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Sample records for active magnesium chelatase

  1. Role of Magnesium Chelatase Activity in the Early Steps of the Tetrapyrrole Biosynthetic Pathway1

    PubMed Central

    Papenbrock, Jutta; Mock, Hans-Peter; Tanaka, Ryouichi; Kruse, Elisabeth; Grimm, Bernhard

    2000-01-01

    Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX chelatase (Mg-chelatase) is located at the branchpoint of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, at which point protoporphyrin IX is distributed for the synthesis of chlorophyll and heme. We investigated the regulatory contribution of Mg-chelatase to the flow of metabolites. In plants, the enzyme complex consists of three subunits, designated CHL D, CHL I, and CHL H. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants expressing antisense RNA for the Mg-chelatase subunit CHL H were analyzed to elucidate further the role of Mg-chelatase in the distribution of protoporphyrin IX into the branched tetrapyrrolic pathway. The transgenic plants displayed a reduced growth rate and chlorophyll deficiency. Both phenotypical properties were correlated with lower Mg-chelatase activity. Unexpectedly, less protoporphyrin IX and heme accumulated, and a decrease in 5-aminolevulinate (ALA)-synthesizing capacity and ALA dehydratase activity paralleled the progressive reduction in Mg-chelatase activity in the transformants compared with control plants. The reduced activities of the early enzymatic steps corresponded with lower levels of transcripts encoding glutamyl-tRNA reductase and ALA-dehydratase. The decreased expression and activities of early enzymes in the pathway could be explained by a feedback-controlled mechanism in response to lower Mg-chelatase activity. We discuss intercompartmental signaling that synchronizes the activities of the first steps in tetrapyrrolic metabolism with the late steps for the synthesis of end products. PMID:10759511

  2. The magnesium-chelatase in developing cucumber cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Mg-chelatase in chloroplasts catalyzes the insertion of Mg into protoporphyrin. This step is the first in the tetrapyrrole pathway unique to chlorophyll biosynthesis. Mg-chelatase was assayed in semi-green cucumber cotyledons by an adaptation of the method of Fuesler at al, (1984) Plant Physiol. 74, 928-933. Plastid intactness was essential for Mg-chelatase activity. The estimated Km for the protoporphyrin substrate was between 0.5 and 1.0 {mu}M. In the presence of 4 mM ATP and an ATP regenerating system, activities of 500 pmol Mg-Protoporphyrin/mg protein/20 min were routinely recorded. In greening cotyledons, the specific activity of the Mg-chelatase increased steadily until the chlorophyll content of the plastids reached about 30 nmol/mg plastid protein, at which point further greening caused a decrease in Mg-chelatase activity. The total heme content of the plastids also rose with greening and paralleled the increase in Mg-chelatase activity. The regulation of heme levels and Mg-chelatase activity in greening cotyledons will be discussed. Substrate specificity studies showed that mesoporphyrin and deuteroporphyrin were active substrates for Mg chelation. The Mg-chelatase was not inhibited by its product, Mg-Protoporphyrin, but was inhibited by N-methyl mesoporphyrin (I{sub 50} = 2.5 {mu}M). Mg-chelatase activity was also measured in fully mature pea and corn chloroplasts (grown under diurnal light); the specific activities were comparable with those in cucumber.

  3. The catalytic power of magnesium chelatase: a benchmark for the AAA(+) ATPases.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nathan B P; Brindley, Amanda A; Hunter, C Neil; Reid, James D

    2016-06-01

    In the first committed reaction of chlorophyll biosynthesis, magnesium chelatase couples ATP hydrolysis to the thermodynamically unfavorable Mg(2+) insertion into protoporphyrin IX (ΔG°' of circa 25-33 kJ·mol(-1) ). We explored the thermodynamic constraints on magnesium chelatase and demonstrate the effect of nucleotide hydrolysis on both the reaction kinetics and thermodynamics. The enzyme produces a significant rate enhancement (kcat /kuncat of 400 × 10(6) m) and a catalytic rate enhancement, kcat/KmDIXK0.5Mgkuncat, of 30 × 10(15) m(-1) , increasing to 300 × 10(15) m(-1) with the activator protein Gun4. This is the first demonstration of the thermodynamic benefit of ATP hydrolysis in the AAA(+) family. PMID:27176620

  4. Further characterization of the magnesium chelatase in isolated developing cucumber chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-04-01

    Mg-chelatase catalyzes the first step unique to the chlorophyll branch of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, namely the insertion of Mg into protoporphyrin IX (Proto). Mg-chelatase was assayed in intact chloroplasts from semi-green cucumber (Cucumis sativus, cv Sumter) cotyledons. In the presence of Proto and MgATP, enzyme activity was linear for 50 minutes. Plastid intactness was directly related to (and necessary for) Mg-chelatase activity. Uncouplers and ionophores did not inhibit Mg-chelatase in the presence of ATP. The nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs, {beta},{gamma}-methylene ATP and adenylylimidodiphosphate, could not sustain Mg-chelatase activity alone and were inhibitory in the presence of ATP (I{sub 50} 10 and 3 millimolar, respectively). Mg-chelatase was also inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide (I{sub 50}, 50 micromolar) and the metal ion chelators 2,2{prime}-dipyridyl and 1,10 phenanthroline (but not to the same degree by their nonchelating analogs). In addition to Proto, the following porphyrins acted as Mg-chelatase substrates, giving comparable specific activities: deuteroporphyrin, mesoporphyrin, 2-ethyl, 4-vinyl Proto and 2-vinyl, 4-ethyl Proto. Mg-chelatase activity and freely exchangeable heme levels increased steadily with greening, reaching a maximum and leveling off after 15 hours in the light. Exogenous protochlorophyllide, chlorophyllide, heme, and Mg-Proto had no measurable effect on Mg-chelatase activity. The potent ferrochelatase inhibitors, N-methylmesoporphyrin and N-methylprotoporphyrin, inhibited Mg-chelatase at micromolar concentrations.

  5. Three semidominant barley mutants with single amino acid substitutions in the smallest magnesium chelatase subunit form defective AAA+ hexamers

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, A.; Willows, R. D.; Roberts, T. H.; Hansson, M.

    2002-01-01

    Many enzymes of the bacteriochlorophyll and chlorophyll biosynthesis pathways have been conserved throughout evolution, but the molecular mechanisms of the key steps remain unclear. The magnesium chelatase reaction is one of these steps, and it requires the proteins BchI, BchD, and BchH to catalyze the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX upon ATP hydrolysis. Structural analyses have shown that BchI forms hexamers and belongs to the ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) family of proteins. AAA+ proteins are Mg2+-dependent ATPases that normally form oligomeric ring structures in the presence of ATP. By using ATPase-deficient BchI subunits, we demonstrate that binding of ATP is sufficient to form BchI oligomers. Further, ATPase-deficient BchI proteins can form mixed oligomers with WT BchI. The formation of BchI oligomers is not sufficient for magnesium chelatase activity when combined with BchD and BchH. Combining WT BchI with ATPase-deficient BchI in an assay disrupts the chelatase reaction, but the presence of deficient BchI does not inhibit ATPase activity of the WT BchI. Thus, the ATPase of every WT segment of the hexamer is autonomous, but all segments of the hexamer must be capable of ATP hydrolysis for magnesium chelatase activity. We suggest that ATP hydrolysis of each BchI within the hexamer causes a conformational change of the hexamer as a whole. However, hexamers containing ATPase-deficient BchI are unable to perform this ATP-dependent conformational change, and the magnesium chelatase reaction is stalled in an early stage. PMID:12357035

  6. An organelle-free assay for pea chloroplast Mg-chelatase: Resolution of the activity into soluble and membrane bound fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Mg-chelatase, which catalyzes the insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin, lies at the branchpoint of heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis in chloroplasts. Since magnesium chelation is the first step unique to chlorophyll synthesis, one would expect this step to be highly regulated. However, to date little is known about the enzymology or regulation of Mg-chelatase due mostly to an inability to assay it's activity outside of the intact plastid. Here the authors report the first truly in vitro i.e. organelle-free, assay for Mg-chelatase. Mg-chelatase activity in intact pea chloroplasts which is 3 to 4 fold higher than in cucumber chloroplasts, survived chloroplast lysis and could be fractionated, by centrifugation, into supernatant and pellet components. Both of these fractions were required to reconstitute Mg-chelatase activity and both were inactivated by boiling; indicating that the enzyme is composed of soluble and membrane bound protein(s). The specific activity of the reconstituted system was typically 1 nmol Mg-Deuteroporphyrin/h/mg protein and activity was linear for at least 60 min under our assay conditions. ATP and magnesium were required for Mg-chelatase activity. The soluble component could be fractionated with ammonium sulfate. The product of the reaction was confirmed fluorometrically as the magnesium chelate of the porphyrin substrate. Crude separation of chloroplast membranes into thylakoids and envelopes, suggested that the membrane-bound component of Mg-chelatase is probably located in the envelope.

  7. In vitro assay of the chlorophyll biosynthetic enzyme Mg-chelatase: Resolution of the activity into soluble and membrane-bound fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-07-01

    The first committed step in chlorophyll synthesis is the Mg-chelatase-catalyzed insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin IX. Since iron insertion into protoporphyrin leads to heme formation, Mg-chelatase lies at the branch point of heme and chlorophyll synthesis in chloroplasts. Little is known about the enzymology or regulation of Mg-chelatase, as it has been assayed only in intact cucumber chloroplasts. In this report we describe an in vitro assay for Mg-chelatase. Mg-chelatase activity in intact pea chloroplasts was 3- to 4-fold higher than in cucumber chloroplasts. This activity survived chloroplast lysis and could be fractionated by centrifugation into supernatant and pellet components. Both of these fractions were required to reconstitute Mg-chelatase activity, and both were inactivated by boiling indicating that the enzyme is composed of soluble and membrane-bound protein(s). The product of the reaction was confirmed fluorometrically as the magnesium chelate of the porphyrin substrate. The specific activity of the reconstituted system was typically 1 nmol of Mg-deuteroporphyrin per h per mg of protein, and activity was linear for at least 60 min under our assay conditions. ATP and magnesium were required for Mg-chelatase activity and the enzymen was sensitive to the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide (I{sub 50}, 20 {mu}M). Broken and reconstituted cucumber chloroplasts were unable to maintain Mg-chelatase activity. However, the cucumber supernatant fraction was active when combined with the pellet fraction of peas; the converse was not true, which suggested that the cucumber pellet was the component that lost activity during lysis.

  8. Nanomechanical and Thermophoretic Analyses of the Nucleotide-Dependent Interactions between the AAA+ Subunits of Magnesium Chelatase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In chlorophyll biosynthesis, the magnesium chelatase enzyme complex catalyzes the insertion of a Mg2+ ion into protoporphyrin IX. Prior to this event, two of the three subunits, the AAA+ proteins ChlI and ChlD, form a ChlID–MgATP complex. We used microscale thermophoresis to directly determine dissociation constants for the I-D subunits from Synechocystis, and to show that the formation of a ChlID–MgADP complex, mediated by the arginine finger and the sensor II domain on ChlD, is necessary for the assembly of the catalytically active ChlHID–MgATP complex. The N-terminal AAA+ domain of ChlD is essential for complex formation, but some stability is preserved in the absence of the C-terminal integrin domain of ChlD, particularly if the intervening polyproline linker region is retained. Single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used to determine the factors that stabilize formation of the ChlID–MgADP complex at the single molecule level; ChlD was attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe in two different orientations, and the ChlI subunits were tethered to a silica surface; the probability of subunits interacting more than doubled in the presence of MgADP, and we show that the N-terminal AAA+ domain of ChlD mediates this process, in agreement with the microscale thermophoresis data. Analysis of the unbinding data revealed a most probable interaction force of around 109 pN for formation of single ChlID–MgADP complexes. These experiments provide a quantitative basis for understanding the assembly and function of the Mg chelatase complex. PMID:27133226

  9. Nanomechanical and Thermophoretic Analyses of the Nucleotide-Dependent Interactions between the AAA(+) Subunits of Magnesium Chelatase.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nathan B P; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Brindley, Amanda A; Hunter, C Neil

    2016-05-25

    In chlorophyll biosynthesis, the magnesium chelatase enzyme complex catalyzes the insertion of a Mg(2+) ion into protoporphyrin IX. Prior to this event, two of the three subunits, the AAA(+) proteins ChlI and ChlD, form a ChlID-MgATP complex. We used microscale thermophoresis to directly determine dissociation constants for the I-D subunits from Synechocystis, and to show that the formation of a ChlID-MgADP complex, mediated by the arginine finger and the sensor II domain on ChlD, is necessary for the assembly of the catalytically active ChlHID-MgATP complex. The N-terminal AAA(+) domain of ChlD is essential for complex formation, but some stability is preserved in the absence of the C-terminal integrin domain of ChlD, particularly if the intervening polyproline linker region is retained. Single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used to determine the factors that stabilize formation of the ChlID-MgADP complex at the single molecule level; ChlD was attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe in two different orientations, and the ChlI subunits were tethered to a silica surface; the probability of subunits interacting more than doubled in the presence of MgADP, and we show that the N-terminal AAA(+) domain of ChlD mediates this process, in agreement with the microscale thermophoresis data. Analysis of the unbinding data revealed a most probable interaction force of around 109 pN for formation of single ChlID-MgADP complexes. These experiments provide a quantitative basis for understanding the assembly and function of the Mg chelatase complex. PMID:27133226

  10. Magnesium chelatase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides: initial characterization of the enzyme using purified subunits and evidence for a BchI-BchD complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, L C; Jensen, P E; Hunter, C N

    1999-01-01

    The enzyme magnesium-protoporphyrin IX chelatase (Mg chelatase) catalyses the insertion of Mg into protoporphyrin IX, the first committed step in (bacterio)chlorophyll biosynthesis. In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, this reaction is catalysed by the products of the bchI, bchD and bchH genes. These genes have been expressed in Escherichia coli so that the BchI, BchD and BchH proteins are produced with N-terminal His6 affinity tags, which has led to the production of large amounts of highly purified, highly active Mg chelatase subunits from a single chromatography step. Furthermore, BchD has been purifed free of contamination with the chaperone GroEL, which had proven to be a problem in the past. BchD, present largely as an insoluble protein in E. coli, was purified in 6 M urea and refolded by addition of BchI, MgCl2 and ATP, yielding highly active protein. BchI/BchD mixtures prepared in this way were used in conjunction with BchH to determine the kinetic parameters of R. sphaeroides Mg chelatase for its natural substrates. We have been able to demonstrate for the first time that BchI and BchD form a complex, and that Mg2+ and ATP are required to establish and maintain this complex. Gel filtration data suggest that BchI and BchD form a complex of molecular mass 200 kDa in the presence of Mg2+ and ATP. Our data suggest that, in vivo, BchD is only folded correctly and maintained in its correct conformation in the presence of BchI, Mg2+ and ATP. PMID:9882621

  11. Identical Substitutions in Magnesium Chelatase Paralogs Result in Chlorophyll-Deficient Soybean Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Benjamin W.; Mani, Dhananjay; Curtin, Shaun J.; Slattery, Rebecca A.; Michno, Jean-Michel; Ort, Donald R.; Schaus, Philip J.; Palmer, Reid G.; Orf, James H.; Stupar, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    The soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] chlorophyll-deficient line MinnGold is a spontaneous mutant characterized by yellow foliage. Map-based cloning and transgenic complementation revealed that the mutant phenotype is caused by a nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution in the third exon of a Mg-chelatase subunit gene (ChlI1a) on chromosome 13. This gene was selected as a candidate for a different yellow foliage mutant, T219H (Y11y11), that had been previously mapped to chromosome 13. Although the phenotypes of MinnGold and T219H are clearly distinct, sequencing of ChlI1a in T219H identified a different nonsynonymous mutation in the third exon, only six base pairs from the MinnGold mutation. This information, along with previously published allelic tests, were used to identify and clone a third yellow foliage mutation, CD-5, which was previously mapped to chromosome 15. This mutation was identified in the ChlI1b gene, a paralog of ChlI1a. Sequencing of the ChlI1b allele in CD-5 identified a nonsynonymous substitution in the third exon that confers an identical amino acid change as the T219H substitution at ChlI1a. Protein sequence alignments of the two Mg-chelatase subunits indicated that the sites of amino acid modification in MinnGold, T219H, and CD-5 are highly conserved among photosynthetic species. These results suggest that amino acid alterations in this critical domain may create competitive inhibitory interactions between the mutant and wild-type ChlI1a and ChlI1b proteins. PMID:25452420

  12. Structural and functional consequences of removing the N-terminal domain from the magnesium chelatase ChlH subunit of Thermosynechococcus elongatus

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Nathan B. P.; Marklew, Christopher J.; Qian, Pu; Brindley, Amanda A.; Davison, Paul A.; Bullough, Per A.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium chelatase (MgCH) initiates chlorophyll biosynthesis by catalysing the ATP-dependent insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin. This large enzyme complex comprises ChlH, I and D subunits, with I and D involved in ATP hydrolysis, and H the protein that handles the substrate and product. The 148 kDa ChlH subunit has a globular N-terminal domain attached by a narrow linker to a hollow cage-like structure. Following deletion of this ~18 kDa domain from the Thermosynechoccus elongatus ChlH, we used single particle reconstruction to show that the apo- and porphyrin-bound forms of the mutant subunit consist of a hollow globular protein with three connected lobes; superposition of the mutant and native ChlH structures shows that, despite the clear absence of the N-terminal ‘head’ region, the rest of the protein appears to be correctly folded. Analyses of dissociation constants shows that the ΔN159ChlH mutant retains the ability to bind protoporphyrin and the Gun4 enhancer protein, although the addition of I and D subunits yields an extremely impaired active enzyme complex. Addition of the Gun4 enhancer protein, which stimulates MgCH activity significantly especially at low Mg2+ concentrations, partially reactivates the ΔN159ChlH–I–D mutant enzyme complex, suggesting that the binding site or sites for Gun4 on H do not wholly depend on the N-terminal domain. PMID:25471602

  13. Color formation in nitrite-free dried hams as related to Zn-protoporphyrin IX and Zn-chelatase activity.

    PubMed

    Parolari, Giovanni; Benedini, Riccardo; Toscani, Tania

    2009-08-01

    The development of red pigment Zn-protoporphyrin IX (ZPP) in nitrite-free Parma hams was investigated in 5 leg muscles at several stages of processing and the activity of muscle Zn-chelatase was concurrently assayed for its potential role in ZPP formation. A steady increase of the pigment was observed throughout the manufacturing stages at mild temperatures while no development was observed during the prior cold resting phase. The enzyme was partly inactivated according to a muscle-dependent pattern, resulting in similar ZPP contents, hence color, in finished hams. It is concluded that enzyme-dependent synthesis of ZPP in nitrite-free dried hams contributes to color development, enabling muscles in dried hams to become more similar in redness than in green thighs. Therefore, checking raw meat for the enzyme content may be a means to control color formation in nitrite-free dry-cured meat derivatives. PMID:19723176

  14. A link between magnesium-chelatase H subunit and sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase SnRK2.6/OST1 in Arabidopsis guard cell signalling in response to abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shan; Lu, Kai; Wu, Zhen; Jiang, Shang-Chuan; Yu, Yong-Tao; Bi, Chao; Xin, Qi; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium-chelatase H subunit [CHLH/putative abscisic acid (ABA) receptor ABAR] positively regulates guard cell signalling in response to ABA, but the molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. A member of the sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase 2 family, SnRK2.6/open stomata 1 (OST1)/SRK2E, which plays a critical role in ABA signalling in Arabidopsis guard cells, interacts with ABAR/CHLH. Neither mutation nor over-expression of the ABAR gene affects significantly ABA-insensitive phenotypes of stomatal movement in the OST1 knockout mutant allele srk2e. However, OST1 over-expression suppresses ABA-insensitive phenotypes of the ABAR mutant allele cch in stomatal movement. These genetic data support that OST1 functions downstream of ABAR in ABA signalling in guard cells. Consistent with this, ABAR protein is phosphorylated, but independently of the OST1 protein kinase. Two ABAR mutant alleles, cch and rtl1, show ABA insensitivity in ABA-induced reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production, as well as in ABA-activated phosphorylation of a K+ inward channel KAT1 in guard cells, which is consistent with that observed in the pyr1 pyl1 pyl2 pyl4 quadruple mutant of the well-characterized ABA receptor PYR/PYL/RCAR family acting upstream of OST1. These findings suggest that ABAR shares, at least in part, downstream signalling components with PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors for ABA in guard cells; though cch and rtl1 show strong ABA-insensitive phenotypes in both ABA-induced stomatal closure and inhibition of stomatal opening, while the pyr1 pyl1 pyl2 pyl4 quadruple mutant shows strong ABA insensitivity only in ABA-induced stomatal closure. These data establish a link between ABAR/CHLH and SnRK2.6/OST1 in guard cell signalling in response to ABA. PMID:26175350

  15. A link between magnesium-chelatase H subunit and sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase SnRK2.6/OST1 in Arabidopsis guard cell signalling in response to abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shan; Lu, Kai; Wu, Zhen; Jiang, Shang-Chuan; Yu, Yong-Tao; Bi, Chao; Xin, Qi; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium-chelatase H subunit [CHLH/putative abscisic acid (ABA) receptor ABAR] positively regulates guard cell signalling in response to ABA, but the molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. A member of the sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase 2 family, SnRK2.6/open stomata 1 (OST1)/SRK2E, which plays a critical role in ABA signalling in Arabidopsis guard cells, interacts with ABAR/CHLH. Neither mutation nor over-expression of the ABAR gene affects significantly ABA-insensitive phenotypes of stomatal movement in the OST1 knockout mutant allele srk2e. However, OST1 over-expression suppresses ABA-insensitive phenotypes of the ABAR mutant allele cch in stomatal movement. These genetic data support that OST1 functions downstream of ABAR in ABA signalling in guard cells. Consistent with this, ABAR protein is phosphorylated, but independently of the OST1 protein kinase. Two ABAR mutant alleles, cch and rtl1, show ABA insensitivity in ABA-induced reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production, as well as in ABA-activated phosphorylation of a K(+) inward channel KAT1 in guard cells, which is consistent with that observed in the pyr1 pyl1 pyl2 pyl4 quadruple mutant of the well-characterized ABA receptor PYR/PYL/RCAR family acting upstream of OST1. These findings suggest that ABAR shares, at least in part, downstream signalling components with PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors for ABA in guard cells; though cch and rtl1 show strong ABA-insensitive phenotypes in both ABA-induced stomatal closure and inhibition of stomatal opening, while the pyr1 pyl1 pyl2 pyl4 quadruple mutant shows strong ABA insensitivity only in ABA-induced stomatal closure. These data establish a link between ABAR/CHLH and SnRK2.6/OST1 in guard cell signalling in response to ABA. PMID:26175350

  16. The magnesium chelation step in chlorophyll biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The biogenesis of energy transducing membranes requires the coordinate synthesis of prosthetic groups, proteins and lipids. Two of the major prosthetic groups, chlorophyll and heme, share a common biosynthetic pathway that diverges at the point of metal insertion into protoporphyrin IX. Insertion of iron leads to heme, while insertion of magnesium leads to chlorophyll. The Mg-chelatase from intact cucumber chloroplasts has been characterized with regard to substrate specificity, regulation, ATP requirement, and a requirement for intact chloroplasts. Mg-chelatase was isolated from maize, barley and peas and characterized in order to circumvent the intact chloroplast requirement of cucumber Mg-chelatase. Pea Mg-chelatase activity is higher than cucumber Mg-chelatase activity, and lacks the requirement for intact chloroplasts. Studies on isolated pea Mg-chelatase have shown more cofactors are required for the reaction than are seen with ferrochelatase, indicating a greater opportunity for regulatory control of this pathway. Two of the cofactors are proteins, and there appears to be a requirement for a protease-sensitive component which is outside the outer envelope. We are developing a continuous spectrophotometric assay for Mg-chelatase activity, and an assay for free heme which has shown heme efflux from intact chloroplasts. 18 refs. (MHB)

  17. Mg-chelatase of tobacco: The role of the subunit CHL D in the chelation step of protoporphyrin IX

    PubMed Central

    Gräfe, Susanna; Saluz, Hans-Peter; Grimm, Bernhard; Hänel, Frank

    1999-01-01

    The Mg-chelation is found to be a prerequisite to direct protoporphyrin IX into the chlorophyll (Chl)-synthesizing branch of the tetrapyrrol pathway. The ATP-dependent insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin IX is catalyzed by the enzyme Mg-chelatase, which consists of three protein subunits (CHL D, CHL I, and CHL H). We have chosen the Mg-chelatase from tobacco to obtain more information about the mode of molecular action of this complex enzyme by elucidating the interactions in vitro and in vivo between the central subunit CHL D and subunits CHL I and CHL H. We dissected CHL D in defined peptide fragments and assayed for the essential part of CHL D for protein–protein interaction and enzyme activity. Surprisingly, only a small part of CHL D, i.e., 110 aa, was required for interaction with the partner subunits and maintenance of the enzyme activity. In addition, it could be demonstrated that CHL D is capable of forming homodimers. Moreover, it interacted with both CHL I and CHL H. Our data led to the outline of a two-step model based on the cooperation of the subunits for the chelation process. PMID:10051574

  18. Magnesium

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements are available? Magnesium is available in multivitamin-mineral supplements and other dietary supplements . Forms of magnesium ... higher intakes of magnesium have a higher bone mineral density , which is important in reducing the risk ...

