Science.gov

Sample records for active radiation techniques

  1. The regeneration of polluted activated carbon by radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minghong, Wu; Borong, Bao; Ruimin, Zhou; Jinliang, Zhu; Longxin, Hu

    1998-10-01

    In this paper, the regeneration of used activated carbon from monosodium glutamate factory was experimented using radiation and acid-alkali chemical cleaning method. Results showed that the activated carbon saturated with pollutants can be wash away easily by flushing with chemical solution prior irradiation. DSC was used to monitor the change of carbon adsorption

  2. Monolithic active pixel radiation detector with shielding techniques

    DOEpatents

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.

    2016-09-06

    A monolithic active pixel radiation detector including a method of fabricating thereof. The disclosed radiation detector can include a substrate comprising a silicon layer upon which electronics are configured. A plurality of channels can be formed on the silicon layer, wherein the plurality of channels are connected to sources of signals located in a bulk part of the substrate, and wherein the signals flow through electrically conducting vias established in an isolation oxide on the substrate. One or more nested wells can be configured from the substrate, wherein the nested wells assist in collecting charge carriers released in interaction with radiation and wherein the nested wells further separate the electronics from the sensing portion of the detector substrate. The detector can also be configured according to a thick SOA method of fabrication.

  3. Review of radiation hardening techniques for EDFAs in space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Tian, CuiPing; Wang, YingYing; Wang, Pu

    2015-03-01

    The damage mechanism and test technology of space radiation environment to space equipment was classified and the radiation protection demand of active fiber for space application was analyzed. The radiation hardening techniques of Ce doping, hydrogen loading and pre-radiation exposure and thermal annealing for Er:Yb co-doped fiber was surveyed.

  4. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  5. Stereology techniques in radiation biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubinova, Lucie; Mao, XiaoWen; Janacek, Jiri; Archambeau, John O.; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Clinicians involved in conventional radiation therapy are very concerned about the dose-response relationships of normal tissues. Before proceeding to new clinical protocols, radiation biologists involved with conformal proton therapy believe it is necessary to quantify the dose response and tolerance of the organs and tissues that will be irradiated. An important focus is on the vasculature. This presentation reviews the methodology and format of using confocal microscopy and stereological methods to quantify tissue parameters, cell number, tissue volume and surface area, and vessel length using the microvasculature as a model tissue. Stereological methods and their concepts are illustrated using an ongoing study of the dose response of the microvessels in proton-irradiated hemibrain. Methods for estimating the volume of the brain and the brain cortex, the total number of endothelial cells in cortical microvessels, the length of cortical microvessels, and the total surface area of cortical microvessel walls are presented step by step in a way understandable for readers with little mathematical background. It is shown that stereological techniques, based on a sound theoretical basis, are powerful and reliable and have been used successfully.

  6. Principles and Techniques of Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Leon M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the physical processes involved in the deposition of energy from ionizing radiation in the absorber system. Identifies principles relevant to these processes which are responsible for ionization and excitation of the components of the absorber system. Briefly describes some experimental techniques in use in radiation chemical studies.…

  7. Small Active Radiation Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.

    2004-01-01

    A device, named small active radiation monitor, allows on-orbit evaluations during periods of increased radiation, after extravehicular activities, or at predesignated times for crews on such long-duration space missions as on the International Space Station. It also permits direct evaluation of biological doses, a task now performed using a combination of measurements and potentially inaccurate simulations. Indeed the new monitor can measure a full array of radiation levels, from soft x-rays to hard galactic cosmic-ray particles. With refinement, it will benefit commercial (nuclear power-plant workers, airline pilots, medical technicians, physicians/dentists, and others) and military personnel as well as the astronauts for whom thermoluminescent dosimeters are inadequate. Civilian and military personnel have long since graduated from film badges to thermoluminescent dosimeters. Once used, most dosimeters must be returned to a central facility for processing, a step that can take days or even weeks. While this suffices for radiation workers for whom exposure levels are typically very low and of brief duration, it does not work for astronauts. Even in emergencies and using express mail, the results can often be delayed by as much as 24 hours. Electronic dosimeters, which are the size of electronic oral thermometers, and tattlers, small electronic dosimeters that sound an alarm when the dose/dose rate exceeds preset values, are also used but suffer disadvantages similar to those of thermoluminescent dosimeters. None of these devices fully answers the need of rapid monitoring during the space missions. Instead, radiation is monitored by passive detectors, which are read out after the missions. Unfortunately, these detectors measure only the absorbed dose and not the biologically relevant dose equivalent. The new monitor provides a real-time readout, a time history of radiation exposures (both absorbed dose and biologically relevant dose equivalent), and a count of the

  8. Electron Beam Instrumentation Techniques Using Coherent Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. X.

    1997-05-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in short electron bunches for different applications such as short wavelength FELs, linear colliders, advanced accelerators such as laser or plasma wakefield accelerators, and Compton backscattering X-ray sources. A short bunch length is needed to meet various requirements such as high peak current, low momentum spread, high luminosity, small ratio of bunch length to plasma wavelength, or accurate timing. Meanwhile, much progress has been made on photoinjectors and different magnetic and RF bunching schemes to produce very short bunches. Measurement of those short bunches becomes essential to develop, characterize, and operate such demanding machines. Conventionally, bunch duration of short electron bunches is measured by transverse RF deflecting cavities or streak camera. With such devices it becomes very challenging to measure bunch length down to a few hundred femtoseconds. Many frequency domain techniques have been recently developed, based on a relation between bunch profile and coherent radiation spectrum. These techniques provide excellent performance for short bunches. In this paper, coherent radiation and its applications to bunch length measurement will be discussed. A strategy for bunch length control at Jefferson Lab will be presented, which includes a noninvasive coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) monitor, a zero-phasing technique used to calibrate the CSR detector, and phase transfer measurement used to correct RF phase drifts.

  9. Exploring actinide materials through synchrotron radiation techniques.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei-Qun; Yuan, Li-Yong; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Wang, Lin; Mei, Lei; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Zhang, Li; Li, Zi-Jie; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang

    2014-12-10

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) based techniques have been utilized with increasing frequency in the past decade to explore the brilliant and challenging sciences of actinide-based materials. This trend is partially driven by the basic needs for multi-scale actinide speciation and bonding information and also the realistic needs for nuclear energy research. In this review, recent research progresses on actinide related materials by means of various SR techniques were selectively highlighted and summarized, with the emphasis on X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scattering spectroscopy, which are powerful tools to characterize actinide materials. In addition, advanced SR techniques for exploring future advanced nuclear fuel cycles dealing with actinides are illustrated as well. PMID:25169914

  10. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  11. Advancing Techniques of Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sagar A; Wo, Jennifer Y; Hong, Theodore S

    2016-07-01

    Since the advent of radiation therapy for rectal cancer, there has been continual investigation of advancing technologies and techniques that allow for improved dose conformality to target structures while limiting irradiation of surrounding normal tissue. For locally advanced disease, intensity modulated and proton beam radiation therapy both provide more highly conformal treatment volumes that reduce dose to organs at risk, though the clinical benefit in terms of toxicity reduction is unclear. For early stage disease, endorectal contact therapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy may be a definitive treatment option for patients who are poor operative candidates or those with low-lying tumors that desire sphincter-preservation. Finally, there has been growing evidence that supports stereotactic body radiotherapy as a safe and effective salvage treatment for the minority of patients that locally recur following trimodality therapy for locally advanced disease. This review addresses these topics that remain areas of active clinical investigation. PMID:27238474

  12. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon). PMID:22181304

  13. Some Radiation Techniques Used in the GU-3 Gamma Irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Dodbiba, Andon; Ylli, Ariana; Stamo, Iliriana; Kongjika, Efigjeni

    2007-04-23

    Different radiation techniques, measurement of dose and its distibution throughout the irradiated materials are the main problems treated in this paper. The oscillometry method combined with the ionization chamber, as an absolute dosimeter, is used for calibration of routine ECB dosimeters. The dose uniformity, for the used radiation techniques in our GU-3 Gamma Irradiator with Cs-137, is from 93% up to 99%.

  14. New radiosonde techniques to measure radiation profiles through the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf; Romanens, Gonzague; Levrat, Gilbert

    2013-04-01

    Solar and thermal radiation fluxes are usually measured at Earth's surface and at the top of the atmosphere. Here we show radiosonde techniques that allow measuring radiation flux profiles and the radiation budget from the Earth's surface to above 30 km in the stratosphere. During two-hour flights solar shortwave and thermal longwave irradiance, downward and upward, is measured with four individual sensors at one-second resolution, along with standard PTU radiosonde profiles. Daytime and nighttime shortwave and longwave radiation measurements, and 24 hours surface measurements, allow determining radiation budget- and total net radiation profiles through the atmosphere. We use a double balloon technique to prevent pendulum motion during the ascent and to keep the sonde as horizontal as possible. New techniques using auto controlled airplanes are now investigated to retrieve the sonde after release at a certain altitude and to land it if possible at the launch station.

  15. Technique for Radiometer and Antenna Array Calibration with a Radiated Noise Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutosh; Laymon, Charles; Meyer, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique to calibrate a microwave radiometer and antenna array system. This calibration technique uses a radiated noise source in addition to two calibration sources internal to the radiometer. The method accurately calibrates antenna arrays with embedded active devices (such as amplifiers) which are used extensively in active phased array antennas.

  16. Microcurrent therapeutic technique for treatment of radiation toxicity

    DOEpatents

    Lennox, Arlene; Funder, Sandra

    2000-01-01

    The present technique provides a method of remediating the toxicities associated with radiation therapy. A conductive gel is applied to the affected bodily area. A sinusoidally pulsed biphasic DC current is then applied to the affected bodily area using at least one electrode. The electrode is manipulated using active tactile manipulation by for a predetermined time and the frequency of the sinusoidally pulsed biphasic DC current is decreased during the course of the treatment. The method also includes applying a spiked pulsed biphasic DC current to the affected bodily area using at least one electrode. This electrode is also manipulated using active tactile manipulation by for a predetermined time and the frequency of the spiked pulsed biphasic DC current is also decreased during the course of the treatment.

  17. Hybrid hydrogels produced by ionizing radiation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. J. A.; Amato, V. S.; Lugão, A. B.; Parra, D. F.

    2012-09-01

    The interest in biocompatible hydrogels with particular properties has increased considerably in recent years due to their versatile applications in biomedicine, biotechnology, pharmacy, agriculture and controlled release of drugs. The use of hydrogels matrices for particular drug-release applications has been investigated with the synthesis of modified polymeric hydrogel of PVAl and 0.5, 1.0, 1.5% nano-clay. They were processed using gamma radiation from Cobalt-60 source at 25 kGy dose. The characterization of the hydrogels was conducted and toxicity was evaluated. The dried hydrogel was analyzed for thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and swelling in solutions of different pH. The membranes have no toxicity. The nano-clay influences directly the equilibrium swelling.

  18. High accuracy radiation efficiency measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozakoff, D. J.; Schuchardt, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The relatively large antenna subarrays (tens of meters) to be used in the Solar Power Satellite, and the desire to accurately quantify antenna performance, dictate the requirement for specialized measurement techniques. The error contributors associated with both far-field and near-field antenna measurement concepts were quantified. As a result, instrumentation configurations with measurement accuracy potential were identified. In every case, advances in the state of the art of associated electronics were found to be required. Relative cost trade-offs between a candidate far-field elevated antenna range and near-field facility were also performed.

  19. Flow-cytometry techniques in radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.F.; Hale, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Considerable evidence exists that all blood cells are derived from HSC. These cells are of interest to radiobiologists because they are highly sensitive to low doses of ionizing radiation. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are present in the marrow at a concentration of approximately 2-3 HSC per 1000 nucleated marrow cells. In the past, only clonogenic assays requiring 8-13 days and ten irradiated recipient rodents were available for assaying HSC. Because of the importance of HSC in the post-irradiation syndrome, the authors developed a new rapid method based on flow cytometry not only to assay but also to purify and characterize HSC. This new method makes extensive use of non-clonal antibodies conjugated to fluorescent phycobiliproteins through the sulfhydryls of the hinge region of the IgG molecule. An optical bench arrangement with a dye laser and an argon laser was used for dual excitation of the phycobiliprotein-monoclonal antibody conjugates and various cellular and DNA probes. Using 4', 6-diamidino 2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAP) exclusion to identify viable cells, it was possible to follow regeneration of post-irradiated rat marrow HSC.

  20. Development of "active correlation" technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    With reaching to extremely high intensities of heavy-ion beams new requirements for the detection system of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) will definitely be set. One of the challenges is how to apply the "active correlations" method to suppress beam associated background products without significant losses in the whole long-term experiment efficiency value. Different scenarios and equations to develop the method according this requirement are under consideration in the present paper. The execution time to estimate the dead time parameter associated with the optimal choice of the life-time parameter is presented.

  1. Recent progress in the transition radiation detector techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, L. C. L.

    1973-01-01

    A list of some of the major experimental achievements involving charged particles in the relativistic region are presented. With the emphasis mainly directed to the X-ray region, certain modes of application of the transition radiation for the identification and separation of relativistic charged particles are discussed. Some recent developments in detection techniques and improvements in detector performances are presented. Experiments were also carried out to detect the dynamic radiation, but no evidence of such an effect was observed.

  2. New techniques of low level environmental radiation monitoring at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    P. Degtiarenko, V. Popov

    2010-07-01

    We present the first long-term environmental radiation monitoring results obtained using the technique of pulse mode readout for the industry-standard Reuter-Stokes RSS-1013 argon-filled high pressure ionization chambers (HPIC). With novel designs for the front-end electronics readout and customized signal processing algorithms, we are capable of detecting individual events of gas ionization in the HPIC, caused by interactions of gammas and charged particles in the gas. The technique provides enough spectroscopic information to distinguish between several different types of environmental and man-made radiation. The technique also achieves a high degree of sensitivity and stability of the data, allowing long-term environmental radiation monitoring with unprecedented precision.

  3. Radiation protection for manned space activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1983-01-01

    The Earth's natural radiation environment poses a hazard to manned space activities directly through biological effects and indirectly through effects on materials and electronics. The following standard practices are indicated that address: (1) environment models for all radiation species including uncertainties and temporal variations; (2) upper bound and nominal quality factors for biological radiation effects that include dose, dose rate, critical organ, and linear energy transfer variations; (3) particle transport and shielding methodology including system and man modeling and uncertainty analysis; (4) mission planning that includes active dosimetry, minimizes exposure during extravehicular activities, subjects every mission to a radiation review, and specifies operational procedures for forecasting, recognizing, and dealing with large solar flaes.

  4. Fabrication techniques for reverse electrode coaxial germanium nuclear radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1980-11-01

    Germanium detectors with reverse polarity coaxial electrodes have been shown to exhibit improved resistance to radiation damage as compared with conventional electrode devices. However, the production of reverse electrode devices involves the development of new handling and fabrication techniques which has limited their wider application. We have developed novel techniques which lead to a device which is simple to fabricate, environmentally passivated and surface state adjusted.

  5. RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION: ACTIVITIES AND ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The question of human safety relative to exposure to RF radiation obviously predates the first ANSI guideline established in 1966, but no enforceable Federal standards or guidelines exist for RF radiation exposure; the ANSI guideline which was revised in 1982 is voluntary or advi...

  6. The radiation techniques of tomotherapy & intensity-modulated radiation therapy applied to lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhengfei

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays an important role in the management of lung cancer. Development of radiation techniques is a possible way to improve the effect of RT by reducing toxicities through better sparing the surrounding normal tissues. This article will review the application of two forms of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), fixed-field IMRT and helical tomotherapy (HT) in lung cancer, including dosimetric and clinical studies. The advantages and potential disadvantages of these two techniques are also discussed. PMID:26207214

  7. Measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A cosmic radiation dose to the Apollo 16 crew of 180 + or - 100 mR was calculated from the specific activities of Na-22 and Na-24 in pre and postflight urine specimens. The specific activities of Cr-51 and Co-60 are higher in postflight specimens than in preflight specimens, presumably due to a postflight injection of radiochromium. The Fe-59 and Cs-137 specific activities are also reported and appear to be normal. The radiation doses received by a pilot and a navigator flying a high altitude mission during the solar flare of August 4 to 9, 1972 were calculated from the specific activity of Na-24 in their urine. These values are compared with the expected radiation dose calculated form the known shape and intensity of the proton spectrum. They demonstrate the magnitude of atmospheric shielding.

  8. Radiation Effects and Hardening Techniques for Spacecraft Microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambles, J. W.; Maki, G. K.

    2002-01-01

    The natural radiation from the Van Allen belts, solar flares, and cosmic rays found outside of the protection of the earth's atmosphere can produce deleterious effects on microelectronics used in space systems. Historically civil space agencies and the commercial satellite industry have been able to utilize components produced in special radiation hardened fabrication process foundries that were developed during the 1970s and 1980s under sponsorship of the Departments of Defense (DoD) and Energy (DoE). In the post--cold war world the DoD and DoE push to advance the rad--hard processes has waned. Today the available rad--hard components lag two-plus technology node generations behind state- of-the-art commercial technologies. As a result space craft designers face a large performance gap when trying to utilize available rad--hard components. Compounding the performance gap problems, rad--hard components are becoming increasingly harder to get. Faced with the economic pitfalls associated with low demand versus the ever increasing investment required for integrated circuit manufacturing equipment most sources of rad--hard parts have simply exited this market in recent years, leaving only two domestic US suppliers of digital rad--hard components. This paper summarizes the radiation induced mechanisms that can cause digital microelectronics to fail in space, techniques that can be applied to mitigate these failure mechanisms, and ground based testing used to validate radiation hardness/tolerance. The radiation hardening techniques can be broken down into two classes, Hardness By Process (HBP) and Hardness By Design (HBD). Fortunately many HBD techniques can be applied to commercial fabrication processes providing space craft designer with radiation tolerant Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) that can bridge the performance gap between the special HBP foundries and the commercial state-of-the-art performance.

  9. Active galaxies and radiative heating.

    PubMed

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P; Ciotti, Luca

    2005-03-15

    There is abundant evidence that heating processes in the central regions of elliptical galaxies have both prevented large-scale cooling flows and assisted in the expulsion of metal rich gas. We now know that each such spheroidal system harbours in its core a massive black hole weighing ca. 0.13% of the mass in stars and also know that energy was emitted by each of these black holes with an efficiency exceeding 10% of its rest mass. Since, if only 0.5% of that radiant energy were intercepted by the ambient gas, its thermal state would be drastically altered, it is worth examining in detail the interaction between the out-flowing radiation and the equilibrium or inflowing gas. On the basis of detailed hydrodynamic computations we find that relaxation oscillations are to be expected with the radiative feedback quite capable of regulating both the growth of the central black hole and also the density and thermal state of the gas in the galaxy. Mechanical input of energy by jets may assist or dominate over these radiative effects. We propose specific observational tests to identify systems which have experienced strong bursts of radiative heating from their central black holes. PMID:15681285

  10. Numerical Techniques for Coupled Ring Current - Radiation Belt Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseev, N.; Shprits, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts can be described by the Fokker-Planck equation which includes radial diffusion and local energy and pitch angle diffusion. Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB-3D) code was developed to solve the Fokker-Planck equation. It incorporates a range of numerical techniques which are appropriate for this purpose. The code has been recently extended to include convection and now solves the convection-diffusion problem in 4D. The report is devoted to several numerical algorithms for modeling of the Earth's radiation belts. We concentrate on high-order schemes ( 7th and 9th order) for solution of an advection-diffusion problem in 1D, 2D,3D and 4D. Results of tests performed to study accuracy and speed of these schemes are presented in the report.

  11. Technique to Predict Ultraviolet Radiation Embrittlement of Polymers in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the low-Earth-orbit environment, solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation embrittles polymer materials through bond breaking and crosslinking. This UV embrittlement increases the surface hardness of the polymer. Before the durability of polymer materials in the low- Earth-orbit environment can be predicted, the extent of UV embrittlement needs to be determined. However, traditional techniques for measuring the microhardness of materials cannot be employed to measure changes in the hardness of UV-embrittled surfaces because traditional techniques measure bulk hardness and are not sensitive enough to surface changes. A unique technique was used at the NASA Lewis Research Center to quantify polymer surface damage that had been induced by UV radiation. The technique uses an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure surface microhardness. An atomic force microscope measures the repulsive forces between the atoms in a microscopic cantilevered tip and the atoms on the surface of a sample. Typically, an atomic force microscope produces a topographic image of a surface by monitoring the movement of the tip over features of the surface. The force applied to the cantilevered tip, and the indention of the tip into the surface, can be measured. The relationship between force and distance of indentation, the quantity force/distance (newtons/meter), provides a measure of the surface hardness. Under identical operating conditions, direct comparisons of surface hardness values can be made.

  12. Review of measurement techniques for the neutron radiative-capture process

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The experimental techniques applied in measurements of the neutron capture process are reviewed. The emphasis is on measurement techniques used in neutron capture cross section measurements. The activation technique applied mainly in earlier work has still its use in some cases, specifically for measurements of technologically important cross sections (/sup 238/U and /sup 232/Th) with high accuracy. Three major prompt neutron radioactive capture detection techniques have evolved: the total gamma radiation energy detection technique (mainly with large liquid scintillation detectors), the gamma-energy proportional detectors (with proportional counters or Moxon-Rae detectors), and the pulse-height weighting technique. These measurement techniques are generally applicable, however, shortcomings limit the achievable accuracy to a approx. = 5 to 15% uncertainty level.

  13. The measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Cosmic radiation doses to the crews of the Apollo 14, 15, and 16 missions of 142 + or - 80, 340 + or - 80, and 210 + or - 130 mR respectively were calculated from the specific activities of Na-22 and Na-24 in the postflight urine specimens of the astronauts. The specific activity of Fe-59 was higher in the urine than in the feces of the Apollo 14 and 15 astronauts, and a possible explanation is given. The concentrations of K-40, K-42, Cr-51, Co-60, and Cs-137 in the urine are also reported for these astronauts. The radiation doses received by pilots and navigators flying high altitude missions during the solar flare of March 27 to 30, 1972 were calculated from the specific activity of Na-24 in their urine. These values are compared with the expected radiation dose calculated from the known shape and intensity of the proton spectrum and demonstrate the magnitude of atmospheric shielding. The concentrations of Na, K, Rb, Cs, Fe, Co, Ag, Zn, Hg, As, Sb, Se, and Br were measured in the urine specimens from the Apollo 14 and 15 astronauts by neutron activation analysis. The mercury and arsenic levels were much higher than expected.

  14. Active personal radiation monitor for lunar EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straume, Tore; Borak, Tom; Braby, L. A.; Lusby, Terry; Semones, Edward J.; Vazquez, Marcelo E.

    As astronauts return to the Moon-and this time, work for extended periods-there will be a critical need for crew personnel radiation monitoring as they operate lunar rovers or otherwise perform a myriad of extravehicular activities (EVAs). Our focus is on development of a small personal radiation monitor for lunar EVA that responds to the complex radiation quality and changing dose rates on the Moon. Of particular concern are active monitoring capabilities that provide both early warning and radiation dosimetry information during solar particle events (SPEs). To accomplish this, we are developing small detectors integrated with modern high speed, low power microelectronics to measure dose-rate and dose-mean lineal energy in real time. The monitor is designed to perform over the range of dose rates and LETs expected from both GCR and SPE radiations during lunar EVA missions. The monitor design provides simultaneous measurement of dose-equivalent rates at two tissue-equivalent depths simulating skin and marrow. The compact personal monitor is estimated to be the size of a cell phone and would fit on an EVA spacesuit (e.g., in backpack) or in a toolbox. The four-year development effort (which began December 2007) will result in a prototype radiation monitor field tested and characterized for the major radiations expected on the surface of the Moon. We acknowledge support from NSBRI through grants to NASA Ames Research Center (T. Straume, PI) and Colorado State University (T. Borak, PI).

  15. Eigenspace techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Liebst, Bradley S.; Farm, Jerome A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of eigenspace techniques for the design of an active flutter suppression system for a hypothetical research drone is discussed. One leading edge and two trailing edge aerodynamic control surfaces and four sensors (accelerometers) are available for each wing. Full state control laws are designed by selecting feedback gains which place closed loop eigenvalues and shape closed loop eigenvectors so as to stabilize wing flutter and reduce gust loads at the wing root while yielding accepatable robustness and satisfying constrains on rms control surface activity. These controllers are realized by state estimators designed using an eigenvalue placement/eigenvector shaping technique which results in recovery of the full state loop transfer characteristics. The resulting feedback compensators are shown to perform almost as well as the full state designs. They also exhibit acceptable performance in situations in which the failure of an actuator is simulated.

  16. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J.

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  17. Image Guidance in Radiation Therapy: Techniques and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Tejinder

    2014-01-01

    In modern day radiotherapy, the emphasis on reduction on volume exposed to high radiotherapy doses, improving treatment precision as well as reducing radiation-related normal tissue toxicity has increased, and thus there is greater importance given to accurate position verification and correction before delivering radiotherapy. At present, several techniques that accomplish these goals impeccably have been developed, though all of them have their limitations. There is no single method available that eliminates treatment-related uncertainties without considerably adding to the cost. However, delivering “high precision radiotherapy” without periodic image guidance would do more harm than treating large volumes to compensate for setup errors. In the present review, we discuss the concept of image guidance in radiotherapy, the current techniques available, and their expected benefits and pitfalls. PMID:25587445

  18. Implementation of Image-Guidance Techniques in Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Michael; Clark, Brenda; MacPherson, Miller; Montgomery, Lynn; Gerig, Lee

    2008-06-01

    For more than 100 years, physicists have been a vital part of the medical team required to deliver radiation therapy. Their role encompasses the verification of dose accuracy to the development and implementation of new techniques, the most recent of which is the incorporation of daily image guidance to account for inter- and intra-fraction target changes. For example, computed tomography (CT) integrated into radiotherapy treatment units allows the image-guided treatment of the prostate where the target location depends on the degree of rectal filling--a parameter that changes on timescales from minutes to weeks. Different technology is required for the adequate treatment of small lung tumours since respiration occurs on timescales of seconds. This presentation will review current image-guided techniques.

  19. Studying photonuclear reactions using the activation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyshev, S. S.; Ermakov, A. N.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Khankin, V. V.; Kurilik, A. S.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-05-01

    The experimental setup that is used at the Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Moscow State University to study photonuclear reactions using the activation technique is described. The system is based on two modern compact race track microtrons with maximum energy of electrons of up to 55 and 67.7 MeV. A low-background HPGe detector is used to measure the induced gamma activity. The data acquisition and analysis system, used to process the measured spectra, is described. The described system is used to study multiparticle photonuclear reactions and production of nuclei far from the beta stability region.

  20. High pressure x-ray diffraction techniques with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Liu

    2016-07-01

    This article summarizes the developments of experimental techniques for high pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD) in diamond anvil cells (DACs) using synchrotron radiation. Basic principles and experimental methods for various diffraction geometry are described, including powder diffraction, single crystal diffraction, radial diffraction, as well as coupling with laser heating system. Resolution in d-spacing of different diffraction modes is discussed. More recent progress, such as extended application of single crystal diffraction for measurements of multigrain and electron density distribution, time-resolved diffraction with dynamic DAC and development of modulated heating techniques are briefly introduced. The current status of the high pressure beamline at BSRF (Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility) and some results are also presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10875142, 11079040, and 11075175). The 4W2 beamline of BSRF was supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. KJCX2-SW-N20, KJCX2-SW-N03, and SYGNS04).

  1. Radiation and photografting as complementary techniques for immobilizing bioactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, J. L.; Jankiewicz, S. V.; Long, M. A.; Sangster, D. F.

    The technique of radiation grafting to immobilize a typical enzyme, trypsin, to three representative backbone polymers namely polypropylene, PVC and polystyrene, is described. The process involves the simultaneous grafting of p-nitrostyrene to the polymer, the nitro group subsequently being converted to its isothiocyanato derivative to which trypsin is attached. For this immobilization work, the utilization of additives which enhance grafting is shown to be an advantage. Typical of the additives used are mineral acids (≈0.1M) and polyfunctional monomers (≈1% v/v), the two acting in a synergistic fashion when used together. A new class of additives, namely metal salts such as LiClO 4, which also increase grafting yields has now been discovered. The reactivity of these salts in grafting enhancement is compared with that of mineral acid. A new model for the modus operandi of metal salts as well as acids in grafting enhancement is proposed whereby increased grafting yields are attributed to increased partitioning of monomer into the graft region in the presence of ionic solutes. The significance of using these additives to prepare radiation copolymers for enzyme immobilization is discussed. In addition to ionizing radiation, UV is also shown to be of value as an initiator for the preparation of graft copolymers for enzyme immobilization, however the presence of sensitizer in the copolymer may limit the photografting method. The possibility of using radiation curing processes involving electron beam (EB) and high powered (300 W/inch) UV sources for immobilization work has been explored and found to be feasible. The curing system possesses great potential for the current immobilization work since complete polymerization is achieved in a fraction of a second.

  2. Measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A cosmic radiation dose to the Apollo 17 crew of 1.3 R was calculated from the specific activities of Na-24 in their postflight urine specimens. The specific activities of K-42, Cr-51, Co60, and Sb-124, introduced by injection into the astronauts, are extremely high in these specimens. The Fe-59 and Cs-137 levels are also reported and appear to be normal. The concentrations of Na, K, Rb, Cs, Ca, Sr, Ba, Cr, Fe, Co, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, Hg, Sn, As, Sb, Se, Br, Sc, La, Sm, Eu, Tb, Hf, Ta, and Th were measured in urine specimens from the Apollo 17 astronauts by neutron activation analysis. Strontium, barium, gold, cadmium, lanthanum, samarium, europium, terbium, thorium, and tin are reported for the first time. The concentrations or excretion rates of bromine and the alkali metals exhibit singificantly reduced postflight levels and are generally lower than values observed for previous missions. Chromium concentrations reflect radiochromium injections.

  3. Control of sound radiation with active/adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research is discussed in the area of active structural acoustic control with active/adaptive structures. Progress in the areas of structural acoustics, actuators, sensors, and control approaches is presented. Considerable effort has been given to the interaction of these areas with each other due to the coupled nature of the problem. A discussion is presented on actuators bonded to or embedded in the structure itself. The actuators discussed are piezoceramic actuators and shape memory alloy actuators. The sensors discussed are optical fiber sensors, Nitinol fiber sensors, piezoceramics, and polyvinylidene fluoride sensors. The active control techniques considered are state feedback control techniques and least mean square adaptive algorithms. Results presented show that significant progress has been made towards controlling structurally radiated noise by active/adaptive means applied directly to the structure.

  4. Radiation synthesized protein-based nanoparticles: A technique overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varca, Gustavo H. C.; Perossi, Gabriela G.; Grasselli, Mariano; Lugão, Ademar B.

    2014-12-01

    Seeking for alternative routes for protein engineering a novel technique - radiation induced synthesis of protein nanoparticles - to achieve size controlled particles with preserved bioactivity has been recently reported. This work aimed to evaluate different process conditions to optimize and provide an overview of the technique using γ-irradiation. Papain was used as model protease and the samples were irradiated in a gamma cell irradiator in phosphate buffer (pH=7.0) containing ethanol (0-35%). The dose effect was evaluated by exposure to distinct γ-irradiation doses (2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy) and scale up experiments involving distinct protein concentrations (12.5-50 mg mL-1) were also performed. Characterization involved size monitoring using dynamic light scattering. Bityrosine detection was performed using fluorescence measurements in order to provide experimental evidence of the mechanism involved. Best dose effects were achieved at 10 kGy with regard to size and no relevant changes were observed as a function of papain concentration, highlighting very broad operational concentration range. Bityrosine changes were identified for the samples as a function of the process confirming that such linkages play an important role in the nanoparticle formation.

  5. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fugui; Li, Ming; Gao, Lidan; Sheng, Weifan; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-06-15

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as the subnanometer scale and that the variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a one-dimensional surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach toward effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques. PMID:27304296

  6. Continuous dosimetry of the biologically harmful UV-radiation in Antarctica with the biofilm technique.

    PubMed

    Quintern, L E; Puskeppeleit, M; Rainer, P; Weber, S; el Naggar, S; Eschweiler, U; Horneck, G

    1994-01-01

    For the first time, a continuous biological dosimetry experiment for cytotoxic solar UV-radiation has been performed in Antarctica. The biologically harmful UV-radiation on the ground was measured at the German Antarctic Georg von Neumayer Station (70 degrees 37' S, 80 degrees 22' W) from December 1990 to March 1992 using the biofilm technique. The UV-sensitive targets were dried spores of Bacillus subtilis which were immobilized on the film surface. The UV-induced inhibition of biological activity, determined photometrically from the protein synthesized after incubation and staining, was taken as a measure for the absorbed UV-dose. Films were exposed in horizontal position for time intervals ranging from 4 days during summer up to 51 and 41 days before and after the polar night respectively. The use of different cut-off filters allowed the calculation of the biologically effective UVA, UVB and the complete UV-radiation (UVA + B). The data were compared with the global radiation and the ozone column thickness indicating an increase of biologically harmful UVB radiation during austral spring at reduced ozone concentrations yielding a radiation amplification factor (RAF) of 1.4, whereas for the total UV(A + B) range the RAF amounted to 0.3. PMID:8151457

  7. Active Correlation Technique: Status and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, Yury

    2010-04-30

    During the recent years, at the FLNR (JINR) a successful cycle of experiments has been accomplished on the synthesis of the superheavy elements with Z = 112-118 with {sup 48}Ca beam. From the viewpoint of the detection of rare decays and background suppression, this success was achieved due to the application of a new radical technique--the method of active correlations. The method employs search in a real-time mode for a pointer to a probable correlation like recoil-alpha for switching the beam off. In the case of detection in the same detector strip an additional alpha-decay event, of 'beam OFF' time interval is prolonged automatically.

  8. Auroral kilometric radiation source characteristics using ray tracing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, R.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.; Lefeuvre, F.; Hanasz, J.; Brittnacher, M.; Parks, G.

    2002-11-01

    3-D ray tracing to the presumed auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) source region has been performed using the input data from wave distribution function (WDF) based on the AKR waveforms recorded on board the Interball 2 satellite by the French wave experiment MEMO. Both the direction of the WDF maximum and the WDF form and angular size have been taken into account. Two instances of AKR emissions were observed on 28 January 1997 at 2037 and 2107 UT. Rays traced in R-X mode out of the s/c point toward two different active regions on the auroral oval (as seen with Polar UV imager after projection of the source region along the magnetic field lines down to the ionosphere level). Source region apparent angular sizes based on WDF are compatible with sizes estimated from signal modulation produced by electric antenna system rotation.

  9. Radiation treatment planning techniques for lymphoma of the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    Della Biancia, Cesar; Hunt, Margie; Furhang, Eli; Wu, Elisa; Yahalom, Joachim . E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: Involved-field radiation therapy of the stomach is often used in the curative treatment of gastric lymphoma. Yet, the optimal technique to irradiate the stomach with minimal morbidity has not been well established. This study was designed to evaluate treatment planning alternatives for stomach irradiation, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), to determine which approach resulted in improved dose distribution and to identify patient-specific anatomic factors that might influence a treatment planning choice. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with lymphoma of the stomach (14 mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas and 1 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) were categorized into 3 types, depending on the geometric relationship between the planning target volume (PTV) and kidneys. AP/PA and 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) plans were generated for each patient. IMRT was planned for 4 patients with challenging geometric relationship between the PTV and the kidneys to determine whether it was advantageous to use IMRT. Results: For type I patients (no overlap between PTV and kidneys), there was essentially no benefit from using 3DCRT over AP/PA. However, for patients with PTVs in close proximity to the kidneys (type II) or with high degree of overlap (type III), the 4-field 3DCRT plans were superior, reducing the kidney V {sub 15Gy} by approximately 90% for type II and 50% for type III patients. For type III, the use of a 3DCRT plan rather than an AP/PA plan decreased the V {sub 15Gy} by approximately 65% for the right kidney and 45% for the left kidney. In the selected cases, IMRT led to a further decrease in left kidney dose as well as in mean liver dose. Conclusions: The geometric relationship between the target and kidneys has a significant impact on the selection of the optimum beam arrangement. Using 4-field 3DCRT markedly decreases the kidney dose. The addition of IMRT led to further incremental improvements in the left kidney

  10. Radiation Detection for Active Interrogation of HEU

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    2004-12-09

    This report briefly describes the neutrons and gamma rays emitted by active interrogation of HEU, briefly discusses measurement methods, briefly discusses sources and detectors relevant to detection of shielded HEU in Sealand containers, and lists the measurement possibilities for the various sources. All but one of the measurement methods detect radiation emitted by induced fission in the HEU; the exception utilizes nuclear resonance fluorescence. The brief descriptions are supplemented by references. This report presents some active interrogation possibilities but the status of understanding is not advanced enough to select particular methods. Additional research is needed to evaluate these possibilities.

  11. Impact of advanced microstructural characterization techniques on modeling and analysis of radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Odette, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of radiation-induced alterations of dimensional and mechanical properties has been shown to be a direct and often predictable consequence of radiation-induced microstructural changes. Recent advances in understanding of the nature and role of each microstructural component in determining the property of interest has led to a reappraisal of the type and priority of data needed for further model development. This paper presents an overview of the types of modeling and analysis activities in progress, the insights that prompted these activities, and specific examples of successful and ongoing efforts. A review is presented of some problem areas that in the authors' opinion are not yet receiving sufficient attention and which may benefit from the application of advanced techniques of microstructural characterization. Guidelines based on experience gained in previous studies are also provided for acquisition of data in a form most applicable to modeling needs.

  12. Radiations and biodegradation techniques for detoxifying Carica papaya seed oil for effective dietary and industrial use.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Israel Sunmola; Bisi-Adeniyi, Tolulope Dorcas; Adedoyin, Toluwalase Ronke; Rotimi, Solomon Oladapo

    2015-10-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is toxic in high concentration. The capacity of Aspergillus niger, microwave and ultraviolet radiations to reduce the BITC levels in Carica papaya Linn seed oil were assessed in vitro. BITC at different concentrations were periodically exposed to microwave and ultraviolet radiations for 30 min and 10 h, respectively; and to identify Aspergillus niger for 4 days. Microwave radiation significantly reduced (p < 0.05) BITC levels (0.0272, 0.0544, and 0.0816 μmol) to 12.19, 8.99 and 27.5 % respectively within 15 min. Ultraviolet radiation significantly reduced (p < 0.05) BITC levels at all the concentrations. A. niger significantly increased (p < 0.05) BITC degradation on days 2 and 4 at 0.816, 1.36 and 2.72 nmol. Glutathione activity was significantly increased (p < 0.05) while glutathione S-transferase activity significantly reduced (p < 0.05) at all concentrations on days 3 and 4 respectively. The three techniques are possible models for improving the dietary consumption of the oil. PMID:26396392

  13. Measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Only two of the fecal specimens collected inflight during the Apollo 15 mission were returned for analysis. Difficulty in obtaining reasonably accurate radiation dose estimates based on the cosmogenic radionuclide content of the specimens was encountered due to the limited sampling. The concentrations of Na-22, K-40, Cr-51, Fe-59, and Cs-137 are reported. The concentrations of 24 major, minor, and trace elements in these two specimens were determined. Most concentrations are typical of those observed previously. Major exceptions are extremely low values for selenium and extraordinarily high values for rare earth elements. The net Po-210 activities in the Apollo 11 and 12 Solar Wind Composition foils and in the Apollo 8 and 12 spacecraft reflective coatings due to lunar exposure have been determined. Equilibrium concentrations of 0.082 + or - 0.012 disintegrations /sq cm sec of Rn-222 in the lunar atmosphere and 0.0238 + or - 0.0035 disintegrations /sq cm sec of Po-210 on the lunar surface have been calculated for Oceanus Procellarum.

  14. Photocatalytic Active Radiation Measurements and Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Underwood, Lauren W.

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalytic materials are being used to purify air, to kill microbes, and to keep surfaces clean. A wide variety of materials are being developed, many of which have different abilities to absorb various wavelengths of light. Material variability, combined with both spectral illumination intensity and spectral distribution variability, will produce a wide range of performance results. The proposed technology estimates photocatalytic active radiation (PcAR), a unit of radiation that normalizes the amount of light based on its spectral distribution and on the ability of the material to absorb that radiation. Photocatalytic reactions depend upon the number of electron-hole pairs generated at the photocatalytic surface. The number of electron-hole pairs produced depends on the number of photons per unit area per second striking the surface that can be absorbed and whose energy exceeds the bandgap of the photocatalytic material. A convenient parameter to describe the number of useful photons is the number of moles of photons striking the surface per unit area per second. The unit of micro-einsteins (or micromoles) of photons per m2 per sec is commonly used for photochemical and photoelectric-like phenomena. This type of parameter is used in photochemistry, such as in the conversion of light energy for photosynthesis. Photosynthetic response correlates with the number of photons rather than by energy because, in this photochemical process, each molecule is activated by the absorption of one photon. In photosynthesis, the number of photons absorbed in the 400 700 nm spectral range is estimated and is referred to as photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). PAR is defined in terms of the photosynthetic photon flux density measured in micro-einsteins of photons per m2 per sec. PcAR is an equivalent, similarly modeled parameter that has been defined for the photocatalytic processes. Two methods to measure the PcAR level are being proposed. In the first method, a calibrated

  15. Review of active radiation shielding developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Roberto

    The radiation risk due to ionizing particles is a critical issue for long duration manned space missions. The ionization losses in the materials of the spacecraft provide passive shielding effectively stopping low energy particles. However, the estimates of the material required to obtain an acceptable level of radiation result in a prohibitive mass. Active electromagnetic shields, which deflect the charged particles, have been considered as an alternative solution. During the last 10 years the interest in this area has grown. A study of active magnetic shielding based on high-temperature superconductors (HTS) was initiated in an ESA study in 2010, continued in the context of the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) programs (2011-2014) as well as within a dedicated FP7 EU program, SR2S (2013-2015). The aim of these effort was to provide a realistic evaluation of the possibilities based on current technology levels as well extrapolating to reasonable technology advances expected during the next decade. The different configurations considered were assessed in terms of their technical feasibility and shielding efficiency. We present here a status report of the ongoing work and some preliminary results.

  16. Neutron Activation Analysis: Techniques and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, Ryan

    2011-04-27

    The role of neutron activation analysis in low-energy low-background experimentsis discussed in terms of comparible methods. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis is introduce. The procedure of instrumental neutron activation analysis is detailed especially with respect to the measurement of trace amounts of natural radioactivity. The determination of reactor neutron spectrum parameters required for neutron activation analysis is also presented.

  17. RST (Robust Satellite Techniques) analysis for monitoring earth emitted radiation in seismically active area of California (US): a long term (2006-2011) analysis of GOES-W/IMAGER thermal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramutoli, V.; Armandi, B.; Filizzola, C.; Genzano, N.; Lisi, M.; Paciello, R.; Pergola, N.

    2014-12-01

    More than ten years of applications of the RST (Robust Satellite Techniques) methodology for monitoring earthquake prone area by using satellite TIR(Thermal InfraRed) data, have shown the ability of this approach to discern anomalous TIR signals possibly associated to seismic activity from normal fluctuations of Earth's thermal emission related to other causes independent on the earthquake occurrence. The RST approach was already tested in the case of tens of earthquakes occurred in different continents (Europe, Asia, America and Africa), in various geo-tectonic settings (compressive, extensional and transcurrent) and with a wide range of magnitudes (from 4.0 to 7.9), by analyzing time series of TIR images acquired by sensors on board of polar (like NOAA/AVHRR, EOS/MODIS) and geostationary satellites (like MFG/MVIRI, MSG/SEVIRI, GOES/IMAGER). In addition RST method has been independently tested by several researchers around the world as well as in the framework of several projects funded by different national space agencies (like the Italian ASI, the U.S. NASA and the German DLR) and recently during the EC-FP7 projectPRE-EARTHQUAKES (www.pre-earthquakes.org),which was devoted to study the earthquake precursors using satellite techniques. This paper will show the results of RST analysis on 6 years (2006-2011)of TIR satellite record collected by GOES-W/IMAGER over Southern part United State (California).Results will be discussed particularly in the prospective of an integrated approach devoted to systematically collectand analyze in real-time, independent observations for a time-Dependent Assessment of Seismic Hazard (t-DASH).

  18. A diagnostic technique used to obtain cross range radiation centers from antenna patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T. H.; Burnside, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    A diagnostic technique to obtain cross range radiation centers based on antenna radiation patterns is presented. This method is similar to the synthetic aperture processing of scattered fields in the radar application. Coherent processing of the radiated fields is used to determine the various radiation centers associated with the far-zone pattern of an antenna for a given radiation direction. This technique can be used to identify an unexpected radiation center that creates an undesired effect in a pattern; on the other hand, it can improve a numerical simulation of the pattern by identifying other significant mechanisms. Cross range results for two 8' reflector antennas are presented to illustrate as well as validate that technique.

