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Sample records for active membrane properties

  1. Investigation of membrane active properties and antiradical activity of gossypol and its derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New asymmetrical derivatives of gossypol were synthesized. The antioxidant activity of gossypol and these derivatives was studied. The interaction of these compounds with modeled lipid membranes was also studied. It was found that the antioxidant effects and ability to interact with membranes was...

  2. Membrane-Active Properties and Antiradical Activity of Gossypol and Its Derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New asymmetrical derivatives of gossypol were synthesized. The antioxidant activity of gossypol and these derivatives was studied. The interaction of these compounds with modeled lipid membranes was also studied. It was found that the antioxidant effects and ability to interact with membranes was...

  3. Passive and active membrane properties contribute to the temporal filtering properties of midbrain neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fortune, E S; Rose, G J

    1997-05-15

    This study examined the contributions of passive and active membrane properties to the temporal selectivities of electrosensory neurons in vivo. The intracellular responses to time-varying (2-30 Hz) electrosensory stimulation and current injection of 27 neurons in the midbrain of the weakly electric fish Eigenmannia were recorded. Each neuron was filled with biocytin to reveal its anatomy. Neurons were divided into two biophysically distinct groups based on their frequency-dependent responses to sinusoidal current injection over the range 2-30 Hz. Fourteen neurons showed low-pass filtering, with a maximum decline in the amplitude of voltage responses of >2.6 dB (X = 4.30 dB, s = 1.10 dB) to sinusoidal current injection. These neurons also showed low-pass filtering of electrosensory information but with larger maximum declines in postsynaptic potential amplitude (X = 9.53 dB, s = 3.34 dB; n = 10). These neurons had broad dendritic arbors and relatively spiny dendrites. Five neurons showed all-pass filtering, having maximum decline in the amplitude of voltage responses of <2.0 dB (X = 1.16 dB, s = 0.61 dB). For electrosensory stimuli, however, these neurons showed low-, band-, or high-pass filtering. These neurons had small dendritic arbors and few or no spines. Voltage-dependent "active" conductances were revealed in eight neurons by using several levels of current clamp. In four of these neurons, the duration of the voltage-dependent conductances decreased in concert with the period of the electrosensory stimulus, whereas in the other four neurons the duration of the voltage-dependent conductances was relatively short (<30 msec) and nearly constant across sensory stimulation frequencies. These conductances enhanced the temporal filtering properties of neurons. PMID:9133400

  4. Barrier properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) membranes containing carbon nanotubes or activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Surdo, Erin M; Khan, Iftheker A; Choudhury, Atif A; Saleh, Navid B; Arnold, William A

    2011-04-15

    Carbon nanotube addition has been shown to improve the mechanical properties of some polymers. Because of their unique adsorptive properties, carbon nanotubes may also improve the barrier performance of polymers used in contaminant containment. This study compares the barrier performance of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes containing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to that for PVA containing powdered activated carbon (PAC). Raw and surface-functionalized versions of each sorbent were tested for their abilities to adsorb 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene and Cu(2+), representing the important hydrophobic organic and heavy metal contaminant classes, as they diffused across the PVA. In both cases, PAC (for 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene) and functionalized PAC (for Cu(2+)) outperformed SWCNTs on a per mass basis by trapping more of the contaminants within the barrier membrane. Kinetics of sorption are important in evaluating barrier properties, and poor performance of SWCNT-containing membranes as 1,2,4-TCB barriers is attributed to kinetic limitations. PMID:21349636

  5. Salt stress in a membrane bioreactor: dynamics of sludge properties, membrane fouling and remediation through powdered activated carbon dosing.

    PubMed

    De Temmerman, L; Maere, T; Temmink, H; Zwijnenburg, A; Nopens, I

    2014-10-15

    Membrane bioreactors are a well-established technology for wastewater treatment. However, their efficiency is adversely impacted by membrane fouling, primarily inciting very conservative operations of installations that makes them less appealing from an economic perspective. This fouling propensity of the activated sludge is closely related to system disturbances. Therefore, improved insight into the impact of fouling is crucial towards increased membrane performance. In this work, the disturbance of a salt shock was investigated with respect to sludge composition and filterability in two parallel lab-scale membrane bioreactors. Several key sludge parameters (soluble microbial products, sludge-bound extracellular polymeric substances, supramicron particle size distributions (PSD), submicron particle concentrations) were intensively monitored prior to, during, and after a disturbance to investigate its impact as well as the potential governing mechanism. Upon salt addition, the supramicron PSD immediately shifted to smaller floc sizes, and the total fouling rate increased. Following a certain delay, an increase in submicron particles, supernatant proteins, and polysaccharides was observed as well as an increase in the irreversible membrane fouling rate. Recovery from the disturbance was evidenced with a simultaneous decrease in the above mentioned quantities. A similar experiment introducing powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition used for remediation resulted in either no or less significant changes in the above mentioned quantities, signifying its potential as a mitigation strategy. PMID:24999116

  6. In vivo antibacterial activity and pharmacological properties of the membrane-active glycopeptide antibiotic YV11455.

    PubMed

    Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Konai, Mohini M; Manjunath, Goutham B; Prakash, Relekar G; Mani, Bhuvana; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Ranjan, Shome B; Ravikumar, Raju; Chakraborty, Subhankari P; Roy, Somenath; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-06-01

    The membrane-active glycopeptide antibiotic YV11455 is a lipophilic cationic vancomycin analogue that demonstrates rapid and concentration-dependent killing of clinically relevant multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-positive bacteria in vitro. YV11455 was 2-fold and 54-270-fold more effective than vancomycin against clinical isolates of vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant bacteria, respectively. In this study, the in vivo efficacy, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and acute toxicology of YV11455 were investigated. In vivo activity and pharmacodynamics were determined in the neutropenic mouse thigh infection model against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). YV11455 produced dose-dependent reductions in MRSA titres in thigh muscle. When administered intravenously, the 50% effective dose (ED(50)) for YV11455 against MRSA was found to be 3.3 mg/kg body weight, and titres were reduced by up to ca. 3log(10)CFU/g from pre-treatment values at a dosage of 12 mg/kg with single treatment. Single-dose pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated linear kinetics and a prolonged half-life, with an increase in drug exposure (area under the concentration-time curve) compared with vancomycin. The peak plasma concentration following an intravenous dose of 12 mg/kg was 543.5 μg/mL. Acute toxicology studies revealed that YV11455 did not cause any significant alterations in biochemical parameters or histological pictures related to major organs such as the liver and kidney at its pharmacodynamic endpoint (ED(3-log kill)). These findings collectively suggest that YV11455 could be used clinically for the treatment of infections caused by MDR Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25900818

  7. Antimicrobial properties of membrane-active dodecapeptides derived from MSI-78.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Claudia; Fernandes, Mariana; Pinheiro, Marina; Maia, Sílvia; Seabra, Catarina L; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Costa, Fabíola; Reis, Salette; Gomes, Paula; Martins, M Cristina L

    2015-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a class of broad-spectrum antibiotics known by their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes and their low tendency to induce bacterial resistance, arising as excellent candidates to fight bacterial infections. In this study we aimed at designing short 12-mer AMPs, derived from a highly effective and broad spectrum synthetic AMP, MSI-78 (22 residues), by truncating this peptide at the N- and/or C-termini while spanning its entire sequence with 1 amino acid (aa) shifts. These designed peptides were evaluated regarding antimicrobial activity against selected gram-positive Staphylococcus strains and the gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). The short 12-mer peptide CEM1 (GIGKFLKKAKKF) was identified as an excellent candidate to fight P. aeruginosa infections as it displays antimicrobial activity against this strain and selectivity, with negligible toxicity to mammalian cells even at high concentrations. However, in general most of the short 12-mer peptides tested showed a reduction in antimicrobial activity, an effect that was more pronounced for gram-positive Staphylococcus strains. Interestingly, CEM1 and a highly similar peptide differing by only one aa-shift (CEM2: IGKFLKKAKKFG), showed a remarkably contrasting AMP activity. These two peptides were chosen for a more detailed study regarding their mechanism of action, using several biophysical assays and simple membrane models that mimic the mammalian and bacterial lipid composition. We confirmed the correlation between peptide helicity and antimicrobial activity and propose a mechanism of action based on the disruption of the bacterial membrane permeability barrier. PMID:25680229

  8. Effects of DO levels on surface force, cell membrane properties and microbial community dynamics of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ma, Si-Jia; Ding, Li-Li; Huang, Hui; Geng, Jin-Ju; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hong-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we employ atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and MiSeq analysis to study the effects of traditional dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.71-1.32mg/L, 2.13-3.02mg/L and 4.31-5.16mg/L) on surface force, cell membrane properties and microbial community dynamics of activated sludge. Results showed that low DO level enhanced the surface force and roughness of activated sludge; the medium DO level decreased cell membrane fluidity by reducing the synthesis of branched fatty acids in the cell membrane; high DO level resulted in the highest protein content in the effluent by EEM scanning. Abundance of Micropruina, Zoogloea and Nakamurella increased and Paracoccus and Rudaea decreased with the increase of DO levels. RDA analysis suggested that saturated fatty acids (SFA), anteiso-fatty acids (AFA) and iso-fatty acids (IFA) were closely related to effluent quality as well as some genera. PMID:27187569

  9. Rational modification of a dendrimeric peptide with antimicrobial activity: consequences on membrane-binding and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Batoni, Giovanna; Casu, Mariano; Giuliani, Andrea; Luca, Vincenzo; Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Manzo, Giorgia; Pintus, Manuela; Pirri, Giovanna; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Scorciapino, Mariano A; Serra, Ilaria; Ulrich, Anne S; Wadhwani, Parvesh

    2016-03-01

    Peptide-based antibiotics might help containing the rising tide of antimicrobial resistance. We developed SB056, a semi-synthetic peptide with a dimeric dendrimer scaffold, active against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Being the mechanism of SB056 attributed to disruption of bacterial membranes, we enhanced the amphiphilic profile of the original, empirically derived sequence [WKKIRVRLSA-NH2] by interchanging the first two residues [KWKIRVRLSA-NH2], and explored the effects of this modification on the interaction of peptide, both in linear and dimeric forms, with model membranes and on antimicrobial activity. Results obtained against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus planktonic strains, with or without salts at physiological concentrations, confirmed the added value of dendrimeric structure over the linear one, especially at physiological ionic strength, and the impact of the higher amphipathicity obtained through sequence modification on enhancing peptide performances. SB056 peptides also displayed intriguing antibiofilm properties. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most susceptible strain in sessile form, notably to optimized linear analog lin-SB056-1 and the wild-type dendrimer den-SB056. Membrane affinity of all peptides increased with the percentage of negatively charged lipids and was less influenced by the presence of salt in the case of dendrimeric peptides. The analog lin-SB056-1 displayed the highest overall affinity, even for zwitterionic PC bilayers. Thus, in addition to electrostatics, distribution of charged/polar and hydrophobic residues along the sequence might have a significant role in driving peptide-lipid interaction. Supporting this view, dendrimeric analog den-SB056-1 retained greater membrane affinity in the presence of salt than den-SB056, despite the fact that they bear exactly the same net positive charge. PMID:26614437

  10. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity, and membrane permeabilizing properties of C-terminally modified nisin conjugates accessed by CuAAC.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Jack C; van der Wal, Steffen; Quarles van Ufford, H C; Breukink, Eefjan; Liskamp, Rob M J; Rijkers, Dirk T S

    2013-12-18

    Functionalization of the lantibiotic nisin with fluorescent reporter molecules is highly important for the understanding of its mode of action as a potent antimicrobial peptide. In addition to this, multimerization of nisin to obtain multivalent peptide constructs and conjugation of nisin to bioactive molecules or grafting it on surfaces can be attractive methods for interference with bacterial growth. Here, we report a convenient method for the synthesis of such nisin conjugates and show that these nisin derivatives retain both their antimicrobial activity and their membrane permeabilizing properties. The synthesis is based on the Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC) as a bioorthogonal ligation method for large and unprotected peptides in which nisin was C-terminally modified with propargylamine and subsequently efficiently conjugated to a series of functionalized azides. Two fluorescently labeled nisin conjugates together with a dimeric nisin construct were prepared while membrane insertion as well as antimicrobial activity were unaffected by these modifications. This study shows that C-terminal modification of nisin does not deteriorate biological activity in sharp contrast to N-terminal modification and therefore C-terminally modified nisin analogues are valuable tools to study the antibacterial mode of action of nisin. Furthermore, the ability to use stoichiometric amounts of the azide containing molecule opens up possibilities for surface tethering and more complex multivalent structures. PMID:24266643

  11. Auxin-activated NADH oxidase activity of soybean plasma membranes is distinct from the constitutive plasma membrane NADH oxidase and exhibits prion-like properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Morre, Dorothy M.; Ternes, Philipp

    2003-01-01

    The hormone-stimulated and growth-related cell surface hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase activity of etiolated hypocotyls of soybeans oscillates with a period of about 24 min or 60 times per 24-h day. Plasma membranes of soybean hypocotyls contain two such NADH oxidase activities that have been resolved by purification on concanavalin A columns. One in the apparent molecular weight range of 14-17 kDa is stimulated by the auxin herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The other is larger and unaffected by 2,4-D. The 2,4-D-stimulated activity absolutely requires 2,4-D for activity and exhibits a period length of about 24 min. Also exhibiting 24-min oscillations is the rate of cell enlargement induced by the addition of 2,4-D or the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Immediately following 2,4-D or IAA addition, a very complex pattern of oscillations is frequently observed. However, after several hours a dominant 24-min period emerges at the expense of the constitutive activity. A recruitment process analogous to that exhibited by prions is postulated to explain this behavior.

  12. A pore-forming toxin requires a specific residue for its activity in membranes with particular physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Morante, Koldo; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Tanaka, Koji; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-04-24

    The physicochemical landscape of the bilayer modulates membrane protein function. Actinoporins are a family of potent hemolytic proteins from sea anemones acting at the membrane level. This family of cytolysins preferentially binds to target membranes containing sphingomyelin, where they form lytic pores giving rise to cell death. Although the cytolytic activity of the actinoporin fragaceatoxin C (FraC) is sensitive to vesicles made of various lipid compositions, it is far from clear how this toxin adjusts its mechanism of action to a broad range of physiochemical landscapes. Herein, we show that the conserved residue Phe-16 of FraC is critical for pore formation in cholesterol-rich membranes such as those of red blood cells. The interaction of a panel of muteins of Phe-16 with model membranes composed of raft-like lipid domains is inactivated in cholesterol-rich membranes but not in cholesterol-depleted membranes. These results indicate that actinoporins recognize different membrane environments, resulting in a wider repertoire of susceptible target membranes (and preys) for sea anemones. In addition, this study has unveiled promising candidates for the development of protein-based biosensors highly sensitive to the concentration of cholesterol within the membrane. PMID:25759390

  13. A Pore-Forming Toxin Requires a Specific Residue for Its Activity in Membranes with Particular Physicochemical Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Morante, Koldo; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Tanaka, Koji; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-01-01

    The physicochemical landscape of the bilayer modulates membrane protein function. Actinoporins are a family of potent hemolytic proteins from sea anemones acting at the membrane level. This family of cytolysins preferentially binds to target membranes containing sphingomyelin, where they form lytic pores giving rise to cell death. Although the cytolytic activity of the actinoporin fragaceatoxin C (FraC) is sensitive to vesicles made of various lipid compositions, it is far from clear how this toxin adjusts its mechanism of action to a broad range of physiochemical landscapes. Herein, we show that the conserved residue Phe-16 of FraC is critical for pore formation in cholesterol-rich membranes such as those of red blood cells. The interaction of a panel of muteins of Phe-16 with model membranes composed of raft-like lipid domains is inactivated in cholesterol-rich membranes but not in cholesterol-depleted membranes. These results indicate that actinoporins recognize different membrane environments, resulting in a wider repertoire of susceptible target membranes (and preys) for sea anemones. In addition, this study has unveiled promising candidates for the development of protein-based biosensors highly sensitive to the concentration of cholesterol within the membrane. PMID:25759390

  14. Modulation of neuronal activity and plasma membrane properties with low-power millimeter waves in organotypic cortical slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikov, Victor; Arakaki, Xianghong; Harrington, Michael; Fraser, Scott E.; Siegel, Peter H.

    2010-08-01

    As millimeter waves (MMWs) are being increasingly used in communications and military applications, their potential effects on biological tissue has become an important issue for scientific inquiry. Specifically, several MMW effects on the whole-nerve activity were reported, but the underlying neuronal changes remain unexplored. This study used slices of cortical tissue to evaluate the MMW effects on individual pyramidal neurons under conditions mimicking their in vivo environment. The applied levels of MMW power are three orders of magnitude below the existing safe limit for human exposure of 1 mW cm-2. Surprisingly, even at these low power levels, MMWs were able to produce considerable changes in neuronal firing rate and plasma membrane properties. At the power density approaching 1 µW cm-2, 1 min of MMW exposure reduced the firing rate to one third of the pre-exposure level in four out of eight examined neurons. The width of the action potentials was narrowed by MMW exposure to 17% of the baseline value and the membrane input resistance decreased to 54% of the baseline value across all neurons. These effects were short lasting (2 min or less) and were accompanied by MMW-induced heating of the bath solution at 3 °C. Comparison of these results with previously published data on the effects of general bath heating of 10 °C indicated that MMW-induced effects cannot be fully attributed to heating and may involve specific MMW absorption by the tissue. Blocking of the intracellular Ca2+-mediated signaling did not significantly alter the MMW-induced neuronal responses suggesting that MMWs interacted directly with the neuronal plasma membrane. The presented results constitute the first demonstration of direct real-time monitoring of the impact of MMWs on nervous tissue at a microscopic scale. Implication of these findings for the therapeutic modulation of neuronal excitability is discussed.

  15. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  16. Membrane Elastic Properties and Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Bruno; Ayala, Yareni; Fonseca, Anna Carolina C.; Romão, Luciana F.; Amaral, Racκele F.; Salgado, Leonardo T.; Lima, Flavia R.; Farina, Marcos; Viana, Nathan B.; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Nussenzveig, H. Moysés

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the cell membrane, interacting with its attached cytoskeleton, is an important regulator of cell function, exerting and responding to forces. We investigate this relationship by looking for connections between cell membrane elastic properties, especially surface tension and bending modulus, and cell function. Those properties are measured by pulling tethers from the cell membrane with optical tweezers. Their values are determined for all major cell types of the central nervous system, as well as for macrophage. Astrocytes and glioblastoma cells, which are considerably more dynamic than neurons, have substantially larger surface tensions. Resting microglia, which continually scan their environment through motility and protrusions, have the highest elastic constants, with values similar to those for resting macrophage. For both microglia and macrophage, we find a sharp softening of bending modulus between their resting and activated forms, which is very advantageous for their acquisition of phagocytic functions upon activation. We also determine the elastic constants of pure cell membrane, with no attached cytoskeleton. For all cell types, the presence of F-actin within tethers, contrary to conventional wisdom, is confirmed. Our findings suggest the existence of a close connection between membrane elastic constants and cell function. PMID:23844071

  17. Enzymatically active ultrathin pepsin membranes.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Michiel J T; Schmidt, Thomas; Barth, Monika; Tutus, Murat; Benes, Nieck E; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-05-11

    Enzymatically active proteins enable efficient and specific cleavage reactions of peptide bonds. Covalent coupling of the enzymes permits immobilization, which in turn reduces autolysis-induced deactivation. Ultrathin pepsin membranes were prepared by facile interfacial polycondensation of pepsin and trimesoyl chloride. The pepsin membrane allows for simultaneous enzymatic conversion and selective removal of digestion products. The large water fluxes through the membrane expedite the transport of large molecules through the pepsin layers. The presented method enables the large-scale production of ultrathin, cross-linked, enzymatically active membranes. PMID:25779668

  18. Versatile Membrane Deformation Potential of Activated Pacsin

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Laura J.; Sondermann, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Endocytosis is a fundamental process in signaling and membrane trafficking. The formation of vesicles at the plasma membrane is mediated by the G protein dynamin that catalyzes the final fission step, the actin cytoskeleton, and proteins that sense or induce membrane curvature. One such protein, the F-BAR domain-containing protein pacsin, contributes to this process and has been shown to induce a spectrum of membrane morphologies, including tubules and tube constrictions in vitro. Full-length pacsin isoform 1 (pacsin-1) has reduced activity compared to its isolated F-BAR domain, implicating an inhibitory role for its C-terminal Src homology 3 (SH3) domain. Here we show that the autoinhibitory, intramolecular interactions in pacsin-1 can be released upon binding to the entire proline-rich domain (PRD) of dynamin-1, resulting in potent membrane deformation activity that is distinct from the isolated F-BAR domain. Most strikingly, we observe the generation of small, homogenous vesicles with the activated protein complex under certain experimental conditions. In addition, liposomes prepared with different methods yield distinct membrane deformation morphologies of BAR domain proteins and apparent activation barriers to pacsin-1's activity. Theoretical free energy calculations suggest bimodality of the protein-membrane system as a possible source for the different outcomes, which could account for the coexistence of energetically equivalent membrane structures induced by BAR domain-containing proteins in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest a versatile role for pacsin-1 in sculpting cellular membranes that is likely dependent both on protein structure and membrane properties. PMID:23236520

  19. Ligand-Dependent Conformations and Dynamics of the Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor Determine Its Activation and Membrane-Driven Oligomerization Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jufang; Khelashvili, George; Mondal, Sayan; Mehler, Ernest L.; Weinstein, Harel

    2012-01-01

    From computational simulations of a serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) model complexed with pharmacologically and structurally diverse ligands we identify different conformational states and dynamics adopted by the receptor bound to the full agonist 5-HT, the partial agonist LSD, and the inverse agonist Ketanserin. The results from the unbiased all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that the three ligands affect differently the known GPCR activation elements including the toggle switch at W6.48, the changes in the ionic lock between E6.30 and R3.50 of the DRY motif in TM3, and the dynamics of the NPxxY motif in TM7. The computational results uncover a sequence of steps connecting these experimentally-identified elements of GPCR activation. The differences among the properties of the receptor molecule interacting with the ligands correlate with their distinct pharmacological properties. Combining these results with quantitative analysis of membrane deformation obtained with our new method (Mondal et al, Biophysical Journal 2011), we show that distinct conformational rearrangements produced by the three ligands also elicit different responses in the surrounding membrane. The differential reorganization of the receptor environment is reflected in (i)-the involvement of cholesterol in the activation of the 5-HT2AR, and (ii)-different extents and patterns of membrane deformations. These findings are discussed in the context of their likely functional consequences and a predicted mechanism of ligand-specific GPCR oligomerization. PMID:22532793

  20. Proline transport across the intestinal microvillus membrane may be regulated by membrane physical properties.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, D C; Gibbs, D J; Meddings, J B

    1992-03-23

    There is now abundant evidence that integral membrane protein function may be modulated by the physical properties of membrane lipids. The intestinal brush border membrane represents a membrane system highly specialized for nutrient absorption and, thus, provides an opportunity to study the interaction between integral membrane transport proteins and their lipid environment. We have previously demonstrated that alterations in this environment may modulate the function of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter in terms of its affinity for glucose. In this communication we report that membrane lipid-protein interactions are distinctly different for the proline transport proteins. Maximal transport rates for L-proline by either the neutral brush border or imino transport systems are reduced 10-fold when the surrounding membrane environment is made more fluid over the physiological range that exists along the crypt-villus axis. Furthermore, in microvillus membrane vesicles prepared from enterocytes isolated from along the crypt-villus axis a similar gradient exists in the functional activity of these transport systems. This would imply that either the functional activity of these transporters are regulated by membrane physical properties or that the synthesis and insertion of these proteins is coordinated in concert with membrane physical properties as the enterocyte migrates up the crypt-villus axis. PMID:1567897

  1. A comparison of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of sludges from a complete-mix activated sludge reactor and a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Rion P; Trussell, R Shane; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W; Jenkins, David

    2007-03-01

    The properties of sludges from a pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) and two bench-scale complete-mix, activated sludge (CMAS) reactors treating municipal primary effluent were determined. Compared with the CMAS sludges, the SMBR sludge contained a higher amount of soluble microbial products (SMP) and colloidal material attributed to the use of a membrane for solid-liquid separation; a higher amount nocardioform bacteria, resulting from efficient foam trapping; and a lower amount of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), possibly because there was no selective pressure for the sludge to settle. High aeration rates in both the CMAS and SMBR reactors produced sludges with higher numbers of smaller particles. Normalized capillary suction time values for the SMBR sludge were lower than for the CMAS sludges, possibly because of its lower EPS content. PMID:17469664

  2. Membrane optical activity: some facts and fallacies.

    PubMed

    Wallach, D F; Low, D A; Bertland, A V

    1973-11-01

    The circular dichroism of hypothetical, water-filled, spherical shells, 75-3500 nm in radius, with walls 7.5 nm thick, composed of poly(L-lysine) in various conformational proportions, and suspended in water, were computed from the known optical properties of this polypeptide by classical general light-scattering theory (Mie theory). Comparison of the computed curves of circular dichroism spectra with those of diverse membranes reveals large discrepancies below 215 nm and shows that light scattering does not adequately account for the optical activity of membranes containing appreciable proportions of nonhelical conformation. However, turbidity effects can explain the anomalies of membrane optical rotatory dispersion near 233 nm, if not uniquely so. We conclude that the optical activity of neither most soluble proteins nor membrane proteins can provide accurate conformational information when synthetic polypeptides are used as standards and list the reasons for this argument. We also show that present techniques to "correct" membrane optical activity are likely to produce additional artifact. PMID:4522300

  3. Thermodynamic properties of purple membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Marque, J; Eisenstein, L; Gratton, E; Sturtevant, J M; Hardy, C J

    1984-01-01

    We measured the density, expansivity, specific heat at constant pressure, and sound velocity of suspensions of purple membrane from Halobacterium halobium and their constituent buffers. From these quantities we calculated the apparent values for the density, expansivity, adiabatic compressibility, isothermal compressibility, specific heat at constant pressure, and specific heat at constant volume for the purple membrane. These results are discussed with respect to previously reported measurements on globular proteins and lipids. Our data suggest a simple additive model in which the protein and lipid molecules expand and compress independently of each other. However, this simple model seems to fail to describe the specific heat data. Our compressibility data suggest that bacteriorhodopsin in native purple membrane binds less water than many globular proteins in neutral aqueous solution, a finding consistent with the lipid surround of bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane. PMID:6498271

  4. Mechano-capacitive properties of polarized membranes.

    PubMed

    Mosgaard, Lars D; Zecchi, Karis A; Heimburg, Thomas

    2015-10-28

    Biological membranes are capacitors that can be charged by applying a field across the membrane. The charges on the capacitor exert a force on the membrane that leads to electrostriction, i.e. a thinning of the membrane. Since the force is quadratic in voltage, negative and positive voltage have an identical influence on the physics of symmetric membranes. However, this is not the case for a membrane with an asymmetry leading to a permanent electric polarization. Positive and negative voltages of identical magnitude lead to different properties. Such an asymmetry can originate from a lipid composition that is different on the two monolayers of the membrane, or from membrane curvature. The latter effect is called 'flexoelectricity'. As a consequence of permanent polarization, the membrane capacitor is discharged at a voltage different from zero. This leads to interesting electrical phenomena such as outward or inward rectification of membrane permeability. Here, we introduce a generalized theoretical framework, that treats capacitance, polarization, flexoelectricity, piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity in the same language. We show applications to electrostriction, membrane permeability and piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity close to melting transitions, where such effects are especially pronounced. PMID:26324950

  5. Properties and performance of EUVL pellicle membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Emily E.; Vanpaemel, Johannes; Pollentier, Ivan; Zahedmanesh, Houman; Adelmann, Christoph; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Jonckheere, Rik; Lee, Jae Uk

    2015-10-01

    EUV mask protection during handling and exposure remains a challenge for high volume manufacturing using EUV scanners. A thin, transparent membrane can be mounted above the mask pattern so that any particle that falls onto the front of the mask is held out of focus and does not image. The fluoropolymer membranes that are compatible with 193nm lithography absorb too strongly at the 13.5nm EUV exposure wavelength to be considered. Initially, the industry planned to expose EUV masks without any pellicle; however, the time and cost of fabricating and qualifying an EUV mask is simply too high to risk decimating wafer yield each time a particle falls onto the mask pattern. Despite the challenges of identifying a membrane for EUV, the industry has returned to the pellicle concept for protection. EUVL pellicles have been in development for more than a decade and reasonable options exist. Meeting all pellicle requirements is difficult, so this type of risk-mitigation effort is needed to ensure that there is a viable high-volume manufacturing option. This paper first reviews the desired membrane properties for EUVL pellicles. Next, candidate materials are introduced based on reported properties and compatibility with fabrication. Finally a set of candidate membranes are fabricated. These membranes are screened using a simplified set of tests to assess their suitability as an EUV pellicle. EUV transmission, film stress, and film durability data are included. The results are presented along with general guidelines for pellicle membrane properties for EUV manufacturing.

  6. Ceramic ultrafiltration membranes with photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Deborah Wildman

    The photocatalytic properties of ceramic ultrafilters have been utilized in the development of a novel in-situ membrane cleaning process for ultrafiltration membranes fabricated from titania. The use of the photoactive membrane layer mitigates the effects of foulants in the system, thereby yielding an increase in the observed overall flux without sacrificing rejection of the solute by the membrane. Photocatalytic membranes of titania supported on porous tubes of alpha-alumina were fabricated using sol-gel techniques. These membranes were developed on the basis of the results of two-level factorial experimental designs. Electron microscopy and x-ray spectrometry were employed to evaluate coverage of the support by the membrane, the thickness of the membrane, and the presence of defects in the membrane. The photocatalytic membrane system was characterized to determine both morphological and performance parameters. Morphological parameters included the pore diameters, Darcy coefficients, and the individual resistances associated with each of the porous layers comprising the composite photocatalytic membrane. Performance parameters included the nominal molecular weight cutoff values of the ceramic membranes, the rate of permeation of pure solvent in the presence and the absence of UV illumination through the porous layers of interest, and the ability of the photocatalytic membrane to resist fouling and maintain permselectivity in the presence of UV illumination. The photocatalytic membranes were used to ultrafilter aqueous solutions of polymeric organic foulants present at an initial concentration of 1 x 10-3 M. Formation of a gel layer of foulant on the surface of the membrane was observed in the presence and in the absence of UV radiation; however, the results of permeability experiments indicated that formation of this foulant layer was significantly retarded (by a factor of two) in the presence of UV radiation. Improvement in the flow rate of permeate through the

  7. How Membrane-Active Peptides Get into Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-21

    The structure-function relationship for a family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from the skin of Australian tree frogs is discussed and compared with that of peptide toxins from bee and Australian scorpion venoms. Although these membrane-active peptides induce a similar cellular fate by disrupting the lipid bilayer integrity, their lytic activity is achieved via different modes of action, which are investigated in relation to amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and membrane lipid composition. In order to better understand what structural features govern the interaction between peptides and lipid membranes, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which translocate through the membrane without compromising its integrity, are also discussed. AMPs possess membrane lytic activities that are naturally designed to target the cellular membrane of pathogens or competitors. They are extremely diverse in amino acid composition and often show specificity against a particular strain of microbe. Since our antibiotic arsenal is declining precariously in the face of the rise in multiantibiotic resistance, AMPs increasingly are seen as a promising alternative. In an effort to understand their molecular mechanism, biophysical studies of a myriad of AMPs have been reported, yet no unifying mechanism has emerged, rendering difficult the rational design of drug leads. Similarly, a wide variety of cytotoxic peptides are found in venoms, the best known being melittin, yet again, predicting their activity based on a particular amino acid composition or secondary structure remains elusive. A common feature of these membrane-active peptides is their preference for the lipid environment. Indeed, they are mainly unstructured in solution and, in the presence of lipid membranes, quickly adsorb onto the surface, change their secondary structure, eventually insert into the hydrophobic core of the membrane bilayer, and finally disrupt the bilayer integrity. These steps define the molecular

  8. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  9. Nonequilibrium fluctuations, traveling waves, and instabilities in active membranes.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, S; Toner, J; Prost, J

    2000-04-10

    The stability of a flexible fluid membrane containing a distribution of mobile, active proteins (e.g., proton pumps) is shown to depend on the structure and functional asymmetry of the proteins. A stable active membrane is in a nonequilibrium steady state with height fluctuations whose statistical properties are governed by the protein activity. Disturbances are predicted to travel as waves at sufficiently long wavelength, with speed set by the normal velocity of the pumps. The unstable case involves a spontaneous, pump-driven undulation of the membrane, with clumping of the proteins in regions of high activity. PMID:11019123

  10. Viscoelastic properties of human tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tao; Dai, Chenkai; Gan, Rong Z

    2007-02-01

    The tympanic membrane or eardrum of human ear transfers sound waves into mechanical vibration from the external ear canal into the middle ear and cochlea. Mechanical properties of the tympanic membrane (TM) play an important role in sound transmission through the ear. Although limited resources about linear elastic properties of the TM are available in literature, there is a lack of measurement or modeling of viscoelastic properties of the TM at low stress levels. In this study, the uniaxial tensile, stress relaxation, and failure tests were conducted on fresh human cadaver TM specimens to explore mechanical properties of the TM. The experimental results were analyzed using the hyperelastic Ogden model and digital image correlation method. The constitutive equation and non-linear elastic properties of the TM were presented by functions of the stress and strain at the stress range from 0 to 1 MPa. Viscoelastic properties of the TM were described by the stress relaxation function and hysteresis. The results show that the uniaxial tensile test with the aid of digital image correlation analysis is a reliable and useful approach for measuring mechanical properties of ear tissues. The data presented in this paper contribute to ear biomechanics in both experimental measurement and theoretical analysis of ear tissues. PMID:17160465

  11. Dendrotoxin acceptor from bovine synaptic plasma membranes. Binding properties, purification and subunit composition of a putative constituent of certain voltage-activated K+ channels.

    PubMed Central

    Parcej, D N; Dolly, J O

    1989-01-01

    Dendrotoxin is a snake polypeptide that blocks selectively and potently certain voltage-sensitive, fast-activating K+ channels in the nervous system, where it binds with high affinity to membranous acceptors. Herein, the acceptor protein for dendrotoxin in bovine synaptic membranes is solubilized in active form and its complete purification achieved by affinity chromatography, involving a novel elution procedure. This putative K+-channel constituent is shown to be a large oligomeric glycoprotein containing two major subunits, with Mr values of 75,000 and 37,000. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2930493

  12. Properties of liposomal membranes containing lysolecithin.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, T; Inoue, K; Nojima, S

    1976-06-01

    Liposomes have been prepared with lysolecithin (1-acyl-sn-3-glycerylphosphorylcholine), egg lecithin (3-sn-phosphatidylcholine), dicetyl phosphate, and cholesterol. The ability to function as a barrier to the diffusion of glucose marker and the sensitivities of the liposomes to hypotonic treatment and other reagents which modified the permeability were examined. Generally, lysolecithin incorporation decreased the effectiveness of the membranes as a barrier to glucose and made the membranes more "osmotically fragile." Cholesterol incorporation counteracted the effect of incorporated lysolecithin. The more cholesterol incorporated into liposomes, the more lysolecthin could be incorporated into the membrane without loss of function as a barrier. With more than 50 mole% of colesterol, lysolecithin alone could form membranes which were practically impermeable to glucose. The hemolytic activity of lysolecithin was affected by mixing with various lecithins or cholesterol. Liposomes containing lysolecithin, which have the ability to trap glucose marker, showed poor hemolytic activity, while lipid micelles with lysolecithin (which could trap little glucose) showed almost the same hemolytic activity as lysolecithin itself. There seems to be a close correlation between hemolytic activity and barrier function of lipid micelles. PMID:986392

  13. A common landscape for membrane-active peptides

    PubMed Central

    Last, Nicholas B; Schlamadinger, Diana E; Miranker, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    Three families of membrane-active peptides are commonly found in nature and are classified according to their initial apparent activity. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient components of the innate immune system and typically act by disruption of microbial membranes leading to cell death. Amyloid peptides contribute to the pathology of diverse diseases from Alzheimer's to type II diabetes. Preamyloid states of these peptides can act as toxins by binding to and permeabilizing cellular membranes. Cell-penetrating peptides are natural or engineered short sequences that can spontaneously translocate across a membrane. Despite these differences in classification, many similarities in sequence, structure, and activity suggest that peptides from all three classes act through a small, common set of physical principles. Namely, these peptides alter the Brownian properties of phospholipid bilayers, enhancing the sampling of intrinsic fluctuations that include membrane defects. A complete energy landscape for such systems can be described by the innate membrane properties, differential partition, and the associated kinetics of peptides dividing between surface and defect regions of the bilayer. The goal of this review is to argue that the activities of these membrane-active families of peptides simply represent different facets of what is a shared energy landscape. PMID:23649542

  14. Designing Mimics of Membrane Active Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sgolastra, Federica; deRonde, Brittany M.; Sarapas, Joel M.; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N.

