. [Giant adrenal myelolipoma].

    PubMed

    El Mejjad, Amine; Fekak, Hamid; Dakir, Mohamed; Sarf, Ismail; Manni, Ahmed; Meziane, Fethi

    2004-02-01

    Adrenal myelolipoma is a rare, benign, non-secreting tumour composed of adipose and haematopoietic tissue. The authors report a rare case of giant adrenal myelolipoma in a 53-year-old patient presenting with low back pain and a palpable flank mass on examination. CT scan suggested the diagnosis and surgical resection was indicated in view of the size and symptomatic nature of this mass. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis. The outcome was favourable without recurrence after a follow-up of one year. The diagnosis of adrenal myelolipoma is based on radiology. Conservative management is generally sufficient for small asymptomatic tumours, but resection is required for large (> 5 cm) and/or symptomatic tumours. PMID:15098761

  16. Giant facial lymphangioma.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Claire; Wong, Lindsey; Wood, Jeyhan; David, Lisa R; Argenta, Louis C

    2011-07-01

    Lymphatic malformation (LM) is a benign cystic entity resulting from aberrant lymphatic drainage. Often evident at birth, most LMs have declared themselves by 2 years of age. They can be concerning when they occur near vital structures such as the airway or orbit. The natural history varies considerable from spontaneous gradual regression to long-term growth and debilitation. Depending on the location, structures involved, and clinical course of the LM, therapeutic options include observation, intralesional sclerosis, laser therapy, and surgical excision. The literature provides guidelines for treatment options that must be carefully applied to the facial region. We present a newborn infant who presented to our institution with giant facial lymphangioma who underwent a combination of sclerosis, laser ablation, and surgery with reconstruction. PMID:21772195

  17. Interleukin-1 Receptor-associated Kinase-4 (IRAK4) Promotes Inflammatory Osteolysis by Activating Osteoclasts and Inhibiting Formation of Foreign Body Giant Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Katsuyama, Eri; Miyamoto, Hiroya; Kobayashi, Tami; Sato, Yuiko; Hao, Wu; Kanagawa, Hiroya; Fujie, Atsuhiro; Tando, Toshimi; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Miyamoto, Kana; Niki, Yasuo; Morioka, Hideo; Matsumoto, Morio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Formation of foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) occurs following implantation of medical devices such as artificial joints and is implicated in implant failure associated with inflammation or microbial infection. Two major macrophage subpopulations, M1 and M2, play different roles in inflammation and wound healing, respectively. Therefore, M1/M2 polarization is crucial for the development of various inflammation-related diseases. Here, we show that FBGCs do not resorb bone but rather express M2 macrophage-like wound healing and inflammation-terminating molecules in vitro. We also found that FBGC formation was significantly inhibited by inflammatory cytokines or infection mimetics in vitro. Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 (IRAK4) deficiency did not alter osteoclast formation in vitro, and IRAK4-deficient mice showed normal bone mineral density in vivo. However, IRAK4-deficient mice were protected from excessive osteoclastogenesis induced by IL-1β in vitro or by LPS, an infection mimetic of Gram-negative bacteria, in vivo. Furthermore, IRAK4 deficiency restored FBGC formation and expression of M2 macrophage markers inhibited by inflammatory cytokines in vitro or by LPS in vivo. Our results demonstrate that osteoclasts and FBGCs are reciprocally regulated and identify IRAK4 as a potential therapeutic target to inhibit stimulated osteoclastogenesis and rescue inhibited FBGC formation under inflammatory and infectious conditions without altering physiological bone resorption. PMID:25404736

  18. Pharma giants swap research programs.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical giants Novartis and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) agreed in late April to swap some assets, with Novartis handing off its vaccine business to GSK and getting most of the British company's cancer portfolio in return. PMID:25002632

  19. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  20. Landscape of the lost giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene megafauna extinction erased a group of remarkable animals. Whether humans had a prominent role in the extinction remains controversial, but it is emerging that the disappearance of the giants has markedly affected the environment.

  1. Kuiper Prize: Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2007-10-01

    The study of giant planet atmospheres is near and dear to me, for several reasons. First, the giant planets are photogenic; the colored clouds are great tracers, and one can make fantastic movies of the atmosphere in motion. Second, the giant planets challenge us with storms that last for hundreds of years and winds that blow faster the farther you go from the sun. Third, they remind us of Earth with their hurricanes, auroras, and lightning, but they also are the link to the 200 giant planets that have been discovered around other stars. This talk will cover the past, present, and future (one hopes) of giant planet research. I will review the surprises of the Voyager and Galileo eras, and will discuss what we are learning now from the Cassini orbiter. I will review the prospects for answering the outstanding questions like: Where's the water? What is providing the colors of the clouds? How deep do the features extend? Where do the winds get their energy? What is the role of the magnetic field? Finally, I will briefly discuss how extrasolar giant planets compare with objects in our own solar system.

  2. Nebulin--a giant chameleon.

    PubMed

    Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2008-01-01

    Nebulin is an enormous protein of the muscle sarcomere. It is a determinant of thin filament length, Z-disk structure and fiber contractility. The nebulin gene contains four regions of alternative splicing, providing a wealth of different isoforms of the protein. The precise function of these numerous isoforms in various types of muscle tissue remains to be elucidated, as does their role in the maintenance of normal muscle strength and activity. Understanding these basic mechanisms is a prerequisite for the development of specific therapies for the disorders caused by mutations in the nebulin gene. Such mutations are the main cause of autosomal recessive nemaline (rod) myopathy, especially of the typical form of this congenital myopathy. Further known disorders caused by nebulin mutations are several other subcategories of recessively inherited nemaline myopathy and a novel distal myopathy caused byhomozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene. Because of the giant size of the gene, molecular genetic testing methods are difficult to design for routine diagnostic use. PMID:19181091

  3. The Giant Planet Satellite Exospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Exospheres are relatively common in the outer solar system among the moons of the gas giant planets. They span the range from very tenuous, surface-bounded exospheres (e.g., Rhea, Dione) to quite robust exospheres with exobase above the surface (e.g., lo, Triton), and include many intermediate cases (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus). The exospheres of these moons exhibit an interesting variety of sources, from surface sputtering, to frost sublimation, to active plumes, and also well illustrate another common characteristic of the outer planet satellite exospheres, namely, that the primary species often exists both as a gas in atmosphere, and a condensate (frost or ice) on the surface. As described by Yelle et al. (1995) for Triton, "The interchange of matter between gas and solid phases on these bodies has profound effects on the physical state of the surface and the structure of the atmosphere." A brief overview of the exospheres of the outer planet satellites will be presented, including an inter-comparison of these satellites exospheres with each other, and with the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury.

  4. Giant retinal tears.

    PubMed

    Shunmugam, Manoharan; Ang, Ghee Soon; Lois, Noemi

    2014-01-01

    A giant retinal tear (GRT) is a full-thickness neurosensory retinal break that extends circumferentially around the retina for three or more clock hours in the presence of a posteriorly detached vitreous. Its incidence in large population-based studies has been estimated as 1.5% of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments, with a significant male preponderance, and bilaterality in 12.8%. Most GRTs are idiopathic, with trauma, hereditary vitreoretinopathies and high myopia each being causative in decreasing frequency. The vast majority of GRTs are currently managed with a pars plana vitrectomy; the use of adjunctive circumferential scleral buckling is debated, but no studies have shown a clear anatomical or visual advantage with its use. Similarly, silicone oil tamponade does not influence long-term outcomes when compared with gas. Primary and final retinal reattachment rates are achieved in 88% and 95% of patients, respectively. Even when the retina remains attached, however, visual recovery may be limited. Furthermore, fellow eyes of patients with a GRT are at higher risk of developing retinal tears and retinal detachment. Prophylactic treatment under these circumstances may be considered but there is no firm evidence of its efficacy at the present time. PMID:24138895

  5. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1–2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50–60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion’s pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor.

  6. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes. PMID:22425154

  7. Human osteoclast and giant cell differentiation: the apparent switch from nonspecific esterase to tartrate resistant acid phosphatase activity coincides with the in situ expression of osteopontin mRNA.