  19. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography: techniques and future perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifeng; Liu, Xin; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan C; Qu, Mingliang; Christner, Jodie; Fletcher, Joel G; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2011-01-01

    Despite universal consensus that computed tomography (CT) overwhelmingly benefits patients when used for appropriate indications, concerns have been raised regarding the potential risk of cancer induction from CT due to the exponentially increased use of CT in medicine. Keeping radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable, consistent with the diagnostic task, remains the most important strategy for decreasing this potential risk. This article summarizes the general technical strategies that are commonly used for radiation dose management in CT. Dose-management strategies for pediatric CT, cardiac CT, dual-energy CT, CT perfusion and interventional CT are specifically discussed, and future perspectives on CT dose reduction are presented. PMID:22308169

  20. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 20: Radiation Monitoring Techniques (Radiochemical).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  1. Probing Radiation Damage in Plutonium Alloys with Multiple Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W

    2010-04-21

    A material subjected to radiation damage will usually experience changes in its physical properties. Measuring these changes in the physical properties provides a basis to study radiation damage in a material which is important for a variety of real world applications from reactor materials to semiconducting devices. When investigating radiation damage, the relative sensitivity of any given property can vary considerably based on the concentration and type of damage present as well as external parameters such as the temperature and starting material composition. By measuring multiple physical properties, these differing sensitivities can be leveraged to provide greater insight into the different aspects of radiation damage accumulation, thereby providing a broader understanding of the mechanisms involved. In this report, self-damage from {alpha}-particle decay in Pu is investigated by measuring two different properties: magnetic susceptibility and resistivity. The results suggest that while the first annealing stage obeys second order chemical kinetics, the primary mechanism is not the recombination of vacancy-interstitial close pairs.

  2. European activities in radiation protection in medicine.

    PubMed

    Simeonov, Georgi

    2015-07-01

    The recently published Council Directive 2013/59/Euratom ('new European Basic Safety Standards', EU BSS) modernises and consolidates the European radiation protection legislation by taking into account the latest scientific knowledge, technological progress and experience with implementing the current legislation and by merging five existing Directives into a single piece of legislation. The new European BSS repeal previous European legislation on which the national systems for radiation protection in medicine of the 28 European Union (EU) Member States are based, including the 96/29/Euratom 'BSS' and the 97/43/Euratom 'Medical Exposure' Directives. While most of the elements of the previous legislation have been kept, there are several legal changes that will have important influence over the regulation and practice in the field all over Europe-these include, among others: (i) strengthening the implementation of the justification principle and expanding it to medically exposed asymptomatic individuals, (ii) more attention to interventional radiology, (iii) new requirements for dose recording and reporting, (iv) increased role of the medical physics expert in imaging, (v) new set of requirements for preventing and following up on accidents and (vi) new set of requirements for procedures where radiological equipment is used on people for non-medical purposes (non-medical imaging exposure). The EU Member States have to enforce the new EU BSS before January 2018 and bring into force the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with it. The European Commission has certain legal obligations and powers to verify the compliance of the national measures with the EU laws and, wherever necessary, issue recommendations to, or open infringement cases against, national governments. In order to ensure timely and coordinated implementation of the new European legal requirements for radiation protection, the Commission is launching several actions

  3. The measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The principal gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes, produced in the body of astronauts by cosmic-ray bombardment, which have half-lives long enough to be useful for radiation dose evaluation, are Be-7, Na-22, and Na-24. The sodium isotopes were measured in the preflight and postflight urine and feces, and those feces specimens collected during the manned Apollo missions, by analysis of the urine salts and the raw feces in large crystal multidimensional gamma-ray spectrometers. The Be-7 was chemically separated, and its concentration measured in an all NaI (TL), anticoincidence shielded, scintillation well crystal. The astronaut radiation dose in millirads, as determined for the Apollo 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 missions, was 330, 160, smaller than 315, 870 plus or minus 550, 31, 110, and smaller than 250, respectively.

  4. The impact of radiation hardened by design (RHBD) techniques on the performance of readout integrated circuits in radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbs, John E.; Gramer, Mark E.; Maestas-Jepson, Diana; Dole, Gary A.; Hahn, Allan

    2008-08-01

    The tolerance of a hybrid array (HA) to total ionizing dose (TID) radiation continues to be a major performance consideration for space based imaging systems. In an effort to improve TID performance, HA manufacturers have begun to utilize circuit design techniques to enhance the TID tolerance of readout integrated circuits (ROICs). This paper will report on the radiometric and TID radiation characterizations of a HA that utilizes radiation-hardened-by-design (RHBD) techniques. This paper will not describe the design techniques used. Instead, characterization data are presented that demonstrate a HA TID tolerance of over 25 units of total ionizing dose (UTID). This result is compared with the performance of devices with ROICs processed at commercial foundries that do not make use of RHBD techniques. The HA described in this paper represents a state-of-the-art device; the ROIC was designed to be low noise, high gain, and radiation tolerant. While design techniques were utilized to enhance its TID hardness, no special fabrication processes were used.

  5. Optimal control techniques for active noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Keeling, S. L.; Silcox, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Active suppression of noise in a bounded enclosure is considered within the framework of optimal control theory. A sinusoidal pressure field due to exterior offending noise sources is assumed to be known in a neighborhood of interior sensors. The pressure field due to interior controlling sources is assumed to be governed by a nonhomogeneous wave equation within the enclosure and by a special boundary condition designed to accommodate frequency-dependent reflection properties of the enclosure boundary. The form of the controlling sources is determined by considering the steady-state behavior of the system, and it is established that the control strategy proposed is stable and asymptotically optimal.

  6. Measurement of soil moisture using remote sensing multisensor radiation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, W. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical modeling as well as laboratory and field measurement were coupled with analysis of aircraft data obtained from controlled sites in an effort to enhance understanding of the microwave response due to soil moisture so as to specify sensor parameters and develop inversion algorithms. Models to predict the complex dielectric constant were produced which led to the interpretation of the results in terms of a matrix potential rather than simply moisture content. Similar advances were made in the development of coherent and incoherent radiative transfer models and rough surface scattering models.

  7. Radiation exposure induces inflammasome pathway activation in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Stoecklein, Veit M; Osuka, Akinori; Ishikawa, Shizu; Lederer, Madeline R; Wanke-Jellinek, Lorenz; Lederer, James A

    2015-02-01

    Radiation exposure induces cell and tissue damage, causing local and systemic inflammatory responses. Because the inflammasome pathway is triggered by cell death and danger-associated molecular patterns, we hypothesized that the inflammasome may signal acute and chronic immune responses to radiation. Using a mouse radiation model, we show that radiation induces a dose-dependent increase in inflammasome activation in macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, T cells, and B cells as judged by cleaved caspase-1 detection in cells. Time course analysis showed the appearance of cleaved caspase-1 in cells by day 1 and sustained expression until day 7 after radiation. Also, cells showing inflammasome activation coexpressed the cell surface apoptosis marker annexin V. The role of caspase-1 as a trigger for hematopoietic cell losses after radiation was studied in caspase-1(-/-) mice. We found less radiation-induced cell apoptosis and immune cell loss in caspase-1(-/-) mice than in control mice. Next, we tested whether uric acid might mediate inflammasome activation in cells by treating mice with allopurinol and discovered that allopurinol treatment completely blocked caspase-1 activation in cells. Finally, we demonstrate that radiation-induced caspase-1 activation occurs by a Nod-like receptor family protein 3-independent mechanism because radiation-exposed Nlrp3(-/-) mice showed caspase-1 activation profiles that were indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice. In summary, our data demonstrate that inflammasome activation occurs in many immune cell types following radiation exposure and that allopurinol prevented radiation-induced inflammasome activation. These results suggest that targeting the inflammasome may help control radiation-induced inflammation. PMID:25539818

  8. Novel Techniques for Exploring the Physics of the Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2012-10-01

    The plasma physics of the Radiation Belts (RB) is a premier scientific topic with important technological implications. A new mission the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) will be launched in August, 2012, fully instrumented to explore the RB Physics with emphasis on particle interactions with low frequency plasma waves that control the rates of energetic particle precipitation, acceleration and transport. An important difficulty with passive observation, such as the RBSP, is the ``chicken & egg'' problem. Namely particles drive waves while waves precipitate, accelerate and transport particles. It is a complex, non-linear interaction with multiple feedbacks. The two-satellite coverage provided by RBSP and similar missions does not allow for uniquely identifying cause and effect. A new technology recently developed using ionospheric heaters -- powerful HF transmitters or phased arrays - that allow controlled heating of the ionosphere provides us with means for injecting low frequency waves in the ULF/ELF/VLF range into the RB and using the satellites overflying the heater magnetic flux tubes to diagnose the wave particle interactions. The paper will provide a comprehensive planning of experiments that use the HAARP, Arecibo and SURA heaters in conjunction with RBSP and other satellite missions, such as the Air Force DSX and the Russian RESONANCE, to provide new inroads into the RB physics.

  9. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Techniques to Monitor Radiation Damage in RPV and Internal Components

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Laurence; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jisnmin; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Wall, Joe

    2015-11-02

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate that nonlinear ultrasonics (NLU) can be used to directly and quantitatively measure the remaining life in radiation damaged reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and internal components. Specific damage types to be monitored are irradiation embrittlement and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Our vision is to develop a technique that allows operators to assess damage by making a limited number of NLU measurements in strategically selected critical reactor components during regularly scheduled outages. This measured data can then be used to determine the current condition of these key components, from which remaining useful life can be predicted. Methods to unambiguously characterize radiation related damage in reactor internals and RPVs remain elusive. NLU technology has demonstrated great potential to be used as a material sensor – a sensor that can continuously monitor a material’s damage state. The physical effect being monitored by NLU is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave. The degree of nonlinearity is quantified with the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β, which is an absolute, measurable material constant. Recent research has demonstrated that nonlinear ultrasound can be used to characterize material state and changes in microscale characteristics such as internal stress states, precipitate formation and dislocation densities. Radiation damage reduces the fracture toughness of RPV steels and internals, and can leave them susceptible to IASCC, which may in turn limit the lifetimes of some operating reactors. The ability to characterize radiation damage in the RPV and internals will enable nuclear operators to set operation time thresholds for vessels and prescribe and schedule replacement activities for core internals. Such a capability will allow a more clear definition of reactor safety margins. The research consists of three tasks: (1

  10. Studies on the effect of mobile phone radiation on DNA using laser induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnu, K.; Nithyaja, B.; Pradeep, C.; Sujith, R.; Mohanan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2011-11-01

    In the present study we have investigated the effect of mobile phone radiation on deoxyribonucleic acid by using fluorescence technique. Absorption spectra shows increase in absorption of DNA after exposure to radiation from mobile phone with different SAR values and microwave frequency which give information about unwinding of the DNA double strand. Fluorescence intensity of dye doped DNA solution is getting reduced suggesting that the absorbed energy is used for unwinding of double strand of DNA after irradiating with microwave radiation. Unwinding of the DNA is very sensitive to power of the microwave radiation.

  11. Active radiation hardening technology for fiber-optic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Suo, Xinxin; Yang, Mingwei

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrated an active radiation hardening technology for fiber optic source developed for high performance fiber optic gyroscope. The radiation characteristic of erbium-doped fiber was studied experimentally. The radiation induced attenuation (RIA) at 980nm pump light was identified to be the main reason for the degradation and there was photo-bleaching effect in EDF too. A variable parameters control technology was proposed and taken to keep the 980nm and 1550nm light energy stable and high stability and radiation-resistance fiber source with gauss profile spectrum was realized .The source can stand against more than 50 krad (Si) total radiation dose.

  12. An improved technique for global solar radiation estimation using numerical weather prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamim, M. A.; Remesan, R.; Bray, M.; Han, D.

    2015-07-01

    Global solar radiation is the driving force in hydrological cycle especially for evapotranspiration (ET) and is quite infrequently measured. This has led to the reliance on indirect techniques of estimation for data scarce regions. This study presents an improved technique that uses information from a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model (National Centre for Atmospheric Research NCAR's Mesoscale Meteorological model version 5 MM5), for the determination of a cloud cover index (CI), a major factor in the attenuation of the incident solar radiation. The cloud cover index (CI) together with the atmospheric transmission factor (KT) and output from a global clear sky solar radiation were then used for the estimation of global solar radiation for the Brue catchment located in the southwest of England. The results clearly show an improvement in the estimated global solar radiation in comparison to the prevailing approaches.

  13. Techniques for Promoting Active Learning. The Cross Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, K. Patricia

    This guide offers suggestions for implementing active learning techniques in the community college classroom. The author argues that, although much of the literature on active learning emphasizes collaboration and small-group learning, active learning does not always involve interaction. It must also involve reflection and self-monitoring of both…

  14. Comparison of data inversion techniques for remotely sensed wide-angle observations of Earth emitted radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The shape factor, parameter estimation, and deconvolution data analysis techniques were applied to the same set of Earth emitted radiation measurements to determine the effects of different techniques on the estimated radiation field. All three techniques are defined and their assumptions, advantages, and disadvantages are discussed. Their results are compared globally, zonally, regionally, and on a spatial spectrum basis. The standard deviations of the regional differences in the derived radiant exitance varied from 7.4 W-m/2 to 13.5 W-m/2.

  15. Radiation safety at accelerator facilities NCRP activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Kenneth R.

    1997-02-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has issued 13 reports, dating back to 1949, giving guidance and recommendations for radiation protection at accelerator facilities. There are six current reports on the topics of neutron radiation; facility and shielding design; alarms and access control systems; and equipment design, performance, and use. Scientific Committee 46 (SC 46) is currently overseeing the development of two reports that will provide up-to-date guidance for the design of medical accelerator facilities and shielding. SC 46 has also proposed that a report be written to provide guidance for the design and shielding of industrial accelerator and large irradiator facilities. This paper describes the status and contents of these reports.

  16. Optimized digital filtering techniques for radiation detection with HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salathe, Marco; Kihm, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes state-of-the-art digital filtering techniques that are part of GEANA, an automatic data analysis software used for the GERDA experiment. The discussed filters include a novel, nonlinear correction method for ballistic deficits, which is combined with one of three shaping filters: a pseudo-Gaussian, a modified trapezoidal, or a modified cusp filter. The performance of the filters is demonstrated with a 762 g Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector, produced by Canberra, that measures γ-ray lines from radioactive sources in an energy range between 59.5 and 2614.5 keV. At 1332.5 keV, together with the ballistic deficit correction method, all filters produce a comparable energy resolution of ~1.61 keV FWHM. This value is superior to those measured by the manufacturer and those found in publications with detectors of a similar design and mass. At 59.5 keV, the modified cusp filter without a ballistic deficit correction produced the best result, with an energy resolution of 0.46 keV. It is observed that the loss in resolution by using a constant shaping time over the entire energy range is small when using the ballistic deficit correction method.

  17. Utilization of radiation technique on the saccharification and fermentation of biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaetsu, I.; Kumakura, M.; Fujimura, T.; Yoshii, F.; Kojima, T.; Tamada, M.

    The application of irradiation technique to the process of saccharification and subsequent fermentation of cellulosic wastes such as chaff and rice straw to obtain ethanol, was investigated. It was found that when waste raw materials were irradiated by ?-ray or electron beam, they became accessible to the subsequent enzymatic saccharification reaction. Irradiation of 10 7-10 8 Rad was enough for this effect. Some kind of additives reduced necessary dosage for this pretreatment. Cellulase, Trichoderma reesei which produce cellulase, and yeast were immobilized as biocatalysts for biomass conversion by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomer at low temperature. The immobilized cellulase showed almost same activity of glucose production as the native cellulase. Continuous saccharification reaction was carried out by using the immobilized cellulase. The immobilized Trichoderma reesei and the immobilized yeast showed almost same activity as the intact biocatalysts. It was concluded that the continuous saccharification and subsequent fermentation could be carried out effectively by using the immobilized biocatalysts. Spinach chloroplasts were immobilized by the same method as the first step for the conversion of water into hydrogen gas using solar energy. The immobilized chloroplasts kept the O 2 evolution activity in storage more than 30 days at 4°C. Thermostatility of chloroplasts was also improved greatly by the immobilization.

  18. Measuring the activity of a 51Cr neutrino source based on the gamma-radiation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, V. V.; Gavrin, V. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Malyshkin, Yu. M.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    A technique for the measurement of activities of intense β sources by measuring the continuous gamma-radiation (internal bremsstrahlung) spectra is developed. A method for reconstructing the spectrum recorded by a germanium semiconductor detector is described. A method for the absolute measurement of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of 51Cr is presented.

  19. Validation of a technique for estimating outgoing longwave radiation from HIRS radiance observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, Robert G.; Lee, Hai-Tien; Yanuk, David; Gruber, Arnold

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous observations by the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanning radiometer and the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS) on board the NOAA-9 spacecraft have been used to validate a multispectral technique for estimating the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) from the earth-atmosphere system. Results from approximately 100 000 collocated observations show that the HIRS technique provides instantaneous OLR estimates that agree with the ERBE observations just as well as different ERBE scanners agree with each other--about 5 W m(exp -2) rms. Although there are differences between the HIRS and ERBE estimates that depend upon the scene type and time of day, the HIRS technique explained more than 99% of the variance of the ERBE observations for both day and night observations. The results suggest that the HIRS OLR technique is a suitable replacement for the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer technique now used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for operational estimates of the OLR.

  20. Alternative Medicine Techniques Have Non-Linear Effects on Radiation Response and Can Alter the Expression of Radiation Induced Bystander Effects

    PubMed Central

    Mothersill, Carmel; Smith, Richard; Henry, Matthew; Seymour, Colin; Wong, Raimond

    2013-01-01

    Many so-called “alternative medicine” techniques such as Reiki and acupuncture produce very good outcomes for intractable pain and other chronic illnesses but the efficacy is often dismissed as being psychosomatic. However a plausible mechanism does exist i.e. that the treatments alter the electromagnetic fields in living organisms and thereby prevent or reduce activity of neurons which lead to the pain. Low doses of ionising radiation have similar effects on electromagnetic fields and are known to induce signaling cascades in tissues due to ion gradients. To test this hypothesis cell cultures were exposed to Reiki – like and to acupuncture – like treatments, both performed by qualified practitioners. The cells were exposed either before or after the treatment to x-rays and were monitored for production of direct damage or bystander signals. The data suggest that the alternative techniques altered the response of cells to direct irradiation and altered bystander signal mechanisms. We conclude that alternative medicine techniques involving electromagnetic perturbations may modify the response of cells to ionizing radiation. In addition to the obvious implications for mechanistic studies of low dose effects, this could provide a novel target to exploit in radiation protection and in optimizing therapeutic gain during radiotherapy. PMID:23550268

  1. Ionizing Radiation Impairs T Cell Activation by Affecting Metabolic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng-Hong; Wang, Yi-wen; Chen, Renxiang; Zhou, Bin; Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has a variety of acute and long-lasting adverse effects on the immune system. Whereas measureable effects of radiation on immune cell cytotoxicity and population change have been well studied in human and animal models, little is known about the functional alterations of the surviving immune cells after ionizing radiation. The objective of this study was to delineate the effects of radiation on T cell function by studying the alterations of T cell receptor activation and metabolic changes in activated T cells isolated from previously irradiated animals. Using a global metabolomics profiling approach, for the first time we demonstrate that ionizing radiation impairs metabolic reprogramming of T cell activation, which leads to substantial decreases in the efficiency of key metabolic processes required for activation, such as glucose uptake, glycolysis, and energy metabolism. In-depth understanding of how radiation impacts T cell function highlighting modulation of metabolism during activation is not only a novel approach to investigate the pivotal processes in the shift of T cell homeostasis after radiation, it also may lead to new targets for therapeutic manipulation in the combination of radiotherapy and immune therapy. Given that appreciable effects were observed with as low as 10 cGy, our results also have implications for low dose environmental exposures. PMID:26078715

  2. Incorporating Active Learning Techniques into a Genetics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, W. Theodore; Jabot, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    We revised a sophomore-level genetics class to more actively engage the students in their learning. The students worked in groups on quizzes using the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique (IF-AT) and active-learning projects. The IF-AT quizzes allowed students to discuss key concepts in small groups and learn the correct answers in class. The…

  3. Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in medical X-ray imaging have enabled the development of new techniques capable of assessing not only bone quantity but also structure. This article provides (a) a brief review of the current X-ray methods used for quantitative assessment of the skeleton, (b) data on the levels of radiation exposure associated with these methods and (c) information about radiation safety issues. Radiation doses associated with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry are very low. However, as with any X-ray imaging technique, each particular examination must always be clinically justified. When an examination is justified, the emphasis must be on dose optimisation of imaging protocols. Dose optimisation is more important for paediatric examinations because children are more vulnerable to radiation than adults. Methods based on multi-detector CT (MDCT) are associated with higher radiation doses. New 3D volumetric hip and spine quantitative computed tomography (QCT) techniques and high-resolution MDCT for evaluation of bone structure deliver doses to patients from 1 to 3 mSv. Low-dose protocols are needed to reduce radiation exposure from these methods and minimise associated health risks. PMID:20559834

  4. Prediction of the solar radiation on the Earth using support vector regression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piri, Jamshid; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Petković, Dalibor; Tong, Chong Wen; Rehman, Muhammad Habib ur

    2015-01-01

    The solar rays on the surface of Earth is one of the major factor in water resources, environmental and agricultural modeling. The main environmental factors influencing plants growth are temperature, moisture, and solar radiation. Solar radiation is rarely obtained in weather stations; as a result, many empirical approaches have been applied to estimate it by using other parameters. In this study, a soft computing technique, named support vector regression (SVR) has been used to estimate the solar radiation. The data was collected from two synoptic stations with different climate conditions (Zahedan and Bojnurd) during the period of 5 and 7 years, respectively. These data contain sunshine hours, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, average relative humidity and daily solar radiation. In this study, the polynomial and radial basis functions (RBF) are applied as the SVR kernel function to estimate solar radiation. The performance of the proposed estimators is confirmed with the simulation results.

  5. Direct satellite observations on bremsstrahlung radiation as a technique to investigate its role in meteorological processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. G.; Imhof, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    It was suggested that bremsstrahlung radiation associated with strong auroras (in turn associated with geomagnetic disturbances) may cause increased ionization near the 300-millibar level, which, in turn, leads to the formation of cirrus clouds. These clouds could modify the outgoing black body radiation rates and influence weather patterns. The first satellite observations on bremsstrahlung radiation produced in the atmosphere by precipitating energetic electrons are discussed. This type of observation affords the possibility of directly monitoring the bremsstrahlung energy input to the lower atmosphere over large segments of earth and at frequent intervals. Detailed measurements on the spatial and energy distributions of the bremsstrahlung radiation are feasible with present techniques, and satellite data on widespread bremsstrahlung events are presented and discussed. From comparison of the ion production rates from cosmic rays with those calculated from bremsstrahlung from precipitating energetic electrons, it is concluded that bremsstrahlung radiation is a negligible contributor to the ionization near the 300-millibar level.

  6. Experimental, theoretical and computational study of frequency upshift of electromagnetic radiation using plasma techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, C.

    1992-09-01

    This is a second year progress report on Experimental, Theoretical and Computational Study of Frequency Upshift of Electromagnetic Radiation Using Plasma Techniques.'' The highlights are: (I) Ionization fronts have been shown to frequency upshift e.m. radiation by greater than a factor 5. In the experiments, 33 GHz microwave radiation is upshifted to more than 175 GHz using a relativistically propagating ionization front created by a laser beam. (II) A Letter describing the results has been published in Physical Review Letters and an invited'' paper has been submitted to IEEE Trans. in Plasma Science.

  7. Recent Developments in Three Dimensional Radiation Transport Using the Green's Function Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockell, Candice; Tweed, John; Blattnig, Steve R.; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    In the future, astronauts will be sent into space for longer durations of time compared to previous missions. The increased risk of exposure to dangerous radiation, such as Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Particle Events, is of great concern. Consequently, steps must be taken to ensure astronaut safety by providing adequate shielding. In order to better determine and verify shielding requirements, an accurate and efficient radiation transport code based on a fully three dimensional radiation transport model using the Green's function technique is being developed

  8. Imaging techniques for assaying lymphocyte activation in action

    PubMed Central

    Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Sherman, Eilon; Barr, Valarie A.; Samelson, Lawrence E.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging techniques have greatly improved our understanding of lymphocyte activation. Technical advances in spatial and temporal resolution and new labelling tools have enabled researchers to directly observe the activation process. Consequently, research using imaging approaches to study lymphocyte activation has expanded, providing an unprecedented level of cellular and molecular detail in the field. As a result, certain models of lymphocyte activation have been verified, others have been revised and yet others have been replaced with new concepts. In this article, we review the current imaging techniques that are used to assess lymphocyte activation in different contexts, from whole animals to single molecules, and discuss the advantages and potential limitations of these methods. PMID:21179118

  9. Space activities and radiation protection of crew members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straube, Ulrich; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther; Facius, Rainer; Reiter, Thomas; Kehl, Marcel; Damann, M. D. Volker; Tognini, Michel

    Personnel working as crew in space-based activities e.g. professional astronauts and cosmo-nauts but also -to a certain extend-space flight participants ("space tourists"), demand health and safety considerations that have to include radiation protection measures. The radiation environment that a crew is exposed to during a space flight, differs significantly to that found on earth including commercial aviation, mainly due to the presence of heavy charged particles with great potential for biological damage. The exposure exceeds those routinely received by terrestrial radiation workers. A sequence of activities has to be conducted targeting to mitigate adverse effects of space radiation. Considerable information is available and applied through the joint efforts of the Space Agencies that are involved in the operations of the International Space Station, ISS. This presentation will give an introduction to the current measures for ra-diation monitoring and protection of astronauts of the European Space Agency (ESA). It will include information: on the radiation protection guidelines that shall ensure the proper imple-mentation and execution of radiation protection measures, the operational hardware used for radiation monitoring and personal dosimetry on ISS, as well as information about operational procedures that are applied.

  10. Measurements of the neutron dose equivalent for various radiation qualities, treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hälg, R A; Besserer, J; Boschung, M; Mayer, S; Lomax, A J; Schneider, U

    2014-05-21

    In radiation therapy, high energy photon and proton beams cause the production of secondary neutrons. This leads to an unwanted dose contribution, which can be considerable for tissues outside of the target volume regarding the long term health of cancer patients. Due to the high biological effectiveness of neutrons in regards to cancer induction, small neutron doses can be important. This study quantified the neutron doses for different radiation therapy modalities. Most of the reports in the literature used neutron dose measurements free in air or on the surface of phantoms to estimate the amount of neutron dose to the patient. In this study, dose measurements were performed in terms of neutron dose equivalent inside an anthropomorphic phantom. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using track etch detectors as a function of the distance to the isocenter, as well as for radiation sensitive organs. The dose distributions were compared with respect to treatment techniques (3D-conformal, volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for photons; spot scanning and passive scattering for protons), therapy machines (Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators) and radiation quality (photons and protons). The neutron dose equivalent varied between 0.002 and 3 mSv per treatment gray over all measurements. Only small differences were found when comparing treatment techniques, but substantial differences were observed between the linear accelerator models. The neutron dose equivalent for proton therapy was higher than for photons in general and in particular for double-scattered protons. The overall neutron dose equivalent measured in this study was an order of magnitude lower than the stray dose of a treatment using 6 MV photons, suggesting that the contribution of the secondary neutron dose equivalent to the integral dose of a radiotherapy patient is small. PMID:24778349

  11. Measurements of the neutron dose equivalent for various radiation qualities, treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hälg, R. A.; Besserer, J.; Boschung, M.; Mayer, S.; Lomax, A. J.; Schneider, U.

    2014-05-01

    In radiation therapy, high energy photon and proton beams cause the production of secondary neutrons. This leads to an unwanted dose contribution, which can be considerable for tissues outside of the target volume regarding the long term health of cancer patients. Due to the high biological effectiveness of neutrons in regards to cancer induction, small neutron doses can be important. This study quantified the neutron doses for different radiation therapy modalities. Most of the reports in the literature used neutron dose measurements free in air or on the surface of phantoms to estimate the amount of neutron dose to the patient. In this study, dose measurements were performed in terms of neutron dose equivalent inside an anthropomorphic phantom. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using track etch detectors as a function of the distance to the isocenter, as well as for radiation sensitive organs. The dose distributions were compared with respect to treatment techniques (3D-conformal, volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for photons; spot scanning and passive scattering for protons), therapy machines (Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators) and radiation quality (photons and protons). The neutron dose equivalent varied between 0.002 and 3 mSv per treatment gray over all measurements. Only small differences were found when comparing treatment techniques, but substantial differences were observed between the linear accelerator models. The neutron dose equivalent for proton therapy was higher than for photons in general and in particular for double-scattered protons. The overall neutron dose equivalent measured in this study was an order of magnitude lower than the stray dose of a treatment using 6 MV photons, suggesting that the contribution of the secondary neutron dose equivalent to the integral dose of a radiotherapy patient is small.

  12. The effect of data analysis techniques on the interpretation of wide-angle longwave radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    Three different data analysis techniques - shape factor, parameter estimation, and deconvolution - have been applied to the same set of satellite radiation measurements to determine their effect on the estimated radiation field. The measurements are from a wide-angle, horizon-to-horizon, nadir-pointing sensor. The shape factor technique reduces each measurement to a radiant exitance at the top of the atmosphere by simple division by a constant. The parameter estimation technique processes all measurements together as a batch and defines the radiant exitance as a least-squares fit to the data. The deconvolution technique takes advantage of the fact that spherical harmonics are the eigenfunctions of the measurement operator. All three techniques are derived, and their assumptions, advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Their results are compared globally, zonally, regionally and on a spatial spectrum basis. All three techniques give comparable results for global parameters; however, results on a regional scale were quite different. The standard deviations of the regional differences in radiant exitance varied from 7.4 to 13.5 W/sq m. Of the three techniques, the parameter estimation technique produced the best regional results and is the choice of the author.

  13. Synergistic-radiation grafting: A novel modification technique for the preparation of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Schulte, D.

    1993-10-01

    Radiation grafting was performed using different vinylmonomers and solvents simultaneously to modify polyamide-6 substrates. With the new technique, immunadsorbents and media for affinity chromatography were developed for the separation of low density lipoproteins, IgG antibodies and biotin- antibodies. To increase the biocompatibility of polymers, a graft modification was applied which allowed a totally coherent endothelial cell seeding.

  14. Fluorine gettering by activated charcoal in a radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, L.K.; Toth, L.M.

    1988-10-01

    Activated charcoal has been shown to be an effective gettering agent for the fluorine gas that is liberated in a radiation environment. Even though activated charcoal is a commonly used getter, little is known about the radiation stability of the fluorine-charcoal product. This work has shown that not only is the product stable in high gamma radiation fields, but also that radiation enhances the capacity of the charcoal for the fluorine. The most useful application of this work is with the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel salt because the radioactive components (fission products and actinides) cause radiolytic damage to the solid LiF-BeF/sub 2/-ZrF/sub 4/-UF/sub 4/ (64.5, 30.3, 5.0, 0.13 mol %, respectively) resulting in the liberation of fluorine gas. This work has also demonstrated that the maximum damage to the fuel salt by approx.3 /times/ 10/sup 7/ R/h gamma radiation is approximately 2%, at which point the rate of recombination of fluorine with active metal sites within the salt lattice equals the rate of fluorine generation. The enhanced reactivity of the activated charcoal and radiation stability of the product ensures that the gettered fluorine will stay sequestered in the charcoal.

  15. Robust control design techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozbay, Hitay; Bachmann, Glen R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, an active flutter suppression problem is studied for a thin airfoil in unsteady aerodynamics. The mathematical model of this system is infinite dimensional because of Theodorsen's function which is irrational. Several second order approximations of Theodorsen's function are compared. A finite dimensional model is obtained from such an approximation. We use H infinity control techniques to find a robustly stabilizing controller for active flutter suppression.

  16. Radiation protection in radiologic technology: Apathy versus active involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, K.H.

    1982-11-01

    The lack of active participation in radiation protection is a serious problem in Radiologic Technology today. Underlying the problem is professional apathy. An overview of the historical changes, as well as various recent developments in radiology, accentuate the importance of necessary changes in technologists' attitudes and activities. 22 references.

  17. A novel technique of unilateral percutaneous kyphoplasty achieves effective biomechanical strength and reduces radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yan; Yang, Lei; Li, Haijun; Ren, Yajun; Cao, Xiaojian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel technique of percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) with effective biomechanical strength and lower radiation exposure. Methods: Thirty fresh lumbar vertebrae isolated from six hogs were decalcified and compressed to induce osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. Kyphoplasty was performed using three different techniques (ten for each group): conventional unilateral approach (group A), conventional bilateral approach (group B) and novel unilateral approach (group C). Biomechanical indexes including Yield load and stiffness were tested before and after kyphoplasty. The anterior height of each vertebral body (AHVB) was measured before compression, after compression and after kyphoplasty. Frequency of C-arm use and volume of bone cement were also recorded in the process. Results: Compared with group A, our novel technique in group C can significantly improve the recovery of AHVB after compression fractures. However, there was no statistical difference between group B and group C. Values of Yield load in both group B and group C were statistically higher than that in group A, however, no significant difference was found between group B and C. Statistical results of stiffness were similar to Yield load. Regarding volume of bone cement and radiation exposure, the novel technique in group C needed more bone cement and fluoroscopy use than in group A but less than in group B. Conclusions: This novel device makes unilateral kyphoplasty feasible, safe and effective. In the premise of guaranteed biomechanical strength, the new technique significantly reduces risk of radiation exposure in kyphoplasty. PMID:27158403

  18. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C.; Konger, Raymond L.; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  19. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Harrison, Kathleen A; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C; Konger, Raymond L; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-04-12

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  20. PARduino: A Simple Device Measuring and Logging Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Findley, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR, 400 to 700 nm) is one of the primary controls of forest carbon and water relations. In complex terrain, PAR has high spatial-variability. Given the high cost of commercial datalogging equipment, spatially-distributed measurements of PAR have been typically modeled using geographic coordinates and terrain indices. Here, we present a design for a low cost, field-deployable device for measuring and logging PAR built around an Arduino microcontroller (we named it PARduino). PARduino provides for widely distributed sensor arrays and tests the feasibility of using hobbyist-grade electronics for collecting scientific data. PARduino components include a LiCor quantum sensor, EME Systems signal converter/amplifier, and Sparkfun's Arduino Pro Mini microcontroller. Additional components include a real time clock, a microSD flash memory card, and a custom printed circuit board (PCB). We selected the components with an eye towards ease of assembly. Everything can be connected to the PCB using through-hole soldering techniques. Since the device will be deployed in remote research plots that lack easy access to line power, battery life was also a consideration in the design. Extended deployment is possible because PARduino's software keeps it in a low-power sleep mode until ready to make a measurement. PARduino will be open-source hardware for use and improvement by others.

  1. Development of radiation dose reduction techniques for cadmium zinc telluride detectors in molecular breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Michael K.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Weinmann, Amanda; Manduca, Armando; Rhodes, Deborah J.

    2010-08-01

    Background: Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a novel breast imaging technique that uses Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) gamma cameras to detect the uptake of Tc-99m sestamibi in breast tumors. Current techniques employ an administered dose of 20-30 mCi Tc-99m, delivering an effective dose of 6.5-10 mSv to the body. This is ~ 5-10 times that of mammography. The goal of this study was to reduce the radiation dose by a factor of 5-10, while maintaining image quality. Methods: A total of 4 dose reduction schemes were evaluated - a) optimized collimation, b) improved utilization of the energy spectrum below the photopeak, c) adaptive geometric mean algorithm developed for combination of images from opposing detectors, and d) non local means filtering (NLMF) for noise reduction and image enhancement. Validation of the various schemes was performed using a breast phantom containing a variety of tumors and containing activity matched to that observed in clinical studies. Results: Development of tungsten collimators with holes matched to the CZT pixels yielded a 2.1-2.9 gain in system sensitivity. Improved utilization of the energy spectra yielded a 1.5-2.0 gain in sensitivity. Development of a modified geometric mean algorithm yielded a 1.4 reduction in image noise, while retaining contrast. Images of the breast phantom demonstrated that a factor of 5 reduction in dose was achieved. Additional refinements to the NLMF should enable an additional factor of 2 reduction in dose. Conclusion: Significant dose reduction in MBI to levels comparable to mammography can be achieved while maintaining image quality.

  2. Applications Of Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Simulation Techniques For Predicting Single Event Effects In Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Kevin; Reed, Robert; Weller, Robert; Mendenhall, Marcus; Sierawski, Brian; Schrimpf, Ronald

    2011-06-01

    MRED (Monte Carlo Radiative Energy Deposition) is Vanderbilt University's Geant4 application for simulating radiation events in semiconductors. Geant4 is comprised of the best available computational physics models for the transport of radiation through matter. In addition to basic radiation transport physics contained in the Geant4 core, MRED has the capability to track energy loss in tetrahedral geometric objects, includes a cross section biasing and track weighting technique for variance reduction, and additional features relevant to semiconductor device applications. The crucial element of predicting Single Event Upset (SEU) parameters using radiation transport software is the creation of a dosimetry model that accurately approximates the net collected charge at transistor contacts as a function of deposited energy. The dosimetry technique described here is the multiple sensitive volume (MSV) model. It is shown to be a reasonable approximation of the charge collection process and its parameters can be calibrated to experimental measurements of SEU cross sections. The MSV model, within the framework of MRED, is examined for heavy ion and high-energy proton SEU measurements of a static random access memory.

  3. Minimizing occupational and patient radiation exposure using an optimized injection technique

    SciTech Connect

    Holly, A.S.; Stumpf, K.D.; Ortendahl, D.A.; Hattner, R.S.

    1987-12-01

    In an attempt to lower whole-body and hand radiation exposure to the technologist and decrease the number of infiltrated doses, this laboratory instituted a cold start method for radionuclide injection. The authors then compared the radiation dosimetry readings for a period before and after instituting the method. The finger ring exposures and whole-body exposures were compared. The exposure to the technologist's hands was reduced by 56% and to the technologist's body by 28%. Detectable extravasation of the dose was reduced from 64% to 9%. The recommend the use of this technique for all nuclear medicine departments.

  4. Body radiation exposure in breast cancer radiotherapy: Impact of breast IMRT and virtual wedge compensation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Tony; Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen; Vu, Toni; Hicks, Deanna; O'Brien, Peter; Pritchard, Kathleen

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Recent reports demonstrate a dramatically increased rate of secondary leukemia for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant high-dose anthracycline and radiotherapy, and that radiation is an independent factor for the development of leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate the radiation body exposure during breast radiotherapy and to characterize the factors associated with an increased exposure. Patients and Methods: In a prospective cohort of 120 women, radiation measurements were taken from four sites on the body at the time of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze patient and treatment factors associated with the amount of scattered radiation. Results: For standard 50 Gy breast radiotherapy, the minimal dose received by abdominal organs is on average 0.45 Gy, ranging from 0.06 to 1.55 Gy. The use of physical wedges as a compensation technique was the most significant factor associated with increased scattered dose (p < 0.001), resulting in approximately three times more exposure compared with breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dynamic wedge. Conclusions: The amount of radiation that is scattered to a patient's body is consistent with exposure reported to be associated with excess of leukemia. In accordance with the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle, we recommend using breast IMRT or virtual wedging for the radiotherapy of breast cancer receiving high-dose anthracycline chemotherapy.

  5. Techniques to reduce radiation for patients and operators during aortic endografting.

    PubMed

    Resch, Timothy A; Törnqvist, Per; Sonesson, Björn; Dias, Nuno V

    2016-04-01

    Endovascular aortic repair of aortic pathologies has become widely spread among vascular surgeons. Much focus has been directed at perfecting and developing endovascular procedures to treat evermore complex issues. Much less focus has been directed at the radiation hazards to patients as well as operators and staff when such procedures are performed. Radiation exposure must be used according to the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle to avoid short- and long-term negative side effects. Modern imaging technology offers many technological developments to reduce radiation such as low-dose programs, pulsed imaging, flat-panel technology and advanced intraoperative imaging techniques. But beside this, simple measures, based on the understanding of radiation exposure, can easily be implemented in everyday standard practice. Appropriate shielding of patients and staff, using adjuncts to be able to keep a safe distance to the radiation source and avoiding working with inappropriate C-arm angulations should be used routinely. Continued education of vascular surgeons is imperative to implement changes in practice to reduce radiation exposure. PMID:26698035

  6. Radiation-pressure-supported obscuring tori around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pier, Edward A.; Krolik, Julian H.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation pressure acting on dust grains can support the vertical thickness of the obscuring tori believed to exist in active galactic nuclei. Using the results of 2D radiation transfer calculations, we evaluate the radiation force acting on these tori. We find that on the inner edge of the torus the radiation force is about 350 l(E) times the gravitational force of the nucleus, where l(E) is the Eddington ratio. Beyond a few torus heights from the inner edge, the radiation force is negligible with respect to gravity. However, between these two extremes lies a region of considerable size where the ratio of radiation force to gravity is nearly constant and can be of order unity for l(E) about 0.1. If the distribution of material within the torus is sufficiently lumpy, there is a significant time-varying component to the radiation force. This drives the random motions of the constituent clouds, thickening the torus at lower values of l(E).

  7. Quantification of cellulase activity using the quartz crystal microbalance technique.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gang; Heitmann, John A; Rojas, Orlando J

    2009-03-01

    The development of more efficient utilization of biomass has received increased attention in recent years. Cellulases play an important role in processing biomass through advanced biotechnological approaches. Both the development and the application of cellulases require an understanding of the activities of these enzymes. A new method to determine the activity of cellulase has been developed using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique. We compare the results from this technique with those from the IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry) dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) standard method and also from biccinchoninic acid and ion chromatography methods. It is shown that the QCM technique provides results closer to those obtained by measuring the actual reducing sugars. The elimination of the use of color development in the standard redox methods makes the QCM platform easier to implement; it also allows more flexibility in terms of the nature of the substrate. Finally, validation of the proposed method was carried out by relating the crystallinity of different substrates to the cellulase activity. Numerical values of cellulase activities measured with the QCM method showed that celluloses with higher crystallinity indices were hydrolyzed slower and to a lower extent than those of lower crystallinity indices for the cellulase mixtures examined. PMID:19203287

  8. Spectromicroscopy of Polymers: Comparison of Radiation Damage with Electron and Photon Core Excitation Spectroscopy Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, H.; Smith, A. P.; Rightor, E. G.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Urquhart, S.; Leapman, R.

    1997-03-01

    Core excitation microspectroscopy has become a powerful tool for the characterization of polymeric materials due to its sensitivity to chemical functionality. However, the excitations utilized in electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (TEM-EELS) and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy can introduce radiation damage and chemically modify the sample. In order to understand the radiation damage associated with TEM-EELS and NEXAFS spectroscopy we have studied the radiation damage of the common polymer poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as exhibited by changes in the acquired C K-edge excitation spectra. By fitting gaussian functions to the spectral intensity changes as a function of dose, we have determined the critical radiation dose of PET for both NEXAFS spectroscopy and TEM-EELS under typical operating conditions. This critical radiation dose for TEM-EELS is found to be 1.7 ± 0.2 x 10^8 grey (1.7 ± 0.2 x 10^4 Mrad) compared to a critical radiation dose for NEXAFS spectroscopy of 1.4 ± 0.7 x 10^9 grey (1.4 ± 0.7 x 10^5 Mrad). By considering the G factors of the two techniques and the critical radiation dose, a rule of thumb was derived that indicates that with typical present operating conditions, NEXAFS spectroscopy can analyze areas 500 times smaller than TEM-EELS given the same amount of radiation damage. Work supported by: NSF Young Investigator Award (DMR-9458060) and Dow Chemical

  9. Radiation-driven Outflows from and Radiative Support in Dusty Tori of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chi-Ho; Krolik, Julian H.

    2016-07-01

    Substantial evidence points to dusty, geometrically thick tori obscuring the central engines of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), but so far no mechanism satisfactorily explains why cool dust in the torus remains in a puffy geometry. Near-Eddington infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) luminosities coupled with high dust opacities at these frequencies suggest that radiation pressure on dust can play a significant role in shaping the torus. To explore the possible effects of radiation pressure, we perform three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics simulations of an initially smooth torus. Our code solves the hydrodynamics equations, the time-dependent multi–angle group IR radiative transfer (RT) equation, and the time-independent UV RT equation. We find a highly dynamic situation. IR radiation is anisotropic, leaving primarily through the central hole. The torus inner surface exhibits a break in axisymmetry under the influence of radiation and differential rotation; clumping follows. In addition, UV radiation pressure on dust launches a strong wind along the inner surface; when scaled to realistic AGN parameters, this outflow travels at ˜ 5000 {(M/{10}7{M}ȯ )}1/4 {[{L}{UV}/(0.1{L}{{E}})]}1/4 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and carries ˜ 0.1 {(M/{10}7{M}ȯ )}3/4 {[{L}{UV}/(0.1{L}{{E}})]}3/4 M ⊙ yr‑1, where M, {L}{UV}, and {L}{{E}} are the mass, UV luminosity, and Eddington luminosity of the central object respectively.

  10. Radiation-driven Outflows from and Radiative Support in Dusty Tori of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chi-Ho; Krolik, Julian H.

    2016-07-01

    Substantial evidence points to dusty, geometrically thick tori obscuring the central engines of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), but so far no mechanism satisfactorily explains why cool dust in the torus remains in a puffy geometry. Near-Eddington infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) luminosities coupled with high dust opacities at these frequencies suggest that radiation pressure on dust can play a significant role in shaping the torus. To explore the possible effects of radiation pressure, we perform three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics simulations of an initially smooth torus. Our code solves the hydrodynamics equations, the time-dependent multi–angle group IR radiative transfer (RT) equation, and the time-independent UV RT equation. We find a highly dynamic situation. IR radiation is anisotropic, leaving primarily through the central hole. The torus inner surface exhibits a break in axisymmetry under the influence of radiation and differential rotation; clumping follows. In addition, UV radiation pressure on dust launches a strong wind along the inner surface; when scaled to realistic AGN parameters, this outflow travels at ∼ 5000 {(M/{10}7{M}ȯ )}1/4 {[{L}{UV}/(0.1{L}{{E}})]}1/4 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and carries ∼ 0.1 {(M/{10}7{M}ȯ )}3/4 {[{L}{UV}/(0.1{L}{{E}})]}3/4 M ⊙ yr‑1, where M, {L}{UV}, and {L}{{E}} are the mass, UV luminosity, and Eddington luminosity of the central object respectively.