    2014-01-01

    CONSPECTUS As a semi-permeable barrier that controls the flux of biomolecules in and out the cell, the plasma membrane is critical in cell function and survival. Many proteins interact with the plasma membrane and modulate its physiology. Within this large landscape of membrane-active molecules, researchers have focused significant attention on two specific classes of peptides, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) because of their unique properties. In this account, we describe our efforts over the last decade to build and understand synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs). These endeavors represent one specific example of a much larger effort to understand how synthetic molecules interact with and manipulate the plasma membrane. Using both defined molecular weight oligomers and easier to produce, but heterogeneous, polymers, it has been possible to generate scaffolds with biological potency superior to the natural analogs. In one case, a compound has progressed through a phase II clinical trial for pan)staph infections. Modern biophysical assays highlighted the interplay between the synthetic scaffold and lipid composition leading to negative Gaussian curvature, a requirement for both pore formation and endosomal escape. The complexity of this interplay between lipids, bilayer components, and the scaffolds remains to be better resolved, but significant new insight has been provided. It is worthwhile to consider the various aspects of permeation and how these are related to ‘pore formation.’ More recently, our efforts have expanded toward protein transduction domains, or cell penetrating peptide, mimics. The combination of unique molecular scaffolds and guanidinium) rich side chains has produced an array of polymers with robust transduction (and delivery) activity. Being a new area, the fundamental interactions between these new scaffolds and the plasma membrane are just beginning to be understood. Negative Gaussian

  15. Interaction between active ruthenium complex [RuCl3(dppb)(VPy)] and phospholipid Langmuir monolayers: Effects on membrane electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrino, B.; Wrobel, E. C.; Nobre, T. M.; Caseli, L.; Lazaro, S. R.; Júnior, A. C.; Garcia, J. R.; Oliveira, O. N.; Wohnrath, K.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the interaction between mer-[RuCl3(dppb)(VPy)] (dppb = 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphine)butane and VPy = 4-vinylpyridine) (RuVPy) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl serine (DPPS), in Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films. Interaction of RuVPy with DPPS, which predominates in cancer cell membranes, should be weaker than for other phospholipids since RuVPy is less toxic to cancer cells than to healthy cells. Incorporation of RuVPy induced smaller changes in electrochemical properties of LB films of DPPS than for other phospholipids, but the same did not apply to surface pressure isotherms. This calls for caution in establishing correlations between effects from a single property and phenomena on cell membranes.

  16. Enzyme Activities in Polarized Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bass, L.; McIlroy, D. K.

    1968-01-01

    The theoretical pH dependence of enzyme activities in membranes of low dielectric constant is estimated. It is shown that in biological membranes some types of enzymes may attain a limiting pH sensitivity such that an increment of only 0.2 pH unit (sufficient to induce action potentials in squid axons) causes a relative activity change of over 25%. The transients of enzyme activity generated by membrane depolarization and by pH increments in the bathing solution are discussed in relation to the transients of nervous excitation. PMID:5641405

  17. Membrane-Binding and Enzymatic Properties of RPE65

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Philip D.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration of visual pigments is essential for sustained visual function. Although the requirement for non-photochemical regeneration of the visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, was recognized early on, it was only recently that the trans to cis retinoid isomerase activity required for this process was assigned to a specific protein, a microsomal membrane enzyme called RPE65. In this review, we outline progress that has been made in the functional characterization of RPE65. We then discuss general concepts related to protein-membrane interactions and the mechanism of the retinoid isomerization reaction and describe some of the important biochemical and structural features of RPE65 with respect to its membrane-binding and enzymatic properties. PMID:20304090

  18. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  19. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited.

    PubMed

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker's yeast. PMID:26473931

  20. Radiation-Grafted Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Water Electrolysis Cells: Evaluation of Key Membrane Properties.

    PubMed

    Albert, Albert; Barnett, Alejandro O; Thomassen, Magnus S; Schmidt, Thomas J; Gubler, Lorenz

    2015-10-14

    Radiation-grafted membranes can be considered an alternative to perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membranes, such as Nafion, in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolyzer. Styrene, acrylonitrile, and 1,3-diisopropenylbenzene monomers are cografted into preirradiated 50 μm ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) base film, followed by sulfonation to introduce proton exchange sites to the obtained grafted films. The incorporation of grafts throughout the thickness is demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) analysis of the membrane cross-sections. The membranes are analyzed in terms of grafting kinetics, ion-exchange capacity (IEC), and water uptake. The key properties of radiation-grafted membranes and Nafion, such as gas crossover, area resistance, and mechanical properties, are evaluated and compared. The plot of hydrogen crossover versus area resistance of the membranes results in a property map that indicates the target areas for membrane development for electrolyzer applications. Tensile tests are performed to assess the mechanical properties of the membranes. Finally, these three properties are combined to establish a figure of merit, which indicates that radiation-grafted membranes obtained in the present study are promising candidates with properties superior to those of Nafion membranes. A water electrolysis cell test is performed as proof of principle, including a comparison to a commercial membrane electrode assembly (MEA). PMID:26393461

  1. Thioredoxin-like activity of thylakoid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, A.R.; Brennan, T.; Anderson, L.E.

    1980-10-01

    The inactivation of pea leaf chloroplast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by dithiothreitol can be catalyzed by thioredoxin-like molecules that are present in chloroplasts. This thioredoxin activity occurs predominantly as a soluble species, but washed thylakoid membranes also exhibit some thioredoxin-like activity. The membrane-associated thioredoxin can be extracted by treatment with the detergent Triton X-100. The solubilized thioredoxing appears to have a molecular size similar to that of the soluble thioredoxin which catalyzes the same reaction. The thylakoid-bound activity constitutes only about 5% of the total chloroplast thioredoxin activity. The thioredoxin occurring in the membrane fraction cannot, however, be ascribed to the trapping of stroma since less than 0.1% of three stromal marker enzymes are found in the same thylakoid extract.

  2. Organelle morphogenesis by active membrane remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Ipsen, John H.; Rao, Madan; Kumar, P. B. Sunil

    Intracellular organelles are subject to a steady flux of lipids and proteins through active, energy consuming transport processes. Active fission and fusion are promoted by GTPases, e.g., Arf-Coatamer and the Rab-Snare complexes, which both sense and generate local membrane curvature. Here we investigate through Dynamical Triangulation Monte Carlo simulations, the role that these active processes play in determining the morphology and compositional segregation in closed membranes. Our results suggest that the ramified morphologies of organelles observed in-vivo are a consequence of driven nonequilibrium processes rather than equilibrium forces.

  3. Monitoring membrane properties and apoptosis using membrane probes of the 3-hydroxyflavone family.

    PubMed

    Darwich, Zeinab; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Mély, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Environment-sensitive fluorescent membrane probes are attractive tools for investigating the membrane properties and their changes under perturbing conditions. Membrane probes of the 3-hydroxyflavone family are of particular interest due to their excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction, which confers a dual emission highly sensitive to the polarity and hydration of the environment. In the present work, we will describe the protocols used with these probes in order to monitor the physicochemical properties of lipid membrane models and cell plasma membranes and to detect apoptosis. PMID:24108636

  4. Active membrane cholesterol as a physiological effector.

    PubMed

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L

    2016-09-01

    Sterols associate preferentially with plasma membrane sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids to form stoichiometric complexes. Cholesterol in molar excess of the capacity of these polar bilayer lipids has a high accessibility and fugacity; we call this fraction active cholesterol. This review first considers how active cholesterol serves as an upstream regulator of cellular sterol homeostasis. The mechanism appears to utilize the redistribution of active cholesterol down its diffusional gradient to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, where it binds multiple effectors and directs their feedback activity. We have also reviewed a broad literature in search of a role for active cholesterol (as opposed to bulk cholesterol or lipid domains such as rafts) in the activity of diverse membrane proteins. Several systems provide such evidence, implicating, in particular, caveolin-1, various kinds of ABC-type cholesterol transporters, solute transporters, receptors and ion channels. We suggest that this larger role for active cholesterol warrants close attention and can be tested easily. PMID:26874289

  5. Reconstitution of Membrane Proteins into Model Membranes: Seeking Better Ways to Retain Protein Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lithgow, Trevor; Martin, Lisandra L.

    2013-01-01

    The function of any given biological membrane is determined largely by the specific set of integral membrane proteins embedded in it, and the peripheral membrane proteins attached to the membrane surface. The activity of these proteins, in turn, can be modulated by the phospholipid composition of the membrane. The reconstitution of membrane proteins into a model membrane allows investigation of individual features and activities of a given cell membrane component. However, the activity of membrane proteins is often difficult to sustain following reconstitution, since the composition of the model phospholipid bilayer differs from that of the native cell membrane. This review will discuss the reconstitution of membrane protein activities in four different types of model membrane—monolayers, supported lipid bilayers, liposomes and nanodiscs, comparing their advantages in membrane protein reconstitution. Variation in the surrounding model environments for these four different types of membrane layer can affect the three-dimensional structure of reconstituted proteins and may possibly lead to loss of the proteins activity. We also discuss examples where the same membrane proteins have been successfully reconstituted into two or more model membrane systems with comparison of the observed activity in each system. Understanding of the behavioral changes for proteins in model membrane systems after membrane reconstitution is often a prerequisite to protein research. It is essential to find better solutions for retaining membrane protein activities for measurement and characterization in vitro. PMID:23344058

  6. Active membranes studied by X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Giahi, A; El Alaoui Faris, M; Bassereau, P; Salditt, T

    2007-08-01

    In view of recent theories of "active" membranes, we have studied multilamellar phospholipid membrane stacks with reconstituted transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR) under different illumination conditions by X-ray scattering. The light-active protein is considered as an active constituent which drives the system out of equilibrium and is predicted to change the collective fluctuation properties of the membranes. Using X-ray reflectivity, X-ray non-specular (diffuse) scattering, and grazing incidence scattering, we find no detectable change in the scattering curves when changing the illumination condition. In particular the intermembrane spacing d remains constant, after eliminating hydration-related artifacts by design of a suitable sample environment. The absence of any observable non-equilibrium effects in the experimental window is discussed in view of the relevant parameters and recent theories. PMID:17712523

  7. Polyvinylidenefluoride/carbon nanotubes mixed matrix membranes with tailored properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontananova, Enrica; Grosso, Valentina; Aljlil, Saad A.; Bahattab, Mohammed A.; Vuono, Danilo; Di Profio, Gianluca; Drioli, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    Membrane operations are promising tools for efficient and environmentally friendly separations. However, the development of advanced membranes with tailored properties is a key issue to be addressed in order to better exploit the potentialities of membrane-based separations. An important approach toward this aim is the development of mixed matrix membranes in which an organic and an inorganic phase coexist in order to have synergic effects on membrane properties. The peculiar properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) such as high electrical and thermal conductivity, high strength and unique transport properties, has motivated a considerable effort to produce CNT-polymer composites in order to engineer membrane properties. In this work the roughness, wettability, morphology, crystalline phase and pore size of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) membranes were tailored working on the membrane preparation conditions, as well as, by blending the polymer with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A study on the effect of concentration of the polymer, use of pore forming additives, type and concentration of MWCNTs (pristine and functionalized), was carried out. The results highlighted interesting relationships between membrane microstructure and composition, as well as, MWCNTs distribution, on transport and wettability properties, in the perspectives of a more efficient application of PVDF membranes in liquid phase separations.

  8. Influence of water and membrane microstructure on the transport properties of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Ana Rosa

    Proton transport in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) depends on interaction between water and acid groups covalently bound to the polymer. Although the presence of water is important in maintaining the PEM's functions, a thorough understanding of this topic is still lacking. The objective of this work is to provide a better understanding of how the nature water, confined to ionic domains of the polymer, influences the membrane's ability to transport protons, methanol and water. Understanding this topic will facilitate development of new materials with favorable transport properties for fuel cells use. Five classes of polymer membranes were used in this work: polyacrylonitrile-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (PAN-g-macPSSA); poly(vinylidene difluoride) irradiation-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (PVDF-g-PSSA); poly(ethylenetetrafluoroethylene) irradiation-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (ETFE-gPSSA); PVDF-g-PSSA with hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA); and perfluorosulfonic acid membrane (Nafion). The nature of water within the polymers (freezable versus non-freezable states) was measured by systematically freezing samples, and observing the temperature at which water freezes and the amount of heat released in the process. Freezing water-swollen membranes resulted in a 4-fold decrease in the proton conductivity of the PEM. Activation energies of proton transport before and after freezing were ˜ 0.15 eV and 0.5 eV, consistent with proton transport through liquid water and bound water, respectively. Reducing the content of water in membrane samples decreased the amount of freezable and non-freezable water. Calorimetric measurements of membranes in various degrees of hydration showed that water molecules became non-freezable when lambda, (water molecules per sulfonic acid group) was less than ˜14. Proton conduction through membranes containing only non-freezable water was demonstrated to be feasible. Diffusion experiments showed that the permeability of methanol

  9. Membrane has high urea-rejection properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T.

    1977-01-01

    Membranes are synthesized from ethylene and nitrogen in RF plasma at low power, gas-flow rates, and pressure. Ethylene and nitrogen are used because flow rate and partial pressure of each gas can be independently controlled to produce optimum conditions for synthesizing membrane. Membrane is particularly useful in recycling and purifying water.

  10. Process for restoring membrane permeation properties

    DOEpatents

    Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.G.

    1997-05-20

    A process is described for restoring the selectivity of high-free-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70--100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use. 8 figs.

  11. Process for restoring membrane permeation properties

    DOEpatents

    Pinnau, Ingo; Toy, Lora G.; Casillas, Carlos G.

    1997-05-20

    A process for restoring the selectivity of high-flee-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70-100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use.

  12. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment. PMID:27486044

  13. Improved antifouling properties of polyamide nanofiltration membranes by reducing the density of surface carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yinghui; Tiraferri, Alberto; Yip, Ngai Yin; Adout, Atar; Huang, Xia; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-12-18

    Carboxyls are inherent functional groups of thin-film composite polyamide nanofiltration (NF) membranes, which may play a role in membrane performance and fouling. Their surface presence is attributed to incomplete reaction of acyl chloride monomers during the membrane active layer synthesis by interfacial polymerization. In order to unravel the effect of carboxyl group density on organic fouling, NF membranes were fabricated by reacting piperazine (PIP) with either isophthaloyl chloride (IPC) or the more commonly used trimesoyl chloride (TMC). Fouling experiments were conducted with alginate as a model hydrophilic organic foulant in a solution, simulating the composition of municipal secondary effluent. Improved antifouling properties were observed for the IPC membrane, which exhibited lower flux decline (40%) and significantly greater fouling reversibility or cleaning efficiency (74%) than the TMC membrane (51% flux decline and 40% cleaning efficiency). Surface characterization revealed that there was a substantial difference in the density of surface carboxyl groups between the IPC and TMC membranes, while other surface properties were comparable. The role of carboxyl groups was elucidated by measurements of foulant-surface intermolecular forces by atomic force microscopy, which showed lower adhesion forces and rupture distances for the IPC membrane compared to TMC membranes in the presence of calcium ions in solution. Our results demonstrated that a decrease in surface carboxyl group density of polyamide membranes fabricated with IPC monomers can prevent calcium bridging with alginate and, thus, improve membrane antifouling properties. PMID:23205860

  14. Effect of Hydroperoxides on Red Blood Cell Membrane Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Hale, John P.; Winlove, C. Peter; Petrov, Peter G.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of oxidative stress on red blood cell membrane mechanical properties in vitro using detailed analysis of the membrane thermal fluctuation spectrum. Two different oxidants, the cytosol-soluble hydrogen peroxide and the membrane-soluble cumene hydroperoxide, are used, and their effects on the membrane bending elastic modulus, surface tension, strength of confinement due to the membrane skeleton, and 2D shear elastic modulus are measured. We find that both oxidants alter significantly the membrane elastic properties, but their effects differ qualitatively and quantitatively. While hydrogen peroxide mainly affects the elasticity of the membrane protein skeleton (increasing the membrane shear modulus), cumene hydroperoxide has an impact on both membrane skeleton and lipid bilayer mechanical properties, as can be seen from the increased values of the shear and bending elastic moduli. The biologically important implication of these results is that the effects of oxidative stress on the biophysical properties, and hence the physiological functions, of the cell membrane depend on the nature of the oxidative agent. Thermal fluctuation spectroscopy provides a means of characterizing these different effects, potentially in a clinical milieu. PMID:22004746

  15. Supported phospholipid/alkanethiol biomimetic membranes: insulating properties.

    PubMed Central

    Plant, A L; Gueguetchkeri, M; Yap, W

    1994-01-01

    A novel model lipid bilayer membrane is prepared by the addition of phospholipid vesicles to alkanethiol monolayers on gold. This supported hybrid bilayer membrane is rugged, easily and reproducibly prepared in the absence of organic solvent, and is stable for very long periods of time. We have characterized the insulating characteristics of this membrane by examining the rate of electron transfer and by impedance spectroscopy. Supported hybrid bilayers formed from phospholipids and alkanethiols are pinhole-free and demonstrate measured values of conductivity and resistivity which are within an order of magnitude of that reported for black lipid membranes. Capacitance values suggest a dielectric constant of 2.7 for phospholipid membranes in the absence of organic solvent. The protein toxin, melittin, destroys the insulating capability of the phospholipid layer without significantly altering the bilayer structure. This model membrane will allow the assessment of the effect of lipid membrane perturbants on the insulating properties of natural lipid membranes. PMID:7811924

  16. Activation of Membrane Cholesterol by 63 Amphipaths†

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Yvonne; Ye, Jin; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Steck, Theodore L.

    2009-01-01

    A few membrane-intercalating amphipaths have been observed to stimulate the interaction of cholesterol with cholesterol oxidase, saponin and cyclodextrin, presumably by displacing cholesterol laterally from its phospholipid complexes. We now report that this effect, referred to as cholesterol activation, occurs with dozens of other amphipaths, including alkanols, saturated and cis- and trans-unsaturated fatty acids, fatty acid methyl esters, sphingosine derivatives, terpenes, alkyl ethers, ketones, aromatics and cyclic alkyl derivatives. The apparent potency of the agents tested ranged from 3 μM to 7 mM and generally paralleled their octanol/water partition coefficients, except that relative potency declined for compounds with> 10 carbons. Some small amphipaths activated cholesterol at a membrane concentration of ~3 moles per 100 moles bilayer lipids, about equimolar with the cholesterol they displaced. Lysophosphatidylserine countered the effects of all these agents, consistent with its ability to reduce the pool of active membrane cholesterol. Various amphipaths stabilized red cells against the hemolysis elicited by cholesterol depletion, presumably by substituting for the extracted sterol. The number and location of cis and trans fatty acid unsaturations and the absolute stereochemistry of enantiomer pairs had only small effects on amphipath potency. Nevertheless, potency varied ~7-fold within a group of diverse agents with similar partition coefficients. We infer that a wide variety of amphipaths can displace membrane cholesterol by competing stoichiometrically but with only limited specificity for its weak association with phospholipids. Any number of other drugs and experimental agents might do the same. PMID:19655814

  17. Membrane activity of biomimetic facially amphiphilic antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Arnt, Lachelle; Rennie, Jason R; Linser, Sebastian; Willumeit, Regine; Tew, Gregory N

    2006-03-01

    Membranes are a central feature of all biological systems, and their ability to control many cellular processes is critically important. As a result, a better understanding of how molecules bind to and select between biological membranes is an active area of research. Antimicrobial host defense peptides are known to be membrane-active and, in many cases, exhibit discrimination between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The design of synthetic molecules that capture the biological activity of these natural peptides has been shown. In this report, the interaction between our biomimetic structures and different biological membranes is reported using both model vesicle and in vitro bacterial cell experiments. Compound 1 induces 12% leakage at 20 microg/mL against phosphatidylglycerol (PG)-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) vesicles vs only 3% leakage at 200 microg/mL against phosphatidyl-L-serine (PS)-phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles. Similarly, a 40% reduction in fluorescence is measured in lipid movement experiments for PG-PE compared to 10% for PS-PC at 600 s. A 30 degrees C increase in the phase transition of stearoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylserine is observed in the presence of 1. These results show that lipid composition is more important for selectivity than overall net charge. Additionally, the overall concentration of a given lipid is another important factor. An effort is made to connect model vesicle studies with in vitro data and naturally occurring lipid compositions. PMID:16494408

  18. The properties of an ion selective enzymatic asymmetric synthetic membrane.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitz, M. A.

    1971-01-01

    With the aid of a simple model membrane system, the properties of cellulose enzymes and of membrane selectivity and pump-like action are considered. The model is based on materials possibly present on a primitive earth, as well as on a membrane able to sort or concentrate these materials. An overview of the model membrane system is presented in terms of how it is constructed, what its properties are, and what to expect in performance characteristics. The model system is shown to be useful for studying the selective and in some cases accelerated transfer of nutrients and metabolites.

  19. Relating rejection of trace organic contaminants to membrane properties in forward osmosis: measurements, modelling and implications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Nghiem, Long D; Price, William E; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-02-01

    This study elucidates the relationship between membrane properties and the rejection of trace organic contaminants (TrOCs) in forward osmosis (FO). An asymmetric cellulose triacetate (CTA) and a thin-film composite (TFC) polyamide FO membrane were used for this investigation. The effective average pore radius (rp), selective barrier thickness over porosity parameter (l/ε), surface charge, support layer structural parameter (S), pure water permeability coefficient (A) and salt (NaCl) permeability coefficient (B) of the two membranes were systematically characterised. Results show that measured rejection of TrOCs as a function of permeate water flux can be well described by the pore hindrance transport model. This observation represents the first successful application of this model, which was developed for pressure-driven nanofiltration, to an osmotically-driven membrane process. The rejection of charged TrOCs by the CTA and TFC membranes was high and was governed by both electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance. The TFC membrane exhibited higher rejection of neutral TrOCs with low molecular weight than the CTA membrane, although the estimated pore size of the TFC membrane (0.42 nm) was slightly larger than that of the CTA membrane (0.37 nm). This higher rejection of neutral TrOCs by the TFC membrane is likely attributed to its active layer properties, namely a more effective active layer structure, as indicated by a larger l/ε parameter, and pore hydration induced by the negative surface charge. PMID:24345822

  20. Ionic transport properties of template-synthesized gold nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng

    Ionic transport in nanotubes exhibits unique properties due to the strong interactions between ions and the nanotube surface. The main objective of my research is to explore and regulate the ionic transport in gold nanotube membranes. Chapter 1 overviews a versatile method of fabricating nanostructured materials, called the template synthesis. Important parameters of the template synthesis are introduced such as templates and deposition methods. The template synthesis method is used to prepare membranes used in this dissertation. Chapter 2 describes a method to increase the ionic conductivity in membranes containing gold nanotubes with small diameter (4 nm). The gold nanotube membrane is prepared by the electroless plating of gold in a commercially available polycarbonate membrane. Voltages are applied to the gold nanotube membrane and fixed charges are injected on the gold nanotube walls. We show that ionic conductivity of the gold nanotube membrane can be enhanced in aqueous potassium chloride (KCl) solution at negative applied voltages. When the most negative voltage (-0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl) is applied to the membrane, the ionic conductivity of the solution inside the gold nanotube (94 mS.cm-1) is comparable to that of 1 M aqueous KCl, over two orders of magnitude higher than that of the 0.01 M KCl contacting the membrane. Chapter 3 explores another important transport property of the gold nanotube membrane -- ion permselectivity. When the permselective membrane separates two electrolyte solutions at different concentrations, a membrane potential is developed and measured by the potentiometric method. Surface charge density and the ion mobilities are estimated by fitting the experimental data with a pre-existing model. The surface charge density of the gold nanotube membrane in this research is estimated to be 2 muC/cm2. Chapter 4 describes voltage-controlled ionic transport in a gold/polypyrrole membrane doped with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Polypyrrole

  1. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  2. Properties of Plasma Membrane from Pea Root Seedlings under Altered Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymchuk, D.; Baranenko, V.; Vorobyova, T. V.; Kurylenko, I.; Chyzhykova, O.; Dubovoy, V.

    In this study, the properties of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plasma membrane were examined to determine how the membrane structure and functions are regulated in response to clinorotation (2 rev/min) conditions. Membrane preparations enriched by plasma membrane vesicles were obtained by aqueous two-phase partitioning from 6-day seedling roots. The specific characteristics of H^+-ATPase, lípid composition and peroxidation intensity as well as fluidity of lipid bilayer were analysed. ATP hydrolytic activity was inhibited by ortovanadate and was insensitive to aside and nitrate in sealed plasma membrane vesicles isolated from both clinorotated and control seedlings. Plasma membrane vesicles from clinorotated seedlings in comparison to controls were characterised by increase in the total lipid/protein ratio, ATP hydrolytic activity and intensifying of lipid peroxidation. Sitosterol and campesterol were the predominant free sterol species. Clinorotated seedlings contained a slightly higher level of unsaturated fatty acid than controls. Plasma membrane vesicles were labelled with pyrene and fluorescence originating from monomeric (I_M) molecules and excimeric (I_E) aggregates were measured. The calculated I_E/I_M values were higher in clinorotated seedlings compared with controls reflecting the reduction in membrane microviscosity. The involvement of the changes in plasma membrane lipid content and composition, fluidity and H^+-ATPase activity in response of pea seedlings to altered gravity is discussed.

  3. O-(carboxymethyl)-chitosan nanofiltration membrane surface functionalized with graphene oxide nanosheets for enhanced desalting properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiali; Gao, Xueli; Wang, Jian; Wei, Yi; Li, Zhaokui; Gao, Congjie

    2015-02-25

    A novel O-(carboxymethyl)-chitosan (OCMC) nanofiltration (NF) membrane is developed via surface functionalization with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets to enhance desalting properties. Using ring-opening polymerization between epoxy groups of GO nanosheets and amino groups of OCMC active layer, GO nanosheets are irreversibly bound to the membrane. The OCMC NF membranes surface-functionalized with GO nanosheets are characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle analyzer, and zeta potential analyzer. The membranes exhibit not only higher permeability but also better salt rejections than the pristine membranes and the commercial NF membranes; besides, the desalting properties are enhanced with the concentration of GO nanosheets increasing. Furthermore, the transport mechanism of GO-OCMC NF membranes reveals that the nanoporous structure of GO-OCMC functional layer and size exclusion and electrostatic repulsion of water nanochannels formed by GO nanosheets lead to the membranes possessing enhanced desalting properties. PMID:25635511

  4. Structured microparticles with tailored properties produced by membrane emulsification.

    PubMed

    Vladisavljević, Goran T

    2015-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of membrane emulsification routes for fabrication of structured microparticles with tailored properties for specific applications. Direct (bottom-up) and premix (top-down) membrane emulsification processes are discussed including operational, formulation and membrane factors that control the droplet size and droplet generation regimes. A special emphasis was put on different methods of controlled shear generation on membrane surface, such as cross flow on the membrane surface, swirl flow, forward and backward flow pulsations in the continuous phase and membrane oscillations and rotations. Droplets produced by membrane emulsification can be used for synthesis of particles with versatile morphology (solid and hollow, matrix and core/shell, spherical and non-spherical, porous and coherent, composite and homogeneous), which can be surface functionalised and coated or loaded with macromolecules, nanoparticles, quantum dots, drugs, phase change materials and high molecular weight gases to achieve controlled/targeted drug release and impart special optical, chemical, electrical, acoustic, thermal and magnetic properties. The template emulsions including metal-in-oil, solid-in-oil-in-water, oil-in-oil, multilayer, and Pickering emulsions can be produced with high encapsulation efficiency of encapsulated materials and narrow size distribution and transformed into structured particles using a variety of solidification processes, such as polymerisation (suspension, mini-emulsion, interfacial and in-situ), ionic gelation, chemical crosslinking, melt solidification, internal phase separation, layer-by-layer electrostatic deposition, particle self-assembly, complex coacervation, spray drying, sol-gel processing, and molecular imprinting. Particles fabricated from droplets produced by membrane emulsification include nanoclusters, colloidosomes, carbon aerogel particles, nanoshells, polymeric (molecularly imprinted, hypercrosslinked, Janus and core

  5. Reverse osmosis membrane of high urea rejection properties. [water purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Polymeric membranes suitable for use in reverse osmosis water purification because of their high urea and salt rejection properties are prepared by generating a plasma of an unsaturated hydrocarbon monomer and nitrogen gas from an electrical source. A polymeric membrane is formed by depositing a polymer of the unsaturated monomer from the plasma onto a substrate, so that nitrogen from the nitrogen gas is incorporated within the polymer in a chemically combined form.

  6. Effect of defoliant (butiphose) on morpho-physiological properties and enzyme systems of natural membranes.

    PubMed

    Mirakhmedov, A K; Ochilov, K R; Sagatova, G A; Khan, M Z; Khole, V

    1989-03-01

    Butiphose (Tributyltritiophosphate, (C4H9S)3PO) a commonly used defoliant in cotton growing regions of USSR, caused extensive alterations in morphological features of erythrocyte and nuclear membranes and affected the permeability properties of rat liver mitochondrial membrane. It disrupted Ca2+ transport system and other energy dependent processes in mitochondria. A reduction in the activity of cytochrome-c-oxidase and NAD.H-oxidase was also observed. PMID:2606532

  7. Mechanical and water sorption properties of nafion and composite nafion/titanium dioxide membranes for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satterfield, May Barclay

    The mechanical properties of the membranes used in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are important to the performance and longevity of the cell. The speed and extent of membrane water uptake depend on the membrane's viscoelastic mechanical properties, which are themselves dependent on membrane hydration, and increased hydration improves membrane proton conductivity and fuel cell performance. Membrane mechanical properties also affect durability and cell longevity, preventing membrane failure from stresses induced by changing temperature and water content during operational cycling. Further, membrane creep and stress-relaxation can change the extent of membrane/electrode contact, also changing cell behavior. New composite membrane materials have exhibited superior performance in fuel cells, and it is suspected that improved mechanical properties are responsible. Studies of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell dynamics using Nafion membranes have demonstrated the importance of membrane mechanical properties, swelling and water-absorption behavior to cell performance. Nonlinear and delayed dynamic responses to changing operating parameters were unexpected, but reminiscent of polymer viscoelastic behavior and water sorption dynamics, illustrating the need to better understand membrane properties to design and operate fuel cells. Further, Nafion/TiO2 composite membranes developed by the Princeton Chemistry Department improve fuel cell performance, which may be due to changes in membrane microstructure and enhanced mechanical properties. Mechanical properties, stress-relaxation behavior, water sorption and desorption rates and pressures exerted during hydration by a confined membrane have been measured for Nafion and for Nafion/TiO2 composite membranes. Mechanical properties, including the Young's modulus and limits of elastic deformation are dependent on temperature and membrane water content. The Young's modulus decreases with increasing water content and

  8. Antiviral activity of squalamine: Role of electrostatic membrane binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckerman, Bernard; Qu, Wei; Mishra, Abhijit; Zasloff, Michael; Wong, Gerard; Luijten, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Recent workootnotetextM. Zasloff et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. (USA) 108, 15978 (2011). has demonstrated that squalamine, a molecule found in the liver of sharks, exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral properties. It has been proposed that this activity results from the charge-density matching of squalamine and phospholipid membranes, causing squalamine to bind to membranes and displace proteins such as Rac1 that are crucial for the viral replication cycle. Here we investigate this hypothesis by numerical simulation of a coarse-grained model for the competition between Rac1 and squalamine in binding affinity to a flat lipid bilayer. We perform free-energy calculations to test the ability of squalamine to condense stacked bilayer systems and thereby displace bulkier Rac1 molecules. We directly compare our findings to small-angle x-ray scattering results for the same setup.

  9. Alterations in the activities of hepatic plasma-membrane and microsomal enzymes during liver regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Deliconstantinos, G; Ramantanis, G

    1983-01-01

    A marked increase in the activities of rat liver plasma-membrane (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase and microsomal Ca2+-stimulated ATPase was observed 18h after partial hepatectomy. Lipid analyses for both membrane preparations reveal that in partially hepatectomized rats the cholesterol and sphingomyelin content are decreased with a subsequent decrease in the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio compared with those of sham-operated animals. Changes in the allosteric properties of plasma-membrane (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase by F- (as reflected by changes in the Hill coefficient) indicated a fluidization of the lipid bilayer of both membrane preparations in 18 h-regenerating liver. The amphipathic dodecyl glucoside incorporated into the hepatic plasma membranes evoked a marked increase in the (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase and 5'-nucleotidase activities. The lack of effect of the glucoside on the Lubrol-PX-solubilized 5'-nucleotidase indicates that changes in the activities of the membrane-bound enzymes caused by the glucoside are due to modulation of the membrane fluidity. Dodecyl glucoside appears to increase the membrane fluidity, evaluated through changes in the Hill coefficient for plasma-membrane (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase. The biological significance of these data is discussed in terms of the differences and changes in the interaction of membrane-bound enzymes with membrane lipids during liver regeneration. PMID:6309144

  10. Membrane perturbing properties of sucrose polyesters.

    PubMed

    McManus, G G; Buchanan, G W; Jarrell, H C; Epand, R M; Epand, R F; Cheetham, J J

    2001-02-01

    Sucrose polyester (SPE), in the form of sucrose octaesters and sucrose hexaesters of palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), oleic (18:1cis), and linoleic (18:2cis) acids, have many uses. Applications include: a non-caloric fat substitute, detoxification agent, and oral contrast agent for human abdominal (MRI) magnetic resonance imaging. However, it has been shown that the ingestion of SPE was shown to generate a depletion of physiologically important lipidic vitamins and other lipophilic molecules. In order to better understand, at the molecular level, the type of interaction between SPE and lipid membrane, we have, first synthesized different type of labelled and non-labelled SPEs. Secondly, we have studied the effect of SPEs on multilamellar dispersions of dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DEPE) and dipalmitoylphosphocholine (DPPC) as a function of temperature, SPE composition and concentration. The effects of SPEs were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction, 2H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. At low concentration (< 1 mol%) all of the SPEs lowered the bilayer to the inverted hexagonal phase transition temperature of DEPE and induced the formation of a cubic phase in a composition dependent manner. At the same low concentration, SPEs in DPPC induce the formation of a non-bilayer phase as seen by 31P NMR. Order parameter measurements of DPPC-d62/SPE mixtures show that the SPE effect on the DPPC monolayer thickness is dependent on the SPE, concentration, chains length and saturation level. At higher concentration (> or = 10 mol%) SPE are very potent DEPE bilayer to HII phase transition promoters, although at that concentration the SPE have lost the ability to form cubic phases. SPEs have profound effects on the phase behaviour of model membrane systems, and may be important to consider when developing current and potential industrial and medical applications. PMID:11269937

  11. Water uptake, ionic conductivity and swelling properties of anion-exchange membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, QJ; Ge, SH; Wang, CY

    2013-12-01

    Water uptake, ionic conductivity and dimensional change of the anion-exchange membrane made by Tokuyama Corporation (A201 membrane) are investigated at different temperatures and water activities. Specifically, the amount of water taken up by membranes exposed to water vapor and membranes soaked in liquid water is determined. The water uptake of the A201 membrane increases with water content as well as temperature. In addition, water sorption data shows Schroeder's paradox for the AEMs investigated. The swelling properties of the A201 membrane exhibit improved dimensional stability compared with Nafion membrane. Water sorption of the A201 membrane occurs with a substantial negative excess volume of mixing. The threshold value of hydrophilic fraction in the A201 membrane for ionic conductivity is around 0.34, above which, the conductivity begins to rise quickly. This indicates that a change in the connectivity of the hydrophilic domains occurs when hydrophilic fraction approaches 0.34. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Membrane protein properties revealed through data-rich electrostatics calculations

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Grabe, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The electrostatic properties of membrane proteins often reveal many of their key biophysical characteristics, such as ion channel selectivity and the stability of charged membrane-spanning segments. The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is the gold standard for calculating protein electrostatics, and the software APBSmem enables the solution of the PB equation in the presence of a membrane. Here, we describe significant advances to APBSmem including: full automation of system setup, per-residue energy decomposition, incorporation of PDB2PQR, calculation of membrane induced pKa shifts, calculation of non-polar energies, and command-line scripting for large scale calculations. We highlight these new features with calculations carried out on a number of membrane proteins, including the recently solved structure of the ion channel TRPV1 and a large survey of 1,614 membrane proteins of known structure. This survey provides a comprehensive list of residues with large electrostatic penalties for being embedded in the membrane potentially revealing interesting functional information. PMID:26118532

  13. Structure and physical properties of biomembranes and model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hianik, T.