    PubMed

    Connor, J R; Dodds, R A; James, I E; Gowen, M

    1995-12-01

    Animal model and in vitro cultures suggest that osteoclasts and cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system share a common precursor. However, the human osteoclast precursor has not been positively identified. We attempted to identify the precursor in situ by using a number of osteoclast- and macrophage-selective markers, together with the expression of osteopontin mRNA, previously shown to be abundant in human osteoclasts. Sections of osteophytic bone and a panel of inflammatory connective tissues were processed for in situ hybridization; serial sections were analyzed for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and nonspecific esterase (NSE) activity, selective cytochemical markers for the osteoclast and cells of the macrophage/monocyte lineage, respectively. The murine anti-human osteoclast monoclonal antibodies 23C6 (vitronectin receptor) and C35 (osteoclast-selective) were used to further identify the osteoclast phenotype. We compared osteoclasts, giant cells, and their respective putative mononuclear precursors. At resorption sites within osteophytic bone, osteopontin mRNA was expressed in osteoclasts and a distinct population of TRAP+, NSE- mononuclear cells. Adjacent clusters of mononuclear cells were TRAP- and NSE+ or were active for both enzymes; these cells demonstrated variable expression of osteopontin mRNA. In the inflammatory connective tissues, abundant macrophage-like cells (NSE+/TRAP-) did not express osteopontin mRNA. However, TRAP+ mononuclear cells observed among clusters of NSE+ cells did express osteopontin mRNA. At these sites, clusters of putative macrophage polykaryons removing fragments of bone debris were observed. These giant cells and associated mononuclear cells were NSE- and distinctly TRAP+, and expressed osteopontin mRNA, C35, and 23C6 (human osteoclast) reactivity. Therefore, cells involved in the remodeling (resorption) of bone or the removal of bone debris, together with their immediate precursors, switch from being NSE

  8. Light induces changes in activities of Na+/K+-ATPase, H+/K+-ATPase and glutamine synthetase in tissues involved directly or indirectly in light-enhanced calcification in the giant clam, Tridacna squamosa

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Yuen K.; Ching, Biyun; Hiong, Kum C.; Choo, Celine Y. L.; Boo, Mel V.; Wong, Wai P.; Chew, Shit F.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of 12 h of exposure to light, as compared with 12 h of exposure to darkness (control), on enzymatic activities of transporters involved in the transport of NH+4 or H+, and activities of enzymes involved in converting NH+4 to glutamate/glutamine in inner mantle, outer mantle, and ctenidia of the giant clam, Tridacna squamosa. Exposure to light resulted in a significant increase in the effectiveness of NH+4 in substitution for K+ to activate Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA), manifested as a significant increase in the Na+/NH+4-activated-NKA activity in the inner mantle. However, similar phenomena were not observed in the extensible outer mantle, which contained abundant symbiotic zooxanthellae. Hence, during light-enhanced calcification, H+ released from CaCO3 deposition could react with NH3 to form NH+4 in the extrapallial fluid, and NH+4 could probably be transported into the shell-facing inner mantle epithelium through NKA. Light also induced an increase in the activity of glutamine synthetase, which converts NH+4 and glutamate to glutamine, in the inner mantle. Taken together, these results explained observations reported elsewhere that light induced a significant increase in pH and a significant decrease in ammonia concentration in the extrapallial fluid, as well as a significant increase in the glutamine concentration in the inner mantle, of T. squamosa. Exposure of T. squamosa to light also led to a significant decrease in the N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-sensitive-V-H+-ATPase (VATPase) in the inner mantle, and significant increases in the Na+/K+-activated-NKA, H+/NH+4-activated-H+/K+-ATPase, and NEM-sensitive-VATPase activities in ctenidia, indicating that light-enhanced calcification might perturb Na+ homeostasis and acid/base balance in the hemolymph, and might involve the active uptake of NH+4 from the environment. This is the first report on light having direct enhancing effects on activities of certain transporters

  9. Light induces changes in activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, H(+)/K(+)-ATPase and glutamine synthetase in tissues involved directly or indirectly in light-enhanced calcification in the giant clam, Tridacna squamosa.

    PubMed

    Ip, Yuen K; Ching, Biyun; Hiong, Kum C; Choo, Celine Y L; Boo, Mel V; Wong, Wai P; Chew, Shit F

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of 12 h of exposure to light, as compared with 12 h of exposure to darkness (control), on enzymatic activities of transporters involved in the transport of NH(+) 4 or H(+), and activities of enzymes involved in converting NH(+) 4 to glutamate/glutamine in inner mantle, outer mantle, and ctenidia of the giant clam, Tridacna squamosa. Exposure to light resulted in a significant increase in the effectiveness of NH(+) 4 in substitution for K(+) to activate Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), manifested as a significant increase in the Na(+)/NH(+) 4-activated-NKA activity in the inner mantle. However, similar phenomena were not observed in the extensible outer mantle, which contained abundant symbiotic zooxanthellae. Hence, during light-enhanced calcification, H(+) released from CaCO3 deposition could react with NH3 to form NH(+) 4 in the extrapallial fluid, and NH(+) 4 could probably be transported into the shell-facing inner mantle epithelium through NKA. Light also induced an increase in the activity of glutamine synthetase, which converts NH(+) 4 and glutamate to glutamine, in the inner mantle. Taken together, these results explained observations reported elsewhere that light induced a significant increase in pH and a significant decrease in ammonia concentration in the extrapallial fluid, as well as a significant increase in the glutamine concentration in the inner mantle, of T. squamosa. Exposure of T. squamosa to light also led to a significant decrease in the N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-sensitive-V-H(+)-ATPase (VATPase) in the inner mantle, and significant increases in the Na(+)/K(+)-activated-NKA, H(+)/NH(+) 4-activated-H(+)/K(+)-ATPase, and NEM-sensitive-VATPase activities in ctenidia, indicating that light-enhanced calcification might perturb Na(+) homeostasis and acid/base balance in the hemolymph, and might involve the active uptake of NH(+) 4 from the environment. This is the first report on light having direct

  10. New Observations of the Giant's Churches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridderstad, Marianna

    2015-05-01

    Orientations of the axes and gates of 49 Giant's Churches (GCs) were examined. Orientations to both solar and lunar events were discovered. The results especially suggest the importance of full moon events. Comparison between the orientations of the southern and the northern GCs did not reveal great differences. The majority of the GCs are situated on the eastern or southern sides of their ridges, and most of them enclose or are surrounded by cairns. Based on parallels to other North European Neolithic cultures, it is proposed that the GCs went through several phases of construction, the last phase being probably related to ritual activities.

  11. Giant persistent photoconductivity in rough silicon nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ping; Mönch, Ingolf; Harazim, Stefan; Huang, Gaoshan; Mei, Yongfeng; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2009-10-01

    This paper reports the observation of giant persistent photoconductivity from rough Si nanomembranes. When exposed to light, the current in p-type Si nanomembranes is enhanced by roughly 3 orders of magnitude in comparison with that in the dark and can persist for days at a high conductive state after the light is switched off. An applied gate voltage can tune the persistent photocurrent and accelerate the response to light. By analyzing the band structure of the devices and the surfaces through various coatings, we attribute the observed effect to hole-localized regions in Si nanomembranes due to the rough surfaces, where light can activate the confined holes. PMID:19637888

  12. Formation of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, G.; Coradini, A.

    2003-04-01

    In this presentation we address the problem of the formation of giant planets and their regular satellites. We study in particular the problem of formation of the Jupiter System comparing the results of the model with the present characteristics of the system, in order to identify what are those better represented by our approach. In fact here, using a 3-D hydro-dynamical code, we study the modalities of gas accretion onto a solid core, believed to be the seed from which Jupiter started. To do that we have modelled three main regions: the central planet, a turbulent accretion disk surrounding it and an extended region from which the gas is collected. In the extended region we treat the gas as a frictionless fluid. Our main goal is to identify what are the characteristics of the planet during its growth and the physical parameters affecting its growth at the expenses of the nebular gas present in the feeding zone. Moreover we want to understand what are the thermodynamical parameters characterizing the gas captured by the planet and swirling around it. Finally, we check if a disk can be formed in prograde rotation around the planet and if this disk can survive the final phases of the planet formation. Due to the interaction between the accreting planet and the disk it has been necessary to develop a complete model of the Jupiter’s structure. In fact the radiation emitted by the growing planet heats up the surrounding gas. In turn the planet’s thermodynamic structure depend on the mass accretion rate onto it. When the accretion is rapid, shock waves in the gas are formed close to the planet. This region cannot be safely treated by a numerical code; for this reason we have developed a semi-analytically model of a a turbulent accretion disk to be considered as transition between the planet and the surrounding disk.

  13. Rotation of Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}⊙ , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{Ω }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{Ω }}{τ }{con}≲ 1 (here {τ }{con} is the convective time), and {{Ω }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}≳ 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  14. The Lushan earthquake and the giant panda: impacts and conservation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zejun; Yuan, Shibin; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Mingchun

    2014-06-01

    Earthquakes not only result in a great loss of human life and property, but also have profound effects on the Earth's biodiversity. The Lushan earthquake occurred on 20 Apr 2013, with a magnitude of 7.0 and an intensity of 9.0 degrees. A distance of 17.0 km from its epicenter to the nearest distribution site of giant pandas recorded in the Third National Survey was determined. Making use of research on the Wenchuan earthquake (with a magnitude of 8.0), which occurred approximately 5 years ago, we briefly analyze the impacts of the Lushan earthquake on giant pandas and their habitat. An earthquake may interrupt ongoing behaviors of giant pandas and may also cause injury or death. In addition, an earthquake can damage conservation facilities for pandas, and result in further habitat fragmentation and degradation. However, from a historical point of view, the impacts of human activities on giant pandas and their habitat may, in fact, far outweigh those of natural disasters such as earthquakes. Measures taken to promote habitat restoration and conservation network reconstruction in earthquake-affected areas should be based on requirements of giant pandas, not those of humans. PMID:24952972

  15. CMB lensing and giant rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan

    2012-05-01

    We study the CMB lensing signature of a pre-inationary particle (PIP), assuming it is responsible for the giant rings anomaly that was found recently in the WMAP data. Simulating Planck-like data we find that generically the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio associated with such a PIP is quite small and it would be difficult to cross correlate the temperature giant rings with the CMB lensing signal. However, if the pre-inationary particle is also responsible for the bulk flow measured from the local large scale structure, which happens to point roughly at the same direction as the giant rings, then the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio is fairly significant.