  11. Radiative-neutron-capture gamma-ray analysis by a linear combination technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, A.B.; Bhargava, R.C.; Senftle, F.E.; Brinkerhoff, J.M.

    1972-01-01

    The linear combination technique, when applied to a gamma-ray spectrum, gives a single number indicative of the extent to which the spectral lines of a sought element are present in a complex spectrum. Spectra are taken of the sought element and of various other substances whose spectra interfere with that of the sought element. A weighting function is then computed for application to spectra of unknown materials. The technique was used to determine calcium by radiative-neutron-capture gamma-ray analysis in the presence of interfering elements, notably titanium, and the results were compared with those for two popular methods of peak area integration. Although linearity of response was similar for the methods, the linear combination technique was much better at rejecting interferences. For analyses involving mixtures of unknown composition the technique consequently offers improved sensitivity. ?? 1972.

  12. A measurement technique to determine the calibration accuracy of an electromagnetic tracking system to radiation isocenter

    SciTech Connect

    Litzenberg, Dale W.; Gallagher, Ian; Masi, Kathryn J.; Lee, Choonik; Prisciandaro, Joann I.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Ritter, Timothy; Lam, Kwok L.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To present and characterize a measurement technique to quantify the calibration accuracy of an electromagnetic tracking system to radiation isocenter.Methods: This technique was developed as a quality assurance method for electromagnetic tracking systems used in a multi-institutional clinical hypofractionated prostate study. In this technique, the electromagnetic tracking system is calibrated to isocenter with the manufacturers recommended technique, using laser-based alignment. A test patient is created with a transponder at isocenter whose position is measured electromagnetically. Four portal images of the transponder are taken with collimator rotations of 45° 135°, 225°, and 315°, at each of four gantry angles (0°, 90°, 180°, 270°) using a 3 × 6 cm{sup 2} radiation field. In each image, the center of the copper-wrapped iron core of the transponder is determined. All measurements are made relative to this transponder position to remove gantry and imager sag effects. For each of the 16 images, the 50% collimation edges are identified and used to find a ray representing the rotational axis of each collimation edge. The 16 collimator rotation rays from four gantry angles pass through and bound the radiation isocenter volume. The center of the bounded region, relative to the transponder, is calculated and then transformed to tracking system coordinates using the transponder position, allowing the tracking system's calibration offset from radiation isocenter to be found. All image analysis and calculations are automated with inhouse software for user-independent accuracy. Three different tracking systems at two different sites were evaluated for this study.Results: The magnitude of the calibration offset was always less than the manufacturer's stated accuracy of 0.2 cm using their standard clinical calibration procedure, and ranged from 0.014 to 0.175 cm. On three systems in clinical use, the magnitude of the offset was found to be 0.053 ± 0.036, 0

  13. Novel On-wafer Radiation Pattern Measurement Technique for MEMS Actuator Based Reconfigurable Patch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a novel on-wafer, antenna far field pattern measurement technique for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based reconfigurable patch antennas. The measurement technique significantly reduces the time and the cost associated with the characterization of printed antennas, fabricated on a semiconductor wafer or dielectric substrate. To measure the radiation patterns, the RF probe station is modified to accommodate an open-ended rectangular waveguide as the rotating linearly polarized sampling antenna. The open-ended waveguide is attached through a coaxial rotary joint to a Plexiglas(Trademark) arm and is driven along an arc by a stepper motor. Thus, the spinning open-ended waveguide can sample the relative field intensity of the patch as a function of the angle from bore sight. The experimental results include the measured linearly polarized and circularly polarized radiation patterns for MEMS-based frequency reconfigurable rectangular and polarization reconfigurable nearly square patch antennas, respectively.

  14. Novel On-Wafer Radiation Pattern Measurement Technique for MEMS Actuator Based Reconfigurable Patch Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2002-10-01

    The paper presents a novel on-wafer, antenna far field pattern measurement technique for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based reconfigurable patch antennas. The measurement technique significantly reduces the time and the cost associated with the characterization of printed antennas, fabricated on a semiconductor wafer or dielectric substrate. To measure the radiation patterns, the RF probe station is modified to accommodate an open-ended rectangular waveguide as the rotating linearly polarized sampling antenna. The open-ended waveguide is attached through a coaxial rotary joint to a Plexiglas(Trademark) arm and is driven along an arc by a stepper motor. Thus, the spinning open-ended waveguide can sample the relative field intensity of the patch as a function of the angle from bore sight. The experimental results include the measured linearly polarized and circularly polarized radiation patterns for MEMS-based frequency reconfigurable rectangular and polarization reconfigurable nearly square patch antennas, respectively.

  15. A new polarimetric active radar calibrator and calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaojian

    2015-10-01

    Polarimetric active radar calibrator (PARC) is one of the most important calibrators with high radar cross section (RCS) for polarimetry measurement. In this paper, a new double-antenna polarimetric active radar calibrator (DPARC) is proposed, which consists of two rotatable antennas with wideband electromagnetic polarization filters (EMPF) to achieve lower cross-polarization for transmission and reception. With two antennas which are rotatable around the radar line of sight (LOS), the DPARC provides a variety of standard polarimetric scattering matrices (PSM) through the rotation combination of receiving and transmitting polarization, which are useful for polarimatric calibration in different applications. In addition, a technique based on Fourier analysis is proposed for calibration processing. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed DPARC and processing technique.

  16. Application of the TLD albedo technique for monitoring and interpretation of neutron stray radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piesch, E.; Burgkhardt, B.

    1980-09-01

    A single sphere albedo technique with TLD 600/TLD 700 detectors has been applied in neutron monitoring to calibrate albedo dosimeters and to interpret neutron stray radiation fields in terms of neutron dose equivalent separated for the energy groups below 0.4 eV, 0.4-10 keV and 10 keV-10 MeV, and Eeff for fast neutrons. The paper describes the technique for field and personnel monitoring under the aspect of an on-line computer program for data recording and processing.

  17. Collisional-radiative switching - A powerful technique for converging non-LTE calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummer, D. G.; Voels, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    A very simple technique has been developed to converge statistical equilibrium and model atmospheric calculations in extreme non-LTE conditions when the usual iterative methods fail to converge from an LTE starting model. The proposed technique is based on a smooth transition from a collision-dominated LTE situation to the desired non-LTE conditions in which radiation dominates, at least in the most important transitions. The proposed approach was used to successfully compute stellar models with He abundances of 0.20, 0.30, and 0.50; Teff = 30,000 K, and log g = 2.9.

  18. Discrete ordinates-Monte Carlo coupling: A comparison of techniques in NERVA radiation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. G.; Normand, E.; Wilcox, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    In the radiation analysis of the NERVA nuclear rocket system, two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations are sufficient to provide detail in the pressure vessel and reactor assembly. Other parts of the system, however, require three-dimensional Monte Carlo analyses. To use these two methods in a single analysis, a means of coupling was developed whereby the results of a discrete ordinates calculation can be used to produce source data for a Monte Carlo calculation. Several techniques for producing source detail were investigated. Results of calculations on the NERVA system are compared and limitations and advantages of the coupling techniques discussed.

  19. Spectral radiative heat transfer in coal furnaces using a hybrid technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1994-03-01

    A hybrid technique has been developed to solve three-dimensional spectral radiation transport equations for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. An optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy is obtained by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P{sub 1} approximation for use in different range of optical thicknesses. The technique is used in conjunction with a char burnout model and spectroscopic data for H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CO, char, soot and ash to determine the influence of ash composition, ash content and coal preparation on furnace heat absorption.

  20. Active vibration control techniques for flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Jayasuriya, Suhada

    1990-01-01

    Two proposed control system design techniques for active vibration control in flexible space structures are detailed. Control issues relevant only to flexible-body dynamics are addressed, whereas no attempt was made to integrate the flexible and rigid-body spacecraft dynamics. Both of the proposed approaches revealed encouraging results; however, further investigation of the interaction of the flexible and rigid-body dynamics is warranted.

  1. Prompt gamma activation analysis: An old technique made new

    SciTech Connect

    English, Jerry; Firestone, Richard; Perry, Dale; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Garabedian, Glenn; Bandong, Bryan; Molnar, Gabor; Revay, Zsolt

    2002-12-01

    The long list of contributors to the prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) project is important because it highlights the broad cast of active PGAA researchers from various facilities and backgrounds. PGAA is basically a simple process in principle that was traditionally difficult in application. It is an old technique that has for years been tied to and associated exclusively with nuclear reactor facilities, which has limited its acceptance as a general, analytical tool for identifying and quantifying elements or, more precisely, isotopes, whether radioactive or nonradioactive. Field use was not a viable option.

  2. Chorus wave-normal statistics in the Earth's radiation belts from ray tracing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuillard, H.; Zaliznyak, Y.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Agapitov, O.; Artemyev, A.; Rolland, G.

    2012-08-01

    Discrete ELF/VLF (Extremely Low Frequency/Very Low Frequency) chorus emissions are one of the most intense electromagnetic plasma waves observed in radiation belts and in the outer terrestrial magnetosphere. These waves play a crucial role in the dynamics of radiation belts, and are responsible for the loss and the acceleration of energetic electrons. The objective of our study is to reconstruct the realistic distribution of chorus wave-normals in radiation belts for all magnetic latitudes. To achieve this aim, the data from the electric and magnetic field measurements onboard Cluster satellite are used to determine the wave-vector distribution of the chorus signal around the equator region. Then the propagation of such a wave packet is modeled using three-dimensional ray tracing technique, which employs K. Rönnmark's WHAMP to solve hot plasma dispersion relation along the wave packet trajectory. The observed chorus wave distributions close to waves source are first fitted to form the initial conditions which then propagate numerically through the inner magnetosphere in the frame of the WKB approximation. Ray tracing technique allows one to reconstruct wave packet properties (electric and magnetic fields, width of the wave packet in k-space, etc.) along the propagation path. The calculations show the spatial spreading of the signal energy due to propagation in the inhomogeneous and anisotropic magnetized plasma. Comparison of wave-normal distribution obtained from ray tracing technique with Cluster observations up to 40° latitude demonstrates the reliability of our approach and applied numerical schemes.

  3. Gamma radiation influence on silica optical fibers measured by optical backscatter reflectometry and Brillouin sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosniok, A.; Sporea, D.; Neguţ, D.; Krebber, K.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the influence of gamma rays on physical properties of different commercially available silica optical fibers stepwise irradiated up to a total dose of 100 kGy. The detection of radiation-induced changes in silica glass offers the possibility of using selected optical fibers as distributed radiation sensors. The measurements performed by us were based on optical backscatter reflectometry and Brillouin distributed sensing. The measurement methods enable an analysis of radiation-induced modification of the group refractive index and density of the optical fibers. The most distinct physical effect observed by us concerns the increase of the optical attenuation with rising total radiation doses. Quantitative measurement results indicate a crucial impact of fiber dopants on radiation-induced physical and sensory characteristics of silica optical fibers affected by differences in fiber fabrication techniques. Based on the obtained results, the suitability of distributed Brillouin sensing for dosimetry applications seems to be improved by modifying the refractive index profile of the fiber core.

  4. Postoperative vaginal radiation in endometrial cancer using a remote afterloading technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, L.; Nori, D.; Anderson, L.; Hilaris, B.

    1985-03-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract. In early stage endometrial cancer, surgery remains the primary mode of treatment while radiation therapy plays an adjuvant role. Prophylactic vaginal radiation has been shown to reduce significantly the incidence of vaginal recurrences. Between the years 1969-1976, 330 patients with FIGO Stages I and II endometrial cancer were treated according to a standard departmental policy in which 40 Gy of external radiation was given to high risk Stage I and II patients in combination with surgery and intravaginal radiation. With this regimen, the mucosal surface received a total equivalent dose of 40 Gy. These treatments were given on an outpatient basis without the need for any sedation or analgesics. The minimum follow-up was 5 years, with a median follow-up of 8.5 years. The overall pelvic and/or vaginal recurrence rate was 2.7%. The incidence of vaginal complications was 3.7%. The advantages of a remote after loading technique in delivering vaginal vault radiation in endometrial cancer are discussed.

  5. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  6. Active cleaning techniques for removing contamination from optical surfaces in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Research in developing an active cleaning technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces in space is reported. In situ contamination/cleaning experiments were conducted on gold and platimum coated mirrors, which were contaminated by exposure to UV radiation in a 1,3, butadiene environment. Argon and oxygen plasma exposure cleaned the mirrors equally well. Silicone cleaning experiments were also conducted. Exposure of the contaminated mirrors to helium, oxygen, and hydrogen plasmas restored the reflectance at the shorter wavelengths and degraded it at the longer wavelengths.

  7. Ecological Insights from Pelagic Habitats Acquired Using Active Acoustic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Lawson, Gareth L

    2016-01-01

    Marine pelagic ecosystems present fascinating opportunities for ecological investigation but pose important methodological challenges for sampling. Active acoustic techniques involve producing sound and receiving signals from organisms and other water column sources, offering the benefit of high spatial and temporal resolution and, via integration into different platforms, the ability to make measurements spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, a variety of questions concerning the ecology of pelagic systems lend themselves to active acoustics, ranging from organism-level investigations and physiological responses to the environment to ecosystem-level studies and climate. As technologies and data analysis methods have matured, the use of acoustics in ecological studies has grown rapidly. We explore the continued role of active acoustics in addressing questions concerning life in the ocean, highlight creative applications to key ecological themes ranging from physiology and behavior to biogeography and climate, and discuss emerging avenues where acoustics can help determine how pelagic ecosystems function. PMID:26515810

  8. Ecological Insights from Pelagic Habitats Acquired Using Active Acoustic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Lawson, Gareth L.

    2016-01-01

    Marine pelagic ecosystems present fascinating opportunities for ecological investigation but pose important methodological challenges for sampling. Active acoustic techniques involve producing sound and receiving signals from organisms and other water column sources, offering the benefit of high spatial and temporal resolution and, via integration into different platforms, the ability to make measurements spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, a variety of questions concerning the ecology of pelagic systems lend themselves to active acoustics, ranging from organism-level investigations and physiological responses to the environment to ecosystem-level studies and climate. As technologies and data analysis methods have matured, the use of acoustics in ecological studies has grown rapidly. We explore the continued role of active acoustics in addressing questions concerning life in the ocean, highlight creative applications to key ecological themes ranging from physiology and behavior to biogeography and climate, and discuss emerging avenues where acoustics can help determine how pelagic ecosystems function.

  9. Useful intensity: A technique to identify radiating regions on arbitrarily shaped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa Junior, C. A.; Tenenbaum, R. A.

    2013-03-01

    This work presents a new technique for the computation of the numerical equivalent to the supersonic acoustic intensity, for arbitrarily shaped sound sources. The technique provides therefore the identification of the regions of a noise source that effectively contribute to the sound power radiated into the far field by filtering non-propagating sound waves. The proposed technique is entirely formulated on the vibrating surface. The radiated acoustic power is obtained through a numerical operator that relates it with the superficial normal velocity distribution. The power operator is obtained by using the boundary element method. Such operator, possesses the property of being Hermitian. The advantage of this characteristic is that it has real eigenvalues and their eigenvectors form an orthonormal set for the velocity distribution. It is applied to the power operator the decomposition in eigenvalues and eigenvectors, becoming possible to compute the numerical equivalent to the supersonic intensity, called here as useful intensity, after applying a cutoff criterion to remove the non-propagating components. Some numerical tests confirming the effectiveness of the convergence criterion are presented. Examples of the application of the useful intensity technique in vibrating surfaces such as a plate, a cylinder with flat caps and an automotive muffler are presented and the numerical results are discussed.

  10. Calibration of the active radiation detector for Spacelab-One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The flight models of the active radiation detector (ARD) for the ENV-01 environmental monitor were calibrated using gamma radiation. Measured sensitivities of the ion chambers were 6.1 + or - 0.3 micron rad per count for ARD S/N1, and 10.4 + or - 0.5 micron rad per count for ARD S/N2. Both were linear over the measured range 0.10 to 500 m/rad hour. The particle counters (proportional counters) were set to respond to approximately 85% of minimum ionizing particles of unit charge passing through them. These counters were also calibrated in the gamma field.

  11. Radiation processing in india-current R & D activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majali, A. B.; Sabharwal, S.

    1995-09-01

    Radiation processing is an area of vigorous activity in today's India. With the indigenous expertise in Co source and irradiator technology, potentially promising applications such as sustained drug delivery systems, vulcanization of natural rubber latex (RVNRL), and degradation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are presently investigated. Over the last four years, technologies for RVNRL and PTFE degradation have been scaled upto pilot scale operations, while radiation polymerized polymer systems have been developed for controlled release of certain drugs. With the commissioning of the 2 MeV EB machine in late 1988, a few EB based processes have also been commercially exploited. The paper briefly reviews these and presents the significant results obtained.

  12. Active thermal extraction of near-field thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, D.; Kim, T.; Minnich, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    Radiative heat transport between materials supporting surface-phonon polaritons is greatly enhanced when the materials are placed at subwavelength separation as a result of the contribution of near-field surface modes. However, the enhancement is limited to small separations due to the evanescent decay of the surface waves. In this work, we propose and numerically demonstrate an active scheme to extract these modes to the far field. Our approach exploits the monochromatic nature of near-field thermal radiation to drive a transition in a laser gain medium, which, when coupled with external optical pumping, allows the resonant surface mode to be emitted into the far field. Our study demonstrates an approach to manipulate thermal radiation that could find applications in thermal management.

  13. Comparison of Various Radiation Therapy Techniques in Breast Cancer Where Target Volume Includes Mammaria Interna Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Mehmet Hakan; Zincircioglu, Seyit Burhanedtin Zorlu, Faruk

    2009-04-01

    In breast cancer radiotherapy, the internal mammary lymphatic chain is treated in the target volume in a group of patients with high-risk criteria. Because of the variability of the anatomic region and structures in the irradiation field, there are a number of different techniques in breast radiotherapy. While irradiating the target volume, we also consider minimizing the dose to critical structures such as heart, lung, and contralateral breast tissue. In this study, we evaluated the dose distribution of different radiotherapy techniques in patients with left-sided breast cancer who had breast-conserving surgery. A three-dimensional computerized planning system (3DCPS) was used for each patient to compare wide-field, oblique photon-electron, and perpendicular photon-electron techniques in terms of dose homogeneities in the target volume; the doses received by the contralateral breast, heart, and lung; and the coverage of the internal mammary chain. Data from 3DCPS were controlled by the Rando-phantom and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Critical structures were irradiated with acceptable dose percentages in addition to the internal mammary chain with both wide-field and photon-electron techniques. We detected more frequent hot spots in the oblique photon-electron technique than in the other techniques, and this situation necessitated changing the junctions. The wide-field technique was easy to perform and exposed less radiation dose to the heart than photon-electron techniques. In conclusion, we suggest the use of the wide-field technique in breast irradiation when the internal mammary area is in the target volume.

  14. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Allison; de Bever, Josh; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  15. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Allison; Bever, Josh de; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  16. Insolubilisation of biologically active materials with novel radiation graft copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, J. L.; Jankiewicz, S. V.; Levot, R.; Sangster, D. F.

    The use of radiation grafting to immobilise a typical enzyme, trypsin, is reported. The technique involves radiation grafting to a backbone polymer a monomer containing an appropriate functional group to which the enzyme is bonded. In the present work, p-nitrostyrene has been grafted to representative trunk polymers, polypropylene and PVC, the nitro group in the resulting copolymer converted to the isothiocyanato derivative to which trypsin is attached. Of importance to this insolubilisation process, especially for radiation sensitive backbone polymers, is the inclusion of additives which enhance grafting. A new class of additives which increase the grafting yields is reported using as representative backbone polymers, naturally occurring cellulose and synthetic low density polyethylene. The new additives are specific metal salts such as LiClO 4. The reactivity of these salts in grafting enhancement has been compared with that of mineral acid which has previously been used as an additive to increase grafting yields in both preirradiation and simultaneous techniques. A new model for grafting enhancement in the presence of the metal salts as well as acids is proposed whereby increased grafting yields are attributed to increased partitioning of monomer into the graft region in the presence of ionic solutes. The value of these additives in preparing copolymers suitable for general reagent insolubilisation reactions is discussed.

  17. Technique of radiation polymerization in fine art conservation: a potentially new method of restoration and preservation. [Uv and electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, J.L.; Major, G.

    1982-01-01

    The technique of using radiation polymerization for the restoration and preservation of art treasures is considered. The processes discussed include both radiation grafting and rapid cure procedures, particularly reactions initiated by uv and eb. Representative examples where the technique has already been used are treated including typical applications with paintings, tapestries, leather and archival repair. The structure of the monomers and oligomers used in both grafting and rapid cure systems is outlined. The experimental conditions where grafting may occur during radiation rapid cure processing are discussed. Possible future developments of the technique are outlined. 1 figure, 8 tables.

  18. Persistence of endometrial activity after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, D.; Heller, P.; Dames, J.; Hoskins, W.; Gallup, D.; Park, R.

    1985-12-01

    Radiation therapy is a proved treatment for cervical carcinoma; however, it destroys ovarian function and has been thought to ablate the endometrium. Estrogen replacement therapy is often prescribed for patients with cervical carcinoma after radiation therapy. A review of records of six teaching hospitals revealed 16 patients who had endometrial sampling for uterine bleeding after standard radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. Fifteen patients underwent dilatation and curettage, and one patient underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy when a dilatation and curettage was unsuccessful. Six patients had fibrosis and inflammation of the endometrial cavity, seven had proliferative endometrium, one had cystic hyperplasia, one had atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, and one had adenocarcinoma. Although the number of patients who have an active endometrium after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma is not known, this report demonstrates that proliferative endometrium may persist, and these patients may develop endometrial hyperplasia or adenocarcinoma. Studies have indicated that patients with normal endometrial glands have an increased risk of developing endometrial adenocarcinoma if they are treated with unopposed estrogen. Patients who have had radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma should be treated with estrogen and a progestational agent to avoid endometrial stimulation from unopposed estrogen therapy.

  19. Pioneering technique using Acellular Dermal Matrix in the rescue of a radiation ulcer

    PubMed Central

    NASEEM, S.; PATEL, A.D.; DEVALIA, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy as an adjuvant to mastectomy is integral to the treatment of breast cancer, but can result in skin ulceration. Skin ulceration following radiotherapy is traditionally managed by removing the implant and allowing the skin to heal by secondary intention. Case report A 42-year-old woman underwent radiotherapy following a breast reconstruction. She developed a 2 x 3cm radiation ulcer. The ulcer was managed by removing the implant and performing capsulectomy. A Beckers 50 expander was placed and reinforced with acellular dermal matrix inferolaterally. At follow-up the patient had a good cosmetic outcome. Conclusion Post-radiation skin ulcers present a challenge to treat with no current standardised management. The use of acellular dermal matrix may present a new technique to promote healing in these testing cases. PMID:27142826

  20. Evaluation and optimization of the structural parameter of diesel nozzle basing on synchrotron radiation imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Gao, Y.; Gong, H.; Li, L.

    2016-04-01

    Lacking of efficient methods, industry currently uses one only parameter—fuel flow rate—to evaluate the nozzle quality, which is far from satisfying the current emission regulations worldwide. By utilizing synchrotron radiation high energy X-ray in Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), together with the imaging techniques, the 3D models of two nozzles with the same design dimensions were established, and the influence of parameters fluctuation in the azimuthal direction were analyzed in detail. Results indicate that, due to the orifice misalignment, even with the same design dimension, the inlet rounding radius of orifices differs greatly, and its fluctuation in azimuthal direction is also large. This difference will cause variation in the flow characteristics at orifice outlet and then further affect the spray characteristics. The study also indicates that, more precise investigation and insight into the evaluation and optimization of diesel nozzle structural parameter are needed.

  1. Detection of uranium enrichment activities using environmental monitoring techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.L.; Carter, J.A.; Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.

    1993-03-30

    Uranium enrichment processes have the capability of producing weapons-grade material in the form of highly enriched uranium. Thus, detection of undeclared uranium enrichment activities is an international safeguards concern. The uranium separation technologies currently in use employ UF{sub 6} gas as a separation medium, and trace quantities of enriched uranium are inevitably released to the environment from these facilities. The isotopic content of uranium in the vegetation, soil, and water near the plant site will be altered by these releases and can provide a signature for detecting the presence of enriched uranium activities. This paper discusses environmental sampling and analytical procedures that have been used for the detection of uranium enrichment facilities and possible safeguards applications of these techniques.

  2. An efficient and accurate technique to compute the absorption, emission, and transmission of radiation by the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Pollack, James B.

    1990-01-01

    CO2 comprises 95 pct. of the composition of the Martian atmosphere. However, the Martian atmosphere also has a high aerosol content. Dust particles vary from less than 0.2 to greater than 3.0. CO2 is an active absorber and emitter in near IR and IR wavelengths; the near IR absorption bands of CO2 provide significant heating of the atmosphere, and the 15 micron band provides rapid cooling. Including both CO2 and aerosol radiative transfer simultaneously in a model is difficult. Aerosol radiative transfer requires a multiple scattering code, while CO2 radiative transfer must deal with complex wavelength structure. As an alternative to the pure atmosphere treatment in most models which causes inaccuracies, a treatment was developed called the exponential sum or k distribution approximation. The chief advantage of the exponential sum approach is that the integration over k space of f(k) can be computed more quickly than the integration of k sub upsilon over frequency. The exponential sum approach is superior to the photon path distribution and emissivity techniques for dusty conditions. This study was the first application of the exponential sum approach to Martian conditions.

  3. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited.

  4. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies.

    PubMed

    Washburn, S A; Blattnig, S R; Singleterry, R C; Westover, S C

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited. PMID:26177618

  5. Quantifying reflectance anisotropy of photosynthetically active radiation in grasslands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    Quantifying the vegetative surface's reflectance anisotropy was an important part of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment, as its major objectives focused on retrieval of surface parameters from satellite-derived reflectances. The explicit remote measurements for approximating the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of photosynthetically active radiation had not been previously undertaken. In this paper the proper expression of reflectance for BRDFs for retrieval of canopy parameters is assessed.

  6. Asymmetric thoracic metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) activity due to prior radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xia; Yang, Hua; Zhuang, Hongming

    2015-06-01

    A 5-year-old patient suffered Horner syndrome, which was caused by a neuroblastoma in the left apex of the lung shown on the initial I-MIBG scan. After the surgical resection and external radiation to the left lung field, a follow-up I-MIBG scan revealed significantly less MIBG activity in the left upper chest compared to the contralateral right upper chest. PMID:25742240

  7. MAG4 versus Alternative Techniques for Forecasting Active-Region Flare Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-06-01

    MAG4 is a technique of forecasting an active region's rate of production of major flares in the coming few days from a free-magnetic-energy proxy. We present a statistical method of measuring the difference in performance between MAG4 and comparable alternative techniques that forecast an active region’s major-flare productivity from alternative observed aspects of the active region. We demonstrate the method by measuring the difference in performance between the “Present MAG4” technique and each of three alternative techniques, called “McIntosh Active-Region Class,” “Total Magnetic Flux,” and “Next MAG4.” We do this by using (1) the MAG4 database of magnetograms and major-flare histories of sunspot active regions, (2) the NOAA table of the major-flare productivity of each of 60 McIntosh active-region classes of sunspot active regions, and (3) five technique-performance metrics (Heidke Skill Score, True Skill Score, Percent Correct, Probability of Detection, and False Alarm Rate) evaluated from 2000 random two-by-two contingency tables obtained from the databases. We find that (1) Present MAG4 far outperforms both McIntosh Active-Region Class and Total Magnetic Flux, (2) Next MAG4 significantly outperforms Present MAG4, (3) the performance of Next MAG4 is insensitive to the forward and backward temporal windows used, in the range of one to a few days, and (4) forecasting from the free-energy proxy in combination with either any broad category of McIntosh active-region classes or any Mount Wilson active-region class gives no significant performance improvement over forecasting from the free-energy proxy alone (Present MAG4). Funding for this research came from NASA’s Game Changing Development Program, Johnson Space Center’s Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG), and AFOSR’s Multi-University Research Initiative. In particular, funding was facilitated by Dr. Dan Fry (NASA-JSC) and David Moore (NASA-LaRC).

  8. Thermal radiation characteristics of nonisothermal cylindrical enclosures using a numerical ray tracing technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of energy emitted from simple or complex cavity designs can lead to intricate solutions due to nonuniform radiosity and irradiation within a cavity. A numerical ray tracing technique was applied to simulate radiation propagating within and from various cavity designs. To obtain the energy balance relationships between isothermal and nonisothermal cavity surfaces and space, the computer code NEVADA was utilized for its statistical technique applied to numerical ray tracing. The analysis method was validated by comparing results with known theoretical and limiting solutions, and the electrical resistance network method. In general, for nonisothermal cavities the performance (apparent emissivity) is a function of cylinder length-to-diameter ratio, surface emissivity, and cylinder surface temperatures. The extent of nonisothermal conditions in a cylindrical cavity significantly affects the overall cavity performance. Results are presented over a wide range of parametric variables for use as a possible design reference.

  9. Field transients of coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation accessed via time-resolving and correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, A.; Semenov, A.; Hübers, H.-W.; Hoehl, A.; Ries, M.; Wüstefeld, G.; Ulm, G.; Ilin, K.; Thoma, P.; Siegel, M.

    2016-03-01

    Decaying oscillations of the electric field in repetitive pulses of coherent synchrotron radiation in the terahertz frequency range was evaluated by means of time-resolving and correlation techniques. Comparative analysis of real-time voltage transients of the electrical response and interferograms, which were obtained with an ultrafast zero-bias Schottky diode detector and a Martin-Puplett interferometer, delivers close values of the pulse duration. Consistent results were obtained via the correlation technique with a pair of Golay Cell detectors and a pair of resonant polarisation-sensitive superconducting detectors integrated on one chip. The duration of terahertz synchrotron pulses does not closely correlate with the duration of single-cycle electric field expected for the varying size of electron bunches. We largely attribute the difference to the charge density oscillations in electron bunches and to the low-frequency spectral cut-off imposed by both the synchrotron beamline and the coupling optics of our detectors.

  10. Consequences of modern anthropometric dimensions for radiographic techniques and patient radiation exposures

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Chintan; Jones, A. Kyle; Willis, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    Radiographic techniques are devised on the basis of anatomic dimensions. Inaccurate dimensions can cause radiographs to be exposed inappropriately and patient radiation exposures to be calculated incorrectly. The source of anatomic dimensions in common usage dates back to 1948. The objective of this study was to compare traditional and modern anthropometric data, use modern dimensions to estimate potential errors in patient exposure, and suggest modified technique guidelines. Anthropometry software was used to derive modern anatomic dimensions. Data from routine annual testing were analyzed to develop an x-ray generator output curve. Published tabulated data were used to determine the relationship between tissue half-value layer and kilovoltage. These relationships were used to estimate entrance skin exposure and create a provisional technique guide. While most anatomic regions were actually larger than previously indicated, some were similar, and a few were smaller. Accordingly, exposure estimates were higher, similar, or lower, depending on the anatomic region. Exposure estimates using modern dimensions for clinically significant regions of the trunk were higher than those calculated with traditional dimensions. Exposures of the postero-anterior chest, lateral chest, antero-posterior (AP) abdomen, male AP pelvis, and female AP pelvis were larger by 48%, 31%, 54%, 52%, and 112%, respectively. The dimensions of bony regions of the anatomy, such as the joints and skull, were unchanged. These findings are consistent with the idea that anatomic areas where fat is deposited are larger in the modern U.S. population than they were in previous years. Exposure techniques for manual radiography and calculations of patient dose for automatic exposure control radiography should be adjusted according to the modern dimensions. Population radiation exposure estimates calculated in national surveys should also be modified appropriately. PMID:18777922

  11. An active control strategy for achieving weak radiator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshineh, K. . Acoustics and Radar Technology Lab.); Koopmann, G.H. . Center for Acoustics and Vibration)

    1994-01-01

    A general control strategy is presented for active suppression of total radiated sound power from harmonically excited structures based on the measurement of their response. Using the measured response of the structure together with knowledge of its structural mobility, and equivalent primary excitation force is found at discrete points along the structure. Using this equivalent primary force and performing a quadratic optimization of the power radiated form the structure, a set of control forces is found at selected points on the structure that results in minimum radiated sound power. A numerical example of this strategy is presented for a simply supported beam in a rigid baffle excited by a harmonic plane wave incident at an oblique angle. A comparison of the response of the beam with and without control forces shows a large reduction in the controlled response displacement magnitude. In addition, as the result of the action of the control forces, the magnitude of the wave number spectrum of the beam's response in the supersonic region is decreased substantially. The effect of the number and location of the actuators on reductions in sound power level is also studied. The actuators located at the anti-nodes of structural modes within the supersonic region together with those located near boundaries are found to be the most effective in controlling the radiation of sound from a structure.

  12. Active Extraction of Near-field Thermal Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ding; Kim, Taeyong; Minnich, Austin

    Radiative heat transport between materials supporting surface-phonon polaritons is greatly enhanced when the materials are placed at sub-wavelength separation as a result of the contribution of near-field surface modes. However, the enhancement is limited to small separations due to the evanescent decay of the surface waves. In this work, we propose and numerically demonstrate an active radiative cooling (ARC) scheme to extract these modes to the far-field. Our approach exploits the monochromatic nature of near-field thermal radiation to drive a transition in a laser gain medium, which, when coupled with external optical pumping, allows the resonant surface mode to be emitted into the far-field. We also provide further insights into our ARC scheme by applying the theoretical framework used for laser cooling of solids (LCS) to ARC. We show that LCS and ARC can be described with the same mathematical formalism by replacing the electron-phonon coupling parameter in LCS with the electron-photon coupling parameter in ARC. Using this framework, we examine the predictions of the formalism for LCS and ARC using realistic parameters and find that ARC can achieve higher efficiency and extracted power over a wide range of conditions. Our study demonstrates a new approach to manipulate near-field thermal radiation for thermal management.

  13. Numerical analysis of radiation propagation in innovative volumetric receivers based on selective laser melting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Fabrizio; Santiago, Sergio; Roccabruna, Mattia; Luque, Salvador; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose; Crema, Luigi; Romero, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Volumetric absorbers constitute one of the key elements in order to achieve high thermal conversion efficiencies in concentrating solar power plants. Regardless of the working fluid or thermodynamic cycle employed, design trends towards higher absorber output temperatures are widespread, which lead to the general need of components of high solar absorptance, high conduction within the receiver material, high internal convection, low radiative and convective heat losses and high mechanical durability. In this context, the use of advanced manufacturing techniques, such as selective laser melting, has allowed for the fabrication of intricate geometries that are capable of fulfilling the previous requirements. This paper presents a parametric design and analysis of the optical performance of volumetric absorbers of variable porosity conducted by means of detailed numerical ray tracing simulations. Sections of variable macroscopic porosity along the absorber depth were constructed by the fractal growth of single-cell structures. Measures of performance analyzed include optical reflection losses from the absorber front and rear faces, penetration of radiation inside the absorber volume, and radiation absorption as a function of absorber depth. The effects of engineering design parameters such as absorber length and wall thickness, material reflectance and porosity distribution on the optical performance of absorbers are discussed, and general design guidelines are given.

  14. International Perspectives on Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine: Outcomes of an IAEA Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Shortt, Ken Davidsson, Lena; Hendry, Jolyon; Dondi, Maurizio; Andreo, Pedro

    2008-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency organized an international conference called, 'Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine' (QANTRM). It dealt with quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of radiation medicine (diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy) at the international level. Participants discussed QA issues pertaining to the implementation of new technologies and the need for education and staff training. The advantage of developing a comprehensive and harmonized approach to QA covering both the technical and the managerial issues was emphasized to ensure the optimization of benefits to patient safety and effectiveness. The necessary coupling between medical radiation imaging and radiotherapy was stressed, particularly for advanced technologies. However, the need for a more systematic approach to the adoption of advanced technologies was underscored by a report on failures in intensity-modulated radiotherapy dosimetry auditing tests in the United States, which could imply inadequate implementation of QA for these new technologies. A plenary session addressed the socioeconomic impact of introducing advanced technologies in resource-limited settings. How shall the dual gaps, one in access to basic medical services and the other in access to high-quality modern technology, be addressed?.

  15. Initiation techniques and the vacuum-ultraviolet-radiation efficiency of a stabilized multichannel surface discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcheremiskine, V. I.; Uteza, O. P.; Sentis, M. L.; Mikheev, L. D.

    2006-01-01

    Multichannel surface discharges possess a number of advantageous characteristics for the optical pumping of photochemically driven lasers. This work reports on a type of large-area low-inductance sources of intense UV-VUV (vacuum-ultraviolet) radiation based on spatially stabilized multichannel discharges in gases. The discharges consist of several dozens of closely located parallel plasma channels initiated synchronously along a dielectric surface on the area of several hundred square centimeters. In comparison with a large-area diffuse surface discharge, the plasma confinement within relatively thin channels greatly improves the efficiency of the discharge emission in the VUV spectral range. Several techniques are introduced, which allow a synchronous formation and homogeneous development of multiple spatially stabilized discharge channels. Technical efficiency of the discharge radiation within the spectral range of 120-200nm reaches 5% and an effective brightness temperature of the radiating plasma exceeds 20kK. Synchronous operation of a number of multichannel discharge modules producing high-intensity submicrosecond optical pulses is demonstrated, which is of importance for the pump source scaling and geometrical adaptation.

  16. International perspectives on quality assurance and new techniques in radiation medicine: outcomes of an IAEA conference.

    PubMed

    Shortt, Ken; Davidsson, Lena; Hendry, Jolyon; Dondi, Maurizio; Andreo, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency organized an international conference called, "Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine" (QANTRM). It dealt with quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of radiation medicine (diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy) at the international level. Participants discussed QA issues pertaining to the implementation of new technologies and the need for education and staff training. The advantage of developing a comprehensive and harmonized approach to QA covering both the technical and the managerial issues was emphasized to ensure the optimization of benefits to patient safety and effectiveness. The necessary coupling between medical radiation imaging and radiotherapy was stressed, particularly for advanced technologies. However, the need for a more systematic approach to the adoption of advanced technologies was underscored by a report on failures in intensity-modulated radiotherapy dosimetry auditing tests in the United States, which could imply inadequate implementation of QA for these new technologies. A plenary session addressed the socioeconomic impact of introducing advanced technologies in resource-limited settings. How shall the dual gaps, one in access to basic medical services and the other in access to high-quality modern technology, be addressed? PMID:18406944

  17. Experimental comparison between speckle and grating-based imaging technique using synchrotron radiation X-rays.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Yogesh; Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-08-01

    X-ray phase contrast and dark-field imaging techniques provide important and complementary information that is inaccessible to the conventional absorption contrast imaging. Both grating-based imaging (GBI) and speckle-based imaging (SBI) are able to retrieve multi-modal images using synchrotron as well as lab-based sources. However, no systematic comparison has been made between the two techniques so far. We present an experimental comparison between GBI and SBI techniques with synchrotron radiation X-ray source. Apart from the simple experimental setup, we find SBI does not suffer from the issue of phase unwrapping, which can often be problematic for GBI. In addition, SBI is also superior to GBI since two orthogonal differential phase gradients can be simultaneously extracted by one dimensional scan. The GBI has less stringent requirements for detector pixel size and transverse coherence length when a second or third grating can be used. This study provides the reference for choosing the most suitable technique for diverse imaging applications at synchrotron facility. PMID:27505829

  18. Involved-Node Radiotherapy and Modern Radiation Treatment Techniques in Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Beaudre, Anne; Ferreira, Ivaldo; Pichenot, Charlotte; Messai, Taha; Lessard, Nathalie Athalie; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical outcome of the involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) concept using modern radiation treatments (intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]or deep-inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy [DIBH) in patients with localized supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma. Methods and Materials: All but 2 patients had early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, and they were treated with chemotherapy prior to irradiation. Radiation treatments were delivered using the INRT concept according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. IMRT was performed with the patient free-breathing. For the adapted breath-hold technique, a spirometer dedicated to DIBH radiotherapy was used. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy was performed with those patients. Results: Fifty patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (48 patients with primary Hodgkin lymphoma, 1 patient with recurrent disease, and 1 patient with refractory disease) entered the study from January 2003 to August 2008. Thirty-two patients were treated with IMRT, and 18 patients were treated with the DIBH technique. The median age was 28 years (range, 17-62 years). Thirty-four (68%) patients had stage I - (I-IIA) IIA disease, and 16 (32%) patients had stage I - (I-IIB) IIB disease. All but 3 patients received three to six cycles of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD). The median radiation doses to patients treated with IMRT and DIBH were, respectively, 40 Gy (range, 21.6-40 Gy) and 30.6 Gy (range, 19.8-40 Gy). Protection of various organs at risk was satisfactory. Median follow-up was 53.4 months (range, 19.1-93 months). The 5-year progression-free and overall survival rates for the whole population were 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80%-97%) and 94% (95% CI, 75%-98%), respectively. Recurrences occurred in 4 patients: 2 patients had in-field relapses, and 2 patients had visceral recurrences. Grade 3 acute lung toxicity (transient pneumonitis) occurred in 1 case. Conclusions

  19. Active Learning Techniques Applied to an Interdisciplinary Mineral Resources Course.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    An interdisciplinary active learning course was introduced at the University of Puget Sound entitled 'Mineral Resources and the Environment'. Various formative assessment and active learning techniques that have been effective in other courses were adapted and implemented to improve student learning, increase retention and broaden knowledge and understanding of course material. This was an elective course targeted towards upper-level undergraduate geology and environmental majors. The course provided an introduction to the mineral resources industry, discussing geological, environmental, societal and economic aspects, legislation and the processes involved in exploration, extraction, processing, reclamation/remediation and recycling of products. Lectures and associated weekly labs were linked in subject matter; relevant readings from the recent scientific literature were assigned and discussed in the second lecture of the week. Peer-based learning was facilitated through weekly reading assignments with peer-led discussions and through group research projects, in addition to in-class exercises such as debates. Writing and research skills were developed through student groups designing, carrying out and reporting on their own semester-long research projects around the lasting effects of the historical Ruston Smelter on the biology and water systems of Tacoma. The writing of their mini grant proposals and final project reports was carried out in stages to allow for feedback before the deadline. Speakers from industry were invited to share their specialist knowledge as guest lecturers, and students were encouraged to interact with them, with a view to employment opportunities. Formative assessment techniques included jigsaw exercises, gallery walks, placemat surveys, think pair share and take-home point summaries. Summative assessment included discussion leadership, exams, homeworks, group projects, in-class exercises, field trips, and pre-discussion reading exercises

  20. Active control technique of fractional-order chaotic complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Gamal M.; Ahmed, Mansour E.; Abed-Elhameed, Tarek M.

    2016-06-01

    Several kinds of synchronization of fractional-order chaotic complex systems are challenging research topics of current interest since they appear in many applications in applied sciences. Our main goal in this paper is to introduce the definition of modified projective combination-combination synchronization (MPCCS) of some fractional-order chaotic complex systems. We show that our systems are chaotic by calculating their Lyapunov exponents. The fractional Lyapunov dimension of the chaotic solutions of these systems is computed. A scheme is introduced to calculate MPCCS of four different (or identical) chaotic complex systems using the active control technique. Special cases of this type, which are projective and anti C-C synchronization, are discussed. Some figures are plotted to show that MPCCS is achieved and its errors approach zero.

  1. Activation studies of NEG coatings by surface techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R. K.; Jagannath,; Bhushan, K. G.; Gadkari, S. C.; Mukund, R.; Gupta, S. K.

    2013-02-05

    NEG (Non Evaporable Getters)materials in the form of ternary alloy coatings have many benefits compare to traditional bare surfaces such as Extreme high vacuum(XHV), lower secondary electron yield(SEY), low photon desorption cofficient. The extreme high vacuum (pressure > 10{sup -10} mbar) is very useful to the study of surfaces of the material, for high energy particle accelerators(LHC, Photon Factories), synchrotrons (ESRF, Ellectra) etc. Low secondary electron yield leads to better beam life time. In LHC the pressure in the interaction region of the two beams is something of the order of 10{sup -12} mbar. In this paper preparation of the coatings and their characterization to get the Activation temperature by using the surface techniques XPS, SEM and SIMS has been shown.

  2. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. PMID:25770423

  3. Measuring the activity of a {sup 51}Cr neutrino source based on the gamma-radiation spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbachev, V. V. Gavrin, V. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Malyshkin, Yu. M.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2015-12-15

    A technique for the measurement of activities of intense β sources by measuring the continuous gamma-radiation (internal bremsstrahlung) spectra is developed. A method for reconstructing the spectrum recorded by a germanium semiconductor detector is described. A method for the absolute measurement of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of {sup 51}Cr is presented.