    2006-12-01

    Biomembranes belong to the most important structures of the cell and the cell organels. They play not only structural role of the barrier separating the external and internal part of the membrane but contain also various functional molecules, like receptors, ionic channels, carriers and enzymes. The cell membrane also preserves non-equillibrium state in a cell which is crucial for maintaining its excitability and other signaling functions. The growing interest to the biomembranes is also due to their unique physical properties. From physical point of view the biomembranes, that are composed of lipid bilayer into which are incorporated integral proteins and on their surface are anchored peripheral proteins and polysaccharides, represent liquid scrystal of smectic type. The biomembranes are characterized by anisotropy of structural and physical properties. The complex structure of biomembranes makes the study of their physical properties rather difficult. Therefore several model systems that mimic the structure of biomembranes were developed. Among them the lipid monolayers at an air-water interphase, bilayer lipid membranes (BLM), supported bilayer lipid membranes (sBLM) and liposomes are most known. This work is focused on the introduction into the "physical word" of the biomembranes and their models. After introduction to the membrane structure and the history of its establishment, the physical properties of the biomembranes and their models areare stepwise presented. The most focus is on the properties of lipid monolayers, BLM, sBLM and liposomes that were most detailed studied. This contribution has tutorial character that may be usefull for undergraduate and graduate students in the area of biophysics, biochemistry, molecular biology and bioengineering, however it contains also original work of the author and his co-worker and PhD students, that may be usefull also for specialists working in the field of biomembranes and model membranes.

  14. Gender differences in alcohol-induced oxidative stress and altered membrane properties in erythrocytes of rats.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kindinti Rameshwar; Reddy, Vaddi Damodara; Padmavathi, Pannuru; Kavitha, Godugu; Saradamma, Bulle; Varadacharyulu, N C

    2013-02-01

    Alcohol-induced oxidative stress leads to imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the antioxidant defense system, resulting in oxidative damage to membrane components such as lipids and proteins, ultimately altering membrane properties. In this study, we assessed oxidative stress status and alterations in erythrocyte membrane properties in alcohol-administered rats with respect to gender difference. Alcohol (20% v/v) administered rats of both genders showed significant changes in plasma lipid profile with elevated nitrite/nitrate levels. Furthermore, alcohol-administration significantly decreased erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes and enhanced erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation, cholesterol/phospholipid (C/P) ratio and Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity in both males and females. Besides, anisotropic studies revealed that alcohol-administration significantly decreased erythrocyte membrane fluidity. In conclusion, alcohol-administration significantly increased oxidative stress by decreasing antioxidant status, and subsequent generation of ROS altered membrane properties by altering fluidity and Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity. Female rats were more vulnerable to alcohol-induced biochemical and biophysical changes in plasma and erythrocyte including oxidative stress than male rats. PMID:23617072

  15. Effect of membrane tension on the physical properties of DOPC lipid bilayer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, A. Srinivas; Warshaviak, Dora Toledo; Chachisvilis, Mirianas

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer were performed to explore its mechanosensitivity. Variations in the bilayer properties, such as area per lipid, volume, thickness, hydration depth (HD), hydration thickness (HT), lateral diffusion coefficient, and changes in lipid structural order were computed in the membrane tension range 0 to 15 dyn/cm. We determined that an increase in membrane tension results in a decrease in the bilayer thickness and HD of ∼5% and ∼5.7% respectively, whereas area per lipid, volume, and HT/HD increased by 6.8%, 2.4%, and 5% respectively. The changes in lipid conformation and orientation were characterized using orientational (S2) and deuterium (SCD) order parameters. Upon increase of membrane tension both order parameters indicated an increase in lipid disorder by 10– 20%, mostly in the tail end region of the hydrophobic chains. The effect of membrane tension on lipid lateral diffusion in the DOPC bilayer was analyzed on three different time scales corresponding to inertial motion, anomalous diffusion and normal diffusion. The results showed that lateral diffusion of lipid molecules is anomalous in nature due to the non-exponential distribution of waiting times. The anomalous and normal diffusion coefficients increased by 20% and 52% when the membrane tension changed from 0 to 15 dyn/cm, respectively. In conclusion, our studies showed that membrane tension causes relatively significant changes in the area per lipid, volume, polarity, membrane thickness, and fluidity of the membrane suggesting multiple mechanisms by which mechanical perturbation of the membrane could trigger mechanosensitive response in cells. PMID:22588133

  16. Plant pentacyclic triterpenic acids as modulators of lipid membrane physical properties.

    PubMed

    Prades, Jesús; Vögler, Oliver; Alemany, Regina; Gomez-Florit, Manuel; Funari, Sérgio S; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Barceló, Francisca

    2011-03-01

    Free triterpenic acids (TTPs) present in plants are bioactive compounds exhibiting multiple nutriceutical activities. The underlying molecular mechanisms have only been examined in part and mainly focused on anti-inflammatory properties, cancer and cardiovascular diseases, in all of which TTPs frequently affect membrane-related proteins. Based on the structural characteristics of TTPs, we assume that their effect on biophysical properties of cell membranes could play a role for their biological activity. In this context, our study is focused on the compounds, oleanolic (3β-hydroxy-12-oleanen-28-oic acid, OLA), maslinic (2α,3β-dihydroxy-12-oleanen-28-oic acid, MSL) and ursolic ((3β)-3-hydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid, URL) as the most important TTPs present in orujo olive oil. X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance and Laurdan fluorescence data provide experimental evidence that OLA, MSL and URL altered the structural properties of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC-Cholesterol (Cho) rich membranes, being located into the polar-hydrophobic interphase. Specifically, in DPPC membranes, TTPs altered the structural order of the L(β'), phase without destabilizing the lipid bilayer. The existence of a nonbilayer isotropic phase in coexistence with the liquid crystalline L(α) phase, as observed in DPPC:URL samples, indicated the presence of lipid structures with high curvature (probably inverted micelles). In DPPC:Cho membranes, TTPs affected the membrane phase properties increasing the Laurdan GP values above 40°C. MSL and URL induced segregation of Cho within the bilayer, in contrast to OLA, that reduced the structural organization of the membrane. These results strengthen the relevance of TTP interactions with cell membranes as a molecular mechanism underlying their broad spectrum of biological effects. PMID:21167812

  17. Detecting Extracellular Carbonic Anhydrase Activity Using Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Delacruz, Joannalyn; Mikulski, Rose; Tu, Chingkuang; Li, Ying; Wang, Hai; Shiverick, Kathleen T.; Frost, Susan C.; Horenstein, Nicole A.; Silverman, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Current research into the function of carbonic anhydrases in cell physiology emphasizes the role of membrane-bound carbonic anhydrases, such as carbonic anhydrase IX that has been identified in malignant tumors and is associated with extracellular acidification as a response to hypoxia. We present here a mass spectrometric method to determine the extent to which total carbonic anhydrase activity is due to extracellular carbonic anhydrase in whole cell preparations. The method is based on the biphasic rate of depletion of 18O from CO2 measured by membrane inlet mass spectrometry. The slopes of the biphasic depletion are a sensitive measure of the presence of carbonic anhydrase outside and inside of the cells. This property is demonstrated here using suspensions of human red cells in which external carbonic anhydrase was added to the suspending solution. It is also applied to breast and prostate cancer cells which both express exofacial carbonic anhydrase IX. Inhibition of external carbonic anhydrase is achieved by use of a membrane impermeant inhibitor that was synthesized for this purpose, p-aminomethylbenzenesulfonamide attached to a polyethyleneglycol polymer. PMID:20417171

  18. Improving the Performance and Antifouling Properties of Thin-Film Composite Membranes for Water Separation Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiraferri, Alberto

    Membrane-based water separation processes utilize semi-permeable membranes to retain dissolved solids and contaminants. Deployment of these technologies for desalination and wastewater reuse has the potential to sustainably increase the supply of potable, agricultural, and industrial water. Despite considerable development of semi-permeable membranes in the last decades, several design obstacles hampering their progress have yet to be overcome. Specifically, major membrane improvements are currently sought with respect to their performance and productivity, as well as their resistance to fouling. This dissertation research aims at the advancement of semi-permeable membranes by rational optimization of their design to: (i) understand and improve their transport properties and (ii) reduce fouling by organic molecules and delay biofouling by microorganisms. In particular, thin-film composite polyamide membranes for both reverse osmosis and forward osmosis processes are the main target of the investigation. The structural and physicochemical properties of thin-film composite membranes are both characterized and tailored through implementation of original techniques and novel functionalization protocols. The membrane structure and morphology are rationally modified to enhance the mass transport within the support layer. The influence of fabrication conditions on support layer formation and on its final structure is elucidated. The intricate interrelationship among the performance of the different layers of the composite membrane is highlighted and a new protocol is developed to characterize the transport properties of membranes deployed in forward osmosis processes. Novel approaches to impart targeted properties to the active surface of thin-film composite membranes are also proposed. The functionalization is achieved by exploiting the inherent moieties of the polyamide layer to irreversibly bind nanomaterials with desired properties. An experimental method to determine

  19. Water permeation through Nafion membranes: the role of water activity.

    PubMed

    Majsztrik, Paul; Bocarsly, Andrew; Benziger, Jay

    2008-12-25

    The permeation of water through 1100 equivalent weight Nation membranes has been measured for film thicknesses of 51-254 microm, temperatures of 30-80 degrees C, and water activities (a(w)) from 0.3 to 1 (liquid water). Water permeation coefficients increased with water content in Nafion. For feed side water activity in the range 0 < a(w) < 0.8, permeation coefficients increased linearly with water activity and scaled inversely with membrane thickness. The permeation coefficients were independent of membrane thickness when the feed side of the membrane was in contact with liquid water (a(w) = 1). The permeation coefficient for a 127 microm thick membrane increased by a factor of 10 between contacting the feed side of the membrane to water vapor (a(w) = 0.9) compared to liquid water (a(w) = 1). Water permeation couples interfacial transport across the fluid membrane interface with water transport through the hydrophilic phase of Nafion. At low water activity the hydrophilic volume fraction is small and permeation is limited by water diffusion. The volume fraction of the hydrophilic phase increases with water activity, increasing water transport. As a(w) --> 1, the effective transport rate increased by almost an order of magnitude, resulting in a change of the limiting transport resistance from water permeation across the membrane to interfacial mass transport at the gas/membrane interface. PMID:19053672

  20. Influences of acid-base property of membrane on interfacial interactions related with membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor based on thermodynamic assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Qu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Meijia; Lin, Hongjun; Zhou, Xiaoling; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Mei, Rongwu; Hong, Huachang

    2016-08-01

    Failure of membrane hydrophobicity in predicting membrane fouling requires a more reliable indicator. In this study, influences of membrane acid base (AB) property on interfacial interactions in two different interaction scenarios in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) were studied according to thermodynamic approaches. It was found that both the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and foulant samples in the MBR had relatively high electron donor (γ(-)) component and low electron acceptor (γ(+)) component. For both of interaction scenarios, AB interaction was the major component of the total interaction. The results showed that, the total interaction monotonically decreased with membrane γ(-), while was marginally affected by membrane γ(+), suggesting that γ(-) could act as a reliable indicator for membrane fouling prediction. This study suggested that membrane modification for fouling mitigation should orient to improving membrane surface γ(-) component rather than hydrophilicity. PMID:27155263

  1. How Lipid Membranes Affect Pore Forming Toxin Activity.

    PubMed

    Rojko, Nejc; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-12-15

    Pore forming toxins (PFTs) evolved to permeate the plasma membrane of target cells. This is achieved in a multistep mechanism that usually involves binding of soluble protein monomer to the lipid membrane, oligomerization at the plane of the membrane, and insertion of part of the polypeptide chain across the lipid membrane to form a conductive channel. Introduced pores allow uncontrolled transport of solutes across the membrane, inflicting damage to the target cell. PFTs are usually studied from the perspective of structure-function relationships, often neglecting the important role of the bulk membrane properties on the PFT mechanism of action. In this Account, we discuss how membrane lateral heterogeneity, thickness, and fluidity influence the pore forming process of PFTs. In general, lipid molecules are more accessible for binding in fluid membranes due to steric reasons. When PFT specifically binds ordered domains, it usually recognizes a specific lipid distribution pattern, like sphingomyelin (SM) clusters or SM/cholesterol complexes, and not individual lipid species. Lipid domains were also suggested to act as an additional concentration platform facilitating PFT oligomerization, but this is yet to be shown. The last stage in PFT action is the insertion of the transmembrane segment across the membranes to build the transmembrane pore walls. Conformational changes are a spontaneous process, and sufficient free energy has to be available for efficient membrane penetration. Therefore, fluid bilayers are permeabilized more readily in comparison to highly ordered and thicker liquid ordered lipid phase (Lo). Energetically more costly insertion into the Lo phase can be driven by the hydrophobic mismatch between the thinner liquid disordered phase (Ld) and large protein complexes, which are unable to tilt like single transmembrane segments. In the case of proteolipid pores, membrane properties can directly modulate pore size, stability, and even selectivity. Finally

  2. The Structural Basis of Cholesterol Activity in Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Brett N.; Bielska, Agata; Lee, Tiffany; Daily, Michael D.; Covey, Douglas F.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Baker, Nathan A.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2013-10-15

    Although the majority of free cellular cholesterol is present in the plasma membrane, cholesterol homeostasis is principally regulated through sterol-sensing proteins that reside in the cholesterol-poor endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to acute cholesterol loading or depletion, there is rapid equilibration between the ER and plasma membrane cholesterol pools, suggesting a biophysical model in which the availability of plasma membrane cholesterol for trafficking to internal membranes modulates ER membrane behavior. Previous studies have predominantly examined cholesterol availability in terms of binding to extramembrane acceptors, but have provided limited insight into the structural changes underlying cholesterol activation. In this study, we use both molecular dynamics simulations and experimental membrane systems to examine the behavior of cholesterol in membrane bilayers. We find that cholesterol depth within the bilayer provides a reasonable structural metric for cholesterol availability and that this is correlated with cholesterol-acceptor binding. Further, the distribution of cholesterol availability in our simulations is continuous rather than divided into distinct available and unavailable pools. This data provide support for a revised cholesterol activation model in which activation is driven not by saturation of membrane-cholesterol interactions but rather by bulk membrane remodeling that reduces membrane-cholesterol affinity.

  3. Recent trends in the tuning of polymersomes' membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Le Meins, J-F; Sandre, O; Lecommandoux, S

    2011-02-01

    "Polymersomes" are vesicular structures made from the self-assembly of block copolymers. Such structures present outstanding interest for different applications such as micro- or nano-reactor, drug release or can simply be used as tool for understanding basic biological mechanisms. The use of polymersomes in such applications is strongly related to the way their membrane properties are controlled and tuned either by a precise molecular design of the constituting block or by addition of specific components inside the membrane (formulation approaches). Typical membrane properties of polymersomes obtained from the self-assembly of "coil coil" block copolymer since the end of the nineties will be first briefly reviewed and compared to those of their lipidic analogues, named liposomes. Therefore the different approaches able to modulate their permeability, mechanical properties or ability to release loaded drugs, using macromolecular engineering or formulations, are detailed. To conclude, the most recent advances to modulate the polymersomes' properties and systems that appear very promising especially for biomedical application or for the development of complex and bio-mimetic structures are presented. PMID:21337017

  4. Development of active-transport membrane devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-07-01

    This report introduces the concept of Air Products` AT membranes for the separation of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} from process gas streams and presents results from the first year fabrication concept development studies.

  5. Polymer electrolyte membranes from fluorinated polyisoprene-block-sulfonated polystyrene: Membrane structure and transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sodeye, Akinbode; Huang, Tianzi; Gido, Samuel; Mays, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    With a view to optimizing morphology and ultimately properties, membranes have been cast from relatively inexpensive block copolymer ionomers of fluorinated polyisoprene-block-sulfonated polystyrene (FISS) with various sulfonation levels, in both the acid form and the cesium neutralized form. The morphology of these membranes was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering, as well as water uptake, proton conductivity and methanol permeability within the temperature range from 20 to 60 C. Random phase separated morphologies were obtained for all samples except the cesium sample with 50 mol% sulfonation. The transport properties increased with increasing degree of sulfonation and temperature for all samples. The acid form samples absorbed more water than the cesium samples with a maximum swelling of 595% recorded at 60 C for the acid sample having 50 mol% sulfonation. Methanol permeability for the latter sample was more than an order of magnitude less than for Nafion 112 but so was the proton conductivity within the plane of the membrane at 20 C. Across the plane of the membrane this sample had half the conductivity of Nafion 112 at 60 C.

  6. Active membrane having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Ruscic, Katarina J; Sears, Devin N; Smith, Luis J; Klingler, Robert J; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-09-24

    The present invention relates to a physicochemically-active porous membrane for electrochemical cells that purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. One dimension of the pore surface has a macroscopic length (1 nm-1000 .mu.m) and is directed parallel to the direction of an electric field, which is produced between the cathode and the anode electrodes of an electrochemical cell. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  7. Characterization of antibacterial polyethersulfone membranes using the Respiration Activity Monitoring System (RAMOS).

    PubMed

    Kochan, Jozef; Scheidle, Marco; van Erkel, Joost; Bikel, Matías; Büchs, Jochen; Wong, John Erik; Melin, Thomas; Wessling, Matthias

    2012-10-15

    Membranes with antibacterial properties were developed using surface modification of polyethersulfone ultrafiltration membranes. Three different modification strategies using polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer (LbL) technique are described. The first strategy relying on the intrinsic antibacterial properties of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) exhibits only little antibacterial effects. The other two strategies contain silver in both ionic (Ag(+)) and metallic (Ag(0)) form. Ag(+) embedded into negatively charged poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate) (PSS) layers totally inhibits bacterial growth. Ag(0) nanoparticles were introduced to the membrane surface by LbL deposition of chitosan- and poly(methacrylic acid) - sodium salt (PMA)-capped silver nanoparticles and subsequent UV or heat treatment. Antibacterial properties of the modified membranes were quantified by a new method based on the Respiration Activity Monitoring System (RAMOS), whereby the oxygen transfer rates (OTR) of E. coli K12 cultures on the membranes were monitored online. As opposed to colony forming counting method RAMOS yields more quantitative and reliable data on the antibacterial effect of membrane modification. Ag-imprinted polyelectrolyte film composed of chitosan (Ag(0))/PMA(Ag(0))/chitosan(Ag(0)) was found to be the most promising among the tested membranes. Further investigation revealed that the concentration and equal distribution of silver in the membrane surface plays an important role in bacterial growth inhibition. PMID:22884245

  8. Membrane stretching triggers mechanosensitive Ca2+ channel activation in Chara.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Naoya; Kikuyama, Munehiro

    2009-03-01

    In order to confirm that mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels are activated by membrane stretching, we stretched or compressed the plasma membrane of Chara by applying osmotic shrinkage or swelling of the cell by varying the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. Aequorin studies revealed that treatments causing membrane stretching induced a transient but large increase in cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) (Delta[Ca(2+)](c)). However, the observed Delta[Ca(2+)](c) decreased during the treatments, resulting in membrane compression. A second experiment was carried out to study the relationship between changes in membrane potential (DeltaE(m)) and stretching or compression of the plasma membrane. Significant DeltaE(m) values, often accompanied by an action potential, were observed during the initial exchange of the bathing medium from a hypotonic medium to a hypertonic one (plasmolysis). DeltaE(m) appears to be triggered by a partial stretching of the membrane as it was peeled from the cell wall. After plasmolysis, other exchanges from hypertonic to hypotonic media, with their accompanying membrane stretching, always induced large DeltaE(m) values and were often accompanied by an action potential. By contrast, action potentials were scarcely observed during other exchanges from hypotonic to hypertonic solutions (=membrane compression). Thus, we concluded that activation of the mechanosensitive channels is triggered by membrane stretching in Chara. PMID:19234734

  9. Lachesana tarabaevi, an expert in membrane-active toxins.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenkov, Alexey I; Sachkova, Maria Y; Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Grishin, Eugene V; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2016-08-15

    In the present study, we show that venom of the ant spider Lachesana tarabaevi is unique in terms of molecular composition and toxicity. Whereas venom of most spiders studied is rich in disulfide-containing neurotoxic peptides, L. tarabaevi relies on the production of linear (no disulfide bridges) cytolytic polypeptides. We performed full-scale peptidomic examination of L. tarabaevi venom supported by cDNA library analysis. As a result, we identified several dozen components, and a majority (∼80% of total venom protein) exhibited membrane-active properties. In total, 33 membrane-interacting polypeptides (length of 18-79 amino acid residues) comprise five major groups: repetitive polypeptide elements (Rpe), latarcins (Ltc), met-lysines (MLys), cyto-insectotoxins (CIT) and latartoxins (LtTx). Rpe are short (18 residues) amphiphilic molecules that are encoded by the same genes as antimicrobial peptides Ltc 4a and 4b. Isolation of Rpe confirms the validity of the iPQM (inverted processing quadruplet motif) proposed to mark the cleavage sites in spider toxin precursors that are processed into several mature chains. MLys (51 residues) present 'idealized' amphiphilicity when modelled in a helical wheel projection with sharply demarcated sectors of hydrophobic, cationic and anionic residues. Four families of CIT (61-79 residues) are the primary weapon of the spider, accounting for its venom toxicity. Toxins from the CIT 1 and 2 families have a modular structure consisting of two shorter Ltc-like peptides. We demonstrate that in CIT 1a, these two parts act in synergy when they are covalently linked. This finding supports the assumption that CIT have evolved through the joining of two shorter membrane-active peptides into one larger molecule. PMID:27287558

  10. Preparation of polysaccharide loaded collagen membrane with anti-oxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zibin; Ding, Shengli; He, Xiaohong; Dai, Xuemei; Xiao, Qian; Yang, Min; Leng, Xue; Ma, Yanshun; Yang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The scavenging activity of polysaccharides from Lycium barbarum, Lentinus edodes and Ganoderma Lucidum Karst to DPPH free radicals was investigated. It was found that among the three polysaccharides, Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) exhibits the best scavenging activity. Polysaccharide loaded collagen membranes were prepared by mixing LBP with collagen, starch, glycerol, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and glutaraldehyde. In vitro drug release from membranes was evaluated. With increasing the immersion time, the release rate first increases and then slows down. Meanwhile, the scavenging activity to DPPH radicals exhibits similar variation, in agreement with a good release effect of the membrane. The optimal formulation of collagen membrane and preparation parameters were obtained considering the overall properties and the scavenging activity to radicals. PMID:26406078

  11. Modification of polyethylene terephthalate track membrane properties by ammonia plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravets, Lyubov; Dmitriev, Serguei; Dinescu, George; Lazea, Andrada; Raiciu, Eric

    2004-09-01

    The properties of polyethylene terephthalate track membranes (PET TM) exposed to ammonia are investigated. The influence of the conditions of plasma treatment on the basic characteristics of the membranes, namely pore size and shape, wettability, water permeability, is studied. PET TM of the thickness of 10 μ m with the effective pore diameter of 0.215 μ m (pore density 2\\cdot 10^8 cm-2) were under study. The plasma treatment was performed on a plasma-chemical installation realizing a RF-discharge on the frequency 13.56 MHz. The process was conducted in a dynamic mode. Before delivering vapours of the plasma forming gas, the chamber was beforehand vacuumed down to residual pressure of 10-2 Torr. One side of the membranes was subjected to plasma. The discharge parameters (gas pressure in the vacuum chamber, discharge power) and the duration of plasma action were varied. It has been figured out that when treating the membranes in plasma of the explored gas there are two competing processes: etching of a polymeric matrix and deposition of a polymeric layer on their surface. It has been shown that at a short time of plasma action and low values of the discharge parameters, an etching process is mainly observed. Decrease in the thickness of the membranes and increase in the effective pore diameter testifies it. A result of the gas-discharge etching is also a hydrophilization of the TM surface stipulated by formation of polar function groups in the points of breaking chemical bonds. Here the value of the water contact angle of surface decreases down to 45-50 degrees in some cases. It has been shown that at a longer action of the plasma and increase of the discharge parameters, as accumulation in the chamber of etch products takes place, a process of deposition of a polymeric film becomes dominating, and it is proved by increasing the width of the membranes and changing their color. The value of the water contact angle of surface in this case is grown and, depending

  12. Functional Implications of Plasma Membrane Condensation for T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Carmel M.; Engelhardt, Karin; Williamson, David; Grewal, Thomas; Jessup, Wendy; Harder, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    The T lymphocyte plasma membrane condenses at the site of activation but the functional significance of this receptor-mediated membrane reorganization is not yet known. Here we demonstrate that membrane condensation at the T cell activation sites can be inhibited by incorporation of the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC), which is known to prevent the formation of raft-like liquid-ordered domains in model membranes. We enriched T cells with 7KC, or cholesterol as control, to assess the importance of membrane condensation for T cell activation. Upon 7KC treatment, T cell antigen receptor (TCR) triggered calcium fluxes and early tyrosine phosphorylation events appear unaltered. However, signaling complexes form less efficiently on the cell surface, fewer phosphorylated signaling proteins are retained in the plasma membrane and actin restructuring at activation sites is impaired in 7KC-enriched cells resulting in compromised downstream activation responses. Our data emphasizes lipids as an important medium for the organization at T cell activation sites and strongly indicates that membrane condensation is an important element of the T cell activation process. PMID:18509459

  13. Molecular Details of Membrane Fluidity Changes during Apoptosis and Relationship to Phospholipase A2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Elizabeth; Pickett, Katalyn R.; Streeter, Michael C.; Warcup, Ashley O.; Nelson, Jennifer; Judd, Allan M.; Bell, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Secretory phospholipase A2 exhibits much greater activity toward apoptotic versus healthy cells. Various plasma membrane changes responsible for this phenomenon have been proposed, including biophysical alterations described as “membrane fluidity” and “order.” Understanding of these membrane perturbations was refined by applying studies with model membranes to fluorescence measurements during thapsigargin-induced apoptosis of S49 cells using probes specific for the plasma membrane: Patman and trimethylammonium-diphenylhexatriene. Alterations in emission properties of these probes corresponded with enhanced susceptibility of the cells to hydrolysis by secretory phospholipase A2. By applying a quantitative model, additional information was extracted from the kinetics of Patman equilibration with the membrane. Taken together, these data suggested that the phospholipids of apoptotic membranes display greater spacing between adjacent headgroups, reduced interactions between neighboring lipid tails, and increased penetration of water among the heads. The phase transition of artificial bilayers was used to calibrate quantitatively the relationship between probe fluorescence and the energy of interlipid interactions. This analysis was applied to results from apoptotic cells to estimate the frequency with which phospholipids protrude sufficiently at the membrane surface to enter the enzyme’s active site. The data suggested that this frequency increases 50–100-fold as membranes become susceptible to hydrolysis during apoptosis. PMID:22967861

  14. Network and neuronal membrane properties in hybrid networks reciprocally regulate selectivity to rapid thalamocortical inputs.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, Michael J; Pinto, David J

    2012-11-01

    Rapidly changing environments require rapid processing from sensory inputs. Varying deflection velocities of a rodent's primary facial vibrissa cause varying temporal neuronal activity profiles within the ventral posteromedial thalamic nucleus. Local neuron populations in a single somatosensory layer 4 barrel transform sparsely coded input into a spike count based on the input's temporal profile. We investigate this transformation by creating a barrel-like hybrid network with whole cell recordings of in vitro neurons from a cortical slice preparation, embedding the biological neuron in the simulated network by presenting virtual synaptic conductances via a conductance clamp. Utilizing the hybrid network, we examine the reciprocal network properties (local excitatory and inhibitory synaptic convergence) and neuronal membrane properties (input resistance) by altering the barrel population response to diverse thalamic input. In the presence of local network input, neurons are more selective to thalamic input timing; this arises from strong feedforward inhibition. Strongly inhibitory (damping) network regimes are more selective to timing and less selective to the magnitude of input but require stronger initial input. Input selectivity relies heavily on the different membrane properties of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. When inhibitory and excitatory neurons had identical membrane properties, the sensitivity of in vitro neurons to temporal vs. magnitude features of input was substantially reduced. Increasing the mean leak conductance of the inhibitory cells decreased the network's temporal sensitivity, whereas increasing excitatory leak conductance enhanced magnitude sensitivity. Local network synapses are essential in shaping thalamic input, and differing membrane properties of functional classes reciprocally modulate this effect. PMID:22896716

  15. Development and modulation of intrinsic membrane properties control the temporal precision of auditory brain stem neurons.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Delwen L; Gleiss, Sarah A; Berger, Christina; Kümpfbeck, Franziska S; Ammer, Julian J; Felmy, Felix

    2015-01-15

    Passive and active membrane properties determine the voltage responses of neurons. Within the auditory brain stem, refinements in these intrinsic properties during late postnatal development usually generate short integration times and precise action-potential generation. This developmentally acquired temporal precision is crucial for auditory signal processing. How the interactions of these intrinsic properties develop in concert to enable auditory neurons to transfer information with high temporal precision has not yet been elucidated in detail. Here, we show how the developmental interaction of intrinsic membrane parameters generates high firing precision. We performed in vitro recordings from neurons of postnatal days 9-28 in the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of Mongolian gerbils, an auditory brain stem structure that converts excitatory to inhibitory information with high temporal precision. During this developmental period, the input resistance and capacitance decrease, and action potentials acquire faster kinetics and enhanced precision. Depending on the stimulation time course, the input resistance and capacitance contribute differentially to action-potential thresholds. The decrease in input resistance, however, is sufficient to explain the enhanced action-potential precision. Alterations in passive membrane properties also interact with a developmental change in potassium currents to generate the emergence of the mature firing pattern, characteristic of coincidence-detector neurons. Cholinergic receptor-mediated depolarizations further modulate this intrinsic excitability profile by eliciting changes in the threshold and firing pattern, irrespective of the developmental stage. Thus our findings reveal how intrinsic membrane properties interact developmentally to promote temporally precise information processing. PMID:25355963

  16. Preparation of the superhydrophobic nano-hybrid membrane containing carbon nanotube based on chitosan and its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Kaili; Gao, Aiqin; Cheng, Xi; Xie, Kongliang

    2015-10-01

    The functional nano-hybrid surface containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) on chitosan incorporated with the cationic chitosan (C-CS), MWCNTs and silicon couple agent (KH-560) was designed and prepared. The nano-hybrid membranes (NHM) containing MWCNTs were modified by perfluorooctanesulfonyl fluoride (PFOSF). The superhydrophobic multi-functional membranes with biological activity and superhydrophobic surface were obtained. The incorporated MWCNTs improved the roughness of the nano-hybrid membranes. The perfluorinated end groups of the nano-hybrid membrane surface provided low energy surface. The antibacterial activity, surface superhydrophobicity and mechanical property of the perfluorinated nano-hybrid membranes (PFNM) were discussed. Their morphological structures and surface ingredients were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX). The PFNMs had excellent antibacterial property and superhydrophobicity. The novel nano-hybrid membranes with excellent antibacterial, superhydrophbic, and mechanical properties have potential applications in the food engineering, bioengineering fields and medical materials. PMID:26076639

  17. Physical Effects of Buckwheat Extract on Biological Membrane In Vitro and Its Protective Properties.

    PubMed

    Włoch, Aleksandra; Strugała, Paulina; Pruchnik, Hanna; Żyłka, Romuald; Oszmiański, Jan; Kleszczyńska, Halina

    2016-04-01

    Buckwheat is a valuable source of many biologically active compounds and nutrients. It has properties that reduce blood cholesterol levels, and so reduces the risk of atherosclerosis, seals the capillaries, and lowers blood pressure. The aim of the study was to determine quantitative and qualitative characteristics of polyphenols contained in extracts from buckwheat husks and stalks, the biological activity of the extracts, and biophysical effects of their interaction with the erythrocyte membrane, treated as a model of the cell. An analysis of the extract's composition has shown that buckwheat husk and stalk extracts are a rich source of polyphenolic compounds, the stalk extracts showing more compounds than the husk extract. The study allowed to determine the location which incorporated polyphenols occupy in the erythrocyte membrane and changes in the membrane properties caused by them. It was found that the extracts do not induce hemolysis of red blood cells, causing an increase in osmotic resistance of erythrocytes. They affect mainly the hydrophilic region by changing the degree of order of the polar heads of lipids, but do little to change the fluidity of the membrane and its hydration. The results showed also that polyphenolic substances included in the extracts well protect the membranes of red blood cells against oxidation and exhibit anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:26581904

  18. Changes in physicochemical and transport properties of a reverse osmosis membrane exposed to chloraminated seawater.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Lauren; Renkens, Tennie; Maugin, Thomas; Croué, Jean-Philippe; Mariñas, Benito J

    2015-02-17

    This study contributed to improving our understanding of how disinfectants, applied to control biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes, result in membrane performance degradation. We investigated changes in physicochemical properties and permeation performance of a RO membrane with fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layer. Membrane samples were exposed to varying concentrations of monochloramine, bromide, and iodide in both synthetic and natural seawater. Elemental analysis of the membrane active layer by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) revealed the incorporation of bromine and iodine into the polyamide. The kinetics of polyamide bromination were first order with respect to the concentration of the secondary oxidizing agent Br2 for the conditions investigated. Halogenated membranes were characterized after treatment with a reducing agent and heavy ion probes to reveal the occurrence of irreversible ring halogenation and an increase in carboxylic groups, the latter produced as a result of amide bond cleavage. Finally, permeation experiments revealed increases in both water permeability and salt passage as a result of oxidative damage. PMID:25590510

  19. Elastic Properties of Polymerised and Fluid Membranes Under Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillcock, Julian Charles

    The stability of a living cell relies on the properties and interrelations of its constituent parts. The fluid bilayer surrounding the cell separates the cytoplasm inside the cell from the extracellular environment. A cross-linked network of proteins within the cytoplasm supports the fluid bilayer and contributes to the cell's elasticity. Three properties relating to the behaviour of a model fluid bilayer and polymerised network are investigated by Monte Carlo simulation: the phase behaviour of a system of discotic liquid crystal molecules, the elastic properties of a model polymerised network, and the stability and rupture of a model fluid membrane. The isotropic to nematic transition induced by hydrostatic pressure in a system of discotic liquid cystal molecules in three dimensions is presented. The study concentrates on the phase behaviour resulting from the anisotropy of the disks. The transition is present for disks whose thickness to radius ratio is less than 40%, but is absent for thicker disks. A more specialised model of disks restricted to intersect a planar interface between two immiscible fluids is investigated, but has no isotropic -nematic phase transition at finite temperature. The elastic properties of a two-dimensional, triangulated network of Hookean springs are investigated as a function of temperature and applied tension. The compression modulus decreases, and the shear modulus increases, as the tension on the network is increased. The elastic properties of self-avoiding networks at low temperature are well described by a mean field theory. When the self-avoidance constraint is removed, the network undergoes a phase transition to a collapsed state of small area as the tension is reduced to zero. Both types of network show an unstable expansion of their area when the stretching tension exceeds a specified value. Both networks also have the unusual property (referred to as a negative Poisson ratio) of expanding transversely when stretched