  19. Nickel(II) Chelatase Variants Directly Evolved from Murine Ferrochelatase: Porphyrin Distortion and Kinetic Mechanism†

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Neil R.; Franco, Ricardo; Shelnutt, John A.; Ferreira, Gloria C.

    2011-01-01

    The heme biosynthetic pathway culminates with the ferrochelatase-catalyzed ferrous iron chelation into protoporphyrin IX to form protoheme. The catalytic mechanism of ferrochelatase has been proposed to involve the stabilization of a nonplanar porphyrin to present the pyrrole nitrogens to the metal ion substrate. Previously, we hypothesized that the ferrochelatase-induced nonplanar distortions of the porphyrin substrate impose selectivity for the divalent metal ion incorporated into the porphyrin ring and facilitate the release of the metalated porphyrin through its reduced affinity for the enzyme. Using resonance Raman spectroscopy, the structural properties of porphyrins bound to the active site of directly evolved Ni-chelatase variants are now examined with regard to the mode and extent of porphyrin deformation and related to the catalytic properties of the enzymes. The Ni2+-chelatase variants (S143T, F323L, and S143T/F323L), which were directly evolved to exhibit an enhanced Ni2+-chelatase activity over that of the parent wild-type ferrochelatase, induced a weaker saddling deformation of the porphyrin substrate. Steady-state kinetic parameters of the evolved variants for Ni2+- and Fe2+-chelatase activities increased compared to those of wild-type ferrochelatase. In particular, the reduced porphyrin saddling deformation correlated with increased catalytic efficiency toward the metal ion substrate (Ni2+ or Fe2+). The results lead us to propose that the decrease in the induced protoporphyrin IX saddling mode is associated with a less stringent metal ion preference by ferrochelatase and a slower porphyrin chelation step. PMID:21222436

  20. Effect of magnesium ion on human osteoblast activity

    PubMed Central

    He, L.Y.; Zhang, X.M.; Liu, B.; Tian, Y.; Ma, W.H.

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium, a promising biodegradable metal, has been reported in several studies to increase bone formation. Although there is some information regarding the concentrations of magnesium ions that affect bone remodeling at a cellular level, little is known about the effect of magnesium ions on cell gap junctions. Therefore, this study aimed to systematically investigate the effects of different concentrations of magnesium on bone cells, and further evaluate its effect on gap junctions of osteoblasts. Cultures of normal human osteoblasts were treated with magnesium ions at concentrations of 1, 2 and 3 mM, for 24, 48 and 72 h. The effects of magnesium ions on viability and function of normal human osteoblasts and on gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in osteoblasts were investigated. Magnesium ions induced significant (P<0.05) increases in cell viability, alkaline phosphate activity and osteocalcin levels of human osteoblasts. These stimulatory actions were positively associated with the concentration of magnesium and the time of exposure. Furthermore, the GJIC of osteoblasts was significantly promoted by magnesium ions. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that magnesium ions induced the activity of osteoblasts by enhancing GJIC between cells, and influenced bone formation. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the influence of magnesium on bone remodeling and to the advance of its application in clinical practice. PMID:27383121

  1. A Magnesium-Activated Carbon Hybrid Capacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, HD; Shterenberg, I; Gofer, Y; Doe, RE; Fischer, CC; Ceder, G; Aurbach, D

    2013-12-11

    Prototype cells of hybrid capacitor were developed, comprising activated carbon (AC) cloth and magnesium (Mg) foil as the positive and negative electrodes, respectively. The electrolyte solution included ether solvent (TBF) and a magnesium organo-halo-aluminate complex 0.25 M Mg2Cl3+-Ph2AlCl2-. In this solution Mg can be deposited/dissolved reversibly for thousands of cycles with high reversibility (100% cycling efficiency). The main barrier for integrating porous AC electrodes with this electrolyte solution was the saturation of the pores with the large ions in the AC prior to reaching the potential limit. This is due to the existence of bulky Mg and Al based ionic complexes consisting Cl, alkyl or aryl (R), and THF ligands. This problem was resolved by adding 0.5 M of lithium chloride (LiCl), thus introducing smaller ionic species to the solution. This Mg hybrid capacitor system demonstrated a stable cycle performance for many thousands of cycles with a specific capacitance of 90 Fg(-1) for the AC positive electrodes along a potential range of 2.4 V. (C) 2014 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnesium Based Materials and their Antimicrobial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Duane Allan

    The overall goals of this body of work were to characterize the antimicrobial properties of magnesium (Mg) metal and nano-magnesium oxide (nMgO) in vitro, to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity of Mg metal, and to incorporate MgO nanoparticles into a polymeric implant coating and evaluate its in vitro antimicrobial properties. In the course of this work it was found that Mg metal, Mg-mesh, and nMgO have in vitro antimicrobial properties that are similar to a bactericidal antibiotic. For Mg metal, the mechanism of this activity appears to be related to an increase in pH (i.e. a more alkaline environment) and not an increase in Mg2+. Given that Mg-mesh is a Mg metal powder, the assumption is that it has the same mechanism of activity as Mg metal. The mechanism of activity for nMgO remains to be elucidated and may be related to a combination of interaction of the nanoparticles with the bacteria and the alkaline pH. It was further demonstrated that supernatants from suspensions of Mg-mesh and nMgO had the same antimicrobial effect as was noted when the particles were used. The supernatant from Mg-mesh and nMgO was also noted to prevent biofilm formation for two Staphylococcus strains. Finally, poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) composites of Mg-mesh (PCL+Mg-mesh) and nMgO (PCL+nMgO) were produced. Coatings applied to screws inhibited growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in thin disc format inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus in addition to the E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Pure Mg metal was noted to have some cytotoxic effect on murine fibroblast and osteoblast cell lines, although this effect needs to be characterized further. To address the need for an in vivo model for evaluating implant associated infections, a new closed fracture osteomyelitis model in the femur of the rat was developed. Magnesium, a readily available and inexpensive metal was shown to have antimicrobial properties that appear to be related to its corrosion products and

  3. Mechanism of the Mg-chelatase step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Jon

    2002-05-02

    Mg-chelatase catalyzes the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin-IX (Proto) in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. This is the first step unique to the chlorophyll pathway and is at the branchpoint between heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that the enzyme from pea chloroplasts requires three distinct protein fractions (now known to contain the D, I and H subunits). The reaction requires ATP in two distinct steps: activation requiring two of the fractions (I and D) and metal ion insertion, requiring all three fractions. Work covered in this granting period includes the cloning and expression of the active form of one of the pea subunits and demonstration of the change in chromatographic behavior of the subunits upon activation with ATP.

  4. Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, H.; Bulian, W.; Bungardt, K.; Gürs, K.; Gürs, U.; Helling, W.; Kyri, H.; Laue, H. J.; Mahler, W.; Matting, A.; Meyer, F. R.; Mialki, W.; Ritter, F.; Ruge, J.; Saur, G.; Simon, W.; Strnat, K.; Weber, R.; Weigand, H. H.; Weik, H.; Ziesler, H.; Borchers, Heinz; Schmidt, Ernst

    Magnesium wird überwiegend durch Schmelzflußelektrolyse hergestellt. Das dabei anfallende Reinmagnesium hat einen Mg-Gehalt von etwa 99,9%. Hauptbeimengung ist das Eisen; Silizium und Aluminium sind nur in Spuren vorhanden. Der Anwendungsumfang des Reinmagnesiums ist gering; dagegen werden Magnesiumlegierungen zunehmend, insbesondere für den Druckguß verwendet. Neben den bis etwa zum Jahre 1950 allein gebräuchlichen Mg-Mn-, Mg-Al- und Mg-Al-Zn-Legierungen werden heute mehr und mehr die besonders warmfesten Legierungen mit Zusätzen von Zirkon, Thorium und Seltenen Erden hergestellt (siehe dazu auch Abschnitt Seltene Erden). Als Umhüllungsmaterial für Uranstäbe dient die Legierung Magnox A 12, die nach [H 3] neben 1 % Al noch geringe Mengen an Ca und Ba enthält. In den in Deutschland üblichen Kurzzeichen (DIN 1729) werden die chemischen Symbole und der ungefähre Gehalt der wichtigsten Legierungselemente angegeben. Gußlegierungen werden zusätzlich durch ein G (Sandguß oder Kokillenguß) oder ein D (Druckguß) gekennzeichnet (siehe Tab. 5).

  5. Effect of the conditions of activation of magnesium chloride on the substructure and composition of applied titanium-magnesium catalysts of polymerization of ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, V.A.; Perkovets, D.V.; Bukatov, G.D.; Sergeev, S.A.; Moroz, E.M.; Makhtarulin, S.I.

    1989-02-01

    The effect of the conditions of activation of magnesium chloride on the substructure and composition of applied titanium-magnesium catalysts of polymerization of ethylene was studied; the catalysts were prepared by different methods: (1) by adsorption of TiCl/sub 4/ on highly disperse magnesium chloride prepared from unsolvated butylmagnesium chloride; (2) by adsorption of TiCl/sub 4/ on magnesium chloride activated by grinding; (3) by combined grinding of magnesium chloride with titanium tetrachloride. It was shown that TiCl/sub 4/ reacts with defects in the structure of the magnesium chloride, whose concentration is correlated with the size of the regions of coherent scattering determined from x-ray data.

  6. Hemin/G-quadruplex structure and activity alteration induced by magnesium cations.

    PubMed

    Kosman, J; Juskowiak, B

    2016-04-01

    The influence of metal cations on G-quadruplex structure and peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme activity was investigated. Experiments revealed a significant role of magnesium ion, which in the presence of potassium cation influenced DNAzyme activity. This ability has been associated with alteration of G-quadruplex topology and consequently affinity to bind hemin molecule. It has been demonstrated that G-quadruplex based on PS2.M sequence under these conditions formed parallel topology, which exhibited lower activity than that observed in standard potassium-containing solution. On the other hand DNAzyme/magnesium ion system based on telomeric sequence, which did not undergo significant structural changes, exhibited higher peroxidase activity upon magnesium ion addition. In both cases, the stabilization effect of magnesium cations on G-quadruplex structure was observed. The mechanism of DNAzyme activity alteration by magnesium ion can be explained by its influence on the pKa value of DNAzyme. Magnesium ion decreased pKa for PS2.M based system but increased it for telomeric DNAzyme. Magnesium cation effect on G-quadruplex structure as well as DNAzyme activity is particularly important since this ion is one of the most common metal cations in biological samples. PMID:26778160

  7. Extracellular magnesium and calcium blockers modulate macrophage activity.

    PubMed

    Libako, Patrycja; Nowacki, Wojciech; Castiglioni, Sara; Mazur, Andrzej; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) possesses anti-inflammatory properties, partly because it antagonizes calcium (Ca) and inhibits L-type Ca channels. Our aim was to determine the effects of different concentrations of extracellular Mg, with or without Ca-channel blockers, in macrophages. A macrophage-like cell line J774.E was cultured in different concentrations of extracellular Mg and exposed to i) the phorbol ester PMA to induce the production of reactive oxygen species ii) lipopolysaccharide to induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, or iii) ovalbumin to study endocytosis. The Ca antagonists verapamil and/or TMB-8 were used to interfere with Ca homeostasis. Different concentrations of extracellular Mg did not impact on endocytosis, while Ca antagonists markedly decreased it. Low extracellular Mg exacerbated, whereas Ca antagonists inhibited, PMA-induced production of free radicals. Ca blockers prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription and release of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, while extracellular Mg had only a marginal effect. Ca channel inhibitors markedly reduced the activity of J774.E cells, thus underscoring the critical role of Ca in the non-specific immune response, a role which was, in some instances, also modulated by extracellular Mg. PMID:27160489

  8. Identical substitutions in magnesium chelatase paralogs result in chlorophyll deficient soybean mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) chlorophyll deficient line MinnGold is a spontaneous mutant characterized by yellow foliage. Map-based cloning and transgenic complementation revealed that the mutant phenotype is caused by a non-synonymous nucleotide substitution in the third exon of a Mg-chelat...

  9. Efficacy of activated charcoal and magnesium citrate in the treatment of oral paraquat intoxication.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, P; Friedman, P A; Lovejoy, F H

    1985-02-01

    The binding capacity of activated charcoal for paraquat was evaluated in vitro and in vivo and compared with Fuller's earth. In vitro activated charcoal absorbs paraquat and is as effective as Fuller's earth. Activated charcoal's absorbing capacity for paraquat is increased when it is suspended in magnesium citrate and is maximal at pH 7.8. Paraquat (200 mg/kg) administered orally to male mice, followed 30 minutes later by activated charcoal, Fuller's earth (4 gm/kg), and magnesium citrate (0.01 cc/gm) resulted in a survival rate of 31% in the controls, 63% in the activated charcoal and Fuller's earth groups, and 69% in the magnesium citrate group (P values not significant). When activated charcoal was administered concomitantly with magnesium citrate, the survival rate was improved significantly to 94% (P less than 0.01). The efficacy and greater availability of activated charcoal and magnesium citrate make these materials the treatment of choice for gastrointestinal decontamination in oral paraquat poisoning. PMID:3970396

  10. Magnesium ions increase the activity of Bacillus deramificans pullulanase expressed by Brevibacillus choshinensis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chun; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Addition of MgCl2 to the culture medium has been found to dramatically increase the activity of Bacillus deramificans pullulanase expressed by Brevibacillus choshinensis. The specific activity of the pullulanase obtained from medium supplemented with MgCl2 was also higher than that obtained in culture medium without added magnesium ions. In this work, the mechanism of this increase was studied. When cultured in medium without added magnesium ions, B. choshinensis mainly produced a thermolabile, inactive form of pullulanase. The addition of magnesium ions led to the production of a thermostable, active form of pullulanase. Circular dichroism assays revealed considerable differences in secondary structure between the active and inactive pullulanase forms. Transmission electron microscopy suggested that magnesium ion addition inhibits the shedding of cell wall protein (HWP) layers from the cell surface. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that magnesium ion addition represses transcription of HWP. Because the pullulanase gene and HWP have identical promoters, pullulanase gene transcription was also inhibited. These results suggest that when pullulanase is expressed slowly, it tends to fold into an active form. PMID:27026175

  11. Antibacterial activities of magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles against foodborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antibacterial activities of magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NP) alone or in combination with other antimicrobials (nisin and ZnO NP) against E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Stanley were investigated. The results show that MgO NP have strong bactericidal activity against the pathogens, achievin...

  12. Fast neutron activation analysis of oxide inclusions in magnesium alloy ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, C. D.; James, W. D.

    1999-06-01

    Magnesium will have an increasingly important role to play in the automotive industry's materials strategy. In addition to its obvious use as a lightweight alternative, magnesium offers advantages in areas such as component integration and NVH (noise, vibration and harshness). Although the metallic composition of magnesium alloys has been carefully defined, there is no uniform industry standard for non-metallic inclusions, such as oxides, which are believed to adversely impact the material's strength. A definitive test has been needed, preferably one that provides a highly sensitive, calibrated, nondestructive evaluation of the metal's bulk oxide content. In response to this need, fast neutron activation analysis (FNAA) has emerged as an important tool for providing highly accurate quantitative information on the oxygen content in magnesium alloys. Oxygen levels from less than 50 to several thousand ppm have been observed in these alloys, with the highest levels concentrated at the top center of the ingot. Several operational procedures have been developed to optimize the analysis, including: a new automated, blank-free procedure which pneumatically transports machined magnesium cylinders between the irradiation and counting facilities; the use of an oxygen standard prepared from polyethylene and titanium dioxide, machined to match the sample dimensions; and implementation of new background subtraction software.

  13. The magnesium transporter A is activated by cardiolipin and is highly sensitive to free magnesium in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Subramani, Saranya; Perdreau-Dahl, Harmonie; Morth, Jens Preben

    2016-01-01

    The magnesium transporter A (MgtA) is a specialized P-type ATPase, believed to import Mg2+ into the cytoplasm. In Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, the virulence determining two-component system PhoQ/PhoP regulates the transcription of mgtA gene by sensing Mg2+ concentrations in the periplasm. However, the factors that affect MgtA function are not known. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that MgtA is highly dependent on anionic phospholipids and in particular, cardiolipin. Colocalization studies confirm that MgtA is found in the cardiolipin lipid domains in the membrane. The head group of cardiolipin plays major role in activation of MgtA suggesting that cardiolipin may act as a Mg2+ chaperone for MgtA. We further show that MgtA is highly sensitive to free Mg2+ (Mg2+free) levels in the solution. MgtA is activated when the Mg2+free concentration is reduced below 10 μM and is strongly inhibited above 1 mM, indicating that Mg2+free acts as product inhibitor. Combined, our findings conclude that MgtA may act as a sensor as well as a transporter of Mg2+. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11407.001 PMID:26780187

  14. Mg-chelatase I subunit 1 and Mg-protoporphyrin IX methyltransferase affect the stomatal aperture in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Masakazu; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Tsuzuki, Tomo; Soda, Midori; Morimoto, Sayuri; Okigaki, Yukiko; Ohishi, Takaya; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2014-07-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of stomatal opening and closure, we performed a genetic screen using infrared thermography to isolate stomatal aperture mutants. We identified a mutant designated low temperature with open-stomata 1 (lost1), which exhibited reduced leaf temperature, wider stomatal aperture, and a pale green phenotype. Map-based analysis of the LOST1 locus revealed that the lost1 mutant resulted from a missense mutation in the Mg-chelatase I subunit 1 (CHLI1) gene, which encodes a subunit of the Mg-chelatase complex involved in chlorophyll synthesis. Transformation of the wild-type CHLI1 gene into lost1 complemented all lost1 phenotypes. Stomata in lost1 exhibited a partial ABA-insensitive phenotype similar to that of rtl1, a Mg-chelatase H subunit missense mutant. The Mg-protoporphyrin IX methyltransferase (CHLM) gene encodes a subsequent enzyme in the chlorophyll synthesis pathway. We examined stomatal movement in a CHLM knockdown mutant, chlm, and found that it also exhibited an ABA-insensitive phenotype. However, lost1 and chlm seedlings all showed normal expression of ABA-induced genes, such as RAB18 and RD29B, in response to ABA. These results suggest that the chlorophyll synthesis enzymes, Mg-chelatase complex and CHLM, specifically affect ABA signaling in the control of stomatal aperture and have no effect on ABA-induced gene expression. PMID:24840863

  15. Enhancement of antidepressant-like activity by joint administration of imipramine and magnesium in the forced swim test: Behavioral and pharmacokinetic studies in mice.

    PubMed

    Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Kedzierska, Ewa; Wyska, Elzbieta; Librowski, Tadeusz; Szymura-Oleksiak, Joanna; Fidecka, Sylwia; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2005-07-01

    The effect of joint administration of imipramine (IMI) and magnesium (Mg) on antidepressant-like activity was studied in mice using forced swim test (FST). Mg doses ineffective per se (5 and 10 mg/kg) given jointly with IMI also at ineffective doses (10 and 15 mg/kg) resulted in a potent reduction in the immobility time. Since these combined treatments did not influence locomotor activity, the antidepressant-like activity was not due to non-specific behavioral activation. Moreover, we estimated the effect of joint administration of magnesium and IMI in FST on serum and brain magnesium, IMI and its active metabolite desipramine (DMI) concentrations in mice. Swim stress (mice subjected to FST) increased the magnesium concentration in serum and decreased it in the brain compared to naive animals. Moreover administration of IMI increased (normalized) magnesium brain concentration, without influence on the serum level. Joint administration of IMI and magnesium did not influence magnesium (compared with FST) or IMI and DMI (compared with IMI treatment alone) concentrations in both examined tissues. The present data demonstrated an enhancement of the antidepressant-like effect by joint administration of IMI and magnesium in the FST, and further indicate the particular role of magnesium in the antidepressant action. Since there was no increase in IMI, DMI or magnesium concentration after joint administration of magnesium and IMI, the data suggest that pharmacodynamic rather than pharmacokinetic interaction between magnesium and IMI is accountable for behavioral effect in the FST. PMID:15936065

  16. Magnesium Gluconate

    MedlinePlus

    Magnesium gluconate is used to treat low blood magnesium. Low blood magnesium is caused by gastrointestinal disorders, prolonged vomiting or ... disease, or certain other conditions. Certain drugs lower magnesium levels as well.This medication is sometimes prescribed ...