  4. Radiation treatment for the right naris in a pediatric anesthesia patient using an adaptive oral airway technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sponseller, Patricia Pelly, Nicole; Trister, Andrew; Ford, Eric; Ermoian, Ralph

    2015-10-01

    Radiation therapy for pediatric patients often includes the use of intravenous anesthesia with supplemental oxygen delivered via the nasal cannula. Here, we describe the use of an adaptive anesthesia technique for electron irradiation of the right naris in a preschool-aged patient treated under anesthesia. The need for an intranasal bolus plug precluded the use of standard oxygen supplementation. This novel technique required the multidisciplinary expertise of anesthesiologists, radiation therapists, medical dosimetrists, medical physicists, and radiation oncologists to ensure a safe and reproducible treatment course.

  5. Larynx-sparing techniques using intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Lin, Haibo; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Deville, Curtiland; Dutta, Pinaki R.; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore whether the laryngeal dose can be reduced by using 2 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques: whole-neck field IMRT technique (WF-IMRT) vs. junctioned IMRT (J-IMRT). The effect on planning target volumes (PTVs) coverage and laryngeal sparing was evaluated. WF-IMRT technique consisted of a single IMRT plan, including the primary tumor and the superior and inferior neck to the level of the clavicular heads. The larynx was defined as an organ at risk extending superiorly to cover the arytenoid cartilages and inferiorly to include the cricoid cartilage. The J-IMRT technique consisted of an IMRT plan for the primary tumor and the superior neck, matched to conventional antero-posterior opposing lower neck fields at the level of the thyroid notch. A central block was used for the anterior lower neck field at the level of the larynx to restrict the dose to the larynx. Ten oropharyngeal cancer cases were analyzed. Both the primary site and bilateral regional lymphatics were included in the radiotherapy targets. The averaged V95 for the PTV57.6 was 99.2% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 97.4% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT. The averaged V95 for the PTV64 was 99.9% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 98.9% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT and the averaged V95 for the PT70 was 100.0% for WF-IMRT technique compared with 99.5% (p = 0.04) for J-IMRT. The averaged mean laryngeal dose was 18 Gy with both techniques. The averaged mean doses within the matchline volumes were 69.3 Gy for WF-MRT and 66.2 Gy for J-IMRT (p = 0.03). The WF-IMRT technique appears to offer an optimal coverage of the target volumes and a mean dose to the larynx similar with J-IMRT and should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  6. Simplified field-in-field technique for a large-scale implementation in breast radiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Kirova, Youlia M.; Campana, Francois; Dendale, Remi; Fourquet, Alain

    2012-07-01

    We wanted to evaluate a simplified 'field-in-field' technique (SFF) that was implemented in our department of Radiation Oncology for breast treatment. This study evaluated 15 consecutive patients treated with a simplified field in field technique after breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. Radiotherapy consisted of whole-breast irradiation to the total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and a boost of 16 Gy in 8 fractions to the tumor bed. We compared dosimetric outcomes of SFF to state-of-the-art electronic surface compensation (ESC) with dynamic leaves. An analysis of early skin toxicity of a population of 15 patients was performed. The median volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose was 763 mL (range, 347-1472) for SFF vs. 779 mL (range, 349-1494) for ESC. The median residual 107% isodose was 0.1 mL (range, 0-63) for SFF and 1.9 mL (range, 0-57) for ESC. Monitor units were on average 25% higher in ESC plans compared with SFF. No patient treated with SFF had acute side effects superior to grade 1-NCI scale. SFF created homogenous 3D dose distributions equivalent to electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves. It allowed the integration of a forward planned concomitant tumor bed boost as an additional multileaf collimator subfield of the tangential fields. Compared with electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves, shorter treatment times allowed better radiation protection to the patient. Low-grade acute toxicity evaluated weekly during treatment and 2 months after treatment completion justified the pursuit of this technique for all breast patients in our department.

  7. MBI facility at BESSY II for time-resolved pump-probe techniques with laser and undulator radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatzke, Johannes; Winter, Bernd J.; Quast, T.; Hertel, Ingolf V.

    1998-10-01

    The MBI develops a facility at BESSY II dedicated to pump- probe techniques combining synchrotron and laser radiation. The synchronization of laser and synchrotron pulses will allow time resolved experiments on the picosecond time scale at this. The features of the facility, the optical parameters of the synchrotron beamline, the synchronization technique and pulse stretching considerations will be outlined. Current developments will be reported.

  8. Radiation Dose Reduction in Transmission CT Using a Novel Iterative Fourier-Based Reconstruction Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahimian, Benjamin Pooya

    Tomographic imaging has had a radical impact on diverse fields ranging from the study of the small in microscopy, to the study of the large in astronomy, but perhaps most significantly, it has unequivocally revolutionized the practice of medicine. Although the applications of tomography are wide and diverse, the central problems associated with its mathematical and experimental implementation are similar. Most notably, the problem of image reconstruction from missing and noisy projection data and the problem of radiation dose imparted to biological specimens and patients are persistent and prominent problems in tomographic applications. Since by virtue of its nature, tomographic reconstruction is a mathematical problem, the development of more accurate and sophisticated reconstruction algorithms capable of solving for missing projection data and or producing accurate lower noise reconstructions, may hold promise in alleviating such problems. In this work, a method of tomographic acquisition and exact iterative Fourier-based reconstruction is developed, which in conjunction with physical constraints, advanced regularization constraints, and an oversampling method, aims to solve for the missing projection data and arrive at a less noisy solution in a manner that is concurrently and strictly consistent with the experimental data. Specifically, the proposed technique, termed Equally-Sloped Tomography (EST), is experimentally implemented and evaluated on four important transmission tomographic imaging modalities: transmission electron microtomography, synchrotron x-ray phase contrast tomography, synchrotron x-ray absorption tomography, and kilovoltage x-ray medical CT. In each modality, using a series of image quality phantoms studies, the performance of technique is quantitatively assessed and compared to existing methods. The potential for dose reduction is investigated by determining the factor by which the number of projections or the source flux can be reduced

  9. Radiation does from medical in-vivo prompt gamma-ray activation using a mobile nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Chung, C; Chen, C P; Chang, P S

    1988-10-01

    A method of medical diagnosis of toxic elements, using a neutron beam from a mobile nuclear reactor to perform partial-body in-vivo prompt gamma-ray activation technique, has been developed. Both neutron and gamma-ray dose equivalents in an irradiated phantom and around medical researchers were measured and evaluated. Neutron flux at various kinetic energies was measured using an activation foil technique, and the neutron dose equivalents at tissues of risk inside the irradiated phantom were calculated by neutron transport code. Gamma-ray dose equivalents inside the irradiated phantom and around the nuclear reactor were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters. The risk associated with the neutron and gamma radiation dose equivalents received by both the irradiated phantom and medical researchers were evaluated in detail. The radiation safety of the in-vivo medical diagnosis using the mobile nuclear reactor, under the context of radiation protection guidelines, is discussed. PMID:3170218

  10. Study of novel techniques for verification imaging and patient dose reconstruction in external beam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarry, Genevieve

    Treatment delivery verification is an essential step of radiotherapy. The purpose of this thesis is to develop new methods to improve the verification of photon and electron beam radiotherapy treatments. This is achieved through developing and testing (1) a way to acquire portal images during electron beam treatments, (2) a method to reconstruct the dose delivered to patients during photon beam treatments and (3) a technique to improve image quality in kilovoltage (kV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) by correcting for scattered radiation. The portal images were acquired using the Varian CL21EX linac and the Varian aS500 electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The EGSnrc code was used to model fully the CL21EX, the aS500 and the kV CBCT system. We demonstrate that portal images of electron beam treatments with adequate contrast and resolution can be produced using the bremsstrahlung photons portion of the electron beam. Monte Carlo (MC) calculations were used to characterize the bremsstrahlung photons and to obtain predicted images of various phantoms. The technique was applied on a head and neck patient. An algorithm to reconstruct the dose given to patients during photon beam radiotherapy was developed and validated. The algorithm uses portal images and MC simulations. The primary fluence at the detector is back-projected through the patient. CT geometry to obtain a reconstructed phase space file. The reconstructed phase space file is used to calculate the reconstructed dose to the patient using MC simulations. The reconstruction method was validated in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms for conventional and IMRT fields. The scattered radiation present in kV CBCT images was evaluated using MC simulations. Simulated predictions of the scatter distribution were subtracted from CBCT projection images prior to the reconstruction to improve the reconstructed image quality. Reducing the scattered radiation was found to improve contrast and reduce shading

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  12. Activation of Protease Activated Receptor 2 by Exogenous Agonist Exacerbates Early Radiation Injury in Rat Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR{sub 2}) is highly expressed throughout the gut and regulates the inflammatory, mitogenic, fibroproliferative, and nociceptive responses to injury. PAR{sub 2} is strikingly upregulated and exhibits increased activation in response to intestinal irradiation. We examined the mechanistic significance of radiation enteropathy development by assessing the effect of exogenous PAR{sub 2} activation. Methods and Materials: Rat small bowel was exposed to localized single-dose radiation (16.5 Gy). The PAR{sub 2} agonist (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH{sub 2}) or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally daily for 3 days before irradiation (before), for 7 days after irradiation (after), or both 3 days before and 7 days after irradiation (before-after). Early and delayed radiation enteropathy was assessed at 2 and 26 weeks after irradiation using quantitative histologic examination, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The PAR{sub 2} agonist did not elicit changes in the unirradiated (shielded) intestine. In contrast, in the irradiated intestine procured 2 weeks after irradiation, administration of the PAR{sub 2} agonist was associated with more severe mucosal injury and increased intestinal wall thickness in all three treatment groups (p <.05) compared with the vehicle-treated controls. The PAR{sub 2} agonist also exacerbated the radiation injury score, serosal thickening, and mucosal inflammation (p <.05) in the before and before-after groups. The short-term exogenous activation of PAR{sub 2} did not affect radiation-induced intestinal injury at 26 weeks. Conclusion: The results of the present study support a role for PAR{sub 2} activation in the pathogenesis of early radiation-induced intestinal injury. Pharmacologic PAR{sub 2} antagonists might have the potential to reduce the intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and/or as countermeasures in radiologic accidents or terrorism scenarios.

  13. Radiation-based techniques for use in the border protection context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creagh, Dudley

    2014-02-01

    Most airline travelers will be familiar with the current overt passenger examination procedures: metal detectors and small tunnel X-ray examination systems. The mix of overt and covert systems used to prevent dangerous goods and contraband from passing through the portal is constantly changing, dictated by policy decisions made by governments. The United States of America and the European Union are the largest regulatory bodies, and their procedures are adopted by smaller countries: Australia, for example.This paper discusses a wide variety of techniques used by Border Protection Agencies. Most of these examination systems involve the use of the emission, absorption, and scattering of electromagnetic radiation and descriptions of these systems will comprise the bulk of this paper.However, a brief discussion of the use of neutron scattering will be given to demonstrate how systems for the examination of large objects may develop in the future.

  14. Active sampling technique to enhance chemical signature of buried explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, John S.; French, Patrick D.

    2004-09-01

    Deminers and dismounted countermine engineers commonly use metal detectors, ground penetrating radar and probes to locate mines. Many modern landmines have a very low metal content, which severely limits the effectiveness of metal detectors. Canines have also been used for landmine detection for decades. Experiments have shown that canines smell the explosives which are known to leak from most types of landmines. The fact that dogs can detect landmines indicates that vapor sensing is a viable approach to landmine detection. Several groups are currently developing systems to detect landmines by "sniffing" for the ultra-trace explosive vapors above the soil. The amount of material that is available to passive vapor sensing systems is limited to no more than the vapor in equilibrium with the explosive related chemicals (ERCs) distributed in the surface soils over and near the landmine. The low equilibrium vapor pressure of TNT in the soil/atmosphere boundary layer and the limited volume of the boundary layer air imply that passive chemical vapor sensing systems require sensitivities in the picogram range, or lower. ADA is working to overcome many of the limitations of passive sampling methods, by the use of an active sampling method that employs a high-powered (1,200+ joules) strobe lamp to create a highly amplified plume of vapor and/or ERC-bearing fine particulates. Initial investigations have demonstrated that this approach can amplify the detectability of TNT by two or three orders of magnitude. This new active sampling technique could be used with any suitable explosive sensor.

  15. Improved mesh based photon sampling techniques for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Relson, E.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Biondo, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    The design of fusion power systems requires analysis of neutron activation of large, complex volumes, and the resulting particles emitted from these volumes. Structured mesh-based discretization of these problems allows for improved modeling in these activation analysis problems. Finer discretization of these problems results in large computational costs, which drives the investigation of more efficient methods. Within an ad hoc subroutine of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, we implement sampling of voxels and photon energies for volumetric sources using the alias method. The alias method enables efficient sampling of a discrete probability distribution, and operates in 0(1) time, whereas the simpler direct discrete method requires 0(log(n)) time. By using the alias method, voxel sampling becomes a viable alternative to sampling space with the 0(1) approach of uniformly sampling the problem volume. Additionally, with voxel sampling it is straightforward to introduce biasing of volumetric sources, and we implement this biasing of voxels as an additional variance reduction technique that can be applied. We verify our implementation and compare the alias method, with and without biasing, to direct discrete sampling of voxels, and to uniform sampling. We study the behavior of source biasing in a second set of tests and find trends between improvements and source shape, material, and material density. Overall, however, the magnitude of improvements from source biasing appears to be limited. Future work will benefit from the implementation of efficient voxel sampling - particularly with conformal unstructured meshes where the uniform sampling approach cannot be applied. (authors)

  16. Second primary cancers after radiation for prostate cancer: A systematic review of the clinical data and impact of treatment technique

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Louise; Henry, Ann; Hoskin, Peter; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Venselaar, Jack

    2014-01-01

    The development of a radiation induced second primary cancer (SPC) is one the most serious long term consequences of successful cancer treatment. This review aims to evaluate SPC in prostate cancer (PCa) patients treated with radiotherapy, and assess whether radiation technique influences SPC. A systematic review of the literature was performed to identify studies examining SPC in irradiated PCa patients. This identified 19 registry publications, 21 institutional series and 7 other studies. There is marked heterogeneity in published studies. An increased risk of radiation-induced SPC has been identified in several studies, particularly those with longer durations of follow-up. The risk of radiation-induced SPC appears small, in the range of 1 in 220 to 1 in 290 over all durations of follow-up, and may increase to 1 in 70 for patients followed up for more than 10 years, based on studies which include patients treated with older radiation techniques (i.e. non-conformal, large field). To date there are insufficient clinical data to draw firm conclusions about the impact of more modern techniques such as IMRT and brachytherapy on SPC risk, although limited evidence is encouraging. In conclusion, despite heterogeneity between studies, an increased risk of SPC following radiation for PCa has been identified in several studies, and this risk appears to increase over time. This must be borne in mind when considering which patients to irradiate and which techniques to employ. PMID:24485765

  17. Preparation of Poly Acrylic Acid-Poly Acrylamide Composite Nanogels by Radiation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbaniazar, Parisa; Sepehrianazar, Amir; Eskandani, Morteza; Nabi-Meibodi, Mohsen; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Nanogel, a nanoparticle prepared from a cross-linked hydrophilic polymer network, has many biomedical applications. A radiation technique has recently been introduced as one of the appropriate methods for the preparation of polymeric nanogels due to its additive-free initiation and easy control procedure. Methods: We have investigated the formation of nano-sized polymeric gels, based on the radiation-induced inter- and intra-molecular cross-linking of the inter-polymer complex (IPC) of polyacrylamide (PAAm) and polyacrylic acide (PAAc). Results: The results indicated that the prepared polymeric complex composed of PAAm and PAAc was converted into nanogel by irradiation under different doses (1, 3, 5 and 7 kGy). This was due to inter- and intra-molecular cross-linking at the range of 446-930 nm as characterized by the photon correlation spectroscopy method. Increasing the irradiation dose reduced the size of nanoparticles to 3 kGy; however, the higher doses increased the size and size distribution. Scanning electron microscopy images indicated the nanogel formation in the reported size by particle size and showed the microcapsule structure of the prepared nanogels. Biocompatibility of nanogels were assessed and proved by MTT assay. Conclusion: It was concluded that low dose irradiation can be successfully applied for nanometre-ranged hydrogel. PMID:26236667

  18. Chirp excitation technique to enhance microbubble displacement induced by ultrasound radiation force.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Zhang, Dong; Zheng, Hairong; Gong, Xiufen

    2009-03-01

    Ultrasound radiation force has been proposed to increase the targeting efficiency in ultrasonic molecular imaging and drug delivery. A chirp excitation technique is proposed to increase the radiation force induced microbubble displacement and might potentially be used for enhancing the targeting efficiency of microbubble clouds. In this study, a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation is used to estimate the radius-time behavior of insonified microbubbles, and the translation of insonified microbubbles is calculated by using the particle trajectory equation. Simulations demonstrate that the chirp excitation is superior to the sinusoidal one in displacing microbubbles with a wide-size distribution, and that the performance is dependent on the parameters of the chirp signal such as the center frequency and frequency range. For Gaussian size distributed microbubble clouds with mean diameter of 3.5 microm and variance of 1, a 2.25 MHz chirp with frequency range of 1.5 MHz induces about 59.59% more microbubbles over a distance of 10 microm during 200 micros insonification, compared to a 2.25 MHz sinusoidal excitation with equal acoustic pressure. PMID:19275298

  19. Novel Technique for Hepatic Fiducial Marker Placement for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarraya, Hajer; Chalayer, Chloé; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Bonodeau, Francois; Lacornerie, Thomas; Mirabel, Xavier; Boulanger, Thomas; Taieb, Sophie; Kramar, Andrew; Lartigau, Eric; Ceugnart, Luc

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To report experience with fiducial marker insertion and describe an advantageous, novel technique for fiducial placement in the liver for stereotactic body radiation therapy with respiratory tracking. Methods and Materials: We implanted 1444 fiducials (single: 834; linked: 610) in 328 patients with 424 hepatic lesions. Two methods of implantation were compared: the standard method (631 single fiducials) performed on 153 patients from May 2007 to May 2010, and the cube method (813 fiducials: 610 linked/203 single) applied to 175 patients from April 2010 to March 2013. The standard method involved implanting a single marker at a time. The novel technique entailed implanting 2 pairs of linked markers when possible in a way to occupy the perpendicular edges of a cube containing the tumor inside. Results: Mean duration of the cube method was shorter than the standard method (46 vs 61 minutes; P<.0001). Median numbers of skin and subcapsular entries were significantly smaller with the cube method (2 vs 4, P<.0001, and 2 vs 4, P<.0001, respectively). The rate of overall complications (total, major, and minor) was significantly lower in the cube method group compared with the standard method group (5.7% vs 13.7%; P=.013). Major complications occurred while using single markers only. The success rate was 98.9% for the cube method and 99.3% for the standard method. Conclusions: We propose a new technique of hepatic fiducial implantation that makes use of linked fiducials and involves fewer skin entries and shorter time of implantation. The technique is less complication-prone and is migration-resistant.

  20. Lab-Based Measurement of Remediation Techniques for Radiation Portal Monitors (Initial Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Livesay, Jake; Guzzardo, Tyler; Lousteau, Angela L

    2012-02-01

    Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM) deployed by the Second Line of Defense (SLD) are known to be sensitive to the natural environmental radioactive background. There are several techniques used to mitigate the effects of background on the monitors, but since the installation environments can vary significantly from one another the need for a standardized, systematic, study of remediation techniques was proposed and carried out. This study is not meant to serve as the absolute last word on the subject. The data collected are, however, intelligible and useful. Some compromises were made, each of which will be described in detail. The hope of this initial report is to familiarize the SLD science teams with ORNL's effort to model the effect of various remediation techniques on simple, static backgrounds. This study provides a good start toward benchmarking the model, and each additional increment of data will serve to make the model more robust. The scope of this initial study is limited to a few basic cases. Its purpose is to prove the utility of lab-based study of remediation techniques and serve as a standard data set for future use. This importance of this first step of standardization will become obvious when science teams are working in parallel on issues of remediation; having a common starting point will do away with one category of difference, thereby making easier the task of determining the sources of disagreement. Further measurements will augment this data set, allowing for further constraint of the universe of possible situations. As will be discussed in the 'Going Forward' section, more data will be included in the final report of this work. Of particular interest will be the data taken with the official TSA lead collimators, which will provide more direct results for comparison with installation data.

  1. A snapshot of radiation therapy techniques and technology in Queensland: An aid to mapping undergraduate curriculum

    SciTech Connect

    Bridge, Pete; Carmichael, Mary-Ann; Brady, Carole; Dry, Allison

    2013-03-15

    Undergraduate students studying the Bachelor of Radiation Therapy at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) attend clinical placements in a number of department sites across Queensland. To ensure that the curriculum prepares students for the most common treatments and current techniques in use in these departments, a curriculum matching exercise was performed. A cross-sectional census was performed on a pre-determined “Snapshot” date in 2012. This was undertaken by the clinical education staff in each department who used a standardized proforma to count the number of patients as well as prescription, equipment, and technique data for a list of tumour site categories. This information was combined into aggregate anonymized data. All 12 Queensland radiation therapy clinical sites participated in the Snapshot data collection exercise to produce a comprehensive overview of clinical practice on the chosen day. A total of 59 different tumour sites were treated on the chosen day and as expected the most common treatment sites were prostate and breast, comprising 46% of patients treated. Data analysis also indicated that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) use is relatively high with 19.6% of patients receiving IMRT treatment on the chosen day. Both IMRT and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) indications matched recommendations from the evidence. The Snapshot method proved to be a feasible and efficient method of gathering useful data to inform curriculum matching. Frequency of IMRT use in Queensland matches or possibly exceeds that indicated in the literature. It is recommended that future repetition of the study be undertaken in order to monitor trends in referral patterns and new technology implementation.

  2. A snapshot of radiation therapy techniques and technology in Queensland: An aid to mapping undergraduate curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Pete; Carmichael, Mary-Ann; Brady, Carole; Dry, Allison

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Undergraduate students studying the Bachelor of Radiation Therapy at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) attend clinical placements in a number of department sites across Queensland. To ensure that the curriculum prepares students for the most common treatments and current techniques in use in these departments, a curriculum matching exercise was performed. Methods A cross-sectional census was performed on a pre-determined “Snapshot” date in 2012. This was undertaken by the clinical education staff in each department who used a standardized proforma to count the number of patients as well as prescription, equipment, and technique data for a list of tumour site categories. This information was combined into aggregate anonymized data. Results All 12 Queensland radiation therapy clinical sites participated in the Snapshot data collection exercise to produce a comprehensive overview of clinical practice on the chosen day. A total of 59 different tumour sites were treated on the chosen day and as expected the most common treatment sites were prostate and breast, comprising 46% of patients treated. Data analysis also indicated that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) use is relatively high with 19.6% of patients receiving IMRT treatment on the chosen day. Both IMRT and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) indications matched recommendations from the evidence. Conclusion The Snapshot method proved to be a feasible and efficient method of gathering useful data to inform curriculum matching. Frequency of IMRT use in Queensland matches or possibly exceeds that indicated in the literature. It is recommended that future repetition of the study be undertaken in order to monitor trends in referral patterns and new technology implementation. PMID:26229604

  3. The virtual microphone technique in active sound field control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampropoulos, Iraklis E.; Shimizu, Yasushi

    2003-04-01

    Active Sound Field Control (AFC) has been proven very useful in reverberation enhancement applications in large rooms. However, feedback control is required in order to eliminate peaks in the frequency response of the system. The present research closely follows the studies of Shimizu in AFC, in which smoothing of the rooms transfer function is achieved by averaging the impulse responses of multiple microphones. ``The virtual or rotating microphone technique'' reduces the number of microphones in the aforementioned AFC technology, while still achieving the same acoustical effects in the room. After the impulse responses at previously specified pairs of microphone positions are measured, the ratio of transfer functions for every pair is calculated, thus yielding a constant K. Next, microphones are removed and their impulse responses are reproduced by processing the incoming signal of each pair through a convolver, where the computed K constants have been previously stored. Band limiting, windowing and time variance effects are critical factors, in order to reduce incoherence effects and yield reliable approximations of inverse filters and consequently calculations of K. The project is implemented in a church lacking low frequency reverberation for music and makes use of 2 physical and 2 virtual microphones.

  4. Residual matrix from different separation techniques impacts exosome biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Paolini, Lucia; Zendrini, Andrea; Noto, Giuseppe Di; Busatto, Sara; Lottini, Elisabetta; Radeghieri, Annalisa; Dossi, Alessandra; Caneschi, Andrea; Ricotta, Doris; Bergese, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are gaining a prominent role in research due to their intriguing biology and several therapeutic opportunities. However, their accurate purification from body fluids and detailed physicochemical characterization remain open issues. We isolated exosomes from serum of patients with Multiple Myeloma by four of the most popular purification methods and assessed the presence of residual contaminants in the preparations through an ad hoc combination of biochemical and biophysical techniques - including Western Blot, colloidal nanoplasmonics, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM). The preparations obtained by iodixanol and sucrose gradients were highly pure. To the contrary, those achieved with limited processing (serial centrifugation or one step precipitation kit) resulted contaminated by a residual matrix, embedding the exosomes. The contaminated preparations showed lower ability to induce NfkB nuclear translocation in endothelial cells with respect to the pure ones, probably because the matrix prevents the interaction and fusion of the exosomes with the cell membrane. These findings suggest that exosome preparation purity must be carefully assessed since it may interfere with exosome biological activity. Contaminants can be reliably probed only by an integrated characterization approach aimed at both the molecular and the colloidal length scales. PMID:27009329

  5. Double side read-out technique for mitigation of radiation damage effects in PbWO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchini, M. T.; Auffray, E.; Benaglia, A.; Cavallari, F.; Cockerill, D.; Dolgopolov, A.; Faure, J. L.; Golubev, N.; Hobson, P. R.; Jain, S.; Korjik, M.; Mechinski, V.; Singovski, A.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Tarasov, I.; Zahid, S.

    2016-04-01

    Test beam results of a calorimetric module based on 3×3×22 cm3 PbWO4 crystals, identical to those used in the CMS ECAL Endcaps, read out by a pair of photodetectors coupled to the two opposite sides (front and rear) of each crystal are presented. Nine crystals with different level of induced absorption, from 0 to 20 m‑1, have been tested using electrons in the 50–200 GeV energy range. Photomultiplier tubes have been chosen as photodetectors to allow for a precise measurement of highly damaged crystals. The information provided by this double side read-out configuration allows to correct for event-by-event fluctuations of the longitudinal development of electromagnetic showers. By strongly mitigating the effect of non-uniform light collection efficiency induced by radiation damage, the double side read-out technique significantly improves the energy resolution with respect to a single side read-out configuration. The non-linearity of the response arising in damaged crystals is also corrected by a double side read-out configuration and the response linearity of irradiated crystals is restored. In high radiation environments at future colliders, as it will be the case for detectors operating during the High Luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider, defects can be created inside the scintillator volume leading to a non-uniform response of the calorimetric cell. The double side read-out technique presented in this study provides a valuable way to improve the performance of calorimeters based on scintillators whose active volumes are characterized by high aspect ratio cells similar to those used in this study.

  6. Techniques for measuring vitamin A activity from β-carotene.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guangwen

    2012-11-01

    Dietary β-carotene is the most important precursor of vitamin A. However, the determination of the efficiency of in vivo conversion of β-carotene to vitamin A requires sensitive and safe techniques. It presents the following challenges: 1) circulating β-carotene concentration cannot be altered by eating a meal containing ≤6 mg β-carotene; 2) because retinol concentrations are homeostatically controlled, the conversion of β-carotene into vitamin A cannot be estimated accurately in well-nourished humans by assessing changes in serum retinol after supplementation with β-carotene. In the past half-century, techniques using radioisotopes of β-carotene and vitamin A, depletion-repletion with vitamin A and β-carotene supplements, measurement of postprandial chylomicron fractions after consumption of a β-carotene dose, and finally, stable isotopes as tracers to follow the absorption and conversion of β-carotene in humans have been developed. The reported values for β-carotene to vitamin A conversion showed a wide variation from 2 μg β-carotene to 1 μg retinol (for synthetic pure β-carotene in oil) and 28 μg β-carotene to 1 μg retinol (for β-carotene from vegetables). In recent years, a stable isotope reference method (IRM) was developed that used labeled synthetic β-carotene. The IRM method provided evidence that the conversion of β-carotene to vitamin A is likely dose dependent. With the development of intrinsically labeled plant foods harvested from a hydroponic system with heavy water, vitamin A activity of stable isotope-labeled biosynthetic β-carotene from various foods consumed by humans was studied. The efficacy of plant foods rich in β-carotene, such as natural (spinach, carrots, spirulina), hybrid (high-β-carotene yellow maize), and bioengineered (Golden Rice) foods, to provide vitamin A has shown promising results. The results from these studies will be of practical importance in recommendations for the use of pure β-carotene and foods

  7. A neutron activation technique for manganese measurements in humans.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, C; Byun, S H; Chettle, D R; Inskip, M J; Prestwich, W V

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element for humans, animals, and plants and is required for growth, development, and maintenance of health. Studies show that Mn metabolism is similar to that of iron, therefore, increased Mn levels in humans could interfere with the absorption of dietary iron leading to anemia. Also, excess exposure to Mn dust, leads to nervous system disorders similar to Parkinson's disease. Higher exposure to Mn is essentially related to industrial pollution. Thus, there is a benefit in developing a clean non-invasive technique for monitoring such increased levels of Mn in order to understand the risk of disease and development of appropriate treatments. To this end, the feasibility of Mn measurements with their minimum detection limits (MDL) has been reported earlier from the McMaster group. This work presents improvement to Mn assessment using an upgraded system and optimized times of irradiation and counting for induced gamma activity of Mn. The technique utilizes the high proton current Tandetron accelerator producing neutrons via the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction at McMaster University and an array of nine NaI (Tl) detectors in a 4 π geometry for delayed counting of gamma rays. The neutron irradiation of a set of phantoms was performed with protocols having different proton energy, current and time of irradiation. The improved MDLs estimated using the upgraded set up and constrained timings are reported as 0.67 μgMn/gCa for 2.3 MeV protons and 0.71 μgMn/gCa for 2.0 MeV protons. These are a factor of about 2.3 times better than previous measurements done at McMaster University using the in vivo set-up. Also, because of lower dose-equivalent and a relatively close MDL, the combination of: 2.0 MeV; 300 μA; 3 min protocol is recommended as compared to 2.3 MeV; 400 μA; 45 s protocol for further measurements of Mn in vivo. PMID:25169978

  8. Internal sample attenuator counting (ISAC). A new technique for separating and measuring bound and free activity in radioimmunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Thorell, J.I.

    1981-12-01

    A new method for the separation counting of bound and free activity in radioimmunoassays is described. Particles containing a radiation-abosrbing (attenuating) material are added to the assay. They shield the radiation from either the antibody-bound or the free radioligand. This obviates such manipulations conventionally involved in the separation and counting steps of radioimmunoassays as centrifugation decanting. Bismuth oxide is used as the attenuator. Particles with different properties are described. In one type, bismuth oxide is combined with active charcoal in an agarose matrix and serves as an absorbant for the free radioligand. In another type bismuth oxide is trapped within a polyacrylamide matrix to which antibodies are coupled. This particle can be used with a first- or a second-antibody bound activity. Application of the technique is illustrated with radioimmunoassays for thyroxin, triiodothyronine, human choriogonadotropin, and lutropin (luteinizing hormone).

  9. [Radiotherapy Techniques and Radiation Pneumonitis: A Lot To A Little Or A Little To A Lot?].

    PubMed

    Yu, Bingqi; Wang, Jin; Xu, Yujin; Su, Feng; Shan, Guoping; Chen, Ming

    2015-12-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main treatment for patients with lung cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) are widely used to deliver radiation. Here, we focus on the correlations between dose distribution in lung and radiation pneumonitis according to the analysis about radiotherapy for lung cancer: A lot to a little or a little to a lot, which is the main cause of radiation pneumonitis? PMID:26706952

  10. Spectral and Non Radiative Decay Studies of Lead Di Bromide Single Crystals by Mode Matched Thermal Lens Technique.

    PubMed

    Rejeena, I; Lillibai, B; Thomas, V; Nampoori, V P N; Radhakrishnan, P

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, the investigations on the non radiative decay mechanism, optical band gap determination from absorption spectroscopic studies and fluorescence emission by photo luminescence techniques using different excitation wavelengths on gel derived lead di bromide single crystals are reported. Non radiative decay of the sample is studied using high sensitive dual beam mode matched thermal lens technique. For the thermal lensing experiment the crystal in solution phase is incorporated with rhodamine 6G dye for enhancing the absorption of the crystal sample. The thermal diffusivity of lead di bromide is determined using the probe beam intensity v/s time measurements. PMID:27165040

  11. Simplified techniques to study components of solar radiation under haze and clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Wesely, M.L.

    1982-03-01

    Estimates of the global (G), diffuse (D) and direct-beam (I) irradiances at the surface of the earth can be obtained with a single instrument, ''dial'' radiometer. The dial assembly intermittently shades a solid-state sensor on a continual automatic basis. This is a very simple instrument that does not require mechanical adjustments of the shade. When corrections for imperfect cosine response and excessive shading of sky radiation are performed, measurements averaged over 1 h should be accurate well within +- 5%. Estimates of atmospheric turbidity or haziness can be expressed as an extinction coefficient, computed for I in reference to that obtained under cloudless clean skies for the same solar zenith angle. The uneven spectral response of silicon-cell and PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) sensors should be considered when comparing estimates of G, D or I to measurments of these components by a wide-band sensor. Linear relationships seem adequate for a variety of cloud conditions. This allows the use of single dial silicon-cell radiometer, for example, to estimate quite accurately the values of G, D and I that would be seen by wide-band or PAR radiometers. An alternative, but less exact, means of obtaining estimates of hourly averages of D and I is to measure only G and use the ratio of G to that which would be obtained under clean, cloudless conditions as the sole determining factors.

  12. Characterization of AN Actively Cooled Metal Foil Thermal Radiation Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, J. R.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Salerno, L. J.

    2010-04-01

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) or reduced boil-off (RBO) systems that involve active cooling of large cryogenic propellant tanks will most likely be required for future space exploration missions. For liquid oxygen or methane, such systems could be implemented using existing high technology readiness level (TRL) cryocoolers. However, for liquid hydrogen temperatures (˜20 K) no such coolers exist. In order to partially circumvent this technology gap, the concept of broad area cooling (BAC) has been developed, whereby a low mass thermal radiation shield could be maintained at temperatures around 100 K by steady circulation of cold pressurized gas through a network of narrow tubes. By this method it is possible to dramatically reduce the radiative heat leak to the 20 K tank. A series of experiments, designed to investigate the heat transfer capabilities of BAC systems, have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Results of the final experiment in this series, investigating heat transfer from a metal foil film to a distributed cooling line, are presented here.

  13. Spectral estimators of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Most models of crop growth and yield require an estimate of canopy leaf area index (LAI) or absorption of radiation. Relationships between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by corn canopies and the spectral reflectance of the canopies were investigated. Reflectance factor data were acquired with a Landsat MSS band radiometer. From planting to silking, the three spectrally predicted vegetation indices examined were associated with more than 95 percent of the variability in absorbed PAR. The relationships developed between absorbed PAR and the three indices were evaluated with reflectance factor data acquired from corn canopies planted in 1979 through 1982. Seasonal cumulations of measured LAI and each of the three indices were associated with greater than 50 percent of the variation in final grain yields from the test years. Seasonal cumulations of daily absorbed PAR were associated with up to 73 percent of the variation in final grain yields. Absorbed PAR, cumulated through the growing season, is a better indicator of yield than cumulated leaf area index. Absorbed PAR may be estimated reliably from spectral reflectance data of crop canopies.

  14. Spectral estimators of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Most models of crop growth and yield require an estimate of canopy leaf area index (LAI) or absorption of radiation. Relationships between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by corn canopies and the spectral reflectance of the canopies were investigated. Reflectance factor data were acquired with a LANDSAT MSS band radiometer. From planting to silking, the three spectrally predicted vegetation indices examined were associated with more than 95% of the variability in absorbed PAR. The relationships developed between absorbed PAR and the three indices were evaluated with reflectance factor data acquired from corn canopies planted in 1979 through 1982. Seasonal cumulations of measured LAI and each of the three indices were associated with greater than 50% of the variation in final grain yields from the test years. Seasonal cumulations of daily absorbed PAR were associated with up to 73% of the variation in final grain yields. Absorbed PAR, cumulated through the growing season, is a better indicator of yield than cumulated leaf area index. Absorbed PAR may be estimated reliably from spectral reflectance data of crop canopies.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ACTIVELY COOLED METAL FOIL THERMAL RADIATION SHIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, J. R.; Salerno, L. J.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.

    2010-04-09

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) or reduced boil-off (RBO) systems that involve active cooling of large cryogenic propellant tanks will most likely be required for future space exploration missions. For liquid oxygen or methane, such systems could be implemented using existing high technology readiness level (TRL) cryocoolers. However, for liquid hydrogen temperatures (approx20 K) no such coolers exist. In order to partially circumvent this technology gap, the concept of broad area cooling (BAC) has been developed, whereby a low mass thermal radiation shield could be maintained at temperatures around 100 K by steady circulation of cold pressurized gas through a network of narrow tubes. By this method it is possible to dramatically reduce the radiative heat leak to the 20 K tank. A series of experiments, designed to investigate the heat transfer capabilities of BAC systems, have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Results of the final experiment in this series, investigating heat transfer from a metal foil film to a distributed cooling line, are presented here.

  16. Photosynthetically active radiation and its relationship with global solar radiation in Central China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lunche; Gong, Wei; Ma, Yingying; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Miao

    2014-08-01

    Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and other solar components were observed for a period of 3 years at Wuhan, China to determine for the first time the temporal variability of PAR fraction [PAR/G (G here stands for global solar radiation)] and its dependence on different sky conditions in Central China. PAR, G and PAR/G showed similar seasonal features that peaked in summer and reached their lowest values in winter. The seasonal PAR/G ranged from 1.70 E MJ(-1) (winter) to 2.01 E MJ(-1) (summer) with an annual mean value of 1.89 E MJ(-1). Hourly values of PAR/G increased from 1.78 to 2.11 E MJ(-1) on average as sky conditions changed from clear to cloudy. Monthly mean hourly PAR/G revealed a diurnal variation, with highest values observed around sunrise and sunset, slightly higher PAR fractions were also found around noon for most months. The effect of daylength on PAR/G was also studied and no significant impact was found. Three models were developed to estimate PAR from G. These models consisted of atmospheric parameters that were found to cause substantial changes of PAR/G, such as sky clearness, brightness, path length and the sky clearness index. The estimations obtained from different models were very close to the measured values with maximum relative errors below 8 % (hourly values) in Wuhan. The models were not only tested at seven radiation stations in Central China, but also verified in six stations with different climates in China. The models were found to estimate PAR accurately from commonly available G data in Central China; however, the results also implied that the models need to be modified to account for local climatic conditions when applied to the whole country. PMID:23780493

  17. Digital holographic interferometry: A novel optical calorimetry technique for radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cavan, Alicia; Meyer, Juergen

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To develop and demonstrate the proof-of-principle of a novel optical calorimetry method to determine radiation absorbed dose in a transparent medium. Methods: The calorimetric property of water is measured during irradiation by means of an interferometer, which detects temperature-induced changes in the refractive index that can be mathematically related to absorbed dose. The proposed method uses a technique called digital holographic interferometry (DHI), which comprises an optical laser interferometer setup and consecutive physical reconstruction of the recorded wave fronts by means of the Fresnel transform. This paper describes the conceptual framework and provides the mathematical basis for DHI dosimetry. Dose distributions from a high dose rate Brachytherapy source were measured by a prototype optical setup to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. Results: The developed DHI dosimeter successfully determined absorbed dose distributions in water in the region adjacent to a high dose rate Brachytherapy source. A temperature change of 0.0381 K across a distance of 6.8 mm near the source was measured, corresponding to a dose of 159.3 Gy. The standard deviation in a typical measurement set was ±3.45 Gy (corresponding to an uncertainty in the temperature value of ±8.3 × 10{sup −4} K). The relative dose fall off was in agreement with treatment planning system modeled data. Conclusions: First results with a prototype optical setup and a Brachytherapy source demonstrate the proof-of-principle of the approach. The prototype achieves high spatial resolution of approximately 3 × 10{sup −5} m. The general approach is fundamentally independent of the radiation type and energy. The sensitivity range determined indicates that the method is predominantly suitable for high dose rate applications. Further work is required to determine absolute dose in all three dimensions.

  18. Quantifying reflectance anisotropy of photosynthetically active radiation in grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, E.M. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. This paper reports on a study to quantify the reflectance anisotropy of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for grasslands. PAR falls in the wavelength range 0.4 to 0.7[mu]m. The study looks at the variation of PAR with illumination and vegetative canopy conditions. It uses bidirectional reflectance distribution function data, and measures of anisotropy derived from reflectance factor and reflectance fraction data to aid in the analysis. The data used for this analysis came from an intense effort mounted to measure diurnal changes in the anisotropy of surface reflectance from prairie grassland as a function of the vegetative canopy.

  19. Neutron radiation tolerance of Au-activated silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, W. T.

    1987-01-01

    Double injection devices prepared by the introduction of deep traps, using the Au activation method have been found to tolerate gamma irradiation into the Gigarad (Si) region without significant degradation of operating characteristics. Silicon double injection devices, using deep levels creacted by Au diffusion, can tolerate fast neutron irradiation up to 10 to the 15th n/sq cm. Significant parameter degradation occurs at 10 to the 16th n/sq cm. However, since the actual doping of the basic material begins to change as a result of the transmutation of silicon into phosphorus for neutron fluences greater than 10 to the 17th/sq cm, the radiation tolerance of these devices is approaching the limit possible for any device based on initially doped silicon.

  20. Intercepted photosynthetically active radiation estimated by spectral reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. L.; Asrar, G.; Kanemasu, E. T.

    1984-01-01

    Interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was evaluated relative to greenness and normalized difference (MSS (7-5)/(7+5) for five planting dates of wheat for 1978-79 and 1979-80 at Phoenix, Arizona. Intercepted PAR was calculated from leaf area index and stage of growth. Linear relatinships were found with greeness and normalized difference with separate relatinships describing growth and senescence of the crop. Normalized difference was significantly better than greenness for all planting dates. For the leaf area growth portion of the season the relation between PAR interception and normalized difference was the same over years and planting dates. For the leaf senescence phase the relationships showed more variability due to the lack of data on light interception in sparse and senescing canopies. Normalized difference could be used to estimate PAR interception throughout a growing season.

  1. Treatment Techniques to Reduce Cardiac Irradiation for Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Robert E.; Kim, Leonard; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Khan, Atif J.; Goyal, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of women diagnosed with breast cancer each year receive breast-conserving surgery followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. For women with left-sided breast cancer, there is risk of potential cardiotoxicity from the radiation therapy. As data have become available to quantify the risk of cardiotoxicity from radiation, strategies have also developed to reduce the dose of radiation to the heart without compromising radiation dose to the breast. Several broad categories of techniques to reduce cardiac radiation doses include breath hold techniques, prone positioning, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and accelerated partial breast irradiation, as well as many small techniques to improve traditional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. This review summarizes the published scientific literature on the various techniques to decrease cardiac irradiation in women treated to the left breast for breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25452938

  2. Risk of Second Cancers According to Radiation Therapy Technique and Modality in Prostate Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Wong, Jeannette; Kleinerman, Ruth; Kim, Clara; Morton, Lindsay; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) techniques for prostate cancer are evolving rapidly, but the impact of these changes on risk of second cancers, which are an uncommon but serious consequence of RT, are uncertain. We conducted a comprehensive assessment of risks of second cancer according to RT technique (>10 MV vs ≤10 MV and 3-dimensional [3D] vs 2D RT) and modality (external beam RT, brachytherapy, and combined modes) in a large cohort of prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The cohort was constructed using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database. We included cases of prostate cancer diagnosed in patients 66 to 84 years of age from 1992 to 2004 and followed through 2009. We used Poisson regression analysis to compare rates of second cancer across RT groups with adjustment for age, follow-up, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and comorbidities. Analyses of second solid cancers were based on the number of 5-year survivors (n=38,733), and analyses of leukemia were based on number of 2-year survivors (n=52,515) to account for the minimum latency period for radiation-related cancer. Results: During an average of 4.4 years' follow-up among 5-year prostate cancer survivors (2DRT = 5.5 years; 3DRT = 3.9 years; and brachytherapy = 2.7 years), 2933 second solid cancers were diagnosed. There were no significant differences in second solid cancer rates overall between 3DRT and 2DRT patients (relative risk [RR] = 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91-1.09), but second rectal cancer rates were significantly lower after 3DRT (RR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.40-0.88). Rates of second solid cancers for higher- and lower-energy RT were similar overall (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06), as were rates for site-specific cancers. There were significant reductions in colon cancer and leukemia rates in the first decade after brachytherapy compared to those after external beam RT. Conclusions: Advanced treatment planning may have reduced rectal

  3. INVESTIGATION OF MICROSCOPIC RADIATION DAMAGE IN WASTE FORMS USING ODNMR AND AEM TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed project addresses DOE nuclear waste problems that are currently intractable without achieving a fundamental understanding of radiation effects on high level waste (HLW) forms. This project will investigate the microscopic effects of radiation damage in crystalline an...