  16. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution. PMID:20074322

  17. Structure of giant muscle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Logan C.; Wright, Nathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Giant muscle proteins (e.g., titin, nebulin, and obscurin) play a seminal role in muscle elasticity, stretch response, and sarcomeric organization. Each giant protein consists of multiple tandem structural domains, usually arranged in a modular fashion spanning 500 kDa to 4 MDa. Although many of the domains are similar in structure, subtle differences create a unique function of each domain. Recent high and low resolution structural and dynamic studies now suggest more nuanced overall protein structures than previously realized. These findings show that atomic structure, interactions between tandem domains, and intrasarcomeric environment all influence the shape, motion, and therefore function of giant proteins. In this article we will review the current understanding of titin, obscurin, and nebulin structure, from the atomic level through the molecular level. PMID:24376425

  18. Giant myoma and erythrocytosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozsaran, A A; Itil, I M; Terek, C; Kazandi, M; Dikmen, Y

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study is to discuss the myomatous erythrocytosis syndrome in a patient with a giant subserous uterine myoma. She presented with plethora and an abdominal mass. After venesection of 4 units of blood, the preoperative haematocrit value of 53.3% and haemoglobin value of 17.5 g/dL had decreased to 48.6% and 16.8 g/dL levels, respectively. After the operative extraction of the giant subserous myoma with attached uterus weighing 14.2 kg, the haematocrit and the haemoglobin values had regressed to 40.3% and 14.3 g/dL levels, respectively. The findings indicated that the giant subserous myoma was the cause of the myomatous erythrocytosis syndrome in this patient. PMID:10554963

  19. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Lorraine A; Dumais, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma is considered rare in the dog with little known about the clinicopathologic features. There are few reports in the veterinary literature concerning this benign, reactive lesion, formerly known as giant cell epulis. In humans, the four most commonly described reactive epulides are focal fibrous hyperplasia (fibrous epulis), pyogenic granuloma, peripheral ossifying fibroma, and peripheral giant cell granuloma. This case report describes the diagnosis and surgical management of a peripheral giant cell granuloma in a dog. PMID:26415387

  20. Giant elves: Lightning-generated electromagnetic pulses in giant planets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque Estepa, Alejandro; Dubrovin, Daria; José Gordillo-Vázquez, Francisco; Ebert, Ute; Parra-Rojas, Francisco Carlos; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    We currently have direct optical observations of atmospheric electricity in the two giant gaseous planets of our Solar System [1-5] as well as radio signatures that are possibly generated by lightning from the two icy planets Uranus and Neptune [6,7]. On Earth, the electrical activity of the troposphere is associated with secondary electrical phenomena called Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the mesosphere and lower ionosphere. This led some researchers to ask if similar processes may also exist in other planets, focusing first on the quasi-static coupling mechanism [8], which on Earth is responsible for halos and sprites and then including also the induction field, which is negligible in our planet but dominant in Saturn [9]. However, one can show that, according to the best available estimation for lightning parameters, in giant planets such as Saturn and Jupiter the effect of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) dominates the effect that a lightning discharge has on the lower ionosphere above it. Using a Finite-Differences, Time-Domain (FDTD) solver for the EMP we found [10] that electrically active storms may create a localized but long-lasting layer of enhanced ionization of up to 103 cm-3 free electrons below the ionosphere, thus extending the ionosphere downward. We also estimate that the electromagnetic pulse transports 107 J to 1010 J toward the ionosphere. There emissions of light of up to 108 J would create a transient luminous event analogous to a terrestrial elve. Although these emissions are about 10 times fainter than the emissions coming from the lightning itself, it may be possible to target them for detection by filtering the appropiate wavelengths. [1] Cook, A. F., II, T. C. Duxbury, and G. E. Hunt (1979), First results on Jovian lightning, Nature, 280, 794, doi:10.1038/280794a0. [2] Little, B., C. D. Anger, A. P. Ingersoll, A. R. Vasavada, D. A. Senske, H. H. Breneman, W. J. Borucki, and The Galileo SSI Team (1999), Galileo images of

  1. Giant axonal neuropathy: MRS findings.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Alpay; Kutlu, Ramazan; Sigirci, Ahmet; Baysal, Tamer; Altinok, Tayfun; Yakinci, Cengiz

    2003-10-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare genetic disease of childhood involving the central and peripheral nervous systems. Axonal loss with several giant axons filled with neurofilaments is the main histopathological feature of peripheral nerve biopsies in this disease. Routine neuroimaging studies reveal diffuse hyperintensities in cerebral and cerebellar white matter. In this case report, the authors present the brain magnetic resonance spectroscopic features (normal N-acetylaspartate/creatine and increased choline/creatine and myoinositol/creatine ratios), which might indicate the absence of neuroaxonal loss and the presence of significant demyelination and glial proliferation in white matter, of an 11-year-old boy diagnosed with GAN. PMID:14569833

  2. Chemical Abundances of Symbiotic Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, C.; Mikołajewska, J.; Hinkle, K. H.; Joyce, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution (R ˜ 50000), near-IR spectra were used to measure photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak for 24 symbiotic giants. Spectrum synthesis was employed using local thermal equilibrium and hydrostatic model atmospheres. The metallicities are distributed in a wide range with maximum around [Fe/H] ˜-0.4 - - 0.3 dex. Enrichment in 14N indicates that all the sample giants have experienced the first dredge-up. The relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  3. Charting the Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    zero expansion asymptotically after an infinite time and has a flat geometry). All three observational tests by means of supernovae (green), the cosmic microwave background (blue) and galaxy clusters converge at a Universe around Ωm ~ 0.3 and ΩΛ ~ 0.7. The dark red region for the galaxy cluster determination corresponds to 95% certainty (2-sigma statistical deviation) when assuming good knowledge of all other cosmological parameters, and the light red region assumes a minimum knowledge. For the supernovae and WMAP results, the inner and outer regions corespond to 68% (1-sigma) and 95% certainty, respectively. References: Schuecker et al. 2003, A&A, 398, 867 (REFLEX); Tonry et al. 2003, ApJ, 594, 1 (supernovae); Riess et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 665 (supernovae) Galaxy clusters are far from being evenly distributed in the Universe. Instead, they tend to conglomerate into even larger structures, "super-clusters". Thus, from stars which gather in galaxies, galaxies which congregate in clusters and clusters tying together in super-clusters, the Universe shows structuring on all scales, from the smallest to the largest ones. This is a relict of the very early (formation) epoch of the Universe, the so-called "inflationary" period. At that time, only a minuscule fraction of one second after the Big Bang, the tiny density fluctuations were amplified and over the eons, they gave birth to the much larger structures. Because of the link between the first fluctuations and the giant structures now observed, the unique REFLEX catalogue - the largest of its kind - allows astronomers to put considerable constraints on the content of the Universe, and in particular on the amount of dark matter that is believed to pervade it. Rather interestingly, these constraints are totally independent from all other methods so far used to assert the existence of dark matter, such as the study of very distant supernovae (see e.g. ESO PR 21/98) or the analysis of the Cosmic Microwave background (e

  4. Giant eucalypts - globally unique fire-adapted rain-forest trees?

    PubMed

    Tng, D Y P; Williamson, G J; Jordan, G J; Bowman, D M J S

    2012-11-01

    CONTENTS: Summary    1 I. Introduction    1 II. Giant eucalypts in a global context    2 III. Giant eucalypts - taxonomy and distribution    4 IV. Growth of giant eucalypts    6 V. Fire and regeneration of giant eucalypts    8 VI. Are giant eucalypts different from other rain-forest trees?    9 VII. Conclusions 10 Acknowledgements 11 References 11 SUMMARY: Tree species exceeding 70 m in height are rare globally. Giant gymnosperms are concentrated near the Pacific coast of the USA, while the tallest angiosperms are eucalypts (Eucalyptus spp.) in southern and eastern Australia. Giant eucalypts co-occur with rain-forest trees in eastern Australia, creating unique vegetation communities comprising fire-dependent trees above fire-intolerant rain-forest. However, giant eucalypts can also tower over shrubby understoreys (e.g. in Western Australia). The local abundance of giant eucalypts is controlled by interactions between fire activity and landscape setting. Giant eucalypts have features that increase flammability (e.g. oil-rich foliage and open crowns) relative to other rain-forest trees but it is debatable if these features are adaptations. Probable drivers of eucalypt gigantism are intense intra-specific competition following severe fires, and inter-specific competition among adult trees. However, we suggest that this was made possible by a general capacity of eucalypts for 'hyper-emergence'. We argue that, because giant eucalypts occur in rain-forest climates and share traits with rain-forest pioneers, they should be regarded as long-lived rain-forest pioneers, albeit with a particular dependence on fire for regeneration. These unique ecosystems are of high conservation value, following substantial clearing and logging over 150 yr. PMID:23121314

  5. Magma Reservoirs Feeding Giant Radiating Dike Swarms: Insights from Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosfils, E. B.; Ernst, R. E.