  17. Magnesium inhibits Wnt/β-catenin activity and reverses the osteogenic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, Addy; Guerrero, Fatima; Martinez-Moreno, Julio M; Madueño, Juan A; Herencia, Carmen; Peralta, Alan; Almaden, Yolanda; Lopez, Ignacio; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolastico; Gundlach, Kristina; Büchel, Janine; Peter, Mirjam E; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Rodriguez, Mariano; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium reduces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification in vitro but the mechanism has not been revealed so far. This work used only slightly increased magnesium levels and aimed at determining: a) whether inhibition of magnesium transport into the cell influences VSMC calcification, b) whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a key mediator of osteogenic differentiation, is modified by magnesium and c) whether magnesium can influence already established vascular calcification. Human VSMC incubated with high phosphate (3.3 mM) and moderately elevated magnesium (1.4 mM) significantly reduced VSMC calcification and expression of the osteogenic transcription factors Cbfa-1 and osterix, and up-regulated expression of the natural calcification inhibitors matrix Gla protein (MGP) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). The protective effects of magnesium on calcification and expression of osteogenic markers were no longer observed in VSMC cultured with an inhibitor of cellular magnesium transport (2-aminoethoxy-diphenylborate [2-APB]). High phosphate induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway as demonstrated by the translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus, increased expression of the frizzled-3 gene, and downregulation of Dkk-1 gene, a specific antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. The addition of magnesium however inhibited phosphate-induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Furthermore, TRPM7 silencing using siRNA resulted in activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Additional experiments were performed to test the ability of magnesium to halt the progression of already established VSMC calcification in vitro. The delayed addition of magnesium decreased calcium content, down-regulated Cbfa-1 and osterix and up-regulated MGP and OPG, when compared with a control group. This effect was not observed when 2-APB was added. In conclusion, magnesium transport through the cell membrane is important to inhibit VSMC calcification in vitro

  18. Mg chelatase in chlorophyll synthesis and retrograde signaling in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: CHLI2 cannot substitute for CHLI1

    PubMed Central

    Brzezowski, Pawel; Sharifi, Marina N.; Dent, Rachel M.; Morhard, Marius K.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The oligomeric Mg chelatase (MgCh), consisting of the subunits CHLH, CHLI, and CHLD, is located at the central site of chlorophyll synthesis, but is also thought to have an additional function in regulatory feedback control of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis pathway and in chloroplast retrograde signaling. In Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, two genes have been proposed to encode the CHLI subunit of MgCh. While the role of CHLI1 in A. thaliana MgCh has been substantially elucidated, different reports provide inconsistent results with regard to the function of CHLI2 in Mg chelation and retrograde signaling. In the present report, the possible functions of both isoforms were analyzed in C. reinhardtii. Knockout of the CHLI1 gene resulted in complete loss of MgCh activity, absence of chlorophyll, acute light sensitivity, and, as a consequence, down-regulation of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes. These observations indicate a phenotypical resemblance of chli1 to the chlh and chld C. reinhardtii mutants previously reported. The key role of CHLI1 for MgCh reaction in comparison with the second isoform was confirmed by the rescue of chli1 with genomic CHLI1. Because CHLI2 in C. reinhardtii shows lower expression than CHLI1, strains overexpressing CHLI2 were produced in the chli1 background. However, no complementation of the chli1 phenotype was observed. Silencing of CHLI2 in the wild-type background did not result in any changes in the accumulation of tetrapyrrole intermediates or of chlorophyll. The results suggest that, unlike in A. thaliana, changes in CHLI2 content observed in the present studies do not affect formation and activity of MgCh in C. reinhardtii. PMID:26809558

  19. Mg chelatase in chlorophyll synthesis and retrograde signaling in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: CHLI2 cannot substitute for CHLI1.

    PubMed

    Brzezowski, Pawel; Sharifi, Marina N; Dent, Rachel M; Morhard, Marius K; Niyogi, Krishna K; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    The oligomeric Mg chelatase (MgCh), consisting of the subunits CHLH, CHLI, and CHLD, is located at the central site of chlorophyll synthesis, but is also thought to have an additional function in regulatory feedback control of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis pathway and in chloroplast retrograde signaling. In Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, two genes have been proposed to encode the CHLI subunit of MgCh. While the role of CHLI1 in A. thaliana MgCh has been substantially elucidated, different reports provide inconsistent results with regard to the function of CHLI2 in Mg chelation and retrograde signaling. In the present report, the possible functions of both isoforms were analyzed in C. reinhardtii Knockout of the CHLI1 gene resulted in complete loss of MgCh activity, absence of chlorophyll, acute light sensitivity, and, as a consequence, down-regulation of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes. These observations indicate a phenotypical resemblance of chli1 to the chlh and chld C. reinhardtii mutants previously reported. The key role of CHLI1 for MgCh reaction in comparison with the second isoform was confirmed by the rescue of chli1 with genomic CHLI1 Because CHLI2 in C. reinhardtii shows lower expression than CHLI1, strains overexpressing CHLI2 were produced in the chli1 background. However, no complementation of the chli1 phenotype was observed. Silencing of CHLI2 in the wild-type background did not result in any changes in the accumulation of tetrapyrrole intermediates or of chlorophyll. The results suggest that, unlike in A. thaliana, changes in CHLI2 content observed in the present studies do not affect formation and activity of MgCh in C. reinhardtii. PMID:26809558

  20. Thermally activated diffusion of magnesium from bioapatite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danil'Chenko, S. N.; Kulik, A. N.; Pavlenko, P. A.; Kalinichenko, T. G.; Bugai, A. N.; Chemeris, I. I.; Sukhodub, L. F.

    2006-05-01

    We have attempted to use heat treatment followed by ultrasonic treatment to separate the apatite from the non-apatite components of bone mineral in samples from different animals. The Mg content and the Ca/P ratio in the temperature range 560°C-720°C in the samples before and after ultrasonic treatment were determined by electron-probe x-ray microanalysis. Furthermore, we used atomic absorption spectrometry to measure the Mg content in powdered bone samples only after annealing and in distilled water, which was the “sonication” medium. We obtained evidence for thermally activated transition of Mg from a structurally bound state to a labile state at 680°C-720°C. At the same temperature, the Ca-deficient apatite is transformed to stoichiometric apatite. The data presented are evidence that crystals of Ca-deficient bioapatite are surrounded by Ca-enriched surface layers. As a result of thermal transformations at 680°C-720°C, all the Mg in the biomineral is found in the non-apatite environment surrounding the crystals and is removed by ultrasonic treatment, while the surface-localized Ca penetrates into the apatite lattice, restoring its stoichiometry.

  1. Effect of Surface-active Additives on Physical Properties of Slurries of Vapor-process Magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinns, Murray L

    1955-01-01

    The presence of 3 to 5 percent surface-active additive gave the lowest Brookfield apparent viscosity, plastic viscosity, and yield value that were obtained for slurry fuels containing approximately 50 percent vapor-process magnesium in JP-1 fuel. The slurries settled little and were easily remixed. A polyoxyethylene dodecyl alcohol was the most effective of 13 additives tested in reducing the Brookfield apparent viscosity and the yield value of the slurry. The seven most effective additives all had a hydroxyl group plus an ester or polyoxethylene group in the molecule. The densities of some of the slurries were measured.

  2. Mutation of Gly195 of the ChlH Subunit of Mg-chelatase Reduces Chlorophyll and Further Disrupts PS II Assembly in a Ycf48-Deficient Strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Tim S.; Eaton-Rye, Julian J.; Summerfield, Tina C.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of the photosystems in oxygenic phototrophs requires co-translational insertion of chlorophyll a. The first committed step of chlorophyll a biosynthesis is the insertion of a Mg2+ ion into the tetrapyrrole intermediate protoporphyrin IX, catalyzed by Mg-chelatase. We have identified a Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 strain with a spontaneous mutation in chlH that results in a Gly195 to Glu substitution in a conserved region of the catalytic subunit of Mg-chelatase. Mutant strains containing the ChlH Gly195 to Glu mutation were generated using a two-step protocol that introduced the chlH gene into a putative neutral site in the chromosome prior to deletion of the native gene. The Gly195 to Glu mutation resulted in strains with decreased chlorophyll a. Deletion of the PS II assembly factor Ycf48 in a strain carrying the ChlH Gly195 to Glu mutation did not grow photoautotrophically. In addition, the ChlH-G195E:ΔYcf48 strain showed impaired PS II activity and decreased assembly of PS II centers in comparison to a ΔYcf48 strain. We suggest decreased chlorophyll in the ChlH-G195E mutant provides a background to screen for the role of assembly factors that are not essential under optimal growth conditions. PMID:27489555

  3. Convenient method of simultaneously analyzing aluminum and magnesium in pharmaceutical dosage forms using californium-252 thermal neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Landolt, R.R.; Hem, S.L.

    1983-05-01

    A commercial antacid suspension containing aluminum hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide products was used as a model sample to study the use of a californium-252 thermal neutron activation as a method for quantifying aluminum content as well as for the simultaneous assay of aluminum and magnesium. A 3.5-micrograms californium-252 source was used for the activation, and the induced aluminum-28 and magnesium-27 activity was simultaneously measured by sodium iodide crystal gamma-ray spectrometry using dual single-channel analyzers and scalers. The antacid suspension was contained in a chamber designed with the unique capability of serving as the container for counting the induced radioactivity in addition to being the irradiation chamber itself. This pilot study demonstrated that use of more intense californium-252 sources, which are commonly available, would provide a method that is competitive with the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid titration method in precision and in other aspects as well.

  4. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. L.; Hurley, M. F.; Kvryan, A.; Williams, G.; Scully, J. R.; Birbilis, N.

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes.

  5. Flower-like CoS with nanostructures as a new cathode-active material for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dong; Wu, Danni; Gao, Jing; Wu, Xiaomei; Zeng, Xiaoqin; Ding, Wenjiang

    2015-10-01

    Cobalt sulfides have become promising electrode materials for lithium ion batteries while their applications in rechargeable magnesium batteries are rarely reported. In this paper, we have done some research on the electrochemical properties of cobalt sulfide (CoS) as the cathode-active material for rechargeable magnesium batteries. Flower-like CoS with nanostructures is synthesized by a facile solvothermal route. The obvious redox peaks on the cyclic voltammetric curves confirm the possibility of applications. The galvanostatic charge-discharge tests display excellent cycle stability and high coulomb efficiency. Meanwhile, the possible mechanism of charge-discharge reactions is proposed and discussed. These results show that flower-like CoS is a promising candidate as cathode-active material for rechargeable magnesium batteries.

  6. Exogenous Magnesium Chloride Reduces the Activated Partial Thromboplastin Times of Lupus Anticoagulant-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tokutake, Takayoshi; Baba, Hisami; Shimada, Yuji; Takeda, Wataru; Sato, Keijiro; Hiroshima, Yuki; Kirihara, Takehiko; Shimizu, Ikuo; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2016-01-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay is a basic hemostatic assay based on the time it takes for clots to form in plasma samples after the addition of calcium chloride. It is used to screen for various coagulation disorders. Several previous reports have suggested that magnesium (Mg) might contribute to coagulation reactions by binding to specific coagulation proteins. We investigated the effects of Mg on the APTT. In healthy controls, the APTT was significantly prolonged in proportion to the increase in the concentration of magnesium chloride in the range from 2.1 to 16.7 mmol/L. Among eight samples from patients with various disorders that exhibited prolonged APTT, two samples demonstrated shorter APTT when Mg was added, both of which were from patients that were positive for lupus anticoagulant. When we examined 206 clinical APTT samples, we found that Mg shortened the APTT of two samples. These two samples were also from lupus anticoagulant-positive patients (p-value: <0.003). Our findings regarding the unique effects of exogenous Mg on the APTT of lupus anticoagulant-positive patients might shed light on the role of Mg in APTT assays and lead to the development of a novel screening method for lupus anticoagulant. PMID:27355205

  7. Magnesium basics

    PubMed Central

    Ketteler, Markus

    2012-01-01

    As a cofactor in numerous enzymatic reactions, magnesium fulfils various intracellular physiological functions. Thus, imbalance in magnesium status—primarily hypomagnesaemia as it is seen more often than hypermagnesaemia—might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Measuring total serum magnesium is a feasible and affordable way to monitor changes in magnesium status, although it does not necessarily reflect total body magnesium content. The following review focuses on the natural occurrence of magnesium and its physiological function. The absorption and excretion of magnesium as well as hypo- and hypermagnesaemia will be addressed. PMID:26069819

  8. Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Magnesium hydroxide is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation.This medication is sometimes prescribed ... Magnesium hydroxide come as a tablet and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken as ...

  9. Magnesium Oxide

    MedlinePlus

    ... repeatedly. Magnesium oxide also is used as a dietary supplement when the amount of magnesium in the diet ... any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each ...

  10. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge.

    PubMed

    Liu, R L; Hurley, M F; Kvryan, A; Williams, G; Scully, J R; Birbilis, N

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes. PMID:27350286

  11. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge

    PubMed Central

    Liu, R. L.; Hurley, M. F.; Kvryan, A.; Williams, G.; Scully, J. R.; Birbilis, N.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes. PMID:27350286

  12. Effect of Food Thickener on Dissolution and Laxative Activity of Magnesium Oxide Tablets in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Takashi; Goto, Hidekazu; Yoshimura, Yuya; Kato, Kazushige; Yoshida, Tadashi; Tanaka, Katsuya; Sumiya, Kenji; Kohda, Yukinao

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the dissolution of magnesium oxide (MgO) from MgO tablets placed in a food thickening agent (food thickener) and its effects on laxative activity. We prepared mixtures of MgO tablets suspended in an aqueous suspension and food thickeners in order to evaluate the dissolution of MgO. The results of the dissolution tests revealed that agar-based food thickeners did not affect the MgO dissolution. In contrast, some xanthan gum-based food-thickener products show dissolution rates with certain mixtures containing disintegrated MgO tablets suspended in a food thickener that decrease over time. However, other xanthan gum-based food-thickener products show dissolution rates that decrease immediately after mixing, regardless of the time they were allowed to stand. In order to investigate the laxative activity of MgO, we orally administered a mixture of MgO suspension and food thickener to mice and observed their bowel movements. The animal experiments showed that when agar-based food thickeners were used, the laxative activity of MgO was not affected, but it decreased when xanthan gum-based food thickeners were used. PMID:27040638

  13. Structural Basis for the Magnesium-Dependent Activation and Hexamerization of the Lon AAA+ Protease.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Chu; Tai, Hui-Chung; Chang, Mu-Yueh; Ho, Meng-Ru; Babu, C Satheesan; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lim, Carmay; Chang, Chung-I

    2016-05-01

    The Lon AAA+ protease (LonA) plays important roles in protein homeostasis and regulation of diverse biological processes. LonA behaves as a homomeric hexamer in the presence of magnesium (Mg(2+)) and performs ATP-dependent proteolysis. However, it is also found that LonA can carry out Mg(2+)-dependent degradation of unfolded protein substrate in an ATP-independent manner. Here we show that in the presence of Mg(2+) LonA forms a non-secluded hexameric barrel with prominent openings, which explains why Mg(2+)-activated LonA can operate as a diffusion-based chambered protease to degrade unstructured protein and peptide substrates efficiently in the absence of ATP. A 1.85 Å crystal structure of Mg(2+)-activated protease domain reveals Mg(2+)-dependent remodeling of a substrate-binding loop and a potential metal-binding site near the Ser-Lys catalytic dyad, supported by biophysical binding assays and molecular dynamics simulations. Together, these findings reveal the specific roles of Mg(2+) in the molecular assembly and activation of LonA. PMID:27041593

  14. Magnesium oxide nanoparticles on green activated carbon as efficient CO2 adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Isahak, Wan Nor Roslam; Ramli, Zatil Amali Che; Mohamed Hisham, Mohamed Wahab; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar

    2013-11-01

    This study was focused on carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption ability using Magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles and MgO nanoparticles supported activated carbon based bamboo (BAC). The suitability of MgO as a good CO2 adsorbent was clarified using Thermodynamic considerations (Gibbs-Helmholtz relationship). The ΔH and ΔG of this reaction were - 117.5 kJṡmol-1 and - 65.4 kJṡmol-1, respectively, at standard condition (298 K and 1 atm). The complete characterization of these adsorbent were conducted by using BET, XRD, FTIR, TEM and TPD-CO2. The surface areas for MgO nanoparticles and MgO nanoparticles supported BAC were 297.1 m2/g and 702.5 m2/g, respectively. The MgO nanoparticles supported BAC shown better physical and chemical adsorption ability with 39.8 cm3/g and 6.5 mmol/g, respectively. The combination of MgO nanoparticle and BAC which previously prepared by chemical method can reduce CO2 emissions as well as better CO2 adsorption behavior. Overall, our results indicate that nanoparticles of MgO on BAC posses unique surface chemistry and their high surface reactivity coupled with high surface area allowed them to approach the goal as an efficient CO2 adsorbent.

  15. Abundance ratios of oxygen, neon, and magnesium in solar active regions and flares: The FIP effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widing, K. G.; Feldman, U.

    1995-01-01

    Relative abundances of oxygen, neon, and magnesium have been derived for a sample of nine solar active regions, flares, and an erupting prominance by combining plots of the ion differential emission measures. The observations were photographed in the 300-600 A range by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) spectroheliograph on Skylab. Methods for deriving the Mg/Ne abundance ratio-which measures the separation between the low- first ionization potential (FIP) and high-FIP abundnace plateaus-have been described in previous papers. In this paper we describe the spectroscopic methods for deriving the O/Ne abundance ratio, which gives the ratio between two high-FIP elements. The plot of the O/Ne ratio versus the Mg/Ne ratio in the sample of nine Skylab events is shown. The variation in the Mg/Ne ratio by a factor of 6 is associated with a much smaller range in the O/Ne ratio. This is broadly consistent with the presence of the standard FIP pattern of abundances in the outer atmosphere of the Sun. However, a real change in the relative abundances of oxygen and neon by a factor of 1.5 cannot be excluded.

  16. Magnesium oxide nanoparticles on green activated carbon as efficient CO{sub 2} adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Isahak, Wan Nor Roslam; Ramli, Zatil Amali Che; Mohamed Hisham, Mohamed Wahab; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar

    2013-11-27

    This study was focused on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) adsorption ability using Magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles and MgO nanoparticles supported activated carbon based bamboo (BAC). The suitability of MgO as a good CO{sub 2} adsorbent was clarified using Thermodynamic considerations (Gibbs-Helmholtz relationship). The ΔH and ΔG of this reaction were − 117.5 kJ⋅mol{sup −1} and − 65.4 kJ⋅mol{sup −1}, respectively, at standard condition (298 K and 1 atm). The complete characterization of these adsorbent were conducted by using BET, XRD, FTIR, TEM and TPD−CO{sub 2}. The surface areas for MgO nanoparticles and MgO nanoparticles supported BAC were 297.1 m{sup 2}/g and 702.5 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. The MgO nanoparticles supported BAC shown better physical and chemical adsorption ability with 39.8 cm{sup 3}/g and 6.5 mmol/g, respectively. The combination of MgO nanoparticle and BAC which previously prepared by chemical method can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions as well as better CO{sub 2} adsorption behavior. Overall, our results indicate that nanoparticles of MgO on BAC posses unique surface chemistry and their high surface reactivity coupled with high surface area allowed them to approach the goal as an efficient CO{sub 2} adsorbent.

  17. Activation of CO by Hydrogenated Magnesium(I) Dimers: Sterically Controlled Formation of Ethenediolate and Cyclopropanetriolate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lalrempuia, Ralte; Kefalidis, Christos E; Bonyhady, Simon J; Schwarze, Benedikt; Maron, Laurent; Stasch, Andreas; Jones, Cameron

    2015-07-22

    This study details the formal hydrogenation of two magnesium(I) dimers {(Nacnac)Mg}2 (Nacnac = [{(C6H3R2-2,6)NCMe}2CH](-); R = Pr(i) ((Dip)Nacnac), Et ((Dep)Nacnac)) using 1,3-cyclohexadiene. These reactions afford the magnesium(II) hydride complexes, {(Nacnac)Mg(μ-H)}2. Their reactions with excess CO are sterically controlled and lead cleanly to different C-C coupled products, viz. the ethenediolate complex, ((Dip)Nacnac)Mg{κ(1)-O-[((Dip)Nacnac)Mg(κ(2)-O,O-O2C2H2)]}, and the first cyclopropanetriolate complex of any metal, cis-{((Dep)Nacnac)Mg}3{μ-C3(H3)O3}. Computational studies imply the CO activation processes proceed via very similar mechanisms to those previously reported for related reactions involving f-block metal hydride compounds. This work highlights the potential magnesium compounds hold for use in the "Fischer-Tropsch-like" transformation of CO/H2 mixtures to value added oxygenate products. PMID:26135846

  18. Regulation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) activase: product inhibition, cooperativity, and magnesium activation.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Suratna; Henderson, J Nathan; Liles, Kevin; Hilton, Matthew T; Wachter, Rebekka M

    2015-10-01

    In many photosynthetic organisms, tight-binding Rubisco inhibitors are released by the motor protein Rubisco activase (Rca). In higher plants, Rca plays a pivotal role in regulating CO2 fixation. Here, the ATPase activity of 0.005 mm tobacco Rca was monitored under steady-state conditions, and global curve fitting was utilized to extract kinetic constants. The kcat was best fit by 22.3 ± 4.9 min(-1), the Km for ATP by 0.104 ± 0.024 mm, and the Ki for ADP by 0.037 ± 0.007 mm. Without ADP, the Hill coefficient for ATP hydrolysis was extracted to be 1.0 ± 0.1, indicating noncooperative behavior of homo-oligomeric Rca assemblies. However, the addition of ADP was shown to introduce positive cooperativity between two or more subunits (Hill coefficient 1.9 ± 0.2), allowing for regulation via the prevailing ATP/ADP ratio. ADP-mediated activation was not observed, although larger amounts led to competitive product inhibition of hydrolytic activity. The catalytic efficiency increased 8.4-fold upon cooperative binding of a second magnesium ion (Hill coefficient 2.5 ± 0.5), suggesting at least three conformational states (ATP-bound, ADP-bound, and empty) within assemblies containing an average of about six subunits. The addition of excess Rubisco (24:1, L8S8/Rca6) and crowding agents did not modify catalytic rates. However, high magnesium provided for thermal Rca stabilization. We propose that magnesium mediates the formation of closed hexameric toroids capable of high turnover rates and amenable to allosteric regulation. We suggest that in vivo, the Rca hydrolytic activity is tuned by fluctuating [Mg(2+)] in response to changes in available light. PMID:26283786

  19. Determination of aluminium, silicon and magnesium in geological matrices by delayed neutron activation analysis based on k0 instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Baidoo, I K; Dampare, S B; Opata, N S; Nyarko, B J B; Akaho, E H K; Quagraine, R E

    2013-12-01

    In this work, concentrations of silicon, aluminium and magnesium in geological matrices were determined by Neutron Activation Analysis based on k0-IAEA software. The optimum activation and delay times were found to be 5 min and 15-20 min respectively for the determination of Si via (29)Si (n,p) (29)Al reaction. The adopted irradiation scheme did not work for the determination of magnesium. Each sample was irradiated under a thermal neutron flux density of 5.0 × 10(11) ncm(-2)s(-1). Cadmium covered activation indicated that a permanent epithermal irradiation site for research reactors would be very useful for routine determination of silicon in environmental samples. PMID:23999324

  20. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  1. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  2. Evidence for a hydroxide ion bridging two magnesium ions at the active site of the hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, T; Auffinger, P; Scott, W G; Westhof, E

    1997-01-01

    In the presence of magnesium ions, cleavage by the hammerhead ribozyme RNA at a specific residue leads to 2'3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-OH extremities. In the cleavage reaction an activated ribose 2'-hydroxyl group attacks its attached 3'-phosphate. Molecular dynamics simulations of the crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme, obtained after flash-freezing of crystals under conditions where the ribozyme is active, provide evidence that a mu-bridging OH-ion is located between two Mg2+ions close to the cleavable phosphate. Constrained simulations show further that a flip from the C3'- endo to the C2'- endo conformation of the ribose at the cleavable phosphate brings the 2'-hydroxyl in proximity to both the attacked phosphorous atom and the mu-bridging OH-ion. Thus, the simulations lead to a detailed new insight into the mechanism of hammerhead ribozyme cleavage where a mu-hydroxo bridged magnesium cluster, located on the deep groove side, provides an OH-ion that is able to activate the 2'-hydroxyl nucleophile after a minor and localized conformational change in the RNA. PMID:9254698

  3. Magnesium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mg; Mag Formal name: Magnesium Related tests: Calcium , Potassium , Phosphorus , PTH , Vitamin D At a Glance Test ... can, over time, cause persistently low calcium and potassium levels, it may be checked to help diagnose ...