  4. Successful Application of Active Learning Techniques to Introductory Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the low student achievement in microbiology courses and presents an active learning method applied in an introductory microbiology course which features daily quizzes, cooperative learning activities, and group projects. (Contains 30 references.) (YDS)

  5. A technique for estimating the probability of radiation-stimulated failures of integrated microcircuits in low-intensity radiation fields: Application to the Spektr-R spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. D.; Khamidullina, N. M.

    2006-10-01

    In developing radio-electronic devices (RED) of spacecraft operating in the fields of ionizing radiation in space, one of the most important problems is the correct estimation of their radiation tolerance. The “weakest link” in the element base of onboard microelectronic devices under radiation effect is the integrated microcircuits (IMC), especially of large scale (LSI) and very large scale (VLSI) degree of integration. The main characteristic of IMC, which is taken into account when making decisions on using some particular type of IMC in the onboard RED, is the probability of non-failure operation (NFO) at the end of the spacecraft’s lifetime. It should be noted that, until now, the NFO has been calculated only from the reliability characteristics, disregarding the radiation effect. This paper presents the so-called “reliability” approach to determination of radiation tolerance of IMC, which allows one to estimate the probability of non-failure operation of various types of IMC with due account of radiation-stimulated dose failures. The described technique is applied to RED onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft to be launched in 2007.

  6. A Instrument and Technique for Measuring the Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Grant W.

    1997-09-01

    There is a wealth of information contained in the spatial temperature distribution of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB) >From the pioneering discovery of anisotropy by the COBE satellite to the latest balloon payloads and ground based observations, measurements of the CMB have become the cornerstone of our current understanding of the Universe. Currently, the second generation of CMB experiments are coming on-line. With improved detectors and novel observing strategies, these experiments are destined to make the transition from 'discovering' the anisotropy in the CMB to making precision measurements of the spatial correlation function. Herein I describe the most recent of these second generation experiments: the Medium Scale Anisotropy Measurement (MSAM II). MSAM II is a balloon-based telescope with a bolometric receiver cooled by an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator to 100 mK. MSAM II samples the sky with a 20 prime FWHM beam swept with a triangle wave at 2.5 Hz and will make a precision measurement of the spatial correlation function from 1 = 100 to 1 = 500. In addition to a comprehensive discussion of the fabrication and development of the cryogenic and optical systems of MSAM II, I present a novel method of estimating cosmological parameters from anisotropy measurements using a maximum Likelihood technique which employs the full covariance matrix of observations. This method has been used on the combined three years of MSAM I datasets to constrain the mass fraction of baryons in the universe, ΩB, as well as a number of other cosmological parameters.

  7. Use of image guided radiation therapy techniques and imaging dose measurement at Indian hospitals: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sudesh; Dhote, D. S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Naidu, Suresh; Sutar, A.; Kannan, V.

    2015-01-01

    A national survey was conducted to obtain information about the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques and IGRT dose measurement methods being followed at Indian radiotherapy centers. A questionnaire containing parameters relevant to use of IGRT was prepared to collect the information pertaining to (i) availability and type of IGRT delivery system, (ii) frequency of image acquisition protocol and utilization of these images for different purpose, and (iii) imaging dose measurement. The questionnaire was circulated to 75 hospitals in the country having IGRT facility, and responses of 51 centers were received. Survey results showed that among surveyed hospitals, 86% centers have IGRT facility, 78% centers have kilo voltage three-dimensional volumetric imaging. 75% of hospitals in our study do not perform computed tomography dose index measurements and 89% of centers do not perform patient dose measurements. Moreover, only 29% physicists believe IGRT dose is additional radiation burden to patient. This study has brought into focus the need to design a national protocol for IGRT dose measurement and development of indigenous tools to perform IGRT dose measurements. PMID:26865758

  8. Comparison of the effectiveness of some common animal data scaling techniques in estimating human radiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.B.; Aydogan, B.

    1999-01-01

    In the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, animal studies are typically performed to get a first approximation of the expected radiation dose in humans. This study evaluates the performance of some commonly used data extrapolation techniques to predict residence times in humans using data collected from animals. Residence times were calculated using animal and human data, and distributions of ratios of the animal results to human results were constructed for each extrapolation method. Four methods using animal data to predict human residence times were examined: (1) using no extrapolation, (2) using relative organ mass extrapolation, (3) using physiological time extrapolation, and (4) using a combination of the mass and time methods. The residence time ratios were found to be log normally distributed for the nonextrapolated and extrapolated data sets. The use of relative organ mass extrapolation yielded no statistically significant change in the geometric mean or variance of the residence time ratios as compared to using no extrapolation. Physiologic time extrapolation yielded a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.01, paired t test) in the geometric mean of the residence time ratio from 0.5 to 0.8. Combining mass and time methods did not significantly improve the results of using time extrapolation alone. 63 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Use of image guided radiation therapy techniques and imaging dose measurement at Indian hospitals: A survey.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Sudesh; Dhote, D S; Kumar, Rajesh; Naidu, Suresh; Sutar, A; Kannan, V

    2015-01-01

    A national survey was conducted to obtain information about the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques and IGRT dose measurement methods being followed at Indian radiotherapy centers. A questionnaire containing parameters relevant to use of IGRT was prepared to collect the information pertaining to (i) availability and type of IGRT delivery system, (ii) frequency of image acquisition protocol and utilization of these images for different purpose, and (iii) imaging dose measurement. The questionnaire was circulated to 75 hospitals in the country having IGRT facility, and responses of 51 centers were received. Survey results showed that among surveyed hospitals, 86% centers have IGRT facility, 78% centers have kilo voltage three-dimensional volumetric imaging. 75% of hospitals in our study do not perform computed tomography dose index measurements and 89% of centers do not perform patient dose measurements. Moreover, only 29% physicists believe IGRT dose is additional radiation burden to patient. This study has brought into focus the need to design a national protocol for IGRT dose measurement and development of indigenous tools to perform IGRT dose measurements. PMID:26865758

  10. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Schooneveld, E M; Pietropaolo, A; Andreani, C; Perelli Cippo, E; Rhodes, N J; Senesi, R; Tardocchi, M; Gorini, G

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources. PMID:27502571

  11. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schooneveld, E. M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rhodes, N. J.; Senesi, R.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources.

  12. Technique factors and their relationship to radiation dose in pendant geometry breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, John M.; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Shah, Nikula; Lindfors, Karen K.; Nelson, Thomas R.

    2005-12-15

    The use of breast computed tomography (CT) as an alternative to mammography in some patients is being studied at several institutions. However, the radiation dosimetry issues associated with breast CT are markedly different than in the case of mammography. In this study, the spectral properties of an operational breast CT scanner were characterized both by physical measurement and computer modeling of the kVp-dependent spectra, from 40 to 110 kVp (Be window W anode with 0.30 mm added Cu filtration). Previously reported conversion factors, normalized glandular dose for CT-DgN(ct), derived from Monte Carlo methods, were used in concert with the output spectra of the breast scanner to compute the mean glandular dose to the breast based upon different combinations of x-ray technique factors (kVp and mAs). The mean glandular dose (MGD) was measured as a function of the compressed breast thickness (2-8 cm) and three different breast compositions (0%, 50%, and 100% glandular fractions) in four clinical mammography systems in our institution. The average MGD from these four systems was used to compute the technique factors for breast CT systems that would match the two-view mammographic dose levels. For a 14 cm diameter breast (equivalent to a 5 cm thick compressed breast in mammography), air kerma levels at the breast CT scanner's isocenter (468 mm from the source) of 4.4, 6.4, and 9.0 mGy were found to deliver equivalent mammography doses for 0%, 50%, and 100% glandular breasts (respectively) at 80 kVp. At 80 kVp (where air kerma was 11.3 mGy/100 mAs at the isocenter), 57 mAs (integrated over the entire scan) was required to match the mammography dose for a 14 cm 50% glandular breast. At 50 kVp, 360 mAs is required to match mammographic dose levels. Tables are provided for both air kerma at the isocenter and mAs for 0%, 50%, and 100% glandular breasts. Other issues that impact breast CT technique factors are also discussed.

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  14. Evaluation of Four Techniques Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Comprehensive Locoregional Irradiation of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean; Marsh, Robin; Masi, Kathryn; Griffith, Kent A.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To establish optimal intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for treating the left breast and regional nodes, using moderate deep-inspiration breath hold. Methods and Materials: We developed four IMRT plans of differing complexity for each of 10 patients following lumpectomy for left breast cancer. A dose of 60 Gy was prescribed to the boost planning target volume (PTV) and 52.2 Gy to the breast and supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes. Two plans used inverse-planned beamlet techniques: a 9-field technique, with nine equispaced axial beams, and a tangential beamlet technique, with three to five ipsilateral beams. The third plan (a segmental technique) used a forward-planned multisegment technique, and the fourth plan (a segmental blocked technique) was identical but included a block to limit heart dose. Dose--volume histograms were generated, and metrics chosen for comparison were analyzed using the paired t test. Results: Mean heart and left anterior descending coronary artery doses were similar with the tangential beamlet and segmental blocked techniques but higher with the segmental and 9-field techniques (mean paired difference of 15.1 Gy between segmental and tangential beamlet techniques, p < 0.001). Substantial volumes of contralateral tissue received dose with the 9-field technique (mean right breast V2, 58.9%; mean right lung V2, 75.3%). Minimum dose to {>=}95% of breast PTV was, on average, 45.9 Gy with tangential beamlet, 45.0 Gy with segmental blocked, 51.4 Gy with segmental, and 50.2 Gy with 9-field techniques. Coverage of the internal mammary region was substantially better with the two beamlet techniques than with the segmental blocked technique. Conclusions: Compared to the 9-field beamlet and segmental techniques, a tangential beamlet IMRT technique reduced exposure to normal tissues and maintained reasonable target coverage.

  15. Radiation-hard active CMOS pixel sensors for HL-LHC detector upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, Malte

    2015-02-01

    The luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be increased during the Long Shutdown of 2022 and 2023 (LS3) in order to increase the sensitivity of its experiments. A completely new inner detector for the ATLAS experiment needs to be developed to withstand the extremely harsh environment of the upgraded, so-called High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). High radiation hardness as well as granularity is mandatory to cope with the requirements in terms of radiation damage as well as particle occupancy. A new silicon detector concept that uses commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity full complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes as active sensor for pixel and/or strip layers has risen high attention, because it potentially provides high radiation hardness and granularity and at the same time reduced price due to the commercial processing and possibly relaxed requirements for the hybridization technique. Results on the first prototypes characterized in a variety of laboratory as well as test beam environments are presented.

  16. Investigation of Advanced Dose Verification Techniques for External Beam Radiation Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asuni, Ganiyu Adeniyi

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) have been introduced in radiation therapy to achieve highly conformal dose distributions around the tumour while minimizing dose to surrounding normal tissues. These techniques have increased the need for comprehensive quality assurance tests, to verify that customized patient treatment plans are accurately delivered during treatment. in vivo dose verification, performed during treatment delivery, confirms that the actual dose delivered is the same as the prescribed dose, helping to reduce treatment delivery errors. in vivo measurements may be accomplished using entrance or exit detectors. The objective of this project is to investigate a novel entrance detector designed for in vivo dose verification. This thesis is separated into three main investigations, focusing on a prototype entrance transmission detector (TRD) developed by IBA Dosimetry, Germany. First contaminant electrons generated by the TRD in a 6 MV photon beam were investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. This study demonstrates that modification of the contaminant electron model in the treatment planning system is required for accurate patient dose calculation in buildup regions when using the device. Second, the ability of the TRD to accurately measure dose from IMRT and VMAT was investigated by characterising the spatial resolution of the device. This was accomplished by measuring the point spread function with further validation provided by MC simulation. Comparisons of measured and calculated doses show that the spatial resolution of the TRD allows for measurement of clinical IMRT fields within acceptable tolerance. Finally, a new general research tool was developed to perform MC simulations for VMAT and IMRT treatments, simultaneously tracking dose deposition in both the patient CT geometry and an arbitrary planar detector system, generalized to handle either entrance or exit orientations. It was

  17. An iterative finite element-integral technique for predicting sound radiation from turbofan inlets in steady flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, S. J.; Sigman, R. K.; Zinn, B. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new iterative solution technique for predicting the sound field radiated from a turbofan inlet in steady flight is presented. The sound field is divided into two regions: the sound field within and near the inlet which is computed using the finite element method and the radiation field beyond the inlet which is calculated using an integral solution technique. A continuous solution is obtained by matching the finite element and integral solutions at the interface between the two regions. The applicability of the iterative technique is demonstrated by comparison of experimental results with the theoretical results for several different inlet configurations with and without flow. These examples show that good agreement between experiment and theory is obtained within five iterations.

  18. Activated sampling in complex materials at finite temperature: The properly obeying probability activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocks, Henk; Chubynsky, M. V.; Barkema, G. T.; Mousseau, Normand

    2005-12-01

    While the dynamics of many complex systems is dominated by activated events, there are very few simulation methods that take advantage of this fact. Most of these procedures are restricted to relatively simple systems or, as with the activation-relaxation technique (ART), sample the conformation space efficiently at the cost of a correct thermodynamical description. We present here an extension of ART, the properly obeying probability ART (POP-ART), that obeys detailed balance and samples correctly the thermodynamic ensemble. Testing POP-ART on two model systems, a vacancy and an interstitial in crystalline silicon, we show that this method recovers the proper thermodynamical weights associated with the various accessible states and is significantly faster than molecular dynamics in the simulations of a vacancy below 700 K.

  19. Activated sampling in complex materials at finite temperature: the properly obeying probability activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Vocks, Henk; Chubynsky, M V; Barkema, G T; Mousseau, Normand

    2005-12-22

    While the dynamics of many complex systems is dominated by activated events, there are very few simulation methods that take advantage of this fact. Most of these procedures are restricted to relatively simple systems or, as with the activation-relaxation technique (ART), sample the conformation space efficiently at the cost of a correct thermodynamical description. We present here an extension of ART, the properly obeying probability ART (POP-ART), that obeys detailed balance and samples correctly the thermodynamic ensemble. Testing POP-ART on two model systems, a vacancy and an interstitial in crystalline silicon, we show that this method recovers the proper thermodynamical weights associated with the various accessible states and is significantly faster than molecular dynamics in the simulations of a vacancy below 700 K. PMID:16396563

  20. Radiation-induced signals of gypsum crystals analysed by ESR and TL techniques applied to dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydaş, Canan; Engin, Birol; Aydın, Talat

    2011-02-01

    Natural crystals of terrestrial gypsum were investigated concerning the radiation effects on Electron spin resonance (ESR) and Thermoluminescence (TL) properties and their application for geological dating. ESR signals of Fe 3+, Mn 2+, G1 ( SO3-, g = 2.003) and G2 ( SO4-, g∥=2.018g⊥=2.009) centers were observed. The thermal stability and dose response of the ESR signals were found to be suitable for an age determination using a signal at g = 2.009. The intensity of this center increased with γ-radiation and the additive dose method for this ESR center yielded accumulated dose GD of 67.4 ± 10.1 Gy. Using U, Th and K contents plus the cosmic-ray contribution, a dose rate of 1.92 ± 0.22 mGy/year has been obtained. We have determined the ESR age of the gypsums to be (35 ± 4) × 10 3 years. TL peaks at 157 and 278 °C were observed. By using initial rise method the thermal activation energy of 278 °C TL peak was found to be underestimated, probably due to the thermal quenching. Activation energies and frequency factors obtained by the method of varying the heating rate indicate lifetime of 4.09 × 10 7 years (at 15 °C) for 278 °C peak. The additive dose method applied to this TL peak yielded GD of 75 ± 11 Gy. The corresponding TL age using the 278 °C TL peak was found to be (39 ± 5) × 10 3 years for gypsum sample. The TL age of this sample is consistent with the ESR age within experimental error limits. The obtained ESR and TL ages are not consistent with the expectations of geologists. This contradiction is probably due to the repeatedly recrystallisation of gypsum samples under the environmental conditions after their formation in the upper Miocene-Pliocene Epoch.

  1. Application of thermal analysis techniques in activated carbon production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnals, G.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.; Brady, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal analysis techniques have been used at the ISGS as an aid in the development and characterization of carbon adsorbents. Promising adsorbents from fly ash, tires, and Illinois coals have been produced for various applications. Process conditions determined in the preparation of gram quantities of carbons were used as guides in the preparation of larger samples. TG techniques developed to characterize the carbon adsorbents included the measurement of the kinetics of SO2 adsorption, the performance of rapid proximate analyses, and the determination of equilibrium methane adsorption capacities. Thermal regeneration of carbons was assessed by TG to predict the life cycle of carbon adsorbents in different applications. TPD was used to determine the nature of surface functional groups and their effect on a carbon's adsorption properties.

  2. Mathematical analysis techniques for modeling the space network activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Lisa M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to explore and identify mathematical analysis techniques, and in particular, the use of linear programming. This topic was then applied to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) in order to understand the space network better. Finally, a small scale version of the system was modeled, variables were identified, data was gathered, and comparisons were made between actual and theoretical data.

  3. Innovative techniques in radiation oncology. Clinical research programs to improve local and regional control in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Micaily, B.; Fisher, S.A.; Lamm, F.R. )

    1990-02-01

    There is a growing importance in failure analysis in cancer management. In these analyses locoregional failure as the cause of death emerges as a significant problem in many tumor sites, e.g., head and neck cancer, gynecologic cancer, genitourinary cancer. Because of these data, the radiation oncology community has attributed high priority to research efforts to improve locoregional control. These efforts include the following: (1) brachytherapy alone or with external beam radiation therapy or surgery; (2) intraoperative radiation therapy; (3) hyperthermia with radiation therapy; (4) particle irradiation (protons, neutrons, stripped nuclei, and pions); and (5) routes of administration of the treatment, including infusional (intravenous) chemotherapy with radiation therapy, intraarterial monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides, and intraarterial chemotherapy with radiation therapy. Each area of investigation is discussed.

  4. Application of the planar-scanning technique to the near-field dosimetry of millimeter-wave radiators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianxun; Lu, Hongmin; Deng, Jun

    2015-02-01

    The planar-scanning technique was applied to the experimental measurement of the electric field and power flux density (PFD) in the exposure area close to the millimeter-wave (MMW) radiator. In the near-field region, the field and PFD were calculated from the plane-wave spectrum of the field sampled on a scan plane far from the radiator. The measurement resolution was improved by reducing the spatial interval between the field samples to a fraction of half the wavelength and implementing multiple iterations of the fast Fourier transform. With the reference to the results from the numerical calculation, an experimental evaluation of the planar-scanning measurement was made for a 50 GHz radiator. Placing the probe 1 to 3 wavelengths from the aperture of the radiator, the direct measurement gave the near-field data with significant differences from the numerical results. The planar-scanning measurement placed the probe 9 wavelengths away from the aperture and effectively reduced the maximum and averaged differences in the near-field data by 70.6% and 65.5%, respectively. Applied to the dosimetry of an open-ended waveguide and a choke ring antenna for 60 GHz exposure, the technique proved useful to the measurement of the PFD in the near-field exposure area of MMW radiators. PMID:25644219

  5. A simulation study investigating a radiation detector utilizing the prompt gamma range verification technique for proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Andrew David

    Proton therapy has shown to be a viable therapy for radiation oncology applications. The advantages of using protons as compared to photons in the treatments of diseases with radiation are numerous including the ability to deliver overall lower amounts of lethal radiation doses to the patient. This advantage is due to the fundamental interaction mechanism of the incident therapeutic protons with the patient, which produces a characteristic dose-distribution unique only to protons. Unlike photons, the entire proton beam is absorbed within the patent and the dose-distribution's maximum occurs near the end of the proton's path. Protons deliver less dose on the skin and intervening tissues, tighter dose conformality to the disease site, as well as no dose past the target volume, sparring healthy tissue distally in the patient. Current research in proton therapy is geared towards minimizing proton range uncertainty and monitoring in-vivo the location of the proton's path. Monitoring the beam's path serves also to verify which healthy structures/tissues were irradiated and whether the target volume has met the prescription dose. Among the many techniques used for in-vivo proton monitoring, the technique based on the emitted secondary particles, specifically the Prompt Gamma (PG) method, can be used for clinical implementation. This work focuses on developing a radiation detector system for using the PG method by investigating the characterizing the secondary particle field emitted from plastic and water phantoms as well as a radiation detector based on glass materials that exploits the Cherenkov phenomenon.

  6. Reduction in radiation dose with reconstruction technique in the brain perfusion CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Lee, H. K.; Song, H.; Ju, M. S.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, M. S.; Cho, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    The principal objective of this study was to verify the utility of the reconstruction imaging technique in the brain perfusion computed tomography (PCT) scan by assessing reductions in the radiation dose and analyzing the generated images. The setting used for image acquisition had a detector coverage of 40 mm, a helical thickness of 0.625 mm, a helical shuttle mode scan type and a rotation time of 0.5 s as the image parameters used for the brain PCT scan. Additionally, a phantom experiment and an animal experiment were carried out. In the phantom and animal experiments, noise was measured in the scanning with the tube voltage fixed at 80 kVp (kilovolt peak) and the level of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) was changed from 0% to 100% at 10% intervals. The standard deviation of the CT coefficient was measured three times to calculate the mean value. In the phantom and animal experiments, the absorbed dose was measured 10 times under the same conditions as the ones for noise measurement before the mean value was calculated. In the animal experiment, pencil-type and CT-dedicated ionization chambers were inserted into the central portion of pig heads for measurement. In the phantom study, as the level of the ASIR changed from 0% to 100% under identical scanning conditions, the noise value and dose were proportionally reduced. In our animal experiment, the noise value was lowest when the ASIR level was 50%, unlike in the phantom study. The dose was reduced as in the phantom study.

  7. Optimization of Radiation Therapy Techniques for Prostate Cancer With Prostate-Rectum Spacers: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Gary; Benz, Eileen; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Miralbell, Raymond; Zilli, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Dose-escalated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer improves disease control but is also associated with worse rectal toxicity. A spacer placed between the prostate and rectum can be used to displace the anterior rectal wall outside of the high-dose radiation regions and potentially minimize radiation-induced rectal toxicity. This systematic review focuses on the published data regarding the different types of commercially available prostate-rectum spacers. Dosimetric results and preliminary clinical data using prostate-rectum spacers in patients with localized prostate cancer treated by curative radiation therapy are compared and discussed.

  8. Determination of Jet Noise Radiation Source Locations using a Dual Sideline Cross-Correlation/Spectrum Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. S.; Jaeger, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of our efforts is to extrapolate nearfield jet noise measurements to the geometric far field where the jet noise sources appear to radiate from a single point. To accomplish this, information about the location of noise sources in the jet plume, the radiation patterns of the noise sources and the sound pressure level distribution of the radiated field must be obtained. Since source locations and radiation patterns can not be found with simple single microphone measurements, a more complicated method must be used.

  9. Advanced radiation techniques for inspection of diesel engine combustion chamber materials components. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-09

    Heavy duty truck engines must meet stringent life cycle cost and regulatory requirements. Meeting these requirements has resulted in convergence on 4-stroke 6-in-line, turbocharged, and after-cooled engines with direct-injection combustion systems. These engines provide much higher efficiencies (42%, fuel consumption 200 g/kW-hr) than automotive engines (31%, fuel consumption 270 g/kW-hr), but at higher initial cost. Significant near-term diesel engine improvements are necessary and are spurred by continuing competitive, Middle - East oil problems and Congressional legislation. As a result of these trends and pressures, Caterpillar has been actively pursuing a low-fuel consumption engine research program with emphasis on product quality through process control and product inspection. The goal of this project is to combine the nondestructive evaluation and computational resources and expertise available at LLNL with the diesel engine and manufacturing expertise of the Caterpillar Corporation to develop in-process monitoring and inspection techniques for diesel engine combustion chamber components and materials. Early development of these techniques will assure the optimization of the manufacturing process by design/inspection interface. The transition from the development stage to the manufacturing stage requires a both a thorough understanding of the processes and a way of verifying conformance to process standards. NDE is one of the essential tools in accomplishing both elements and in this project will be integrated with Caterpillar`s technological and manufacturing expertise to accomplish the project goals.

  10. The influence of curricular and extracurricular learning activities on students' choice of chiropractic technique

    PubMed Central

    Sikorski, David M.; KizhakkeVeettil, Anupama; Tobias, Gene S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Surveys for the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners indicate that diversified chiropractic technique is the most commonly used chiropractic manipulation method. The study objective was to investigate the influences of our diversified core technique curriculum, a technique survey course, and extracurricular technique activities on students' future practice technique preferences. Methods: We conducted an anonymous, voluntary survey of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd year chiropractic students at our institution. Surveys were pretested for face validity, and data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: We had 164 students (78% response rate) participate in the survey. Diversified was the most preferred technique for future practice by students, and more than half who completed the chiropractic technique survey course reported changing their future practice technique choice as a result. The students surveyed agreed that the chiropractic technique curriculum and their experiences with chiropractic practitioners were the two greatest bases for their current practice technique preference, and that their participation in extracurricular technique clubs and seminars was less influential. Conclusions: Students appear to have the same practice technique preferences as practicing chiropractors. The chiropractic technique curriculum and the students' experience with chiropractic practitioners seem to have the greatest influence on their choice of chiropractic technique for future practice. Extracurricular activities, including technique clubs and seminars, although well attended, showed a lesser influence on students' practice technique preferences. PMID:26655282

  11. An experimental search for gamma radiation associated with thunderstorm activity

    SciTech Connect

    Fryberger, D.

    1992-11-01

    This experiment is a repeat of an earlier experiment, but with more sensitive apparatus and in a location with a higher incidence of thunderstorm activity. The earlier experiment was undertaken by Ashby and Whitehead to investigate the theory that ball lightning might be associated with the annihilation of small amounts of antimatter, and it yielded some very interesting but inconclusive results. In the course of about 12 months of data taking, four high rate bursts of gamma radiation were detected. These events lasted a few seconds and had many thousands of counts (16500, 5000, 3700, and [gt] 7700. Unfortunately, the association of these gamma ray bursts with thunderstorms or ball lightning was not clearly established, although one of the bursts did occur during a local thunderstorm in rough coincidence with a lightning bolt striking a flagpole about 100 yards from the gamma ray detection crystals. A pulse height spectrum taken for this burst (no spectrum was taken for the other three) exhibited a significant peak, well above background, the energy of which appeared to be compatible with the 511 keV positron annihilation line. While the peak could not be unambiguously attributed to positron annihilation, this certainly appeared to be the most likely source.

  12. An experimental search for gamma radiation associated with thunderstorm activity

    SciTech Connect

    Fryberger, D.

    1992-11-01

    This experiment is a repeat of an earlier experiment, but with more sensitive apparatus and in a location with a higher incidence of thunderstorm activity. The earlier experiment was undertaken by Ashby and Whitehead to investigate the theory that ball lightning might be associated with the annihilation of small amounts of antimatter, and it yielded some very interesting but inconclusive results. In the course of about 12 months of data taking, four high rate bursts of gamma radiation were detected. These events lasted a few seconds and had many thousands of counts (16500, 5000, 3700, and {gt} 7700. Unfortunately, the association of these gamma ray bursts with thunderstorms or ball lightning was not clearly established, although one of the bursts did occur during a local thunderstorm in rough coincidence with a lightning bolt striking a flagpole about 100 yards from the gamma ray detection crystals. A pulse height spectrum taken for this burst (no spectrum was taken for the other three) exhibited a significant peak, well above background, the energy of which appeared to be compatible with the 511 keV positron annihilation line. While the peak could not be unambiguously attributed to positron annihilation, this certainly appeared to be the most likely source.

  13. A new technique for lag screw placement in the dynamic hip screw fixation of intertrochanteric fractures: decreasing radiation time dramatically

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wei-Chao; Li, Jia-Zhen; Chen, Sheng-Hua

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to confirm the decrease in radiation time required for a new technique to place dynamic hip screws (DHS) in intertrochanteric fractures. Seventy-six patients were treated with DHS by either the new technique (NT) or the conventional technique (CT). The width of femoral shaft, the length of the hip screw to be implanted into the injured side, and the distance between the tip of the greater trochanter and the entry point of the guide wire were measured at the uninjured side on the anteroposterior pelvic radiograph preoperatively, and the actual width of the injured femoral shaft was measured intra-operatively. Finally, the entry point and the length of hip screw were obtained through an equation. Mean radiation time of the NT patients (24.57 ± 7.80 s) was significantly shorter than the CT patients (54.2 ± 18.26 s) (P  < 0.001). The new technique decreased radiation time dramatically in DHS fixation. PMID:18265981

  14. Estimation of Evapotranspiration as a function of Photosynthetic Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley, E.; Migliaccio, K.; Judge, J.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this research project is to more accurately measure the water balance and energy movements to properly allocate water resources at the Snapper Creek Site in Miami-Dade County, FL, by quantifying and estimating evapotranspiration (ET). ET is generally estimated using weather based equations, this project focused on estimating ET as a function of Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR). The project objectives were first to compose a function of PAR and calculated coefficients that can accurately estimate daily ET values with the least amount of variables used in its estimation equation, and second, to compare the newly identified ET estimation PAR function to TURC estimations, in comparison to our actual Eddy Covariance (EC) ET data and determine the differences in ET values. PAR, volumetric water content (VWC), and temperature (T) data were quality checked and used in developing singular and multiple variable regression models fit with SigmaPlot software. Fifteen different ET estimation equations were evaluated against EC ET and TURC estimated ET using R2 and slope factors. The selected equation that best estimated EC ET was cross validated using a 5 month data set; its daily and monthly ET values and sums were compared against the commonly used TURC equation. Using a multiple variable regression model, an equation with three variables (i.e., VWC, T, and PAR) was identified that best fit EC ET daily data. However, a regression was also found that used only PAR and provided ET predictions of similar accuracy. The PAR based regression model predicted daily EC ET more accurately than the traditional TURC method. Using only PAR to estimate ET reduces the input variables as compared to using the TURC model which requires T and solar radiation. Thus, not only is the PAR approach more accurate but also more cost effective. The PAR-based ET estimation equation derived in this study may be over fit considering only 5 months of data were used to produce the PAR

  15. Radiation, temperature, and vacuum effects on piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Postolache, Cristian; Tudose, Mihai

    2016-03-01

    The effect of radiation, temperature, and vacuum (RTV) on piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWASs) is discussed. This study is relevant for extending structural health monitoring (SHM) methods to space vehicle applications that are likely to be subjected to harsh environmental conditions such as extreme temperatures (hot and cold), cosmic radiation, and interplanetary vacuums. This study contains both theoretical and experimental investigations with the use of electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS). In the theoretical part, analytical models of circular PWAS resonators were used to derive analytical expressions for the temperature sensitivities of EMIS resonance and antiresonance behavior. Closed-form expressions for frequency and peak values at resonance and antiresonance were derived as functions of the coefficients of thermal expansion, {α }1, {α }2, {α }3; the Poisson ratio, ν and its sensitivity, \\partial ν /\\partial T; the relative compliance gradient (\\partial {s}11E/\\partial T)/{s}11E; and the Bessel function root, z and its sensitivity, \\partial z/\\partial T. In the experimental part, tests were conducted to subject the PWAS transducers to RTV conditions. In one set of experiments, several RTV exposure, cycles were applied with EMIS signatures recorded at the beginning and after each of the repeated cycles. In another set of experiments, PWAS transducers were subjected to various temperatures and the EMIS signatures were recorded at each temperature after stabilization. The processing of measured EMIS data from the first set of experiments revealed that the resonance and antiresonance frequencies changed by less than 1% due to RTV exposure, whereas the resonance and antiresonance amplitudes changed by around 15%. After processing an individual set of EMIS data from the second set of experiments, it was determined that the relative temperature sensitivity of the antiresonance frequency ({f}{{AR}}/{f}{{AR}}) is approximately 63.1× {10

  16. Recent radiation effects activities at JPL: Coping with COTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Johnston, A.; Lee, C.; Swift, G.; Rax, B.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation effects and testing programs on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) devices and circuits, which are important for NASA programs, are discussed. Demands for increased performance levels in spacecraft systems is stimulating the use of electronic and photonic devices. Some advances in electronics to reach high performance will result in the miniaturization of devices, which will lead to increased radiation vulnerability.

  17. Total Participation Techniques: Making Every Student an Active Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmele, Persida; Himmele, William

    2011-01-01

    Yes, there are easy-to-use and incredibly effective alternatives to the "stand and deliver" approach to teaching that causes so many students to tune out--or even drop out. Here's your opportunity to explore dozens of ways to engage K-12 students in active learning and allow them to demonstrate the depth of their knowledge and understanding. The…

  18. Application of activation techniques to biological analysis. [813 references

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, H.J.M.

    1981-12-01

    Applications of activation analysis in the biological sciences are reviewed for the period of 1970 to 1979. The stages and characteristics of activation analysis are described, and its advantages and disadvantages enumerated. Most applications involve activation by thermal neutrons followed by either radiochemical or instrumental determination. Relatively little use has been made of activation by fast neutrons, photons, or charged particles. In vivo analyses are included, but those based on prompt gamma or x-ray emission are not. Major applications include studies of reference materials, and the elemental analysis of plants, marine biota, animal and human tissues, diets, and excreta. Relatively little use of it has been made in biochemistry, microbiology, and entomology, but it has become important in toxicology and environmental science. The elements most often determined are Ag, As, Au, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, I, K, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, and Zn, while few or no determinations of B, Be, Bi, Ga, Gd, Ge, H, In, Ir, Li, Nd, Os, Pd, Pr, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru, Te, Tl, or Y have been made in biological materials.

  19. Active Dust Mitigation Technology for Thermal Radiators for Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; Hogue, M. D.; Johansen, M. R.; Hopkins, J. W.; Holloway, N. M. H.; Connell, J. W.; Chen, A.; Irwin, S. A.; Case, S. O.; VanSuetendael, N. J.; Snyder, S. J.; Clements, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Dust accumulation on thermal radiator surfaces planned for lunar exploration will significantly reduce their efficiency. Evidence from the Apollo missions shows that an insulating layer of dust accumulated on radiator surfaces could not be removed and caused serious thermal control problems. Temperatures measured at different locations in the magnetometer on Apollo 12 were 38 C warmer than expected due to lunar dust accumulation. In this paper, we report on the application of the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) technology being developed in our NASA laboratory and applied to thermal radiator surfaces. The EDS uses electrostatic and dielectrophoretic forces generated by a grid of electrodes running a 2 micro A electric current to remove dust particles from surfaces. Working prototypes of EDS systems on solar panels and on thermal radiators have been successfully developed and tested at vacuum with clearing efficiencies above 92%. For this work EDS prototypes on flexible and rigid thermal radiators were developed and tested at vacuum.

  20. Risk of whole body radiation exposure and protective measures in fluoroscopically guided interventional techniques: a prospective evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kim A; Moss, Tammy L; Rivera, Jose; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2003-01-01

    Background Fluoroscopic guidance is frequently utilized in interventional pain management. The major purpose of fluoroscopy is correct needle placement to ensure target specificity and accurate delivery of the injectate. Radiation exposure may be associated with risks to physician, patient and personnel. While there have been many studies evaluating the risk of radiation exposure and techniques to reduce this risk in the upper part of the body, the literature is scant in evaluating the risk of radiation exposure in the lower part of the body. Methods Radiation exposure risk to the physician was evaluated in 1156 patients undergoing interventional procedures under fluoroscopy by 3 physicians. Monitoring of scattered radiation exposure in the upper and lower body, inside and outside the lead apron was carried out. Results The average exposure per procedure was 12.0 ± 9.8 seconds, 9.0 ± 0.37 seconds, and 7.5 ± 1.27 seconds in Groups I, II, and III respectively. Scatter radiation exposure ranged from a low of 3.7 ± 0.29 seconds for caudal/interlaminar epidurals to 61.0 ± 9.0 seconds for discography. Inside the apron, over the thyroid collar on the neck, the scatter radiation exposure was 68 mREM in Group I consisting of 201 patients who had a total of 330 procedures with an average of 0.2060 mREM per procedure and 25 mREM in Group II consisting of 446 patients who had a total of 662 procedures with average of 0.0378 mREM per procedure. The scatter radiation exposure was 0 mREM in Group III consisting of 509 patients who had a total 827 procedures. Increased levels of exposures were observed in Groups I and II compared to Group III, and Group I compared to Group II. Groin exposure showed 0 mREM exposure in Groups I and II and 15 mREM in Group III. Scatter radiation exposure for groin outside the apron in Group I was 1260 mREM and per procedure was 3.8182 mREM. In Group II the scatter radiation exposure was 400 mREM and with 0.6042 mREM per procedure. In Group III

  1. Neutron spectrum measurements in DT discharges using activation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, B.; Bertalot, L.; Loughlin, M.; Roquemore, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    The JET activation system has eight irradiation ends where samples may be irradiated in the neutron flux from the plasma. There is one end, re-entrant into the top of the vessel, for which there is little intervening material between it and the plasma; the other ends, including two beneath the divertor coils, have increasingly larger amounts of intervening structure. The local neutron spectrum at each irradiation end was measured by simultaneously activating several elemental foils (Al, Au, Co, Fe, In, Mg, Nb, Ni, Ti, Zr). There were 15 activation reactions in the energy range of 0.5-16 MeV which were used as input to the SNL-SAND-II code to determine the neutron energy spectrum. The results are compared with neutron transport calculations both from the MCNP and FURNACE codes: the average standard deviation between measured to SNL-SAND-II calculated activity ratios was as low as 5%. The results demonstrate the reliability of the neutronics calculations and have implications for the design of diagnostics and blankets for the next generation of large tokamaks such as ITER. The 377.9 keV line of the 54Fe(n,2n)53Fe reaction (threshold ˜13.9 MeV, not a dosimetric standard) has also been measured in different plasma conditions. The ratio of the saturated activity from this reaction to that from the 56Fe(n,p)56Mn reaction (threshold ˜4.5 MeV) provides information on the broadening of the 14 MeV fusion peak.

  2. Techniques for active embodiment of participants in virtual environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, R.; Stansfield, S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents preliminary work in the development of an avatar driver. An avatar is the graphical embodiment of a user in a virtual world. In applications such as small team, close quarters training and mission planning and rehearsal, it is important that the user`s avatar reproduce his or her motions naturally and with high fidelity. This paper presents a set of special purpose algorithms for driving the motion of the avatar with minimal information about the posture and position of the user. These algorithms utilize information about natural human motion and posture to produce solutions quickly and accurately without the need for complex general-purpose kinematics algorithms. Several examples illustrating the successful applications of these techniques are included.

  3. Active-contour-based image segmentation using machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    Etyngier, Patrick; Ségonne, Florent; Keriven, Renaud

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a non-linear shape prior for the deformable model framework that we learn from a set of shape samples using recent manifold learning techniques. We model a category of shapes as a finite dimensional manifold which we approximate using Diffusion maps. Our method computes a Delaunay triangulation of the reduced space, considered as Euclidean, and uses the resulting space partition to identify the closest neighbors of any given shape based on its Nyström extension. We derive a non-linear shape prior term designed to attract a shape towards the shape prior manifold at given constant embedding. Results on shapes of ventricle nuclei demonstrate the potential of our method for segmentation tasks. PMID:18051143

  4. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) x ultraviolet radiation (UV) interact to initiate solar injury in apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunburn or solar injury (SI) in apple is associated with high temperature, high visible light and ultraviolet radiation (UV). Fruit surface temperature (FST) thresholds for SI related disorders have been developed but there are no thresholds established for solar radiation. The objectives of the s...

  5. Successful Application of Active Learning Techniques to Introductory Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    HOFFMAN, ELIZABETH A.

    2001-01-01

    While the traditional lecture format may be a successful way to teach microbiology to both medical and nursing students, it was not an effective means of learning for many prenursing and preprofessional students enrolled in either of the introductory microbiology courses at Ashland Community College, an open enrollment institution. The structure of both Medical Microbiology and Principles of Microbiology was redesigned to allow students to address the material in an active manner. Daily quizzes, student group discussions, scrapbooks, lab project presentations and papers, and extra credit projects were all added in order to allow students maximum exposure to the course material in a manner compatible with various methods of learning. Student knowledge, course evaluations, and student success rates have all improved with the active learning format. PMID:23653538

  6. High Energy Radiation Induced Activation of COX-2 and MMP-9 is Mediated by NF-kappaB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolle, G.; Munyu, S.; Jejelowo, O. A.; Sodipe, A.; Shishodia, S.

    2010-04-01

    Space radiation is a known carcinogen, and astronauts are exposed to high-energy radiation. In this study, we demonstrate that high-energy radiation activates cylooxygenase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 through the NF-kB pathway.

  7. Naturally induced secondary radiation in interplanetary space: Preliminary analyses for gamma radiation and radioisotope production from thermal neutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza-Rosado, Heriberto

    1991-09-01

    Thermal neutron activation analyses were carried out for various space systems components to determine gamma radiation dose rates and food radiation contamination levels. The space systems components selected were those for which previous radiation studies existed. These include manned space vehicle radiation shielding, liquid hydrogen propellant tanks for a Mars mission, and a food supply used as space vehicle radiation shielding. The computational method used is based on the fast neutron distribution generated by the BRYNTRN and HZETRN transport codes for Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) at solar minimum conditions and intense solar flares in space systems components. The gamma dose rates for soft tissue are calculated for water and aluminum space vehicle slab shields considering volumetric source self-attenuation and exponential buildup factors. In the case of the lunar habitat with regolith shielding, a completely exposed spherical habitat was assumed for mathematical convenience and conservative calculations. Activation analysis of the food supply used as radiation shielding is presented for four selected nutrients: potassium, calcium, sodium, and phosphorus. Radioactive isotopes that could represent a health hazard if ingested are identified and their concentrations are identified. For nutrients soluble in water, it was found that all induced radioactivity was below the accepted maximum permissible concentrations.

  8. Naturally induced secondary radiation in interplanetary space: Preliminary analyses for gamma radiation and radioisotope production from thermal neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza-Rosado, Heriberto

    1991-01-01

    Thermal neutron activation analyses were carried out for various space systems components to determine gamma radiation dose rates and food radiation contamination levels. The space systems components selected were those for which previous radiation studies existed. These include manned space vehicle radiation shielding, liquid hydrogen propellant tanks for a Mars mission, and a food supply used as space vehicle radiation shielding. The computational method used is based on the fast neutron distribution generated by the BRYNTRN and HZETRN transport codes for Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) at solar minimum conditions and intense solar flares in space systems components. The gamma dose rates for soft tissue are calculated for water and aluminum space vehicle slab shields considering volumetric source self-attenuation and exponential buildup factors. In the case of the lunar habitat with regolith shielding, a completely exposed spherical habitat was assumed for mathematical convenience and conservative calculations. Activation analysis of the food supply used as radiation shielding is presented for four selected nutrients: potassium, calcium, sodium, and phosphorus. Radioactive isotopes that could represent a health hazard if ingested are identified and their concentrations are identified. For nutrients soluble in water, it was found that all induced radioactivity was below the accepted maximum permissible concentrations.

  9. Aerial monitoring in active mud volcano by UAV technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciotta, Antonino; Capasso, Giorgio; Madonia, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    UAV photogrammetry opens various new applications in the close range domain, combining aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry, but also introduces low-cost alternatives to the classical manned aerial photogrammetry. Between 2014 and 2015 tree aerial surveys have been carried out. Using a quadrotor drone, equipped with a compact camera, it was possible to generate high resolution elevation models and orthoimages of The "Salinelle", an active mud volcanoes area, located in territory of Paternò (South Italy). The main risks are related to the damages produced by paroxysmal events. Mud volcanoes show different cyclic phases of activity, including catastrophic events and periods of relative quiescence characterized by moderate activity. Ejected materials often are a mud slurry of fine solids suspended in liquids which may include water and hydrocarbon fluids, the bulk of released gases are carbon dioxide, with some methane and nitrogen, usually pond-shaped of variable dimension (from centimeters to meters in diameter). The scope of the presented work is the performance evaluation of a UAV system that was built to rapidly and autonomously acquire mobile three-dimensional (3D) mapping data in a volcanic monitoring scenario.

  10. Figure Analysis: A Teaching Technique to Promote Visual Literacy and Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiles, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Learning often improves when active learning techniques are used in place of traditional lectures. For many of these techniques, however, students are expected to apply concepts that they have already grasped. A challenge, therefore, is how to incorporate active learning into the classroom of courses with heavy content, such as molecular-based…

  11. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

  12. Development of radiation hard CMOS active pixel sensors for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernegger, Heinz

    2016-07-01

    New pixel detectors, based on commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity full CMOS processes, hold promise as next-generation active pixel sensors for inner and intermediate layers of the upgraded ATLAS tracker. The use of commercial CMOS processes allow cost-effective detector construction and simpler hybridisation techniques. The paper gives an overview of the results obtained on AMS-produced CMOS sensors coupled to the ATLAS Pixel FE-I4 readout chips. The SOI (silicon-on-insulator) produced sensors by XFAB hold great promise as radiation hard SOI-CMOS sensors due to their combination of partially depleted SOI transistors reducing back-gate effects. The test results include pre-/post-irradiation comparison, measurements of charge collection regions as well as test beam results.

  13. The use of synchrotron radiation techniques in the characterization of strained semiconductor heterostructures and thin films [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, C.