  20. Antibacterial property and mechanism of a novel Pu-erh tea nanofibrous membrane.

    PubMed

    Su, Yajuan; Zhang, Chenlu; Wang, Yan; Li, Ping

    2012-02-01

    Pu-erh tea is made via a natural fermentation process. In this study, Pu-erh tea was used as a raw material for nanomaterials preparation and as an antibacterial agent. Antibacterial activities on Escherichia coli of Pu-erh tea, Pu-erh tea powder (PTP) of different sizes, and Pu-erh tea residual powder were firstly determined, respectively. With polyvinyl alcohol as the carrier, through an electrospinning technique, different kinds of nanofibrous membranes were obtained from the extract of Pu-erh tea and nano-PTP (NPTP), and their antibacterial properties and mechanism against E. coli were evaluated. The results showed better antibacterial activity with smaller PTP particles, the nano-sized particles had the best effects, and the MIC of NPTP was 13.5 mg/mL. When NPTP was in nanofibrous membranes, the antibacterial activity decreased slightly, but increased with modification by ZnO. Pu-erh tea in nanofibrous membranes damaged the E. coli cell membranes and caused leakage of K(+) and enzymes. What is more is that damage of the cell walls led to the leakage of fluorescent proteins from enhanced green fluorescence protein-expressing E. coli. These results indicate that the Pu-erh tea nanofibrous membranes had good antibacterial activities against E. coli, which may provide a promising application of novel antibacterial materials. PMID:21858494

  1. Membrane properties of the smooth-muscle fibres of the guinea-pig portal vein.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Kuriyama, H

    1971-05-01

    The membrane activities and the various characteristic constants of the smooth-muscle membrane of the guinea-pig portal vein were investigated with the micro-electrode technique.1. The mean membrane potential was -37 mV. Spontaneous discharges appeared as regular bursts of short trains of spikes alternating with silent periods, as a mixture of single spikes and bursts of spikes appearing continuously, or as regular spikes with low frequency.2. Spontaneous spikes with overshoot were frequently observed. The maximum rate of rise of the spike was 3.7 V/sec. The shapes of the spikes were classified into three different types, i.e. pace-maker type of spike, monophasic spike and spike with a hump during the falling phase.3. Tetrodotoxin (10(-5) g/ml.) did not influence the patterns of the spontaneous train discharges nor the shape of the spike.4. Extracellularly applied outward current elicited spikes which were either monophasic or had a hump on the falling phase. Inward current elicited break excitation of the spike.5. Current-voltage relations, produced by application of inward current pulses to the tissue and measured at various distances from the stimulating partition, were linear.6. The smooth-muscle membrane of portal vein showed cable-like properties. The mean space constant of the membrane was 0.52 mm; the mean time constant of the membrane calculated from the electrotonic potential was 330 msec.7. Conduction velocity of the spike measured by insertion of two micro-electrodes was 0.58 cm/sec.8. The time constant of the foot of the propagated spike was 27 msec. The time constant of the membrane calculated from the time constant of the foot of the spike and the conduction velocity was 310 msec.9. The membrane properties of longitudinal smooth muscle of the portal vein were discussed in comparison with other veins and various visceral smooth muscles. PMID:5580862

  2. Phosphocreatine Interacts with Phospholipids, Affects Membrane Properties and Exerts Membrane-Protective Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata; Epand, Raquel F.; Meiler, Flurina; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Neumann, Dietbert; Widmer, Hans R.; Meier, Beat H.; Epand, Richard M.; Saks, Valdur; Wallimann, Theo; Schlattner, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    A broad spectrum of beneficial effects has been ascribed to creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and their cyclic analogues cyclo-(cCr) and phospho-cyclocreatine (PcCr). Cr is widely used as nutritional supplement in sports and increasingly also as adjuvant treatment for pathologies such as myopathies and a plethora of neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, Cr and its cyclic analogues have been proposed for anti-cancer treatment. The mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects are still controversial and far from being understood. The reversible conversion of Cr and ATP into PCr and ADP by creatine kinase, generating highly diffusible PCr energy reserves, is certainly an important element. However, some protective effects of Cr and analogues cannot be satisfactorily explained solely by effects on the cellular energy state. Here we used mainly liposome model systems to provide evidence for interaction of PCr and PcCr with different zwitterionic phospholipids by applying four independent, complementary biochemical and biophysical assays: (i) chemical binding assay, (ii) surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), (iii) solid-state 31P-NMR, and (iv) differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SPR revealed low affinity PCr/phospholipid interaction that additionally induced changes in liposome shape as indicated by NMR and SPR. Additionally, DSC revealed evidence for membrane packing effects by PCr, as seen by altered lipid phase transition. Finally, PCr efficiently protected against membrane permeabilization in two different model systems: liposome-permeabilization by the membrane-active peptide melittin, and erythrocyte hemolysis by the oxidative drug doxorubicin, hypoosmotic stress or the mild detergent saponin. These findings suggest a new molecular basis for non-energy related functions of PCr and its cyclic analogue. PCr/phospholipid interaction and alteration of membrane structure may not only protect cellular membranes against various insults, but could

  3. An Extended Membrane System with Active Membranes to Solve Automatic Fuzzy Clustering Problems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J; Riscos-Núñez, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    This paper focuses on automatic fuzzy clustering problem and proposes a novel automatic fuzzy clustering method that employs an extended membrane system with active membranes that has been designed as its computing framework. The extended membrane system has a dynamic membrane structure; since membranes can evolve, it is particularly suitable for processing the automatic fuzzy clustering problem. A modification of a differential evolution (DE) mechanism was developed as evolution rules for objects according to membrane structure and object communication mechanisms. Under the control of both the object's evolution-communication mechanism and the membrane evolution mechanism, the extended membrane system can effectively determine the most appropriate number of clusters as well as the corresponding optimal cluster centers. The proposed method was evaluated over 13 benchmark problems and was compared with four state-of-the-art automatic clustering methods, two recently developed clustering methods and six classification techniques. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method in terms of effectiveness and robustness. PMID:26790484

  4. Structural Model of Active Bax at the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bleicken, Stephanie; Jeschke, Gunnar; Stegmueller, Carolin; Salvador-Gallego, Raquel; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Bordignon, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Bax plays a central role in the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Upon activation, cytosolic Bax monomers oligomerize on the surface of mitochondria and change conformation concertedly to punch holes into the outer membrane. The subsequent release of cytochrome c initiates cell death. However, the structure of membrane-inserted Bax and its mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here, we propose a 3D model of active Bax at the membrane based on double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy in liposomes and isolated mitochondria. We show that active Bax is organized at the membrane as assemblies of dimers. In addition to a stable dimerization domain, each monomer contains a more flexible piercing domain involved in interdimer interactions and pore formation. The most important structural change during Bax activation is the opening of the hairpin formed by helices 5 and 6, which adopts a clamp-like conformation central to the mechanism of mitochondrial permeabilization. PMID:25458844

  5. Effect of lipid head group interactions on membrane properties and membrane-induced cationic β-hairpin folding.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Sai J; Xu, Hongcheng; Matysiak, Silvina

    2016-07-21

    Stages in POPS membrane induced SVS-1 folding. One key characteristic of mIFs is the dielectric gradient and subsequently, electrostatic potential that arises from dipolar interactions in the head group region. In this work, we present a coarse-grained (CG) model for anionic and zwitterionic lipids that accounts for dipolar intricacies in the head group region. Prior work on adding dipolar interactions in a coarse grained (CG) model for peptides enabled us to achieve α/β secondary structure content de novo, without any added bias. We have now extended this idea to lipids. To mimic dipolar interactions, two dummy particles with opposite charges are added to CG polar beads. These two dummy charges represent a fluctuating dipole that introduces structural polarization into the head group region. We have used POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and POPS (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine) as our model lipids. We characterize structural, dynamic, and dielectric properties of our CG bilayer, along with the effect of monovalent ions. We observe head group dipoles to play a significant role in membrane dielectric gradient and lipid clustering induced by dipole-dipole interactions in POPS lipids. In addition, we studied membrane-induced peptide folding of a cationic antimicrobial peptide with anticancer activity, SVS-1. We find that membrane-induced peptide folding is driven by both (a) cooperativity in peptide self-interaction and (b) cooperativity in membrane-peptide interaction. In particular, dipolar interactions between the peptide backbone and lipid head groups contribute to stabilizing folded conformations. PMID:27165814

  6. Quantum description of nanoantenna properties of a graphene membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firsova, N. E.; Firsov, Yu. A.

    2016-06-01

    We considered a graphene membrane irradiated by a weak activating periodic electric field in the terahertz range. We used the quantum approach based on the time-dependent density matrix method to analyze the graphene electromagnetic response. For this goal the exact solution was found for the graphene membrane density matrix equation in linear approximation on the external field. On this basis the induced current was studied and then we obtained the formula for quantum conductivity as a function of external field frequency and temperature. The found formula for the conductivity corrected the one obtained in 2007 by Gusynin, Sharapov and Carbotte (Phys. Rev. B, 75 (2007) 165407). The corrected formula allowed to see that the graphene membrane was an oscillating contour, its fundamental eigenfrequency coinciding with a singularity point of the conductivity. The obtained formula allowed us also to calculate the graphene membrane quantum inductivity and capacitance. So in effect we demonstrated that the graphene membrane could be used as an antenna or a transistor. It was shown also that its eigenfrequency could be tuned by doping as its value was found to depend on electrons concentration. It was obtained that the eigenfrequency could be tuned in a rather large terahertz-infrared frequency range as electrons concentration in graphene may differ considerably. The found dependence on concentration is consistent with experiments. The presented formula for conductivity can be used to correct the SPPs Dispersion Relation and for the description of radiation process. It would be useful to take the obtained results into account when constructing devices containing a graphene membrane nanoantenna. Such project could make it possible to create wireless communications among nanosystems. This would be a promising research area of energy harvesting applications.

  7. Intrinsic membrane properties determine hippocampal differential firing pattern in vivo in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Janina; Gan, Jian; Jonas, Peter; Pernía-Andrade, Alejandro J

    2016-05-01

    The hippocampus plays a key role in learning and memory. Previous studies suggested that the main types of principal neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs), CA3 pyramidal neurons, and CA1 pyramidal neurons, differ in their activity pattern, with sparse firing in GCs and more frequent firing in CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons. It has been assumed but never shown that such different activity may be caused by differential synaptic excitation. To test this hypothesis, we performed high-resolution whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in anesthetized rats in vivo. In contrast to previous in vitro data, both CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons fired action potentials spontaneously, with a frequency of ∼3-6 Hz, whereas GCs were silent. Furthermore, both CA3 and CA1 cells primarily fired in bursts. To determine the underlying mechanisms, we quantitatively assessed the frequency of spontaneous excitatory synaptic input, the passive membrane properties, and the active membrane characteristics. Surprisingly, GCs showed comparable synaptic excitation to CA3 and CA1 cells and the highest ratio of excitation versus hyperpolarizing inhibition. Thus, differential synaptic excitation is not responsible for differences in firing. Moreover, the three types of hippocampal neurons markedly differed in their passive properties. While GCs showed the most negative membrane potential, CA3 pyramidal neurons had the highest input resistance and the slowest membrane time constant. The three types of neurons also differed in the active membrane characteristics. GCs showed the highest action potential threshold, but displayed the largest gain of the input-output curves. In conclusion, our results reveal that differential firing of the three main types of hippocampal principal neurons in vivo is not primarily caused by differences in the characteristics of the synaptic input, but by the distinct properties of synaptic integration and input-output transformation. © 2015 The Authors Hippocampus

  8. [Immunotropic and immunogenic properties of Burkholderia pseudomallei surface and membrane antigens].

    PubMed

    Piven', N N; Rybkin, V S; Plekhanova, N G; Zhukova, S I; Viktorov, D V; Avrorova, I V; Demediuk, E A; Drefs, N M; Popov, S F

    2001-01-01

    The immunotropic and immunogenic properties of some chromatographic fractions of B. pseudomallei surface antigenic complex, as well as the preparations of B. pseudomallei outer and cytoplasmic membranes, were studied. The difference between the biopolymers under study in cytotoxicity, humoral and cell-mediated immunity characteristics, phagocytic activity were established. Some antigenic fractions (B, C, C1, H) showed perceptible protective activity (25-60%) in experiments on mice infected with B. pseudomallei virulent strain. One of the preparations of cytoplasmic membrane (CM-1) was also found to have protective properties (30%). Complex immunization with the antigenic complexes under study, introduced in combination with the immunomodulating agent Bromantan, was shown to enhance the protective effect. PMID:11236497

  9. Biological Activity of Blackcurrant Extracts (Ribes nigrum L.) in Relation to Erythrocyte Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cyboran, Sylwia; Żyłka, Romuald; Oszmiański, Jan; Kleszczyńska, Halina

    2014-01-01

    Compounds contained in fruits and leaves of blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum L.) are known as agents acting preventively and therapeutically on the organism. The HPLC analysis showed they are rich in polyphenol anthocyanins in fruits and flavonoids in leaves, that have antioxidant activity and are beneficial for health. The aim of the research was to determine the effect of blackcurrant fruit and leaf extracts on the physical properties of the erythrocyte membranes and assess their antioxidant properties. The effect of the extracts on osmotic resistance, shape of erythrocytes and hemolytic and antioxidant activity of the extracts were examined with spectrophotometric methods. The FTIR investigation showed that extracts modify the erythrocyte membrane and protect it against free radicals induced by UV radiation. The results show that the extracts do not induce hemolysis and even protect erythrocytes against the harmful action of UVC radiation, while slightly strengthening the membrane and inducing echinocytes. The compounds contained in the extracts do not penetrate into the hydrophobic region, but bind to the membrane surface inducing small changes in the packing arrangement of the polar head groups of membrane lipids. The extracts have a high antioxidant activity. Their presence on the surface of the erythrocyte membrane entails protection against free radicals. PMID:24527456

  10. Neuronal Activation by GPI-Linked Neuroligin-1 Displayed in Synthetic Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Baksh, Michael M.; Groves, Jay T.; Dean, Camin; Pautot, Sophie; DeMaria, Shannon; Isacoff, Ehud

    2006-01-01

    We have characterized, in vitro, interactions between hippocampal neuronal cells and silica microbeads coated with synthetic, fluid, lipid bilayer membranes containing the glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI)-linked extracellular domain of the postsynaptic membrane protein neuroligin-1. These bilayer–neuroligin-1 beads activated neuronal cells to form presynaptic nerve terminals at the point of contact in a manner similar to that observed for live PC12 cells, ectopically expressing the full length neuroligin-1. The synthetic membranes exhibited biological activity at neuroligin-1 densities of ∼1 to 6 proteins/μm2. Polyolycarbonate beads with neuroligin-1 covalently attached to the surface failed to activate neurons despite the fact that neuroligin-1 binding activity is preserved. This implies that a lipid membrane environment is likely to be essential for neuroligin-1 activity. This technique allows the study of isolated proteins in an environment that has physical properties resembling those of a cell surface; proteins can diffuse freely within the membrane, retain their in vivo orientations, and are in a nondenatured state. In addition, the synthetic membrane environment affords control over both lipid and protein composition. This technology is easily implemented and can be applied to a wide variety of cellular studies. PMID:16262338

  11. Ammonia-Activated Mesoporous Carbon Membranes for Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Lee, Jeseung; Wang, Xiqing; Dai, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Porous carbon membranes, which generally show improved chemical and thermal stability compared to polymer membranes, have been used in gas separations for many years. In this work, we show that the post-synthesis ammonia treatment of porous carbon at elevated temperature can improve the permeance and selectivity of these membranes for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons from permanent gases. Hierarchically structured porous carbon membranes were exposed to ammonia gas at temperatures ranging from 850 C to 950 C for up to 10 min and the N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} permeances were measured for these different membranes. Higher treatment temperatures and longer exposure times resulted in higher gas permeance values. In addition, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}/N{sub 2} selectivities increased by a factor of 2 as the treatment temperature and time increased up to a temperature and time of 900 C, 10 min. Higher temperatures showed increased permeance but decreased selectivity indicating excess pore activation. Nitrogen adsorption measurements show that the ammonia treatment increased the porosity of the membrane while elemental analysis revealed the presence of nitrogen-containing surface functionalities in the treated carbon membranes. Thus, ammonia treatment at high temperature provides a controlled method to introduce both added microporosity and surface functionality to enhance gas separations performance of porous carbon membranes.

  12. Bilayer Membrane Modulation of Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Structure and Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Cerofolini, Linda; Amar, Sabrina; Lauer, Janelle L; Martelli, Tommaso; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio; Fields, Gregg B

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface proteolysis is an integral yet poorly understood physiological process. The present study has examined how the pericellular collagenase membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and membrane-mimicking environments interplay in substrate binding and processing. NMR derived structural models indicate that MT1-MMP transiently associates with bicelles and cells through distinct residues in blades III and IV of its hemopexin-like domain, while binding of collagen-like triple-helices occurs within blades I and II of this domain. Examination of simultaneous membrane interaction and triple-helix binding revealed a possible regulation of proteolysis due to steric effects of the membrane. At bicelle concentrations of 1%, enzymatic activity towards triple-helices was increased 1.5-fold. A single mutation in the putative membrane interaction region of MT1-MMP (Ser466Pro) resulted in lower enzyme activation by bicelles. An initial structural framework has thus been developed to define the role(s) of cell membranes in modulating proteolysis. PMID:27405411

  13. Bilayer Membrane Modulation of Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Structure and Proteolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cerofolini, Linda; Amar, Sabrina; Lauer, Janelle L.; Martelli, Tommaso; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio; Fields, Gregg B.

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface proteolysis is an integral yet poorly understood physiological process. The present study has examined how the pericellular collagenase membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and membrane-mimicking environments interplay in substrate binding and processing. NMR derived structural models indicate that MT1-MMP transiently associates with bicelles and cells through distinct residues in blades III and IV of its hemopexin-like domain, while binding of collagen-like triple-helices occurs within blades I and II of this domain. Examination of simultaneous membrane interaction and triple-helix binding revealed a possible regulation of proteolysis due to steric effects of the membrane. At bicelle concentrations of 1%, enzymatic activity towards triple-helices was increased 1.5-fold. A single mutation in the putative membrane interaction region of MT1-MMP (Ser466Pro) resulted in lower enzyme activation by bicelles. An initial structural framework has thus been developed to define the role(s) of cell membranes in modulating proteolysis. PMID:27405411

  14. Membrane activity of the phospholipase C-δ1 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    PH-PLCδ1 [the PH domain (pleckstrin homology domain) of PLCδ1 (phospholipase C-δ1)] is among the best-characterized phosphoinositide-binding domains. PH-PLCδ1 binds with high specificity to the headgroup of PtdIns(4,5)P2, but little is known about its interfacial properties. In the present study, we show that PH-PLCδ1 is also membrane-active and can insert significantly into PtdIns(4,5)P2-containing monolayers at physiological (bilayer-equivalent) surface pressures. However, this membrane activity appears to involve interactions distinct from those that target PH-PLCδ1 to the PtdIns(4,5)P2 headgroup. Whereas the majority of PtdIns(4,5)P2-bound PH-PLCδ1 can be displaced by adding excess of soluble headgroup [Ins(1,4,5)P3], membrane activity of PH-PLCδ1 cannot. PH-PLCδ1 differs from other phosphoinositide-binding domains in that its membrane insertion does not require that the phosphoinositide-binding site be occupied. Significant monolayer insertion remains when the phosphoinositide-binding site is mutated, and PH-PLCδ1 can insert into monolayers that contain no PtdIns(4,5)P2 at all. Our results suggest a model in which reversible membrane binding of PH-PLCδ1, mediated by PtdIns(4,5)P2 or other acidic phospholipids, occurs without membrane insertion. Accumulation of the PH domain at the membrane surface enhances the efficiency of insertion, but does not significantly affect its extent, whereas the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol in the lipid mixture promotes the extent of insertion. This is the first report of membrane activity in an isolated PH domain and has implications for understanding the membrane targeting by this common type of domain. PMID:15755258

  15. Modeling and vibration control of an active membrane mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Eric J.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-09-01

    The future of space satellite technology lies in ultra-large mirrors and radar apertures for significant improvements in imaging and communication bandwidths. The availability of optical-quality membranes drives a parallel effort for structural models that can capture the dominant dynamics of large, ultra-flexible satellite payloads. Unfortunately, the inherent flexibility of membrane mirrors wreaks havoc with the payload's on-orbit stability and maneuverability. One possible means of controlling these undesirable dynamics is by embedding active piezoelectric ceramics near the boundary of the membrane mirror. In doing so, active feedback control can be used to eliminate detrimental vibration, perform static shape control, and evaluate the health of the structure. The overall motivation of the present work is to design a control system using distributed bimorph actuators to eliminate any detrimental vibration of the membrane mirror. As a basis for this study, a piezoceramic wafer was attached in a bimorph configuration near the boundary of a tensioned rectangular membrane sample. A finite element model of the system was developed to capture the relevant system dynamics from 0 to 300 Hz. The finite element model was compared against experimental results, and fair agreement found. Using the validated finite element models, structural control using linear quadratic regulator control techniques was then used to numerically demonstrate effective vibration control. Typical results show that less than 12 V of actuation voltage is required to eliminate detrimental vibration of the membrane samples in less than 15 ms. The functional gains of the active system are also derived and presented. These spatially descriptive control terms dictate favorable regions within the membrane domain for placing sensors and can be used as a design guideline for structural control applications. The results of the present work demonstrate that thin plate theory is an appropriate modeling

  16. Cytotoxic bile acids, but not cytoprotective species, inhibit the ordering effect of cholesterol in model membranes at physiologically active concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mello-Vieira, João; Sousa, Tânia; Coutinho, Ana; Fedorov, Aleksander; Lucas, Susana D; Moreira, Rui; Castro, Rui E; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Prieto, Manuel; Fernandes, Fábio

    2013-09-01

    Submillimolar concentrations of cytotoxic bile acids (BAs) induce cell death via apoptosis. On the other hand, several cytoprotective BAs were shown to prevent apoptosis in the same concentration range. Still, the mechanisms by which BAs trigger these opposite signaling effects remain unclear. This study was aimed to determine if cytotoxic and cytoprotective BAs, at physiologically active concentrations, are able to modulate the biophysical properties of lipid membranes, potentially translating into changes in the apoptotic threshold of cells. Binding of BAs to membranes was assessed through the variation of fluorescence parameters of suitable derivatized BAs. These derivatives partitioned with higher affinity to liquid disordered than to the cholesterol-enriched liquid ordered domains. Unlabeled BAs were also shown to have a superficial location upon interaction with the lipid membrane. Additionally, the interaction of cytotoxic BAs with membranes resulted in membrane expansion, as concluded from FRET data. Moreover, it was shown that cytotoxic BAs were able to significantly disrupt the ordering of the membrane by cholesterol at physiologically active concentrations of the BA, an effect not associated with cholesterol removal. On the other hand, cytoprotective bile acids had no effect on membrane properties. It was concluded that, given the observed effects on membrane rigidity, the apoptotic activity of cytotoxic BAs could be potentially associated with changes in plasma membrane organization (e.g. modulation of lipid domains) or with an increase in mitochondrial membrane affinity for apoptotic proteins. PMID:23747364

  17. Controlled change of transport properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track membranes by plasma method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravets, L. I.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Drachev, A. I.; Gilman, A. B.; Lazea, A.; Dinescu, G.

    2007-04-01

    A process of plasma polymerization of dimethylaniline and acrylic acid vapours on the surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track membranes has been investigated. The surface and hydrodynamic properties of the composite membranes produced in this case have been studied. It is shown that the water permeability of the obtained polymeric membranes can be controlled by changing the filtrate pH. Membranes with such properties can be used for controllable drug delivery and in sensor control.

  18. Membrane Changes Associated with Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    George, James N.; Lyons, Roger M.; Morgan, Rebecca K.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of aggregation and secretion on membrane proteins was studied in washed human platelets. Reversible aggregation without secretion was stimulated by ADP and secretion without aggregation was stimulated by thrombin in the presence of EDTA. No loss of platelet surface glycoproteins occurred during reversible ADP-induced platelet aggregation, as measured by quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of platelets that were labeled with 125I-diazotized diiodosulfanilic acid (DD125ISA) before ADP stimulation. Also, no new proteins became exposed on the platelet surface after ADP aggregation, as determined by DD125ISA labeling after stimulation. Thrombin-induced platelet secretion also caused no loss of platelet surface glycoproteins. However, after platelet secretion two new proteins were labeled by DD125ISA: (a) actin and (b) the 149,000-mol wt glycoprotein (termed GP-G), which is contained in platelet granules and secreted in response to thrombin. The identity of DD125ISA-labeled actin was confirmed by four criteria: (a) comigration with actin in three different sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems, (b) elution from a particulate fraction in low ionic strength buffer, (c) co-migration with actin in isoelectric focusing, and (d) binding to DNase I. The identity of actin and its appearance on the platelet surface after thrombin-induced secretion was also demonstrated by the greater binding of an anti-actin antibody to thrombin-treated platelets, measured with 125I-staphylococcal protein A. Therefore, major platelet membrane changes occur after secretion but not after reversible aggregation. The platelet surface changes occurring with secretion may be important in the formation of irreversible platelet aggregates and in the final retraction of the blood clot. Images PMID:6772667

  19. Multiple sources of carbonic anhydrase activity in pea thylakoids: soluble and membrane-bound forms.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, Natalia N; Ignatova, Lyudmila K; Ivanov, Boris N

    2007-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity of pea thylakoids, thylakoid membranes enriched with photosystem I (PSI-membranes), or photosystem II (PSII-membranes) as well as both supernatant and pellet after precipitation of thylakoids treated with detergent Triton X-100 were studied. CA activity of thylakoids in the presence of varying concentrations of Triton X-100 had two maxima, at Triton/chlorophyll (triton/Chl) ratios of 0.3 and 1.0. CA activities of PSI-membranes and PSII-membranes had only one maximum each, at Triton/Chl ratio 0.3 or 1.0, respectively. Two CAs with characteristics of the membrane-bound proteins and one CA with characteristics of the soluble proteins were found in the medium after thylakoids were incubated with Triton. One of the first two CAs had mobility in PAAG after native electrophoresis the same as that of CA residing in PSI-membranes, and the other CA had mobility the same as the mobility of CA residing in PSII-membranes, but the latter was different from CA situated in PSII core-complex (Ignatova et al. 2006 Biochemistry (Moscow) 71:525-532). The properties of the "soluble" CA removed from thylakoids were different from the properties of the known soluble CAs of plant cell: apparent molecular mass was about 262 kD and it was three orders more sensitive to the specific CA inhibitor, ethoxyzolamide, than soluble stromal CA. The data are discussed as indicating the presence of, at least, four CAs in pea thylakoids. PMID:17347907

  20. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase in human erythrocyte membrane. Properties and malonyl-CoA sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, R R; Mancinelli, G; Arduini, A

    1991-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase located in the erythrocyte plasma membrane is sensitive to inhibition by malonyl-CoA and 2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA plus carnitine. Although this inhibition and other properties suggest similarities to the intracellular enzymes in other tissues, no cross-reaction was observed with antisera to the peroxisomal or to the mitochondrial inner-membrane enzyme. The activity was solubilized by and was stable in Triton X-100, which destroys the enzymes found in microsomes and in the mitochondrial outer membrane. The substrate specificity is broader than for the intracellular enzymes, the activities with stearoyl-CoA (114%) and arachidonoyl-CoA (97%) being equal to that with palmitoyl-CoA, and the activities with linoleoyl-CoA (44%) and erucoyl-CoA (46%) about half that with palmitoyl-CoA. The function of this carnitine palmitoyltransferase is probably to buffer the acyl-CoA present in the erythrocyte for turnover of the fatty acyl groups of the membrane lipids. PMID:2039446

  1. The physicochemical properties of polyurethane membranes determined by swelling measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Carja, Gabriela; Apostolescu, Gabriela; Apostolescu, Nicolae

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we have dispersed SAPO-5 zeolite particles in polyurethane matrix for preparation of porous mixed matrix membranes. The goal of work is the determination of the cohesive energy density for unfilled- and zeolite - filled polyurethane membranes. Experimental determination of cohesive energy density values for the prepared membranes is obtained by measuring the swelling coefficients in water and several alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol). The solubility parameters of the membranes are also calculated. For the unfilled membranes the corresponded values of cohesive energy density and solubility parameter increase in comparison to those of the filled membranes. All the tested membranes show a tendency to swell with ethanol.

  2. Characterization and adsorption properties of eggshells and eggshell membrane.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W T; Yang, J M; Lai, C W; Cheng, Y H; Lin, C C; Yeh, C W

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this work was to study the chemical and physical characterization of eggshell and eggshell membrane particles prepared from the hen eggshell waste. Under the characterization measurements investigated, it was found that the pore structures of the two biomaterials belong to a typical Type II, indicating that they should be basically characteristic of nonporous materials or materials with macropores or open voids. Further, the chemical composition of the resulting eggshell particle was strongly associated with the presence of carbonate minerals from the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. In contrast to the resulting eggshell membrane particle, the presence of functional groups of amines and amides was observable because of its chemical composition of fibrous proteins. From the isotherm data of methylene blue at 25 degrees C, the Freundlich model yielded a somewhat better fit than the Langmuir model. The adsorption isotherms revealed the eggshell biosorbents could only uptake the basic dye of less than 1.0mg/g in aqueous medium, which was attributed to their poor pore properties. PMID:15896954

  3. Membrane fouling potentials and cellular properties of bacteria isolated from fouled membranes in a MBR treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, So; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    Membrane fouling remains a major challenge for wider application of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) to wastewater treatment. Membrane fouling is mainly caused by microorganisms and their excreted microbial products. For development of more effective control strategies, it is important to identify and characterize the microorganisms that are responsible for membrane fouling. In this study, 41 bacterial strains were isolated from fouled microfiltration membranes in a pilot-scale MBR treating real municipal wastewater, and their membrane fouling potentials were directly measured using bench-scale cross-flow membrane filtration systems (CFMFSs) and related to their cellular properties. It was found that the fouling potential was highly strain dependent, suggesting that bacterial identification at the strain level is essential to identify key fouling-causing bacteria (FCB). The FCB showed some common cellular properties. The most prominent feature of FCB was that they formed convex colonies having swollen podgy shape and smooth lustrous surfaces with high water, hydrophilic organic matter and carbohydrate content. However, general and rigid biofilm formation potential as determined by microtiter plates and cell surface properties (i.e., hydrophobicity and surface charge) did not correlate with the fouling potential in this study. These results suggest that the fouling potential should be directly evaluated under filtration conditions, and the colony water content could be a useful indicator to identify the FCB. PMID:27232989

  4. Tailored fibro-porous structure of electrospun polyurethane membranes, their size-dependent properties and trans-membrane glucose diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Burugapalli, Krishna; Song, Wenhui; Halls, Justin; Moussy, Francis; Zheng, Yudong; Ma, Yanxuan; Wu, Zhentao; Li, Kang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop polyurethane (PU) based fibro-porous membranes and to investigate the size-effect of hierarchical porous structure on permeability and surface properties of the developed electrospun membranes. Non-woven Selectophore™ PU membranes having tailored fibre diameters, pore sizes, and thickness were spun using electrospinning, and their chemical, physical and glucose permeability properties were characterised. Solvents, solution concentration, applied voltage, flow rate and distance to collector, each were systematically investigated, and electrospinning conditions for tailoring fibre diameters were identified. Membranes having average fibre diameters – 347, 738 and 1102 nm were characterized, revealing average pore sizes of 800, 870 and 1060 nm and pore volumes of 44, 63 and 68% respectively. Hydrophobicity increased with increasing fibre diameter and porosity. Effective diffusion coefficients for glucose transport across the electrospun membranes varied as a function of thickness and porosity, indicating high flux rates for mass transport. Electrospun PU membranes having significantly high pore volumes, extensively interconnected porosity and tailorable properties compared to conventional solvent cast membranes can find applications as coatings for sensors requiring analyte exchange. PMID:23170040

  5. Cholesterol modulates alkaline phosphatase activity of rat intestinal microvillus membranes.

    PubMed

    Brasitus, T A; Dahiya, R; Dudeja, P K; Bissonnette, B M

    1988-06-25

    Experiments were conducted, using a nonspecific lipid transfer protein, to vary the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of rat proximal small intestinal microvillus membranes in order to assess the possible role of cholesterol in modulating enzymatic activities of this plasma membrane. Cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratios from 0.71 to 1.30 were produced from a normal value of 1.05 by incubation with the transfer protein and an excess of either phosphatidylcholine or cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine liposomes for 60 min at 37 degrees C. Cholesterol loading or depletion of the membranes was accompanied by a decrease or increase, respectively, in their lipid fluidity, as assessed by steady-state fluorescence polarization techniques using the lipid-soluble fluorophore 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Increasing the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio also decreased alkaline phosphatase specific activity by approximately 20-30%, whereas decreasing this ratio increased this enzymatic activity by 20-30%. Sucrase, maltase, and lactase specific activities were not affected in these same preparations. Since the changes in alkaline phosphatase activity could be secondary to alterations in fluidity, cholesterol, or both, additional experiments were performed using benzyl alcohol, a known fluidizer. Benzyl alcohol (25 mM) restored the fluidity of cholesterol-enriched preparations to control levels, did not change the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio, and failed to alter alkaline phosphatase activity. These findings, therefore, indicate that alterations in the cholesterol content and cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of microvillus membranes can modulate alkaline phosphatase but not sucrase, maltase, or lactase activities. Moreover, membrane fluidity does not appear to be an important physiological regulator of these enzymatic activities. PMID:3379034

  6. Membrane Thinning and Thickening Induced by Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Grage, Stephan L; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Buth, Gernot; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-01-01

    Membrane thinning has been discussed as a fundamental mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides can perturb cellular membranes. To understand which factors play a role in this process, we compared several amphipathic peptides with different structures, sizes and functions in their influence on the lipid bilayer thickness. PGLa and magainin 2 from X. laevis were studied as typical representatives of antimicrobial cationic amphipathic α-helices. A 1:1 mixture of these peptides, which is known to possess synergistically enhanced activity, allowed us to evaluate whether and how this synergistic interaction correlates with changes in membrane thickness. Other systems investigated here include the α-helical stress-response peptide TisB from E. coli (which forms membrane-spanning dimers), as well as gramicidin S from A. migulanus (a natural antibiotic), and BP100 (designer-made antimicrobial and cell penetrating peptide). The latter two are very short, with a circular β-pleated and a compact α-helical structure, respectively. Solid-state (2)H-NMR and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) on oriented phospholipid bilayers were used as complementary techniques to access the hydrophobic thickness as well as the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance including the water layer in between. This way, we found that magainin 2, gramicidin S, and BP100 induced membrane thinning, as expected for amphiphilic peptides residing in the polar/apolar interface of the bilayer. PGLa, on the other hand, decreased the hydrophobic thickness only at very high peptide:lipid ratios, and did not change the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance. TisB even caused an increase in the hydrophobic thickness and repeat distance. When reconstituted as a mixture, PGLa and magainin 2 showed a moderate thinning effect which was less than that of magainin 2 alone, hence their synergistically enhanced activity does not seem to correlate with a modulation of membrane thickness. Overall, the absence of

  7. A membrane-type acoustic metamaterial with adjustable acoustic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfeldt, F.; Riecken, J.; Gleine, W.; von Estorff, O.