  4. Production of magnesium metal

    DOEpatents

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  5. Effects of chronic sleep deprivation on autonomic activity by examining heart rate variability, plasma catecholamine, and intracellular magnesium levels.

    PubMed

    Takase, Bonpei; Akima, Takashi; Satomura, Kimio; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka; Mastui, Takemi; Ishihara, Masayuki; Kurita, Akira

    2004-10-01

    Chronic sleep deprivation is associated with cardiovascular events. In addition, autonomic activity determined from the levels of the heart rate variability (HRV), plasma catecholamine, and intracellular magnesium (Mg) are important in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular events. This study therefore aimed to determine the effects of chronic sleep deprivation on autonomic activity by examining the HRV, plasma catecholamine, and intracellular magnesium levels. Thirty (30) healthy male college students ranging in age from 20 to 24 years of age (average 22 +/- 1 years; mean +/- SD) with no coronary risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia or a family history of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) were included in the study. Over a 4-week period, the volunteers' plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and erythrocyte-Mg were measured. The study was made during the 4 weeks before and immediately after college finals exams. HRV, obtained from 24-hour ambulatory ECG monitoring, included time and frequency domain indices. The HRV indices and erythrocyte-Mg decreased while norepinephrine increased during chronic sleep deprivation. It is concluded that chronic sleep deprivation causes an autonomic imbalance and decreases intracellular Mg, which could be associated with chronic sleep deprivation-induced cardiovascular events. PMID:15754837

  6. Hypolipidemic Activity of a Natural Mineral Water Rich in Calcium, Magnesium, and Bicarbonate in Hyperlipidemic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Aslanabadi, Naser; Habibi Asl, Bohlool; Bakhshalizadeh, Babak; Ghaderi, Faranak; Nemati, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the effects of a mineral water rich in calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, and sulfate and a marketed mineral water with a composition similar to that of urban water on the lipid profile of dyslipidemic adults. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 32 adults received one liter of "rich mineral water" daily for one month, and 37 adults drank the same amount of normal mineral water for the same period. Changes in lipid profiles were compared separately in each studied group at the end of one month. Results: Results showed that mean cholesterol and low density lipoprotein LDL levels were significantly decreased in both studied groups after one month of drinking mineral water (P<0.05); however, no significant differences in high density lipoprotein (HDL) and triglyceride (TG) levels were seen in either group one month after drinking. There were no statistically significant differences between the "rich mineral water" and the normal mineral water groups in any of the above-mentioned lipid levels ( P>0.05). Conclusion: A one-month intake of mineral water rich in calcium, magnesium bicarbonate, and sulfate decreased cholesterol and LDL levels but not TG or HDL levels in dyslipidemic adults. PMID:24754016

  7. Production of magnesium metal

    DOEpatents

    Blencoe, James G.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Palmer, Donald A.; Beard, James S.

    2012-04-10

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  8. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  9. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  10. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  11. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  12. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 63% of US magnesium compounds production during 2000. Premier Services in Florida, Dow Chemical in Michigan, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from seawater. And Premier Services' recoveries, in Nevada, were from magnasite.

  13. Upregulation of Collagen Expression via PPARβ/δ Activation in Aged Skin by Magnesium Lithospermate B from Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yu Ri; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Dae Hyun; Park, Chan Hum; Park, Min Hi; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Yokozawa, Takako; Tanaka, Takashi; Im, Dong Soon; Kim, Nam Deuk; Yu, Byung Pal; Mo, Sang Hyun; Chung, Hae Young

    2015-08-28

    This study investigated the agonistic activity of magnesium lithospermate B (1), isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza, on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARβ/δ) and the expressions of collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL3A1) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in models of skin aging. The action of compound 1 as a PPARβ/δ agonist was determined by reporter gene assay, immunostaining, and Western blotting. To determine the antiaging effects of compound 1 on skin, aged Sprague-Dawley rat skin and ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated human skin fibroblasts were used. The results show that 1 presented a marked enhancement of both nuclear protein levels and activity of PPARβ/δ in fibroblasts. In addition, 1 prevented downregulation of PPARβ/δ activity in aged rat skin and UVB-induced fibroblasts. Furthermore, 1 increased the expressions of COL1A1, COL3A1, and TGF-β1 in vivo and in a cell culture system. Therefore, the present study shows that compound 1 prevents collagen degradation in aged rat skin and UVB-exposed fibroblasts through PPARβ/δ activation. The therapeutic and cosmetic applications of compound 1 need further investigation. PMID:26280594

  14. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  15. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  16. Activation of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Mediated by Transition-Metal Doped Magnesium Oxide Clusters [MMgO](+/0/-) (M=Sc-Zn).

    PubMed

    Li, Jilai; González-Navarrete, Patricio; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2015-05-18

    Mission: impossible? DFT calculations show that the trends in the thermochemistry are very different for the activation of CO2 and CH4 mediated by transition-metal doped magnesium oxide clusters [MMgO](+/0/-) (M=Sc-Zn). Thus, seeking a "simple" reagent to simultaneously mediate activation and coupling of CH4 and CO2 with high efficiency seems extremely daunting, if not impossible. PMID:25867011

  17. Synthesis of a novel alkali-activated magnesium slag-based nanostructural composite and its photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yao Jun; Kang, Le; Liu, Li Cai; Si, Hai Xiao; Zhang, Ji Fang

    2015-03-01

    A novel type of alkali-activated magnesium slag-based nanostructural composite (AMSNC) co-loaded bimetallic oxide semiconductors of NiO and CuO were synthesized by alkaline activation, ion exchange and wet co-impregnation methods, and then firstly employed as a photocatalyst for the degradation of indigo carmine dye. The XRD, TEM and HRTEM results revealed that CuO in the form of tenorite with mean particle size of about 15 nm and NiO in amorphous phase dispersed on the surface of AMSNC support. The decrease of photoluminescence with increasing amount of NiO and CuO demonstrated that the recombination of photogenerated electrons-holes pairs was prevented when the photogenerated electrons transferred from the metal oxide semiconductor to the AMSNC matrix. The 10(NiO + CuO)/AMSNC specimen showed that the photocatalytic degradation efficiency was up to 100% under UV irradiation for 1 h due to the synergistic effect between the AMSNC and active species of NiO and CuO. The mesoporous structures of specimens acted as critical role for the adsorption of dye molecules, and the photocatalytic degradation of indigo carmine dye obeyed first-order reaction kinetics. A degradation mechanism of photocatalytic oxidation was proposed in the paper.

  18. Magnesium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - magnesium ... Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body. It helps to maintain normal ... There is ongoing research into the role of magnesium in preventing and managing disorders such as high ...

  19. Low magnesium level

    MedlinePlus

    Low magnesium level is a condition in which the amount of magnesium in the blood is lower than normal. The medical ... that convert or use energy ( metabolism ). When the level of magnesium in the body drops below normal, ...

  20. The chlorophyll-deficient golden leaf mutation in cucumber is due to a single nucleotide substitution in CsChlI for magnesium chelatase I subunit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chlorophyll gives the green color in plants. Any mutations in chloroplhyll biosynthesis or regulation may result in colr changes. Leaf color mutants are common in higher plants, which can be used as markers in crop breeding or as a tool in understanding regulatory mechanisms in chlorophyll biosy...

  1. Magnesium lithospermate B and rosmarinic acid, two compounds present in Salvia miltiorrhiza, have potent antiviral activity against enterovirus 71 infections.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yi-Ching; Hsieh, Feng-Chia; Lin, Ying-Ju; Wu, Tzong-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lin, Ching-Ting; Tang, Nou-Ying; Jinn, Tzyy-Rong

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this study was to identify the active ingredients responsible for the anti-EV71 activity produced by Salvia miltiorrhiza extracts. A pGS-EV71 IRES-based bicistronic reporter assay platform was used for rapid analysis of compounds that could specifically inhibit EV71 viral IRES-mediated translation. The analysis identified 2 caffeic acid derivatives, magnesium lithospermate B (MLB) and rosmarinic acid (RA), which suppressed EV71 IRES-mediated translation at concentrations of 30μg/ml. We also found that MLB and RA inhibited EV71 infection when they were added to RD cells during the viral absorption stage. MLB had a low IC50 value of 0.09mM and a high TI value of 10.52. In contrast, RA had an IC50 value of 0.50mM with a TI value of 2.97. MLB and RA (100µg/ml) also reduced EV71 viral particle production and significantly decreased VP1 protein production. We propose that these two derivatives inhibit EV71 viral entry into cells and viral IRES activity, thereby reducing viral particle production and viral RNA expression and blocking viral VP1 protein translation. This study provides useful information for the development of anti-EV71 assays and reagents by demonstrating a convenient EV71 IRES-based bicistronic assay platform to screen for anti-EV71 IRES activity, and also reports 2 compounds, MLB and RA, which are responsible for the anti-EV71 activity of S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:25773498

  2. The TMS Magnesium Committee: Committed to the Advancement of Global Magnesium Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sillekens, Wim H.; Nyberg, Eric A.

    2011-04-21

    The TMS Magnesium Committee was established in the year 2000 as a spin-off of the Reactive Metals Committee, triggered by the strong global growth of magnesium being used in a variety of structural lightweight applications since the mid-1990’s. Since then the committee has seen a distinct development in terms of size, participation and focus. The article at hand outlines this development by recapitulating the output of its two main activities: the annual Magnesium Technology Symposia and the JOM Special Issues dedicated to magnesium research and development. Further records on the Magnesium Committee are available from the committee homepage (accessible through http://members.tms.org).

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) controls magnesium gatekeeper TRPM6 activity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jia; Sun, Baonan; Du, Jianyang; Yang, Wenzhong; Chen, Hsiang-Chin; Overton, Jeffrey D.; Runnels, Loren W.; Yue, Lixia

    2011-01-01

    TRPM6 is crucial for human Mg2+ homeostasis as patients carrying TRPM6 mutations develop hypomagnesemia and secondary hypocalcemia (HSH). However, the activation mechanism of TRPM6 has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphophate (PIP2) controls TRPM6 activation and Mg2+ influx. Stimulation of PLC-coupled M1-receptors to deplete PIP2 potently inactivates TRPM6. Translocation of over-expressed 5-phosphatase to cell membrane to specifically hydrolyze PIP2 also completely inhibits TRPM6. Moreover, depolarization-induced-activation of the voltage-sensitive-phosphatase (Ci-VSP) simultaneously depletes PIP2 and inhibits TRPM6. PLC-activation induced PIP2-depletion not only inhibits TRPM6, but also abolishes TRPM6-mediated Mg2+ influx. Furthermore, neutralization of basic residues in the TRP domain leads to nonfunctional or dysfunctional mutants with reduced activity by PIP2, suggesting that they are likely to participate in interactions with PIP2. Our data indicate that PIP2 is required for TRPM6 channel function; hydrolysis of PIP2 by PLC-coupled hormones/agonists may constitute an important pathway for TRPM6 gating, and perhaps Mg2+ homeostasis. PMID:22180838

  4. Corrosion in Magnesium and a Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akavipat, Sanay

    Magnesium and a magnesium alloy (AZ91C) have been ion implanted over a range of ions energies (50 to 150 keV) and doses (1 x 10('16) to 2 x 10('17) ions/cm('2)) to modify the corrosion properties of the metals. The corrosion tests were done by anodic polarization in chloride -free and chloride-containing aqueous solutions of a borated -boric acid with a pH of 9.3. Anodic polarization measurements showed that some implantations could greatly reduce the corrosion current densities at all impressed voltages and also increased slightly the pitting potential, which indicated the onset of the chloride attack. These improvements in corrosion resistance were caused by boron implantations into both types of samples. However, iron implantations were found to improve only the magnesium alloy. To study the corrosion in more detail, Scanning Auger Microprobe Spectrometer (SAM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an X-ray Energy Spectrometry (XES) attachment, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) measurements were used to analyze samples before, after, and at various corrosion stages. In both the unimplanted pure magnesium and AZ91C samples, anodic polarization results revealed that there were three active corrosion stages (Stages A, C, and E) and two passivating stages (Stages B and D). Examination of Stages A and B in both types of samples showed that only a mild, generalized corrosion had occurred. In Stage C of the TD samples, a pitting breakdown in the initial oxide film was observed. In Stage C of the AZ91C samples, galvanic and intergranular attack around the Mg(,17)Al(,12) intermetallic islands and along the matrix grain boundaries was observed. Stage D of both samples showed the formation of a thick, passivating oxygen containing, probably Mg(OH)(,2) film. In Stage E, this film was broken down by pits, which formed due to the presence of the chloride ions in both types of samples. Stages A through D of the unimplanted samples were not seen in the boron or iron

  5. Alkalization is responsible for antibacterial effects of corroding magnesium.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Eifler, Rainer; Rais, Bushra; Mueller, Peter P

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium alloys are presently investigated as potential medical implant materials for temporary applications. Magnesium has been reported to have antibacterial activities and could therefore be used to prevent antibiotic treatment-resistant bacterial implant infections. For characterizing the effects of magnesium on infectious bacteria, bioluminescent S. aureus or P. aeruginosa were employed. The proliferation of both types of bacteria was suppressed in the presence of metallic magnesium and also in aqueous magnesium corrosion extracts. Of the two soluble corrosion products, magnesium ions were well tolerated while antibacterial activities correlated with increased pH levels of the supernatants. The alkaline pH alone was sufficient for the antibacterial effects which were completely abolished when the pH of the corrosion supernatants was neutralized. These results demonstrate that pH increases are necessary and sufficient for the antibacterial activity of metallic magnesium. In an animal model magnesium implants showed an enhanced but variable resistance to bacterial colonization. PMID:25974048

  6. Results of Resonant Activation and Macroscopic Quantum Tunneling Experiments in Magnesium Diboride Thin Film Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Roberto; Carabello, Steve; Lambert, Joseph; Mlack, Jerome; Dai, Wenqing; Shen, Yi.; Li, Qi; Cunnane, Daniel; Zhuang, C. G.; Chen, Ke; Xi, X. X.

    2012-02-01

    The Josephson junction is an experimental testbed widely used to study resonant activation and macroscopic quantum tunneling. These phenomena have been observed in junctions based on conventional low-temperature superconductors such as Nb and Al, and even in high-Tc, intrinsic superconductors. We report results of superconducting-to normal state switching experiments below 1 K using MgB2-based Josephson heterojunctions with Pb and Nb counter-electrodes. Measurements were made with and without RF excitation. With microwaves, we see evidence of a resonant peak, in addition to the primary escape (from ground state) peak -- consistent with resonant activation. We also observe features suggestive of macroscopic quantum tunneling including peaks in the escape rate enhancements and an ``elbow'' in the graph of calculated escape temperatures Tesc versus sample temperature.

  7. Impact of fumonisin B1 on glutamate toxicity and low magnesium-induced seizure activity in neuronal primary culture.

    PubMed

    Domijan, A-M; Kovac, S; Abramov, A Y

    2012-01-27

    Fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium spp. mould that contaminates maize world-wide. Although its neurodegenerative potential is well established, mechanisms and acute effects of FB(1) on neurons are still not completely understood. Our previous study on astrocytes and neuroblastoma cells demonstrated that acute FB(1) exposure inhibits mitochondrial complex I and leads to mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and calcium deregulation. To further explore the mechanisms of FB(1) neurotoxicity, we here investigated the effects of acute FB(1) co-exposure with glutamate and in the low magnesium model of epilepsy on neuronal calcium level, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell death in glio-neuronal cultures. FB(1) increased the glutamate-induced calcium signal in neurons and changed neuronal calcium signals to more sustained intracellular calcium rises in the low magnesium model of epilepsy that coincided with mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization. FB(1) co-exposure increased the percentage of dead neurons in low magnesium conditions dose dependently when compared with low magnesium exposure only, whereas in FB(1) and glutamate co-exposure neuronal death remained unchanged when compared with glutamate treatment only. Our results show that FB(1) makes neurons more vulnerable to glutamate-induced toxicity and epileptiform conditions, indicating that FB(1) can enhance the detrimental effect of these conditions on neurons. PMID:22178271

  8. Mechanochemically Activated, Calcium Oxide-Based, Magnesium Oxide-Stabilized Carbon Dioxide Sorbents.

    PubMed

    Kurlov, Alexey; Broda, Marcin; Hosseini, Davood; Mitchell, Sharon J; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier; Müller, Christoph R

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is a promising approach to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions and mitigate climate change. However, the costs associated with the capture of CO2 using the currently available technology, that is, amine scrubbing, are considered prohibitive. In this context, the so-called calcium looping process, which relies on the reversible carbonation of CaO, is an attractive alternative. The main disadvantage of naturally occurring CaO-based CO2 sorbents, such as limestone, is their rapid deactivation caused by thermal sintering. Here, we report a scalable route based on wet mechanochemical activation to prepare MgO-stabilized, CaO-based CO2 sorbents. We optimized the synthesis conditions through a fundamental understanding of the underlying stabilization mechanism, and the quantity of MgO required to stabilize CaO could be reduced to as little as 15 wt %. This allowed the preparation of CO2 sorbents that exceed the CO2 uptake of the reference limestone by 200 %. PMID:27529608

  9. Magnesium and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Leary, W P; Reyes, A J

    1983-10-22

    Magnesium deficiency may result from reduced dietary intake of the ion or increased losses in sweat, urine or faeces. Stress potentiates magnesium deficiency, and an increased incidence of sudden death associated with ischaemic heart disease is found in some areas in which soil and drinking water lack magnesium. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated experimentally that reduction of the plasma magnesium level is associated with arterial spasm. Careful studies are required to assess the clinical importance of magnesium and the benefits of magnesium supplementation in man. PMID:6353622

  10. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate

    MedlinePlus

    Choline magnesium trisalicylate is used to relieve the pain, tenderness, inflammation (swelling), and stiffness caused by arthritis and painful ... used to relieve pain and lower fever. Choline magnesium trisalicylate is in a class of nonsteroidal anti- ...

  11. Accelerated Bonding of Magnesium and Aluminum with a CuNi/Ag/CuNi Sandwich Interlayer by Plasma-Activated Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiyu; Rao, Mei; Li, Leijun; Luo, Guoqiang; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Lianmeng

    2016-02-01

    Plasma-activated sintering (PAS) has been applied, for the first time, to join magnesium and aluminum using a CuNi/Ag/CuNi sandwich structural interlayer. A cleaning effect and high efficient plasma heating mode in PAS have contributed to forming a strong interfacial diffusion bond under low temperature 673 K (400 °C) and short dwell time (0.6 ks). The designed interlayer provides a diffusion barrier effect and an enhanced physical contact between the interfaces. Strong bonding has been achieved without forming the brittle Mg-Al intermetallics.

  12. Magnesium and Space Flight.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott M; Zwart, Sara R

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female; 47 ± 5 years old, mean ± SD) before, during, and after 4-6-month space missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight (head-down-tilt bed rest; n = 27 (17 male, 10 female), 35 ± 7 years old). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-h urinary excretion of magnesium, along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-day space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4-6-month space missions. PMID:26670248

  13. Magnesium and Space Flight

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female; 47 ± 5 years old, mean ± SD) before, during, and after 4–6-month space missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight (head-down-tilt bed rest; n = 27 (17 male, 10 female), 35 ± 7 years old). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-h urinary excretion of magnesium, along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-day space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4–6-month space missions. PMID:26670248

  14. Magnesium and Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in astronauts before, during, and after space missions, in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female) on 4-6 month space flight missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight, (head-down tilt bed rest, n=27, 35 +/- 7 y). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-hour urinary excretion of magnesium along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-d space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4- to 6-month space missions.

  15. Major Minerals - Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium, magnesium and phosphorus are essential elements critically important for the function of the musculoskeletal system, including the formation and transduction of energy and the maintenance of healthy bone. The major calcium concern for physically active healthy middle-aged adults is to consu...

  16. Magnesium industry overview

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, B.B.

    1996-10-01

    Magnesium products provide an excellent strength-to-weight ratio, good fatigue strength, high impact strength, good corrosion resistance, high-speed machinability, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. As a result, applications are expanding in almost every industry. Dozens of automotive components are now made of magnesium, including steering wheels, valve covers, and seat frames. Magnesium alloys are also used in computer housings, in-line roller skates, golf clubs, tennis racquets, and baseball bats. Good strength and stiffness at both room and elevated temperatures make magnesium alloys especially valuable for aerospace applications. This article presents an overview of magnesium technology, world production, increasing demand, and recycling.

  17. Magnesium and the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Stella Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral and the second most abundant intracellular divalent cation in the body. It is a required mineral that is involved in more than 300 metabolic reactions in the body. Magnesium helps maintain normal nerve and muscle function, heart rhythm (cardiac excitability), vasomotor tone, blood pressure, immune system, bone integrity, and blood glucose levels and promotes calcium absorption. Because of magnesium's role in energy production and storage, normal muscle function, and maintenance of blood glucose levels, it has been studied as an ergogenic aid for athletes. This article will cover the general roles of magnesium, magnesium requirements, and assessment of magnesium status as well as the dietary intake of magnesium and its effects on exercise performance. The research articles cited were limited from those published in 2003 through 2014. PMID:26166051

  18. Dislocation Creep in Magnesium Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Xiao, X.; Evans, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    To investigate the effect of dissolved Mg on plastic deformation of calcite, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on synthetic calcite with varying amount of Mg content. Mixtures of powders of calcite and dolomite were isostatically hot pressed (HIP) at 850° C and 300 MPa confining pressure for different intervals (2 to 20hrs) resulting in homogeneous aggregates of high-magnesium calcite; Mg content varied from 0.07 to 0.17 mol%. Creep tests were performed at differential stresses from 20 to 160 MPa at 700 to 800° C. Grain sizes before and after deformation were determined from the images obtained from scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Grain sizes are in the range of 5 to 20 microns depending on the HIP time, and decrease with increasing magnesium content. Both BSE images and chemical analysis suggest that all dolomite are dissolved and the Mg distribution is homogeneous through the sample, after 2 hrs HIP. At stresses below 40 MPa, the samples deformed in diffusion region (Coble creep), as described previously by Herwegh. The strength decreases with increasing magnesium content, owing to the difference of grain size. At stresses above 80 MPa, the stress exponent is greater than 3, indicating an increased contribution of dislocation creep. The transition between diffusion to dislocation creep occurs at higher stresses for the samples with higher magnesium content and smaller grain size. Preliminary data suggests a slight increase in strength with increasing magnesium content, but more tests are needed to verify this effect. In a few samples, some strain weakening may have been evident. The activation energy in the transition region (at 80 MPa) is ˜200 KJ/mol with no dependence on magnesium content, agreeing with previous measurements of diffusion creep in natural and synthetic marbles.