    2004-05-01

    In the last couple of decades, high-performance electronic and optoelectronic devices based on semiconductor heterostructures have been required to obtain increasingly strict and well-defined performances, needing a detailed control, at the atomic level, of the structural composition of the buried interfaces. This goal has been achieved by an improvement of the epitaxial growth techniques and by the parallel use of increasingly sophisticated characterization techniques. Among them, a leading role has been certainly played by those exploiting synchrotron radiation (SR) sources. In fact synchrotron radiation has distinct advantages as a photon source, notably high brilliance and continuous energy spectrum; by using the latter characteristic atomic selectivity can be obtained and this is of fundamental help to investigate the structural environment of atoms present only in a few angstrom (Å) thick interface layers of heterostructures. The third generation synchrotron radiation sources have allowed to reach the limit of measuring a monolayer of material, corresponding to about 10 14 atoms/cm 2. Since, in the last decade, the use of intentionally strained heterostructures has greatly enhanced the performance of electrical and electro-optical semiconductor, a particular attention will be devoted to intentionally strained superlattices. First the effect of strain on the band lineups alignments in strained heterostructures will be discussed deeply. Then the attention will be focused on to review the most important results obtained by several groups in the characterization of semiconductor heterostructures using the following structural SR techniques: (i) X-ray absorption-based techniques such as EXAFS, polarization-dependent EXAFS, surface EXAFS and NEXAFS (or XANES); (ii) X-ray diffraction-based techniques such as high-resolution XRD, grazing incidence XRD, XRD reciprocal space maps, X-ray standing waves and diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS); (iii

  14. The investigation of advanced remote sensing, radiative transfer and inversion techniques for the measurement of atmospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, Adarsh; Wang, Pi-Huan

    1985-01-01

    The research program is documented for developing space and ground-based remote sensing techniques performed during the period from December 15, 1977 to March 15, 1985. The program involved the application of sophisticated radiative transfer codes and inversion methods to various advanced remote sensing concepts for determining atmospheric constituents, particularly aerosols. It covers detailed discussions of the solar aureole technique for monitoring columnar aerosol size distribution, and the multispectral limb scattered radiance and limb attenuated radiance (solar occultation) techniques, as well as the upwelling scattered solar radiance method for determining the aerosol and gaseous characteristics. In addition, analytical models of aerosol size distribution and simulation studies of the limb solar aureole radiance technique and the variability of ozone at high altitudes during satellite sunrise/sunset events are also described in detail.

  15. Characterization of Deep Tunneling Activity through Remote-Sensing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    R. G. Best, P. J. Etzler, and J. D. Bloom

    1997-10-01

    This work is a case study demonstrating the uses of multispectral and multi-temporal imagery to characterize deep tunneling activity. A drainage tunnel excavation in Quincy, MA is the case locality. Data used are aerial photographs (digitized) and Daedalus 3600 MSS image data that were collected in July and October of 1994. Analysis of the data includes thermal characterization, spectral characterization, multi-temporal analysis, and volume estimation using digital DEM generation. The results demonstrate the type of information that could be generated by multispectral, multi-temporal data if the study locality were a clandestine excavation site with restricted surface access.

  16. Apollo Mission Techniques Lunar Orbit Activities - Part 1a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the planned sequence of events and the rationale for all lunar missions, and the flight experiences and lessons learned for the lunar orbit activities from a trajectory perspective. Shown are trajectories which include the moon's position at the various stages in the complete trip from launch, to the return and reentry. Included in the presentation are objectives and the sequence of events,for the Apollo 8, and Apollo 10. This is followed by a discussion of Apollo 11, including: the primary mission objective, the sequence of events, and the flight experience. The next mission discussed was Apollo 12. It reviews the objectives, the ground tracking, procedure changes, and the sequence of events. The aborted Apollo 13 mission is reviewed, including the objectives, and the sequence of events. Brief summaries of the flight experiences for Apollo 14-16 are reviewed. The flight sequence of events of Apollo 17 are discussed. In summary each mission consistently performing precision landings required that Apollo lunar orbit activities devote considerable attention to: (1) Improving fidelity of lunar gravity models, (2) Maximizing availability of ground tracking, (3) Minimizing perturbations on the trajectory, (4) Maximizing LM propellant reserves for hover time. Also the use of radial separation maneuvers (1) allows passive re-rendezvous after each rev, but ... (2) sensitive to small dispersions in initial sep direction

  17. Active Flow Control: Instrumentation Automation and Experimental Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gimbert, N. Wes

    1995-01-01

    In investigating the potential of a new actuator for use in an active flow control system, several objectives had to be accomplished, the largest of which was the experimental setup. The work was conducted at the NASA Langley 20x28 Shear Flow Control Tunnel. The actuator named Thunder, is a high deflection piezo device recently developed at Langley Research Center. This research involved setting up the instrumentation, the lighting, the smoke, and the recording devices. The instrumentation was automated by means of a Power Macintosh running LabVIEW, a graphical instrumentation package developed by National Instruments. Routines were written to allow the tunnel conditions to be determined at a given instant at the push of a button. This included determination of tunnel pressures, speed, density, temperature, and viscosity. Other aspects of the experimental equipment included the set up of a CCD video camera with a video frame grabber, monitor, and VCR to capture the motion. A strobe light was used to highlight the smoke that was used to visualize the flow. Additional effort was put into creating a scale drawing of another tunnel on site and a limited literature search in the area of active flow control.

  18. The study of decreasing toxicity of cigarettes with the radiational technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengkui, Tang; Yun, Zhang; Jinju, Xu

    This is a report of the decreasing toxicity of cigarettes. All results of different experimental methods used show that through Co 60-γ radiation treatment the amount of carcinogenic substance in the cigarette smoke condensate obviously decreased.

  19. A gamma-ray testing technique for spacecraft. [considering cosmic radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gribov, B. S.; Repin, N. N.; Sakovich, V. A.; Sakharov, V. M.

    1977-01-01

    The simulated cosmic radiation effect on a spacecraft structure is evaluated by gamma ray testing in relation to structural thickness. A drawing of the test set-up is provided and measurement errors are discussed.

  20. The radiative deceleration of ultrarelativistic jets in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Konigl, Arieh

    1989-05-01

    A detailed study of the dynamical interaction between a highly relativistic jet and the thermal radiation field from an AGN accretion disk is reported, and the Comptonized spectrum arising from this interaction is self-consistently determined. A simple model that captures the essential radiative and geometrical features of realistic disk configurations is presented, and the disk radiation field is calculated. The results confirm Phinney's (1987) suggestion that the thermal radiation field produced by accretion in an AGN could be very effective in decelerating ultrarelativistic jets that are accreted by electromagnetic or hydromagnetic forces closer to the central black hole. Terminal Lorentz factors are consistent with the values inferred in superluminal radio sources are readily produced in this model for plausible disk and jet parameters without additional acceleration in the interaction zone. A new interpretation of the hard X-ray component detected in BL Lac spectra is proposed.

  1. Radiation Safety Aspects for Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment Techniques in Outdoor Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Daren R. Norman; James L. Jones; Brandon W. Blackburn; Allen Fisher; Scott M. Watson; Kevin J. Haskell; Alan W. Hunt; Mark Balzer

    2007-08-01

    As many pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) technologies are being developed for contraband detection within cargo container configurations, the radiation safe operation of source linacs for outdoor operations needs to be addressed. Idaho National Laboratory along with Idaho Accelerator Center are conducting field operations with high energy linacs in open outdoor configurations. The relevant information pertaining to the radiation regulations and dosimetry studies for these configurations will be presented for a prototypical 10 MeV PPA nuclear material detection system.

  2. Concurrent Transient Activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin Pathway Prevents Radiation Damage to Salivary Glands

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Bo; Yang Zhenhua; Shangguan Lei; Zhao Yanqiu; Boyer, Arthur; Liu, Fei

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Many head and neck cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy suffer from permanent impairment of their salivary gland function, for which few effective prevention or treatment options are available. This study explored the potential of transient activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in preventing radiation damage to salivary glands in a preclinical model. Methods and Materials: Wnt reporter transgenic mice were exposed to 15 Gy single-dose radiation in the head and neck area to evaluate the effects of radiation on Wnt activity in salivary glands. Transient Wnt1 overexpression in basal epithelia was induced in inducible Wnt1 transgenic mice before together with, after, or without local radiation, and then saliva flow rate, histology, apoptosis, proliferation, stem cell activity, and mRNA expression were evaluated. Results: Radiation damage did not significantly affect activity of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway as physical damage did. Transient expression of Wnt1 in basal epithelia significantly activated the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in submandibular glands of male mice but not in those of females. Concurrent transient activation of the Wnt pathway prevented chronic salivary gland dysfunction following radiation by suppressing apoptosis and preserving functional salivary stem/progenitor cells. In contrast, Wnt activation 3 days before or after irradiation did not show significant beneficial effects, mainly due to failure to inhibit acute apoptosis after radiation. Excessive Wnt activation before radiation failed to inhibit apoptosis, likely due to extensive induction of mitosis and up-regulation of proapoptosis gene PUMA while that after radiation might miss the critical treatment window. Conclusion: These results suggest that concurrent transient activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway could prevent radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction.

  3. Youth solar ultraviolet radiation exposure, concurrent activities and sun-protective practices: a review.

    PubMed

    Wright, C Y; Reeder, A I

    2005-01-01

    To assist standardization of procedures, facilitate comparisons, and help guide research efforts to optimally inform development of appropriately targeted interventions, there is a need to review methods used to quantify child and adolescent solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure, related outdoor activities and sun-protective practices. This holistic approach is essential for comprehensive research that will provide all-inclusive, informative and meaningful messages for preventive measures of harmful UV exposure. Two databases were searched and 29 studies were retrieved, and these studies report measurement or assessment techniques documenting UV exposure patterns and related outdoor activities. Polysulfone film badges were the main measurement instrument used in 10 studies, with questionnaire, survey data, observation, a model, electronic dosimeters, biological dosimeters, colorimeter and UV colouring labels used in the remaining studies. Methods used to record activities included self-report, parental report, a logbook and observation. Measurement duration and unit of UV exposure varied in most studies, but a method common to 15 studies was measured UV exposure as a percentage of ambient UV. The studies reviewed do not provide sufficient information for the development and evaluation of targeted youth sun protection programs. Studies are required which document precise UV exposure, concurrent activities and sun protection usage for children and adolescents. PMID:16354111

  4. Comparative study of four advanced 3d-conformal radiation therapy treatment planning techniques for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herrassi, Mohamed Yassine; Bentayeb, Farida; Malisan, Maria Rosa

    2013-01-01

    For the head-and-neck cancer bilateral irradiation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most reported technique as it enables both target dose coverage and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. However, during the last 20 years, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques have been introduced, which are tailored to improve the classic shrinking field technique, as regards both planning target volume (PTV) dose conformality and sparing of OAR’s, such as parotid glands and spinal cord. In this study, we tested experimentally in a sample of 13 patients, four of these advanced 3DCRT techniques, all using photon beams only and a unique isocentre, namely Bellinzona, Forward-Planned Multisegments (FPMS), ConPas, and field-in-field (FIF) techniques. Statistical analysis of the main dosimetric parameters of PTV and OAR’s DVH’s as well as of homogeneity and conformity indexes was carried out in order to compare the performance of each technique. The results show that the PTV dose coverage is adequate for all the techniques, with the FPMS techniques providing the highest value for D95%; on the other hand, the best sparing of parotid glands is achieved using the FIF and ConPas techniques, with a mean dose of 26 Gy to parotid glands for a PTV prescription dose of 54 Gy. After taking into account both PTV coverage and parotid sparing, the best global performance was achieved by the FIF technique with results comparable to that of IMRT plans. This technique can be proposed as a valid alternative when IMRT equipment is not available or patient is not suitable for IMRT treatment. PMID:23776314

  5. Innovative techniques to analyze time series of geomagnetic activity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Potirakis, Stelios M.; Eftaxias, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic storms are undoubtedly among the most important phenomena in space physics and also a central subject of space weather. The non-extensive Tsallis entropy has been recently introduced, as an effective complexity measure for the analysis of the geomagnetic activity Dst index. The Tsallis entropy sensitively shows the complexity dissimilarity among different "physiological" (normal) and "pathological" states (intense magnetic storms). More precisely, the Tsallis entropy implies the emergence of two distinct patterns: (i) a pattern associated with the intense magnetic storms, which is characterized by a higher degree of organization, and (ii) a pattern associated with normal periods, which is characterized by a lower degree of organization. Other entropy measures such as Block Entropy, T-Complexity, Approximate Entropy, Sample Entropy and Fuzzy Entropy verify the above mentioned result. Importantly, the wavelet spectral analysis in terms of Hurst exponent, H, also shows the existence of two different patterns: (i) a pattern associated with the intense magnetic storms, which is characterized by a fractional Brownian persistent behavior (ii) a pattern associated with normal periods, which is characterized by a fractional Brownian anti-persistent behavior. Finally, we observe universality in the magnetic storm and earthquake dynamics, on a basis of a modified form of the Gutenberg-Richter law for the Tsallis statistics. This finding suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism. Signatures of discrete scale invariance in Dst time series further supports the aforementioned proposal.

  6. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

  7. On piecewise interpolation techniques for estimating solar radiation missing values in Kedah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaban, Azizan; Zainudin, Lutfi; Bakar, Mohd Nazari Abu

    2014-12-01

    This paper discusses the use of piecewise interpolation method based on cubic Ball and Bézier curves representation to estimate the missing value of solar radiation in Kedah. An hourly solar radiation dataset is collected at Alor Setar Meteorology Station that is taken from Malaysian Meteorology Deparment. The piecewise cubic Ball and Bézier functions that interpolate the data points are defined on each hourly intervals of solar radiation measurement and is obtained by prescribing first order derivatives at the starts and ends of the intervals. We compare the performance of our proposed method with existing methods using Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) and Coefficient of Detemination (CoD) which is based on missing values simulation datasets. The results show that our method is outperformed the other previous methods.

  8. On piecewise interpolation techniques for estimating solar radiation missing values in Kedah

    SciTech Connect

    Saaban, Azizan; Zainudin, Lutfi; Bakar, Mohd Nazari Abu

    2014-12-04

    This paper discusses the use of piecewise interpolation method based on cubic Ball and Bézier curves representation to estimate the missing value of solar radiation in Kedah. An hourly solar radiation dataset is collected at Alor Setar Meteorology Station that is taken from Malaysian Meteorology Deparment. The piecewise cubic Ball and Bézier functions that interpolate the data points are defined on each hourly intervals of solar radiation measurement and is obtained by prescribing first order derivatives at the starts and ends of the intervals. We compare the performance of our proposed method with existing methods using Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) and Coefficient of Detemination (CoD) which is based on missing values simulation datasets. The results show that our method is outperformed the other previous methods.

  9. The application of color display techniques for the analysis of Nimbus infrared radiation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J.; Cherrix, G. T.; Ausfresser, H.

    1972-01-01

    A color enhancement system designed for the Applications Technology Satellite (ATS) spin scan experiment has been adapted for the analysis of Nimbus infrared radiation measurements. For a given scene recorded on magnetic tape by the Nimbus scanning radiometers, a virtually unlimited number of color images can be produced at the ATS Operations Control Center from a color selector paper tape input. Linear image interpolation has produced radiation analyses in which each brightness-color interval has a smooth boundary without any mosaic effects. An annotated latitude-longitude gridding program makes it possible to precisely locate geophysical parameters, which permits accurate interpretation of pertinent meteorological, geological, hydrological, and oceanographic features.

  10. Technique for generating 14 and 16 micron CO/sub 2/ laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kasner, W.H.; Pleasance, L.D.; Toth, V.A.

    1980-12-09

    The direct electrical discharge excitation, pulsed or CW, of a laser gas medium consisting of CO/sub 2/:N/sub 2/:He present in the approximate ratio of 1:2:25 at a total gas pressure of between approximately 8 and 12 torr and an operating temperature between approximately 125/sup 0/K and 150/sup 0/K is described. Sixteen micron laser radiation on the 0200 -> 0110 CO/sub 2/ vibrational transition, and 14 micron laser radiation on the 1000 -> 0110 CO/sub 2/ vibrational transition were supported.

  11. Persistent Activation of the Innate Immune Response in Adult Drosophila Following Radiation Exposure During Larval Development

    PubMed Central

    Sudmeier, Lisa J.; Samudrala, Sai-Suma; Howard, Steven P.; Ganetzky, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment for pediatric central nervous system malignancies, but survivors often suffer from neurological and neurocognitive side effects that occur many years after radiation exposure. Although the biological mechanisms underlying these deleterious side effects are incompletely understood, radiation exposure triggers an acute inflammatory response that may evolve into chronic inflammation, offering one avenue of investigation. Recently, we developed a Drosophila model of the neurotoxic side effects of radiation exposure. Here we use this model to investigate the role of the innate immune system in response to radiation exposure. We show that the innate immune response and NF-ĸB target gene expression is activated in the adult Drosophila brain following radiation exposure during larval development, and that this response is sustained in adult flies weeks after radiation exposure. We also present preliminary data suggesting that innate immunity is radioprotective during Drosophila development. Together our data suggest that activation of the innate immune response may be beneficial initially for survival following radiation exposure but result in long-term deleterious consequences, with chronic inflammation leading to impaired neuronal function and viability at later stages. This work lays the foundation for future studies of how the innate immune response is triggered by radiation exposure and its role in mediating the biological responses to radiation. These studies may facilitate the development of strategies to reduce the deleterious side effects of CRT. PMID:26333838

  12. Changes in biologically active ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface.

    PubMed

    Madronich, S; McKenzie, R L; Björn, L O; Caldwell, M M

    1998-10-01

    Stratospheric ozone levels are near their lowest point since measurements began, so current ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation levels are thought to be close to their maximum. Total stratospheric content of ozone-depleting substances is expected to reach a maximum before the year 2000. All other things being equal, the current ozone losses and related UV-B increases should be close to their maximum. Increases in surface erythemal (sunburning) UV radiation relative to the values in the 1970s are estimated to be: about 7% at Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in winter/spring; about 4% at Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in summer/fall; about 6% at Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes on a year-round basis; about 130% in the Antarctic in spring; and about 22% in the Arctic in spring. Reductions in atmospheric ozone are expected to result in higher amounts of UV-B radiation reaching the Earth's surface. The expected correlation between increases in surface UV-B radiation and decreases in overhead ozone has been further demonstrated and quantified by ground-based instruments under a wide range of conditions. Improved measurements of UV-B radiation are now providing better geographical and temporal coverage. Surface UV-B radiation levels are highly variable because of cloud cover, and also because of local effects including pollutants and surface reflections. These factors usually decrease atmospheric transmission and therefore the surface irradiances at UV-B as well as other wavelengths. Occasional cloud-induced increases have also been reported. With a few exceptions, the direct detection of UV-B trends at low- and mid-latitudes remains problematic due to this high natural variability, the relatively small ozone changes, and the practical difficulties of maintaining long-term stability in networks of UV-measuring instruments. Few reliable UV-B radiation measurements are available from pre-ozone-depletion days. Satellite-based observations of atmospheric ozone and clouds are

  13. Sun protection preferences and behaviors among young adult males during maximum ultraviolet radiation exposure activities.

    PubMed

    Wickenheiser, Marilyn; Baker, Mary Kate; Gaber, Rikki; Blatt, Hanz; Robinson, June K

    2013-08-01

    This study explores sun protection attitudes, preferences, and behaviors among young adult males participating in an open-field activity with extreme ultraviolet radiation exposure. Male drum corps members (n = 137) responded to survey questions regarding their behavior and willingness to engage in sun protection and barriers to sunscreen usage. A subset of members (n = 31) participated in cognitive interviews exploring various sunscreen products and intervention techniques. Participants were knowledgeable about health risks and protection benefits regarding sun exposure. Generally, males had positive attitudes and normative beliefs about using sunscreen. A barrier to sunscreen re-application was lack of adequate time to reapply sunscreen during the open field activity. Males preferred a towelette application method, but were unfamiliar with its efficacy and proper use. Thus, they were more likely to use the more familiar sunscreen spray. To increase sun protection behaviors and lower skin cancer risk for males participating in open-field activities, breaks must be allotted every 2 h and have sufficient time to allow sunscreen application. Future development and research into delivery systems that rapidly and evenly apply sunscreen may help lower exposure in this population. PMID:23912201

  14. Comparative assessment of three image reconstruction techniques for image quality and radiation dose in patients undergoing abdominopelvic multidetector CT examinations

    PubMed Central

    Desai, G S; Thabet, A; Elias, A Y A; Sahani, D V

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare image quality and radiation dose of abdominal CT examinations reconstructed with three image reconstruction techniques. Methods In this Institutional Review Board-approved study, contrast-enhanced (CE) abdominopelvic CT scans from 23 patients were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) and iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) and were reviewed by two blinded readers. Subjective (acceptability, sharpness, noise and artefacts) and objective (noise) measures of image quality were recorded for each image data set. Radiation doses in CT dose index (CTDI) dose–length product were also calculated for each examination type and compared. Imaging parameters were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and a paired t-test. Results All 69 CECT examinations were of diagnostic quality and similar for overall acceptability (mean grade for ASiR, 3.9±0.3; p=0.2 for Readers 1 and 2; IRIS, 3.9±0.4, p=0.2; FBP, 3.8±0.9). Objective noise was considerably lower with both iterative techniques (p<0.0001 and 0.0016 for ASiR and IRIS). Recorded mean radiation dose, i.e. CTDIvol, was 24% and 10% less with ASiR (11.4±3.4 mGy; p<0.001) and IRIS (13.5±3.7 mGy; p=0.06), respectively, than with FBP: 15.0±3.5 mGy. Conclusion At the system parameters used in this study, abdominal CT scans reconstructed with ASiR and IRIS provide diagnostic images with reduced image noise and 10–24% lower radiation dose than FBP. Advances in knowledge CT images reconstructed with FBP are frequently noisy on lowering the radiation dose. Newer iterative reconstruction techniques have different approaches to produce images with less noise; ASiR and IRIS provide diagnostic abdominal CT images with reduced image noise and radiation dose compared with FBP. This has been documented in this study. PMID:23255538

  15. Radiative transfer and radiative driving of outflows in active galactic nuclei and starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, G. S.; Ostriker, J. P.; Ciotti, L.

    2012-12-01

    To facilitate the study of black hole fuelling, star formation and feedback in galaxies, we outline a method for treating the radial forces on interstellar gas due to absorption of photons by dust grains. The method gives the correct behaviour in all of the relevant limits [dominated by the central point source; dominated by the distributed isotropic source; optically thin; optically thick to ultraviolet (UV)/optical; optically thick to infrared (IR)] and reasonably interpolates between the limits when necessary. The method is explicitly energy conserving so that UV/optical photons that are absorbed are not lost, but are rather redistributed to the IR where they may scatter out of the galaxy. We implement the radiative transfer algorithm in a two-dimensional hydrodynamical code designed to study feedback processes in the context of early-type galaxies. We find that the dynamics and final state of simulations are measurably but only moderately affected by radiative forces on dust, even when assumptions about the dust-to-gas ratio are varied from zero to a value appropriate for the Milky Way. In simulations with high gas densities designed to mimic ultraluminous IR galaxies with a star formation rate of several hundred solar masses per year, dust makes a more substantial contribution to the dynamics and outcome of the simulation. We find that, despite the large opacity of dust to UV radiation, the momentum input to the flow from radiation very rarely exceeds L/c due to two factors: the low opacity of dust to the re-radiated IR and the tendency for dust to be destroyed by sputtering in hot gas environments. We also develop a simplification of our radiative transfer algorithm that respects the essential physics but is much easier to implement and requires a fraction of the computational cost.

  16. IMPROVED TECHNIQUE FOR MONITORING ELECTROCARDIOGRAMS DURING EXPOSURE TO RADIO-FREQUENCY RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies were conducted which examined the effects of radio frequency (RF) radiation on heart rate (HR), deep body temperature (TEMP), and electrocardiographic (ECG) waveform parameters in anesthetized rats. One group of animals was exposed to two power levels of continuous wave R...

  17. Improved technique for monitoring electrocardiograms during exposure to radio-frequency radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkinson, W.P.; Gordon, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted which examined the effects of radio frequency (RF) radiation on heart rate (HR), deep body temperature (TEMP), and electrocardiographic (ECG) waveform parameters in anesthetized rats. One group of animals was exposed to two power levels of continuous wave RF radiation averaging 1.0 and 7.4 W/kg at a frequency of 600 MHz. A second group of animals, treated identically but not exposed to RF radiation, served as a control. The electrodes used to monitor the ECG during RF exposure were fabricated using carbon-loaded Teflon wire, a semiconductor material that does not perturb the RF field. Analyses of the ECG were conducted using a recently developed computer-assisted procedure which quantitates HR and waveform intervals over 25-40 individual ECG complexes. There were no artifacts or arrhythmias in the ECGs of the animals exposed to RF radiation. There was a significant linear correlation between HR and TEMP in the RF-exposed group which was not present in the control group.

  18. Advanced data readout technique for Multianode Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube applicable in radiation imaging detectors

    SciTech Connect

    V. Popov

    2011-01-01

    Most of the best performing PSPMT tubes from Hamamatsu and Burle are designed with a pad-matrix anode layout. However, for obtaining a high resolution, a small-sized anode photomultiplier tubes are preferable; these tubes may have 64, 256 or 1024 anodes per tube. If the tubes are used in array to get a larger area detector, the number of analog channels may range from hundreds to thousands. Multichannel analog readout requires special electronics ICs, ASICs etc., which are attached to multichannel DAQ system. As a result, the data file and data processing time will be increased. Therefore, this readout could not be performed in a small project. Usually, most of radiation imaging applications allow the use of analog data processing in front-end electronics, significantly reducing the number of the detector's output lines to data acquisition without reducing the image quality. The idea of pad-matrix decoupling circuit with gain correction was invented and intensively tested in JLab. Several versions of PSPMT readout electronics were produced and studied. All developments were done and optimized specifically for radiation imaging projects. They covered high resolution SPECT, high speed PET, fast neutron imaging, and single tube and multi tube array systems. This paper presents and discusses the summary of the observed results in readout electronics evaluation with different PSPMTs and radiation imaging systems, as well as the advantages and limitations of the developed approach to radiation imaging detectors readout.

  19. Passive radiation detection using optically active CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosiek, Luke; Schalk, Patrick D.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, there have been a number of small-scale and hobbyist successes in employing commodity CMOS-based camera sensors for radiation detection. For example, several smartphone applications initially developed for use in areas near the Fukushima nuclear disaster are capable of detecting radiation using a cell phone camera, provided opaque tape is placed over the lens. In all current useful implementations, it is required that the sensor not be exposed to visible light. We seek to build a system that does not have this restriction. While building such a system would require sophisticated signal processing, it would nevertheless provide great benefits. In addition to fulfilling their primary function of image capture, cameras would also be able to detect unknown radiation sources even when the danger is considered to be low or non-existent. By experimentally profiling the image artifacts generated by gamma ray and β particle impacts, algorithms are developed to identify the unique features of radiation exposure, while discarding optical interaction and thermal noise effects. Preliminary results focus on achieving this goal in a laboratory setting, without regard to integration time or computational complexity. However, future work will seek to address these additional issues.

  20. Changes in biologically active ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Richard L; Björn, Lars Olof; Bais, Alkiviadis; Ilyasad, Mohammad

    2003-01-01

    Since publication of the 1998 UNEP Assessment, there has been continued rapid expansion of the literature on UV-B radiation. Many measurements have demonstrated the inverse relationship between column ozone amount and UV radiation, and in a few cases long-term increases due to ozone decreases have been identified. The quantity, quality and availability of ground-based UV measurements relevant to assessing the environmental impacts of ozone changes continue to improve. Recent studies have contributed to delineating regional and temporal differences due to aerosols, clouds, and ozone. Improvements in radiative transfer modelling capability now enable more accurate characterization of clouds, snow-cover, and topographical effects. A standardized scale for reporting UV to the public has gained wide acceptance. There has been increased use of satellite data to estimate geographic variability and trends in UV. Progress has been made in assessing the utility of satellite retrievals of UV radiation by comparison with measurements at the Earth's surface. Global climatologies of UV radiation are now available on the Internet. Anthropogenic aerosols play a more important role in attenuating UV irradiances than has been assumed previously, and this will have implications for the accuracy of UV retrievals from satellite data. Progress has been made inferring historical levels of UV radiation using measurements of ozone (from satellites or from ground-based networks) in conjunction with measurements of total solar radiation obtained from extensive meteorological networks. We cannot yet be sure whether global ozone has reached a minimum. Atmospheric chlorine concentrations are beginning to decrease. However, bromine concentrations are still increasing. While these halogen concentrations remain high, the ozone layer remains vulnerable to further depletion from events such as volcanic eruptions that inject material into the stratosphere. Interactions between global warming and

  1. SYSTEMATIC SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE FOR EVALUATING COMBINED BIOLOIGCAL/GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic scanning election microscope analytical technique has been developed to examine granular activated carbon used a a medium for biomass attachment in liquid waste treatment. The procedure allows for the objective monitoring, comparing, and trouble shooting of combined ...

  2. Exploring Undergraduates' Perceptions of the Use of Active Learning Techniques in Science Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Ashley J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines students' mixed perceptions of the use of active learning techniques in undergraduate science lectures. Written comments from over 250 students offered an in-depth view of why students perceive these techniques as helping or hindering their learning and experience. Fourth- and fifth-year students were more likely to view…

  3. A three-dimensional muscle activity imaging technique for assessing pelvic muscle function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingchun; Wang, Dan; Timm, Gerald W.

    2010-11-01

    A novel multi-channel surface electromyography (EMG)-based three-dimensional muscle activity imaging (MAI) technique has been developed by combining the bioelectrical source reconstruction approach and subject-specific finite element modeling approach. Internal muscle activities are modeled by a current density distribution and estimated from the intra-vaginal surface EMG signals with the aid of a weighted minimum norm estimation algorithm. The MAI technique was employed to minimally invasively reconstruct electrical activity in the pelvic floor muscles and urethral sphincter from multi-channel intra-vaginal surface EMG recordings. A series of computer simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of the present MAI technique. With appropriate numerical modeling and inverse estimation techniques, we have demonstrated the capability of the MAI technique to accurately reconstruct internal muscle activities from surface EMG recordings. This MAI technique combined with traditional EMG signal analysis techniques is being used to study etiologic factors associated with stress urinary incontinence in women by correlating functional status of muscles characterized from the intra-vaginal surface EMG measurements with the specific pelvic muscle groups that generated these signals. The developed MAI technique described herein holds promise for eliminating the need to place needle electrodes into muscles to obtain accurate EMG recordings in some clinical applications.

  4. Passive and active protection from ionizing radiation in space: new activities and perspectives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillantini, Piero

    Very intense Solar Cosmic Ray (SCR) events are rare, but not predictable, and can be lethal to a not protected crew in deep space. A ‘life saving’ system must therefore be provided also in short duration manned missions. Passive and active ‘life saving’ system will be revised and discussed. Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) instead flow continuously, have a moderate intensity but the accumulation of their effects can have consequences to human health in long duration (≥one year) mission in deep space, and a ‘health saving’ system should be provided. Passive systems are not applicable and recourse has to be made to active systems based on powerful magnetic fields for deviating particles from the habitat where crew members live and work. The activities of last decade are revised and two scenarios are evaluated and discussed: (1) magnetic toroidal systems for mitigating the radiation dose in the relatively large (≅100m3) habitat of interplanetary spaceships; (2) very large magnetic systems for protecting a large habitat (≈500m3) of an inhabited station that should operate for many decades in deep space. Effectiveness, complexity, involved engineering problems and perspectives are outlined and discussed for both the scenarios. They are nowadays studied and evaluated by a cooperative project supported by the European Union that will be illustrated in a dedicated talk.

  5. Parylene-based active micro space radiator with thermal contact switch

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Ai; Suzuki, Yuji

    2014-03-03

    Thermal management is crucial for highly functional spacecrafts exposed to large fluctuations of internal heat dissipation and/or thermal boundary conditions. Since thermal radiation is the only means for heat removal, effective control of radiation is required for advanced space missions. In the present study, a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) active radiator using the contact resistance change has been proposed. Unlike previous bulky thermal louvers/shutters, higher fill factor can be accomplished with an array of electrostatically driven micro diaphragms suspended with polymer tethers. With an early prototype developed with parylene MEMS technologies, radiation heat flux enhancement up to 42% has been achieved.

  6. Measurement of radiation dose with BeO dosimeters using optically stimulated luminescence technique in radiotherapy applications.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Serdar; Güneş Tanır, A; Meriç, Niyazi; Aydınkarahaliloğlu, Ercan

    2015-09-01

    The radiation dose delivered to the target by using different radiotherapy applications has been measured with the help of beryllium oxide (BeO) dosimeters to be placed inside the rando phantom. Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3DCRT), Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy (IMAT) have been used as radiotherapy application. Individual treatment plans have been made for the three radiotherapy applications of rando phantom. The section 4 on the phantom was selected as target and 200 cGy doses were delivered. After the dosimeters placed on section 4 (target) and the sections 2 and 6 (non-target) were irradiated, the result was read through the OSL technique on the Risø TL/OSL system. This procedure was repeated three times for each radiotherapy application. The doses delivered to the target and the non-target sections as a result of the 3DCRT, IMRT and IMAT plans were analyzed. The doses received by the target were measured as 204.71 cGy, 204.76 cGy and 205.65 cGy, respectively. The dose values obtained from treatment planning system (TPS) were compared to the dose values obtained using the OSL technique. It has been concluded that, the radiation dose can be measured with the OSL technique by using BeO dosimeters in medical practices. PMID:26046521

  7. Highly coherent vacuum ultraviolet radiation at the 15th harmonic with echo-enabled harmonic generation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsing, E.; Dunning, M.; Hast, C.; Raubenheimer, T. O.; Weathersby, S.; Xiang, D.

    2014-07-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers are enabling access to new science by producing ultrafast and intense x rays that give researchers unparalleled power and precision in examining the fundamental nature of matter. In the quest for fully coherent x rays, the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique is one of the most promising methods. In this technique, coherent radiation at the high harmonic frequencies of two seed lasers is generated from the recoherence of electron beam phase space memory. Here we report on the generation of highly coherent and stable vacuum ultraviolet radiation at the 15th harmonic of an infrared seed laser with this technique. The experiment demonstrates two distinct advantages that are intrinsic to the highly nonlinear phase space gymnastics of echo-enabled harmonic generation in a new regime, i.e., high frequency up-conversion efficiency and insensitivity to electron beam phase space imperfections. Our results allow comparison and confirmation of predictive models and scaling laws, and mark a significant step towards fully coherent x-ray free-electron lasers that will open new scientific research.

  8. Thermal Performance of Orion Active Thermal Control System With Seven-Panel Reduced-Curvature Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Yuko, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The active thermal control system (ATCS) of the crew exploration vehicle (Orion) uses radiator panels with fluid loops as the primary system to reject heat from spacecraft. The Lockheed Martin (LM) baseline Orion ATCS uses eight-panel radiator coated with silver Teflon coating (STC) for International Space Station (ISS) missions, and uses seven-panel radiator coated with AZ 93 white paint for lunar missions. As an option to increase the radiator area with minimal impact on other component locations and interfaces, the reduced-curvature (RC) radiator concept was introduced and investigated here for the thermal perspective. Each RC radiator panel has 15 percent more area than each Lockheed Martin (LM) baseline radiator panel. The objective was to determine if the RC seven-panel radiator concept could be used in the ATCS for both ISS and lunar missions. Three radiator configurations the LM baseline, an RC seven-panel radiator with STC, and an RC seven-panel radiator with AZ 93 coating were considered in the ATCS for ISS missions. Two radiator configurations the LM baseline and an RC seven-panel radiator with AZ 93 coating were considered in the ATCS for lunar missions. A Simulink/MATLAB model of the ATCS was used to compute the ATCS performance. Some major hot phases on the thermal timeline were selected because of concern about the large amount of water sublimated for thermal topping. It was concluded that an ATCS with an RC seven-panel radiator could be used for both ISS and lunar missions, but with two different coatings STC for ISS missions and AZ 93 for lunar missions to provide performance similar to or better than that of the LM baseline ATCS.

  9. Utilization of Actively-induced, Prompt Radiation Emission for Nonproliferation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    F. W. Blackburn; J. L. Jones; C. E. Moss; J. T. Mihalzco; A. W. Hunt; F. Harmon

    2006-08-01

    The pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) technique, which has demonstrated the ability to detect shielded nuclear material, is based on utilizing delayed neutrons and photons between accelerator pulses. While most active interrogation systems have focused on delayed neutron and gamma-ray signatures, the current requirements of various agencies necessitate bringing faster detection and acquisition capabilities to field inspection applications. This push for decreased interrogation times, increased sensitivity and mitigation of false positives requires that detection systems take advantage of all available information. Collaborative research between Idaho National Lab (INL), Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has focused on exploiting actively-induced, prompt radiation signatures from nuclear material within a pulsed photonuclear environment. To date, these prompt emissions have not been effectively exploited due to difficulties in detection and signal processing inherent in the prompt regime as well as an overall poor understanding of the magnitude and yields of these emissions. Exploitation of prompt radiation (defined as during an accelerator pulse/(photo) fission event and/or immediately after (< l ms)) has the potential to dramatically reduce interrogation times since the yields are more than two orders of magnitude greater than delayed emissions. Recent preliminary experiments conducted at the IAC suggest that it is indeed possible to extract prompt neutron information within a pulsed photon environment. Successful exploitation of prompt emissions is critical for the development of an improved robust, high-throughput, low target dose inspection system for detection of shielded nuclear materials.

  10. Developments in on-line, electron-beam emittance measurements using optical transition radiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, R.B.; Lumpkin, A.H. ); Rule, D.W.; Fiorito, R.B. )

    1989-01-01

    We have developed image analysis software to facilitate the analysis of optical transition radiation (OTR) patterns generated by the electron beam from the Los Alamos free-electron laser facility. The software can be used for beam alignment, beam profile and angular divergence measurements, and the programs run on an IBM AT microcomputer. The programs and their use are described and some results shown. 2 refs., 17 figs.

  11. Configuration studies for active electrostatic space radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ravindra P.; Qiu, Hao; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2013-07-01

    Developing successful and optimal solutions to mitigating the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space long duration missions is critical for the success of deep-space explorations. Space crews traveling aboard interplanetary spacecraft will be exposed to a constant flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), as well as intense fluxes of charged particles during solar particle events (SPEs). A recent report (Tripathi et al., Adv. Space Res. 42 (2008) 1043-1049), had explored the feasibility of using electrostatic shielding in concert with the state-of-the-art materials shielding technologies. Here we continue to extend the electrostatic shielding strategy and quantitatively examine a different configuration based on multiple toroidal rings. Our results show that SPE radiation can almost be eliminated by these electrostatic configurations. Also, penetration probabilities for novel structures such as toroidal rings are shown to be substantially reduced as compared to the simpler all-sphere geometries. More interestingly, the dimensions and aspect ratio of the toroidal rings could be altered and optimized to achieve an even higher degree of radiation protection.

  12. Implanting metal fiducials to guide stereotactic liver radiation: McGill experience and review of current devices, techniques and complications.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Kristina; Cabrera, Tatiana; Roberge, David

    2014-06-01

    In this work we report our technique and outcomes placing percutaneous liver fiducials, summarize the literature on the risks of this procedure and present the various fiducials available today. Thirty-nine subjects, 27 males and 12 females who had received liver fiducial implants between November 2006 and September 2010 were retrospectively studied. Eighty-five gold cylinders (15%) and platinum coils (85%) were inserted under computed tomography (CT) guidance. All fiducials placed proved adequate to proceed with radiation image guidance. With one notable exception of gross migration, fiducials were inserted without serious complications. Although fiducial implantation in the liver has proven successful, the procedure does carry a variety of risks. PMID:24066955

  13. Minimalist fault-tolerance techniques for mitigating single-event effects in non-radiation-hardened microcontrollers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Douglas Wyche

    Commercial microcontrollers--monolithic integrated circuits containing microprocessor, memory and various peripheral functions--such as are used in industrial, automotive and military applications, present spacecraft avionics system designers an appealing mix of higher performance and lower power together with faster system-development time and lower unit costs. However, these parts are not radiation-hardened for application in the space environment and Single-Event Effects (SEE) caused by high-energy, ionizing radiation present a significant challenge. Mitigating these effects with techniques which require minimal additional support logic, and thereby preserve the high functional density of these devices, can allow their benefits to be realized. This dissertation uses fault-tolerance to mitigate the transient errors and occasional latchups that non-hardened microcontrollers can experience in the space radiation environment. Space systems requirements and the historical use of fault-tolerant computers in spacecraft provide context. Space radiation and its effects in semiconductors define the fault environment. A reference architecture is presented which uses two or three microcontrollers with a combination of hardware and software voting techniques to mitigate SEE. A prototypical spacecraft function (an inertial measurement unit) is used to illustrate the techniques and to explore how real application requirements impact the fault-tolerance approach. Low-cost approaches which leverage features of existing commercial microcontrollers are analyzed. A high-speed serial bus is used for voting among redundant devices and a novel wire-OR output voting scheme exploits the bidirectional controls of I/O pins. A hardware testbed and prototype software were constructed to evaluate two- and three-processor configurations. Simulated Single-Event Upsets (SEUs) were injected at high rates and the response of the system monitored. The resulting statistics were used to evaluate

  14. Choosing an Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Technique in the Treatment of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org; Mechalakos, James; Puri, Dev R.; Hunt, Margie

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: With the emerging use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer, selection of technique becomes a critical issue. The purpose of this article is to establish IMRT guidelines for head-and-neck cancer at a given institution. Methods and Materials: Six common head-and-neck cancer cases were chosen to illustrate the points that must be considered when choosing between split-field (SF) IMRT, in which the low anterior neck (LAN) is treated with an anterior field, and the extended whole-field (EWF) IMRT in which the LAN is included with the IMRT fields. For each case, the gross tumor, clinical target, and planning target volumes and the surrounding critical normal tissues were delineated. Subsequently, the SF and EWF IMRT plans were compared using dosimetric parameters from dose-volume histograms. Results: Target coverage and doses delivered to the critical normal structures were similar between the two different techniques. Cancer involving the nasopharynx and oropharynx are best treated with the SF IMRT technique to minimize the glottic larynx dose. The EWF IMRT technique is preferred in situations in which the glottic larynx is considered as a target, i.e., cancer of the larynx, hypopharynx, and unknown head-and-neck primary. When the gross disease extends inferiorly and close to the glottic larynx, EWF IMRT technique is also preferred. Conclusion: Depending on the clinical scenario, different IMRT techniques and guidelines are suggested to determine a preferred IMRT technique. We found that having this treatment guideline when treating these tumors ensures a smoother flow for the busy clinic.

  15. Degradation of Biochemical Activity in Soil Sterilized by Dry Heat and Gamma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, K. L.; Souza, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of soil sterilization by dry heat (0.08% relative humidity), gamma radiation, or both on soil phosphatase, urease, and decarboxylase activity was studied. Soil sterilized by a long exposure to dry heat at relatively low temperatures (eight weeks at 100.5 C) retained higher activities than did soil exposed to a higher temperature (two weeks at 124.5 C), while all activity was destroyed by four days at 148.5 C. Sterilization with 7.5 Mrads destroyed less activity than did heat sterilization. The effect of several individually nonsterizing doses of heat radiation is described.

  16. EFFECT OF SURFACE PREPARATION TECHNIQUE ON THE RADIATION DETECTOR PERFORMANCEOF CDZNTE

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M

    2007-05-23

    Synthetic CdZnTe (CZT) semiconducting crystals are highly suitable for the room temperature-based detection of gamma radiation. The surface preparation of Au contacts on surfaces of CZT detectors is typically conducted after (1) polishing to remove artifacts from crystal sectioning and (2) chemical etching, which removes residual mechanical surface damage however etching results in a Te rich surface layer that is prone to oxidize. Our studies show that CZT surfaces that are only polished (as opposed to polished and etched) can be contacted with Au and will yield lower surface currents. Due to their decreased dark currents, these as-polished surfaces can be used in the fabrication of gamma detectors exhibiting a higher performance than polished and etched surfaces with relatively less peak tailing and greater energy resolution. CdZnTe or ''CZT'' crystals are attractive to use in homeland security applications because they detect radiation at room temperature and do not require low temperature cooling as with silicon- and germanium-based detectors. Relative to germanium and silicon detectors, CZT is composed of higher Z elements and has a higher density, which gives it greater ''stopping power'' for gamma rays making a more efficient detector. Single crystal CZT materials with high bulk resistivity ({rho}>10{sup 10} {Omega} x cm) and good mobility-lifetime products are also required for gamma-ray spectrometric applications. However, several factors affect the detector performance of CZT are inherent to the as grown crystal material such as the presence of secondary phases, point defects and the presence of impurities (as described in a literature review by R. James and researchers). These and other factors can limit radiation detector performance such as low resistivity, which causes a large electronic noise and the presence of traps and other heterogeneities, which result in peak tailing and poor energy resolution.

  17. Modification of biodegradable polymers by radiation crosslinking technique with polyfunctional monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, Fumio; Suhartini, Meri; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Mitomo, Hiroshi; Kume, Tamikazu

    2003-08-01

    Poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA) were electron beam-irradiated in the presence of five different polyfunctional monomers at ambient temperature. Trimethallyl isocyanurate (TMAIC) has been found to greatly enhance the radiation crosslinking of PCL and PBSA. It was pointed out that the optimum yield of gel fraction can be achieved when the polymers were irradiated at a dose of 50 kGy in the presence of 1% TMAIC. High gel fraction largely improves heat stability of PBSA, while biodegradability evaluated by soil burial test of the crosslinked polymers is slightly retarded, however they are effectively destroyed with a slightly smaller rate.