    2003-01-01

    Evidence of lateral dike propagation from shallow magma reservoirs is quite common on the terrestrial planets, and examination of the giant radiating dike swarm population on Venus continues to provide new insight into the way these complex magmatic systems form and evolve. For example, it is becoming clear that many swarms are an amalgamation of multiple discrete phases of dike intrusion. This is not surprising in and of itself, as on Earth there is clear evidence that formation of both magma reservoirs and individual giant radiating dikes often involves periodic magma injection. Similarly, giant radiating swarms on Earth can contain temporally discrete subswarms defined on the basis of geometry, crosscutting relationships, and geochemical or paleomagnetic signatures. The Venus data are important, however, because erosion, sedimentation, plate tectonic disruption, etc. on Earth have destroyed most giant radiating dike swarm's source regions, and thus we remain uncertain about the geometry and temporal evolution of the magma sources from which the dikes are fed. Are the reservoirs which feed the dikes large or small, and what are the implications for how the dikes themselves form? Does each subswarm originate from a single, periodically reactivated reservoir, or do subswarms emerge from multiple discrete geographic foci? If the latter, are these discrete foci located at the margins of a single large magma body, or do multiple smaller reservoirs define the character of the magmatic center as a whole? Similarly, does the locus of magmatic activity change with time, or are all the foci active simultaneously? Careful study of giant radiating dike swarms on Venus is yielding the data necessary to address these questions and constrain future modeling efforts. Here, using giant radiating dike swarms from the Nemesis Tessera (V14) and Carson (V43) quadrangles as examples, we illustrate some of the dike swarm focal region diversity observed on Venus and briefly explore some

  6. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  7. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed. PMID:26143242

  8. Effects of hot-water extract of banana (Musa acuminata) fruit's peel on the antibacterial activity, and anti-hypothermal stress, immune responses and disease resistance of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbegii.

    PubMed

    Rattanavichai, Wutti; Cheng, Winton

    2014-08-01

    The hot-extracts isolated from fruit's peel of banana, Musa acuminata, was evaluated on the antibacterial activity to pathogens from aquatic animals, and immunostimulating potential, disease resistance and anti-hypothermal stress in giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii through injection administration. The banana peel extract (BPE) showed good activity against 1 Gram-positive and 3 Gram-negative pathogens, including Lactococcus garvieae, Photobacteria damsella, Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahemolyticus especially in prawn pathogen of L. garvieae strain, which were carried out by a disk diffusion method. Prawn received BPE via injection administration at 1-6 μg (g prawn)(-1) significantly increased total haemocyte count (THC), hyaline cell (HC), granular cell (GC), phenoloxidase (PO) activity and phagocytic activity against L. garvieae from 3 to 6 days, and significantly increased clearance efficiency against L. garvieae and a significantly decreased coagulation time of prawn from 1 to 6 days. Prawn injected with BPE at 6.0 μg (g prawn)(-1) for 6 days showed significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but significantly decreased respiratory bursts (RBs) of per haemocyte. Survival rates of M. rosenbergii injected with BPE at concentrations of 1, 3 and 6 μg (g prawn)(-1) were significantly higher than those injected with saline control after challenge with L. garvieae for 4-6 days, and the respective relative survival percentages of prawn were 28.6%, 38.1%, and 47.8%, respectively at 6 days. The sublethal time of prawns that had received saline and BPE at 1, 3 and 6 μg (g prawn)(-1) for 6 days and then were transferred from 28 °C to 14 °C were 69.4, 79.8, 83.6, and 90.2 h, respectively. It was concluded that the BPE can be used as the bacteriostat, and immunostimulant and physiological regulator for prawn through injection administration to enhance immunity, physiological responses, and resistance against L. garvieae. PMID

  9. Isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in giant freshwater pawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii): effects on the oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymatic activities and apoptosis in haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufan; Ye, Chaoxia; Wang, Anli; Zhu, Xuan; Chen, Changhong; Xian, Jianan; Sun, Zhenzhu

    2015-10-01

    The residual contaminators such as ammonia and nitrite are widely considered as relevant sources of aquatic environmental pollutants, posing a great threat to shrimp survival. To study the toxicological effects of ammonia and nitrite exposure on the innate immune response in invertebrates, we investigated the oxidative stress and apoptosis in haemocytes of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) under isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in order to provide useful information about adult prawn immune responses. M. rosenbergii (13.44 ± 2.75 g) were exposed to 0, 5, and 25 mg/L total ammonia-N (TAN) and 0, 5, and 20 mg/L nitrite-N for 24 h. All ammonia concentrations were combined with all nitrite concentrations, making a total of nine treatments studied. Following the exposure treatment, antioxidant enzyme activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, nitric oxide (NO) generation, and apoptotic cell ratio of haemocytes were measured using flow cytometry. Results indicated that ROS generation was sensitive to the combined effect of ammonia and nitrite, which subsequently affected the Cu-Zn SOD activity. In addition, CAT showed the highest activity at 5 mg/L TAN while GPx decreased at 5 mg/L TAN and returned towards baseline at 25 mg/L. NO generation synchronized with the apoptotic cell ratio in haemocytes, indicating that NO production was closely associated with programmed cell death. Both NO production and apoptotic ratios significantly decreased following 25 mg/L TAN, which may be due to the antagonistic regulation of NO and GPx. We hypothesized that the toxicological effect of nitrite exhibited less change in physiological changes compared to that of ammonia, because of the high tolerance to nitrite exposure in mature M. rosenbergii and/or the competitive effects of chloride ions. Taken together, these results showed that ammonia and nitrite caused a series of combined oxidative stress and apoptosis in M. rosenbergi, but further

  10. Magnetocardiography with sensors based on giant magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; Parkkonen, L.; Sergeeva-Chollet, N.; Polovy, H.; Fermon, C.; Fowley, C.

    2011-04-01

    Biomagnetic signals, mostly due to the electrical activity in the body, are very weak and they can only be detected by the most sensitive magnetometers, such as Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). We report here biomagnetic recordings with hybrid sensors based on Giant MagnetoResistance (GMR). We recorded magnetic signatures of the electric activity of the human heart (magnetocardiography) in healthy volunteers. The P-wave and QRS complex, known from the corresponding electric recordings, are clearly visible in the recordings after an averaging time of about 1 min. Multiple recordings at different locations over the chest yielded a dipolar magnetic field map and allowed localizing the underlying current sources. The sensitivity of the GMR-based sensors is now approaching that of SQUIDs and paves way for spin electronics devices for functional imaging of the body.

  11. Dietary supplementation of green synthesized manganese-oxide nanoparticles and its effect on growth performance, muscle composition and digestive enzyme activities of the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Asaikkutti, Annamalai; Bhavan, Periyakali Saravana; Vimala, Karuppaiya; Karthik, Madhayan; Cheruparambath, Praseeja

    2016-05-01

    The green synthesized Mn3O4 nanoparticles (manganese-oxide nanoparticles) using Ananas comosus (L.) peel extract was characterized by various techniques. HR-SEM photograph showed that manganese-oxide nanoparticles (Mn-oxide NPs) were spherical in shape, with an average size of 40-50 nm. The Zeta potential revealed the surface charge of Mn-oxide NPs to be negative. Further, the Mn-oxide NPs were dietary supplemented for freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The experimental basal diets were supplemented with Mn-oxide NPs at the rates of 0 (control), 3.0, 6.0, 9.0, 12, 15 and 18 mg/kg dry feed weight. The as-supplemented Mn-oxide NPs were fed in M. rosenbergii for a period of 90 days. The experimental study demonstrated that prawns fed with diet supplemented with 3-18 mg Mn-oxide NPs/kg shows enhanced (P<0.05) growth performance, including final weight and weight gain (WG). Significant differences (P<0.05) in feed conversion ratio (FCR) were observed in prawn fed with different diets. Additionally, prawns fed with 3.0-18 mg/kg Mn-oxide NPs supplemented diets achieved significant (P<0.05) improvement in growth performance, digestive enzyme activities and muscle biochemical compositions, while, the prawns fed with 16 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs showed enhanced performance. Prawns fed on diet supplemented with 16 mg/kg Mn-oxide NPs showed significantly (P<0.05) higher total protein level. The antioxidants enzymatic activity (SOD and CAT) metabolic enzymes status in muscle and hepatopancreas showed no significant (P>0.05) alterations in prawns fed with 3.0-18 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs supplemented diets. Consequently, the present work proposed that 16 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs could be supplemented for flexible enhanced survival, growth and production of M. rosenbergii. Therefore, the data of the present study recommend the addition of 16 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs diet to developed prawn growth and antioxidant defense system. PMID:27049122

  12. A Sleeping Giant Awakened: Reignition of AGN Activity, Reborn Star Formation, and a Multiphase Outflow in one of the Largest Radio Galaxies Known

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant; O'Dea, Christopher; Labiano, Alvaro; Baum, Stefi; McDermid, Richard; Combes, Francoise; Garcia-Burillo, Santiago; Davis, Timothy

    2014-08-01

    3C 236 is the second largest known radio galaxy and one of the largest objects in the known Universe. Its central AGN has recently reignited after a 10 Myr dormancy period, giving rise to a very young and compact radio source and a 1000 km/sec outflow of warm ionized and atomic HI gas. We propose GMOS-N IFU observations to resolve this outflow, determine its driver, and estimate the relative coupling efficiencies between the warm ionized, atomic, and cold molecular gas phases. We will assemble a much-needed spatially resolved Balmer decrement (extinction map) across the dramatic double dust lanes of this source, enabling high spatial resolution star formation rate, efficiency, and gas excitation and velocity maps. These will address several mysteries related to the very high star formation efficiency and the unique nature of the multiphase outflow in this source. 3C 236 is such a remarkable galaxy that whatever the results of the proposed observations, they will have wide-ranging implications for the triggering of star formation and AGN activity, their possibly coupled co-evolution, and the feedback effects of the latter on the former.