  19. Effect of magnesium deficiency on erythrocyte aging in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Elin, R. J.; Utter, A.; Tan, H. K.; Corash, L.

    1980-01-01

    Rats placed on a magnesium-deficient diet show decreased erythrocyte magnesium concentration, shortened erythrocyte survival, and erythrocyte membrane ultrastructure defects and become progressively anemic. Whether these pathologic processes are due to abnormal erythropoiesis or occur in the peripheral circulation is unknown. In the present study, magnesium and hemoglobin concentrations, reticulocyte count, erythrocyte pyrophosphatase, and pyruvate kinase activities were determined at weekly intervals for 6 weeks in whole blood and age-dependent erythrocyte fractions isolated from inbred Fisher rats fed a diet deficient in magnesium or the same diet with added magnesium. Freeze-fracture electron microscopic examinations were performed on age-dependent erythrocyte fractions to evaluate the membrane defect. The youngest red cells from magnesium-deficient rats were similar to those of control animals with respect to erythrocyte magnesium concentrations, pyrophosphatase activities, and membrane morphology. The older erythrocyte fractions from magnesium-deficient rats showed significant decreases in magnesium concentrations, pyrophosphatase activity, and the presence of membrane abnormalities. Thus, new erythrocytes produced in magnesium-deficient rats appear to be normal but rapidly develop biochemical and morphologic abnormalities with aging in a magnesium-deficient plasma environment. Images Figure 1 PMID:6106388

  20. Magnesium in depression.

    PubMed

    Serefko, Anna; Szopa, Aleksandra; Wlaź, Piotr; Nowak, Gabriel; Radziwoń-Zaleska, Maria; Skalski, Michał; Poleszak, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium is one of the most essential mineral in the human body, connected with brain biochemistry and the fluidity of neuronal membrane. A variety of neuromuscular and psychiatric symptoms, including different types of depression, was observed in magnesium deficiency. Plasma/serum magnesium levels do not seem to be the appropriate indicators of depressive disorders, since ambiguous outcomes, depending on the study, were obtained. The emergence of a new approach to magnesium compounds in medical practice has been seen. Apart from being administered as components of dietary supplements, they are also perceived as the effective agents in treatment of migraine, alcoholism, asthma, heart diseases, arrhythmias, renal calcium stones, premenstrual tension syndrome etc. Magnesium preparations have an essential place in homeopathy as a remedy for a range of mental health problems. Mechanisms of antidepressant action of magnesium are not fully understood yet. Most probably, magnesium influences several systems associated with development of depression. The first information on the beneficial effect of magnesium sulfate given hypodermically to patients with agitated depression was published almost 100 years ago. Numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies confirmed the initial observations as well as demonstrated the beneficial safety profile of magnesium supplementation. Thus, magnesium preparations seem to be a valuable addition to the pharmacological armamentarium for management of depression. PMID:23950577

  1. Magnesium in disease

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Although the following text will focus on magnesium in disease, its role in healthy subjects during physical exercise when used as a supplement to enhance performance is also noteworthy. Low serum magnesium levels are associated with metabolic syndrome, Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension; consequently, some individuals benefit from magnesium supplementation: increasing magnesium consumption appears to prevent high blood pressure, and higher serum magnesium levels are associated with a lower risk of developing a metabolic syndrome. There are, however, conflicting study results regarding magnesium administration with myocardial infarction with and without reperfusion therapy. There was a long controversy as to whether or not magnesium should be given as a first-line medication. As the most recent trials have not shown any difference in outcome, intravenous magnesium cannot be recommended in patients with myocardial infarction today. However, magnesium has its indication in patients with torsade de pointes and has been given successfully to patients with digoxin-induced arrhythmia or life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Magnesium sulphate as an intravenous infusion also has an important established therapeutic role in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia as it decreases the risk of eclamptic seizures by half compared with placebo. PMID:26069818

  2. Magnesium in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Lynne M; Ní Fhloinn, Deirdre M; Gaydadzhieva, Gergana T; Mazurkiewicz, Ola M; Leeson, Heather; Wright, Ciara P

    2016-09-01

    Magnesium deficiency is prevalent in women of childbearing age in both developing and developed countries. The need for magnesium increases during pregnancy, and the majority of pregnant women likely do not meet this increased need. Magnesium deficiency or insufficiency during pregnancy may pose a health risk for both the mother and the newborn, with implications that may extend into adulthood of the offspring. The measurement of serum magnesium is the most widely used method for determining magnesium levels, but it has significant limitations that have both hindered the assessment of deficiency and affected the reliability of studies in pregnant women. Thus far, limited studies have suggested links between magnesium inadequacy and certain conditions in pregnancy associated with high mortality and morbidity, such as gestational diabetes, preterm labor, preeclampsia, and small for gestational age or intrauterine growth restriction. This review provides recommendations for further study and improved testing using measurement of red cell magnesium. Pregnant women should be counseled to increase their intake of magnesium-rich foods such as nuts, seeds, beans, and leafy greens and/or to supplement with magnesium at a safe level. PMID:27445320

  3. The anticarcinogenic effect of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Blondell, J M

    1980-08-01

    Evidence is reviewed supporting a hypothesis of an anticarcinogenic effect of magnesium. Animal studies reported increased cancer in rodents maintained on magnesium deficient diets and a preventive effect for rodents fed excess levels of magnesium. Epidemiologic evidence is presented that magnesium levels in water, food, and air are inversely related to cancer mortality. Magnesium may also have a role in the reduced cancer mortality experienced by people living at high altitudes. Two biologically plausible mechanisms are considered by which magnesium could prevent carcinogenesis. Intracellular magnesium may enhance the fidelity of DNA replication or magnesium on the cell membrane may prevent changes which trigger the carcinogenic process. PMID:7442590

  4. Antidiarrhoeal activity of the methanol extract of the barks of Xylocarpus moluccensis in castor oil- and magnesium sulphate-induced diarrhoea models in mice.

    PubMed

    Uddin, S J; Shilpi, J A; Alam, S M S; Alamgir, M; Rahman, M T; Sarker, S D

    2005-10-01

    The methanol (MeOH) extract of the barks of Xylocarpus moluccensis, and different fractions of this extract were studied for antidiarrhoeal activity using castor oil- and magnesium sulphate-induced diarrhoea models in mice. At the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg, the MeOH extract showed significant antidiarrhoeal activity in both models. The EtOAc fraction (EAF) and the residual MeOH fraction (RMF) exhibited similar activity using a dose of 250 mg/kg in both models. No antidiarrhoeal activity was observed with the chloroform fraction (CHF) at the test doses. When tested for antibacterial effect, the MeOH extract displayed moderate inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholera, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermis, Shigella dysentery, Staphylococcus pyogenes, Salmonella typhi, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. While the CHF inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus epidermis, Staphylococcus pyogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the EAF was active against all test organisms except Vibrio cholera and Staphylococcus epidermis. The RMF inhibited the growth of all the test organisms with moderate zone of inhibition. On the basis of these findings, it can be assumed that Xylocarpus moluccensis could be a potential source for novel 'lead' discovery for antidiarrhoeal drug development. PMID:15905054

  5. The Magnesium Branch of the Tetrapyrrole Biosynthetic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, S. I.

    2004-05-11

    It should be noted that the focus of the research changed somewhat during the course of the current award. The initial focus is indicated by the title of the current grant, ''The Magnesium Branch of the Chlorophyll Biosynthetic Pathway''. During the current grant period, Dr. Robert Willows, a postdoctoral associate, joined the faculty of McQuarie University in Australia. When he left my lab, we decided that he should independently pursue research on structure/function relationships in Mg chelatase and that our laboratories would collaborate on regulatory studies of this enzyme. Also, during the current award period, I began collaborating with Dr. Ariane Atteia and Mr. Robert van Lis, who were at the time located at the Autonomous University of Mexico. Dr. Atteia has since joined my laboratory and Mr. van Lis will also do so when he obtains his Ph.D. in the near future. These individuals bring to the laboratory their interests and expertise in the respiratory components of Chlamydomonas and their desire to become experts in tetrapyrrole metabolism. Recently, in a collaboration with Dr. David Bollivar, a former postdoctoral associate who is now at Illinois Wesleyan University, and Dr. Caroline Walker, who was at Clemson University but has since left this research area, we recently made a major breakthrough on the oxygen-independent cyclase reaction, which has now become an important component of the current proposal. Finally, our research on phycobilin biosynthesis in Synechucystis has revealed that this organism can grow at very low oxygen concentrations and its genome contains several genes that may encode for enzymes that catalyze alternative oxygen-independent reactions for tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, so characterizing the genes, their enzymes, and regulation of expression have also become parts of the current proposal.

  6. Overexpression of the Mg-chelatase H subunit in guard cells confers drought tolerance via promotion of stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, Tomo; Takahashi, Koji; Tomiyama, Masakazu; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2013-01-01

    The Mg-chelatase H subunit (CHLH) has been shown to mediate chlorophyll biosynthesis, as well as plastid-to-nucleus and abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated signaling. A recent study using a novel CHLH mutant, rtl1, indicated that CHLH specifically affects ABA-induced stomatal closure, but also that CHLH did not serve as an ABA receptor in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the molecular mechanism by which CHLH engages in ABA-mediated signaling in guard cells remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined CHLH function in guard cells and explored whether CHLH expression might influence stomatal aperture. Incubation of rtl1 guard cell protoplasts with ABA induced expression of the ABA-responsive genes RAB18 and RD29B, as also observed in wild-type (WT) cells, indicating that CHLH did not affect the expression of ABA-responsive genes. Earlier, ABA was reported to inhibit blue light (BL)-mediated stomatal opening, at least in part through dephosphorylating/inhibiting guard cell H+-ATPase (which drives opening). Therefore, we immunohistochemically examined the phosphorylation status of guard cell H+-ATPase. Notably, ABA inhibition of BL-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase was impaired in rtl1 cells, suggesting that CHLH influences not only ABA-induced stomatal closure but also inhibition of BL-mediated stomatal opening by ABA. Next, we generated CHLH-GFP-overexpressing plants using CER6 promoter, which induces gene expression in the epidermis including guard cells. CHLH-transgenic plants exhibited a closed stomata phenotype even when brightly illuminated. Moreover, plant growth experiments conducted under water-deficient conditions showed that CHLH transgenic plants were more tolerant of drought than WT plants. In summary, we show that CHLH is involved in the regulation of stomatal aperture in response to ABA, but not in ABA-induced gene expression, and that manipulation of stomatal aperture via overexpression of CHLH in guard cells improves plant drought tolerance

  7. Transport of magnesium by a bacterial Nramp-related gene.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Ho; Wakeman, Catherine A; Goodson, Jonathan R; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Freedman, Benjamin G; Senger, Ryan S; Winkler, Wade C

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5-2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  8. Transport of Magnesium by a Bacterial Nramp-Related Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Freedman, Benjamin G.; Senger, Ryan S.; Winkler, Wade C.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5–2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  9. Magnesium deficiency: what's our status?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low magnesium intake has been implicated in a broad range of cardiometabolic conditions, including diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Dietary magnesium and total body magnesium status have a widely-used but imperfect biomarker in serum magnesium. Despite serum magnesium’s limitation...

  10. Method for production of magnesium

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, Alexander F.; Howard, Jack B.; Modestino, Anthony J.; Peters, William A.

    1998-01-01

    A continuous process for the production of elemental magnesium is described. Magnesium is made from magnesium oxide and a light hydrocarbon gas. In the process, a feed stream of the magnesium oxide and gas is continuously fed into a reaction zone. There the magnesium oxide and gas are reacted at a temperature of about 1400.degree. C. or greater in the reaction zone to provide a continuous product stream of reaction products, which include elemental magnesium. The product stream is continuously quenched after leaving the reaction zone, and the elemental magnesium is separated from other reaction products.

  11. Method for production of magnesium

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, A.F.; Howard, J.B.; Modestino, A.J.; Peters, W.A.

    1998-07-21

    A continuous process for the production of elemental magnesium is described. Magnesium is made from magnesium oxide and a light hydrocarbon gas. In the process, a feed stream of the magnesium oxide and gas is continuously fed into a reaction zone. There the magnesium oxide and gas are reacted at a temperature of about 1400 C or greater in the reaction zone to provide a continuous product stream of reaction products, which include elemental magnesium. The product stream is continuously quenched after leaving the reaction zone, and the elemental magnesium is separated from other reaction products. 12 figs.

  12. Magnesium battery disposal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffer, Louis; Atwater, Terrill

    1994-12-01

    This study assesses the disposal characteristics of U.S. Army procured military magnesium batteries under current Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste identification regulations administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Magnesium batteries were tested at 100, 50, 10 and 0 percent remaining state of charge. Present findings indicate that magnesium batteries with less than 50 percent remaining charge do not exceed the federal regulatory limit of 5.0 mg/L for chromium. All other RCRA contaminates were below regulatory limits at all levels of remaining charge. Assay methods, findings, disposal requirements and design implications are discussed.

  13. Magnesium for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    VanFleteren, R.

    1996-05-01

    Die cast magnesium parts are rapidly replacing steel and aluminum structural components in automotive applications, as design engineers seek to reduce assembly costs, raise fuel efficiency, and improve safety. Dozens of automotive components are now die cast from magnesium alloys, including seat stanchions, valve covers, steering wheels, and a variety of steering column components. Because of their excellent castability, complex magnesium die castings can sometimes consolidate several components and eliminate assembly steps. Highly ductile magnesium alloys such as AM60B (6% aluminum) and AM50A (5% aluminum) are important in helping to meet automotive industry crash-energy requirements for car seating and steering components. AZ91D (9% aluminum, 1% zinc) alloys are making removable rear seats in new minivans much easier to handle.

  14. Low magnesium level

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the body that convert or use energy ( metabolism ). When the level of magnesium in the body ... Walls RM, et al., eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  15. Magnesium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Magnesium - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight pain. Others feel a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  16. A novel electrophoretic technique designed to modify the ratio of magnesium isotopes inside the creatine kinase active sites. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kouznetsov, Dmitri A; Arkhangelsky, Stanislav E; Berdieva, Alana G; Khasigov, Peter Z; Orlova, Marina A

    2004-09-01

    A simple and efficient preparative electrophoretic technique has been proposed to obtain a modified creatine kinase (CK, E.C.2.7.3.2) molecule with an increased content of 25Mg in the active site. A key point of the method is the special design of a 0.9 x 12.0 cm column for ascendent electrophoresis, packed consecutively, from the bottom to the top, with layers of 30 % PAAG (polyacrylamide grade), 25Mg2+ -containing 7.5 % PAAG, enzyme-binding ADP Sepharose and 2.2 % agarose gels, based on different tris-glycine and tris-HCl separation buffer systems. The isotope substitution process was a result of simultaneous desorption of enzyme from ADP Sepharose and electrically directed extensive flow of 25Mg2+ cations through the porous gel matrix. Greater than 8-fold 25Mg enrichment, i.e. a 10.2-86.3 % increase of 25Mg contribution to total enzyme magnesium, has been reached. The modified 25Mg-rich CK samples manifest higher (2.4-fold increase) values of specific catalytic activity when compared with intact (control) ones. PMID:15370286

  17. Rechargeable Magnesium Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Victor R.; Nanjundiah, Chenniah; Orsini, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Rechargeable power cells based on magnesium anodes developed as safer alternatives to high-energy-density cells like those based on lithium and sodium anodes. At cost of some reduction in energy density, magnesium-based cells safer because less susceptible to catastrophic meltdown followed by flames and venting of toxic fumes. Other advantages include ease of handling, machining, and disposal, and relatively low cost.

  18. Interstellar magnesium abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, M. J.; Dufton, P. L.; Hibbert, A.; York, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    An improved evaluation of the Mg II 1240 A doublet oscillator strength is used in conjunction with recently published Copernicus observations to derive accurate Mg II column densities toward 74 stars. These imply an average of 40 percent of interstellar magnesium is in the gaseous phase. Magnesium depletion is examined as a function of various interstellar extinction and density parameters, and the results are briefly discussed in terms of current depletion theories.

  19. Magnesium for Future Autos

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Luo, Alan A.; Sadayappan, Kumar; Shi, Wenfang

    2008-10-01

    In the quest for better fuel economy and improved environmental performance, magnesium may well become a metal of choice for constructing lighter, more efficient vehicles. Magnesium is the lightest structural metal, yet it has a high strength-to-weight ratio makes it comparable to steel in many applications. The world’s automakers already use magnesium for individual components. But new alloys and processing methods are needed before the metal can become economically and technologically feasible as a major automotive structural material. This article will explore the formation, challenges and initial results of an international collaboration—the Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project—that is leveraging the expertise and resources of Canada, China and the United States to advance the creation of magnesium-intensive vehicles. The MFERD project aims to develop the enabling technologies and knowledge base that will lead to a vehicles that are 50-60 percent lighter, equally affordable, more recyclable and of equal or better quality when compared to today’s vehicles. Databases of information also will be captured in models to enable further alloy and manufacturing process optimization. Finally, a life-cycle analysis of the magnesium used will be conducted.

  20. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.

    1988-10-18

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/alumnum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  1. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-21

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  2. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Anton

    1988-01-01

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  3. Magnesium deficiency accelerates cellular senescence in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Killilea, David W; Ames, Bruce N

    2008-04-15

    Magnesium inadequacy affects more than half of the U.S. population and is associated with increased risk for many age-related diseases, yet the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Altered cellular physiology has been demonstrated after acute exposure to severe magnesium deficiency, but few reports have addressed the consequences of long-term exposure to moderate magnesium deficiency in human cells. Therefore, IMR-90 human fibroblasts were continuously cultured in magnesium-deficient conditions to determine the long-term effects on the cells. These fibroblasts did not demonstrate differences in cellular viability or plating efficiency but did exhibit a decreased replicative lifespan in populations cultured in magnesium-deficient compared with standard media conditions, both at ambient (20% O(2)) and physiological (5% O(2)) oxygen tension. The growth rates for immortalized IMR-90 fibroblasts were not affected under the same conditions. IMR-90 fibroblast populations cultured in magnesium-deficient conditions had increased senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity and increased p16(INK4a) and p21(WAF1) protein expression compared with cultures from standard media conditions. Telomere attrition was also accelerated in cell populations from magnesium-deficient cultures. Thus, the long-term consequence of inadequate magnesium availability in human fibroblast cultures was accelerated cellular senescence, which may be a mechanism through which chronic magnesium inadequacy could promote or exacerbate age-related disease. PMID:18391207

  4. Rapid recovery from major depression using magnesium treatment.

    PubMed

    Eby, George A; Eby, Karen L

    2006-01-01

    Major depression is a mood disorder characterized by a sense of inadequacy, despondency, decreased activity, pessimism, anhedonia and sadness where these symptoms severely disrupt and adversely affect the person's life, sometimes to such an extent that suicide is attempted or results. Antidepressant drugs are not always effective and some have been accused of causing an increased number of suicides particularly in young people. Magnesium deficiency is well known to produce neuropathologies. Only 16% of the magnesium found in whole wheat remains in refined flour, and magnesium has been removed from most drinking water supplies, setting a stage for human magnesium deficiency. Magnesium ions regulate calcium ion flow in neuronal calcium channels, helping to regulate neuronal nitric oxide production. In magnesium deficiency, neuronal requirements for magnesium may not be met, causing neuronal damage which could manifest as depression. Magnesium treatment is hypothesized to be effective in treating major depression resulting from intraneuronal magnesium deficits. These magnesium ion neuronal deficits may be induced by stress hormones, excessive dietary calcium as well as dietary deficiencies of magnesium. Case histories are presented showing rapid recovery (less than 7 days) from major depression using 125-300 mg of magnesium (as glycinate and taurinate) with each meal and at bedtime. Magnesium was found usually effective for treatment of depression in general use. Related and accompanying mental illnesses in these case histories including traumatic brain injury, headache, suicidal ideation, anxiety, irritability, insomnia, postpartum depression, cocaine, alcohol and tobacco abuse, hypersensitivity to calcium, short-term memory loss and IQ loss were also benefited. Dietary deficiencies of magnesium, coupled with excess calcium and stress may cause many cases of other related symptoms including agitation, anxiety, irritability, confusion, asthenia, sleeplessness

  5. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic...

  6. Absorption of magnesium from orally administered magnesium sulfate in man.

    PubMed

    Morris, M E; LeRoy, S; Sutton, S C

    1987-01-01

    The use of magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) as a cathartic in patients with impaired renal function can lead to severe toxicity due to hypermagnesemia. Although toxicity is uncommon in healthy subjects, little is known concerning the extent of absorption of magnesium after a cathartic dose of magnesium sulfate. The bioavailability of magnesium following a large oral dose of magnesium sulfate in normal volunteers was examined in the present investigation. Baseline 24-hour urinary excretion rates of magnesium and creatinine were determined over 3 consecutive days in 6 healthy men. The oral administration of 13.9 g (56.5 mmoles) magnesium sulfate U.S.P., in 4 equal hourly increments, resulted in the urinary excretion (corrected for baseline excretion rate) of 4.0 +/- 2.9% (mean +/- SD) of the dose of magnesium during the first 24 hours and 6.9 +/- 7.0% of the dose during a 72-hour interval. Magnesium sulfate administration had no effect on the 24-hour urinary excretion rate of creatinine. The baseline excretion rate of magnesium was significantly correlated with that of creatinine (r = 0.875) and inorganic sulfate (r = 0.921). All of the subjects experienced mild or moderate diarrhea. Therefore, magnesium is absorbed to a limited and variable extent in healthy adults following a cathartic dose of magnesium sulfate. PMID:3430654

  7. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They ... They combine with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription. ...

  8. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids. These medicines provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  9. Magnesium Deficiency and High Light Intensity Enhance Activities of Superoxide Dismutase, Ascorbate Peroxidase, and Glutathione Reductase in Bean Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Ismail; Marschner, Horst

    1992-01-01

    The influence of varied Mg supply (10-1000 micromolar) and light intensity (100-580 microeinsteins per square meter per second) on the concentrations of ascorbate (AsA) and nonprotein SH-compounds and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.11) and the H2O2 scavenging enzymes, AsA peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) were studied in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves over a 13-day period. The concentrations of AsA and SH-compounds and the activities of SOD and H2O2 scavenging enzymes increased with light intensity, in particular in Mg-deficient leaves. Over the 12-day period of growth for a given light intensity, the concentrations of AsA and SH-compounds and the activities of these enzymes remained more or less constant in Mg-sufficient leaves. In contrast, in Mg-deficient leaves, a progressive increase was recorded, particularly in concentrations of AsA and activities of AsA peroxidase and glutathione reductase, whereas the activities of guaiacol peroxidase and catalase were only slightly enhanced. Partial shading of Mg-deficient leaf blades for 4 days prevented chlorosis, and the activities of the O2.− and H2O2 scavenging enzymes remained at a low level. The results demonstrate the role of both light intensity and Mg nutritional status on the regulation of O2.− and H2O2 scavenging enzymes in chloroplasts. PMID:16668779

  10. EFFECTS OF MANGANESE, CALCIUM, MAGNESIUM, AND ZINC ON NICKEL-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF MURINE NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects that divalent metals have on nickel-induced suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity were studied in mice. Male CBA/J mice were given a single intramuscular injection of nickel chloride (4.5-36 micrograms NiCl2/g), manganese chloride (20-80 micrograms MnCl2/g)...