    2016-07-01

    A new realization of a membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (MAM) with adjustable sound transmission properties is presented. The proposed design distinguishes itself from other realizations by a stacked arrangement of two MAMs which is inflated using pressurized air. The static pressurization leads to large nonlinear deformations and, consequently, geometrical stiffening of the MAMs which is exploited to adjust the eigenmodes and sound transmission loss of the structure. A theoretical analysis of the proposed inflatable MAM design using numerical and analytical models is performed in order to identify two important mechanisms, namely the shifting of the eigenfrequencies and modal residuals due to the pressurization, responsible for the transmission loss adjustment. Analytical formulas are provided for predicting the eigenmode shifting and normal incidence sound transmission loss of inflated single and double MAMs using the concept of effective mass. The investigations are concluded with results from a test sample measurement inside an impedance tube, which confirm the theoretical predictions.

  8. Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Hirsh; Fang, Xianyang; Wen, Yi; Barros, Marilia; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan; Vogt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously, no retroviral Gag protein has been highly purified in milligram quantities and in a biologically relevant and active form. We have purified Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag protein and in parallel several truncation mutants of Gag and have studied their biophysical properties and membrane interactions in vitro. RSV Gag is unusual in that it is not naturally myristoylated. From its ability to assemble into virus-like particles in vitro, we infer that RSV Gag is biologically active. By size exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering, Gag in solution appears extended and flexible, in contrast to previous reports on unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag, which is compact. However, by neutron reflectometry measurements of RSV Gag bound to a supported bilayer, the protein appears to adopt a more compact, folded-over conformation. At physiological ionic strength, purified Gag binds strongly to liposomes containing acidic lipids. This interaction is stimulated by physiological levels of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and by cholesterol. However, unlike HIV-1 Gag, RSV Gag shows no sensitivity to acyl chain saturation. In contrast with full-length RSV Gag, the purified MA domain of Gag binds to liposomes only weakly. Similarly, both an N-terminally truncated version of Gag that is missing the MA domain and a C-terminally truncated version that is missing the NC domain bind only weakly. These results imply that NC contributes to membrane interaction in vitro, either by directly contacting acidic lipids or by promoting Gag multimerization. IMPORTANCE Retroviruses like HIV assemble at and bud from the plasma membrane of cells. Assembly requires the interaction between thousands of Gag molecules to form a lattice. Previous work indicated that lattice formation at the plasma membrane is influenced by the conformation of monomeric HIV. We have extended this work to the more tractable RSV Gag. Our results show that RSV Gag is highly flexible

  9. Spatially distinct and metabolically active membrane domain in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Jennifer M; Luo, Chu-Yuan; Mayfield, Jacob A; Hsu, Tsungda; Fukuda, Takeshi; Walfield, Andrew L; Giffen, Samantha R; Leszyk, John D; Baer, Christina E; Bennion, Owen T; Madduri, Ashoka; Shaffer, Scott A; Aldridge, Bree B; Sassetti, Christopher M; Sandler, Steven J; Kinoshita, Taroh; Moody, D Branch; Morita, Yasu S

    2016-05-10

    Protected from host immune attack and antibiotic penetration by their unique cell envelope, mycobacterial pathogens cause devastating human diseases such as tuberculosis. Seamless coordination of cell growth with cell envelope elongation at the pole maintains this barrier. Unraveling this spatiotemporal regulation is a potential strategy for controlling mycobacterial infections. Our biochemical analysis previously revealed two functionally distinct membrane fractions in Mycobacterium smegmatis cell lysates: plasma membrane tightly associated with the cell wall (PM-CW) and a distinct fraction of pure membrane free of cell wall components (PMf). To provide further insight into the functions of these membrane fractions, we took the approach of comparative proteomics and identified more than 300 proteins specifically associated with the PMf, including essential enzymes involved in cell envelope synthesis such as a mannosyltransferase, Ppm1, and a galactosyltransferase, GlfT2. Furthermore, comparative lipidomics revealed the distinct lipid composition of the PMf, with specific association of key cell envelope biosynthetic precursors. Live-imaging fluorescence microscopy visualized the PMf as patches of membrane spatially distinct from the PM-CW and notably enriched in the pole of the growing cells. Taken together, our study provides the basis for assigning the PMf as a spatiotemporally distinct and metabolically active membrane domain involved in cell envelope biogenesis. PMID:27114527

  10. Large-Aperture Membrane Active Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Large-aperture phased-array microwave antennas supported by membranes are being developed for use in spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems. There may also be terrestrial uses for such antennas supported on stationary membranes, large balloons, and blimps. These antennas are expected to have areal mass densities of about 2 kg/sq m, satisfying a need for lightweight alternatives to conventional rigid phased-array antennas, which have typical areal mass densities between 8 and 15 kg/sq m. The differences in areal mass densities translate to substantial differences in total mass in contemplated applications involving aperture areas as large as 400 sq m. A membrane phased-array antenna includes patch antenna elements in a repeating pattern. All previously reported membrane antennas were passive antennas; this is the first active membrane antenna that includes transmitting/receiving (T/R) electronic circuits as integral parts. Other integral parts of the antenna include a network of radio-frequency (RF) feed lines (more specifically, a corporate feed network) and of bias and control lines, all in the form of flexible copper strip conductors on flexible polymeric membranes. Each unit cell of a prototype antenna (see Figure 1) contains a patch antenna element and a compact T/R module that is compatible with flexible membrane circuitry. There are two membrane layers separated by a 12.7-mm air gap. Each membrane layer is made from a commercially available flexible circuit material that, as supplied, comprises a 127-micron-thick polyimide dielectric layer clad on both sides with 17.5-micron-thick copper layers. The copper layers are patterned into RF, bias, and control conductors. The T/R module is located on the back side of the ground plane and is RF-coupled to the patch element via a slot. The T/R module is a hybrid multilayer module assembled and packaged independently and attached to the membrane array. At the time of reporting the information for

  11. Pervaporation properties of dense polyamide-6 membranes in separation of water-ethanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, W.; Waczynski, M.; Lasota, M.

    1996-04-01

    Several dense polyamide-6 membranes were prepared by casting 7 wt% and/or 10 wt% solutions of polymer in trifluoroethanol. The cast membranes were dried at different temperatures from 25 to 80{degrees}C. Sorption and pervaporation properties of PA-6 membranes in water-ethanol mixtures were obtained. The data obtained showed that water was preferentially sorbed into the membrane and transported through the membrane; however, the pervaporation selectivity factor {alpha}{sup PV} was close to unity at higher concentrations. The selectivity parameters in pervaporation were improved for membranes obtained from 10 wt% polymer and dried at higher temperatures.

  12. Preparation and properties of PLGA nanofiber membranes reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yunfei; Guo, Rui; Liu, Jianghui; Lan, Yong; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Yuanming

    2015-08-01

    Although extensively used in the fields of drug-carrier and tissue engineering, the biocompatibility and mechanical properties of polylactide-polyglycolide (PLGA) nanofiber membranes still limit their applications. The objective of this study was to improve their utility by introducing cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) into PLGA nanofiber membranes. PLGA and PLGA/CNC composite nanofiber membranes were prepared via electrospinning, and the morphology and thermodynamic and mechanical properties of these nanofiber membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The cytocompatibility and cellular responses of the nanofiber membranes were also studied by WST-1 assay, SEM, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Incorporation of CNCs (1, 3, 5, and 7 wt.%) increased the average fiber diameter of the prepared nanofiber membranes from 100 nm (neat PLGA) to ∼400 nm (PLGA/7 wt.% CNC) and improved the thermal stability of the nanofiber membranes. Among the PLGA/CNC composite nanofiber membranes, those loaded with 7 wt.% CNC nanofiber membranes had the best mechanical properties, which were similar to those of human skin. Cell culture results showed that the PLGA/CNC composite nanofiber membranes had better cytocompatibility and facilitated fibroblast adhesion, spreading, and proliferation compared with neat PLGA nanofiber membranes. These preliminary results suggest that PLGA/CNC composite nanofiber membranes are promising new materials for the field of skin tissue engineering. PMID:26047881

  13. Property Blocks: Games and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Alan, Ed.; Dailey, Jean, Ed.

    This pamphlet describes the property blocks produced by MINNEMAST, and discusses their use in the development of thinking processes. Classification systems, including block diagrams and tree diagrams, are discussed. Sixteen classroom activities and eleven games which use the blocks are described. Suggestions to the teacher for further reading are…

  14. Importance of Membrane Structural Integrity for RPE65 Retinoid Isomerization Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Golczak, Marcin; Kiser, Philip D.; Lodowski, David T.; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration of visual chromophore in the vertebrate visual cycle involves the retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein RPE65, the key enzyme catalyzing the cleavage and isomerization of all-trans-retinyl fatty acid esters to 11-cis-retinol. Although RPE65 has no predicted membrane spanning domains, this protein predominantly associates with microsomal fractions isolated from bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We have re-examined the nature of RPE65 interactions with native microsomal membranes by using extraction and phase separation experiments. We observe that hydrophobic interactions are the dominant forces that promote RPE65 association with these membranes. These results are consistent with the crystallographic model of RPE65, which features a large lipophilic surface that surrounds the entrance to the catalytic site of this enzyme and likely interacts with the hydrophobic core of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Moreover, we report a critical role for phospholipid membranes in preserving the retinoid isomerization activity and physical properties of RPE65. Isomerase activity measured in bovine RPE was highly sensitive to phospholipase A2 treatment, but the observed decline in 11-cis-retinol production did not directly reflect inhibition by products of lipid hydrolysis. Instead, a direct correlation between the kinetics of phospholipid hydrolysis and retinoid isomerization suggests that the lipid membrane structure is critical for RPE65 enzymatic activity. We also provide evidence that RPE65 operates in a multiprotein complex with retinol dehydrogenase 5 and retinal G protein-coupled receptor in RPE microsomes. Modifications in the phospholipid environment affecting interactions with these protein components may be responsible for the alterations in retinoid metabolism observed in phospholipid-depleted RPE microsomes. Thus, our results indicate that the enzymatic activity of native RPE65 strongly depends on its membrane binding and phospholipid

  15. Ultrathin and stable active layer of dense composite membrane enabled by poly(dopamine).

    PubMed

    Li, Ben; Liu, Wanpeng; Jiang, Zhongyi; Dong, Xiao; Wang, Baoyi; Zhong, Yurong

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrate that dopamine is able to self-polymerize and adhere firmly onto the substrate, which can create a hierarchical structure comprising an ultrathin active layer and a porous support layer. Such an approach opens a novel way to fabricating highly efficient and stable composite materials including composite membranes. More specifically, in this study the composite membranes are fabricated by simply dipping microporous substrate in aqueous dopamine solution under mild conditions. Nanoindentation measurement reveals the tight adhesion of dopamine onto microporous substrate, which is ascribed to numerous pi-pi and hydrogen-bonding interactions. The chemical composition of the active layer is analyzed by XPS, which demonstrates the self-polymerization of dopamine. The water contact angle of the dopamine coated membranes is reduced remarkably compared with that of the uncoated counterpart. Stylus profiler measurements display that the poly(dopamine) thickness increases as the coating time increases. FESEM images of the membranes' cross section show that an active layer (<100 nm) is deposited on the porous polysulfone (PS) substrate. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is introduced to probe the fractional free volume properties throughout the cross section of the composite membranes and reveal that after dopamine double-coating the active layer becomes thicker and more compact. Moreover, pH and concentration of the dopamine solution exert notable influence on the fractional free volume of the composite membranes. The as-prepared membranes are tentatively employed for pervaporative desulfurization and exhibits satisfying separation performance as well as durability. This facile, versatile, and efficient approach enables a promising prospect for the wide applications of such novel kinds of ultrathin composite materials. PMID:19366196

  16. Importance of Membrane Structural Integrity for RPE65 Retinoid Isomerization Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Golczak, Marcin; Kiser, Philip D.; Lodowski, David T.; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-04-05

    Regeneration of visual chromophore in the vertebrate visual cycle involves the retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein RPE65, the key enzyme catalyzing the cleavage and isomerization of all-trans-retinyl fatty acid esters to 11-cis-retinol. Although RPE65 has no predicted membrane spanning domains, this protein predominantly associates with microsomal fractions isolated from bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We have re-examined the nature of RPE65 interactions with native microsomal membranes by using extraction and phase separation experiments. We observe that hydrophobic interactions are the dominant forces that promote RPE65 association with these membranes. These results are consistent with the crystallographic model of RPE65, which features a large lipophilic surface that surrounds the entrance to the catalytic site of this enzyme and likely interacts with the hydrophobic core of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Moreover, we report a critical role for phospholipid membranes in preserving the retinoid isomerization activity and physical properties of RPE65. Isomerase activity measured in bovine RPE was highly sensitive to phospholipase A{sup 2} treatment, but the observed decline in 11-cis-retinol production did not directly reflect inhibition by products of lipid hydrolysis. Instead, a direct correlation between the kinetics of phospholipid hydrolysis and retinoid isomerization suggests that the lipid membrane structure is critical for RPE65 enzymatic activity. We also provide evidence that RPE65 operates in a multiprotein complex with retinol dehydrogenase 5 and retinal G protein-coupled receptor in RPE microsomes. Modifications in the phospholipid environment affecting interactions with these protein components may be responsible for the alterations in retinoid metabolism observed in phospholipid-depleted RPE microsomes. Thus, our results indicate that the enzymatic activity of native RPE65 strongly depends on its membrane binding and

  17. Nature of the charged headgroup determines the fusogenic potential and membrane properties of lithocholic acid phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Priyanshu; Singh, Manish; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-08-01

    Phospholipids play a crucial role in many cellular processes ranging from selective membrane permeability, to membrane fission and fusion, to cellular signaling. Headgroups of phospholipids determine the membrane properties and fusogenicity of these lipids with target cell membranes. We studied the fusogenic and membrane properties of phospholipids possessing unnatural charged headgroups with model membranes using laurdan based membrane hydration studies, DPH based membrane fluidity, and differential scanning calorimetry. We unravel that fusogenicity, membrane hydration, and fluidity of membranes are strongly contingent on the nature of the phospholipid charged headgroup. Our studies unraveled that introduction of bulky headgroups like dimethylamino pyridine induces maximum membrane hydration and perturbations with high fusogenicity as compared to small headgroup based phospholipids. These phospholipids also have the capability of high retention in DPPC membranes. Hydration and fluidity of these phospholipid-doped DPPC membranes are contingent on the nature of the charged headgroup. This study would help in future design of phospholipid based nanomaterials for effective drug delivery. PMID:25029367

  18. Alterations of Red Cell Membrane Properties in Nneuroacanthocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Siegl, Claudia; Hamminger, Patricia; Jank, Herbert; Ahting, Uwe; Bader, Benedikt; Danek, Adrian; Gregory, Allison; Hartig, Monika; Hayflick, Susan; Hermann, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger; Sammler, Esther M.; Yapici, Zuhal; Prohaska, Rainer; Salzer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Neuroacanthocytosis (NA) refers to a group of heterogenous, rare genetic disorders, namely chorea acanthocytosis (ChAc), McLeod syndrome (MLS), Huntington’s disease-like 2 (HDL2) and pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), that mainly affect the basal ganglia and are associated with similar neurological symptoms. PKAN is also assigned to a group of rare neurodegenerative diseases, known as NBIA (neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation), associated with iron accumulation in the basal ganglia and progressive movement disorder. Acanthocytosis, the occurrence of misshaped erythrocytes with thorny protrusions, is frequently observed in ChAc and MLS patients but less prevalent in PKAN (about 10%) and HDL2 patients. The pathological factors that lead to the formation of the acanthocytic red blood cell shape are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether NA/NBIA acanthocytes differ in their functionality from normal erythrocytes. Several flow-cytometry-based assays were applied to test the physiological responses of the plasma membrane, namely drug-induced endocytosis, phosphatidylserine exposure and calcium uptake upon treatment with lysophosphatidic acid. ChAc red cell samples clearly showed a reduced response in drug-induced endovesiculation, lysophosphatidic acid-induced phosphatidylserine exposure, and calcium uptake. Impaired responses were also observed in acanthocyte-positive NBIA (PKAN) red cells but not in patient cells without shape abnormalities. These data suggest an “acanthocytic state” of the red cell where alterations in functional and interdependent membrane properties arise together with an acanthocytic cell shape. Further elucidation of the aberrant molecular mechanisms that cause this acanthocytic state may possibly help to evaluate the pathological pathways leading to neurodegeneration. PMID:24098554

  19. Alterations of red cell membrane properties in neuroacanthocytosis.

    PubMed

    Siegl, Claudia; Hamminger, Patricia; Jank, Herbert; Ahting, Uwe; Bader, Benedikt; Danek, Adrian; Gregory, Allison; Hartig, Monika; Hayflick, Susan; Hermann, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger; Sammler, Esther M; Yapici, Zuhal; Prohaska, Rainer; Salzer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Neuroacanthocytosis (NA) refers to a group of heterogenous, rare genetic disorders, namely chorea acanthocytosis (ChAc), McLeod syndrome (MLS), Huntington's disease-like 2 (HDL2) and pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), that mainly affect the basal ganglia and are associated with similar neurological symptoms. PKAN is also assigned to a group of rare neurodegenerative diseases, known as NBIA (neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation), associated with iron accumulation in the basal ganglia and progressive movement disorder. Acanthocytosis, the occurrence of misshaped erythrocytes with thorny protrusions, is frequently observed in ChAc and MLS patients but less prevalent in PKAN (about 10%) and HDL2 patients. The pathological factors that lead to the formation of the acanthocytic red blood cell shape are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether NA/NBIA acanthocytes differ in their functionality from normal erythrocytes. Several flow-cytometry-based assays were applied to test the physiological responses of the plasma membrane, namely drug-induced endocytosis, phosphatidylserine exposure and calcium uptake upon treatment with lysophosphatidic acid. ChAc red cell samples clearly showed a reduced response in drug-induced endovesiculation, lysophosphatidic acid-induced phosphatidylserine exposure, and calcium uptake. Impaired responses were also observed in acanthocyte-positive NBIA (PKAN) red cells but not in patient cells without shape abnormalities. These data suggest an "acanthocytic state" of the red cell where alterations in functional and interdependent membrane properties arise together with an acanthocytic cell shape. Further elucidation of the aberrant molecular mechanisms that cause this acanthocytic state may possibly help to evaluate the pathological pathways leading to neurodegeneration. PMID:24098554

  20. Measuring Cysteine Cathepsin Activity to Detect Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Repnik, Urška; Česen, Maruša Hafner; Turk, Boris

    2016-01-01

    During lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), lysosomal lumenal contents can be released into the cytosol. Small molecules are more likely to be released, and cysteine cathepsins, with mature forms possessing a mass of 25-30 kDa, are among the smallest lumenal lysosomal enzymes. In addition, specific substrates for cysteine cathepsins are available to investigators, and therefore the measurement of the cathepsin activity as a hallmark of LMP works well. Here, we present a protocol for measuring the activity of these enzymes after selective plasma membrane permeabilization with a low concentration of digitonin and after total cell membrane lysis with a high concentration of digitonin. A fluorogenic substrate can be added either directly to the well with lysed cells to show LMP or to the cell-free extract to show that the lysosomal membrane has been sufficiently destabilized to allow the translocation of lysosomal enzymes. Although the content of lysosomal cysteine cathepsins differs between cell lines, this method has general applicability, is sensitive, and has high throughput. The presented protocol shows how to measure cysteine cathepsin activity in the presence of lysed cells and also in cell-free extracts. Depending on the aim of the study, one or both types of measurements can be performed. PMID:27140915

  1. Membrane phase characteristics control NA-CATH activity.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Robin; Gillmor, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Our studies presented in this report focus on the behavior of NA-CATH, an α-helical cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, originally discovered in the Naja atra snake. It has demonstrated high potency against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria with minimal hemolysis. Here we examine the kinetics, behaviors and potential mechanisms of the peptide in the presence of membrane liposome, modeling Escherichia coli, whose membrane exhibits distinct lipid phases. To understand NA-CATH interactions, the role of lipid phases is critical. We test three different lipid compositions to detangle the effect of phase on NA-CATH's activity using a series of leakage experiments. From these studies, we observe that NA-CATH changes from membrane disruption to pore-based lysing, depending on phases and lipid composition. This behavior also plays a major role in its kinetics. PMID:27216315

  2. Membrane-Active Macromolecules Resensitize NDM-1 Gram-Negative Clinical Isolates to Tetracycline Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Uppu, Divakara S. S. M.; Manjunath, Goutham B.; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Kaviyil, Jyothi E.; Ravikumar, Raju; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R.; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative ‘superbugs’ such as New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (blaNDM-1) producing pathogens have become world’s major public health threats. Development of molecular strategies that can rehabilitate the ‘old antibiotics’ and halt the antibiotic resistance is a promising approach to target them. We report membrane-active macromolecules (MAMs) that restore the antibacterial efficacy (enhancement by >80-1250 fold) of tetracycline antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 Klebsiella pneumonia and blaNDM-1 Escherichia coli clinical isolates. Organismic studies showed that bacteria had an increased and faster uptake of tetracycline in the presence of MAMs which is attributed to the mechanism of re-sensitization. Moreover, bacteria did not develop resistance to MAMs and MAMs stalled the development of bacterial resistance to tetracycline. MAMs displayed membrane-active properties such as dissipation of membrane potential and membrane-permeabilization that enabled higher uptake of tetracycline in bacteria. In-vivo toxicity studies displayed good safety profiles and preliminary in-vivo antibacterial efficacy studies showed that mice treated with MAMs in combination with antibiotics had significantly decreased bacterial burden compared to the untreated mice. This report of re-instating the efficacy of the antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 pathogens using membrane-active molecules advocates their potential for synergistic co-delivery of antibiotics to combat Gram-negative superbugs. PMID:25789871

  3. Membrane-active macromolecules resensitize NDM-1 gram-negative clinical isolates to tetracycline antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Manjunath, Goutham B; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Kaviyil, Jyothi E; Ravikumar, Raju; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative 'superbugs' such as New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (blaNDM-1) producing pathogens have become world's major public health threats. Development of molecular strategies that can rehabilitate the 'old antibiotics' and halt the antibiotic resistance is a promising approach to target them. We report membrane-active macromolecules (MAMs) that restore the antibacterial efficacy (enhancement by >80-1250 fold) of tetracycline antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 Klebsiella pneumonia and blaNDM-1 Escherichia coli clinical isolates. Organismic studies showed that bacteria had an increased and faster uptake of tetracycline in the presence of MAMs which is attributed to the mechanism of re-sensitization. Moreover, bacteria did not develop resistance to MAMs and MAMs stalled the development of bacterial resistance to tetracycline. MAMs displayed membrane-active properties such as dissipation of membrane potential and membrane-permeabilization that enabled higher uptake of tetracycline in bacteria. In-vivo toxicity studies displayed good safety profiles and preliminary in-vivo antibacterial efficacy studies showed that mice treated with MAMs in combination with antibiotics had significantly decreased bacterial burden compared to the untreated mice. This report of re-instating the efficacy of the antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 pathogens using membrane-active molecules advocates their potential for synergistic co-delivery of antibiotics to combat Gram-negative superbugs. PMID:25789871

  4. Evidence of steroid hormone activity in the chorioallantoic membrane of a Turtle (Pseudemys nelsoni).

    PubMed

    Cruze, Lori; Hamlin, Heather J; Kohno, Satomi; McCoy, Michael W; Guillette, Louis J

    2013-06-01

    Endocrine properties of extraembryonic membranes have traditionally been viewed as a characteristic of placental amniotes. However, our laboratory recently demonstrated that this ability extends to the extraembryonic membranes of two oviparous amniotes (chicken and alligator) indicating that endocrine extraembryonic membranes are not an innovation of placental amniotes and suggesting that this could be a shared amniote characteristic. In this study, we test our hypothesis that the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) obtained from non-archosaurian obligate oviparous amniotes such as turtles, have the potential for steroid hormone activity. To investigate synthesis of a major placental hormone, we performed explant culture and found that the turtle CAM synthesizes progesterone in vitro in the presence of a steroid precursor. In addition, to examine whether the CAM has the ability to respond to steroid signaling, we quantified mRNA expression of the progesterone, androgen, and two estrogen receptors. Finally, to determine if steroid receptor mRNA is translated to protein, we performed immunolocalization of the progesterone receptor. Our data demonstrate that the turtle CAM exhibits steroid synthesis and has steroid hormone signaling capabilities. To that end, steroid hormone activity has now been demonstrated in the CAMs of three oviparous species that represent three independent lineages within oviparous Reptilia that have never exhibited viviparity; thus these data support our hypothesis that endocrine activity of extraembryonic membranes is a conserved trait of Amniota. PMID:23458289

  5. How To Functionalize Ceramics by Perfluoroalkylsilanes for Membrane Separation Process? Properties and Application of Hydrophobized Ceramic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kujawa, Joanna; Cerneaux, Sophie; Kujawski, Wojciech; Bryjak, Marek; Kujawski, Jan

    2016-03-23

    The combination of microscopic (atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy) and goniometric (static and dynamic measurements) techniques, and surface characterization (surface free energy determination, critical surface tension, liquid entry pressure, hydraulic permeability) was implemented to discuss the influence of perfluoroalkylsilanes structure and grafting time on the physicochemistry of the created hydrophobic surfaces on the titania ceramic membranes of 5 kD and 300 kD. The impact of molecular structure of perfluoroalkylsilanes modifiers (possessing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms in the fluorinated part of the alkyl chain) and the time of the functionalization process in the range of 5 to 35 h was studied. Based on the scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, it was found that the localization of grafting molecules depends on the membrane pore size (5 kD or 300 kD). In the case of 5 kD titania membranes, modifiers are attached mainly on the surface and only partially inside the membrane pores, whereas, for 300 kD membranes, the perfluoroalkylsilanes molecules are present within the whole porous structure of the membranes. The application of 4 various types of PFAS molecules enabled for interesting observations and remarks. It was explained how to obtain ceramic membrane surfaces with controlled material (contact angle, roughness, contact angle hysteresis) and separation properties. Highly hydrophobic surfaces with low values of contact angle hysteresis and low roughness were obtained. These surfaces possessed also low values of critical surface tension, which means that surfaces are highly resistant to wetting. This finding is crucial in membrane applicability in separation processes. The obtained and characterized hydrophobic membranes were subsequently applied in air-gap membrane distillation processes. All membranes were very efficient in MD processes, showing good transport and selective properties (∼99% of Na

  6. Structure-property relationships of anionic permselective membranes. [Fe/Cr redox storage batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Anionic exchange membranes are used in Fe/Cr redox storage batteries to separate the anolyte from the catholyte and provide electrical continuity. Membranes with lower area resistivity, higher selectivity and reduced susceptibility toward fouling are required to improve the efficiency and lifetime of these batteries. In order to develop improved membrane, a better understanding of the relationships between these properties and such structural parameters as degree of crosslinking, ion exchange capacity and porosity were needed. The primary objective of this work was to define the structure-property relationships of anionic permselective membranes. A secondary goal was to develop empirical models which can be used to predict membrane performance. This kind of information should be useful for the development of improved membranes. To accomplish these goals a factorial study was carried out with model membranes. These membranes were designed in such a way that all three structural parameters could be varied independently. In this paper it will be shown how this approach not only provided models which could be used to predict membrane performance, but also how one of the model membrane exhibited better properties than state-of-the-art membranes.

  7. Effect of Amphotericin B antibiotic on the properties of model lipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryakova, S.; Dencheva-Zarkova, M.; Genova, J.

    2014-12-01

    Model membranes formed from natural and synthetic lipids are an interesting object for scientific investigations due to their similarity to biological cell membrane and their simple structure with controlled composition and properties. Amphotericin B is an important polyene antifungal antibiotic, used for treatment of systemic fungal infections. It is known from the literature that the studied antibiotic has a substantial effect on the transmembrane ionic channel structures. When applied to the lipid membranes it has the tendency to create pores and in this way to affect the structure and the properties of the membrane lipid bilayer. In this work the thermally induced shape fluctuations of giant quasi-spherical liposomes have been used to study the influence of polyene antibiotic amphotericin B on the elastic properties of model lipid membranes. It have been shown experimentally that the presence of 3 mol % of AmB in the lipid membrane reduces the bending elasticity of the lipid membrane for both studied cases: pure SOPC membrane and mixed SOPC-Cholesterol membrane. Interaction of the amphotericin B with bilayer lipid membranes containing channels have been studied in this work. Model membranes were self-assembled using the patch-clamp and tip-dip patch clamp technique. We have found that amphotericin B is an ionophore and reduces the resistance of the lipid bilayer.

  8. Functional specializations of primary auditory afferents on the Mauthner cells: interactions between membrane and synaptic properties.

    PubMed

    Curti, Sebastian; Pereda, Alberto E

    2010-01-01

    Primary auditory afferents are usually perceived as passive, timing-preserving, lines of communication. Contrasting this view, a special class of auditory afferents to teleost Mauthner cells, a command neuron that organizes tail-flip escape responses, undergoes potentiation of their mixed (electrical and chemical) synapses in response to high frequency cellular activity. This property is likely to represent a mechanism of input sensitization as these neurons provide the Mauthner cell with essential information for the initiation of an escape response. We review here the anatomical and physiological specializations of these identifiable auditory afferents. In particular, we discuss how their membrane and synaptic properties act in concert to more efficaciously activate the Mauthner cells. The striking functional specializations of these neurons suggest that primary auditory afferents might be capable of more sophisticated contributions to auditory processing than has been generally recognized. PMID:19941953

  9. Composite membranes prepared from cation exchange membranes and polyaniline and their transport properties in electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sata, Tshikatsu; Ishii, Yuuko; Kawamura, Kohei; Matsusaki, Koji

    1999-02-01

    A cation exchange membrane was modified with polyaniline by polymerizing aniline with ammonium peroxodisulfate on the membrane surfaces, producing a membrane with polyaniline layers on both surfaces or a membrane with a single polyaniline layer on the surface. The modified membranes, composite membranes, showed sodium ion permselectivity in electrodialysis compared with divalent cations at an optimum polymerization time. The electronic conductivity of dry membranes showed a maximum (ca. 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm) at the same polymerization time as the time to attain a maximum value of the sodium ion permselectivity. Because emeraldine-based polyaniline is conductive and has a cationic charge, the sodium ion permselectivity is based on the difference in the electrostatic repulsion forces of the cationic charge on the membrane surface of a desalting side to divalent cations and sodium ions. In fact, the selective permeation of sodium ions appeared only when the layer faced the desalting side of the membrane, and was affected by dissociation of polyaniline. Further oxidized polyaniline, pernigraniline-based polyaniline, did not affect the permselectivity between cations, and the diffusion coefficient of neutral molecules, urea, increased with increasing polymerization time. Sodium ion permselectivity was maintained with repeated electrodialysis.

  10. Preparation of hydrophilic vinyl chloride copolymer hollow fiber membranes with antifouling properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Sano, Rie; Ishigami, Toru; Kakihana, Yuriko; Ohmukai, Yoshikage; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophilic vinyl chloride copolymer hollow fiber membranes with antifouling properties were prepared from brominated vinyl chloride-hydroxyethyl methacrylate copolymer (poly(VC-co-HEMA-Br)). The base membrane was grafted with two different zwitterionic monomers, (2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine) (MPC) and [2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl] dimethyl (3-sulfopropyl) ammonium hydroxide) (MEDSAH), and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA). The effect of the grafting on the base membrane hydrophilicity and antifouling properties was investigated. For comparison of the results, the pure water permeabilities and pore sizes at the outer surfaces of the grafted hollow fiber membranes were controlled to be similar. A poly(VC-co-HEMA-Br) hollow fiber membrane with similar pure water permeability and pore size was also prepared as a control membrane. A BSA solution was used as a model fouling solution for evaluation of the antifouling properties. Grafting with zwitterionic monomers and PEGMA improved the antifouling properties compared with the control membrane. The PEGMA grafted membrane showed the best antifouling properties among the grafted membranes

  11. Shape-dependent bactericidal activity of copper oxide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Laskar, Aparna; Jana, Madhurya; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • Physical characterizations of these nanoparticles were done by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR. • They showed shape dependent antibacterial activity on different bacterial strain. • They induced both membrane damage and ROS mediated DNA damage in bacteria. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles and their physical characterizations were done by the X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles was determined on both gram positive and gram negative bacterial. Spherical shaped copper oxide nanoparticles showed more antibacterial property on gram positive bacteria where as sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles are more active on gram negative bacteria. We also demonstrated that copper oxide nanoparticles produced reactive oxygen species in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Furthermore, they induced membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thus production of and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally it was concluded that antibacterial activity of nanoparticles depend on physicochemical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles and bacterial strain.

  12. A packed bed membrane reactor for production of biodiesel using activated carbon supported catalyst.

    PubMed

    Baroutian, Saeid; Aroua, Mohamed K; Raman, Abdul Aziz A; Sulaiman, Nik M N

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel continuous reactor has been developed to produce high quality methyl esters (biodiesel) from palm oil. A microporous TiO2/Al2O3 membrane was packed with potassium hydroxide catalyst supported on palm shell activated carbon. The central composite design (CCD) of response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, catalyst amount and cross flow circulation velocity on the production of biodiesel in the packed bed membrane reactor. The highest conversion of palm oil to biodiesel in the reactor was obtained at 70 °C employing 157.04 g catalyst per unit volume of the reactor and 0.21 cm/s cross flow circulation velocity. The physical and chemical properties of the produced biodiesel were determined and compared with the standard specifications. High quality palm oil biodiesel was produced by combination of heterogeneous alkali transesterification and separation processes in the packed bed membrane reactor. PMID:20888219

  13. Some properties and applications of thin self-supporting polymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Korn, U; Rav-Noy, Z; Shtrikman, S

    1978-10-01

    Membranes as thin as 500 A were produced from many plastic materials and transferred to frames with dimensions of several centimeters. The self-supporting membranes were obtained using simple-dip-coating techniques. In some cases additional plasma polymerized layers were applied. These membranes can withstand several procedures of photolithography and chemical processing. The mechanical properties of the membranes are similar to that of the bulk material. Some typical applications are described. These applications include the use of the membranes as substrates for thermoelectric detectors and also as beamsplitters and windows for cells employed in CO(2) laser spectroscopy. PMID:18698977

  14. Properties of stellar activity cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Heidi

    2015-08-01

    The current photometric datasets, that span decades, allow for studying long-term magentic cycles on active stars. Complementary Ca H&K observations give information also on the cycles of normal solar-like stars, which have significantly smaller, and less easily detectable, spots. In recent years, high precision space-based observations, for example from the Kepler satellite, have allowed also to study the sunspot-like spot sizes in other stars. In this talk I will review what is known about the properties of the cyclic stellar activity in other stars than our Sun, and also discuss the future prospects in this field.