  13. Sizing Up Red-Giant Twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    -resolution ground-based spectroscopy at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory and Apache Point Observatory, Rawls and collaborators established that the two stars have masses of 2.17 and 2.15 solar masses, and radii of 8.4 and 8.3 solar radii.Not Quite Twins?Intriguingly, when the authors measured the stellar oscillations from the binary, they were only able to pick out one signal. Using the scaling relations, their measurements reveal that the star producing the oscillations has a mass of 2.17 solar masses and radius of 8.3 radii consistent with both red giants in the system, within error bars. This provides excellent confirmation of the scaling relations for obtaining mass and radius, but it also raises a new question: why is only one star of this twin system producing oscillations?Rawls and collaborators have an idea: one star might be more magnetically active than the other, causing the suppression of oscillations in the more active star. The authors observations and detailed modeling support this idea, but similar analyses of the rest of the red-giant eclipsing binaries identified in the Kepler field will help to determine if KIC 9246715 is unusual, or if this behavior is common among such systems.CitationMeredith L. Rawls et al 2016 ApJ 818 108. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/818/2/108

  14. [Giant intradiploic infratentorial epidermoid cyst].

    PubMed

    Alberione, F; Caire, F; Fischer-Lokou, D; Gueye, M; Moreau, J J

    2007-10-01

    Epidermoid cysts are benign, uncommon lesions (1% of all intracranial tumors). Their localization is intradiploic in 25% of cases, and exceptionally subtentorial. We report here a rare case of giant intradiploic infratentorial epidermoid cyst. A 74-year old patient presented with recent diplopia and sindrome cerebellar. CT scan and MR imaging revealed a giant osteolytic extradural lesion of the posterior fossa (5.2 cm x 3.8 cm) with a small area of peripheral enhancement after contrast injection. Retrosigmoid suboccipital craniectomy allowed a satisfactory removal of the tumor, followed by an acrylic cranioplasty. The outcome was good. Neuropathological examination confirmed an epidermoid cyst. We review the literature and discuss our case. PMID:18008017

  15. Giant viruses come of age.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias G

    2016-06-01

    Viruses with genomes up to a few megabases in length are a common occurrence in nature, even though they have escaped our notice until recently. These giant viruses infect mainly single-celled eukaryotes and isolation efforts concentrating on amoebal hosts alone have spawned hundreds of viral isolates, featuring viruses with previously unseen virion morphologies and the largest known viral genomes and particles. One of the challenges that lie ahead is to analyze and categorize the available data and to establish an approved classification system that reflects the evolutionary relationships and biological properties of these viruses. Extensive sampling of Acanthamoeba-infecting mimiviruses and initial characterization of their virophage parasites have provided a first blueprint of the genetic diversity and composition of a giant virus clade that will facilitate the taxonomic grouping of these fascinating microorganisms. PMID:26999382

  16. Proteorhodopsin genes in giant viruses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Viruses with large genomes encode numerous proteins that do not directly participate in virus biogenesis but rather modify key functional systems of infected cells. We report that a distinct group of giant viruses infecting unicellular eukaryotes that includes Organic Lake Phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa virus encode predicted proteorhodopsins that have not been previously detected in viruses. Search of metagenomic sequence data shows that putative viral proteorhodopsins are extremely abundant in marine environments. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that giant viruses acquired proteorhodopsins via horizontal gene transfer from proteorhodopsin-encoding protists although the actual donor(s) could not be presently identified. The pattern of conservation of the predicted functionally important amino acid residues suggests that viral proteorhodopsin homologs function as sensory rhodopsins. We hypothesize that viral rhodopsins modulate light-dependent signaling, in particular phototaxis, in infected protists. This article was reviewed by Igor B. Zhulin and Laksminarayan M. Iyer. For the full reviews, see the Reviewers’ reports section. PMID:23036091

  17. Giant cell tumor of the humeral head treated by denosumab: Implication to shoulder surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ka Hei; Lam, Albert Ying Lee; Ho, Kenneth Wai Yip; Shek, Tony Wai Hung

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor is a benign bone tumor that is commonly encountered. The optimal treatment of a giant cell tumor which causes extensive bony destruction is controversial. Recent studies on the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand antagonist denosumab may offer a new treatment option for these patients. We presented a patient with giant cell tumor of the humeral head. He was initially treated with denosumab and subsequently with the operation. The shoulder joint was successfully salvaged. But there are potential difficulties that surgeons may face in patients treated with denosumab. PMID:26622131

  18. Giant cell myocarditis in a patient with a spondyloarthropathy after a drug hypersensitivity reaction.

    PubMed

    Mitoff, Peter R; Mesana, Thierry G; Mielniczuk, Lisa M; Grenon, Jackie; Veinot, John P; Cooper, Leslie T; Davies, Ross A

    2013-09-01

    A young woman thought to have seronegative rheumatoid arthritis developed Stevens-Johnson syndrome after treatment with sulfasalazine; this resolved with prednisone. Later she was found to be HLA-B27-positive in keeping with a spondyloarthropathy. Soon afterward, she developed clinical myopericarditis and cardiogenic shock that responded initially to methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin, but recurred. An endomyocardial biopsy demonstrated active myocarditis with a mixed cell composition including rare giant cells, but not enough to classify it as giant cell myocarditis. Heart failure symptoms returned and she eventually required a heart transplant; the explanted heart showed giant cell myocarditis. PMID:23474137

  19. Observed Properties of Giant Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa; Colegrove, Owen

    2014-01-01

    The existence of Giant Cells has been suggested by both theory and observation for over 45 years. We have tracked the motions of supergranules in SDO/HMI Doppler velocity data and find larger (Giant Cell) flows that persist for months. The flows in these cells are clockwise around centers of divergence in the north and counter-clockwise in the south. Equatorward flows are correlated with prograde flows - giving the transport of angular momentum toward the equator that is needed to maintain the Sun's rapid equatorial rotation. The cells are most pronounced at mid- and high-latitudes where they exhibit the rotation rates representative of those latitudes. These are clearly large, long-lived, cellular features, with the dynamical characteristics expected from the effects of the Sun's rotation, but the shapes of the cells are not well represented in numerical models. While the Giant Cell flow velocities are small (<10 m/s), their long lifetimes should nonetheless substantially impact the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's near surface layers.

  20. Hairpin Furans and Giant Biaryls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xin; Mague, Joel T; Donahue, James P; Pascal, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The thermal reaction of two cyclopentadienones with 5,5'-binaphthoquinone or 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in refluxing nitrobenzene (210 °C) gives, in a single synthetic step that includes two Diels-Alder additions, two decarbonylations, and two dehydrogenations, giant biaryl bisquinones (compounds 13, 14, 15, 18, and 21). However, when two cyclopentadienones react with 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in nitrobenzene at higher temperatures (250-260 °C), the resulting products are molecular ribbons composed of two twisted aromatic systems fused to a heteropentahelicene (19, 20, and 22). These molecules are representatives of a new class of chiral polycyclic aromatic compounds, the "hairpin furans". Interestingly, reheating a dimethoxy-substituted giant biaryl (e.g., 21) in nitrobenzene at 260 °C does not yield the corresponding hairpin furan (22), and mechanistic studies indicate that some intermediate or byproduct of the synthesis of the giant biaryls is a reagent or catalyst necessary for the conversion of the dimethoxybiaryl to the furan. PMID:27040596

  1. Guiding the Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-08-01

    New ESO Survey Provides Targets for the VLT Giant astronomical telescopes like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) must be used efficiently. Observing time is expensive and there are long waiting lines of excellent research programmes. Thus the work at the telescope must be very well prepared and optimized as much as possible - mistakes should be avoided and no time lost! Astronomers working with the new 8-m class optical/infrared telescopes must base their observations on detailed lists of suitable target objects if they want to perform cutting-edge science. This is particularly true for research programmes that depend on observations of large samples of comparatively rare, distant objects. This type of work requires that extensive catalogues of such objects must be prepared in advance. One such major catalogue - that will serve as a very useful basis for future VLT observations - has just become available from the new ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). The Need for Sky Surveys Astronomers have since long recognized the need to carry out preparatory observations with other telescopes in order to "guide" large telescopes. To this end, surveys of smaller or larger parts of the sky have been performed by wide-field telescopes, paving the way for subsequent work at the limits of the largest available ground-based telescopes. For instance, a complete photographic survey of the sourthern sky (declination < -17.5°) was carried out in the 1970's with the ESO 1-metre Schmidt Telescope in support of the work at the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory. However, while until recently most observational programmes could rely on samples of objects found on photographic plates, this is no longer possible. New image surveys must match the fainter limiting magnitudes reached by the new and larger telescopes. Modern digital, multi-colour, deep imaging surveys have thus become an indispensable complement to the 8-m telescopes. The new generation of imaging surveys will, without

  2. Cabergoline Treatment in Invasive Giant Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically. PMID:25002819

  3. Blind detection of giant pulses: GPU implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait-Allal, Dalal; Weber, Rodolphe; Dumez-Viou, Cédric; Cognard, Ismael; Theureau, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Radio astronomical pulsar observations require specific instrumentation and dedicated signal processing to cope with the dispersion caused by the interstellar medium. Moreover, the quality of observations can be limited by radio frequency interference (RFI) generated by Telecommunications activity. This article presents the innovative pulsar instrumentation based on graphical processing units (GPU) which has been designed at the Nançay Radio Astronomical Observatory. In addition, for giant pulsar search, we propose a new approach which combines a hardware-efficient search method and some RFI mitigation capabilities. Although this approach is less sensitive than the classical approach, its advantage is that no a priori information on the pulsar parameters is required. The validation of a GPU implementation is under way.