  11. Calcium and Magnesium Ions Are Membrane-Active against Stationary-Phase Staphylococcus aureus with High Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuntao; Yang, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is notorious for its ability to acquire antibiotic-resistance, and antibiotic-resistant S. aureus has become a wide-spread cause of high mortality rate. Novel antimicrobials capable of eradicating S. aureus cells including antibiotic-resistant ones are thus highly desired. Membrane-active bactericides and species-specific antimicrobials are two promising sources of novel anti-infective agents for fighting against bacterial antibiotic-resistance. We herein show that Ca2+ and Mg2+, two alkaline-earth-metal ions physiologically essential for diverse living organisms, both disrupt model S. aureus membranes and kill stationary-phase S. aureus cells, indicative of membrane-activity. In contrast to S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis exhibit unaffected survival after similar treatment with these two cations, indicative of species-specific activity against S. aureus. Moreover, neither Ca2+ nor Mg2+ lyses mouse red blood cells, indicative of hemo-compatibility. This works suggests that Ca2+ and Mg2+ may have implications in targeted eradication of S. aureus pathogen including the antibiotic-resistant ones. PMID:26865182

  12. 1-Nitronapthalene as a cathode material for magnesium reserve batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunakaran, R.; Vasudevan, S.; Sivashanmugam, A.; Kumar, Gopu; Muniyandi, N.

    1-Nitronaphthalene has been investigated for use as a battery depolarizer in conjunction with a high-energt magnesium anode. Acetylene black is added to improve the conductivity of the non-conducting organic compound and its concentration in the mix is optimized for better performance of the cathode. To assess its suitability and its characteristics as a cathode active material, magnesium/1-nitronaphthalene cells are fabricated and discharged in different electrolytes (magnesium chloride, magnesium bromide and magnesium perchlorate) at various current densities. The capacity delivered by the cell system shows better reduction efficiency of the 1-nitronaphthalene depolarizer. Cyclic voltammetric studies are carried out on a glassy-carbon electrode to understand the reduction behaviour of 1-nitronaphthalene.

  13. Biodegradable resistive switching memory based on magnesium difluoride.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiping; Tsang, Melissa; Chen, I-Wei

    2016-08-11

    This study presents a new type of resistive switching memory device that can be used in biodegradable electronic applications. The biodegradable device features magnesium difluoride as the active layer and iron and magnesium as the corresponding electrodes. This is the first report on magnesium difluoride as a resistive switching layer. With on-off ratios larger than one hundred, the device on silicon switches at voltages less than one volt and requires only sub-mA programming current. AC endurance of 10(3) cycles is demonstrated with ±1 V voltage pulses. The switching mechanism is attributed to the formation and rupture of conductive filaments comprising fluoride vacancies in magnesium difluoride. Devices fabricated on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate are tested for functionality, and degradation is subsequently demonstrated in de-ionized water. An additional layer of magnesium difluoride is used to hinder the degradation and extend the lifetime of the device. PMID:27476796

  14. Magnesium Research and Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Joost, William; Smith, Mark T.

    2009-12-30

    The Magnesium Research and Technical Development (MR&TD) project supports efforts to increase using magnesium in automotive applications, including improving technology, lowering costs and increasing the knowledge needed to enable alloy and manufacturing process optimization. MR&TD supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project in collaboration with China and Canada. The MR&TD projects also maintains the magnesium bibliographic database at magnesium.pnl.gov.

  15. Pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis. Structure and re-activation of apoenzyme by the cofactors thiamin diphosphate and magnesium ion.

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, R J; Duggleby, R G

    1991-01-01

    To study the mechanism of re-activation of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase apoenzyme by its cofactors thiamin diphosphate and Mg2+, cofactor-free enzyme was prepared by dialysis against 1 mM-dipicolinic acid at pH 8.2. This apoenzyme was then used in a series of experiments that included determination of: (a) the affinity towards one cofactor when the other was present at saturating concentrations; (b) cofactor-binding rates by measuring the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence on the apoenzyme; (c) the effect of replacement of cofactors with various analogues; (d) the stoichiometry of bound cofactors in holoenzyme; and (e) the molecular mass of apoenzyme by gel filtration. The results of these experiments form the basis for a proposed model for the re-activation of Z. mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase apoenzyme by its cofactors. In this model there exists two alterative but equivalent pathways for cofactor binding. In each pathway the first step is an independent reversible binding of either thiamin diphosphate (Kd 187 microM) or Mg2+ (Kd 1.31 mM) to free apoenzyme. When both cofactors are present, the second cofactor-binding step to form active holoenzyme is a slow quasi-irreversible step. This second binding step is a co-operative process for both thiamin diphosphate (Kd 0.353 microM) and Mg2+ (Kd 2.47 microM). Both the apo- and the holo-enzyme have a tetrameric subunit structure, with cofactors binding in a 1:1 ratio with each subunit. PMID:2049073

  16. Mechanistic studies of copper(II)-aminoglycoside mediated DNA damage and magnesium catalyzed nuclease activity of hammerhead ribozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Anjali A.

    The antibacterial activity of aminoglycosides stems from their high affinity binding to the 16S rRNA in bacteria resulting in inhibition of protein synthesis. Used to treat acute bacterial infections these antibiotics have limited applications due to their high dosage requirements and the emergence of resistant strains. We have synthesized and characterized Cu(II) derivatives of the aminoglycosides, kanamycin A, tobramycin, neamine, kanamycin B, neomycin B, and paromomycin. The first three exhibit preferential and tight binding to Cu(II) as against neomycin B and kanamycin B and paromomycin. EPR of frozen solutions and UV-visible spectroscopy suggest a change in geometry around the Cu(II) but the stabilities of the complexes in water differ. These copper derivatives efficiently cleave plasmid DNA at micromolar concentrations (hydrolytic) and at nanomolar concentrations in the presence co-reactants like hydrogen peroxide or ascorbic acid. Hydrolysis is multi turnover and exhibits Michelis-Menten kinetics with enzyme-like behavior whereas oxidative cleavage is highly specific with C-4' H abstraction resulting in characteristic base propenal and nucleotide base products. Hydroxyl radicals generated are copper based and are generated in close proximity of the substrate. Hammerhead ribozymes are selectively hydrolyzed in the presence of divalent ions with Mg2+ being the metal ion of choice in vivo . Our studies with complex ions like cobalt hexaammine and fac-triamminetriaquochromium(III) establish outer sphere interactions of Mg2+ with the hammerhead in the catalytic site. There are two sets of sites, one structural and one catalytic. Complex ions in the catalytic site and divalent ions in the structural site result in a slow but active hammerhead ribozyme suggesting that the complex ions are not inhibitory, contrary to what was suggested previously.

  17. Magnesium and Osteoporosis: Current State of Knowledge and Future Research Directions

    PubMed Central

    Castiglioni, Sara; Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Albisetti, Walter; Maier, Jeanette A. M.

    2013-01-01

    A tight control of magnesium homeostasis seems to be crucial for bone health. On the basis of experimental and epidemiological studies, both low and high magnesium have harmful effects on the bones. Magnesium deficiency contributes to osteoporosis directly by acting on crystal formation and on bone cells and indirectly by impacting on the secretion and the activity of parathyroid hormone and by promoting low grade inflammation. Less is known about the mechanisms responsible for the mineralization defects observed when magnesium is elevated. Overall, controlling and maintaining magnesium homeostasis represents a helpful intervention to maintain bone integrity. PMID:23912329

  18. Kinetics of the Vacuolar H-Pyrophosphatase : The Roles of Magnesium, Pyrophosphate, and their Complexes as Substrates, Activators, and Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Leigh, R A; Pope, A J; Jennings, I R; Sanders, D

    1992-12-01

    The responses of the vacuolar membrane (tonoplast) proton-pumping inorganic pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase) from oat (Avena sativa L.) roots to changes in Mg(2+) and pyrophosphate (PPi) concentrations have been characterized. The kinetics were complex, and reaction kinetic models were used to determine which of the various PPi complexes were responsible for the observed responses. The results indicate that the substrate for the oat root vacuolar H(+)-PPase is Mg(2)PPi and that this complex is also a non-competitive inhibitor. In addition, the enzyme is activated by free Mg(2+) and competitively inhibited by free PPi. This conclusion differs from that reached in previous studies, in which it was proposed that MgPPi is the substrate for plant vacuolar H(+)-PPases. However, models incorporating MgPPi as a substrate were unable to describe the kinetics of the oat H(+)-PPase. It is demonstrated that models incorporating Mg(2)PPi as the substrate can describe some of the published kinetics of the Kalanchoë daigremontiana vacuolar H(+)-PPase. Calculations of the likely concentrations of Mg(2)PPi in plant cytoplasm suggest that the substrate binding site of the oat vacuolar H(+)-PPase would be about 70% saturated in vivo. PMID:16653186

  19. Neurotic, neuromuscular and autonomic nervous form of magnesium imbalance.

    PubMed

    Durlach, J; Bac, P; Durlach, V; Bara, M; Guiet-Bara, A

    1997-06-01

    The nervous form of magnesium imbalance represents the best documented experimental and clinical aspects of magnesium disorders. The nervous form of primary magnesium deficit (MD) in the adult appears as the best descriptive model for analysis of the symptomatology, aetiology, physiopathology, diagnosis and therapy of the most frequent form of MD. Nervous hyperexcitability due to chronic MD in the adult results in a non-specific clinical pattern with associated central and peripheral neuromuscular symptoms, analogous to the symptomatology previously described in medical literature as latent tetany, hyperventilation syndrome, spasmophilia, chronic fatigue syndrome, neurocirculatory asthenia and idiopathic Barlow's disease. On encountering this non-specific pattern, the signs of neuromuscular hyperexcitability are of much greater importance. Trousseau's sign is less sensitive than Chvostek's sign, but their sensitivities are increased by hyperventilation (Von Bondsdorff's test). Examination of the precordial area will be conducted in order to search clinical stigmata of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) which is a frequent dyskinesia due to chronic MD (about a quarter to one-third of cases). The electromyogram (EMG) shows one (or several) trains of autorhythmic activities beating for more than 2 min of one of the three tetanic activities (uniplets, multiplets or 'complex tonicoclonic tracings') during one of the three facilitation procedures: tourniquet-induced ischaemia lasting 10 min. post-ischaemia lasting 10 min after the removal of the tourniquet and hyperventilation over 5 min. A repetitive EMG constitutes the principal mark of nervous hyperexcitability (NHE) due to MD. The echocardiogram (ECC) is the best tool for detecting MVP, the 2-dimensional ECC with pulsed Doppler being more accurate than time-motion ECC. The routine ionic investigations comprise five static tests: plasma and erythrocyte magnesium, plasma calcium and daily magnesiuria and calciuria. An

  20. GlmU (N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase) bound to three magnesium ions and ATP at the active site

    PubMed Central

    Vithani, Neha; Bais, Vaibhav; Prakash, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU), a bifunctional enzyme exclusive to prokaryotes, belongs to the family of sugar nucleotidyltransferases (SNTs). The enzyme binds GlcNAc-1-P and UTP, and catalyzes a uridyltransfer reaction to synthesize UDP-GlcNAc, an important precursor for cell-wall biosynthesis. As many SNTs are known to utilize a broad range of substrates, substrate specificity in GlmU was probed using biochemical and structural studies. The enzymatic assays reported here demonstrate that GlmU is specific for its natural substrates UTP and GlcNAc-1-P. The crystal structure of GlmU bound to ATP and GlcNAc-1-P provides molecular details for the inability of the enzyme to utilize ATP for the nucleotidyltransfer reaction. ATP binding results in an inactive pre-catalytic enzyme–substrate complex, where it adopts an unusual conformation such that the reaction cannot be catalyzed; here, ATP is shown to be bound together with three Mg2+ ions. Overall, this structure represents the binding of an inhibitory molecule at the active site and can potentially be used to develop new inhibitors of the enzyme. Further, similar to DNA/RNA polymerases, GlmU was recently recognized to utilize two metal ions, MgA 2+ and MgB 2+, to catalyze the uridyltransfer reaction. Interestingly, displacement of MgB 2+ from its usual catalytically competent position, as noted in the crystal structure of RNA polymerase in an inactive state, was considered to be a key factor inhibiting the reaction. Surprisingly, in the current structure of GlmU MgB 2+ is similarly displaced; this raises the possibility that an analogous inhibitory mechanism may be operative in GlmU. PMID:24915076

  1. Mechanisms and regulation of renal magnesium transport.

    PubMed

    Houillier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium's most important role is in the release of chemical energy. Although most magnesium is stored outside of the extracellular fluid compartment, the regulated value is blood magnesium concentration. Cellular magnesium and bone magnesium do not play a major role in the defense of blood magnesium concentration; the major role is played by the kidney, where the renal tubule matches the urinary magnesium excretion and the net entry of magnesium into the extracellular fluid. In the kidney, magnesium is reabsorbed in the proximal tubule, the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, and the distal convoluted tubule. Magnesium absorption is mainly paracellular in the proximal tubule and in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, whereas it is transcellular in the distal convoluted tubule. Several hormones and extracellular magnesium itself alter the distal tubular handling of magnesium, but the hormone(s) regulating extracellular magnesium concentration remains unknown. PMID:24512082

  2. Highly Soluble Alkoxide Magnesium Salts for Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chen; Guo, Bingkun; Jiang, Deen; Custelcean, Radu; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A unique class of air-stable and non-pyrophoric magnesium electrolytes has been developed based on alkoxide magnesium compounds. The crystals obtained from this class of electrolytes exhibit a unique structure of tri-magnesium cluster, [Mg3Cl3(OR)2(THF)6]+ [(THF)MgCl3] . High reversible capacities and good rate capabilities were obtained in Mg-Mo6S8 batteries using these new electrolytes at both 20 and 50 oC.

  3. Nondestructive spot test method for magnesium and magnesium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method for spot test identification of magnesium and various magnesium alloys commonly used in aerospace applications is described. The spot test identification involves color codes obtained when several drops of 3 M hydrochloric acid are placed on the surface to be tested. After approximately thirty seconds, two drops of this reacted acid is transferred to each of two depressions in a spot plate for additions of other chemicals with subsequent color changes indicating magnesium or its alloy.

  4. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Richard L.; McKenzie, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

  5. CELLULAR MAGNESIUM HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Andrea M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium, the second most abundant cellular cation after potassium, is essential to regulate numerous cellular functions and enzymes, including ion channels, metabolic cycles, and signaling pathways, as attested by more than 1000 entries in the literature. Despite significant recent progress, however, our understanding of how cells regulate Mg2+ homeostasis and transport still remains incomplete. For example, the occurrence of major fluxes of Mg2+ in either direction across the plasma membrane of mammalian cells following metabolic or hormonal stimuli has been extensively documented. Yet, the mechanisms ultimately responsible for magnesium extrusion across the cell membrane have not been cloned. Even less is known about the regulation in cellular organelles. The present review is aimed at providing the reader with a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of the mechanisms enacted by eukaryotic cells to regulate cellular Mg2+ homeostasis and how these mechanisms are altered under specific pathological conditions. PMID:21640700

  6. Constraining magnesium cycling in marine sediments using magnesium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, J. A.; Schrag, D. P.

    2010-09-01

    Magnesium concentrations in deep-sea sediment pore-fluids typically decrease down core due to net precipitation of dolomite or clay minerals in the sediments or underlying crust. To better characterize and differentiate these processes, we have measured magnesium isotopes in pore-fluids and sediment samples from Ocean Drilling Program sites (1082, 1086, 1012, 984, 1219, and 925) that span a range of oceanographic settings. At all sites, magnesium concentrations decrease with depth. At sites where diagenetic reactions are dominated by the respiration of organic carbon, pore-fluid δ 26Mg values increase with depth by as much as 2‰. Because carbonates preferentially incorporate 24Mg (low δ 26Mg), the increase in pore-fluid δ 26Mg values at these sites is consistent with the removal of magnesium in Mg-carbonate (dolomite). In contrast, at sites where the respiration of organic carbon is not important and/or weatherable minerals are abundant, pore-fluid δ 26Mg values decrease with depth by up to 2‰. The decline in pore-fluid δ 26Mg at these sites is consistent with a magnesium sink that is isotopically enriched relative to the pore-fluid. The identity of this enriched magnesium sink is likely clay minerals. Using a simple 1D diffusion-advection-reaction model of pore-fluid magnesium, we estimate rates of net magnesium uptake/removal and associated net magnesium isotope fractionation factors for sources and sinks at all sites. Independent estimates of magnesium isotope fractionation during dolomite precipitation from measured δ 26Mg values of dolomite samples from sites 1082 and 1012 are very similar to modeled net fractionation factors at these sites, suggesting that local exchange of magnesium between sediment and pore-fluid at these sites can be neglected. Our results indicate that the magnesium incorporated in dolomite is 2.0-2.7‰ depleted in δ 26Mg relative to the precipitating fluid. Assuming local exchange of magnesium is minor at the rest of the

  7. In vivo assessment of magnesium status in human body using accelerator-based neutron activation measurement of hands: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam; Pejovic-Milic, A.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Chettle, D. R.

    2008-02-15

    Magnesium (Mg) is an element essential for many enzymatic reactions in the human body. Various human and animal studies suggest that changes in Mg status are linked to diseases such as cardiac arrhythmia, coronary heart disease, hypertension, premenstrual syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. Thus, knowledge of Mg levels in the human body is needed. A direct measurement of human blood serum, which contains only 0.3% of the total body Mg, is generally used to infer information about the status of Mg in the body. However, in many clinical situations, Mg stored in large levels, for example in bones, muscles, and soft tissues, needs to be monitored either to evaluate the efficacy of a treatment or to study the progression of diseases associated with the deficiency of total body Mg. This work presents a feasibility study of a noninvasive, in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) technique using the {sup 26}Mg(n,{gamma}){sup 27}Mg reaction to measure Mg levels in human hands. The technique employs the McMaster University high beam current Tandetron accelerator hand irradiation facility and an array of eight NaI (T1) detectors arranged in a 4{pi} geometry for delayed counting of the 0.844 and 1.014 MeV gamma rays emitted when {sup 27}Mg decays in the irradiated hand. Mg determination in humans using IVNAA of hands has been demonstrated to be feasible, with effective doses as low as one-quarter of those delivered in chest x rays. The overall experimental uncertainty in the measurements is estimated to be approximately 5% (1{sigma}). The results are found to be in the range of the in vitro measurements reported for other cortical bones collected from different sites of the human skeleton, which confirms that this technique mainly provides a measure of the amount of Mg in hand bones. The average concentration of Mg determined in human hands is 10.96{+-}1.25 ({+-}1 SD) mg Mg/g Ca. The coefficient of variation (11%) observed in this study is comparable with or lower than several

  8. In vivo assessment of magnesium status in human body using accelerator-based neutron activation measurement of hands: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Pejović-Milić, A; McNeill, F E; Byun, S H; Prestwich, W V; Chettle, D R

    2008-02-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is an element essential for many enzymatic reactions in the human body. Various human and animal studies suggest that changes in Mg status are linked to diseases such as cardiac arrhythmia, coronary heart disease, hypertension, premenstrual syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. Thus, knowledge of Mg levels in the human body is needed. A direct measurement of human blood serum, which contains only 0.3% of the total body Mg, is generally used to infer information about the status of Mg in the body. However, in many clinical situations, Mg stored in large levels, for example in bones, muscles, and soft tissues, needs to be monitored either to evaluate the efficacy of a treatment or to study the progression of diseases associated with the deficiency of total body Mg. This work presents a feasibility study of a noninvasive, in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) technique using the 26Mg (n, gamma) 27Mg reaction to measure Mg levels in human hands. The technique employs the McMaster University high beam current Tandetron accelerator hand irradiation facility and an array of eight NaI (T1) detectors arranged in a 4 pi geometry for delayed counting of the 0.844 and 1.014 MeV gamma rays emitted when 27Mg decays in the irradiated hand. Mg determination in humans using IVNAA of hands has been demonstrated to be feasible, with effective doses as low as one-quarter of those delivered in chest x rays. The overall experimental uncertainty in the measurements is estimated to be approximately 5% (1 sigma). The results are found to be in the range of the in vitro measurements reported for other cortical bones collected from different sites of the human skeleton, which confirms that this technique mainly provides a measure of the amount of Mg in hand bones. The average concentration of Mg determined in human hands is 10.96 +/- 1.25 (+/- 1 SD) mg Mg/g Ca. The coefficient of variation (11%) observed in this study is comparable with or lower than several studies using in

  9. The Magnesium Chelation Step in Chlorophyll Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Dilworth, Ph.D Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division Office of Basis Energy Sciences, greg.dilworth@science.doe.gov

    2001-01-17

    The progress described in this report encompasses work supported by DOE grant DE-FG09-89ER13989 for the period 2/15/92 to the present 6/14/94. The goals of the project were to continue investigating the enzymology of Mg-chelatase and to investigate the co-regulation of heme and chlorophyll formation in intact plastids. During this period the laboratory had additional support (two years) from USDA to investigate heme metabolism in chloroplasts. This report is arranged so that the progress is described by reference to manuscripts which are published, under review or in preparation.

  10. Mineral of the month: magnesium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Magnesium, often confused with last month’s mineral of the month manganese, is valued primarily because of its light weight and high strength-to-weight ratio. Magnesium is the eighth most abundant element and constitutes about 2 percent of the Earth’s crust. It is the third most plentiful element dissolved in seawater, with a concentration averaging 0.13 percent. Magnesium is found in over 60 minerals, and also is recovered from seawater, wells, and lake brines and bitterns.

  11. Low brain magnesium in migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadan, N.M.; Halvorson, H.; Vande-Linde, A.; Levine, S.R.; Helpern, J.A.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-10-01

    Brain magnesium was measured in migraine patients and control subjects using in vivo 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. pMg and pH were calculated from the chemical shifts between Pi, PCr and ATP signals. Magnesium levels were low during a migraine attack without changes in pH. We hypothesize that low brain magnesium is an important factor in the mechanism of the migraine attack.

  12. Magnesium metabolism: a brief review.

    PubMed Central

    Paymaster, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The important role played by the magnesium ion in the body is not generally recognized. The action of numerous enzyme systems critical to cellular metabolism is regulated by it and it contributes importantly to macromolecular structure. Magnesium defiency occurs more often than is generally suspected; magnesium excess, though uncommon, is of special interest to the anaesthetist because it produces a curare-like effect on neuromuscular transmission. It is hoped that this brief review of magnesium metabolism will draw attention to its importance and relevance in everyday practice. PMID:942168

  13. Briefly Bound to Activate: Transient Binding of a Second Catalytic Magnesium Activates the Structure and Dynamics of CDK2 Kinase for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Zhao Qin; Jacobsen, Douglas M.; Young, Matthew A.