  15. Modification of the properties of biological membrane and its protection against oxidation by Actinidia arguta leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Cyboran, Sylwia; Oszmiański, Jan; Kleszczyńska, Halina

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the polyphenol composition and biological activity of an extract from the leaves of kiwi. Antioxidant and hemolytic activity of the extract were examined, as well as its effect on the physical properties of the erythrocyte membrane such as osmotic resistance, membrane fluidity, and packing order of its hydrophilic area. Antioxidant activity of the extract was determined in relation to the erythrocyte membrane oxidized with free radicals induced by UVB and UVC radiation and the compound AAPH. Chromatographic, spectrophotometric and fluorimetric methods were applied in the research. The obtained results showed that kiwi leaves are a rich source of polyphenolic substances, mainly catechins and their dimers, which do not induce red blood cell hemolysis but make them stronger and more resistant to changes in medium tonicity. Substances contained in the extract effectively protect erythrocyte membranes against oxidation induced by physicochemical factors, the effectiveness of the protection depending on the concentration and type of free radical inducer. In addition, the study showed that the kiwi extract increases fluidity of the erythrocyte membrane and causes an increase in packing disorder in the hydrophilic membrane area. The changes seem to be due to the presence of polyphenolic substances in the extract, mainly in the region of the polar heads of lipids, where they can form a barrier protecting the membrane against diffusion of free radicals to the membrane interior. The effects of the extract evidenced by the present research, in particular protection of the biological membrane against free radicals induced by physicochemical agents, make it a potential valuable food additive, to enrich it with polyphenolic compounds that inhibit lipid oxidation in food exposed to UVB radiation. Supplementing the organism with substances contained in kiwi leaves is expected to provide protection against many diseases that develop as a result

  16. Membrane anchoring of diacylglycerol-lactones substituted with rigid hydrophobic acyl domains correlates with biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Raifman, Or; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Comin, Maria J.; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Marquez, Victor E.; Jelinek, Raz

    2009-01-01

    Summary Synthetic diacylglycerol lactones (DAG-lactones) are effective modulators of critical cellular signaling pathways, downstream of the lipophilic second messenger diacylglycerol, that activate a host of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes as well as other non-kinase proteins that share with PKC similar C1 membrane-targeting domains. A fundamental determinant of the biological activity of these amphiphilic molecules is the nature of their interactions with cellular membranes. This study characterizes the membrane interactions and bilayer anchoring of a series of DAG-lactones in which the hydrophobic moiety is a “molecular rod”, namely a rigid 4-[2-(R-phenyl)ethynyl]benzoate moiety in the acyl position. Application of assays employing chromatic biomimetic vesicles and biophysical techniques reveals that the mode of membrane anchoring of the DAG-lactone derivatives was markedly affected by the presence of the hydrophobic diphenyl rod and by the size of the functional unit displayed at the terminus of the rod. Two primary mechanisms of interaction were observed: surface binding of the DAG-lactones at the lipid/water interface and deep insertion of the ligands into the alkyl core of the lipid bilayer. These membrane-insertion properties could explain the different patterns of PKC translocation from cytosol to membranes induced by the molecular-rod DAG-lactones. This investigation emphasizes that the side-residues of DAG-lactones, rather than simply conferring hydrophobicity, profoundly influence membrane interactions and in that fashion may further contribute to the diversity of biological actions of these synthetic biomimetic ligands. PMID:19961537

  17. Properties of ganglioside GM1 in phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Reed, R A; Shipley, G G

    1996-03-01

    Gangliosides have been shown to function as cell surface receptors, as well as participating in cell growth, differentiation, and transformation. In spite of their multiple biological functions, relatively little is known about their structure and physical properties in membrane systems. The thermotropic and structural properties of ganglioside GM1 alone and in a binary system with 1,2-dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. By DSC hydrated GM1 undergoes a broad endothermic transition TM = 26 degrees C (delta H = 1.7 kcal/mol GM1). X-ray diffraction below (-2 degrees C) and above (51 degrees C) this transition indicates a micellar structure with changes occurring only in the wide angle region of the diffraction pattern (relatively sharp reflection at 1/4.12 A-1 at -2 degrees C; more diffuse reflection at 1/4.41 A-1 at 51 degrees C). In hydrated binary mixtures with DPPC, incorporation of GM1 (0-30 mol%; zone 1) decreases the enthalpy of the DPPC pretransition at low molar compositions while increasing the TM of both the pre- and main transitions (limiting values, 39 and 44 degrees C, respectively). X-ray diffraction studies indicate the presence of a single bilayer gel phase in zone 1 that can undergo chain melting to an L alpha bilayer phase. A detailed hydration study of GM1 (5.7 mol %)/DPPC indicated a conversion of the DPPC bilayer gel phase to an infinite swelling system in zone 1 due to the presence of the negatively charged sialic acid moiety of GM1. At 30-61 mol % GM1 (zone 2), two calorimetric transitions are observed at 44 and 47 degrees C, suggesting the presence of two phases. The lower transition reflects the bilayer gel --> L alpha transition (zone 1), whereas the upper transition appears to be a consequence of the formation of a nonbilayer, micellar or hexagonal phase, although the structure of this phase has not been defined by x-ray diffraction. At > 61 mol % GM

  18. Polyethersulfone/polyacrylonitrile blended ultrafiltration membranes: preparation, morphology and filtration properties.

    PubMed

    Pasaoglu, Mehmet Emin; Guclu, Serkan; Koyuncu, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Polyethersulfone (PES)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membranes have been paid attention among membrane research subjects. However, very few studies are included in the literature. In our study, asymmetric ultrafiltration (UF) membranes were prepared from blends of PES/PAN with phase inversion method using water as coagulation bath. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) with Mw of 10,000 Da was used as pore former agent. N,N-dimethylformamide was used as solvent. The effects of different percentage of PVP and PES/PAN composition on morphology and water filtration properties were investigated. Membrane performances were examined using pure water and lake water filtration studies. Performances of pure water were less with the addition of PAN into the PES polymer casting solutions. However, long-term water filtration tests showed that PES/PAN blend membranes anti-fouling properties were much higher than the neat PES membranes. The contact angles of PES/PAN membranes were lower than neat PES membranes because of PAN addition in PES polymer casting solutions. Furthermore, it was found that PES/PAN blend UF membranes' dynamic mechanical analysis properties in terms of Young's modules were less than neat PES membrane because of decreasing amount of PES polymer. PMID:27508379

  19. Aluminum ions alter the function of non-specific phospholipase C through the changes in plasma membrane physical properties.

    PubMed

    Pejchar, Přemysl; Martinec, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The first indication of the aluminum (Al) toxicity in plants growing in acidic soils is the cessation of root growth, but the detailed mechanism of Al effect is unknown. Here we examined the impact of Al stress on the activity of non-specific phospholipase C (NPC) in the connection with the processes related to the plasma membrane using fluorescently labeled phosphatidylcholine. We observed a rapid and significant decrease of labeled diacylglycerol (DAG), product of NPC activity, in Arabidopsis seedlings treated with AlCl₃. Interestingly, an application of the membrane fluidizer, benzyl alcohol, restored the level of DAG during Al treatment. Our observations suggest that the activity of NPC is affected by Al-induced changes in plasma membrane physical properties. PMID:26024014

  20. Aluminum ions alter the function of non-specific phospholipase C through the changes in plasma membrane physical properties

    PubMed Central

    Pejchar, Přemysl; Martinec, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The first indication of the aluminum (Al) toxicity in plants growing in acidic soils is the cessation of root growth, but the detailed mechanism of Al effect is unknown. Here we examined the impact of Al stress on the activity of non-specific phospholipase C (NPC) in the connection with the processes related to the plasma membrane using fluorescently labeled phosphatidylcholine. We observed a rapid and significant decrease of labeled diacylglycerol (DAG), product of NPC activity, in Arabidopsis seedlings treated with AlCl3. Interestingly, an application of the membrane fluidizer, benzyl alcohol, restored the level of DAG during Al treatment. Our observations suggest that the activity of NPC is affected by Al-induced changes in plasma membrane physical properties. PMID:26024014

  1. Quantifying the lateral lipid domain properties in erythrocyte ghost membranes using EPR-spectra decomposition.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Schara, Milan; Strancar, Janez

    2002-07-01

    Using EPR spectroscopy a typical lateral domain structure was detected in the membranes of spin-labeled bovine erythrocyte ghosts. The spectral parameters were determined by decomposing the EPR spectrum into three spectral components and tuned by a hybrid-evolutionary-optimization method. In our experiments the lateral domain structure and its properties were influenced by the variation in the temperature and by the addition of n-butanol. The specific responses of the particular domain types were detected. For the most-ordered domain type a break was seen in the temperature dependence of its order parameter, while the order parameters of the two less-ordered domain types exhibited a continuous decrease. Below the break-point temperature the alcohol-induced membrane fluidity variation is mainly a consequence of the change in the proportions of the least- and the most-ordered domain type and not the change of the domain-type ordering or dynamics (with n-butanol concentration). On the other hand, the fluidity variation above the break-point temperature arises from both types of changes. Interestingly, the proportion of the domain type that has its order parameter between that of the least- and the most-ordered domain type remains almost constant with concentration as well as with temperature, which implies its stability. Such characterization of the lateral membrane domain structure could be beneficial when considering the lipid-protein interactions, because it can be assumed that the activity of the membrane-bound enzyme depends on the properties of the particular domain type. PMID:12202132

  2. A flexible nanofiber-based membrane with superhydrophobic pinning properties.

    PubMed

    Hu, Luyang; Zhang, Shanmei; Zhang, Yumin; Li, Benxia

    2016-06-15

    A nanofiber-based TiO2(B)/carbon nanofiber membrane has been synthesized by a facile and effective route that incorporates electrospinning approach with hydrothermal method. The prepared membrane shows high flexibility and hydrophilicity. After treatment with a low surface energy fluorosilane, the obtained superhydrophobic surface endows the membrane a high adhesive force due to the hybrid microstructure of TiO2(B) nanotubes and nanoplates on fibers. A water droplet on the surface of the membrane appears spherical in shape, which cannot roll off even when the membrane is bent and turned upside down. When a water droplet dropped from a certain height above the tilt membrane, the rolled water droplet can be stopped after a small displacement. In addition, a 12μl water droplet can be quickly captured from a hydrophobic surface by curvature change of the superhydrophobic TiO2(B)/carbon nanofiber membrane. The membrane with excellent static and dynamic pinning performance to water may be expected to apply to biomedical and microfluidic devices. PMID:27038279

  3. Preparation and gas separation properties of zeolite T membrane.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying; Kita, Hidetoshi; Okamoto, Ken-ichi

    2003-09-01

    Zeolite T membranes were synthesized on tubular porous mullite tubes by hydrothermal synthesis. The membranes selectively permeated carbon dioxide from CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2 mixtures with high separation performances, which were due to combined effects of molecular sieving and competitive adsorption. PMID:13678177

  4. Physically Gelled Room-Temperature Ionic Liquid-Based Composite Membranes for CO2/N-2 Separation: Effect of Composition and Thickness on Membrane Properties and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, PT; Voss, BA; Wiesenauer, EF; Gin, DL; Nobe, RD

    2013-07-03

    An aspartame-based, low molecular-weight organic gelator (LMOG) was used to form melt-infused and composite membranes with two different imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) for CO2 separation from N-2. Previous work demonstrated that LMOGs can gel RTILs at low, loading levels, and this aspartame-based LMOG was selected because it has been reported to gel a large number of RTILs. The imidazolium-based RTILs were used because of their inherent good properties for CO2/light gas separations. Analysis of the resulting bulk RTIL/LMOG physical gels showed that these materials have high sol-gel transition temperatures (ca. 135 degrees C) suitable for flue gas applications. Gas permeabilities and burst pressure measurements of thick, melt infused membranes revealed a trade-off between high CO2 permeabilities and good mechanical stability as a function of the LMOG loading. Defect-free, composite membranes of the gelled RTILs were successfully fabricated by choosing an appropriate porous membrane support (hydrophobic PTFE) using a suitable coating technique (roller coating). The thicknesses of the applied composite gel layers ranged from 10.3 to 20.7 mu m, which represents an order of magnitude decrease in active layer thickness, compared to the original melt-infused gel RTIL membranes.

  5. Ion implantation: effect on flux and rejection properties of NF membranes.

    PubMed

    Abitoye, Joshua Olufemi; Mukherjee, J Parna; Jones, Kimberly

    2005-09-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) membranes typically carry a net electric charge, enabling electrostatic interactions to play a pivotal role in the rejection of species such as metals, nitrates, and other charged contaminants. In this study, two types of polymeric NF membranes, polyamide and cellulose acetate, were modified by ion implantation to increase the effective surface charge of the membranes. The modified membranes contain implanted ions in the membrane matrix, inducing a discrete, permanent charge in the active membrane layer. The presence of a permanent charge in the membrane matrix allows for increased electrostatic repulsive forces throughout the entire pH range. Streaming potential measurements were conducted as a function of pH for the modified and unmodified membranes to determine the effect of ion implantation on the zeta potential of the membranes. Rejection experiments were performed in order to quantify the effect of increased electrostatic repulsion on ion rejection, and flux measurements quantified the effect of the modification on permeability. Results indicate that electrostatic interactions near the membrane surface can affect rejection; however, the extent of the effect of increased membrane charge depends on physical-chemical characteristics of the membrane. Increased negative zeta potential of the modified membranes resulted in slightly higher rejection of salts with divalent co-ions from the membrane, with less increase observed with salts of monovalent co-ions. Modified membranes were less permeable than the unmodified membranes. Results of this research hold implications in membrane synthesis and modification studies as well as choice of membranes for water treatment applications. PMID:16190203

  6. The adrenal specific toxicant mitotane directly interacts with lipid membranes and alters membrane properties depending on lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Holger A; Haralampiev, Ivan; Theisgen, Stephan; Schirbel, Andreas; Sbiera, Silviu; Huster, Daniel; Kroiss, Matthias; Müller, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Mitotane (o,p'.-DDD) is an orphan drug approved for the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma. The mechanisms, which are responsible for this activity of the drug, are not completely understood. It can be hypothesized that an impact of mitotane is mediated by the interaction with cellular membranes. However, an interaction of mitotane with (lipid) membranes has not yet been investigated in detail. Here, we characterized the interaction of mitotane and its main metabolite o,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroacetic acid (o,p'-DDA) with lipid membranes by applying a variety of biophysical approaches of nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that mitotane and o,p'-DDA bind to lipid membranes by inserting into the lipid-water interface of the bilayer. Mitotane but not o,p'-DDA directly causes a disturbance of bilayer structure leading to an increased permeability of the membrane for polar molecules. Mitotane induced alterations of the membrane integrity required the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine and/or cholesterol. Collectively, our data for the first time characterize the impact of mitotane on the lipid membrane structure and dynamics, which may contribute to a better understanding of specific mitotane effects and side effects. PMID:27002491

  7. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-05-01

    Plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H(+)-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H(+)-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H(+)-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H(+)-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H(+)-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  8. Effect of unsaturations on the physical properties of a model membrane with the highly polyunsaturated docosahexaenoic fatty acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, Leonor; Klein, Michael L.

    2001-03-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are an essential component of biomembranes. The docosahexaenoic fatty acid (DHA), in particular, is found in high concentrations in retinal and neuronal tissue and in the olfactory bulb. Furthermore, it is well known the ability of DHA rich membranes to modulate membrane protein function, in some situations, by modifying the membrane physical properties. A particularly well studied situation is the DHA effect onthe activity of the visual receptor (protein) rhodopsin. Here, we study at a microscopic level this type of complex systems under physiological conditions. In this way, we can probe the molecular origin of the peculiarities that the system confers to membranes. To this purpose, the structure of a fully hydrated mixed (saturated/polyunsaturated) chain lipid bilayer in the biologically relevant liquid crystalline phase has been examined by performing molecular dynamics simulations. The model membrane, a 1-stearoyl- 2-docosahexaenoic- sn-glycero- 3-phosphatidylcholine (18:0/22:6 PC) lipid bilayer, was investigated at room temperature and ambient pressure and the results obtained in the nanosecond time scale were in good agreement with the available experimental data. Among the effects of the multiple unsaturations on the physical properties of these membranes, we focus on the enhanced permeability to water and small organic solvents, the decreased area compressibility modulus, and the domain formation and chain segregation.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Two-Dimensional Alkanethiol-Coated Gold Nanoparticle Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, K. Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-03-01

    Membranes formed from nanoparticle monolayers have been shown to have mechanical properties that may make them suitable for use in micro-scale devices. Metallic-core nanoparticles with short, organic ligands can form membranes with dimensions up to several micrometers, with large elastic moduli. Experimental tests of membranes with different cores and ligands indicate that ligand length as well as core-ligand and ligand-ligand interactions can influence membrane mechanical response. We use explicit-atom molecular dynamics simulations to examine the properties of membranes formed from a two-dimensional hexagonal array of alkanethiol-coated Au nanoparticles. Results are presented for nanoparticle core diameters from 4-6nm, ligand lengths of 10-18 units and carboxyl and methyl end groups, all of which influence the mechanical properties of the membranes. Knowledge of how microstructure and composition influence membrane properties could lead to efficient membrane manufacture with improved mechanical properties. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Removal properties of human enteric viruses in a pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) process.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takayuki; Okabe, Satoshi; Nakahara, Yoshihito; Sano, Daisuke

    2015-05-15

    In order to evaluate removal properties of human enteric viruses from wastewater by a membrane bioreactor (MBR), influent, anoxic and oxic mixed liquor, and membrane effluent samples were collected in a pilot-scale anoxic-oxic MBR process for 16 months, and concentrations of enteroviruses, norovirus GII, and sapoviruses were determined by real-time PCR using murine norovirus as a process control. Mixed liquor samples were separated into liquid and solid phases by centrifugation, and viruses in the bulk solution and those associated with mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) were quantified. Enteroviruses, norovirus GII, and sapoviruses were detected in the influent throughout the sampling period (geometrical mean, 4.0, 3.1, and 4.4 log copies/mL, respectively). Enterovirus concentrations in the solid phase of mixed liquor were generally lower than those in the liquid phase, and the mean log reduction value between influent and anoxic mixed liquor was 0.40 log units. In contrast, norovirus GII and sapovirus concentrations in the solid phase were equal to or higher than those in the liquid phase, and higher log reduction values (1.3 and 1.1 log units, respectively) were observed between influent and anoxic mixed liquor. This suggested that enteroviruses were less associated with MLSS than norovirus GII and sapoviruses, resulting in lower enterovirus removal in the activated sludge process. Enteroviruses and norovirus GII were detected in the MBR effluent but sapoviruses were not in any effluent samples. When MLSS concentration was reduced to 50-60% of a normal operation level, passages of enteroviruses and norovirus GII through a PVDF microfiltration membrane were observed. Since rejection of viruses by the membrane was not related to trans-membrane pressure which was monitored as a parameter of membrane fouling, the results indicated that adsorption to MLSS plays an important role in virus removal by an MBR, and removal properties vary by viruses reflecting different

  11. Properties of novel polyvinyl alcohol/cellulose nanocrystals/silver nanoparticles blend membranes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Yang, Yi-Qin; Xing, Ying-Ying; Yang, Jiu-Fang; Wang, Shi-Fa

    2013-11-01

    Novel polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) blend membranes containing cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared via a simple method. CNs were prepared by sulfuric acid treatment of microcrystalline cellulose. AgNO3 aqueous solution mixed with the CNs aqueous suspension and was reduced by NaBH4 at room temperature. Purified CNs/AgNPs nanocomposites as functional fillers mixed with polyvinyl alcohol to prepare blend membrane. The morphology, mechanical properties, and antibacterial activities of PVA/CNs/AgNPs composite films were investigated. The PVA/CNs/AgNPs composite films were stable and homogeneous. The tensile strength of PVA was increased from 57.02 MPa to 81.21 MPa when filled with CNs/AgNPs. Antibacterial ratio of PVA/CNs/AgNPs composite against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus was 96.9% and 88.2%, respectively. The CNs/AgNPs nanocomposites could be applied as bi-functional nanofillers within PVA to improve the mechanical properties and antibacterial activities. PMID:24053842

  12. Comparison of the properties of membranes produced with alginate and chitosan from mushroom and from shrimp.

    PubMed

    Bierhalz, Andréa C K; Westin, Cecília Buzatto; Moraes, Ângela Maria

    2016-10-01

    Dense and porous chitosan-alginate membranes (1:1 in mass) useful as coverages of skin wounds treated through cell therapy were produced using chitosan of different chain sizes from fungal (white mushrooms) and animal (shrimp shells) sources. Porous materials were obtained by adding the surfactant Poloxamer 188 to the formulations. The influence of chitosan type on membranes physicochemical properties and toxicity to fibroblasts was evaluated. Porosity was noticed to be more pronounced in membranes obtained with fungal chitosan and increased with its molecular mass. These formulations showed the highest values of thickness, roughness, opacity, liquid uptake and water vapor permeability. The membranes were not toxic to fibroblasts, but the lowest cytotoxicity values (0.16-0.21%) were observed for membranes prepared with fungal chitosan in the presence of surfactant. In conclusion, it is possible to replace chitosan from animal sources by chitosan of fungal origin to produce membranes with negligible cytotoxicity while maintaining appropriate physicochemical properties. PMID:27240752

  13. Water adsorption properties controlled by coating/filling ordered mesoporous silica inside cellulose membranes.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tatsuo

    2013-09-28

    Porous organic membranes have been utilized as hard templates not only for replication of porous macrostructures but also for fabrication of hierarchical porous solids through infiltration of precursor solutions in ordered mesoporous materials. However, such organic membranes are usually burned out as sacrificial skeletons by calcination. In addition, replicated macropores are too big to enhance properties due to inorganic oxide frameworks. In this study, when cellulose membranes were used as organic membranes, a coating/filling technology of ordered mesoporous silicas was proposed and the water adsorption-desorption properties were directly investigated by using the composite membranes after extraction of nonionic surfactants used. The composite membranes possessed enough adsorption capacity for water, which will be potentially useful for improving total energy efficiency in heat-pump and desiccant air conditioning systems. PMID:23925426

  14. Mechanical properties of the plasma membrane of isolated plant protoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, J.; Steponkus, P.L.

    1983-01-01

    The volume of isolated protoplasts of rye (Secale cereale L. cv Puma) in a suspending solution at constant concentration is shown to be negligibly changed by tensions in the plasma membrane which approach that tension necessary to lyse them. This allows a detailed investigation of the plasma membrane stress-strain relation by micropipette aspiration. Over periods less than a second, the membrane behaves as an elastic two-dimensional fluid with an area modulus of elasticity of 230 millinewtons per meter. Over longer periods, the stress-strain relation approaches a surface energy law--the resting tension is independent of area and has a value of the order 100 micronewtons per meter. Over longer periods the untensioned area, which is defined as the area that would be occupied by the molecules in the membrane at any given time if the tension were zero, increases with time under large imposed tensions and decreases under sufficiently small tension. It is proposed that these long term responses are the result of exchange of material between the plane of the membrane and a reservoir of membrane material. The irreversibility of large contractions in area is demonstrated directly, and the behavior of protoplasts during osmotically induced cycles of contraction and expansion is explained in terms of the membrane stress-strain relation.

  15. Cyclohexane triones, novel membrane-active antibacterial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, W J; Broadhurst, A V; Hall, M J; Andrews, K J; Barber, W E; Wong-Kai-In, P

    1988-01-01

    The cyclohexane triones are a novel group of synthetic antibacterial agents that are active against gram-positive bacteria, Haemophilus influenzae, and Mycobacterium smegmatis. In general, these compounds behaved in a manner similar to that of hexachlorophene, inhibiting the transport of low-molecular-weight hydrophilic substances into bacteria. Unlike cationic detergents, such as chlorhexidine, they did not cause disruption of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane over a short time period. The most potent antibacterial cyclohexane trione studied had a reduced ability to inhibit solute transport in comparison with certain less active analogs. Cyclohexane triones may express more than a single type of antibacterial effect. PMID:3137860

  16. Formulation and process optimization of multiparticulate pulsatile system delivered by osmotic pressure-activated rupturable membrane.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sheng-Feng; Hsieh, Chien-Ming; Chen, Ying-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Ho, Hsiu-O; Sheu, Ming-Thau

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a multiparticulate pulsatile drug delivery system activated by a rupturable controlled-release membrane (Eudragit(®) RS) via osmotic pressure (with NaCl as the osmogent) was developed and characterized for omeprazole, omeprazole sodium, and propranolol HCl which have different water solubilities. Multiparticulates in pellet form for incorporation with or without the osmogent were manufactured by three methods and then used to coat a polymeric membrane. Results demonstrated that drug/osmogent-containing pellets manufactured by the extrusion/spheronization method with incorporation of the osmogent were optimal. The lag time (tL) to initiate pulsatile release is regulated by tL=l(2)/(6×D), which is dependent on the coating levels (l(2)) and plasticizer content (D). The pulsatile release pattern was found to be dependent on the osmotic pressure (osmogent), drug solubility, and mechanical properties of the polymeric membrane (elasticity and toughness). Omeprazole with lower water solubility could not generate sufficient osmotic pressure to create a crack in the membrane to activate pulsatile release, whereas the two other model drugs with higher solubilities could. But adsorption of omeprazole sodium on Eudragit(®) RS via charge-charge interactions led the its incomplete release. Finally, with 4% osmogent of NaCl added, a lag time in a range from 0 to 12h proportionally regulated by varying both the membrane thickness and plasticizer level initiated the complete pulsatile release of propranolol HCl. In conclusion, a multiparticulate pulsatile drug delivery system activated by a rupturable controlled-release membrane via osmotic pressure was successfully developed, and clinical applications of chronotherapy with drugs like propranolol HCl are expected. PMID:25575473

  17. Chemical Modulation of the Biological Activity of Reutericyclin: a Membrane-Active Antibiotic from Lactobacillus reuteri

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Philip T.; Wu, Xiaoqian; Maddox, Marcus M.; Singh, Aman P.; Lee, Richard E.; Hurdle, Julian G.

    2014-01-01

    Whilst the development of membrane-active antibiotics is now an attractive therapeutic concept, progress in this area is disadvantaged by poor knowledge of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) required for optimizing molecules to selectively target bacteria. This prompted us to explore the SAR of the Lactobacillus reuteri membrane-active antibiotic reutericyclin, modifying three key positions about its tetramic acid core. The SAR revealed that lipophilic analogs were generally more active against Gram-positive pathogens, but introduction of polar and charged substituents diminished their activity. This was confirmed by cytometric assays showing that inactive compounds failed to dissipate the membrane potential. Radiolabeled substrate assays indicated that dissipation of the membrane potential by active reutericyclins correlated with inhibition of macromolecular synthesis in cells. However, compounds with good antibacterial activities also showed cytotoxicity against Vero cells and hemolytic activity. Although this study highlights the challenge of optimizing membrane-active antibiotics, it shows that by increasing antibacterial potency the selectivity index could be widened, allowing use of lower non-cytotoxic doses. PMID:24739957

  18. High-pressure stainless steel active membrane microvalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G.; Svensson, S.; Ogden, S.; Klintberg, L.; Hjort, K.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, high-pressure membrane microvalves have been designed, manufactured and evaluated. The valves were able to withstand back-pressures of 200 bar with a response time of less than 0.6 s. These stainless steel valves, manufactured with back-end batch production, utilize the large volume expansion coupled to the solid-liquid phase transition in paraffin wax. When membrane materials were evaluated, parylene coated stainless steel was found to be the best choice as compared to polydimethylsiloxane and polyimide. Also, the influence of the orifice placement and diameter is included in this work. If the orifice is placed too close to the rim of the membrane, the valve can stay sealed even after turning the power off, and the valve will not open until the pressure in the system is released. The developed steel valves, evaluated for both water and air, provide excellent properties in terms of mechanical stability, ease of fabrication, and low cost. Possible applications include sampling at high pressures, chemical microreactors, high performance liquid chromatography, pneumatics, and hydraulics.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of lipid membranes with lateral force: rupture and dynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun Yu; Ding, Guang Hong; Karttunen, Mikko

    2014-03-01

    Membranes' response to lateral tension, and eventual rupture, remains poorly understood. In this study, pure dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid bilayers, under tension/pressure, were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The irreversible membrane breakdown is demonstrated to depend on the amplitude of lateral tension, loading rate, and the size of the bilayer. In all of our simulations, -200bar lateral pressure was found to be enough to rupture lipid membrane regardless of the loading rate or the membrane size. Loading rate and membrane size had a significant impact on rupture. A variety of dynamic properties of lipid molecules, probability distribution of area per lipid particularly, have been determined, and found to be fundamental for describing membrane behavior in detail, thus providing the quantitative description for the requirement of membrane rupture. PMID:24374317

  20. Decoupling Mechanical and Ion Transport Properties in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Lucas D.

    Polymer electrolytes are mixtures of a polar polymer and salt, in which the polymer replaces small molecule solvents and provides a dielectric medium so that ions can dissociate and migrate under the influence of an external electric field. Beginning in the 1970s, research in polymer electrolytes has been primarily motivated by their promise to advance electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices, such as lithium ion batteries, flexible organic solar cells, and anhydrous fuel cells. In particular, polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) can improve both safety and energy density by eliminating small molecule, volatile solvents and enabling an all-solid-state design of electrochemical cells. The outstanding challenge in the field of polymer electrolytes is to maximize ionic conductivity while simultaneously addressing orthogonal mechanical properties, such as modulus, fracture toughness, or high temperature creep resistance. The crux of the challenge is that flexible, polar polymers best-suited for polymer electrolytes (e.g., poly(ethylene oxide)) offer little in the way of mechanical robustness. Similarly, polymers typically associated with superior mechanical performance (e.g., poly(methyl methacrylate)) slow ion transport due to their glassy polymer matrix. The design strategy is therefore to employ structured electrolytes that exhibit distinct conducting and mechanically robust phases on length scales of tens of nanometers. This thesis reports a remarkably simple, yet versatile synthetic strategy---termed polymerization-induced phase separation, or PIPS---to prepare PEMs exhibiting an unprecedented combination of both high conductivity and high modulus. This performance is enabled by co-continuous, isotropic networks of poly(ethylene oxide)/ionic liquid and highly crosslinked polystyrene. A suite of in situ, time-resolved experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism by which this network morphology forms, and it appears to be tied to the

  1. Scolopendin 2, a cationic antimicrobial peptide from centipede, and its membrane-active mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heejeong; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Jaeho; Kim, Jae Il; Lee, Dong Gun

    2015-02-01

    Scolopendin 2 is a 16-mer peptide (AGLQFPVGRIGRLLRK) derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. We observed that this peptide exhibited antimicrobial activity in a salt-dependent manner against various fungal and bacterial pathogens and showed no hemolytic effect in the range of 1.6 μM to 100 μM. Circular dichroism analysis showed that the peptide has an α-helical properties. Furthermore, we determined the mechanism(s) of action using flow cytometry and by investigating the release of intracellular potassium. The results showed that the peptide permeabilized the membranes of Escherichia coli O157 and Candida albicans, resulting in loss of intracellular potassium ions. Additionally, bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol and 3,3'-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide assays showed that the peptide caused membrane depolarization. Using giant unilamellar vesicles encapsulating calcein and large unilamellar vesicles containing fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, which were similar in composition to typical E. coli O157 and C. albicans membranes, we demonstrated that scolopendin 2 disrupts membranes, resulting in a pore size between 4.8 nm and 5.0 nm. Thus, we have demonstrated that a cationic antimicrobial peptide, scolopendin 2, exerts its broad-spectrum antimicrobial effects by forming pores in the cell membrane. PMID:25462167

  2. Ti3C2Tx Filler Effect on the Proton Conduction Property of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahua; Zhang, Jiakui; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Yifan; Wang, Jingtao

    2016-08-10

    Conductive polymer electrolyte membranes are increasingly attractive for a wide range of applications in hydrogen-relevant devices, for instance hydrogen fuel cells. In this study, two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx, a typical representative of the recently developed MXene family, is synthesized and employed as a universal filler for its features of large specific surface area, high aspect ratio, and sufficient terminated -OH groups. The Ti3C2Tx is incorporated into polymer matrix to explore its function on membrane microstructure and proton conduction property. Both phase-separated (acidic Nafion and sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)) and non-phase-separated (basic chitosan) polymers are utilized as membrane matrixes. The microstructures, physicochemical properties, and proton conduction properties of the membranes are extensively investigated. It is demonstrated that Ti3C2Tx generates significant promotion effect on proton conduction of the composite membrane by facilitating both vehicle-type and Grotthuss-type proton transfer, yielding several times increased proton conductivity for every polymer-based composite membrane under various conditions, and the composite membrane achieves elevated hydrogen fuel cell performance. The stable Ti3C2Tx also reinforces the thermal and mechanical stabilities of these composite membranes. Since the MXene family includes more than 70 members, this exploration is expected to open up new perspectives for expanding their applications, especially as membrane modifiers and proton conductors. PMID:27430190

  3. Preparation and properties of homogeneous-reinforced polyvinylidene fluoride hollow fiber membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuliang; Xiao, Changfa; Hu, Xiaoyu; Bai, Qianqian

    2013-01-01

    Homogeneous-reinforced (HR) polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes include PVDF polymer solutions (coating layer) and the matrix membrane prepared through the dry-wet spinning process. The performance of HR membranes varies with the polymer concentration in the polymer solutions and is characterized in terms of pure water flux, rejection of protein, porosity, infiltration property, a mechanical strength test, and morphology observations by a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The results of this study indicate that the tensile strength of the HR PVDF membranes decreases slights compared with that of the matrix membrane, but the elongation at break increases much more and the hollow fiber membranes are endowed with better flexibility performance. The HR PVDF hollow fiber membranes have a favorable interfacial bonding between the coating layer and the matrix membrane, as shown by FESEM. The infiltration property is characterized by the contact angle experiments. Pure water flux decreases while the rejection ratio with an increase in polymer concentration increasing. The protein solution flux of the HR PVDF membranes is higher than that of the matrix membrane after 100 min of infiltration.

  4. SEPARATION PROPERTIES OF SURFACE MODIFIED SILICA SUPPORTED LIQUID MEMBRANES FOR DIVALENT METAL REMOVAL/RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The synthesis and separation properties of a mesoporous silica supported liquid membrane (SLM) were studied. The membranes consisted of a silica layer, from dip-coated colloidal silica, on a a-alumina support, modified with DCDMS (dichlorodimethyl silane) to add surface methyl g...

  5. Antibacterial activities of surface modified electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) fibrous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chen; Li, Xinsong; Neoh, K. G.; Shi, Zhilong; Kang, E. T.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) membrane, with its excellent chemical and mechanical properties, has good potential for broad applications. However, due to its hydrophobic nature, microbial colonization is commonly encountered. In this work, electrospun PVDF-HFP fibrous membranes were surface modified by poly(4-vinyl- N-alkylpyridinium bromide) to achieve antibacterial activities. The membranes were first subjected to plasma pretreatment followed by UV-induced surface graft copolymerization of 4-vinylpyridine (4VP) and quaternization of the grafted pyridine groups with hexylbromide. The chemical composition of the surface modified PVDF-HFP electrospun membranes was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology and mechanical properties of pristine and surface modified PVDF-HFP fibrous membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile test, respectively. The antibacterial activities of the modified electrospun PVDF-HFP fibrous membranes were assessed against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli ( E. coli). The results showed that the PVDF-HFP fibrous membranes modified with quaternized pyridinium groups are highly effective against both bacteria with killing efficiency as high as 99.9999%.

  6. Study on the effects of nylon-chitosan-blended membranes on the spheroid-forming activity of human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Hsiao, Wen-Chu; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Yu, Hsin-Su; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Lai, Juin-Yih; Young, Tai-Horng

    2006-10-01

    Though reported limitedly in tissue engineering, modification of cellular functions can be achieved by culturing them into multicellular spheroids. We have shown melanocytes form spheroids on chitosan surface. However, how biomaterials promote spheroid formation has never been systemically investigated. In this work, nylon, which inhibits melanocyte spheroid formation, and chitosan, which promotes melanocyte spheroid formation, are used to prepare nylon/chitosan-blended membranes. Membranes composed of pure nylon, pure chitosan and various ratios of nylon and chitosan are employed to examine their effects on spheroid formation. Melanocytes show better adhesion to nylon membranes than that to chitosan membranes. In blended membranes, as more nylon is incorporated, cell adhesion increases and the trend for spheroid formation decreases. Melanocytes can only form spheroids on membranes with poorer cell adhesion. Examining the surface of the blended membranes shows phase separation of nylon and chitosan. As nylon content increases, the nylon phase on the membrane surface increases and thereby enhances cell adhesion. The opposite trend for cell adhesion and spheroid formation substantiates our hypothesis of spheroid formation on biomaterials: a balance between cell-substrate interaction and cell-cell interaction. The decrease in cell-substrate interaction tilts the balance to a state more favorable for spheroid formation. Our work can serve as a model to investigate the relative strengths of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and also pave way to design blended membranes with desired physical properties while preserving the spheroid-forming activity. PMID:16777216

  7. Transport properties of track-etched membranes having variable effective pore-lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Ali, Mubarak; Nasir, Saima; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The transport rate of molecules through polymeric membranes is normally limited because of their micrometer-scale thickness which restricts their suitability for more practical application. To study the effect of effective pore length on the transport behavior, polymer membranes containing cylindrical and asymmetric-shaped nanopores were prepared through a two-step ion track-etching technique. Permeation experiments were performed separately to investigate the transport properties (molecular flux and selectivity) of these track-etched membranes. The permeation data shows that the molecular flux across membranes containing asymmetric nanopores is higher compared to those having cylindrical pores. On the other hand, the cylindrical pore membranes exhibit higher selectivity than asymmetric pores for the permeation of charged molecules across the membrane. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements of single-pore membranes further verify that asymmetric pores exhibit lower resistance for the flow of ions and therefore show higher currents than cylindrical pores. Moreover, unmodified and polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified asymmetric-shaped pore membranes were successfully used for the separation of cationic and anionic analyte molecules from their mixture, respectively. In this study, two distinct effects (pore geometry and pore density, i.e. number of pores cm-2), which mainly influence membrane selectivity and molecular transport rates, were thoroughly investigated in order to optimize the membrane performance. In this context, we believe that membranes with high molecular transport rates could readily find their application in molecular separation and controlled drug delivery processes.