  4. Nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect

    El Eid, Mounib F.

    2014-05-09

    The nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars (briefly: AGB)is a challenging and fascinating subject in the theory of stellar evolution and important for observations as well. This is because about of half the heavy elements beyond iron are synthesized during thermal pulsation phases of these stars. Furthermore, the understanding of the production of the heavy elements and some light elements like carbon and fluorine represent a powerful tool to get more insight into the internal structure of these stars. The diversity of nuclear processing during the AGB phases may also motivate experimental activities in measuring important nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we emphasize several interesting feature of the nucleosynthesis in AGB stars which still needs further elaboration especially from theoretical point of view.

  5. Red Giants in Eclipsing Binaries as a Benchmark for Asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawls, Meredith L.

    2016-04-01

    Red giants with solar-like oscillations are astrophysical laboratories for probing the Milky Way. The Kepler Space Telescope revolutionized asteroseismology by consistently monitoring thousands of targets, including several red giants in eclipsing binaries. Binarity allows us to directly measure stellar properties independently of asteroseismology. In this dissertation, we study a subset of eight red giant eclipsing binaries observed by Kepler with a range of orbital periods, oscillation behavior, and stellar activity. Two of the systems do not show solar-like oscillations at all. We use a suite of modeling tools to combine photometry and spectroscopy into a comprehensive picture of each star's life. One noteworthy case is a double red giant binary. The two stars are nearly twins, but have one main set of solar-like oscillations with unusually low-amplitude, wide modes, likely due to stellar activity and modest tidal forces acting over the 171 day eccentric orbit. Mixed modes indicate the main oscillating star is on the secondary red clump (a core-He-burning star), and stellar evolution modeling supports this with a coeval history for a pair of red clump stars. The other seven systems are all red giant branch stars (shell-H-burning) with main sequence companions. The two non-oscillators have the strongest magnetic signatures and some of the strongest lifetime tidal forces with nearly-circular 20–34 day orbits. One system defies this trend with oscillations and a 19 day orbit. The four long-period systems (>100 days) have oscillations, more eccentric orbits, and less stellar activity. They are all detached binaries consistent with coevolution. We find the asteroseismic scaling laws are approximately correct, but fail the most for stars that are least like the Sun by systematically overestimating both mass and radius. Strong magnetic activity and tidal effects often occur in tandem and act to suppress solar-like oscillations. These red giant binaries offer an

  6. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  7. Speciation and phylogeography of giant petrels Macronectes.

    PubMed

    Techow, N M S M; O'Ryan, C; Phillips, R A; Gales, R; Marin, M; Patterson-Fraser, D; Quintana, F; Ritz, M S; Thompson, D R; Wanless, R M; Weimerskirch, H; Ryan, P G

    2010-02-01

    We examine global phylogeography of the two forms of giant petrel Macronectes spp. Although previously considered to be a single taxon, and despite debate over the status of some populations and the existence of minimal genetic data (one mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence per form), the current consensus based on morphology is that there are two species, Northern Giant Petrel M. halli and Southern Giant Petrel M. giganteus. This study examined genetic variation at cytochrome b as well as six microsatellite loci in giant petrels from 22 islands, representing most island groups at which the two species breed. Both markers support separate species status, although sequence divergence in cytochrome b was only 0.42% (corrected). Divergence was estimated to have occurred approximately 0.2mya, but with some colonies apparently separated for longer (up to 0.5 my). Three clades were found within giant petrels, which separated approximately 0.7mya, with the Southern Giant Petrel paraphyletic to a monophyletic Northern Giant Petrel. There was evidence of past fragmentation during the Pleistocene, with subsequent secondary contact within Southern Giant Petrels. The analysis also suggested a period of past population expansion that corresponded roughly to the timing of speciation and the separation of an ancestral giant petrel population from the fulmar Fulmarus clade. PMID:19755164

  8. Territoriality of Giant Otter Groups in an Area with Seasonal Flooding

    PubMed Central

    Leuchtenberger, Caroline; Magnusson, William E.; Mourão, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Territoriality carries costs and benefits, which are commonly affected by the spatial and temporal abundance and predictability of food, and by intruder pressure. Giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis) live in groups that defend territories along river channels during the dry season using chemical signals, loud vocalizations and agonistic encounters. However, little is known about the territoriality of giant otters during the rainy season, when groups leave their dry season territories and follow fish dispersing into flooded areas. The objective of this study was to analyze long-term territoriality of giant otter groups in a seasonal environment. The linear extensions of the territories of 10 giant otter groups were determined based on locations of active dens, latrines and scent marks in each season. Some groups overlapped the limits of neighboring territories. The total territory extent of giant otters was correlated with group size in both seasons. The extent of exclusive territories of giant otter groups was negatively related to the number of adults present in adjacent groups. Territory fidelity ranged from 0 to 100% between seasons. Some groups maintained their territory for long periods, which demanded constant effort in marking and re-establishing their territories during the wet season. These results indicate that the defense capacity of groups had an important role in the maintenance of giant otter territories across seasons, which may also affect the reproductive success of alpha pairs. PMID:25955248

  9. Territoriality of giant otter groups in an area with seasonal flooding.

    PubMed

    Leuchtenberger, Caroline; Magnusson, William E; Mourão, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Territoriality carries costs and benefits, which are commonly affected by the spatial and temporal abundance and predictability of food, and by intruder pressure. Giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis) live in groups that defend territories along river channels during the dry season using chemical signals, loud vocalizations and agonistic encounters. However, little is known about the territoriality of giant otters during the rainy season, when groups leave their dry season territories and follow fish dispersing into flooded areas. The objective of this study was to analyze long-term territoriality of giant otter groups in a seasonal environment. The linear extensions of the territories of 10 giant otter groups were determined based on locations of active dens, latrines and scent marks in each season. Some groups overlapped the limits of neighboring territories. The total territory extent of giant otters was correlated with group size in both seasons. The extent of exclusive territories of giant otter groups was negatively related to the number of adults present in adjacent groups. Territory fidelity ranged from 0 to 100% between seasons. Some groups maintained their territory for long periods, which demanded constant effort in marking and re-establishing their territories during the wet season. These results indicate that the defense capacity of groups had an important role in the maintenance of giant otter territories across seasons, which may also affect the reproductive success of alpha pairs. PMID:25955248

  10. The SEEDs of Planet Formation: Indirect Signatures of Giant Planets in Transitional Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol; Currie, T.

    2012-01-01

    We live in a planetary system with 2 gas giant planets, and as a resu lt of RV, transit, microlensing, and transit timing studies have ide ntified hundreds of giant planet candidates in the past 15 years. Su ch studies have preferentially concentrated on older, low activity So lar analogs, and thus tell us little about .when, where, and how gian t planets form in their disks, or how frequently they form in disks associated with intermediate-mass stars.

  11. Evaluating landscape options for corridor restoration between giant panda reserves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; McShea, William J; Wang, Dajun; Li, Sheng; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Hao; Lu, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of corridors can offset the negative effects of habitat fragmentation by connecting isolated habitat patches. However, the practical value of corridor planning is minimal if corridor identification is not based on reliable quantitative information about species-environment relationships. An example of this need for quantitative information is planning for giant panda conservation. Although the species has been the focus of intense conservation efforts for decades, most corridor projects remain hypothetical due to the lack of reliable quantitative researches at an appropriate spatial scale. In this paper, we evaluated a framework for giant panda forest corridor planning. We linked our field survey data with satellite imagery, and conducted species occupancy modelling to examine the habitat use of giant panda within the potential corridor area. We then conducted least-cost and circuit models to identify potential paths of dispersal across the landscape, and compared the predicted cost under current conditions and alternative conservation management options considered during corridor planning. We found that due to giant panda's association with areas of low elevation and flat terrain, human infrastructures in the same area have resulted in corridor fragmentation. We then identified areas with high potential to function as movement corridors, and our analysis of alternative conservation scenarios showed that both forest/bamboo restoration and automobile tunnel construction would significantly improve the effectiveness of corridor, while residence relocation would not significantly improve corridor effectiveness in comparison with the current condition. The framework has general value in any conservation activities that anticipate improving habitat connectivity in human modified landscapes. Specifically, our study suggested that, in this landscape, automobile tunnels are the best means to remove current barriers to giant panda movements caused by