    2014-10-02

    We have determined high-resolution crystal structures of a CDK2/Cyclin A transition state complex bound to ADP, substrate peptide, and MgF{sub 3}{sup -}. Compared to previous structures of active CDK2, the catalytic subunit of the kinase adopts a more closed conformation around the active site and now allows observation of a second Mg{sup 2+} ion in the active site. Coupled with a strong [Mg{sup 2+}] effect on in vitro kinase activity, the structures suggest that the transient binding of the second Mg{sup 2+} ion is necessary to achieve maximum rate enhancement of the chemical reaction, and Mg{sup 2+} concentration could represent an important regulator of CDK2 activity in vivo. Molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the simultaneous binding of substrate peptide, ATP, and two Mg{sup 2+} ions is able to induce a more rigid and closed organization of the active site that functions to orient the phosphates, stabilize the buildup of negative charge, and shield the subsequently activated {gamma}-phosphate from solvent.

  14. Lithium-aluminum-magnesium electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Melendres, Carlos A.; Siegel, Stanley

    1978-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary, high-temperature electrochemical cell. The cell also includes a molten salt electrolyte of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides and a positive electrode including a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent and a magnesium-aluminum alloy as a structural matrix. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, magnesium, and aluminum are formed but the electrode composition in both its charged and discharged state remains substantially free of the alpha lithium-aluminum phase and exhibits good structural integrity.

  15. Magnesium Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    This Phase II project is developing a magnesium (Mg) Hall effect thruster system that would open the door for in situ resource utilization (ISRU)-based solar system exploration. Magnesium is light and easy to ionize. For a Mars- Earth transfer, the propellant mass savings with respect to a xenon Hall effect thruster (HET) system are enormous. Magnesium also can be combusted in a rocket with carbon dioxide (CO2) or water (H2O), enabling a multimode propulsion system with propellant sharing and ISRU. In the near term, CO2 and H2O would be collected in situ on Mars or the moon. In the far term, Mg itself would be collected from Martian and lunar regolith. In Phase I, an integrated, medium-power (1- to 3-kW) Mg HET system was developed and tested. Controlled, steady operation at constant voltage and power was demonstrated. Preliminary measurements indicate a specific impulse (Isp) greater than 4,000 s was achieved at a discharge potential of 400 V. The feasibility of delivering fluidized Mg powder to a medium- or high-power thruster also was demonstrated. Phase II of the project evaluated the performance of an integrated, highpower Mg Hall thruster system in a relevant space environment. Researchers improved the medium power thruster system and characterized it in detail. Researchers also designed and built a high-power (8- to 20-kW) Mg HET. A fluidized powder feed system supporting the high-power thruster was built and delivered to Busek Company, Inc.

  16. Magnesium sulfate protects fetal skin from intrauterine ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Kaptanoglu, Asli F; Arca, Turkan; Kilinc, Kamer

    2012-09-01

    Intrauterine ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in fetus occurs with multifactorial pathogenesis and results with multiorgan injury including skin. Magnesium has widespread use in obstetric practice. Inn addition to magnesium's tocolytic and neuroprotective properties, it also has free radical reducing effects. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether magnesium sulfate could have protective effect on fetal rat skin in intrauterine ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Fetal skin ischemia was induced by clamping the utero-ovarian arteries bilaterally for 30 min, and reperfusion was achieved by removing the clamps for 60 min in 19-day pregnant rats. Magnesium Sulfate (MgSO(4)) was given to pregnant rats 20 min before I/R injury at the dose of 600 mg/kg in magnesium treatment group. No ischemia reperfusion was applied to control and sham-operated groups. Lipid peroxidation from the skin tissues was determined as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was determined for neutrophil activation. The results showed that the levels of TBARS and MPO increased significantly in the fetal rat skin after I/R injury compared to control group. Levels of TBARS and MPO were significantly lower than those of I/R group in Magnesium-treated group. In conclusion, intrauterine ischemia-reperfusion may produce considerable fetal skin injury. Increased TBARS and MPO activity can be inhibited by magnesium treatment. This suggests that magnesium treatment may have protective effect on fetal rat skin in intrauterine I/R injury. PMID:22310734

  17. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium-doped ceramics has been described to modify brushite cements and improve their biological behavior. However, few studies have analyzed the efficiency of this approach to induce magnesium substitution in brushite crystals. Mg-doped ceramics composed of Mg-substituted β-TCP, stanfieldite and/or farringtonite were reacted with primary monocalcium phosphate (MCP) in the presence of water. The cement setting reaction has resulted in the formation of brushite and newberyite within the cement matrix. Interestingly, the combination of SAED and EDX analyses of single crystal has indicated the occurrence of magnesium substitution within brushite crystals. Moreover, the effect of magnesium ions on the structure, and mechanical and setting properties of the new cements was characterized as well as the release of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Further research would enhance the efficiency of the system to incorporate larger amounts of magnesium ions within brushite crystals. PMID:25428098

  18. Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Schmidt, Joachim; Kisters, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. It has been recognized as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, where it is crucial for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism. Magnesium is required for DNA and RNA synthesis, reproduction, and protein synthesis. Moreover, magnesium is essential for the regulation of muscular contraction, blood pressure, insulin metabolism, cardiac excitability, vasomotor tone, nerve transmission and neuromuscular conduction. Imbalances in magnesium status—primarily hypomagnesemia as it is seen more common than hypermagnesemia—might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Based on magnesium’s many functions within the human body, it plays an important role in prevention and treatment of many diseases. Low levels of magnesium have been associated with a number of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (e.g., stroke), migraine headaches, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). PMID:26404370

  19. Understanding the effect of magnesium ion concentration on the catalytic activity of ribonuclease H through computation: Does a third metal binding site modulate endonuclease activity?

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ming-Hsun; De Vivo, Marco; Peraro, Matteo Dal; Klein, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Ribonuclease H (RNase H) belongs to the nucleotidyl-transferase (NT) superfamily and hydrolyzes the phosphodiester linkage on the RNA strand of a DNA/RNA hybrid duplex. Due to its activity in HIV reverse transcription, it represents a promising target for anti-HIV drug design. While crystallographic data have located two ions in the catalytic site, there is ongoing debate concerning just how many metal ions bound at the active site are optimal for catalysis. Indeed, experiments have shown a dependency of the catalytic activity on the Mg2+ concentration. Moreover, in RNase H the glutamate residue E188 has been shown to be essential for full enzymatic activation regardless of the Mg2+ concentration. The catalytic center is known to contain two Mg2+ ions (Nowotny et al.) and E188 is not one of the primary metal ligands. Herein, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are employed to study the metal-ligand coordination in RNase H at different concentration of Mg2+. Importantly, the presence of a third Mg2+ ion, bound to the second-shell ligand E188, is persistent feature of the MD simulations. Free energy calculations have identified two distinct conformations depending on the concentration of Mg2+. At standard concentration, a third Mg2+ is found in the catalytic pocket but it does not perturb the optimal RNase H active conformation. However, at higher concentration, the third Mg2+ ion heavily perturbs the nucleophilic water and thereby influences the catalytic efficiency of RNase H. In addition, the E188A mutant shows no ability to engage additional Mg2+ ions nearby the catalytic pocket. This finding likely explains the decrease in catalytic activity of E188A, and also supports the key role of E188 in localizing the third Mg2+ ion at the active site. Glutamate residues are commonly found surrounding the metal center in the endonuclease family, which suggests that this structural motif may be an important feature to enhance catalytic activity. The present MD

  20. Expanding Mg-Zn hybrid chemistry: inorganic salt effects in addition reactions of organozinc reagents to trifluoroacetophenone and the implications for a synergistic lithium-magnesium-zinc activation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Clegg, William; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Kennedy, Alan R; McCall, Matthew D; Russo, Luca; Hevia, Eva

    2011-07-18

    Numerous organic transformations rely on organozinc compounds made through salt-metathesis (exchange) reactions from organolithium or Grignard reagents with a suitable zinc precursor. By combining X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations, this study sheds new light on the constitution of the organometallic species involved in this important synthetic tool. Investigations into the metathesis reactions of equimolar amounts of Grignard reagents (RMgX) and ZnCl(2) in THF led to the isolation of novel magnesium-zinc hybrids, [{(thf)(2)Mg(μ-Cl)(3)ZnR}(2)] (R=Et, tBu, nBu or o-OMe-C(6)H(4)), which exhibit an unprecedented structural motif in mixed magnesium-zinc chemistry. Furthermore, theoretical modelling of the reaction of EtMgCl with ZnCl(2) reveals that formation of the mixed-metal compound is thermodynamically preferred to that of the expected homometallic products, RZnCl and MgCl(2). This study also assesses the alkylating ability of hybrid 3 towards the sensitive ketone trifluoroacetophenone, revealing a dramatic increase in the chemoselectivity of the reaction when LiCl is introduced as an additive. This observation, combined with recent related breakthroughs in synthesis, points towards the existence of a trilateral Li/Mg/Zn synergistic effect. PMID:21656589

  1. Synthesis of magnesium diboride by magnesium vapor infiltration process (MVIP)

    DOEpatents

    Serquis, Adriana C.; Zhu, Yuntian T.; Mueller, Frederick M.; Peterson, Dean E.; Liao, Xiao Zhou

    2003-01-01

    A process of preparing superconducting magnesium diboride powder by heating an admixture of solid magnesium and amorphous boron powder or pellet under an inert atmosphere in a Mg:B ratio of greater than about 0.6:1 at temperatures and for time sufficient to form said superconducting magnesium diboride. The process can further include exposure to residual oxygen at high synthesis temperatures followed by slow cooling. In the cooling process oxygen atoms dissolved into MgB.sub.2 segregated to form nanometer-sized coherent Mg(B,O) precipitates in the MgB.sub.2 matrix, which can act as flux pinning centers.

  2. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis of magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles from magnesium.

    PubMed

    Baidukova, Olga; Skorb, Ekaterina V

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation in water provides special kinetic and thermodynamic conditions for chemical synthesis and nanostructuring of solids. Using cavitation phenomenon, we obtained magnesium hydroxide from pure magnesium. This approach allows magnesium hydroxide to be synthesized without the requirement of any additives and non-aqueous solvents. Variation of sonochemical parameters enabled a total transformation of the metal to nanosized brucite with distinct morphology. Special attention is given to the obtaining of platelet-shaped, nanometric and de-agglomerated powders. The products of the synthesis were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). PMID:26964968

  3. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No. 1309-48-4... powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide or...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2, CAS... a white precipitate by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble magnesium salt or...

  7. Mineral resource of the month: magnesium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium is the eighthmost abundant element in Earth’s crust, and the second-most abundant metal ion in seawater. Although magnesium is found in more than 60 minerals, only brucite, dolomite, magnesite and carnallite are commercially important for their magnesium content. Magnesium and its compounds also are recovered from seawater, brines found in lakes and wells, and bitterns (salts).

  8. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... salt or by hydration of reactive grades of magnesium oxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No... light magnesium oxide. Heating the salts under more rigorous conditions (1200 °C for 12 hours)...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to crystallization... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O,...

  11. Role of Cellular Magnesium in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Long, Samantha; Romani, Andrea MP

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is required for many of the major organs to function and plays a crucial role in human and mammalian physiology. Magnesium is essential for the structure of bones and teeth, acts as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymes in the body, including binding to ATP for kinase reactions, and affects permeability of excitable membranes and neuromuscular transmission. Despite these essential roles, much is still unknown about magnesium physiology and homeostasis. Currently, nutritionists believe that the general population intakes insufficient magnesium daily through the diet. The effects of magnesium deficiency are, for the most part undetected, and simple, widespread assessments of magnesium intake remain unavailable for humans. Many of the patients admitted to hospitals or medical care facilities are unaware of their low magnesium levels. Moreover, because magnesium is predominantly an intracellular cation (>99%), serum magnesium levels remain a poor predictor of tissue magnesium content and availability. This review will discuss the effects of magnesium deficiency in various pathologies affecting the human population. The underlying causes for magnesium depletion in major physiological systems will be examined along with the involved signaling pathways and the main roles of magnesium homeostasis. Where possible (e.g. alcoholism), the implications of administering supplemental magnesium will be discussed. Ultimately, this review will advocate for the necessity of identifying easy and reproducible methods to assess serum and cellular magnesium levels and to identify magnesium deficiency in order to alleviate related pathological conditions. PMID:25839058

  12. Physicochemical action of potassium-magnesium citrate in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, C. Y.; Koenig, K.; Khan, R.; Haynes, S.; Padalino, P.

    1992-01-01

    Effect of potassium-magnesium citrate on urinary biochemistry and crystallization of stone-forming salts was compared with that of potassium citrate at same dose of potassium in five normal subjects and five patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Compared to the placebo phase, urinary pH rose significantly from 6.06 +/- 0.27 to 6.48 +/- 0.36 (mean +/- SD, p less than 0.0167) during treatment with potassium citrate (50 mEq/day for 7 days) and to 6.68 +/- 0.31 during therapy with potassium-magnesium citrate (containing 49 mEq K, 24.5 mEq Mg, and 73.5 mEq citrate per day). Urinary pH was significantly higher during potassium-magnesium citrate than during potassium citrate therapy. Thus, the amount of undissociated uric acid declined from 118 +/- 61 mg/day during the placebo phase to 68 +/- 54 mg/day during potassium citrate treatment and, more prominently, to 41 +/- 46 mg/day during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy. Urinary magnesium rose significantly from 102 +/- 25 to 146 +/- 37 mg/day during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy but not during potassium citrate therapy. Urinary citrate rose more prominently during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy (to 1027 +/- 478 mg/day from 638 +/- 252 mg/day) than during potassium citrate treatment (to 932 +/- 297 mg/day). Consequently, urinary saturation (activity product) of calcium oxalate declined significantly (from 1.49 x 10(-8) to 1.03 x 10(-8) M2) during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy and marginally (to 1.14 x 10(-8) M2) during potassium citrate therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  13. Magnesium: Engineering the Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. B.; Yang, H. Y.; Abbott, T. B.; Easton, M. A.; Birbilis, N.

    2012-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys provide numerous benefits as lightweight materials; however, industrial deployment of Mg in most instances requires anticorrosion coatings. Engineering the Mg surface is an area that has been undergoing intense research recently. Surface engineering commences with the "pretreatment" step, which can be used to modify the surface composition and morphology, resulting in surface enrichment or depletion of alloying elements. Following this, electrochemical plating (including electro- and electroless plating) and conversion coatings have emerged as common means of coating Mg. In this study, we present the key aspects relating to the science and technology associated with pretreatment, electrochemical plating, and conversion coatings. This is followed by experimental examples of engineered surfaces of industrial relevance.

  14. Magnesium and hearing.

    PubMed

    Cevette, Michael J; Vormann, Jürgen; Franz, Kay

    2003-01-01

    The last several decades have revealed clinical and experimental data regarding the importance of magnesium (Mg) in hearing. Increased susceptibility to noise damage, ototoxicity, and auditory hyperexcitability are linked to states of Mg deficiency. Evidence for these processes has come slowly and direct effects have remained elusive because plasma Mg levels do not always correlate with its deficiency. Despite the major progress in the understanding of cochlear mechanical and auditory nerve function, the neurochemical and pharmacologic role of Mg is not clear. The putative mechanism suggests that Mg deficiency may contribute to a metabolic cellular cascade of events. Mg deficiency leads to an increased permeability of the calcium channel in the hair cells with a consequent over influx of calcium, an increased release of glutamate via exocytosis, and over stimulation of NMDA receptors on the auditory nerve. This paper provides a current overview of relevant Mg metabolism and deficiency and its influence on hearing. PMID:12940704

  15. Thallium magnesium chloride: A high light yield, large effective atomic number, intrinsically activated crystalline scintillator for X-ray and gamma-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yutaka; Koshimizu, Masanori; Yanagida, Takayuki; Okada, Go; Saeki, Keiichiro; Asai, Keisuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the luminescence and the scintillation properties of a newly developed thallium magnesium chloride (TlMgCl3) crystal. The crystal sample can be easily fabricated from the melt using the Bridgman method. The photoluminescence band appeared near the wavelength of 405 nm under excitation at 230 nm. An X-ray-induced scintillation spectrum showed an intense emission band near the wavelength of 405 nm. The decay time constant was estimated to be approximately 60 ns (∼25%) and 350 ns (∼75%) using a bi-exponential fitting. The scintillation light yield reached 46,000 photons/MeV with an energy resolution of 5% at 662 keV.

  16. Magnesium status and digoxin toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Young, I S; Goh, E M; McKillop, U H; Stanford, C F; Nicholls, D P; Trimble, E R

    1991-01-01

    1. Eighty-one hospital patients receiving digoxin were separated into groups with and without digoxin toxicity using clinical criteria. Serum digoxin, sodium, potassium, calcium, creatinine, magnesium and monocyte magnesium concentrations were compared. 2. Subjects with digoxin toxicity had impaired colour vision (P less than 0.0001, Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test) and increased digoxin levels (1.89 (1.56-2.21) vs 1.34 (1.20-1.47) nmol l-1, P less than 0.01) (mean (95% confidence limits], though there was considerable overlap between two groups. 3. Subjects with digoxin toxicity had lower levels of serum magnesium (0.80 (0.76-0.84) vs 0.88 (0.85-0.91) mmol l-1, P less than 0.01) and monocyte magnesium (6.40 (5.65-7.16) vs 8.76 (7.81-9.71) mg g-1 DNA, P less than 0.01), but there were no significant differences in other biochemical parameters. A greater proportion of toxic subjects were receiving concomitant diuretic therapy (20/21 vs 37/60, P less than 0.05). 4. Magnesium deficiency was the most frequently identified significant electrolyte disturbance in relation to digoxin toxicity. In the presence of magnesium deficiency digoxin toxicity developed at relatively low serum digoxin concentrations. PMID:1768564

  17. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tanoi, Keitaro; Kobayashi, Natsuko I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium ions (Mg2+) are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency. PMID:27135350

  18. Magnesium and fetal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, K.

    1988-01-01

    Fetal growth retardation and premature labor are major problems in perinatal medicine today and account for a great deal of the observed fetal morbidity. While the neonatal death rate has steadily declined over the past decade, there has been a lack of concommitant decrease in these two leading problems. Magnesium (Mg/sup ++/) plays a major role in both of these areas of concern. The fact that it is used as a treatment for premature labor has led investigators to look at low Mg/sup ++/ as a possible cause of this poorly understood phenomenon. The second major cause of small for gestational age infants is intrauterine growth retardation, a condition which may be of either fetal or maternal origin. In either case, Mg/sup ++/ may be implicated since it exerts a strong influence on the underlying pathophysiology of placental failure and maternal hypertension. Both of these conditions are mediated by vascular and platelet hyperactivity as well as by and increase in the ration of thromboxane to prostacyclin. Studies in both the human and animal species are beginning to show how Mg/sup ++/ interacts in these conditions to produce such a damaging fetal outcome. The recent use of Doppler velocimetry of the developing fetus has shown reduced fetal vascular and maternal uterine vascular compliance as early as 14 weeks of gestation in those who would be so affected.

  19. Acute tocolysis for fetal distress: terbutaline versus magnesium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Magann, E F; Cleveland, R S; Dockery, J R; Chauhan, S P; Martin, J N; Morrison, J C

    1993-11-01

    Forty-six women in active labour who developed fetal distress requiring abdominal delivery were randomized to receive 0.25 mg of terbutaline (subcutaneously) or magnesium sulphate as a 4-g bolus (intravenously) to decrease uterine activity. The terbutaline-treated group in contrast to the magnesium sulphate-treated group had reduced uterine activity as measured by Montevideo units (p < 0.002). This decrease in uterine activity was noted more rapidly in all 23 patients who received terbutaline, 1.8 +/- 0.74 minutes compared to 7.5 +/- 2.1 minutes in the 16 of 23 patients (magnesium sulphate-treated women) in whom a decrease in uterine activity occurred (p < 0.001). Umbilical cord arterial blood pH at delivery was less than 7.20 in only 2 of the 23 patients treated with terbutaline versus 7 of the 23 in the magnesium sulphate-treated group. We conclude that terbutaline is an effective and more rapid-acting tocolytic agent to arrest uterine activity prior to delivery for fetal distress. PMID:8179541

  20. Magnesium silicide intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gh.; Gill, H. S.; Varin, R. A.

    1993-11-01

    Methods of induction melting an ultra-low-density magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) intermetallic and its alloys and the resulting microstructure and microhardness were studied. The highest quality ingots of Mg2Si alloys were obtained by triple melting in a graphite crucible coated with boron nitride to eliminate reactivity, under overpressure of high-purity argon (1.3 X 105 Pa), at a temperature close to but not exceeding 1105 °C ± 5 °C to avoid excessive evaporation of Mg. After establishing the proper induction-melting conditions, the Mg-Si binary alloys and several Mg2Si alloys macroalloyed with 1 at. pct of Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, Zn, Mn, Cr, and Fe were induction melted and, after solidification, investigated by optical microscopy and quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both the Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectic in the binary alloys exhibited a small but systematic increase in the Si content as the overall composition of the binary alloy moved closer toward the Mg2Si line compound. The Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the as-solidified Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectics in the Mg-Si binary alloys decreased with increasing Mg (decreasing Si) content in the eutectic. This behavior persisted even after annealing for 75 hours at 0.89 pct of the respective eutectic temperature. The Mg-rich eutectic in the Mg2Si + Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, and Zn alloys contained sections exhibiting a different optical contrast and chemical composition than the rest of the eutectic. Some particles dispersed in the Mg2Si matrix were found in the Mg2Si + Cr, Mn, and Fe alloys. The EDS results are presented and discussed and compared with the VHN data.

  1. Lightweight magnesium-lithium alloys show promise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. T.; Cataldo, C. E.

    1964-01-01

    Evaluation tests show that magnesium-lithium alloys are lighter and more ductile than other magnesium alloys. They are being used for packaging, housings, containers, where light weight is more important than strength.

  2. Magnesium/Calcium Competition at Excitable Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belzer, Bill; Fry, Panni

    1998-01-01

    Considers some consequences of altering intracellular calcium supply by magnesium concentration changes. Focuses on using this procedure as an exercise with allied health students as they witness therapeutic uses of magnesium and other calcium entry inhibitors. (DDR)

  3. Deleterious effects of magnesium intoxication upon the domestic broiler chick

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    Dietary levels of 0.6 to 0.8% magnesium in a corn-soy basal were rachitogenic. These rickets appeared most like phosphorus deficiency. Bone Ca/P ratios were numerically quite low implying a lack of transformation from amorphous calcium phosphate to hydroxyapatite. Bone alkaline phosphatase activity was elevated. Additional dietary phosphorus ameliorated, but could not overcome the rachitogenic effects of magnesium. Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD), induced by elevated dietary P, was decreased by high levels of dietary Mg, but with no decrease in plasma phosphorus. Anticoccidial ionophores fed in conjunction with a moderate dietary challenge of Mg (0.48%) produced no clear changes in plasma calcium or Mg, but did interact to reduce body weight. The diarrhea caused by magnesium intoxication is not due to hyperosmotic loads of Mg per se. Rather, Cl was observed to be the major ionic constituent of the gut osmotic load implying different gut ionic fluxes in control versus magnesium intoxicated chicks. These data imply that the cathartic action of Mg is due to hypersecretion of the gut. Effects mediated or modified by the CNS changed in magnesium intoxicated chicks. Such chicks appeared cold and stayed near the heat. When startled, they exhibited extreme avoidance behavior and seizures similar to epilepsy and/or Cl deficiency. Brain tissue Mg content did not concomitantly increase. Whether these effects are due to central signals is unclear.