  8. Transport properties of track-etched membranes having variable effective pore-lengths.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Ali, Mubarak; Nasir, Saima; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The transport rate of molecules through polymeric membranes is normally limited because of their micrometer-scale thickness which restricts their suitability for more practical application. To study the effect of effective pore length on the transport behavior, polymer membranes containing cylindrical and asymmetric-shaped nanopores were prepared through a two-step ion track-etching technique. Permeation experiments were performed separately to investigate the transport properties (molecular flux and selectivity) of these track-etched membranes. The permeation data shows that the molecular flux across membranes containing asymmetric nanopores is higher compared to those having cylindrical pores. On the other hand, the cylindrical pore membranes exhibit higher selectivity than asymmetric pores for the permeation of charged molecules across the membrane. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements of single-pore membranes further verify that asymmetric pores exhibit lower resistance for the flow of ions and therefore show higher currents than cylindrical pores. Moreover, unmodified and polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified asymmetric-shaped pore membranes were successfully used for the separation of cationic and anionic analyte molecules from their mixture, respectively. In this study, two distinct effects (pore geometry and pore density, i.e. number of pores cm(-2)), which mainly influence membrane selectivity and molecular transport rates, were thoroughly investigated in order to optimize the membrane performance. In this context, we believe that membranes with high molecular transport rates could readily find their application in molecular separation and controlled drug delivery processes. PMID:26553245

  9. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhakar; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD). Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH) and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP). Results show that curcumin significantly (p < 0.01) downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP) of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects. PMID:26904287

  10. Omniphobic Membrane for Robust Membrane Distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, SH; Nejati, S; Boo, C; Hu, YX; Osuji, CO; Ehmelech, M

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we fabricate an omniphobic microporous membrane for membrane distillation (MD) by modifying a hydrophilic glass fiber membrane with silica nanoparticles followed by surface fluorination and polymer coating. The modified glass fiber membrane exhibits an anti-wetting property not only against water but also against low surface tension organic solvents that easily wet a hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane that is commonly used in MD applications. By comparing the performance of the PTFE and omniphobic membranes in direct contact MD experiments in the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), we show that SDS wets the hydrophobic PTFE membrane but not the omniphobic membrane. Our results suggest that omniphobic membranes are critical for MD applications with feed waters containing surface active species, such as oil and gas produced water, to prevent membrane pore wetting.

  11. [Study of antioxidant and membrane activity of rosmarinic acid using different model systems].

    PubMed

    Popov, A M; Osipov, A N; Korepanova, E A; Krivoshapko, O N; Artiukov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid is found in many species of different families of higher plants and its chemical structure is phenol propanoid with various biological activity. In this paper, we conducted a comparative study of antioxidant (radical-scavenging) properties of rosmarinic acid in systems of 2,2'-azo-bis(2-methylpropionamidin)dihydrochloride-luminol and hemoglobin-hydrogen peroxide-lu- minol, determined its protective potential in preventing peroxidation of linoleic acid, and evaluated the effect on the permeability of planar bilayer lipid membranes. Linoleic acid peroxidation was assessed by iron-thiocyanate method. In these studies, trolox was used as a reference antioxidant, and ascorbic acid, and dihydroquercetin were taken as standards. Rosmarinic acid is significantly superior to trolox, ascorbic acid and dihydroquercetin in the tests for antioxidant activity in the systems studied, as well as in inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation. According to their activity the investigated substances can be arranged in the following order: rosmarinic acid > dihydroquercetin trolox > ascorbic acid. Rosmarinic acid does not cause significant changes in the permeability of planar bilayer membranes in a dose range of 0.5 to 10 mkg/mL. Antioxidant activity of rosmarinic acid is due to the neutralization of reactive oxygen species and/or luminol radicals generated in model systems. The observed features of the antioxidant and membrane activity of rosmarinic acid, which may underlie the previously mentioned pharmacological effects are discussed. PMID:25481945

  12. [Study of antioxidant and membrane activity of rosmarinic acid using different model systems].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid is found in many species of different families of higher plants and its chemical structure is phenol propanoid with various biological activity. In this paper, we conducted a comparative study of antioxidant (radical-scavenging) properties of rosmarinic acid in systems of 2,2'-azo-bis(2-methylpropionamidin)dihydrochloride-luminol and hemoglobin-hydrogen peroxide-lu- minol, determined its protective potential in preventing peroxidation of linoleic acid, and evaluated the effect on the permeability of planar bilayer lipid membranes. Linoleic acid peroxidation was assessed by iron-thiocyanate method. In these studies, trolox was used as a reference antioxidant, and ascorbic acid, and dihydroquercetin were taken as standards. Rosmarinic acid is significantly superior to trolox, ascorbic acid and dihydroquercetin in the tests for antioxidant activity in the systems studied, as well as in inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation. According to their activity the investigated substances can be arranged in the following order: rosmarinic acid > dihydroquercetin trolox > ascorbic acid. Rosmarinic acid does not cause significant changes in the permeability of planar bilayer membranes in a dose range of 0.5 to 10 mkg/mL. Antioxidant activity of rosmarinic acid is due to the neutralization of reactive oxygen species and/or luminol radicals generated in model systems. The observed features of the antioxidant and membrane activity of rosmarinic acid, which may underlie the previously mentioned pharmacological effects are discussed. PMID:25508797

  13. Different metabolic activity in placental and reflected regions of the human amniotic membrane.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Asmita; Weidinger, Adelheid; Hofer, Martin; Steinborn, Ralf; Lindenmair, Andrea; Hennerbichler-Lugscheider, Simone; Eibl, Johann; Redl, Heinz; Kozlov, Andrey V; Wolbank, Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Cells of the human amniotic membrane (hAM) have stem cell characteristics with low immunogenicity and anti-inflammatory properties. While hAM is an excellent source for tissue engineering, so far, its sub-regions have not been taken into account. We show that placental and reflected hAM differ distinctly in morphology and functional activity, as the placental region has significantly higher mitochondrial activity, however significantly less reactive oxygen species. Since mitochondria may participate in processes such as cell rescue, we speculate that amniotic sub-regions may have different potential for tissue regeneration, which may be crucial for clinical applications. PMID:26386652

  14. Influence of protein bulk properties on membrane surface coverage during immobilization.

    PubMed

    Militano, Francesca; Poerio, Teresa; Mazzei, Rosalinda; Piacentini, Emma; Gugliuzza, Annarosa; Giorno, Lidietta

    2016-07-01

    Biomolecules immobilization is a key factor for many biotechnological applications. For this purpose, the covalent immobilization of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lipase from Candida rugosa and protein G on differently functionalized regenerated cellulose membranes was investigated. Dynamic light scattering and electrophoresis measurements carried out on biomolecules in solution indicated the presence of monomers, dimers and trimers for both BSA and protein G, while large aggregates were observed for lipase. The immobilization rate and the surface coverage on functionalized regenerated cellulose membranes were studied as a function of biomolecule concentration. Results indicated that the saturation coverage of BSA and protein G was concentration independent (immobilized protein amount of 2.40±0.03mg/g and 2.65±0.07mg/g, respectively). Otherwise, a different immobilization kinetics trend was obtained for lipase, for which the immobilized amount increases as a function of time without reaching a saturation value. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) micrographs showed the formation of monolayers for both BSA and protein G on the membrane surface, while a multilayer structure is found for lipase, in agreement with the trends observed in the related immobilization kinetics. As a result, the morphology of the proteins layer on the membrane surface seems to be strictly dependent on the proteins behavior in solution. Besides, the surface coverage has been described for BSA and protein G by the pseudo second order models, the results indicating the surface reaction as the controlling step of immobilization kinetics. Finally, enzyme activity and binding capacity studies indicated the preservation of the biomolecule functional properties. PMID:27022871

  15. Location and Effects of an Antitumoral Catechin on the Structural Properties of Phosphatidylethanolamine Membranes.

    PubMed

    Casado, Francisco; Teruel, José A; Casado, Santiago; Ortiz, Antonio; Rodríguez-López, José N; Aranda, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Green tea catechins exhibit high diversity of biological effects including antioncogenic properties, and there is enormous interest in their potential use in the treatment of a number of pathologies. It is recognized that the mechanism underlying the activity of catechins relay in part in processes related to the membrane, and many studies revealed that the ability of catechins to interact with lipids plays a probably necessary role in their mechanism of action. We present in this work the characterization of the interaction between an antitumoral synthetically modified catechin (3-O-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl)-(-)-catechin, TMCG) and dimiristoylphosphatidyl-ethanolamine (DMPE) membranes using an array of biophysical techniques which include differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. We found that TMCG incorporate into DMPE bilayers perturbing the thermotropic transition from the gel to the fluid state forming enriched domains which separated into different gel phases. TMCG does not influence the overall bilayer assembly of phosphatidylethanolamine systems but it manages to influence the interfacial region of the membrane and slightly decrease the interlamellar repeat distance of the bilayer. TMCG seems to be located in the interior of the phosphatidylethanolamine bilayer with the methoxy groups being in the deepest position and some portion of the molecule interacting with the water interface. We believe that the reported interactions are significant not only from the point of view of the known antitumoral effect of TMCG, but also might contribute to understanding the basic molecular mechanism of the biological effects of the catechins found at the membrane level. PMID:27347914

  16. Membrane-Active Peptides and the Clustering of Anionic Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwani, P.; Epand, R.F.; Heidenreich, N.; Bürck, J.; Ulrich, A.S.; Epand, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    There is some overlap in the biological activities of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). We compared nine AMPs, seven CPPs, and a fusion peptide with regard to their ability to cluster anionic lipids in a mixture mimicking the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, as measured by differential scanning calorimetry. We also studied their bacteriostatic effect on several bacterial strains, and examined their conformational changes upon membrane binding using circular dichroism. A remarkable correlation was found between the net positive charge of the peptides and their capacity to induce anionic lipid clustering, which was independent of their secondary structure. Among the peptides studied, six AMPs and four CPPs were found to have strong anionic lipid clustering activity. These peptides also had bacteriostatic activity against several strains (particularly Gram-negative Escherichia coli) that are sensitive to lipid clustering agents. AMPs and CPPs that did not cluster anionic lipids were not toxic to E. coli. As shown previously for several types of AMPs, anionic lipid clustering likely contributes to the mechanism of antibacterial action of highly cationic CPPs. The same mechanism could explain the escape of CPPs from intracellular endosomes that are enriched with anionic lipids. PMID:22853904

  17. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Koyano, Yuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2016-08-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous two-dimensional fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it was shown [A. S. Mikhailov and R. Kapral, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015)PNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.1506825112] that such active proteins should induce nonthermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxislike drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them. PMID:27627343

  18. Effect of clofibrate on the enzyme activity of rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Renaud, G; Foliot, A; Marais, J; Infante, R

    1980-03-15

    The activity of 3 plasma membranes marker enzymes (5'-nucleotidase, Mg++-ATPase and alkaline phosphodiesterase-I) was determined in plasma membranes isolated from liver of control and of clofibrate-treated rats. A complete indentity of plasma membranes enzyme activity in the 2 groups of experimental animals was observed for the 3 enzymes studied. PMID:6102923

  19. On Physical Properties of Tetraether Lipid Membranes: Effects of Cyclopentane Rings

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau; Ayesa, Umme; Prakash Daswani, Varsha; Hur, Ellah Chay

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent findings related to the physical properties of tetraether lipid membranes, with special attention to the effects of the number, position, and configuration of cyclopentane rings on membrane properties. We discuss the findings obtained from liposomes and monolayers, composed of naturally occurring archaeal tetraether lipids and synthetic tetraethers as well as the results from computer simulations. It appears that the number, position, and stereochemistry of cyclopentane rings in the dibiphytanyl chains of tetraether lipids have significant influence on packing tightness, lipid conformation, membrane thickness and organization, and headgroup hydration/orientation. PMID:23028246

  20. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-06-16

    We believe that the high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is the result of the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with amore » nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Additionally, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.« less

  1. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-06-16

    We believe that the high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is the result of the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with a nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Additionally, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.

  2. Fundamental Studies of Assembly and Mechanical Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Unilamellar Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi

    This dissertation work focuses on: (i) obtaining a phospholipid bilayer membrane (LBM)/conducting electrode system with low defect density and optimized rigidity; (ii) investigating vesicle stability and mechanical properties. LBM is a simplified yet representative cell membrane model. LBMs assembled on conductive surfaces can probe protein-LBM interactions activities electrochemically. Sterically stabilized vesicles could be used as cell models or for drug delivery. The main challenges for LBM assembly on gold are vesicles do not spontaneously rupture to form LBMs on gold and the roughness of the gold substrate has considerable influence on molecular film defect density. In this study, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) vesicles were functionalized with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-poly(ethylene glycol)-2000-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate] (DSPE-PEG-PDP) to yield stable LBMs on gold without surface modification. A template-stripping method was used to obtain atomically flat and pristine gold surfaces. The critical force to initiate vesicle rupture decreases with increasing DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration, indicating that gold-thiolate bonding between DSPE-PEG-PDP and gold substrates promotes LBM formation. Mechanical properties of LBMs and vesicles were investigated as a function of DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration via Atomic Force Microscopy. The elastic moduli of LBMs were determined with DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration ranging from 0mol% to 24mol% and were found to depend on PEG chain conformation. Incorporating DSPE-PEG-PDP molecules with PEG in mushroom conformation results in a decrease of LBM rigidity, while incorporating PEG in brush conformation leads to LBM stiffening. Contrarily, mechanical properties of functionalized vesicles did not vary significantly by varying DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration. LBM with tunable rigidity by adjusting DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration provides a versatile cell membrane model for studying protein or

  3. Glucose transport and microvillus membrane physical properties along the crypt-villus axis of the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Meddings, J B; DeSouza, D; Goel, M; Thiesen, S

    1990-01-01

    Both transport function and microvillus membrane physical properties evolve as the enterocyte matures and migrates up the crypt-villus axis. We isolated enriched fractions of villus tip, mid-villus, and crypt enterocytes from which microvillus membrane vesicles were prepared. Using this material we characterized the alterations that occur in microvillus membrane fluidity as the rabbit enterocyte matures and correlated these with kinetic studies of glucose transport. With increasing maturity the microvillus membrane becomes more rigid due to both an increase in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and alterations in individual phospholipid subclasses. Maximal rates of glucose transport were greatest in microvillus membrane vesicles prepared from mature cells. However, the glucose concentration producing half-maximal rates of transport (Km) was significantly lower in crypt microvillus membrane vesicles, suggesting that a distinct glucose transporter existed in crypt enterocytes. This distinction disappeared when differences between membrane lipid environments were removed. By fluidizing villus-tip microvillus membrane vesicles, in vitro, to levels seen in the crypt microvillus membrane, we observed a reduction in the Km of this transport system. These data suggest that the kinetic characteristics of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter are dependent upon its local membrane environment. Images PMID:2318967

  4. Glucocorticoid-induced alterations in mitochondrial membrane properties and respiration in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Karin; Rainer, Johannes; Bindreither, Daniel; Ritter, Ireen; Gnaiger, Erich; Kofler, Reinhard; Oefner, Peter J; Renner, Kathrin

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondria are signal-integrating organelles involved in cell death induction. Mitochondrial alterations and reduction in energy metabolism have been previously reported in the context of glucocorticoid (GC)-triggered apoptosis, although the mechanism is not yet clarified. We analyzed mitochondrial function in a GC-sensitive precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) model as well as in GC-sensitive and GC-resistant T-ALL model systems. Respiratory activity was preserved in intact GC-sensitive cells up to 24h under treatment with 100 nM dexamethasone before depression of mitochondrial respiration occurred. Severe repression of mitochondrial respiratory function was observed after permeabilization of the cell membrane and provision of exogenous substrates. Several mitochondrial metabolite and protein transporters and two subunits of the ATP synthase were downregulated in the T-ALL and in the precursor B-ALL model at the gene expression level under dexamethasone treatment. These data could partly be confirmed in ALL lymphoblasts from patients, dependent on the molecular abnormality in the ALL cells. GC-resistant cell lines did not show any of these defects after dexamethasone treatment. In conclusion, in GC-sensitive ALL cells, dexamethasone induces changes in membrane properties that together with the reduced expression of mitochondrial transporters of substrates and proteins may lead to repressed mitochondrial respiratory activity and lower ATP levels that contribute to GC-induced apoptosis. PMID:21237131

  5. Basement membrane stiffening promotes retinal endothelial activation associated with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Scott, Harry A; Monickaraj, Finny; Xu, Jun; Ardekani, Soroush; Nitta, Carolina F; Cabrera, Andrea; McGuire, Paul G; Mohideen, Umar; Das, Arup; Ghosh, Kaustabh

    2016-02-01

    Endothelial activation is a hallmark of the high-glucose (HG)-induced retinal inflammation associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR). However, precisely how HG induces retinal endothelial activation is not fully understood. We hypothesized that HG-induced up-regulation of lysyl oxidase (LOX), a collagen-cross-linking enzyme, in retinal capillary endothelial cells (ECs) enhances subendothelial basement membrane (BM) stiffness, which, in turn, promotes retinal EC activation. Diabetic C57BL/6 mice exhibiting a 70 and 50% increase in retinal intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expression and leukocyte accumulation, respectively, demonstrated a 2-fold increase in the levels of BM collagen IV and LOX, key determinants of capillary BM stiffness. Using atomic force microscopy, we confirmed that HG significantly enhances LOX-dependent subendothelial matrix stiffness in vitro, which correlated with an ∼2.5-fold increase in endothelial ICAM-1 expression, a 4-fold greater monocyte-EC adhesion, and an ∼2-fold alteration in endothelial NO (decrease) and NF-κB activation (increase). Inhibition of LOX-dependent subendothelial matrix stiffening alone suppressed HG-induced retinal EC activation. Finally, using synthetic matrices of tunable stiffness, we demonstrated that subendothelial matrix stiffening is necessary and sufficient to promote EC activation. These findings implicate BM stiffening as a critical determinant of HG-induced retinal EC activation and provide a rationale for examining BM stiffness and underlying mechanotransduction pathways as therapeutic targets for diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26443820

  6. Thinking in Terms of Structure-Activity-Relationships (T-SAR): A Tool to Better Understand Nanofiltration Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, José F.; Jastorff, Bernd; Störmann, Reinhold; Stolte, Stefan; Thöming, Jorg

    2011-01-01

    A frontier to be conquered in the field of membrane technology is related to the very limited scientific base for the rational and task-specific design of membranes. This is especially true for nanofiltration membranes with properties that are based on several solute-membrane interaction mechanisms. “Thinking in terms of Structure-Activity-Relationships” (T-SAR) is a methodology which applies a systematic analysis of a chemical entity based on its structural formula. However, the analysis become more complex with increasing size of the molecules considered. In this study, T-SAR was combined with classical membrane characterization methods, resulting in a new methodology which allowed us not only to explain membrane characteristics, but also provides evidence for the importance of the chemical structure for separation performance. We demonstrate an application of the combined approach and its potential to discover stereochemistry, molecular interaction potentials, and reactivity of two FilmTec nanofiltration membranes (NF-90 and NF-270). Based on these results, it was possible to predict both properties and performance in the recovery of hydrophobic ionic liquids from aqueous solution. PMID:24957730

  7. Influence of decavanadate on rat synaptic plasma membrane ATPases activity.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Danijela; Colović, Mirjana; Bosnjaković-Pavlović, Nada; Spasojević-De Bire, Anne; Vasić, Vesna

    2009-09-01

    The in vitro influence of decameric vanadate species on Na+/K+-ATPase, plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA)-calcium pump and ecto-ATPase activity, using rat synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) as model system was investigated, whereas the commercial porcine cerebral cortex Na+/K+-ATPase served as a reference. The thermal behaviour of the synthesized decavanadate (V10) has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, while the type of polyvanadate anion was identified using the IR spectroscopy. The concentration-dependent responses to V10 of all enzymes were obtained. The half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the enzyme activity was achieved at (4.74 +/- 1.15) x 10(-7) mol/l for SPM Na+/K+-ATPase, (1.30 +/- 0.10) x 10(-6) mol/l for commercial Na+/K+-ATPase and (3.13 +/- 1.70) x 10(-8) mol/l for Ca2+-ATPase, while ecto-ATPase is significantly less sensitive toward V10 (IC50 = (1.05 +/- 0.10) x 10(-4) mol/l) than investigated P-type ATPases. Kinetic analysis showed that V10 inhibited Na+/K+-ATPase by reducing the maximum enzymatic velocity and apparent affinity for ATP (increasing K(m) value), implying a mixed mode of interaction between V10 and P-type ATPases. PMID:20037196

  8. Dramatic nano-fluidic properties of carbon nanotube membranes as a platform for protein channel mimetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinds, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have three key attributes that make them of great interest for novel membrane applications: 1) atomically flat graphite surface allows for ideal fluid slip boundary conditions and extremely fast flow rates 2) the cutting process to open CNTs inherently places functional chemistry at CNT core entrance for chemical selectivity and 3) CNT are electrically conductive allowing for electrochemical reactions and application of electric fields gradients at CNT tips. Pressure driven flux of a variety of solvents (H2O, hexane, decane ethanol, methanol) are 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than conventional Newtonian flow [Nature 2005, 438, 44] due to atomically flat graphite planes inducing nearly ideal slip conditions. However this is eliminated with selective chemical functionalization [ACS Nano 2011 5(5) 3867-3877] needed to give chemical selectivity. These unique properties allow us to explore the hypothesis of producing ``Gatekeeper'' membranes that mimic natural protein channels to actively pump through rapid nm-scale channels. With anionic tip functionality strong electroosmotic flow is induced by unimpeded cation flow with similar 10,000 fold enhancements [Nature Nano 2012 7(2) 133-39]. With enhanced power efficiency, carbon nanotube membranes were employed as the active element of a switchable transdermal drug delivery device that can facilitate more effective treatments of drug abuse and addiction. Recently methods to deposit Pt monolayers on CNT surface have been developed making for highly efficient catalytic platforms. Discussed are other applications of CNT protein channel mimetics, for large area robust engineering platforms, including water purification, flow battery energy storage, and biochemical/biomass separations. DOE EPSCoR (DE-FG02-07ER46375) and DARPA, W911NF-09-1-0267

  9. Selective flow-induced vesicle rupture to sort by membrane mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Pommella, Angelo; Brooks, Nicholas J.; Seddon, John M.; Garbin, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Vesicle and cell rupture caused by large viscous stresses in ultrasonication is central to biomedical and bioprocessing applications. The flow-induced opening of lipid membranes can be exploited to deliver drugs into cells, or to recover products from cells, provided that it can be obtained in a controlled fashion. Here we demonstrate that differences in lipid membrane and vesicle properties can enable selective flow-induced vesicle break-up. We obtained vesicle populations with different membrane properties by using different lipids (SOPC, DOPC, or POPC) and lipid:cholesterol mixtures (SOPC:chol and DOPC:chol). We subjected vesicles to large deformations in the acoustic microstreaming flow generated by ultrasound-driven microbubbles. By simultaneously deforming vesicles with different properties in the same flow, we determined the conditions in which rupture is selective with respect to the membrane stretching elasticity. We also investigated the effect of vesicle radius and excess area on the threshold for rupture, and identified conditions for robust selectivity based solely on the mechanical properties of the membrane. Our work should enable new sorting mechanisms based on the difference in membrane composition and mechanical properties between different vesicles, capsules, or cells. PMID:26302783

  10. Conformational activation of visual rhodopsin in native disc membranes.

    PubMed

    Malmerberg, Erik; M Bovee-Geurts, Petra H; Katona, Gergely; Deupi, Xavier; Arnlund, David; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Johansson, Linda C; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Nazarenko, Elena; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Menzel, Andreas; de Grip, Willem J; Neutze, Richard

    2015-03-10

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that serves as a dim-light receptor for vision in vertebrates. We probed light-induced conformational changes in rhodopsin in its native membrane environment at room temperature using time-resolved wide-angle x-ray scattering. We observed a rapid conformational transition that is consistent with an outward tilt of the cytoplasmic portion of transmembrane helix 6 concomitant with an inward movement of the cytoplasmic portion of transmembrane helix 5. These movements were considerably larger than those reported from the basis of crystal structures of activated rhodopsin, implying that light activation of rhodopsin involves a more extended conformational change than was previously suggested. PMID:25759477

  11. Model Membrane and Cell Studies of Antimicrobial Activity of Melittin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Jamasbi, Elaheh; Mularski, Anna; Separovic, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Melittin is a 26 residue peptide and the major component of bee (Apis mellifera) venom. Although melittin has both anticancer and antimicrobial properties, utilization has been limited due to its high lytic activity against eukaryotic cells. The mechanism of this lytic activity remains unclear but several mechanisms have been proposed, including pore formation or a detergent like mechanism, which result in lysis of cell membranes. Several analogues of melittin have been synthesized to further understand the role of specific residues in its antimicrobial and lytic activity. Melittin analogues that have a proline residue substituted for an alanine, lysine or cysteine have been studied with both model membrane systems and living cells. These studies have revealed that the proline residue plays a critical role in antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity. Analogues lacking the proline residue and dimers of these analogues displayed decreased cytotoxicity and minimum inhibition concentrations. Several mutant studies have shown that, when key substitutions are made, the resultant peptides have more activity in terms of pore formation than the native melittin. Designing analogues that retain antimicrobial and anticancer activity while minimizing haemolytic activity will be a promising way to utilize melittin as a potential therapeutic agent. PMID:26139117

  12. Preparation and Properties of Nano-Hydroxyapatite/Gelatin/Poly(vinyl alcohol) Composite Membrane.

    PubMed

    Liao, Haotian; Shi, Kun; Peng, Jinrong; Qu, Ying; Liao, Jinfeng; Qian, Zhiyong

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the bone-like composite membrane based on blends of gelatin (Gel), nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) was fabricated by solvent casting and evaporation methods. The effect of n-HA content and the ratio of Gel/PVA on the properties of the composite was investigated. The Gel/PVA and n-HA/Gel/PVA composite membranes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties of the composites were determined by tensile tests. The as prepared composite membranes exhibited hydrophobility, the water contact angle of composite membrane was 126.6 when its mass ratio of n-HA/Gel/PVA was 10/50/40. The tensile strength of composite membranes was greatly increased due to the introduction of n-HA, and the tensile strength was increased to 74.92 MPa when the mass ratio of n-HA/Gel/PVA was 10/50/40. SEM observation indicated that n-HA was dispersed in the membranes and a sea-island structure was formed in the n-HA/Gel/PVA composite membranes, resulting in a significant increase in tensile strength. The as-prepared n-HA/Gel/PVA composite membranes may be applied in the field of bone tissue engineering. PMID:26369028

  13. Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs modulate the physicochemical properties of plasma membrane in experimental colorectal cancer: a fluorescence spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Vaish, Vivek; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2011-12-01

    According to "fluid-mosaic model," plasma membrane is a bilayer constituted by phospholipids which regulates the various cellular activities governed by many proteins and enzymes. Any chemical, biochemical, or physical factor has to interact with the bilayer in order to regulate the cellular metabolism where various physicochemical properties of membrane, i.e., polarization, fluidity, electrostatic potential, and phase state may get affected. In this study, we have observed the in vivo effects of a pro-carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) and the two non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); sulindac and celecoxib on various properties of the plasma membrane of colonocytes, i.e., electric potential, fluidity, anisotropy, microviscosity, lateral diffusion, and phase state in the experimentally induced colorectal cancer. A number of fluorescence probes were utilized like membrane fluidity and anisotropy by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, membrane microviscosity by Pyrene, membrane electric potential by merocyanine 540, lateral diffusion by N-NBD-PE, and phase state by Laurdan. It is observed that membrane phospholipids are less densely packed and therefore, the membrane is more fluid in case of carcinogenesis produced by DMH than control. But NSAIDs are effective in reverting back the membrane toward normal state when co-administered with DMH. The membrane becomes less fluid, composed of low electric potential phospholipids whose lateral diffusion is being prohibited and the membrane stays mostly in relative gel phase. It may be stated that sulindac and celecoxib, the two NSAIDs may exert their anti-neoplastic role in colorectal cancer via modifying the physicochemical properties of the membranes. PMID:21725642

  14. Ceramic membranes for catalytic membrane reactors with high ionic conductivities and low expansion properties

    DOEpatents

    Mackay, Richard; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics of the composition: Ln.sub.x Sr.sub.2-x-y Ca.sub.y B.sub.z M.sub.2-z O.sub.5+.delta. where Ln is an element selected from the fblock lanthanide elements and yttrium or mixtures thereof; B is an element selected from Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof; M is a d-block transition element of mixtures thereof; 0.01.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0; 0.01.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.0.7; 0.01.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.1.0 and .delta. is a number that varies to maintain charge neutrality are provided. These ceramics are useful in ceramic membranes and exhibit high ionic conductivity, high chemical stability under catalytic membrane reactor conditions and low coefficients of expansion. The materials of the invention are particularly useful in producing synthesis gas.

  15. The effect of membrane parameters on the properties of the nerve impulse.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabah, N. H.; Leibovic, K. N.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of varying some membrane parameters is explored, basing the investigation on computer simulation of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations for the squid giant axon, including variations in the membrane capacitance, conductances, and the rate constants. It is shown that by reducing the degree of regeneration in the excitable membrane, the character of the nerve signal can be smoothly changed from that of the axonal spike to essentially electrotonic spread, with all gradations in between. The reduction in the degree of regeneration can most simply be brought about by a decrease in the density of active membrane patches.

  16. Signaling Network Triggers and Membrane Physical Properties Control the Actin Cytoskeleton-Driven Isotropic Phase of Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Fardin, Marc-Antoine; Xiong, Yuguang; Lipshtat, Azi; Rossier, Olivier; Sheetz, Michael P.; Iyengar, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Cell spreading is regulated by signaling from the integrin receptors that activate intracellular signaling pathways to control actin filament regulatory proteins. We developed a hybrid model of whole-cell spreading in which we modeled the integrin signaling network as ordinary differential equations in multiple compartments, and cell spreading as a three-dimensional stochastic model. The computed activity of the signaling network, represented as time-dependent activity levels of the actin filament regulatory proteins, is used to drive the filament dynamics. We analyzed the hybrid model to understand the role of signaling during the isotropic phase of fibroblasts spreading on fibronectin-coated surfaces. Simulations showed that the isotropic phase of spreading depends on integrin signaling to initiate spreading but not to maintain the spreading dynamics. Simulations predicted that signal flow in the absence of Cdc42 or WASP would reduce the spreading rate but would not affect the shape evolution of the spreading cell. These predictions were verified experimentally. Computational analyses showed that the rate of spreading and the evolution of cell shape are largely controlled by the membrane surface load and membrane bending rigidity, and changing information flow through the integrin signaling network has little effect. Overall, the plasma membrane acts as a damper such that only ∼5% of the actin dynamics capability is needed for isotropic spreading. Thus, the biophysical properties of the plasma membrane can condense varying levels of signaling network activities into a single cohesive macroscopic cellular behavior. PMID:21320428

  17. Membrane stretch and cytoplasmic Ca2+ independently modulate stretch-activated BK channel activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hu-Cheng; Agula, Hasi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Fa; Sokabe, Masahiro; Li, Lu-Ming

    2010-11-16

    Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels are responsible for changes in chemical and physical signals such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and membrane potentials. Previously, we reported that a BK channel cloned from chick heart (SAKCaC) is activated by membrane stretch. Molecular cloning and subsequent functional characterization of SAKCaC have shown that both the membrane stretch and intracellular Ca(2+) signal allosterically regulate the channel activity via the linker of the gating ring complex. Here we investigate how these two gating principles interact with each other. We found that stretch force activated SAKCaC in the absence of cytoplasmic Ca(2+). Lack of Ca(2+) bowl (a calcium binding motif) in SAKCaC diminished the Ca(2+)-dependent activation, but the mechanosensitivity of channel was intact. We also found that the abrogation of STREX (a proposed mechanosensing apparatus) in SAKCaC abolished the mechanosensitivity without altering the Ca(2+) sensitivity of channels. These observations indicate that membrane stretch and intracellular Ca(2+) could independently modulate SAKCaC activity. PMID:20673577

  18. Effects of sterilization methods on the physical, chemical, and biological properties of silk fibroin membranes.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Mariana Agostini; Weska, Raquel Farias; Beppu, Marisa Masumi

    2014-05-01

    Silk fibroin has been widely explored for many biomedical applications, due to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. Sterilization is a fundamental step in biomaterials processing and it must not jeopardize the functionality of medical devices. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of different sterilization methods in the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of dense and porous silk fibroin membranes. Silk fibroin membranes were treated by several procedures: immersion in 70% ethanol solution, ultraviolet radiation, autoclave, ethylene oxide, and gamma radiation, and were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction, tensile strength and in vitro cytotoxicity to Chinese hamster ovary cells. The results indicated that the sterilization methods did not cause perceivable morphological changes in the membranes and the membranes were not toxic to cells. The sterilization methods that used organic solvent or an increased humidity and/or temperature (70% ethanol, autoclave, and ethylene oxide) increased the silk II content in the membranes: the dense membranes became more brittle, while the porous membranes showed increased strength at break. Membranes that underwent sterilization by UV and gamma radiation presented properties similar to the nonsterilized membranes, mainly for tensile strength and FTIR results. PMID:24259492

  19. Enzymatic activation of cellulose acetate membrane for reducing of protein fouling.

    PubMed

    Koseoglu-Imer, Derya Y; Dizge, Nadir; Koyuncu, Ismail

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the surface of cellulose acetate (CA) ultrafiltration membrane was activated with serine protease (Savinase) enzyme to reduce protein fouling. Enzyme molecules were covalently immobilized with glutaraldehyde (cross-linking agent) onto the surface of CA membranes. The membrane activation was verified using filtration experiments and morphological analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy of the activated membrane when compared with raw membrane were confirmed that the enzyme was immobilized onto the membrane surface. The immobilization efficiencies changed from 13.2 to 41.2% according to the enzyme ratios from 2.5 to 10.0 mg/mL. However, the permeability values decreased from 232±6 to 121±4 L/m(2) h bar with increasing enzyme concentration from 2.5 to 10.0 mg/mL. In fouling experiments, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the protein model solution and activated sludge was used as the model biological sludge. Enzyme-activated membranes exhibited good filtration performances and protein rejection efficiencies were compared with raw CA membrane. Also the relative flux reduction (RFR) ratios of membranes were calculated as 97% and 88% for raw CA and enzyme-activated membranes (5 mg/mL savinase), respectively. The membrane activated with Savinase enzyme could be proposed as a surface treatment method before filtration to mitigate protein fouling. PMID:22218336

  20. The bacteriocin AS-48 requires dimer dissociation followed by hydrophobic interactions with the membrane for antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Cebrián, Rubén; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Valdivia, Eva; Albert, Armando; Maqueda, Mercedes; Sánchez-Barrena, María José

    2015-05-01

    The molecular mechanism underlining the antibacterial activity of the bacteriocin AS-48 is not known, and two different and opposite alternatives have been proposed. Available data suggested that the interaction of positively charged amino acids of AS-48 with the membrane would produce membrane destabilization and disruption. Alternatively, it has been proposed that AS-48 activity could rely on the effective insertion of the bacteriocin into the membrane. The biological and structural properties of the AS-48G13K/L40K double mutant were investigated to shed light on this subject. Compared with the wild type, the mutant protein suffered an important reduction in the antibacterial activity. Biochemical and structural studies of AS-48G13K/L40K mutant suggest the basis of its decreased antimicrobial activity. Lipid cosedimentation assays showed that the membrane affinity of AS-48G13K/L40K is 12-fold lower than that observed for the wild type. L40K mutation is responsible for this reduced membrane affinity and thus, hydrophobic interactions are involved in membrane association. Furthermore, the high-resolution crystal structure of AS-48G13K/L40K, together with the study of its dimeric character in solution showed that G13K stabilizes the inactive water-soluble dimer, which displays a reduced dipole moment. Our data suggest that the cumulative effect of these three affected properties reduces AS-48 activity, and point out that the bactericidal effect is achieved by the electrostatically driven approach of the inactive water-soluble dimer towards the membrane, followed by the dissociation and insertion of the protein into the lipid bilayer. PMID:25816760

  1. Low temperature alters plasma membrane lipid composition and ATPase activity of pineapple fruit during blackheart development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuchan; Pan, Xiaoping; Qu, Hongxia; Underhill, Steven J R

    2014-02-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) plays central role in triggering primary responses to chilling injury and sustaining cellular homeostasis. Characterising response of membrane lipids to low temperature can provide important information for identifying early causal factors contributing to chilling injury. To this end, PM lipid composition and ATPase activity were assessed in pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus) in relation to the effect of low temperature on the development of blackheart, a form of chilling injury. Chilling temperature at 10 °C induced blackheart development in concurrence with increase in electrolyte leakage. PM ATPase activity was decreased after 1 week at low temperature, followed by a further decrease after 2 weeks. The enzyme activity was not changed during 25 °C storage. Loss of total PM phospholipids was found during postharvest senescence, but more reduction was shown from storage at 10 °C. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were the predominant PM phospholipid species. Low temperature increased the level of phosphatidic acid but decreased the level of phosphatidylinositol. Both phospholipid species were not changed during storage at 25 °C. Postharvest storage at both temperatures decreased the levels of C18:3 and C16:1, and increased level of C18:1. Low temperature decreased the level of C18:2 and increased the level of C14:0. Exogenous application of phosphatidic acid was found to inhibit the PM ATPase activity of pineapple fruit in vitro. Modification of membrane lipid composition and its effect on the functional property of plasma membrane at low temperature were discussed in correlation with their roles in blackheart development of pineapple fruit. PMID:24390546

  2. Cytolytic activity in T cell clones derived from human synovial rheumatoid membrane: inhibition by synovial fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Miltenburg, A M; Van Laar, J M; De Kuiper, P; Daha, M R; Breedveld, F C

    1990-01-01

    A panel of T cell clones was derived from the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated whether T cell clones with cytolytic properties were present and whether T cell cytotoxicity was influenced by the presence of synovial fluid. These issues were studied using anti-CD3 and lectin-induced cytotoxicity assays. The majority of the T cell clones derived from the synovial membrane showed cytotoxic properties although non-cytotoxic clones were also found. Three clones (N11, N6 and N15) showed strong cytotoxicity (more than 40% lysis at an effector-to-target cell ratio of 10:1) whereas three clones (N16, N4 and N14) were non-cytotoxic (less than 20% lysis at an effector-to-target cell ratio of 10:1). The induction of cytotoxicity in the anti-CD3-driven system was shown to be dependent on the dose of anti-CD3 present. When synovial fluid was added to these assays a strong inhibition of cytotoxicity was found. This inhibition of cytotoxicity was found with synovial fluid samples of RA patients, as well as with non-RA synovial fluids. Both anti-CD3 and lectin-dependent cytotoxicity assays were strongly inhibited. In conclusion, T cell clones with cytotoxic activity can be isolated from rheumatoid synovial membrane. In the presence of synovial fluid these cytotoxic cells are inhibited to exert their cytotoxic function. PMID:2148285

  3. Integrated carboxylic carbon nanotube pathways with membranes for voltage-activated humidity detection and microclimate regulation.