  12. Evaluating Landscape Options for Corridor Restoration between Giant Panda Reserves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; McShea, William J.; Wang, Dajun; Li, Sheng; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Hao; Lu, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of corridors can offset the negative effects of habitat fragmentation by connecting isolated habitat patches. However, the practical value of corridor planning is minimal if corridor identification is not based on reliable quantitative information about species-environment relationships. An example of this need for quantitative information is planning for giant panda conservation. Although the species has been the focus of intense conservation efforts for decades, most corridor projects remain hypothetical due to the lack of reliable quantitative researches at an appropriate spatial scale. In this paper, we evaluated a framework for giant panda forest corridor planning. We linked our field survey data with satellite imagery, and conducted species occupancy modelling to examine the habitat use of giant panda within the potential corridor area. We then conducted least-cost and circuit models to identify potential paths of dispersal across the landscape, and compared the predicted cost under current conditions and alternative conservation management options considered during corridor planning. We found that due to giant panda's association with areas of low elevation and flat terrain, human infrastructures in the same area have resulted in corridor fragmentation. We then identified areas with high potential to function as movement corridors, and our analysis of alternative conservation scenarios showed that both forest/bamboo restoration and automobile tunnel construction would significantly improve the effectiveness of corridor, while residence relocation would not significantly improve corridor effectiveness in comparison with the current condition. The framework has general value in any conservation activities that anticipate improving habitat connectivity in human modified landscapes. Specifically, our study suggested that, in this landscape, automobile tunnels are the best means to remove current barriers to giant panda movements caused by

  13. Metabolic rates of giant pandas inform conservation strategies.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yuxiang; Hou, Rong; Spotila, James R; Paladino, Frank V; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-01-01

    The giant panda is an icon of conservation and survived a large-scale bamboo die off in the 1980s in China. Captive breeding programs have produced a large population in zoos and efforts continue to reintroduce those animals into the wild. However, we lack sufficient knowledge of their physiological ecology to determine requirements for survival now and in the face of climate change. We measured resting and active metabolic rates of giant pandas in order to determine if current bamboo resources were sufficient for adding additional animals to populations in natural reserves. Resting metabolic rates were somewhat below average for a panda sized mammal and active metabolic rates were in the normal range. Pandas do not have exceptionally low metabolic rates. Nevertheless, there is enough bamboo in natural reserves to support both natural populations and large numbers of reintroduced pandas. Bamboo will not be the limiting factor in successful reintroduction. PMID:27264109

  14. Metabolic rates of giant pandas inform conservation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Yuxiang; Hou, Rong; Spotila, James R.; Paladino, Frank V.; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-01-01

    The giant panda is an icon of conservation and survived a large-scale bamboo die off in the 1980s in China. Captive breeding programs have produced a large population in zoos and efforts continue to reintroduce those animals into the wild. However, we lack sufficient knowledge of their physiological ecology to determine requirements for survival now and in the face of climate change. We measured resting and active metabolic rates of giant pandas in order to determine if current bamboo resources were sufficient for adding additional animals to populations in natural reserves. Resting metabolic rates were somewhat below average for a panda sized mammal and active metabolic rates were in the normal range. Pandas do not have exceptionally low metabolic rates. Nevertheless, there is enough bamboo in natural reserves to support both natural populations and large numbers of reintroduced pandas. Bamboo will not be the limiting factor in successful reintroduction. PMID:27264109

  15. Warm Disks from Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    In the process of searching for exoplanetary systems, weve discovered tens of debris disks close around distant stars that are especially bright in infrared wavelengths. New research suggests that we might be looking at the late stages of terrestrial planet formation in these systems.Forming Terrestrial PlanetsAccording to the widely-accepted formation model for our solar-system, protoplanets the size of Mars formed within a protoplanetary disk around our Sun. Eventually, the depletion of the gas in the disk led the orbits of these protoplanets to become chaotically unstable. Finally, in the giant impact stage, many of the protoplanets collided with each other ultimately leading to the formation of the terrestrial planets and their moons as we know them today.If giant impact stages occur in exoplanetary systems, too leading to the formation of terrestrial exoplanets how would we detect this process? According to a study led by Hidenori Genda of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, we might be already be witnessing this stage in observations of warm debris disks around other stars. To test this, Genda and collaborators model giant impact stages and determine what we would expect to see from a system undergoing this violent evolution.Modeling CollisionsSnapshots of a giant impact in one of the authors simulations. The collision causes roughly 0.05 Earth masses of protoplanetary material to be ejected from the system. Click for a closer look! [Genda et al. 2015]The collaborators run a series of simulations evolving protoplanetary bodies in a solar system. The simulations begin 10 Myr into the lifetime of the solar system, i.e., after the gas from the protoplanetary disk has had time to be cleared and the protoplanetary orbits begin to destabilize. The simulations end when the protoplanets are done smashing into each other and have again settled into stable orbits, typically after ~100 Myr.The authors find that, over an average giant impact stage, the total amount of

  16. Giant rockslides from the inside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidinger, Johannes T.; Korup, Oliver; Munack, Henry; Altenberger, Uwe; Dunning, Stuart A.; Tippelt, Gerold; Lottermoser, Werner

    2014-03-01

    The growing body of research on large-scale mass wasting events so far has only scarcely investigated the sedimentology of chaotic deposits from non-volcanic terrestrial landslides such that any overarching and systematic terminological framework remains elusive. Yet recent work has emphasized the need for better understanding the internal structure and composition of rockslide deposits as a means to characterise the mechanics during the final stages of runout and emplacement. We offer a comprehensive overview on the occurrence of rock fragmentation and frictional melt both at different geographic locations, and different sections within large (>106 m) rockslide masses. We argue that exposures of pervasively fragmented and interlocked jigsaw-cracked rock masses; basal mélange containing rip-up clasts and phantom blocks; micro-breccia; and thin bands of basal frictionite are indispensable clues for identifying deposits from giant rockslides that may remain morphologically inconspicuous otherwise. These sedimentary assemblages are diagnostic tools for distinguishing large rockslide debris from macro- and microscopically similar glacial deposits, tectonic fault-zone breccias, and impact breccias, and thus help avoid palaeoclimatic and tectonic misinterpretations, let alone misestimates of the hazard from giant rockslides. Moreover, experimental results from Mössbauer spectroscopy of frictionite samples support visual interpretations of thin sections, and demonstrate that short-lived (<10 s) friction-induced partial melting at temperatures >1500 °C in the absence of water occurred at the base of several giant moving rockslides. This finding supports previous theories of dry excess runout accompanied by comminution of rock masses down to μm-scale, and indicates that catastrophic motion of large fragmenting rock masses does not require water as a potential lubricant.

  17. [Aortitis in giant cell arteritis].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Duhaut, P

    2016-04-01

    Aortitis is a frequent complication of giant cell arteritis. Imaging techniques can reveal the inflammation of the aortic wall. CT-scan can show circumferential aortic wall thickening, or TEP-scan can show aortic FDG-uptake. Aortic aneurysm and dissection is a feared but probably rare complication of the inflammation of the aortic wall during GCA. Screening for aortitis could be proposed for patients with symptoms of aortic involvement, for patients with signs of large vessels involvement (limb claudication, bruit) or for patients with incomplete response to treatment. The best follow-up and treatment are to be determined for the patients with aortitis related to GCA. PMID:26781692

  18. Giant Piloleiomyoma of the Forehead

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gun-Wook; Park, Hyun-Je; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Kim, Su-Han; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous piloleiomyomas are benign smooth muscle tumors arising from the arrector pili muscles. Piloleiomyomas appear as firm dermal papules of skin color or with a reddish to brown surface, and are commonly located on the extremities. Histologically, these lesions are composed of interlacing bundles of smooth muscle cells in the reticular dermis. Our case presented with an unusually large nodule on the forehead that was accompanied by intermittent pain. Histological analysis was compatible with piloleiomyoma and the lesion showed haphazardly arranged bundles of smooth muscle in the dermis. We describe herein an interesting case of a giant piloleiomyoma occurring on the forehead. PMID:22148036

  19. Platelet interaction within giant intracranial aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.; King, M.E.; Peerless, S.J.; Vezina, W.C.; Brown, G.W.; Chamberlain, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Turbulence within intracranial aneurysms may result in tearing of the aneurysmal wall, exposing the subendothelial matrix to circulating platelets. In this study, platelet interaction in giant intracranial aneurysms was evaluated by a dual-isotope technique employing In-labeled platelets and Tc-labeled red blood cells. The use of two isotopes allows the subtraction of the blood pool and the calculation of the ratio indium deposited:indium blood pool (In(D)/In(BP)). A ratio greater than zero indicates platelet deposition within aneurysm. Thirteen patients were evaluated in this way, with platelet deposition demonstrated in six. In these six patients, the ratio In(D)/In(BP) was found to be significantly elevated, with a mean value of 0.96 +/- 0.65. Three of these six patients has symptoms of recurrent transient neurological deficits; one of these three suffered a complete stroke following documentation of platelet deposition. In this case, the aneurysm was obtained at surgery and was found to contain intraluminal platelet aggregation when viewed by scanning electron microscopy. In the remaining seven patients, the ratio IN(D)/In(BP) was found not to be significantly elevated (mean -0.03 and/- 0.06), indicating the absence of active platelet deposition. Two of these patients had prior symptoms of cerebral ischemia; one of these was found to have an ulcer in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery which was probably responsible for thromboembolic events to the hemisphere. The authors conclude that platelet aggregation occurs more frequently than previously recognized in giant intracranial aneurysms, and their data substantiate the hypothesis that platelet metabolic products or thrombi originating from a large aneurysm may embolize to distal cerebral vessels.