  4. Susceptibility of metallic magnesium implants to bacterial biofilm infections.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Rohde, Manfred; Rais, Bushra; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Mueller, Peter P

    2016-06-01

    Magnesium alloys have promising mechanical and biological properties as biodegradable medical implant materials for temporary applications during bone healing or as vascular stents. Whereas conventional implants are prone to colonization by treatment resistant microbial biofilms in which bacteria are embedded in a protective matrix, magnesium alloys have been reported to act antibacterial in vitro. To permit a basic assessment of antibacterial properties of implant materials in vivo an economic but robust animal model was established. Subcutaneous magnesium implants were inoculated with bacteria in a mouse model. Contrary to the expectations, bacterial activity was enhanced and prolonged in the presence of magnesium implants. Systemic antibiotic treatments were remarkably ineffective, which is a typical property of bacterial biofilms. Biofilm formation was further supported by electron microscopic analyses that revealed highly dense bacterial populations and evidence for the presence of extracellular matrix material. Bacterial agglomerates could be detected not only on the implant surface but also at a limited distance in the peri-implant tissue. Therefore, precautions may be necessary to minimize risks of metallic magnesium-containing implants in prospective clinical applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1489-1499, 2016. PMID:26860452

  5. Antenatal magnesium sulfate: Neuro-protection for preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Oddie, S; Tuffnell, D J; McGuire, W

    2015-11-01

    The neuro-protective effect of antenatal magnesium sulfate on very preterm infants has been demonstrated in good-quality randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses. Magnesium administered prior to preterm delivery crosses over to the foetal circulation and acts via several pathways to reduce perinatal neuronal damage. Meta-analysis of the trial data indicates that antenatal magnesium sulfate reduces the risk of cerebral palsy by one-third, and results in one fewer case in every 50 women treated. Treatment is associated with discomfort and flushing in some women, but maternal side-effects are mostly transient and manageable. Magnesium sulfate has also been found to be without any serious adverse consequences in newborn infants. Consensus recommendations and guidelines have been developed and implemented internationally, and endorsed by the UK Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. However, magnesium sulfate for neuro-protection of very preterm infants has not yet become established widely in UK practice. Paediatricians, neonatologists and advocacy groups for preterm infants and their families could contribute to raising awareness and engage in dissemination activities and implementation initiatives to develop local protocols for adoption of this safe, effective and cost-effective intervention to reduce the burden of cerebral palsy in children born very preterm. PMID:25896966

  6. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate by the addition of...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425... GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular formula approximately (MgCO3)4·Mg(OH)2·5H2O, CAS Reg. No. 39409-82-0) is also known as magnesium carbonate hydroxide. It is a...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  11. Solid-state rechargeable magnesium battery

    DOEpatents

    Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Liu, Tianbiao; Li, Guosheng

    2016-09-06

    Embodiments of a solid-state electrolyte comprising magnesium borohydride, polyethylene oxide, and optionally a Group IIA or transition metal oxide are disclosed. The solid-state electrolyte may be a thin film comprising a dispersion of magnesium borohydride and magnesium oxide nanoparticles in polyethylene oxide. Rechargeable magnesium batteries including the disclosed solid-state electrolyte may have a coulombic efficiency .gtoreq.95% and exhibit cycling stability for at least 50 cycles.

  12. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular formula approximately (MgCO3)4·Mg(OH)2·5H2O, CAS Reg. No. 39409-82-0) is also known as magnesium...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  14. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  1. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  2. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  3. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  13. Magnesium, Inflammation, and Obesity in Chronic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    About 60% of U.S. adults do not consume the Estimated Average Intake for magnesium, but widespread pathological conditions attributed to magnesium deficiency have not been reported. However, low magnesium status has been associated with numerous pathological conditions characterized as having a chr...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 76 FR 69284 - Pure Magnesium From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Pure Magnesium From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on pure magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... USITC Publication 4274 (October 2011), entitled Pure Magnesium from China: Investigation No....

  3. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  4. Synthesis of superconducting magnesium diboride objects

    DOEpatents

    Finnemore, Douglas K.; Canfield, Paul C.; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Petrovic, Cedomir; Cunningham, Charles E.; Lapertot, Gerard

    2003-08-15

    A process to produce magnesium diboride objects from boron objects with a similar form is presented. Boron objects are reacted with magnesium vapor at a predetermined time and temperature to form magnesium diboride objects having a morphology similar to the boron object's original morphology.

  5. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  6. Synthesis Of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride Objects.

    DOEpatents

    Finnemore, Douglas K.; Canfield, Paul C.; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Petrovic, Cedomir; Cunningham, Charles E.; Lapertot, Gerard

    2003-07-08

    A process to produce magnesium diboride objects from boron objects with a similar form is presented. Boron objects are reacted with magnesium vapor at a predetermined time and temperature to form magnesium diboride objects having a morphology similar to the boron object's original morphology.

  7. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  15. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  17. The UK geochemical environment and cardiovascular diseases: magnesium in food and water.

    PubMed

    Davies, B E

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) contribute approximately one-third to noncommunicable diseases in the UK. The central role of magnesium in CVDs (enzyme activity, cardiac signalling, etc.) is well established. Mortality and morbidity rates for CVDs may be inversely related to water hardness, suggesting a role for environmental magnesium. Published official and quasi-official data sources were evaluated to establish a model magnesium intake for a representative adult: standardised reference individual (SRI), standardised reference male (SRM) or standardised reference female (SRF). For typical dietary constituents, only tap water is probably locally derived and bottled water may not be. Fruits and vegetables are imported from many countries, while meat, dairy and cereal products represent a composite of UK source areas. Alcoholic beverages provide magnesium, there is doubt about its absorptive efficiency, and they are not locally derived. A simple model was devised to examine the effect of varying dietary contributions to total daily intake of magnesium. Omitting tap or bottled water, the combined intake, solid food plus alcoholic beverages, is 10.57 mmol Mg (84.5 % RNI) for the SRM and for the SRF, 8.10 mmol Mg (71.7 % RNI). Consumers drinking water derived from reservoirs or rivers, or supplementing it with the purest bottled water, improve their magnesium intake only slightly compared with water containing no magnesium. Choosing bottled water with high magnesium content when the public supply derives from rivers or reservoirs partially satisfies magnesium needs. Real improvement in SRI magnesium nutrition is seen only where water is hard. However, this conclusion cannot be validated until new measurement technologies for body magnesium become available. PMID:25528218

  18. Production, structure, texture, and mechanical properties of severely deformed magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. Yu.; Antonova, O. V.; Kamenetskii, B. I.; Klyukin, I. V.; Komkova, D. A.; Antonov, B. D.

    2016-05-01

    Methods of the severe plastic deformation (SPD) of pure magnesium at room temperature, namely, transverse extrusion and hydroextrusion in a self-destroyed shell, have been developed. The maximum true strain of the samples after the hydroextrusion was e ~ 3.2; in the course of transverse extrusion and subsequent cold rolling, a true strain of e ~ 6.0 was achieved. The structure and mechanical properties of the magnesium samples have been studied in different structural states. It has been shown that the SPD led to a decrease in the grain size d to ~2 μm; the relative elongation at fracture δ increased to ~20%. No active twinning has been revealed. The reasons for the high plasticity of magnesium after SPD according to the deformation modes suggested are discussed from the viewpoint of the hierarchy of the observed structural states.

  19. High Strength and Thermally Stable Nanostructured Magnesium Alloys and Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Wei

    Magnesium and its alloys are currently in the spotlight of global research because of the need to limit energy consumption and reduce the environmental impact. In particular, their low densities compared to other structural metals make them a very attractive alternative in the automobile and aerospace industries. However, their low strength compared to other structural materials (e.g. Al and steels) has limited their widespread application. This dissertation presents the results of developing and investigation of a high strength nanostructured magnesium-aluminum alloy and composite. The nanostructured magnesium alloy is prepared by cryomilling and consolidated by spark-plasma-sintering. Focused ion beam is used to prepare micropillars with different diameters ranging from 1.5 to 8 mum and micro-compression test is conducted by nanoindenter in order to evaluate the mechanical properties. The yield strength obtained in the present study is around three times higher than conventional magnesium alloys (120 MPa vs. 370 MPa). The yield strength of the nanostructured magnesium alloy is further improved through hot extrusion, resulting in a yield strength of 550 MPa and an ultimate strength of 580 MPa. The nanostructured magnesium alloy exhibits a strong size-dependence, and a significant improvement in strength is observed when the pillar diameter is reduced to below 3.5 mum. The deformation mechanisms of the compressed pillars were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The size-induced strengthening is attributed to a less number of dislocation sources along with a higher activity of non-basal deformation mechanisms. We have also developed a high strength and thermally stable nanostructured magnesium composite by adding diamantane. A yield strength of 500 MPa is achieved, moreover, excellent thermal stability is demonstrated in the magnesium alloy containing diamantanes. The strength and grain size are thermally stable after annealing at 400°C for 100

  20. Magnesium Diboride Current Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    A recently discovered superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), can be used to fabricate conducting leads used in cryogenic applications. Dis covered to be superconducting in 2001, MgB2 has the advantage of remaining superconducting at higher temperatures than the previously used material, NbTi. The purpose of these leads is to provide 2 A of electricity to motors located in a 1.3 K environment. The providing environment is a relatively warm 17 K. Requirements for these leads are to survive temperature fluctuations in the 5 K and 11 K heat sinks, and not conduct excessive heat into the 1.3 K environment. Test data showed that each lead in the assembly could conduct 5 A at 4 K, which, when scaled to 17 K, still provided more than the required 2 A. The lead assembly consists of 12 steelclad MgB2 wires, a tensioned Kevlar support, a thermal heat sink interface at 4 K, and base plates. The wires are soldered to heavy copper leads at the 17 K end, and to thin copper-clad NbTi leads at the 1.3 K end. The leads were designed, fabricated, and tested at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe - Institut foer Technische Physik before inclusion in Goddard's XRS (X-Ray Spectrometer) instrument onboard the Astro-E2 spacecraft. A key factor is that MgB2 remains superconducting up to 30 K, which means that it does not introduce joule heating as a resistive wire would. Because the required temperature ranges are 1.3-17 K, this provides a large margin of safety. Previous designs lost superconductivity at around 8 K. The disadvantage to MgB2 is that it is a brittle ceramic, and making thin wires from it is challenging. The solution was to encase the leads in thin steel tubes for strength. Previous designs were so brittle as to risk instrument survival. MgB2 leads can be used in any cryogenic application where small currents need to be conducted at below 30 K. Because previous designs would superconduct only at up to 8 K, this new design would be ideal for the 8-30 K range.

  1. Combustion Synthesis of Magnesium Aluminate

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, M. A.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2011-10-20

    In the system MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, three compounds MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10}(also expressed as-Mg{sub 0.4}Al{sub 2.4}O{sub 4}) and MgAl{sub 26}O{sub 40} are well known. Importance of the first two is well established. Magnesium aluminate (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel is a technologically important material due to its interesting thermal properties. The MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramics also find application as humidity sensors. Apart from the luminescence studies, the interest in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} is due to various applications such as humidity-sensing and PEM fuel cells, TL/OSL dosimetry of the ionizing radiations, white light source. Interest in the MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} has aroused due to possible use as a substrate for GaN growth. Attempt was made to synthesize these compounds by the combustion synthesis using metal nitrates as oxidizer and urea as a fuel. Compounds MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} were formed in a single step, while MgAl{sub 26}O{sub 40} was not formed by this procedure. Activation of MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} by rare earth ions like Ce{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} and ns{sup 2} ion Pb{sup 2+} could be achieved. Excitation bands for MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} are at slightly shorter wavelengths compared to those reported for MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  2. Combustion Synthesis of Magnesium Aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, M. A.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    In the system MgO-Al2O3, three compounds MgAl2O4, MgAl6O10 (also expressed as- Mg0.4Al2.4O4) and MgAl26O40 are well known. Importance of the first two is well established. Magnesium aluminate (MgAl2O4) spinel is a technologically important material due to its interesting thermal properties. The MgAl2O4 ceramics also find application as humidity sensors. Apart from the luminescence studies, the interest in MgAl2O4 is due to various applications such as humidity-sensing and PEM fuel cells, TL/OSL dosimetry of the ionizing radiations, white light source. Interest in the MgAl6O10 has aroused due to possible use as a substrate for GaN growth. Attempt was made to synthesize these compounds by the combustion synthesis using metal nitrates as oxidizer and urea as a fuel. Compounds MgAl2O4 and MgAl6O10 were formed in a single step, while MgAl26O40 was not formed by this procedure. Activation of MgAl6O10 by rare earth ions like Ce3+, Eu3+ and Tb3+ and ns2 ion Pb2+ could be achieved. Excitation bands for MgAl6O10 are at slightly shorter wavelengths compared to those reported for MgAl2O4.

  3. [The significance of magnesium in orthopedics. V. Magnesium in osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Ditmar, R; Steidl, L

    1989-04-01

    The authors submit an investigation of 60 patients with senile, post-menopausal and drug-induced osteoporosis. Using the method of absorption spectrophotometry, they found a reduced level of Mg in red blood cells in 63.6% of senile, 66.7% postmenopausal and only in 22.2% drug-induced osteoporoses. Also the mean level of red cell magnesium was significantly lower in the group of senile (1.94 mmol) and postmenopausal (1.85 mmol) osteoporosis as compared with drug-induced osteoporosis (2.25 mmol). The authors revealed moreover that the level of red cell magnesium in the former two groups declines in proportion to the severity of osteoporosis and correlates thus with the clinical and X-ray finding. For treatment of osteoporisis the authors used magnesium lactate alone (in 37 patients) and combined with sodium fluoride (in 23 patients). In the majority of patients they had very favourable results. Based on laboratory and therapeutic results, consistent with data in the experimental literature, the authors assume that magnesium as a catalyst of bone metabolism and as one of the most important factors controlling the formation of bone matrix and its mineralization plays a significant role in the aetiopathogenesis of senile and postmenopausal osteoporosis. The authors assume that Mg deficiency which is increasing in recent years in soil as well as in foodstuffs and water may be the main cause of the increasing number of patients with osteoporosis in civilized countries. Magnesium should have its firm place not only in therapy but also in prevention of the majority of osteoporosis. PMID:2750424

  4. Attenuation of Magnesium Sulfate on CoCl₂-Induced Cell Death by Activating ERK1/2/MAPK and Inhibiting HIF-1α via Mitochondrial Apoptotic Signaling Suppression in a Neuronal Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Yang; Hsieh, You-Liang; Ju, Da-Tong; Lin, Chien-Chung; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Liou, Yi-Fan; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Lin, Jing-Ying

    2015-08-31

    Magnesium sulfate (MgSO₄) ameliorates hypoxia/ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis in a rat model. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms governing the anti-apoptotic effect of MgSO₄ on cobalt chloride (CoCl₂)-exposed NB41A3 mouse neuroblastoma cells. MgSO₄ increased the viability of NB41A3 cells treated with CoCl₂ in a dose-dependent manner. MgSO₄ treatment was shown to lead to an increase in the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, with a concomitant decrease in the pro-apoptotic proteins. MgSO₄ also attenuated the CoCl₂-induced disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)) and reduced the release of cytochrome c form the mitochondria to the cytosol. Furthermore, exposure to CoCl₂ caused activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). On the other hand, MgSO₄ markedly reduced CoCl₂-induced HIF-1α activation and suppressed HIF-1α downstream protein BNIP3. MgSO₄ treatment induced ERK1/2 activation and attenuated CoCl₂-induced activation of p38 and JNK. Addition of the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 significantly reduced the ability of MgSO₄ to protect neurons from CoCl₂-induced mitochondrial apoptotic events. However, incubation of cultures with the p38 and JNK inhibitors did not significantly affect MgSO₄-mediated neuroprotection. MgSO₄ appears to suppress CoCl₂-induced NB41A3 cell death by activating ERK1/2/ MAPK pathways, which further modulates the role of Bcl-2 family proteins and mitochondria in NB41A3 cells. Our data suggest that MgSO₄ may act as a survival factor that preserves mitochondrial integrity and inhibits apoptotic pathways. PMID:26211648

  5. A SEARCH FOR MAGNESIUM IN EUROPA'S ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerst, S. M.; Brown, M. E.

    2013-02-20

    Europa's tenuous atmosphere results from sputtering of the surface. The trace element composition of its atmosphere is therefore related to the composition of Europa's surface. Magnesium salts are often invoked to explain Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer spectra of Europa's surface, thus magnesium may be present in Europa's atmosphere. We have searched for magnesium emission in the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph archival spectra of Europa's atmosphere. Magnesium was not detected and we calculate an upper limit on the magnesium column abundance. This upper limit indicates that either Europa's surface is depleted in magnesium relative to sodium and potassium, or magnesium is not sputtered as efficiently resulting in a relative depletion in its atmosphere.

  6. Nonaqueous magnesium electrochemistry and its application in secondary batteries.

    PubMed

    Aurbach, Doron; Weissman, Idit; Gofer, Yosef; Levi, Elena

    2003-01-01

    A revolution in modern electronics has led to the miniaturization and evolution of many portable devices, such as cellular telephones and laptop computers, since the 1980s. This has led to an increasing demand for new and compatible energy storage technologies. Furthermore, a growing awareness of pollution issues has provided a strong impetus for the science and technology community to develop alternatives with ever-higher energy densities, with the ultimate goal of being able to propel electric vehicles. Magnesium's thermodynamic properties make this metal a natural candidate for utilization as an anode in high-energy-density, rechargeable battery systems. We report herein on the results of extensive studies on magnesium anodes and magnesium insertion electrodes in nonaqueous electrolyte solutions. Novel, rechargeable nonaqueous magnesium battery systems were developed based on the research. This work had two major challenges: one was to develop electrolyte solutions with especially high anodic stability in which magnesium anodes can function at a high level of cycling efficiency; the other was to develop a cathode that can reversibly intercalate Mg ions in these electrolyte systems. The new magnesium batteries consist of Mg metal anodes, an electrolyte with a general structure of Mg(AlX(3-n)R(n)R')(2) (R',R = alkyl groups, X = halide) in ethereal solutions (e.g., tetrahydrofuran, polyethers of the "glyme" family), and Chevrel phases of MgMo(3)S(4) stoichiometry as highly reversible cathodes. With their practical energy density expected to be >60 Wh/Kg, the battery systems can be cycled thousands of times with almost no capacity fading. The batteries are an environmentally friendly alternative to lead-acid and nickel-cadmium batteries and are composed of abundant, inexpensive, and nonpoisonous materials. The batteries are expected to provide superior results in large devices that require high-energy density, high cycle life, a high degree of safety, and low

  7. The effect of dissolved magnesium on diffusion creep in calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwegh, Marco; Xiao, Xiaohui; Evans, Brian

    2003-07-01

    We experimentally tested a series of synthetic calcite marbles with varying amounts of dissolved magnesium in a standard triaxial deformation machine at 300 MPa confining pressure, temperatures between 700 and 850°C, stresses between 2 and 100 MPa, and strain rates between 10 -7 and 10 -3 s -1. The samples were fabricated by hot isostatic pressing of a mixture of calcite and dolomite at 850°C and 300 MPa. The fabrication protocol resulted in a homogeneous, fine-grained high-magnesian calcite aggregate with minimal porosity and with magnesium contents between 0.07 and 0.17 mol% MgCO 3. At stresses below 40 MPa the samples deformed with linear viscosity that depended inversely on grain size to the 3.26±0.51 power, suggesting that the mechanisms of deformation were some combination of grain boundary diffusion and grain boundary sliding. Because small grain sizes tended to occur in the high-magnesium calcite, the strength also appeared to vary inversely with magnesium content. However, the strength at constant grain size does not depend on the amount of dissolved magnesium, and thus, the impurity effect seems to be indirect. At stresses higher than 40 MPa, the aggregates become non-linearly viscous, a regime we interpret to be dislocation creep. The transition between the two regimes depends on grain size, as expected. The activation energy for diffusion creep is 200±30 kJ/mol and is quite similar to previous measurements in natural and synthetic marbles deformed at similar conditions with no added magnesium.

  8. Magnesium-Based Corrosion Nano-Cells For Reductive Transformation Of Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnesium, with its potential to reduce a variety of aqueous contaminants, unique self-limiting corrosion behavior affording long active life times, natural abundance, low cost, and environmentally friendly nature, promises to be an effective technology. However, nanoparticles o...

  9. Anticorrosive magnesium hydroxide coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yanying; Wu, Guangming; Zhao, Qing; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Xing, Guangjian; Li, Donglin

    2009-09-01

    Magnesium alloys are potential biodegradable biomaterials in orthopedic surgery. However, the rapid degradation rate has limited their application in biomedical field. A great deal of studies have been done to improve the resistance of magnesium alloys. In this article, An anticorrosive magnesium hydroxide coating with a thickness of approximately 100μm was formed on an AZ31 magnesium alloy by hydrothermal method. The morphology of the coatings were observed by an optical microscope and SEM. And the samples were soaked in hank's solution (37°C) to investigate the corrosion resistance. Magnesium alloy AZ31 with magnesium hydroxide coatings present superior corrosion resistance than untreated samples.

  10. The magnesium chelation step in chlorophyll biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, J.

    1990-11-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, the biogenesis of energy transducing membranes requires the coordinate synthesis of prosthetic groups, proteins, and various lipids. Two of the major prosthetic groups, chlorophyll and heme, share a common biosynthetic pathway that diverges at the point of metal insertion into protoporphyrin IX (Proto). Insertion of iron leads to the formation of hemes, while insertion of magnesium is the first step unique to chlorophyll formation. This project is directed toward identifying the enzyme(s) responsible for magnesium chelation and elucidating the mechanism which regulates the flux of precursors through the branch point enzymes in isolated chloroplasts. Using intact chloroplasts from greening cucumber cotyledons, we have confirmed the ATP requirement for Mg-Proto formation. Use of non-hydrolyzable ATP analogs, uncouplers and ionophores has led to the conclusions that ATP hydrolysis is necessary, but that this hydrolysis is not linked to the requirement for membrane intactness by transmembrane ion gradients or electrical potentials. The enzyme(s) are flexible with respect to the porphyrin substrate specificity, accepting porphyrins with -vinyl, -ethyl, or -H substituents at the 2 and 4 positions. The activity increases approximately four-fold during greening. Possible physiological feedback inhibitors such as heme, protochlorophyllide, and chlorophyllide had no specific effect on the activity. The activity has now been assayed in barely, corn and peas, with the system from peas almost ten-fold more active than the cucumber system. Work is continuing in pea chloroplasts with the development of a continuous assay and investigation of the feasibility of characterizing an active, organelle-free preparation. 6 figs.