  18. Comparing Computer-Supported Dynamic Modeling and "Paper & Pencil" Concept Mapping Technique in Students' Collaborative Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komis, Vassilis; Ergazaki, Marida; Zogza, Vassiliki

    2007-01-01

    This study aims at highlighting the collaborative activity of two high school students (age 14) in the cases of modeling the complex biological process of plant growth with two different tools: the "paper & pencil" concept mapping technique and the computer-supported educational environment "ModelsCreator". Students' shared activity in both cases…

  19. Role Play Simulations: The Assessment of an Active Learning Technique and Comparisons with Traditional Lectures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeNeve, Kristina; Heppner, Mary J.

    1997-01-01

    Use of active learning techniques of role-playing and simulation in an industrial psychology course (n=29 students) is described and assessed. Subjective reports and objective assessments of knowledge retention indicate the approach was effective. The differential importance of active learning and passive learning (lecture) in the college…

  20. Teaching Tip: Using Activity Diagrams to Model Systems Analysis Techniques: Teaching What We Preach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lending, Diane; May, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Activity diagrams are used in Systems Analysis and Design classes as a visual tool to model the business processes of "as-is" and "to-be" systems. This paper presents the idea of using these same activity diagrams in the classroom to model the actual processes (practices and techniques) of Systems Analysis and Design. This tip…

  1. The effects of solar activity on the global solar radiation measured at Khargha Oasis in the Western Dessert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, M.; Mohamed, A.

    Khargha is an Oasis in the Western Desert of Egypt of coordinates lat. 25 o 27/ N, long. 30 o 32 / E, and elevation 77.8 meter over the sea level. It is one of the driest areas in the world, the global solar radiation measured starting from January 1976 till now by station belong to the Egyptian Meteorological Authority. We used the data for the last 25 years of the 20"' Century on the daily bases, it is more than two solar cycles. The annual mean of relative humidity for Khargha is 30, and the total rainfall in mms as annual mean is less than one. Where, the evaporation in mms per day as annual mean is about 16. The total sky cover in oktas as annual mean is 0.4 at the midnight, while it is one oktas at the noon as 2annual mean, and 0.7 oktas on the mean of the day. The annual mean is 6.5 Kwh/rn /day for global solar radiation. Fourier analysis technique used to analysis the time series to show any reflection for the 11-year cycle of the solar activity on the measured global radiation in remote, clean, and dry desert area. The results indicate periodicity's similar to the solar activity periodicities, especially that of the eleven year cycle, in a good indication for the effect of solar activity on the climate change.

  2. Detection of active faults using EMR-Technique and Cerescope at Landau area in central Upper Rhine Graben, SW Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagag, Wael; Obermeyer, Hennes

    2016-01-01

    Two conjugate sets of active faults oriented NNE-SSW and NNW-SSE have been detected at Landau area in SW Germany. These faults follow the old trends of the rift-related structures predominating in the Upper Rhine Graben (URG), which originated during Late Eocene-Miocene time. Linear and horizontal measurements were performed by using the Cerescope device and interpreted, applying the Electromagnetic Radiation (EMR) Technique. Linear EMR-profiles were helpful for mapping active faults, while the main horizontal stress (σH, N to NNE) was easily identified with EMR-horizontal measurements. Reactivation of rift-related structures of the Upper Rhine Graben at Landau area produces a new system of active shallow fractures following old trends, and has been detected through the present study by Cerescope applying the EMR-Technique. The present results imply that the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) to the south of Landau has a great impact on reactivation of the pre-existing rift-related faults by mechanical hydro-fracturing occurring within the reservoir rocks underneath the area.

  3. Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Apurva; Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource; Doeff, Marca M.; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J.; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C.; Conry, Thomas

    2013-04-30

    We describe the use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques to probe details of intercalation/deintercalation processes in electrode materials for Li ion and Na ion batteries. Both in situ and ex situ experiments are used to understand structural behavior relevant to the operation of devices.

  4. Source description and sampling techniques in PEREGRINE Monte Carlo calculations of dose distributions for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Schach von Wittenau, A.E.; Cox, L.J.; Bergstrom, P.H., Jr.; Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Hornstein, S.M.

    1997-10-31

    We outline the techniques used within PEREGRINE, a 3D Monte Carlo code calculation system, to model the photon output from medical accelerators. We discuss the methods used to reduce the phase-space data to a form that is accurately and efficiently sampled.

  5. Long-Term Outcomes of Patients With Spinal Cord Gliomas Treated by Modern Conformal Radiation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Jenna; Loeffler, Jay Steven; Niemierko, Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: This study retrospectively examines the long-term therapeutic outcomes of 32 patients with primary spinal cord gliomas at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1991 and 2005 treated by either photon intensity-modulated radiotherapy or conformal proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Individual patient tumor types included 14 ependymomas, 17 astrocytomas, and one oligodendroglioma. Twenty-two patients were treated with photon beam radiation therapy, and 10 patients were treated with proton beam therapy. The overall survival and time to progression were analyzed. Average radiation dose for patients was 51 Gy in 1.8 median daily fractions over 29 treatments. Results: For all 32 patients, the overall 5-year survival was 65% and the progression-free survival was 61%, respectively. Overall survival was significantly worse for patients more than 55 years of age (p = 0.02). Ependymoma patients had significantly longer survival times than astrocytoma patients (p = 0.05). Patients who had undergone a biopsy developed worse outcomes then those with a resection (p = 0.05). With the caveat of a limited number of patients, the multivariate model seems to suggest improved overall survival for younger patients (<54 years of age), ependymoma histology, and photon vs. proton treatment. Conclusion: For patients with spinal cord gliomas, significant factors associated with patient outcome include tumor pathology, age, extent of surgery, and treatment.

  6. Radiation for bone metastases: conventional techniques and the role of systemic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Janjan, N A

    1997-10-15

    Pain management often is difficult in patients with bone metastases. Metastatic disease represents >40% of oncologic practice, and >70% of patients with metastatic disease have uncontrolled cancer-related pain. Significant morbidity caused by pathologic fracture and spinal cord compression can result from untreated bone metastases. Representing both a manifestation of systemic disease as well as causing localized symptoms, bone metastases require a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Radiation therapy provides both localized and systemic treatment options in addition to chemohormonal therapies and surgery. External beam irradiation provides palliation in >70% of patients through tumor regression of a localized lesion. Systemic radiopharmaceuticals treat multifocal disease either alone or as an adjuvant to external beam irradiation. Efficient and comprehensive management of bone metastases is imperative because of the associated symptoms, prior therapies, complex underlying medical problems, and clinical presentations that often require emergent interventions. Intensification of pain may be observed with hormonal therapy and systemic radiopharmaceuticals. Symptomatic relief from antineoplastic therapies generally requires 4-12 weeks and may be related to reossification. Symptoms, occurring due to the disease and/or while awaiting response to therapy, must be aggressively managed. Persistent or recurrent pain after therapy may be due to bony instability or fracture before reossification occurs. An Interdisciplinary Bone Metastases Clinic, with representatives from Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Oncology, Nuclear Medicine, Orthopedic Surgery, Pain and Symptom Management, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Radiation Oncology, was developed that allows coordinated evaluation, treatment, and symptom management of these complex clinical presentations. PMID:9362430

  7. Immobilization of microbial cell and yeast cell and its application to biomass conversion using radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaetsu, Isao; Kumakura, Minoru; Fujimura, Takashi; Kasai, Noboru; Tamada, Masao

    The recent results of immobilization of cellulase-producing cells and ethanol-fermentation yeast by radiation were reported. The enzyme of cellulase produced by immobilized cells was used for saccharification of lignocellulosic wastes and immobilized yeast cells were used for fermentation reaction from glucose to ethanol. The wastes such as chaff and bagasse were treated by γ-ray or electron-beam irradiation in the presence of alkali and subsequent mechanical crushing, to form a fine powder less than 50 μm in diameter. On the other hand, Trichoderma reesei as a cellulase-producing microbial cell was immobilized on a fibrous carrier having a specific porous structure and cultured to produce cellulase. The enzymatic saccharification of the pretreated waste was carried out using the produced cellulase. The enhanced fermentation process to produce ethanol from glucose with the immobilized yeast by radiation was also studied. The ethanol productivity of immobilized growing yeast cells thus obtained was thirteen times that of free yeast cells in a 1:1 volume of liquid medium to immobilized yeast cells.

  8. Investigation of microscopic radiation damage in waste forms using ODNMR and AEM techniques. (EMSP Project Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.; Luo, J.; Beitz, J.; Li, S.; Williams, C.; Zhorin, V.

    2000-04-21

    This project seeks to understand the microscopic effects of radiation damage in nuclear waste forms. The authors' approach to this challenge encompasses studies of ceramics and glasses containing short-lived alpha- and beta-emitting actinides with electron microscopy, laser and X-ray spectroscopic techniques, and computational modeling and simulations. In order to obtain information on long-term radiation effects on waste forms, much of the effort is to investigate {alpha}-decay induced microscopic damage in 18-year old samples of crystalline yttrium and lutetium orthophosphates that initially contained {approximately} 1(wt)% of the alpha-emitting isotope {sup 244}Cm (18.1 y half life). Studies also are conducted on borosilicate glasses that contain {sup 244}Cm, {sup 241}Am, or {sup 249}Bk, respectively. The authors attempt to gain clear insights into the properties of radiation-induced structure defects and the consequences of collective defect-environment interactions, which are critical factors in assessing the long-term performance of high-level nuclear waste forms.

  9. Development of Innovative Radioactive Isotope Production Techniques at the Pennsylvania State University Radiation Science and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, Amanda M.; Heidrich, Brenden; Durrant, Chad; Bascom, Andrew; Unlu, Kenan

    2013-08-15

    The Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) at the Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) has produced radioisotopes for research and commercial purposes since 1956. With the rebirth of the radiochemistry education and research program at the RSEC, the Center stands poised to produce a variety of radioisotopes for research and industrial work that is in line with the mission of the DOE Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, Isotope Development and Production Research and Application Program. The RSEC received funding from the Office of Science in 2010 to improve production techniques and develop new capabilities. Under this program, we improved our existing techniques to provide four radioisotopes (Mn-56, Br-82, Na-24, and Ar-41) to researchers and industry in a safe and efficient manner. The RSEC is also working to develop new innovative techniques to provide isotopes in short supply to researchers and others in the scientific community, specifically Cu-64 and Cu-67. Improving our existing radioisotopes production techniques and investigating new and innovative methods are two of the main initiatives of the radiochemistry research program at the RSEC.

  10. Application of modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique on liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning following RTOG 0438 guideline

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Chengyu Chen, Yong; Fang, Deborah; Iannuzzi, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a feasible treatment method for the nonoperable, patient with early-stage liver cancer. Treatment planning for the SBRT is very important and has to consider the simulation accuracy, planning time, treatment efficiency effects etc. The modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique is a 3-dimensional conformal arc planning method, which has been proposed for liver SBRT planning at our center. In this study, we compared the MDCA technique with the RapidArc technique in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs). The results show that the MDCA technique has comparable plan quality to RapidArc considering PTV coverage, hot spots, heterogeneity index, and effective liver volume. For the 5 PTVs studied among 4 patients, the MDCA plan, when compared with the RapidArc plan, showed 9% more hot spots, more heterogeneity effect, more sparing of OARs, and lower liver effective volume. The monitor unit (MU) number for the MDCA plan is much lower than for the RapidArc plans. The MDCA plan has the advantages of less planning time, no-collision treatment, and a lower MU number.

  11. Radiation Measurements Performed with Active Detectors Relevant for Human Space Exploration.

    PubMed

    Narici, Livio; Berger, Thomas; Matthiä, Daniel; Reitz, Günther

    2015-01-01

    A reliable radiation risk assessment in space is a mandatory step for the development of countermeasures and long-duration mission planning in human spaceflight. Research in radiobiology provides information about possible risks linked to radiation. In addition, for a meaningful risk evaluation, the radiation exposure has to be assessed to a sufficient level of accuracy. Consequently, both the radiation models predicting the risks and the measurements used to validate such models must have an equivalent precision. Corresponding measurements can be performed both with passive and active devices. The former is easier to handle, cheaper, lighter, and smaller but they measure neither the time dependence of the radiation environment nor some of the details useful for a comprehensive radiation risk assessment. Active detectors provide most of these details and have been extensively used in the International Space Station. To easily access such an amount of data, a single point access is becoming essential. This review presents an ongoing work on the development of a tool that allows obtaining information about all relevant measurements performed with active detectors providing reliable inputs for radiation model validation. PMID:26697408

  12. Radiation Measurements Performed with Active Detectors Relevant for Human Space Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Narici, Livio; Berger, Thomas; Matthiä, Daniel; Reitz, Günther

    2015-01-01

    A reliable radiation risk assessment in space is a mandatory step for the development of countermeasures and long-duration mission planning in human spaceflight. Research in radiobiology provides information about possible risks linked to radiation. In addition, for a meaningful risk evaluation, the radiation exposure has to be assessed to a sufficient level of accuracy. Consequently, both the radiation models predicting the risks and the measurements used to validate such models must have an equivalent precision. Corresponding measurements can be performed both with passive and active devices. The former is easier to handle, cheaper, lighter, and smaller but they measure neither the time dependence of the radiation environment nor some of the details useful for a comprehensive radiation risk assessment. Active detectors provide most of these details and have been extensively used in the International Space Station. To easily access such an amount of data, a single point access is becoming essential. This review presents an ongoing work on the development of a tool that allows obtaining information about all relevant measurements performed with active detectors providing reliable inputs for radiation model validation. PMID:26697408

  13. MAG4 Versus Alternative Techniques for Forecasting Active-Region Flare Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 is a technique of forecasting an active region's rate of production of major flares in the coming few days from a free-magnetic-energy proxy. We present a statistical method of measuring the difference in performance between MAG4 and comparable alternative techniques that forecast an active region's major-flare productivity from alternative observed aspects of the active region. We demonstrate the method by measuring the difference in performance between the "Present MAG4" technique and each of three alternative techniques, called "McIntosh Active-Region Class," "Total Magnetic Flux," and "Next MAG4." We do this by using (1) the MAG4 database of magnetograms and major-flare histories of sunspot active regions, (2) the NOAA table of the major-flare productivity of each of 60 McIntosh active-region classes of sunspot active regions, and (3) five technique-performance metrics (Heidke Skill Score, True Skill Score, Percent Correct, Probability of Detection, and False Alarm Rate) evaluated from 2000 random two-by-two contingency tables obtained from the databases. We find that (1) Present MAG4 far outperforms both McIntosh Active-Region Class and Total Magnetic Flux, (2) Next MAG4 significantly outperforms Present MAG4, (3) the performance of Next MAG4 is insensitive to the forward and backward temporal windows used, in the range of one to a few days, and (4) forecasting from the free-energy proxy in combination with either any broad category of McIntosh active-region classes or any Mount Wilson active-region class gives no significant performance improvement over forecasting from the free-energy proxy alone (Present MAG4).

  14. Comparative evaluation of passive, active, and passive-active distraction techniques on pain perception during local anesthesia administration in children

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmoniem, Soad A.; Mahmoud, Sara A.

    2015-01-01

    Local anesthesia forms the backbone of pain control techniques and is necessary for a painless dental procedure. Nevertheless, administering a local anesthetic injection is among the most anxiety-provoking procedures to children. This study was performed to compare the efficacy of different distraction techniques (passive, active, and passive-active) on children’s pain perception during local anesthesia administration. A total of 90 children aged four to nine years, requiring inferior alveolar nerve block for primary molar extraction, were included in this study and randomly divided into three groups according to the distraction technique employed during local anesthesia administration. Passive distraction group: the children were instructed to listen to a song on headphones; Active distraction group: the children were instructed to move their legs up and down alternatively; and Passive-active distraction group: this was a combination between both techniques. Pain perception during local anesthesia administration was evaluated by the Sounds, Eyes, and Motor (SEM) scale and Wong Baker FACES® Pain Rating Scale. There was an insignificant difference between the three groups for SEM scale and Wong Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale at P = 0.743 and P = 0.112 respectively. The examined distraction techniques showed comparable results in reducing pain perception during local anesthesia administration. PMID:27222759

  15. Implementation and validation of an ultrasonic tissue characterization technique for quantitative assessment of normal-tissue toxicity in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jun; Zhang Pengpeng; Osterman, K. Sunshine; Woodhouse, Shermian A.; Schiff, Peter B.; Yoshida, Emi J.; Lu Zheng Feng; Pile-Spellman, Eliza R.; Kutcher, Gerald J.; Liu Tian

    2009-05-15

    The goal of this study was to implement and validate a noninvasive, quantitative ultrasonic technique for accurate and reproducible measurement of normal-tissue toxicity in radiation therapy. The authors adapted an existing ultrasonic tissue characterization (UTC) technique that used a calibrated 1D spectrum based on region-of-interest analysis. They modified the calibration procedure by using a reference phantom instead of a planar reflector. This UTC method utilized ultrasonic radio-frequency echo signals to generate spectral parameters related to the physical properties (e.g., size, shape, and relative acoustic impedance) of tissue microstructures. Three spectral parameters were investigated for quantification of normal-tissue injury: Spectral slope, intercept, and midband fit. They conducted a tissue-mimicking phantom study to verify the reproducibility of UTC measurements and initiated a clinical study of radiation-induced breast-tissue toxicity. Spectral parameter values from measurements on two phantoms were reproducible within 1% of each other. Eleven postradiation breast-cancer patients were studied and significant differences between the irradiated and untreated (contralateral) breasts were observed for spectral intercept (p=0.003) and midband fit (p<0.001) but not for slope (p=0.14). In comparison to the untreated breast, the average difference in the spectral intercept was 2.99{+-}0.75 dB and the average difference in the midband fit was 3.99{+-}0.65 dB. The preliminary clinical study demonstrated the feasibility of using the quantitative ultrasonic method to evaluate normal-tissue toxicity in radiation therapy.

  16. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Jeremy P.; Murphy, James D.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Loo, Billy W.; Diehn, Maximilian

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  17. Biologically weighted measurement of UV radiation in space and on earth with the biofilm technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, P.; Horneck, G.

    Biological dosimetry has provided experimental proof of the high sensitivity of the biologically effective UVB doses to changes in atmospheric ozone and has thereby confirmed the predictions from model calculations. The biological UV dosimeter 'biofilm' whose sensitivity is based on dried spores of B. subtilis as UV target weights the incident UV radiation according to its DNA damaging potential. Biofilm dosimetry was applicated in space experiments as well as in use in remote areas on Earth. Examples are long-term UV measurements in Antarctica, measurements of diurnal UV profiles parallel in time at different locations in Europe, continuous UV measurements in the frame of the German UV measurement network and personal UV dosimetry. In space biofilms were used to determine the biological efficiency of the extraterrestrial solar UV, to simulate the effects of decreasing ozone concentrations and to determine the interaction of UVB and vitamin D production of cosmonauts in the MIR station.

  18. Biologically weighted measurement of UV radiation in space and on Earth with the biofilm technique.

    PubMed

    Rettberg, P; Horneck, G

    2000-01-01

    Biological dosimetry has provided experimental proof of the high sensitivity of the biologically effective UVB doses to changes in atmospheric ozone and has thereby confirmed the predictions from model calculations. The biological UV dosimeter 'biofilm' whose sensitivity is based on dried spores of B. subtilis as UV target weights the incident UV radiation according to its DNA damaging potential. Biofilm dosimetry was applicated in space experiments as well as in use in remote areas on Earth. Examples are long-term UV measurements in Antarctica, measurements of diurnal UV profiles parallel in time at different locations in Europe, continuous UV measurements in the frame of the German UV measurement network and personal UV dosimetry. In space biofilms were used to determine the biological efficiency of the extraterrestrial solar UV, to simulate the effects of decreasing ozone concentrations and to determine the interaction of UVB and vitamin D production of cosmonauts in the MIR station. PMID:12038486

  19. Unipolar charge sensing using Frisch grid technique for amorphous selenium radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldan, A. H.; Karim, K. S.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate amorphous Selenium Frisch-grid detector design to improve the spectral performance, reliability of single photon detection, and image lag for radiation imaging and detection. Incomplete charge collection due to the low electron mobility in amorphous Selenium results in depth-dependent signal variations. The slow signal rise-time for the portion of the induced charge due to electron-movement towards the anode and significant electron trapping cause ballistic deficit. This phenomenon can be observed from spectrum tailing (also called "electron tailing" for a-Se) and the wide Gaussian spectrum at low photon energies. The implications of this analysis for the design of new Selenium-based photoconductors are discussed, and some preliminary simulation results of the theory are presented.

  20. The use of radiation dose-reduction techniques in the practices of dental faculty members.

    PubMed

    Geist, James R; Katz, Jerald O

    2002-06-01

    X-ray exposure to dental patients has been significantly reduced by the introduction of speed group E intraoral film, rectangular beam limitation, long position indicating devices (PIDs), and rare-earth intensifying screens for extraoral radiography. Research indicates that many dentists do not use these techniques. However, schools of dentistry have implemented them to varying degrees for many years, so this investigation was conducted to determine the extent to which dental school faculty members use these materials and techniques in their own practices. Comparisons were made between full- and part-time instructors, those in practice for fifteen years or less and those in practice for more than fifteen years, and those with postgraduate education versus those with no formal education beyond dental school. The significance of differences was measured with chi-square analysis. The results indicate that dentists with faculty appointments utilize dose-reducing techniques to degrees that are comparable to or greater than reported usage by non-dental faculty practitioners. Faculty dentists in practice fifteen years or less are more likely than their older colleagues to use E-speed film (p = 0.001), whereas those in practice more than fifteen years are more likely to use longer PIDs (p = 0.049). Greater acceptance of these practices by faculty may lead to reinforcement of their use in the clinical education of dental students. PMID:12117090

  1. Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries Using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Doeff, Marca M.; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J.; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C.; Conry, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Intercalation compounds such as transition metal oxides or phosphates are the most commonly used electrode materials in Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. During insertion or removal of alkali metal ions, the redox states of transition metals in the compounds change and structural transformations such as phase transitions and/or lattice parameter increases or decreases occur. These behaviors in turn determine important characteristics of the batteries such as the potential profiles, rate capabilities, and cycle lives. The extremely bright and tunable x-rays produced by synchrotron radiation allow rapid acquisition of high-resolution data that provide information about these processes. Transformations in the bulk materials, such as phase transitions, can be directly observed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), while X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) gives information about the local electronic and geometric structures (e.g. changes in redox states and bond lengths). In situ experiments carried out on operating cells are particularly useful because they allow direct correlation between the electrochemical and structural properties of the materials. These experiments are time-consuming and can be challenging to design due to the reactivity and air-sensitivity of the alkali metal anodes used in the half-cell configurations, and/or the possibility of signal interference from other cell components and hardware. For these reasons, it is appropriate to carry out ex situ experiments (e.g. on electrodes harvested from partially charged or cycled cells) in some cases. Here, we present detailed protocols for the preparation of both ex situ and in situ samples for experiments involving synchrotron radiation and demonstrate how these experiments are done. PMID:24300777

  2. Characterization of electrode materials for lithium ion and sodium ion batteries using synchrotron radiation techniques.

    PubMed

    Doeff, Marca M; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C; Conry, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Intercalation compounds such as transition metal oxides or phosphates are the most commonly used electrode materials in Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. During insertion or removal of alkali metal ions, the redox states of transition metals in the compounds change and structural transformations such as phase transitions and/or lattice parameter increases or decreases occur. These behaviors in turn determine important characteristics of the batteries such as the potential profiles, rate capabilities, and cycle lives. The extremely bright and tunable x-rays produced by synchrotron radiation allow rapid acquisition of high-resolution data that provide information about these processes. Transformations in the bulk materials, such as phase transitions, can be directly observed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), while X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) gives information about the local electronic and geometric structures (e.g. changes in redox states and bond lengths). In situ experiments carried out on operating cells are particularly useful because they allow direct correlation between the electrochemical and structural properties of the materials. These experiments are time-consuming and can be challenging to design due to the reactivity and air-sensitivity of the alkali metal anodes used in the half-cell configurations, and/or the possibility of signal interference from other cell components and hardware. For these reasons, it is appropriate to carry out ex situ experiments (e.g. on electrodes harvested from partially charged or cycled cells) in some cases. Here, we present detailed protocols for the preparation of both ex situ and in situ samples for experiments involving synchrotron radiation and demonstrate how these experiments are done. PMID:24300777

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

  4. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  5. Investigating real-time activation of adenosine receptors by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine receptors play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, for example regulating myocardial oxygen consumption and the release of neurotransmitters. The activations of adenosine receptors have been studied by some kinds of techniques, such as western blot, immunohistochemistry, etc. However, these techniques cannot reveal the dynamical response of adenosine receptors under stimulation. In this paper, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique was introduced to study the real-time activation of adenosine receptors by monitoring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level. The results showed that there were significant differences between adenosine receptors on real-time responses under stimulation. Moreover, the dynamics of cAMP level demonstrated that competition between adenosine receptors existed. Taken together, our study indicates that monitoring the dynamics of cAMP level using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique could be one potential approach to investigate the mechanism of competitions between adenosine receptors.

  6. Advanced x-ray spectrometric techniques for characterization of nuclear materials: An overview of recent laboratory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, N. L.

    2014-11-01

    Advancements in x-ray spectrometric techniques at different stages have made this technique suitable for characterization of nuclear materials with respect to trace/major element determinations and compositional uniformity studies. The two important features of total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometry: 1) requirement of very small amount of sample in ng level 2) multielement analytical capability, in addition to other features, make this technique very much suitable to nuclear materials characterization as most of the nuclear materials are radioactive and the radioactive waste generated and radiation hazards to the operator are minimum when such low amount of sample is used. Similarly advanced features of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence e.g. better geometry for high flux, reduction in background due to application of radiation filters have made the measurements of samples sealed inside thin alkathene/PVC covers possible with good sensitivity. This approach avoids putting the instrument inside a glove box for measuring radioactive samples and makes the operation/maintenance of the instrument and analysis of the samples possible in easy and fast manner. This approach has been used for major element determinations in mixed uranium-plutonium samples. Similarly μ-XRF with brilliant and micro-focused excitation sources can be used for compositional uniformity study of reactor fuel pellets. A μ-XRF study using synchrotron light source has been made to assess the compositional uniformity of mixed uranium-thorium oxide pellets produced by different processes. This approach is simple as it does not involve any sample preparation and is non-destructive. A brief summary of such activities carried out in our laboratory in past as well as ongoing and planned for the future have been discussed in the present manuscript.

  7. Inhibition of Protease-activated Receptor 1 Ameliorates Intestinal Radiation Mucositis in a Preclinical Rat Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junru; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Chintala, Madhu; Fink, Louis M.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, using a specific small-molecule inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling, whether the beneficial effect of thrombin inhibition on radiation enteropathy development is due to inhibition of blood clotting or to cellular (PAR1-mediated) thrombin effects. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent fractionated X-irradiation (5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 9) of a 4-cm small-bowel segment. Early radiation toxicity was evaluated in rats receiving PAR1 inhibitor (SCH602539, 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg/d) from 1 day before to 2 weeks after the end of irradiation. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis was evaluated in animals receiving SCH602539 (0, 15, or 30 mg/kg/d) until 2 weeks after irradiation, or continuously until termination of the experiment 26 weeks after irradiation. Results: Blockade of PAR1 ameliorated early intestinal toxicity, with reduced overall intestinal radiation injury (P=.002), number of myeloperoxidase-positive (P=.03) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive (P=.04) cells, and collagen III accumulation (P=.005). In contrast, there was no difference in delayed radiation enteropathy in either the 2- or 26-week administration groups. Conclusion: Pharmacological blockade of PAR1 seems to reduce early radiation mucositis but does not affect the level of delayed intestinal radiation fibrosis. Early radiation enteropathy is related to activation of cellular thrombin receptors, whereas platelet activation or fibrin formation may play a greater role in the development of delayed toxicity. Because of the favorable side-effect profile, PAR1 blockade should be further explored as a method to ameliorate acute intestinal radiation toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer and to protect first responders and rescue personnel in radiologic/nuclear emergencies.

  8. Micro-Fabricated Solid-State Radiation Detectors for Active Personal Dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2007-01-01

    Active radiation dosimetry is important to human health and equipment functionality for space applications outside the protective environment of a space station or vehicle. This is especially true for long duration missions to the moon, where the lack of a magnetic field offers no protection from space radiation to those on extravehicular activities. In order to improve functionality, durability and reliability of radiation dosimeters for future NASA lunar missions, single crystal silicon carbide devices and scintillating fiber detectors are currently being investigated for applications in advanced extravehicular systems. For many years, NASA Glenn Research Center has led significant efforts in silicon carbide semiconductor technology research and instrumentation research for sensor applications under extreme conditions. This report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments toward characterization of radiation-sensing components for the recommendation of their fitness for advanced dosimetry development.

  9. Application of Semi Active Control Techniques to the Damping Suppression Problem of Solar Sail Booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adetona, O.; Keel, L. H.; Whorton, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Solar sails provide a propellant free form for space propulsion. These are large flat surfaces that generate thrust when they are impacted by light. When attached to a space vehicle, the thrust generated can propel the space vehicle to great distances at significant speeds. For optimal performance the sail must be kept from excessive vibration. Active control techniques can provide the best performance. However, they require an external power-source that may create significant parasitic mass to the solar sail. However, solar sails require low mass for optimal performance. Secondly, active control techniques typically require a good system model to ensure stability and performance. However, the accuracy of solar sail models validated on earth for a space environment is questionable. An alternative approach is passive vibration techniques. These do not require an external power supply, and do not destabilize the system. A third alternative is referred to as semi-active control. This approach tries to get the best of both active and passive control, while avoiding their pitfalls. In semi-active control, an active control law is designed for the system, and passive control techniques are used to implement it. As a result, no external power supply is needed so the system is not destabilize-able. Though it typically underperforms active control techniques, it has been shown to out-perform passive control approaches and can be unobtrusively installed on a solar sail boom. Motivated by this, the objective of this research is to study the suitability of a Piezoelectric (PZT) patch actuator/sensor based semi-active control system for the vibration suppression problem of solar sail booms. Accordingly, we develop a suitable mathematical and computer model for such studies and demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach with computer simulations.

  10. Analytical-HZETRN model for rapid assessment of active magnetic radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of active radiation shielding designs has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on deep-space missions at a significantly lower mass penalty than designs utilizing only passive shielding. Unfortunately, the determination of the radiation exposure inside these shielded environments often involves lengthy and computationally intensive Monte Carlo analysis. In order to evaluate the large trade space of design parameters associated with a magnetic radiation shield design, an analytical model was developed for the determination of flux inside a solenoid magnetic field due to the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) radiation environment. This analytical model was then coupled with NASA's radiation transport code, HZETRN, to account for the effects of passive/structural shielding mass. The resulting model can rapidly obtain results for a given configuration and can therefore be used to analyze an entire trade space of potential variables in less time than is required for even a single Monte Carlo run. Analyzing this trade space for a solenoid magnetic shield design indicates that active shield bending powers greater than ˜15 Tm and passive/structural shielding thicknesses greater than 40 g/cm2 have a limited impact on reducing dose equivalent values. Also, it is shown that higher magnetic field strengths are more effective than thicker magnetic fields at reducing dose equivalent.

  11. Analytical-HZETRN Model for Rapid Assessment of Active Magnetic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of active radiation shielding designs has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on deep-space missions at a significantly lower mass penalty than designs utilizing only passive shielding. Unfortunately, the determination of the radiation exposure inside these shielded environments often involves lengthy and computationally intensive Monte Carlo analysis. In order to evaluate the large trade space of design parameters associated with a magnetic radiation shield design, an analytical model was developed for the determination of flux inside a solenoid magnetic field due to the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) radiation environment. This analytical model was then coupled with NASA's radiation transport code, HZETRN, to account for the effects of passive/structural shielding mass. The resulting model can rapidly obtain results for a given configuration and can therefore be used to analyze an entire trade space of potential variables in less time than is required for even a single Monte Carlo run. Analyzing this trade space for a solenoid magnetic shield design indicates that active shield bending powers greater than 15 Tm and passive/structural shielding thicknesses greater than 40 g/cm2 have a limited impact on reducing dose equivalent values. Also, it is shown that higher magnetic field strengths are more effective than thicker magnetic fields at reducing dose equivalent.

  12. Report on policy and activities concerning public awareness of health effects of low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    1986-11-01

    In the summer of 1986, the Executive Committee authorized a study limited to determining policy and practices relevant to dissemination of information to the public on radiation health effects in three federal agencies. This report summarizes findings on two broad questions related to the communication issue: What, if any, are the policies under which federal agencies operate in disseminating information on health effects of radiation and what are the current programs and activities designed to provide the public information on health effects of radiation.

  13. Using Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) Observations to Estimate Potential Evaporation with Combination Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Freyberg, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    Estimating potential evaporation with combination equations typically depends on observations of solar radiation. In situations where only photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) observations are available, a conversion model is required. We use coincident observations of solar radiation and PAR to build a conversion model for the Santa Cruz Mountains region of California, USA. The model takes advantage of the strong seasonality in cloud cover and albedo, using two seasonal sub-models to improve performance. We examine the uncertainty induced by model error in predictions of potential evaporation and reference crop evaporation using locally calibrated combination equations, and compare with direct observations of pan evaporation and inferred estimates of lake evaporation.

  14. Active Noise Control of Radiated Noise from Jets Originating NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Fuller, Christopher R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Turner, Travis L.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of jet noise using a closed-loop active noise control system with highbandwidth active chevrons was investigated. The high frequency energy introduced by piezoelectrically-driven chevrons was demonstrated to achieve a broadband reduction of jet noise, presumably due to the suppression of large-scale turbulence. For a nozzle with one active chevron, benefits of up to 0.8 dB overall sound pressure level (OASPL) were observed compared to a static chevron nozzle near the maximum noise emission angle, and benefits of up to 1.9 dB OASPL were observed compared to a baseline nozzle with no chevrons. The closed-loop actuation system was able to effectively reduce noise at select frequencies by 1-3 dB. However, integrated OASPL did not indicate further reduction beyond the open-loop benefits, most likely due to the preliminary controller design, which was focused on narrowband performance.

  15. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  16. Improved Satellite-based Photosysnthetically Active Radiation (PAR) for Air Quality Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour Biazar, A.; McNider, R. T.; Cohan, D. S.; White, A.; Zhang, R.; Dornblaser, B.; Doty, K.; Wu, Y.; Estes, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the challenges in understanding the air quality over forested regions has been the uncertainties in estimating the biogenic hydrocarbon emissions. Biogenic volatile organic compounds, BVOCs, play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry, particularly in ozone and particulate matter (PM) formation. In southeastern United States, BVOCs (mostly as isoprene) are the dominant summertime source of reactive hydrocarbon. Despite significant efforts in improving BVOC estimates, the errors in emission inventories remain a concern. Since BVOC emissions are particularly sensitive to the available photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), model errors in PAR result in large errors in emission estimates. Thus, utilization of satellite observations to estimate PAR can help in reducing emission uncertainties. Satellite-based PAR estimates rely on the technique used to derive insolation from satellite visible brightness measurements. In this study we evaluate several insolation products against surface pyranometer observations and offer a bias correction to generate a more accurate PAR product. The improved PAR product is then used in biogenic emission estimates. The improved biogenic emission estimates are compared to the emission inventories over Texas and used in air quality simulation over the period of August-September 2013 (NASA's Discover-AQ field campaign). A series of sensitivity simulations will be performed and evaluated against Discover-AQ observations to test the impact of satellite-derived PAR on air quality simulations.

  17. Use of Synchrotron Radiation-Analytical Techniques To Reveal Chemical Origin of Silver-Nanoparticle Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liming; Zhang, Tianlu; Li, Panyun; Huang, Wanxia; Tang, Jinglong; Wang, Pengyang; Liu, Jing; Yuan, Qingxi; Bai, Ru; Li, Bai; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying

    2015-06-23

    To predict potential medical value or toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs), it is necessary to understand the chemical transformation during intracellular processes of NPs. However, it is a grand challenge to capture a high-resolution image of metallic NPs in a single cell and the chemical information on intracellular NPs. Here, by integrating synchrotron radiation-beam transmission X-ray microscopy (SR-TXM) and SR-X-ray absorption near edge structure (SR-XANES) spectroscopy, we successfully capture the 3D distribution of silver NPs (AgNPs) inside a single human monocyte (THP-1), associated with the chemical transformation of silver. The results reveal that the cytotoxicity of AgNPs is largely due to the chemical transformation of particulate silver from elemental silver (Ag(0))n, to Ag(+) ions and Ag-O-, then Ag-S- species. These results provide direct evidence in the long-lasting debate on whether the nanoscale or the ionic form dominates the cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles. Further, the present approach provides an integrated strategy capable of exploring the chemical origins of cytotoxicity in metallic nanoparticles. PMID:25994391

  18. A framework for automated contour quality assurance in radiation therapy including adaptive techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, M. B.; Kavanaugh, J. A.; Wooten, H. O.; Green, O. L.; DeWees, T. A.; Gay, H.; Thorstad, W. L.; Li, H.; Mutic, S.

    2015-07-01

    Contouring of targets and normal tissues is one of the largest sources of variability in radiation therapy treatment plans. Contours thus require a time intensive and error-prone quality assurance (QA) evaluation, limitations which also impair the facilitation of adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Here, an automated system for contour QA is developed using historical data (the ‘knowledge base’). A pilot study was performed with a knowledge base derived from 9 contours each from 29 head-and-neck treatment plans. Size, shape, relative position, and other clinically-relevant metrics and heuristically derived rules are determined. Metrics are extracted from input patient data and compared against rules determined from the knowledge base; a computer-learning component allows metrics to evolve with more input data, including patient specific data for ART. Nine additional plans containing 42 unique contouring errors were analyzed. 40/42 errors were detected as were 9 false positives. The results of this study imply knowledge-based contour QA could potentially enhance the safety and effectiveness of RT treatment plans as well as increase the efficiency of the treatment planning process, reducing labor and the cost of therapy for patients.

  19. Detector control system for the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker: architecture and development techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaś, ElŻbieta; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Olszowska, Jolanta

    2012-05-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. With ~300000 drift tube proportional counters (straws) filled with stable gas mixture and high voltage biased it provides precise quasi-continuous tracking and particles identification. Safe, coherent and efficient operation of the TRT is fulfilled with the help of the Detector Control System (DCS) running on 11 computers as PVSS (industrial SCADA) projects. Standard industrial and custom developed server applications and protocols are used for reading hardware parameters. Higher level control system layers based on the CERN JCOP framework allow for automatic control procedures, efficient error recognition and handling and provide a synchronization mechanism with the ATLAS data acquisition system. Different data bases are used to store the detector online parameters, the configuration parameters and replicate a subset of them used to flag data quality for physics reconstruction. The TRT DCS is fully integrated with the ATLAS Detector Control System.

  20. Measuring exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation using a dosimetric technique: understanding participant compliance issues.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiandong; Lucas, Robyn M; Harrison, Simone L; van der Mei, Ingrid; Whiteman, David C; Mason, Rebecca; Nowak, Madeleine; Brodie, Alison M; Kimlin, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Personal ultraviolet dosimeters have been used in epidemiological studies to understand the risks and benefits of individuals' exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). We investigated the types and determinants of noncompliance associated with a protocol for use of polysulphone UVR dosimeters. In the AusD Study, 1002 Australian adults (aged 18-75 years) were asked to wear a new dosimeter on their wrist each day for 10 consecutive days to quantify their daily exposure to solar UVR. Of the 10 020 dosimeters distributed, 296 (3%) were not returned or used (Type-I noncompliance) and other usage errors were reported for 763 (8%) returned dosimeters (Type-II noncompliance). Type-I errors were more common in participants with predominantly outdoor occupations. Type-II errors were reported more frequently on the first day of measurement; weekend days or rainy days; and among females; younger people; more educated participants or those with outdoor occupations. Half (50%) the participants reported a noncompliance error on at least 1 day during the 10-day period. However, 92% of participants had at least 7 days of usable data without any apparent noncompliance issues. The factors identified should be considered when designing future UVR dosimetry studies. PMID:24571445

  1. Radiation dose verification using real tissue phantom in modern radiotherapy techniques

    PubMed Central

    Gurjar, Om Prakash; Mishra, S. P.; Bhandari, Virendra; Pathak, Pankaj; Patel, Prapti; Shrivastav, Garima

    2014-01-01

    In vitro dosimetric verification prior to patient treatment has a key role in accurate and precision radiotherapy treatment delivery. Most of commercially available dosimetric phantoms have almost homogeneous density throughout their volume, while real interior of patient body has variable and varying densities inside. In this study an attempt has been made to verify the physical dosimetry in actual human body scenario by using goat head as “head phantom” and goat meat as “tissue phantom”. The mean percentage variation between planned and measured doses was found to be 2.48 (standard deviation (SD): 0.74), 2.36 (SD: 0.77), 3.62 (SD: 1.05), and 3.31 (SD: 0.78) for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) (head phantom), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT; head phantom), 3DCRT (tissue phantom), and IMRT (tissue phantom), respectively. Although percentage variations in case of head phantom were within tolerance limit (< ± 3%), but still it is higher than the results obtained by using commercially available phantoms. And the percentage variations in most of cases of tissue phantom were out of tolerance limit. On the basis of these preliminary results it is logical and rational to develop radiation dosimetry methods based on real human body and also to develop an artificial phantom which should truly represent the interior of human body. PMID:24600172

  2. Reduction of photosynthetically active radiation under extreme stratospheric aerosol loads

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstl, S.A.W.; Zardecki, A.

    1981-08-01

    The recently published hypothesis that the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinctions might be caused by an obstruction of sunlight is tested by model calculations. First we compute the total mass of stratospheric aerosols under normal atmospheric conditions for four different (measured) aerosol size distributions and vertical profiles. For comparison, the stratospheric dust masses after four volcanic eruptions are also evaluated. Detailed solar radiative transfer calculations are then performed for artificially increased aerosol amounts until the postulated darkness scenario is obtained. Thus we find that a total stratospheric aerosol mass between 1 and 4 times 10/sup 1/ g is sufficient to reduce photosynthesis to 10/sup -3/ of normal. We also infer from this result tha the impact of a 0.4- to 3-km-diameter asteroid or a close encounter with a Halley-size comet may deposit that amount of particulates into the stratosphere. The darkness scenario of Alvarez et al. is thus shown to be a possible extinction mechanism, even with smaller size asteroids of comets than previously estimated.

  3. Evaluation of the photocatalytic activity of Ln3+-TiO2 nanomaterial using fluorescence technique for real wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Saif, M; Aboul-Fotouh, S M K; El-Molla, S A; Ibrahim, M M; Ismail, L F M

    2014-07-15

    Evaluation the photocatalytic activity of different Ln(3+) modified TiO2 nanomaterials using fluorescence based technique has rarely been reported. In the present work, xmol Ln(3+) modified TiO2 nanomaterials (Ln = Nd(3+), Sm(3+), Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Dy(3+) and Er(3+) ions; x = 0.005, 0.008, 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03) were synthesized by sol-gel method and characterized using different advanced techniques. The photocatalytic efficiency of the modified TiO2 expressed in the charge carrier separation and OH radicals formation were assigned using TiO2 fluorescence quenching and fluorescence probe methods, respectively. The obtained fluorescence measurements confirm that doping treatment significantly decreases the electron-hole recombination probability in the obtained Ln(3+)/TiO2. Moreover, the rate of OH radicals formation is increased by doping. The highly active nanoparticles (0.02Gd(3+)/TiO2 and 0.01Eu(3+)/TiO2) were applied for industrial wastewater treatment using solar radiation as a renewable energy source. PMID:24667419

  4. Effects of UVB radiation on Photosynthesis Activity of Wolffia arrhiza as Probed by Chlorophyll Fluorescence Transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaohong; Hao, Zongjie; Chen, Kun; Liu, Yongding

    UV radiation is one major environmental stress for growth of Wolffia arrhiza which is regarded as a good candidate producer for establishing CELSS during extraterrestrial colonization and spaceflight. In this study, we found that UVB radiation inhibited photosynthetic CO2 assimilation activity significantly, and the content of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids decreased obviously when plants were exposed to UVB radiation for 6 h. High UVB radiation also declined the quantum yield of primary photochemistry (φPo), the quantum yield for electron transport (φEo) and the efficiency per trapped excitation (ψo) in the cells of Wolffia arrhiza simultaneously, while the amount of active PSII reaction centers per excited cross section (RC/CS) and the total number of active reaction center per absorption (RC/ABS) had the same changes under UV-B radiation stress. These results indicated that the effects of UV- B radiation on photosynthesis of Wolffia arrhiza maybe functioned by inhibition the electron transport and inactivation of reaction centers, but the inhibition maybe happen in more than one site in photosynthetic apparatus which is different to that in salt adaptation.