  20. Bilateral giant cyst of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Ferrante, J; Schmidt, R; Eisenbeis, C H

    1987-01-01

    The case of a 61 year old white female with a rapidly progressive rheumatoid arthritis who developed bilateral giant cyst of the shoulder is described here. Arthrographic investigation indicated that these giant cysts were true synovial cysts rather than "pseudocysts". PMID:3427842

  1. Giant Prolactinoma Presenting with Neck Pain and Structural Compromise of the Occipital Condyles.

    PubMed

    Yecies, Derek; Ajlan, Abdulrazag; Ratliff, John; Ziskin, Jennifer; Hwang, Peter; Vogel, Hannes; Katznelson, Laurence; Harsh, Griffith

    2015-11-01

    Prolactinomas are the most common form of endocrinologically active pituitary adenoma; they account for ∼ 45% of pituitary adenomas encountered in clinical practice. Giant adenomas are those > 4 cm in diameter. Less than 0.5% of pituitary adenomas encountered in neurosurgical practice are giant prolactinomas. Patients with giant prolactinomas typically present with highly elevated prolactin levels, endocrinologic disturbances, and neurologic symptoms from mass-induced pressure. Described here is an unusual case of a giant prolactinoma presenting with neck pain and structural compromise of the occipital condyles. Transnasal biopsy of the nasopharyngeal portion of the mass obtained tissue consistent with an atypical prolactinoma with p53 reactivity and a high Ki-67 index of 5%. Despite the size and invasiveness of the tumor, the patient had resolution of his clinical symptoms, dramatic reduction of his hyperprolactinemia, and near-complete disappearance of his tumor following medical treatment. PMID:26623246

  2. Giant Prolactinoma Presenting with Neck Pain and Structural Compromise of the Occipital Condyles

    PubMed Central

    Yecies, Derek; Ajlan, Abdulrazag; Ratliff, John; Ziskin, Jennifer; Hwang, Peter; Vogel, Hannes; Katznelson, Laurence; Harsh, Griffith

    2015-01-01

    Prolactinomas are the most common form of endocrinologically active pituitary adenoma; they account for ∼ 45% of pituitary adenomas encountered in clinical practice. Giant adenomas are those > 4 cm in diameter. Less than 0.5% of pituitary adenomas encountered in neurosurgical practice are giant prolactinomas. Patients with giant prolactinomas typically present with highly elevated prolactin levels, endocrinologic disturbances, and neurologic symptoms from mass-induced pressure. Described here is an unusual case of a giant prolactinoma presenting with neck pain and structural compromise of the occipital condyles. Transnasal biopsy of the nasopharyngeal portion of the mass obtained tissue consistent with an atypical prolactinoma with p53 reactivity and a high Ki-67 index of 5%. Despite the size and invasiveness of the tumor, the patient had resolution of his clinical symptoms, dramatic reduction of his hyperprolactinemia, and near-complete disappearance of his tumor following medical treatment. PMID:26623246

  3. Sodium in weak G-band giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Lambert, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Sodium abundances have been determined for eight weak G-band giants whose atmospheres are greatly enriched with products of the CN-cycling H-burning reactions. Systematic errors are minimized by comparing the weak G-band giants to a sample of similar but normal giants. If, further, Ca is selected as a reference element, model atmosphere-related errors should largely be removed. For the weak-G-band stars (Na/Ca) = 0.16 +/- 0.01, which is just possibly greater than the result (Na/Ca) = 0.10 /- 0.03 from the normal giants. This result demonstrates that the atmospheres of the weak G-band giants are not seriously contaminated with products of ON cycling.

  4. Giant Planets in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, S. N.; White, R. J.; Latham, D. W.

    2015-10-01

    Two decades after the discovery of 51 Peg b, more than 200 hot Jupiters have now been confirmed, but the details of their inward migration remain uncertain. While it is widely accepted that short period giant planets could not have formed in situ, several different mechanisms (e.g., Type II migration, planet-planet scattering, Kozai-Lidov cycles) may contribute to shrinking planetary orbits, and the relative importance of each is not well-constrained. Migration through the gas disk is expected to preserve circular, coplanar orbits and must occur quickly (within ˜ 10 Myr), whereas multi-body processes should initially excite eccentricities and inclinations and may take hundreds of millions of years. Subsequent evolution of the system (e.g., orbital circularization and inclination damping via tidal interaction with the host star) may obscure these differences, so observing hot Jupiters soon after migration occurs can constrain the importance of each mechanism. Fortunately, the well-characterized stars in young and adolescent open clusters (with known ages and compositions) provide natural laboratories for such studies, and recent surveys have begun to take advantage of this opportunity. We present a review of the discoveries in this emerging realm of exoplanet science, discuss the constraints they provide for giant planet formation and migration, and reflect on the future direction of the field.

  5. Deep Imaging of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, G.

    2010-10-01

    With the development of high contrast imaging instruments and techniques, vast efforts have been devoted during the past decade to detect and characterize lighter, cooler and closer companions to nearby stars, and ultimately image new planetary systems. Complementary to other observing techniques (radial velocity, transit, micro-lensing, pulsar-timing and astrometry), this approach has opened a new astrophysical window to study the physical properties and the formation and evolution mechanisms of giant planets at orbits larger than a few AUs. In this review, I will briefly present the main motivations to use deep imaging to search for exoplanets and review the constant progress achieved thanks to improved performances of advanced instrumentation and data analysis techniques. I will describe the main classes of stars identified and observed so far to increase the chances of detection. I will also detail the classical strategy adopted to identify false alarms and characterize true companions. I will review the current status of the different deep imaging surveys as well as the main results that recently led to the discovery of giant planets probably formed like the ones of our solar system. Finally, I will rise the questions and uncertainties related to the formation mechanisms, the physical properties and the frequency of these planetary mass companions to conclude with the exciting and attractive perspectives offered with the future generation of deep imaging instruments.

  6. Two Giant Planets Orbiting the K Giant Star η Cet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, T.; Reffert, S.; Tan, X.; Lee, M. H.; Quirrenbach, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present evidence of a new planetary system around the K giant η Cet (HIP 5364, HD 6805, HR 334), based on 124 high-precision optical and infrared radial velocity data, taken at Lick Observatory (Hamilton) and at VLT (CRIRES). The best dynamical fit to the data is consistent with two massive planets (m 1sini~2.6M Jup , m 2sini~3.3MJup ) and with periods of P 1~407 days, P 2~740 days. To test the η Cet system's stability we perform ~ 10,000 dynamical investigations with maximum time spans of 108 years. We find that in case of moderate eccentricities, the planets can be effectively trapped in an anti-aligned stable 2:1 mean motion resonance (MMR), very close to the separatrix. A larger non-resonant stable region exists in low-eccentricity parameter space, although less probable than the 2:1 MMR region.

  7. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Kim, Rockki; Ryu, Jae-Hyun; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Song, Ki-Joon; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Kee, Sun-Ho . E-mail: keesh@korea.ac.kr

    2005-08-01

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3{beta} activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death.

  8. A multifrequency study of giant radio sources - I. Low-frequency Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of selected sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Saikia, D. J.; Machalski, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present low-frequency observations with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope of a sample of giant radio sources, and high-frequency observations of three of these sources with the Very Large Array. From multifrequency observations of the lobes, we estimate the magnetic field strengths using three different approaches, and show that these differ at most by a factor of ~3. For these large radio sources, the inverse-Compton losses usually dominate over synchrotron losses when estimates of the classical minimum energy magnetic field are used, consistent with earlier studies. However, this is often not true if the magnetic fields are close to the values estimated using the formalism of Beck & Krause. We also examine the spectral indices of the cores and any evidence of recurrent activity in these sources. We probe the environment using the symmetry parameters of these sources and suggest that their environments are often asymmetric on scales of ~1 Mpc, consistent with earlier studies.

  9. Deep Biosphere Secrets of the Mediterranean Salt Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, Giovanni; Lugli, Stefano; McGenity, Terry; Kuroda, Junichiro; Takai, Ken; Treude, Tina; Camerlenghi, Angelo

    2015-04-01

    One component of the IODP multi-platform drilling proposal called DREAM (Deep-Sea Record of Mediterranean Messisnian Events), plans to investigate the deep biosphere associated to the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) Salt Giant. We propose that the MSC Salt Giant, because of the variety of chemical environments it produces, has the potential to harbour an unprecedented diversity of microbial life with exceptional metabolic activity. Gypsum and anhydrite deposits provide a virtually unlimited source of sulphate at depths where oxidants are a rarity in other sedimentary environments. When reduced organic carbon comes into contact with these minerals there is the potential for a dynamic deep biosphere community of sulphate reducers to develop, with implications for sedimentary biogeochemical cycles and the souring of cruide oil. But the thickness of the Messinian evaporites and the range of chemical environments it harbours poses fundamental questions: will the interaction of several extreme conditions of temperature, salinity, pressure and chemical composition limit the ability of microbes to take advantage of such favourable thermodynamic conditions? And has such a diverse set of physical and chemical environments fostered microbal diversity, rather than phylogenetic specialization, as recent research into deep Mediterranean brine systems seems to indicate ? Over three kilometres in thickness, approaching the known temperature limits of life and with fluids precipitating carbonate, sulphate, halite and potash salts, microbes living within and around the MSC Salt Giant will be subject to the most exotic combinations of extremes, and have likely evolved yet unknown adaptations. Gypsum and Halite crystals contain fluid inclusions that are a micro-habitat in which microbes survive for tens of thousands, to possibly millions, of years, posing the fundamental question of cells devoting nearly all of their energy flow to somatic maintenance needs, rather than growth and

  10. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-14

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.