    PubMed

    Pingitore, V; Miriello, D; Drioli, E; Gugliuzza, A

    2015-06-14

    This work describes some single walled carboxylic carbon nanotubes with outstanding transport properties when assembled in a 3D microarray working like a humidity membrane-sensor and an adjustable moisture regulator. Combined nano-assembly approaches are used to build up a better quality pathway through which assisted-charge and mass transport synchronically takes place. The structure-electrical response relationship is found, while controllable and tunable donor-acceptor interactions established at material interfaces are regarded as key factors for the accomplishment of charge transportation, enhanced electrical responses and adjustable moisture exchange. Raman and infrared spectroscopy provides indications about the fine structural and chemical features of the hybrid-composite membranes, resulting in perfect agreement with related morphology and electrical properties. Enhanced and modular electrical response to changes in the surrounding atmosphere is concerned with doping events, while assisted moisture regulation is discussed in relation to swelling and hopping actions. The electro-activated hybrid-composite membrane proposed in this work can be regarded as an attractive 'sense-to-act' precursor for smart long-distance monitoring systems with capability to adapt itself and provide local comfortable microenvironments. PMID:25939404

  4. Cassava root membrane proteome reveals activities during storage root maturation.

    PubMed

    Naconsie, Maliwan; Lertpanyasampatha, Manassawe; Viboonjun, Unchera; Netrphan, Supatcharee; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Ogasawara, Naotake; Narangajavana, Jarunya

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crops of Thailand. Its storage roots are used as food, feed, starch production, and be the important source for biofuel and biodegradable plastic production. Despite the importance of cassava storage roots, little is known about the mechanisms involved in their formation. This present study has focused on comparison of the expression profiles of cassava root proteome at various developmental stages using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Based on an anatomical study using Toluidine Blue, the secondary growth was confirmed to be essential during the development of cassava storage root. To investigate biochemical processes occurring during storage root maturation, soluble and membrane proteins were isolated from storage roots harvested from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old cassava plants. The proteins with differential expression pattern were analysed and identified to be associated with 8 functional groups: protein folding and degradation, energy, metabolism, secondary metabolism, stress response, transport facilitation, cytoskeleton, and unclassified function. The expression profiling of membrane proteins revealed the proteins involved in protein folding and degradation, energy, and cell structure were highly expressed during early stages of development. Integration of these data along with the information available in genome and transcriptome databases is critical to expand knowledge obtained solely from the field of proteomics. Possible role of identified proteins were discussed in relation with the activities during storage root maturation in cassava. PMID:26547558

  5. Preparation of Chemically-Tailored Copolymer Membranes with Tunable Ion Transport Properties.

    PubMed

    Qu, Siyi; Dilenschneider, Theodore; Phillip, William A

    2015-09-01

    Membranes derived from copolymer materials are a promising platform due to their straightforward fabrication and small yet tunable pore structures. However, most current applications of these membranes are limited to the size-selective filtration of solutes. In this study, to advance the utility of copolymer membranes beyond size-selective filtrations, a poly(acrylonitrile-r-oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate-r-glycidyl methacrylate) (P(AN-r-OEGMA-r-GMA)) copolymer is used to fabricate membranes that can be chemically modified via straightforward schemes. The P(AN-r-OEGMA-r-GMA) copolymer is cast into asymmetric membranes using a nonsolvent induced phase separation technique. Then, the surface charge of the membrane is modified to tailor its performance for nanofiltration applications. The oxirane groups of the glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) moiety that line the pore walls of the membrane allows for both positively charged and negatively charged moieties to be introduced directly without any prior activation. Notably, the highly size-selective nanostructure of the copolymer materials is retained throughout the functionalization processes. Specifically, amine moieties are attached to the pore walls using the aminolysis of the oxirane groups. The resulting amine-functionalized membrane is positively charged and rejects up to 87% of the salt dissolved in a 10 mM magnesium chloride feed solution. Further modification of the amine-functionalized membrane with 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate results in pore walls lined by sulfonic acid moieties. These negatively charged membranes reject up to 90% of a 10 mM sodium sulfate feed solution. Throughout the modification scheme, the membrane permeability remains equal to 1.5 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) and the rejection of neutral solutes (i.e., sucrose and poly(ethylene oxide)) is consistent with the membrane having a single well-defined pore diameter of ∼5 nm. The performance of the membrane as a function of ion valence

  6. Structure, morphology and properties of genipin-crosslinked carboxymethylchitosan porous membranes.

    PubMed

    Fiamingo, Anderson; Campana-Filho, Sergio Paulo

    2016-06-01

    Highly porous genipin cross-linked membranes of carboxymethylchitosan exhibiting different crosslinking degree (3%membranes were able to adsorb high amounts of PBS and presented high ultimate tensile strength and elongation-at-break the lower the crosslinking degree and the higher the molecular of the parent carboxymethylchitosan. Particularly, the membrane prepared from high molecular weight carboxymethylchitosan displayed higher swelling ratio (17.5g/g), ultimate tensile strength (≥300kPa) and elongation-at-break (≥65%). The susceptibility to lysozyme degradation depends only on the crosslinking degree of the membranes, the degradation rate being faster the lower the crosslinking degree. The preparation of lightly genipin cross-linked carboxymethylchitosan membranes displaying appropriated properties to fulfill specific applications as biomaterials is envisaged by using high molecular weight carboxymethylchitosan. PMID:27083355

  7. Liquid but Durable: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Explain the Unique Properties of Archaeal-Like Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugunov, Anton O.; Volynsky, Pavel E.; Krylov, Nikolay A.; Boldyrev, Ivan A.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2014-12-01

    Archaeal plasma membranes appear to be extremely durable and almost impermeable to water and ions, in contrast to the membranes of Bacteria and Eucaryota. Additionally, they remain liquid within a temperature range of 0-100°C. These are the properties that have most likely determined the evolutionary fate of Archaea, and it may be possible for bionanotechnology to adopt these from nature. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to assess at the atomistic level the structure and dynamics of a series of model archaeal membranes with lipids that have tetraether chemical nature and ``branched'' hydrophobic tails. We conclude that the branched structure defines dense packing and low water permeability of archaeal-like membranes, while at the same time ensuring a liquid-crystalline state, which is vital for living cells. This makes tetraether lipid systems promising in bionanotechnology and material science, namely for design of new and unique membrane nanosystems.

  8. Liquid but durable: molecular dynamics simulations explain the unique properties of archaeal-like membranes.

    PubMed

    Chugunov, Anton O; Volynsky, Pavel E; Krylov, Nikolay A; Boldyrev, Ivan A; Efremov, Roman G

    2014-01-01

    Archaeal plasma membranes appear to be extremely durable and almost impermeable to water and ions, in contrast to the membranes of Bacteria and Eucaryota. Additionally, they remain liquid within a temperature range of 0-100°C. These are the properties that have most likely determined the evolutionary fate of Archaea, and it may be possible for bionanotechnology to adopt these from nature. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to assess at the atomistic level the structure and dynamics of a series of model archaeal membranes with lipids that have tetraether chemical nature and "branched" hydrophobic tails. We conclude that the branched structure defines dense packing and low water permeability of archaeal-like membranes, while at the same time ensuring a liquid-crystalline state, which is vital for living cells. This makes tetraether lipid systems promising in bionanotechnology and material science, namely for design of new and unique membrane nanosystems. PMID:25501042

  9. Effects of non-thermal plasma on the electrical properties of an erythrocyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Young; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Tae Soo; Lim, Jaekwan; Uhm, Han S.; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-09-01

    Non-thermal plasma is used here for membrane oxidation and permeabilization in which the electrical properties of an erythrocyte membrane are investigated after treatments. The zeta potential as measured by electrophoresis shows the increased negativity of the membrane surface potential (Ψs). The secondary electron emission coefficient ( γ) measured by a focused ion beam shows a decrease in the dipole potential (Ψd) of lipid molecules. The voltage-sensitive fluorescent intensity as measured by flow cytometry shows a decrease in the trans-membrane potential (ΔΨ) through the lipid bilayer membrane. These results allow us to take a step forward to unveil the complex events occurring in plasma-treated cells.

  10. Liquid but Durable: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Explain the Unique Properties of Archaeal-Like Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chugunov, Anton O.; Volynsky, Pavel E.; Krylov, Nikolay A.; Boldyrev, Ivan A.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2014-01-01

    Archaeal plasma membranes appear to be extremely durable and almost impermeable to water and ions, in contrast to the membranes of Bacteria and Eucaryota. Additionally, they remain liquid within a temperature range of 0–100°C. These are the properties that have most likely determined the evolutionary fate of Archaea, and it may be possible for bionanotechnology to adopt these from nature. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to assess at the atomistic level the structure and dynamics of a series of model archaeal membranes with lipids that have tetraether chemical nature and “branched” hydrophobic tails. We conclude that the branched structure defines dense packing and low water permeability of archaeal-like membranes, while at the same time ensuring a liquid-crystalline state, which is vital for living cells. This makes tetraether lipid systems promising in bionanotechnology and material science, namely for design of new and unique membrane nanosystems. PMID:25501042

  11. Physiochemical Properties of Aluminum Adjuvants Elicit Differing Reorganization of Phospholipid Domains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Antúnez, Lorena R; Livingston, Andrea; Berkland, Cory; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2016-05-01

    Most vaccines contain aluminum adjuvants; however, their exact mechanism of action remains unclear. A novel mechanism by Shi and colleagues proposes aluminum adjuvants may enhance immune activation by binding and reorganizing lipids that are key components of lipid rafts. To better understand the specificity of interaction between aluminum adjuvants and the cell membrane lipids, we present a biophysical study of lipid domain clustering in simple model phospholipid monolayers containing dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) exposed to two aluminum adjuvants, Alhydrogel and Adju-Phos. Surface pressure measurements and fluorescence microscopy images verified aluminum adjuvant-induced increase in lipid domain size, even in the key lipid raft components. Additionally, adjuvant induced lipid clustering differed based on the physicochemical properties of the adjuvants. Alhydrogel appeared to reduce monolayer compressibility and insert into the monolayer, while Adju-Phos induced more significant changes in domain size, without compromising the integrity of the monolayer. The Alhydrogel and Adju-Phos-mediated reorganization of phospholipid domains reported here supports the new mechanistic paradigm proposed by Shi and co-workers, and further suggests that lipid clustering is induced even in simple phospholipid membranes. The results present the basis for future exploration into lipid-mediated mechanisms of action for adjuvants. PMID:26998680

  12. Functional, photochemically active, and chemically asymmetric membranes by interfacial polymerization of derivatized multifunctional prepolymers

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-04-17

    The preparation of a novel class of thin film membranes by interfacial polymerization is disclosed, said membranes incorporating as part of their polymeric structure the functionality of monomeric or oligomeric precursors. Specific embodiments include porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives that are photochemically or electrochemically active, as well as chemically asymmetric membranes.

  13. Functional, photochemically active, and chemically asymmetric membranes by interfacial polymerization of derivatized multifunctional prepolymers

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The preparation of a novel class of thin film membranes by interfacial polymerization is disclosed, said membranes incorporating as part of their polymeric structure the functionality of monomeric or oligomeric precursors. Specific embodiments include porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives that are photochemically or electrochemically active, as well as chemically asymmetric membranes.

  14. Fusicoccin Binding to Its Plasma Membrane Receptor and the Activation of the Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    De Michelis, Maria Ida; Pugliarello, Maria Chiara; Rasi-Caldogno, Franca

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of fusicoccin binding were investigated in microsomes from 24-h-old radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings. The time course of fusicoccin binding depended on fusicoccin concentration: equilibrium was reached much faster at 10 nanomolar fusicoccin than at 0.3 nanomolar fusicoccin. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding as a function of fusicoccin concentration indicated a single class of receptor sites with a Kd of 1.8 nanomolar and a site density of 6.3 picomoles per milligram protein. Similar values (Kd 1.7 nanomolar and site density 7 picomoles per milligram protein) were obtained from the analysis of the dependence of equilibrium binding on membrane concentration at fixed fusicoccin concentrations. Fusicoccin binding comigrated with the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in an equilibrium sucrose density gradient: both activities formed a sharp peak (1.18 grams per milliliter) clearly distinct from that of markers of other membranes which all peaked at lower densities. The saturation profiles of fusicoccin binding and of fusicoccin-induced activation of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase, measured under identical conditions, were similar, supporting the view that fusicoccin-induced activation of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase is mediated by fusicoccin binding to its plasma membrane receptor. PMID:16666723

  15. Experimental study on the microstructure and nanomechanical properties of the wing membrane of dragonfly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Kewei; Bai, Ke; Wang, Wensheng; Song, Fan

    2007-06-01

    Detailed investigations on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the wing membrane of the dragonfly are carried out. It is found that in the direction of the thickness the membrane was divided into three layers rather than a single entity as traditionally considered, and on the surfaces the membrane displays a random distribution rough microstructure that is composed of numerous nanometer scale columns coated by the cuticle wax secreted. The characteristics of the surface structure are measured and described. The mechanical properties of the membranes taken separately from the wings of live and dead dragonflies are investigated by the nanoindentation technique. The Young’s moduli obtained here are approximately two times greater than the previous result, and the reasons that yield the difference are discussed.

  16. Red wine activates plasma membrane redox system in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Idolo; Moccia, Stefania; Volpe, Silvestro; Alfieri, Giovanna; Strollo, Daniela; Bilotto, Stefania; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Di Renzo, Massimo; Aquino, Rita P; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we report that polyphenols present in red wine obtained by a controlled microvinification process are able to protect human erythrocytes from oxidative stress and to activate Plasma Membrane Redox System (PMRS). Human plasma obtained from healthy subjects was incubated in the presence of whole red wine at a concentration corresponding to 9.13-73 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents to verify the capacity to protect against hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-induced plasma oxidation and to minimize chloramine formation. Red wine reduced hemolysis and chloramine formation induced by HOCl of 40 and 35%, respectively. PMRS present on human erythrocytes transfers electrons from intracellular molecules to extracellular electron acceptors. We demonstrated that whole red wine activated PMRS activity in human erythrocytes isolated from donors in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum at about 70-100 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents. We also showed that red wine increased glutathione (GSH) levels and erythrocytic antioxidant capacity, measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) quenching assay. Furthermore, we reported that GSH played a crucial role in regulating PMRS activity in erythrocytes. In fact, the effect of iodoacetamide, an alkylating agent that induces depletion of intracellular GSH, was completely counteracted by red wine. Bioactive compounds present in red wine, such as gallic acid, resveratrol, catechin, and quercetin were unable to activate PMRS when tested at the concentrations normally present in aged red wines. On the contrary, the increase of PMRS activity was associated with the anthocyanin fraction, suggesting the capacity of this class of compounds to positively modulate PMRS enzymatic activity. PMID:26866566

  17. Biologically Inspired Photocatalytically Active Membranes for Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsinger, Nichola M.

    There is an alarming increase of a variety of new chemicals that are now being discharged into the wastewater system causing increased concern for public health and safety because many are not removed by typical wastewater treatment practices. Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) is a heterogeneous photocatalytic material that rapidly and completely mineralizing organics without harmful byproducts. TiO2 is synthesized by various methods, which lack the necessary control of crystal size, phase, and morphological features that yield optimized semiconductor materials. Mineralizing organisms demonstrate how nature can produce elegant structures at room temperature through controlled organic-mineral interactions. Here, we utilize biologically-inspired scaffolds to template the nucleation and growth of inorganic materials such as TiO2, which aid in controlling the size and phase of these particles and ultimately, their properties. Nanosized rutile and anatase particles were synthesized under solution conditions at relatively low temperatures and mild pH conditions. The effects of reaction conditions on phase and grain size were investigated and discussed from coordination chemistry and coarsening mechanisms. Photocatalytic characterization of TiO2 phase mixtures was performed to investigate their synergistic effect. The suspension conditions of these catalytic nanomaterials were modulated to optimize the degradation rate of organic analytes. Through the addition of an organic scaffold during the synthesis reaction, a mechanically robust (elastic) composite material containing TiO2 nanoparticles was produced. This composite was subsequently heat-treated to produce a porous, high surface area TiO2 nanoparticulate membrane. Processing conditions were investigated to characterize the growth and phase transformation of TiO2, which ultimately impacts photocatalytic performance. These bulk porous TiO2 structures can be fabricated and tailored to act as stand-alone photocatalytic membranes

  18. Spatial variations in membrane properties in the intact rat lens.

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, G J; Mathias, R T

    1992-01-01

    We have used linear frequency domain techniques to measure impedance at various locations and depths in the intact rat lens. The data are used to obtain best-fit solutions to a new electrical model based on lens structure, allowing us to estimate localized conductances of surface cell membranes (Gs), fiber cell membranes (gm), and gap junctions (Gj) as functions of position. We find that gm is small and fairly uniform throughout the lens (2.02 +/- 0.58 microS/cm2); for the anterior surface-epithelial cells Gs = 1.26 +/- 0.19 mS/cm2; for the posterior surface differentiating fiber cells Gs = 0.46 +/- 0.04 mS/cm2. Thus, Gs varies about the equator in a stepwise fashion. Gj between fiber cells at locations interior to 80% of the radius is fairly uniform (0.75 S/cm2); but in the outer 20% Gj varies smoothly and symmetrically from both poles (0.66 S/cm2) to equator (5.95 S/cm2). This pattern of variation in Gj is similar to the pattern of inward and outward currents reported by Robinson and Patterson (1983. Curr. Eye Res. 2:843-847). We therefore suggest that the nonuniform distribution of functional gap junctions, not the surface cell conductance or Na/K pumps, may be responsible for directing these current flows. Gap junctional uncoupling during exposure to elevated calcium and acidification was also examined. High calcium (20 mM, with the calcium ionophore A23187) produced modest (twofold) irreversible uncoupling along with large, irreversible decreases in membrane potential. We did not pursue this further. Acidification with 20 and 100% CO2-bubbled Tyrode's produced 5- and 15-fold reversible uncoupling, respectively, only in the outer 20% of the lens radius. The remaining inner 80% of the lens gap junctions seemed resistant to the acidification and did not uncouple. PMID:1420894

  19. Branched phospholipids render lipid vesicles more susceptible to membrane-active peptides.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Natalie J; Seaton, Pamela; Pokorny, Antje

    2016-05-01

    Iso- and anteiso-branched lipids are abundant in the cytoplasmic membranes of bacteria. Their function is assumed to be similar to that of unsaturated lipids in other organisms - to maintain the membrane in a fluid state. However, the presence of terminally branched membrane lipids is likely to impact other membrane properties as well. For instance, lipid acyl chain structure has been shown to influence the activity of antimicrobial peptides. Moreover, the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents in Staphylococcus aureus is accompanied by a shift in the fatty acid composition toward a higher fraction of anteiso-branched lipids. Little is known about how branched lipids and the location of the branch point affect the activity of membrane-active peptides. We hypothesized that bilayers containing lipids with low phase transition temperatures would tend to exclude peptides and be less susceptible to peptide-induced perturbation than those made from higher temperature melting lipids. To test this hypothesis, we synthesized a series of asymmetric phospholipids that only differ in the type of fatty acid esterified at the sn-2 position of the lipid glycerol backbone. We tested the influence of acyl chain structure on peptide activity by measuring the kinetics of release from dye-encapsulated lipid vesicles made from these synthetic lipids. The results were compared to those obtained using vesicles made from S. aureus and Staphylococcus sciuri membrane lipid extracts. Anteiso-branched phospholipids, which melt at very low temperatures, produced lipid vesicles that were only slightly less susceptible to peptide-induced dye release than those made from the iso-branched isomer. However, liposomes made from bacterial phospholipid extracts were generally much more resistant to peptide-induced perturbation than those made from any of the synthetic lipids. The results suggest that the increase in the fraction of anteiso-branched fatty acids in antibiotic-resistant strains

  20. Shielding membrane surface carboxyl groups by covalent-binding graphene oxide to improve anti-fouling property and the simultaneous promotion of flux.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-Long; Xia, Xue; Tao, Yu; Yun, Hui; Hou, Ya-Nan; Zhao, Chang-Wei; Luo, Qin; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2016-10-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an excellent material for membrane surface modification. However, little is known about how and to what extent surface functional groups change after GO modification influence membrane anti-fouling properties. Carboxyl is an inherent functional group on polyamide or other similar membranes. Multivalent cations in wastewater secondary effluent can bridge with carboxyls on membrane surfaces and organic foulants, resulting in serious membrane fouling. In this study, carboxyls of a polydopamine (pDA)/1,3,5-benzenetricarbonyl trichloride (TMC) active layer are shielded by covalently-bound GO. The process is mediated by N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). For GO containing low quantities of carboxyls, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and zeta potential analyzer test results reveal that the carboxyl density decreased by 52.3% compare to the pDA/TMC membrane after GO modification. Fouling experiments shows that the flux only slightly declines in the GO functionalized membrane (19.0%), compared with the pDA/TMC membrane (36.0%) after fouling. In addition, during GO modification process the pDA/TMC active layer also become harder and thinner with the aid of EDC/NHS. So the pure water permeability increases from 56.3 ± 18.2 to 103.7 ± 12.0 LMH/MPa. Our results provide new insights for membrane modification work in water treatment and other related fields. PMID:27479294

  1. Immobilization of tris(2 pyridyl) methylamine in a PVC-Membrane Sensor and Characterization of the Membrane Properties

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the increasing industrial use of titanium compounds, its determination is the subject of considerable efforts. The ionophore or membrane active recognition is the most important component of any polymeric membrane sensor. The sensor’s response depends on the ionophore and bonding between the ionophore and the target ion. Ionophores with molecule-sized dimensions containing cavities or semi-cavities can surround the target ion. The bond between the ionophore and target ion gives different selectivity and sensitivity toward the other ions. Therefore, ionophores with different binding strengths can be used in the sensor. Results In the present work, poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) based membrane incorporating tris (2 pyridyl) methylamine (tpm) as an ionophore has been prepared and explored as a titanium(III) selective sensor. Conclusions The strengths of the ion–ionophore (Ti(OH)2+-tpm) interactions and the role of ionophore on membrane were tested by various techniques such as elemental analysis, UV–vis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). All data approved the successful incorporation of organic group via covalent bond. PMID:22564322

  2. Membrane lipid physical state and modulation of the Na+,Mg2+-ATPase activity in Acholeplasma laidlawii B.

    PubMed Central

    Silvius, J R; McElhaney, R N

    1980-01-01

    Careful analysis of the Arrhenius plot of the Na+,Mg2+-ATPase (ATP pyrophosphohydrolase, EC 3.6.1.8) activity in Acholeplasma laidlawii B membranes of varying fatty acid composition has been combined with differential thermal analysis of the membrane lipid phase transitions to evaluate the effects of membrane lipid properties on the enzyme activity. Our results indicate that the enzyme is active only in association with liquid-crystalline lipids, exhibiting a significant heat capacity of activation, delta Cp++, for the ATP hydrolytic reaction in this case. Quantitative analyses of Arrhenius plots for the enzyme activity in membranes whose lipids exhibit a gel-to-liquid-crystalline phase transition in the physiological temperature range suggest that the ATPase is inactivated when its boundary lipids undergo a phase transition that is driven by the bulk lipid phase transition but is less cooperative than the latter. Our results suggest that the familiar "biphasic linear" Arrhenius plots obtained for many membrane enzymes may in fact have a more complex shape, analysis of which can furnish useful information regarding the behavior of the enzyme molecule. Images PMID:6445554

  3. Plasma deposition of silver nanoparticles on ultrafiltration membranes: antibacterial and anti-biofouling properties

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Mercedes Cecilia; Ruano, Gustavo; Wolf, Marcus; Hecker, Dominic; Vidaurre, Elza Castro; Schmittgens, Ralph; Rajal, Verónica Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    A novel and versatile plasma reactor was used to modify Polyethersulphone commercial membranes. The equipment was applied to: i) functionalize the membranes with low-temperature plasmas, ii) deposit a film of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and, iii) deposit silver nanoparticles (SNP) by Gas Flow Sputtering. Each modification process was performed in the same reactor consecutively, without exposure of the membranes to atmospheric air. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the particles and modified membranes. SNP are evenly distributed on the membrane surface. Particle fixation and transport inside membranes were assessed before- and after-washing assays by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling analysis. PMMA addition improved SNP fixation. Plasma-treated membranes showed higher hydrophilicity. Anti-biofouling activity was successfully achieved against Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis) and -negative (Salmonella Typhimurium) bacteria. Therefore, disinfection by ultrafiltration showed substantial resistance to biofouling. The post-synthesis functionalization process developed provides a more efficient fabrication route for anti-biofouling and anti-bacterial membranes used in the water treatment field. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a gas phase condensation process combined with a PECVD procedure in order to deposit SNP on commercial membranes to inhibit biofouling formation. PMID:26166926

  4. Red Blood Cell Susceptibility to Pneumolysin: CORRELATION WITH MEMBRANE BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES.

    PubMed

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Petrov, Peter G; Khafaji, Mawya A; Mughal, Muhammad K; Naylor, Claire E; Shore, Angela C; Gooding, Kim M; Casanova, Francesco; Mitchell, Tim J; Titball, Richard W; Winlove, C Peter

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the plasma membrane as well as membrane morphology on the susceptibility of human red blood cells to the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin, a key virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, using single cell studies. We show a correlation between the physical properties of the membrane (bending rigidity and surface and dipole electrostatic potentials) and the susceptibility of red blood cells to pneumolysin-induced hemolysis. We demonstrate that biochemical modifications of the membrane induced by oxidative stress, lipid scrambling, and artificial cell aging modulate the cell response to the toxin. We provide evidence that the diversity of response to pneumolysin in diabetic red blood cells correlates with levels of glycated hemoglobin and that the mechanical properties of the red blood cell plasma membrane are altered in diabetes. Finally, we show that diabetic red blood cells are more resistant to pneumolysin and the related toxin perfringolysin O relative to healthy red blood cells. Taken together, these studies indicate that the diversity of cell response to pneumolysin within a population of human red blood cells is influenced by the biophysical and biochemical status of the plasma membrane and the chemical and/or oxidative stress pre-history of the cell. PMID:26984406

  5. Temperature effects on nanostructure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-04-30

    In this study, the properties of mechanically stable single-nanoparticle (NP)-thick membranes have largely been studied at room temperature. How these membranes soften as nanoparticle ligands disorder with increasing temperature is unknown. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to probe the temperature dependence of the mechanical and nanostructural properties of nanoparticle membranes made of 6 nm diameter Au nanoparticles coated with dodecanethiol ligands and terminated with either methyl (CH3) or carboxyl (COOH) terminal groups. For methyl-terminated ligands, interactions along the alkane chain provide mechanical stiffness, with a Young's modulus of 1.7 GPa at 300 K. For carboxyl-terminated chains, end-group interactions are significant,more » producing stiffer membranes at all temperatures, with a Young's modulus of 3.8 GPa at 300 K. For both end-group types, membrane stiffness is reduced to zero at about 400 K. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of membranes at 300 K that have been annealed at 400 K are comparable to samples that do not undergo thermal annealing.« less

  6. Temperature effects on nanostructure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-04-30

    In this study, the properties of mechanically stable single-nanoparticle (NP)-thick membranes have largely been studied at room temperature. How these membranes soften as nanoparticle ligands disorder with increasing temperature is unknown. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to probe the temperature dependence of the mechanical and nanostructural properties of nanoparticle membranes made of 6 nm diameter Au nanoparticles coated with dodecanethiol ligands and terminated with either methyl (CH3) or carboxyl (COOH) terminal groups. For methyl-terminated ligands, interactions along the alkane chain provide mechanical stiffness, with a Young's modulus of 1.7 GPa at 300 K. For carboxyl-terminated chains, end-group interactions are significant, producing stiffer membranes at all temperatures, with a Young's modulus of 3.8 GPa at 300 K. For both end-group types, membrane stiffness is reduced to zero at about 400 K. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of membranes at 300 K that have been annealed at 400 K are comparable to samples that do not undergo thermal annealing.

  7. Structure and transport properties of ethylcellulose membranes with different types and granulation of magnetic powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasowska, Monika; Strzelewicz, Anna; Rybak, Aleksandra; Dudek, Gabriela; Cieśla, Michał

    2016-06-01

    Structure and transport properties of ethylcellulose membranes with dispersed magnetic powder were investigated. The study mainly focused on diffusion, which is one of the transport mechanisms. The transport properties depend on many parameters like: polymeric matrix used, type of powder, its amount and granulation. The structure of the pattern formed by magnetic particles in the membrane matrix was studied. Description of the system was based on the phenomenological and molecular (random walk on a fractal lattice) approaches. Two parameters were calculated: the fractal dimension of random walk dw, and the fractal dimension of membrane structure df. The knowledge of both parameters made it possible to use the generalized equation of diffusion on the fractal structure obtained by Metzler et al. The research was carried out to determine the influence of magnetic powder granulation on the transport properties. The results showed that the random walk within the membranes of the smallest magnetic powder granulation was of the most subdiffusive character. Detailed investigation and quantitative description of gas transport through the membranes enables designing the membranes to be used in air oxygen enrichment.

  8. Hydrophilicity and antifouling property of membrane materials from cellulose acetate/polyethersulfone in DMAc.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua; Chen, Fushan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, cellulose acetate (CA) was blended with polyethersulfone (PES) to endow the ultrafiltration membrane with the improved hydrophilicity and antifouling property by using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) as the solvent. The effects of blend composition and evaporation time on the mechanical strength and pure water flux were investigated. It was found that the optimal composition of the casting solution was: 18wt% (PES), 4wt% (Polyvinylpyrrolidone K30), 3wt% (CA) and 20s (Evaporation time). The characteristics of CA-PES blend membranes were investigated through the methods of contact angle goniometer, antifouling property, compatibility, thermo gravimetric analysis and SEM. The results showed that the hydrophilicity and antifouling property of CA-PES ultrafiltration membranes were enhanced in comparison with the pure PES membranes. The CA-PES membranes exhibited semi-compatibility and good thermal stability below 270°C. This study provided a potential industrial application prospect of CA-PES membranes prepared in DMAc. PMID:27211301

  9. Salt transport properties of model reverse osmosis membranes using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Kathleen; Chan, Edwin; Stafford, Gery; Stafford, Christopher

    With the increasing shortage of clean water, efficient purification technologies including membrane separations are becoming critical. The main requirement of reverse osmosis in particular is to maximize water permeability while minimizing salt permeability. Such performance optimization has typically taken place through trial and error approaches. In this work, key salt transport metrics are instead measured in model reverse osmosis membranes using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As shown previously, EIS can provide both the membrane resistance Rm and membrane capacitance Cm, with Rm directly related to salt permeability. The membranes are fabricated in a molecular layer by layer approach, which allows for control over such parameters as thickness, surface and bulk chemistry, and network geometry/connectivity. Rm, and therefore salt permeability, follows the expected trends with thickness and membrane area but shows unusual behavior when the network geometry is systematically varied. By connecting intrinsic material properties such as the salt permeability with macroscopic performance measures we can begin to establish design rules for improving membrane efficiency and facilitate the creation of next-generation separation membranes.

  10. A nanohybrid membrane with lipid bilayer-like properties utilized as a conductimetric saccharin sensor.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, Nikolaos G; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2007-10-31

    Since their introduction, artificial lipid bilayer membranes were used in a wide array of applications, such as sensors, biocompatible materials and study-models of the cell's outer boundary. Here, we present a nanohybrid membrane using an inorganic host and amphiphilic organic molecules with lipid bilayer-like properties. The stability of the presented mimetic membrane is significantly improved when compared to existing methods. The nanohybrid membrane exhibited two thermotropic phases corresponding to the L(alpha) and L(beta) phases that lipid bilayer membranes are known to adopt. Integration of cholesterol molecules into the nanohybrid membrane lead to the same qualitative effects as in lipid bilayers, including expansion of the bilayer spacing and decrease of the L(alpha) to L(beta) transition enthalpy. To further illustrate the similarities of the synthesized membrane with a lipid bilayer, the ability of the nanohybrid membrane to function as saccharin conductimetric sensor was evaluated. The lower limit of detection of the sensor was 6 microM and the linear range of response was from 20 to 400 microM. PMID:17548189