  5. Exploring Techniques for Vision Based Human Activity Recognition: Methods, Systems, and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Tang, Jinshan; Zhang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Qiu, Yimin

    2013-01-01

    With the wide applications of vision based intelligent systems, image and video analysis technologies have attracted the attention of researchers in the computer vision field. In image and video analysis, human activity recognition is an important research direction. By interpreting and understanding human activities, we can recognize and predict the occurrence of crimes and help the police or other agencies react immediately. In the past, a large number of papers have been published on human activity recognition in video and image sequences. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey of the recent development of the techniques, including methods, systems, and quantitative evaluation of the performance of human activity recognition. PMID:23353144

  6. Deflection of polarised radiation - Relative phase delay technique. [photon geodesic motion variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B.; Melnick, G.; Harwit, M.; Sato, T.; Stelzried, C. T.; Jauncey, D.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses the geodesic motion of photons, considering particularly whether oppositely polarized photons fall at the same rate. It is assumed that orthogonally polarized photons would be equally deflected by the gravitational field of a nonrotating mass. Upon the introduction of rotation, the angular momentum of the deflecting source couples to the photon spin through gravitational field action. Thus there arise separate trajectories for orthogonal polarizations. Searching for changes in polarization in a deflected beam is accomplished by a relative phase delay technique. If the beam is split into orthogonal linear polarization, final polarization is elliptical. Experiments have been performed on searching for ellipticity developments in the linearly polarized carrier waves from Helios 1 and 2, and the results are presented.

  7. Multilevel NLTE radiative transfer in isolated atmospheric structures: implementation of the MALI-technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, P.

    1995-07-01

    We have developed and extensively tested a new multilevel NLTE transfer code for isolated solar atmospheric structures (loops, prominences, spicules etc.). The code is based on the MALI approach of Rybicki & Hummer (1991, 1992) to multilevel accelerated lambda iterations. It is demonstrated that this method is fully capable of treating a difficult problem of NLTE hydrogen excitation and ionization equilibrium, provided that we linearize the preconditioned statistical equilibrium equations with respect to atomic level populations and the electron density. With this generalization of the original MALI approach, the numerical code is robust and stable. As compared to the standard linearization method of Auer & Mihalas (1969), the new MALI code designed for 1D slabs is more than one order of magnitude faster and its accuracy is quite satisfactory. We discuss several details of our implementation of the MALI technique to isolated, externally irradiated, 1D structures and finally draw some future prospects.

  8. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    PubMed Central

    Accardo, Angelo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Limongi, Tania; Marinaro, Giovanni; Riekel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data. PMID:24971957

  9. Multi-Anvil Techniques in Conjunction With Synchrotron Radiation - MAX80 and MAX200x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H. J.; Schilling, F. R.; Lathe, C.

    2005-12-01

    During the early 80's of the last century geoscientists worldwide realized synchrotron radiation as a highly valuable tool for in situ experiments, i.e. experiments under simulated Earth's mantle conditions. MAX80 at HASYLAB, Hamburg, a single-stage multi-anvil DIA-system at a synchrotron beamline was among the high-pressure pioneer apparatus designed in Japan. Meantime it is equipped for all kinds of ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with synchrotron radiation measurements, i.e. XRD and X-radiography. The maximum conditions are about 10 GPa / 2000 K. To make transition zone conditions accessible and to achieve bigger specimen volumes the sister apparatus MAX200x, a double-stage DIA-system, was installed at the HASYLAB HARWI-II beamline recently. The newly designed high-flux hard wiggler is an optimum X-ray source for this kind of experiments. MAX2000x is designed to reach 25 GPa and 2400 K, simultaneously. MAX200x is driven by a hydraulic ram with a maximum load of 1750 tons. This press is mounted on a y-z-table to adjust the sample to the synchrotron beam. Furthermore, the press can be rotated to enhance statistics during the diffraction experiments. The whole system weights about 30 tons. Derived from the successful equipment of MAX80 and adapted to the new task MAX200x is equipped for XRD with a Ge-solid-state detector, for transient ultrasonic interferometry, as well as with a radiography system to measure the change of volume and shape of the sample under in situ conditions. A stepper motor driven slits system allows to optimize X-ray beam size and shape for the experiments. The whole system is remote controlled. The goniometer will be mounted on a moveable table. Both, experiments with monochromatic and white X-rays will be available. Besides Ge-solid state detector new designed goniometers will be used to enhance the precision of the experiments. Parallel to the installation of MAX200x some innovative experiments were carried out to improve the

  10. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  11. Comparison of Techniques to Reduce Bremsstrahlung Background Radiation from Monoenergetic Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M; McNabb, D

    2006-06-29

    An important applied technology is a tunable mono-energetic photon source [1]. These sources are made of relativistic electron accelerators coupled to low-energy lasers, which produce high-energy, mono-energetic-rays. One challenge associated with systems such as this is a continuum of bremsstrahlung background created when an electron beam passes through an aperture of some sort and the electron bunch or its halo impinges on the aperture pictured in figure 1. For instance, in the current T-REX [1] design for the interaction point between the laser- and electron-beam, the electron-beam passes through the center of a mirror used to reflect the laser. There is a potential with this design that bremsstrahlung radiation may be produced at the edges of the mirror openings and contaminate the mono-energetic photon beam. Certain applications [2] may be sensitive to this contamination. To reduce the bremsstrahlung contaminate a collimator (thickness {approx}24in. (calculated from XCOM database [3]) to attenuate by a factor of 10{sup -3} the 112MeV photons expected in the T-REX demonstration [1]) is situated between the aperture and target. To maximize the brightness of the photon-beam, the collimator opening must be no less than the size of the photon-beam spot size expected to be about 1mm. This fixes the collimator opening. a priori the aperture size must be greater than the collimator opening and is a function distance between the aperture and collimator. In this paper we focus on two approaches to estimate the aperture size, given a collimator and a target whose sizes and distances from the aperture are given. In the next section we will discuss these approaches.

  12. Behavior Change Techniques Implemented in Electronic Lifestyle Activity Monitors: A Systematic Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Zakkoyya H; Mayrsohn, Brian G; Rowland, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Background Electronic activity monitors (such as those manufactured by Fitbit, Jawbone, and Nike) improve on standard pedometers by providing automated feedback and interactive behavior change tools via mobile device or personal computer. These monitors are commercially popular and show promise for use in public health interventions. However, little is known about the content of their feedback applications and how individual monitors may differ from one another. Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the behavior change techniques implemented in commercially available electronic activity monitors. Methods Electronic activity monitors (N=13) were systematically identified and tested by 3 trained coders for at least 1 week each. All monitors measured lifestyle physical activity and provided feedback via an app (computer or mobile). Coding was based on a hierarchical list of 93 behavior change techniques. Further coding of potentially effective techniques and adherence to theory-based recommendations were based on findings from meta-analyses and meta-regressions in the research literature. Results All monitors provided tools for self-monitoring, feedback, and environmental change by definition. The next most prevalent techniques (13 out of 13 monitors) were goal-setting and emphasizing discrepancy between current and goal behavior. Review of behavioral goals, social support, social comparison, prompts/cues, rewards, and a focus on past success were found in more than half of the systems. The monitors included a range of 5-10 of 14 total techniques identified from the research literature as potentially effective. Most of the monitors included goal-setting, self-monitoring, and feedback content that closely matched recommendations from social cognitive theory. Conclusions Electronic activity monitors contain a wide range of behavior change techniques typically used in clinical behavioral interventions. Thus, the monitors may represent a medium by which

  13. Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels using Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid passive/active noise control system utilizing constrained layer damping and model predictive feedback control is presented. This system is used to control the sound radiation of panels due to broadband disturbances. To facilitate the hybrid system design, a methodology for placement of constrained layer damping which targets selected modes based on their relative radiated sound power is developed. The placement methodology is utilized to determine two constrained layer damping configurations for experimental evaluation of a hybrid system. The first configuration targets the (4,1) panel mode which is not controllable by the piezoelectric control actuator, and the (2,3) and (5,2) panel modes. The second configuration targets the (1,1) and (3,1) modes. The experimental results demonstrate the improved reduction of radiated sound power using the hybrid passive/active control system as compared to the active control system alone.

  14. Overview of active methods for shielding spacecraft from energetic space radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    During the 1960's and into the early 1970's, investigations were conducted related to the feasibility of using active radiation shielding methods, such as afforded by electromagnetic fields, as alternatives to passive, bulk material shielding to attenuate space radiations. These active concepts fall into four categories: (1) electrostatic fields; (2) plasma shields; (3) confined magnetic fields; and (4) unconfined magnetic fields. In nearly all of these investigations, consideration was given only to shielding against protons or electrons, or both. During the 1980's and 1990's there were additional studies related to proton shielding and some new studies regarding the efficacy of using active methods to shield from the high energy heavy ion (HZE particle) component of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum. In this overview, each concept category is reviewed and its applicability and limitations for the various types of space radiations are described. Recommendations for future research on this topic are made.

  15. Overview of active methods for shielding spacecraft from energetic space radiation.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W

    2001-01-01

    During the 1960's and into the early 1970's, investigations were conducted related to the feasibility of using active radiation shielding methods, such as afforded by electromagnetic fields, as alternatives to passive, bulk material shielding to attenuate space radiations. These active concepts fall into four categories: (1) electrostatic fields; (2) plasma shields; (3) confined magnetic fields; and (4) unconfined magnetic fields. In nearly all of these investigations, consideration was given only to shielding against protons or electrons, or both. During the 1980's and 1990's there were additional studies related to proton shielding and some new studies regarding the efficacy of using active methods to shield from the high energy heavy ion (HZE particle) component of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum. In this overview, each concept category is reviewed and its applicability and limitations for the various types of space radiations are described. Recommendations for future research on this topic are made. PMID:11770543

  16. Operational radiation protection for astronauts and cosmonauts and correlated activities of ESA Medical Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straube, Ulrich; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther; Facius, Rainer; Fuglesang, Christer; Reiter, Thomas; Damann, Volker; Tognini, Michel

    2010-04-01

    Since the early times of human spaceflight radiation has been, besides the influence of microgravity on the human body, recognized as a main health concern to astronauts and cosmonauts. The radiation environment that the crew experiences during spaceflight differs significantly to that found on earth due to particles of greater potential for biological damage. Highly energetic charged particles, such as protons, helium nuclei ("alpha particles") and heavier ions up to iron, originating from several sources, as well as protons and electrons trapped in the Earth's radiation belts, are the main contributors. The exposure that the crew receives during a spaceflight significantly exceeds exposures routinely received by terrestrial radiation workers. The European Space Agency's (ESA) Astronaut Center (EAC) in Cologne, Germany, is home of the European Astronaut Corps. Part of the EAC is the Crew Medical Support Office (CMSO or HSF-AM) responsible for ensuring the health and well-being of the European Astronauts. A sequence of activities is conducted to protect astronauts and cosmonauts health, including those aiming to mitigate adverse effects of space radiation. All health related activities are part of a multinational Medical Operations (MedOps) concept, which is executed by the different Space Agencies participating in the human spaceflight program of the International Space Station (ISS). This article will give an introduction to the current measures used for radiation monitoring and protection of astronauts and cosmonauts. The operational guidelines that shall ensure proper implementation and execution of those radiation protection measures will be addressed. Operational hardware for passive and active radiation monitoring and for personal dosimetry, as well as the operational procedures that are applied, are described.

  17. Evaluation of radiation exposure from diagnostic radiology examinations: technique/exposure guides for the craniocaudal projection in mammography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The publication presents Center for Devices and Radiological Health suggestions for appropriate technique/exposure guides for use with the mammographic craniocaudal projection. This type of projection is the most-commonly used mammographic view and much exposure data is available for it. Even if a facility commonly uses another projection in mammography, problems affecting radiation exposure and image quality with one projection often are problems affecting all projections conducted with a particular x-ray imaging systems. The use of T/E guides to detect and correct the problems with the craniocaudal projection will have a beneficial effect as well on exposure levels and image quality of other projections conducted on the same system.

  18. Aerosol-induced lung injuries observed by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Weisheng; Zhang, Guilin; Liu, Ping; Sun, Jianqi; Hwu, Yeukuang; Je, Jung Ho; Tan, Mingguang; Li, Yan

    2007-09-01

    Adverse health effects are associated with the inhalation of a variety of atmospheric particles. To study the lung injuries caused by aerosol PM2.5, synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique was used. Nude mice were inoculated with PM2.5 samples collected from suburban area (JD), industrial area (BS) and traffic tunnel (DPQ) of Shanghai. From X-ray phase-contrast images of lung tissues, apart from blood vessels and structures of alveoli, even hemorrhage spots of several microns caused by the inflammation were clearly observed. The studies showed that the PM2.5 samples collected from the traffic tunnel (DPQ) produced higher level of lung injury, followed by the aerosol samples collected from industrial area (BS) and suburban area (JD). Our studies also helped us to understand the process of lung injuries caused by aerosol particles.

  19. MAG4 versus alternative techniques for forecasting active region flare productivity

    PubMed Central

    Falconer, David A; Moore, Ronald L; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 is a technique of forecasting an active region's rate of production of major flares in the coming few days from a free magnetic energy proxy. We present a statistical method of measuring the difference in performance between MAG4 and comparable alternative techniques that forecast an active region's major-flare productivity from alternative observed aspects of the active region. We demonstrate the method by measuring the difference in performance between the “Present MAG4” technique and each of three alternative techniques, called “McIntosh Active-Region Class,” “Total Magnetic Flux,” and “Next MAG4.” We do this by using (1) the MAG4 database of magnetograms and major flare histories of sunspot active regions, (2) the NOAA table of the major-flare productivity of each of 60 McIntosh active-region classes of sunspot active regions, and (3) five technique performance metrics (Heidke Skill Score, True Skill Score, Percent Correct, Probability of Detection, and False Alarm Rate) evaluated from 2000 random two-by-two contingency tables obtained from the databases. We find that (1) Present MAG4 far outperforms both McIntosh Active-Region Class and Total Magnetic Flux, (2) Next MAG4 significantly outperforms Present MAG4, (3) the performance of Next MAG4 is insensitive to the forward and backward temporal windows used, in the range of one to a few days, and (4) forecasting from the free-energy proxy in combination with either any broad category of McIntosh active-region classes or any Mount Wilson active-region class gives no significant performance improvement over forecasting from the free-energy proxy alone (Present MAG4). Key Points Quantitative comparison of performance of pairs of forecasting techniques Next MAG4 forecasts major flares more accurately than Present MAG4 Present MAG4 forecast outperforms McIntosh AR Class and total magnetic flux PMID:26213517

  20. Multicenter long-term validation of a minicourse in radiation-reducing techniques in the catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kuon, Eberhard; Weitmann, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Dörr, Marcus; Hummel, Astrid; Riad, Alexander; Busch, Mathias C; Felix, Stephan B; Empen, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Patient radiation exposure in invasive cardiology is considerable. We aimed to investigate, in a multicenter field study, the long-term efficacy of an educational 90-minute workshop in cardiac invasive techniques with reduced irradiation. Before and at a median period of 2.5 months and 2.0 years after the minicourse (periods I, II, and III, respectively) at 5 German cardiac centers, 18 interventionalists documented various radiation parameters for 10 coronary angiographies. The median patient dose area product (DAP) for periods I, II, and III amounted to 26.6, 12.2, and 9.6 Gy × cm(2), respectively. The short-term and long-term effects were related to shorter median fluoroscopy times (180, 138, and 114 seconds), fewer radiographic frames (745, 553, and 417) because of fewer (11, 11, and 10) and shorter (64, 52, and 44 frames/run) runs, consistent collimation, and restriction to an adequate image quality; both radiographic DAP/frame (27.7, 17.3, and 18.4 mGy × cm(2)) and fluoroscopic DAP/second (26.6, 12.9, and 14.9 mGy × cm(2)) decreased significantly. Multivariate analysis over time indicated increasing efficacy of the minicourse itself (-55% and -64%) and minor influence of interventionist experience (-4% and -3% per 1,000 coronary angiographies, performed lifelong until the minicourse and until period III). In conclusion, autonomous self-surveillance of various dose parameters and feedback on individual radiation safety efforts supported the efficacy of a 90-minute course program toward long-lasting and ongoing patient dose reduction. PMID:25579886

  1. Recognition of human activity characteristics based on state transitions modeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Vinayak; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2012-06-01

    Human Activity Discovery & Recognition (HADR) is a complex, diverse and challenging task but yet an active area of ongoing research in the Department of Defense. By detecting, tracking, and characterizing cohesive Human interactional activity patterns, potential threats can be identified which can significantly improve situation awareness, particularly, in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). Understanding the nature of such dynamic activities, inevitably involves interpretation of a collection of spatiotemporally correlated activities with respect to a known context. In this paper, we present a State Transition model for recognizing the characteristics of human activities with a link to a prior contextbased ontology. Modeling the state transitions between successive evidential events determines the activities' temperament. The proposed state transition model poses six categories of state transitions including: Human state transitions of Object handling, Visibility, Entity-entity relation, Human Postures, Human Kinematics and Distance to Target. The proposed state transition model generates semantic annotations describing the human interactional activities via a technique called Casual Event State Inference (CESI). The proposed approach uses a low cost kinect depth camera for indoor and normal optical camera for outdoor monitoring activities. Experimental results are presented here to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed technique.

  2. Nonlinear techniques for forecasting solar activity directly from its time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical techniques for constructing nonlinear predictive models to forecast solar flux directly from its time series are presented. This approach makes it possible to extract dynamical invariants of our system without reference to any underlying solar physics. We consider the dynamical evolution of solar activity in a reconstructed phase space that captures the attractor (strange), given a procedure for constructing a predictor of future solar activity, and discuss extraction of dynamical invariants such as Lyapunov exponents and attractor dimension.

  3. Nonlinear techniques for forecasting solar activity directly from its time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents numerical techniques for constructing nonlinear predictive models to forecast solar flux directly from its time series. This approach makes it possible to extract dynamical in variants of our system without reference to any underlying solar physics. We consider the dynamical evolution of solar activity in a reconstructed phase space that captures the attractor (strange), give a procedure for constructing a predictor of future solar activity, and discuss extraction of dynamical invariants such as Lyapunov exponents and attractor dimension.

  4. Investigation on corrosion behavior of Ni-based alloys in molten fluoride salt using synchrotron radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Min; Zheng, Junyi; Lu, Yanling; Li, Zhijun; Zou, Yang; Yu, Xiaohan; Zhou, Xingtai

    2013-09-01

    Ni-based alloys have been selected as the structural materials in molten-salt reactors due to their high corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties. In this paper, the corrosion behavior of some Ni-based superalloys including Inconel 600, Hastelloy X and Hastelloy C-276 were investigated in molten fluoride salts at 750 °C. Morphology and microstructure of corroded samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM), synchrotron radiation X-ray microbeam fluorescence (μ-XRF) and synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) techniques. Results from μ-XRF and SR-XRD show that the main depleted alloying element of Ni-based alloys in molten fluoride salt is Cr. In addition, the results indicate that Mo can enhance the corrosion resistance in molten FLiNaK salts. Among the above three Ni-based alloys, Hastelloy C-276 exhibits the best corrosion resistance in molten fluoride salts 750 °C. Higher-content Mo and lower-content Cr in Hastelloy C-276 alloy were responsible for the better anti-corrosive performance, compared to the other two alloys.

  5. Ultraviolet and photosynthetically active radiation can both induce photoprotective capacity allowing barley to overcome high radiation stress.

    PubMed

    Klem, Karel; Holub, Petr; Štroch, Michal; Nezval, Jakub; Špunda, Vladimír; Tříska, Jan; Jansen, Marcel A K; Robson, T Matthew; Urban, Otmar

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the effects of acclimation to ultraviolet (UV) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) on photoprotective mechanisms in barley leaves. Barley plants were acclimated for 7 days under three combinations of high or low UV and PAR treatments ([UV-PAR-], [UV-PAR+], [UV+PAR+]). Subsequently, plants were exposed to short-term high radiation stress (HRS; defined by high intensities of PAR - 1000 μmol m(-2) s(-1), UV-A - 10 W m(-2) and UV-B 2 W m(-2) for 4 h), to test their photoprotective capacity. The barley variety sensitive to photooxidative stress (Barke) had low constitutive flavonoid content compared to the resistant variety (Bonus) under low UV and PAR intensities. The accumulation of lutonarin and 3-feruloylquinic acid, but not of saponarin, was greatly enhanced by high PAR and further increased by UV exposure. Acclimation of plants to both high UV and PAR intensities also increased the total pool of xanthophyll-cycle pigments (VAZ). Subsequent exposure to HRS revealed that prior acclimation to UV and PAR was able to ameliorate the negative consequences of HRS on photosynthesis. Both total contents of epidermal flavonols and the total pool of VAZ were closely correlated with small reductions in light-saturated CO2 assimilation rate and maximum quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry caused by HRS. Based on these results, we conclude that growth under high PAR can substantially increase the photoprotective capacity of barley plants compared with plants grown under low PAR. However, additional UV radiation is necessary to fully induce photoprotective mechanisms in the variety Barke. This study demonstrates that UV-exposure can lead to enhanced photoprotective capacity and can contribute to the induction of tolerance to high radiation stress in barley. PMID:25583309

  6. Recent developments of optically stimulated luminescence materials and techniques for radiation dosimetry and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, A. S.; Lee, J. I.; Kim, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    During the last 10 years, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) has emerged as a formidable competitor not only to thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) but also to several other dosimetry systems. Though a large number of materials have been synthesized and studied for OSL, Al2O3:C continues to dominate the dosimetric applications. Re-investigations of OSL in BeOindicate that this material might provide an alternative to Al2O3:C. Study of OSL of electronic components of mobile phones and ID cards appears to have opened up a feasibility of dosimetry and dose reconstruction using the electronic components of gadgets of everyday use in the events of unforeseen situations of radiological accidents, including the event of a dirty bomb by terrorist groups. Among the newly reported materials, a very recent development of NaMgF3:Eu2+ appears fascinating because of its high OSL sensitivity and tolerable tissue equivalence. In clinical dosimetry, an OSL as a passive dosimeter could do all that TLD can do, much faster with a better or at least the same efficiency; and in addition, it provides a possibility of repeated readout unlike TLD, in which all the dose information is lost in a single readout. Of late, OSL has also emerged as a practical real-time dosimeter for in vivo measurements in radiation therapy (for both external beams and brachytherapy) and in various diagnostic radiological examinations including mammography and CT dosimetry. For in vivo measurements, a probe of Al2O3:C of size of a fraction of a millimeter provides the information on both the dose rate and the total dose from the readout of radioluminescence and OSL signals respectively, from the same probe. The availability of OSL dosimeters in various sizes and shapes and their performance characteristics as compared to established dosimeters such as plastic scintillation dosimeters, diode detectors, MOSFET detectors, radiochromic films, etc., shows that OSL may soon become the first choice for point dose

  7. Radiation induced chemical activity at iron and copper oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Sarah C.

    The radiolysis of three iron oxides, two copper oxides, and aluminum oxide with varying amounts of water were performed using gamma-rays and 5 MeV 4He ions. The adsorbed water on the surfaces was characterized using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy, which indicated that all of the oxides had chemisorbed water on the surface. Physisorbed water was observed on the Fe2O 3 and Al2O3 surfaces as well. Molecular hydrogen was produced from adsorbed water only on Fe2O3 and Al 2O3, while the other compounds did not show any hydrogen production due to the low amounts of water on the surfaces. Slurries of varying amounts of water were also examined for hydrogen production, and they showed yields that were greater than the yield for bulk water. However, the yields of hydrogen from the copper compounds were much lower than those of the iron suggesting that the copper oxides are relatively inert to radiation induced damage to nearby water. X-ray diffraction measurements did not show any indication of changes to the bulk crystal structure due to radiolysis for any of the oxides. The surfaces of the oxides were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the iron samples, FeO and Fe3O4, Raman spectroscopy revealed areas of Fe2O3 had formed following irradiation with He ions. XPS indicated the formation of a new oxygen species on the iron oxide surfaces. Raman spectroscopy of the copper oxides did not reveal any changes in the surface composition, however, XPS measurements showed a decrease in the amount of OH groups on the surface of Cu2O, while for the CuO samples the amount of OH groups were found to increase following radiolysis. Pristine Al2O3 showed the presence of a surface oxyhydroxide layer which was observed to decrease following radiolysis, consistent with the formation of molecular hydrogen.

  8. Time scaling with efficient time-propagation techniques for atoms and molecules in pulsed radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hamido, Aliou; Frapiccini, Ana Laura; Piraux, Bernard; Eiglsperger, Johannes; Madronero, Javier; Mota-Furtado, Francisca; O'Mahony, Patrick

    2011-07-15

    We present an ab initio approach to solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation to treat electron- and photon-impact multiple ionization of atoms or molecules. It combines the already known time-scaled coordinate method with a high-order time propagator based on a predictor-corrector scheme. In order to exploit in an optimal way the main advantage of the time-scaled coordinate method, namely, that the scaled wave packet stays confined and evolves smoothly toward a stationary state, of which the squared modulus is directly proportional to the electron energy spectra in each ionization channel, we show that the scaled bound states should be subtracted from the total scaled wave packet. In addition, our detailed investigations suggest that multiresolution techniques like, for instance, wavelets are the most appropriate ones to represent the scaled wave packet spatially. The approach is illustrated in the case of the interaction of a one-dimensional model atom as well as atomic hydrogen with a strong oscillating field.

  9. Behavior Change Techniques Present in Wearable Activity Trackers: A Critical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Kathryn; Li, Melissa; Giangregorio, Lora; Burns, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background Wearable activity trackers are promising as interventions that offer guidance and support for increasing physical activity and health-focused tracking. Most adults do not meet their recommended daily activity guidelines, and wearable fitness trackers are increasingly cited as having great potential to improve the physical activity levels of adults. Objective The objective of this study was to use the Coventry, Aberdeen, and London-Refined (CALO-RE) taxonomy to examine if the design of wearable activity trackers incorporates behavior change techniques (BCTs). A secondary objective was to critically analyze whether the BCTs present relate to known drivers of behavior change, such as self-efficacy, with the intention of extending applicability to older adults in addition to the overall population. Methods Wearing each device for a period of 1 week, two independent raters used CALO-RE taxonomy to code the BCTs of the seven wearable activity trackers available in Canada as of March 2014. These included Fitbit Flex, Misfit Shine, Withings Pulse, Jawbone UP24, Spark Activity Tracker by SparkPeople, Nike+ FuelBand SE, and Polar Loop. We calculated interrater reliability using Cohen's kappa. Results The average number of BCTs identified was 16.3/40. Withings Pulse had the highest number of BCTs and Misfit Shine had the lowest. Most techniques centered around self-monitoring and self-regulation, all of which have been associated with improved physical activity in older adults. Techniques related to planning and providing instructions were scarce. Conclusions Overall, wearable activity trackers contain several BCTs that have been shown to increase physical activity in older adults. Although more research and development must be done to fully understand the potential of wearables as health interventions, the current wearable trackers offer significant potential with regard to BCTs relevant to uptake by all populations, including older adults. PMID:27122452

  10. VAPORIZATION TECHNIQUE TO MEASURE MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN THE AMES/'SALOMELLA' ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the research was to develop and characterize a sensitive test method to detect mutagenic activity of volatile liquid organic chemicals (i.e., volatiles) in the Ames/Salmonella assay. A Tedlar bag vaporization technique was developed which increased contact time bet...

  11. An Active Self-Determination Technique: Involving Students in Effective Career Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denison, Grace L.

    This paper discusses creating story boards to help students with disabilities to develop effective career plans. It describes storyboarding as a technique for project planning which requires active involvement of both hemispheres of the brain. A group of 6-8 people, including students, teachers, counselors, and vocational rehabilitation…

  12. RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES FOR EXISTING DETACHED HOUSES - TECHNICAL GUIDANCE (THIRD EDITION) FOR ACTIVE SOIL DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical guidance document is designed to aid in the selection, design, installation and operation of indoor radon reduction techniques using soil depressurization in existing houses. Its emphasis is on active soil depressurization; i.e., on systems that use a fan to depre...

  13. Radiation Protection Studies of International Space Station Extravehicular Activity Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A. (Editor); Shavers, Mark R. (Editor); Saganti, Premkumar B. (Editor); Miller, Jack (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This publication describes recent investigations that evaluate radiation shielding characteristics of NASA's and the Russian Space Agency's space suits. The introduction describes the suits and presents goals of several experiments performed with them. The first chapter provides background information about the dynamic radiation environment experienced at ISS and summarized radiation health and protection requirements for activities in low Earth orbit. Supporting studies report the development and application of a computer model of the EMU space suit and the difficulty of shielding EVA crewmembers from high-energy reentrant electrons, a previously unevaluated component of the space radiation environment. Chapters 2 through 6 describe experiments that evaluate the space suits' radiation shielding characteristics. Chapter 7 describes a study of the potential radiological health impact on EVA crewmembers of two virtually unexamined environmental sources of high-energy electrons-reentrant trapped electrons and atmospheric albedo or "splash" electrons. The radiological consequences of those sources have not been evaluated previously and, under closer scrutiny. A detailed computational model of the shielding distribution provided by components of the NASA astronauts' EMU is being developed for exposure evaluation studies. The model is introduced in Chapters 8 and 9 and used in Chapter 10 to investigate how trapped particle anisotropy impacts female organ doses during EVA. Chapter 11 presents a review of issues related to estimating skin cancer risk form space radiation. The final chapter contains conclusions about the protective qualities of the suit brought to light form these studies, as well as recommendations for future operational radiation protection.

  14. Technique development for estimation of CO2 and CH4 concentration using radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Prabhunath; Rastogi, Shantanu; Singh, Rp; Panigrahy, S.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO _{2}) and methane (CH _{4}) are the well-known green house gases. Accurate spatially and temporally continuous estimation of these gases is essential for many environmental studies. Satellite observations provide important input in global monitoring of green house gases, and the area of scientific research which can help to reduce the uncertainty in measurement of trace gas concentration evolved rapidly. Spectral techniques are used to derive GHG concentration by developing the relation between satellite derived differential absorption indices with gaseous concentration. In the present work spectra were simulated to study the effect of different CO _{2} and CH _{4} concentration for estimation of atmospheric transmittances in the near infrared spectral region. Forward simulation was carried out using GUI based PcLnWin3.1 model. It uses calculations made by the FASCODE using HITRAN, molecular spectroscopic databases. It was found that for study of CO _{2} suitable spectral window is the 1.6 μm (6250 cm ^{-1}) band where there are two prominent absorptions at 1.576 μm (6348 cm ^{-1}) due to 2v _{1}+2v _{2}+v _{3} and 1.606 μm (6228 cm ^{-1}) due to v _{1}+4v _{2}+v _{3}. Of these 1.606 μm is dominant and more suitable. The suitable CH _{4} spectral window is 1.666 μm where although most of the P branch dissolves in water absorption but Q and R bands are sensitive and not affected by any other absorption. Optimum spectral resolution for correct determination of gas concentrations was found. It was observed from that the resolving power about 8000 (Δ λ ˜ 0.2 nm) is needed for detection of atmospheric CO _{2} and CH _{4} concentration at the 1.60 μm and 1.66 μm spectral region respectively.

  15. New materials and new techniques for imaging of long wavelength IR radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.

    1990-11-01

    Work on this program was directed towards the preliminary verification of the possibility of a completely new type of long wavelength infrared imaging system. This study proposed to explore the change in polarized reflectance from the pyro-optic surface, making use of the exceptional sensitivity of the newer ellipsometric techniques for reflectance studies. Cardinal advantages for the pyro-optic reflectance method are the following: (1) thermally sensitive film need only be thick enough to support the evanescent wave on reflection, so that pixel volume (mass) can be exceedingly small; (2) films can be mounted upon a critically dehydrated gel substrate which is transparent to visible light but affords near perfect thermal isolation; (3) there is no need for contacts to individual pixel elements as in the pyroelectric imagers; and (4) calculations show that for a film 0.1 micron meter thick, mounted on a silica gel substrate, the thermal efficiency is such that if the thermometric sensitivity of the film is sufficient to detect a temperature change of 1mK then for a system with f(1) optics this could correspond to a temperature difference in the object plane of 0.1K. The studies on this program were in two parts. The first objective was to verify the high values of temperature derivative of refractive index which has been reported in bismuth vanadate BiVO4, molybdenum MoS2, and antimony sulphur iodide SbSI. The second objective was to design and build a compact thermoelectric heater cooler which could be used to impart a known small AC temperature change to explore the detectivity limit for a pyro-optic application.

  16. Considerations concerning the use of counting active personal dosimeters in pulsed fields of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Peter; Borowski, Markus; Iwatschenko, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Active personal electronic dosimeters (APDs) exhibit limitations in pulsed radiation fields, which cannot be overcome without the use of new detection technology. As an interim solution, this paper proposes a method by which some conventional dosimeters can be operated in a way such that, based on the basic knowledge about the pulsed radiation field, any dosimetric failure of the dosimeter is signalised by the instrument itself. This method is not applicable to all combinations of APD and pulsed radiation field. The necessary requirements for the APD and for the parameters of the pulsed radiation field are given in the paper. Up to now, all such requirements for APDs have not been tested or verified in a type test. The suitability of the method is verified for the use of one APD used in two clinical pulsed fields. PMID:20083488

  17. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. I - Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of sound radiation from vibrating plates by oscillating forces applied directly to the structure is analytically studied. The model consists of a plane acoustic wave incident on a clamped elastic circular thin plate. Control is achieved by point forces, and quadratic optimization is used to calculate the optimal control gains necessary to minimize a cost function proportional to the radiated acoustic power (the transmitted field). The results show that global attenuation of broadband radiated sound levels for low to mid-range frequencies can be achieved with one or two control forces, irrespective of whether the system is on or off resonance. The efficiency of the control strategy is demonstrated to be related to the nature of the coupling between the plate modes of response and the radiated field.

  18. Radiation activated CHK1/MEPE pathway may contribute to microgravity-induced bone density loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Ya

    2015-11-01

    Bone density loss in astronauts on long-term space missions is a chief medical concern. Microgravity in space is the major cause of bone density loss (osteopenia), and it is believed that high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in space exacerbates microgravity-induced bone density loss; however, the mechanism remains unclear. It is known that acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) as a small peptide released by matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) promotes osteopenia. We previously discovered that MEPE interacted with checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) to protect CHK1 from ionizing radiation promoted degradation. In this study, we addressed whether the CHK1-MEPE pathway activated by radiation contributes to the effects of microgravity on bone density loss. We examined the CHK1, MEPE and secreted MEPE/ASARM levels in irradiated (1 Gy of X-ray) and rotated cultured human osteoblast cells. The results showed that radiation activated CHK1, decreased the levels of CHK1 and MEPE in human osteoblast cells and increased the release of MEPE/ASARM. These results suggest that the radiation-activated CHK1/MEPE pathway exacerbates the effects of microgravity on bone density loss, which may provide a novel targeting factor/pathway for a future countermeasure design that could contribute to reducing osteopenia in astronauts.

  19. Radiation activated CHK1/MEPE pathway may contribute to microgravity-induced bone density loss.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Ya

    2015-11-01

    Bone density loss in astronauts on long-term space missions is a chief medical concern. Microgravity in space is the major cause of bone density loss (osteopenia), and it is believed that high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in space exacerbates microgravity-induced bone density loss; however, the mechanism remains unclear. It is known that acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) as a small peptide released by matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) promotes osteopenia. We previously discovered that MEPE interacted with checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) to protect CHK1 from ionizing radiation promoted degradation. In this study, we addressed whether the CHK1-MEPE pathway activated by radiation contributes to the effects of microgravity on bone density loss. We examined the CHK1, MEPE and secreted MEPE/ASARM levels in irradiated (1 Gy of X-ray) and rotated cultured human osteoblast cells. The results showed that radiation activated CHK1, decreased the levels of CHK1 and MEPE in human osteoblast cells and increased the release of MEPE/ASARM. These results suggest that the radiation-activated CHK1/MEPE pathway exacerbates the effects of microgravity on bone density loss, which may provide a novel targeting factor/pathway for a future countermeasure design that could contribute to reducing osteopenia in astronauts. PMID:26553637

  20. Radiation activated CHK1/MEPE pathway may contribute to microgravity-induced bone density loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Bone density loss in astronauts on long-term space missions is a chief medical concern. Microgravity in space is the major cause of bone density loss (osteopenia), and it is believed that high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in space exacerbates microgravity-induced bone density loss; however, the mechanism remains unclear. It is known that acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) as a small peptide released by matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) promotes osteopenia. We previously discovered that MEPE interacted with checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) to protect CHK1 from ionizing radiation promoted degradation. In this study, we addressed whether the CHK1-MEPE pathway activated by radiation contributes to the effects of microgravity on bone density loss. We examined the CHK1, MEPE and secreted MEPE/ASARM levels in irradiated (1 Gy of X-ray) and rotated cultured human osteoblast cells. The results showed that radiation activated CHK1, decreased the levels of CHK1 and MEPE in human osteoblast cells and increased the release of MEPE/ASARM. These results suggest that the radiation-activated CHK1/MEPE pathway exacerbates the effects of microgravity on bone density loss, which may provide a novel targeting factor/pathway for a future countermeasure design that could contribute to reducing osteopenia in astronauts. PMID:26553637

  1. Visualization and characterization of the acoustic radiation force assisted displacement of particles using an OCT technique (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razani, Marjan; Zam, Azhar; Arezza, Nico J. J.; Wang, Yan J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we present a technique to image the enhanced particle displacement generated using an acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation source. A swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system with a center wavelength of 1310nm, a bandwidth of ~100nm, and an A-scan rate of 100 kHz (MEMS-VCSEL OCT Thorlabs) was used to detect gold nanoparticle (70nm in diameter) displacement .ARF was applied after the nanoparticles passed through a porous membrane and diffused into a collagen (6% collagen) matrix. B-mode, M-B mode, 3D and Speckle Variance (SV) images were acquired before and after the ARF beam was on. Differential OCT speckle variance images with and without the ARF were used to measure the particle displacement. The images were used to detect the microscopic enhancement of nanoparticle displacement generated by the ARF. Using this OCT imaging technique, the extravasation of particles though a porous membrane and characterization of the enhanced particle displacement in a collagen gel after using an ARF excitation was achieved.

  2. Evaluation of radioisotope tracer and activation analysis techniques for contamination monitoring in space environment simulation chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smathers, J. B.; Kuykendall, W. E., Jr.; Wright, R. E., Jr.; Marshall, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Radioisotope measurement techniques and neutron activation analysis are evaluated for use in identifying and locating contamination sources in space environment simulation chambers. The alpha range method allows the determination of total contaminant concentration in vapor state and condensate state. A Cf-252 neutron activation analysis system for detecting oils and greases tagged with stable elements is described. While neutron activation analysis of tagged contaminants offers specificity, an on-site system is extremely costly to implement and provides only marginal detection sensitivity under even the most favorable conditions.

  3. Pro-Activeness of Parents in Accepting Behavior Management Techniques: A Cross-Sectional Evaluative Study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jolly; Kaur, Manpreet; Trivedi, Krishna; Shah, Shalin; Virda, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The contemporary parents are more active and participate in the decision making during dental treatment. Aim To assess the parents’ acceptance towards behavior management techniques commonly used in the pediatric dentistry in different dental situation. Materials and Methods Fifty-one parents participated in the study. Children’s dental fear was assessed by the parents before attending power point presentation using Dental Subscale of the Children’s Fear Survey Schedule (CFSS-DS). Parents viewed power point presentation of eight behavior management techniques being used during pediatric dental treatment. The techniques were: 1) Voice control; 2) Tell-Show-Do; 3) Positive reinforcement; 4) Parental presence or absence; 5) HOME; 6) Physical restraint; 7) N2O-O2 sedation; 8) General anesthesia. Parents were asked to arrange various behavior management techniques from most accepted technique to least accepted technique in various dental situations according to their view. Results All the parents completed the questionnaire. Most children show increased anxiety related to dental component of CFSS-DS scale particularly during the administration of local anesthetic. In present study most preferred behavior management technique was Tell-Show-Do followed by positive reinforcement and least preferred behavior management technique was general anesthesia followed by physical restraint. Conclusion Children’s anxiety level increases during the condition related to dentistry which can be overcome by developing positive approach in children and parents towards dentistry and by utilizing various behaviour management strategies. A generalized low parental tolerance level for firm management techniques was seen in the present study population.

  4. Continuum radiation from active galactic nuclei: A statistical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isobe, T.; Feigelson, E. D.; Singh, K. P.; Kembhavi, A.

    1986-01-01

    The physics of the continuum spectrum of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) was examined using a large data set and rigorous statistical methods. A data base was constructed for 469 objects which include radio selected quasars, optically selected quasars, X-ray selected AGNs, BL Lac objects, and optically unidentified compact radio sources. Each object has measurements of its radio, optical, X-ray core continuum luminosity, though many of them are upper limits. Since many radio sources have extended components, the core component were carefully selected out from the total radio luminosity. With survival analysis statistical methods, which can treat upper limits correctly, these data can yield better statistical results than those previously obtained. A variety of statistical tests are performed, such as the comparison of the luminosity functions in different subsamples, and linear regressions of luminosities in different bands. Interpretation of the results leads to the following tentative conclusions: the main emission mechanism of optically selected quasars and X-ray selected AGNs is thermal, while that of BL Lac objects is synchrotron; radio selected quasars may have two different emission mechanisms in the X-ray band; BL Lac objects appear to be special cases of the radio selected quasars; some compact radio sources show the possibility of synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) in the optical band; and the spectral index between the optical and the X-ray bands depends on the optical luminosity.

  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  6. Dosimetric study for cervix carcinoma treatment using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compensation based on 3D intracavitary brachytherapy technique

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Gang; Wang, Pei; Lang, Jinyi; Tian, Yin; Luo, Yangkun; Fan, Zixuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compensation based on 3D high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) boost technique (ICBT + IMRT) has been used in our hospital for advanced cervix carcinoma patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric results of the four different boost techniques (the conventional 2D HDR intracavitary brachytherapy [CICBT], 3D optimized HDR intracavitary brachytherapy [OICBT], and IMRT-alone with the applicator in situ). Material and methods For 30 patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma, after the completion of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for whole pelvic irradiation 45 Gy/25 fractions, five fractions of ICBT + IMRT boost with 6 Gy/fractions for high risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and 5 Gy/fractions for intermediate risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were applied. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired using an in situ CT/MRI-compatible applicator. The gross tumor volume (GTV), the high/intermediate-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV/IRCTV), bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were contoured by CT scans. Results For ICBT + IMRT plan, values of D90, D100 of HRCTV, D90, D100, and V100 of IRCTV significantly increased (p < 0.05) in comparison to OICBT and CICBT. The D2cc values for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were significantly lower than that of CICBT and IMRT alone. In all patients, the mean rectum V60 Gy values generated from ICBT + IMRT and OICBT techniques were very similar but for bladder and sigmoid, the V60 Gy values generated from ICBT + IMRT were higher than that of OICBT. For the ICBT + IMRT plan, the standard deviations (SD) of D90 and D2cc were found to be lower than other three treatment plans. Conclusions The ICBT + IMRT technique not only provides good target coverage but also maintains low doses (D2cc) to the OAR. ICBT + IMRT is an optional technique to boost parametrial region or tumor of large size and irregular shape

  7. Measurements of fusion neutron yields by neutron activation technique: Uncertainty due to the uncertainty on activation cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankunas, Gediminas; Batistoni, Paola; Sjöstrand, Henrik; Conroy, Sean

    2015-07-01

    The neutron activation technique is routinely used in fusion experiments to measure the neutron yields. This paper investigates the uncertainty on these measurements as due to the uncertainties on dosimetry and activation reactions. For this purpose, activation cross-sections were taken from the International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File (IRDFF-v1.05) in 640 groups ENDF-6 format for several reactions of interest for both 2.5 and 14 MeV neutrons. Activation coefficients (reaction rates) have been calculated using the neutron flux spectra at JET vacuum vessel, both for DD and DT plasmas, calculated by MCNP in the required 640-energy group format. The related uncertainties for the JET neutron spectra are evaluated as well using the covariance data available in the library. These uncertainties are in general small, but not negligible when high accuracy is required in the determination of the fusion neutron yields.

  8. A local active noise control system based on a virtual-microphone technique for railway sleeping vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, J.; Egaña, J. M.; Viñolas, J.

    2006-11-01

    Low-frequency broadband noise generated on a railway vehicle by the wheel-rail interaction could be a big annoyance for passengers in sleeping cars. Low-frequency acoustic radiation is extremely difficult to attenuate by using passive devices. In this article, an active noise control (ANC) technique has been proposed for this purpose. A three-dimensional cabin was built in the laboratory to carry out the experiments. The proposed scheme is based on a Filtered-X Least Mean Square (FXLMS) control algorithm, particularised for a virtual-microphone technique. Control algorithms were designed with the Matlab-Simulink tool, and the Real Time Windows Target toolbox of Matlab was used to run in real time the ANC system. Referring to the results, different simulations and experimental performances were analysed to enlarge the silence zone around the passenger's ear zone and along the bed headboard. Attenuations of up to 20 and 15 dB(A) (re:20 μPa) were achieved at the passenger's ear in simulations and in experimental results, respectively.

  9. Miniature Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter dosimeter for active personal radiation monitoring of astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson Huber, Aubrey

    The accurate measurement of spaceflight crew radiation exposure is of utmost importance. If onboard instrumentation shows that the pre-determined limit for radiation exposure has been met or exceeded during a mission, that mission can be greatly affected by the implementation of precautionary measures, or, in more extreme cases, the crew's health being negatively affected. Large active regional monitors determine real-time radiation risks of the crew during spaceflight, while small passive personal badges detect individual astronaut total exposure levels upon their return to Earth. At present, there are no personal active radiation dosimeters that can assess the continuous radiation risk to individual astronauts during spaceflight. Personal active radiation devices would be ideal for current operations in low-Earth orbit (LEO), as well as upcoming extravehicular activities on the Moon, Mars, or other planetary bodies. This project focused on the miniaturization of the Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counters (TEPCs) presently being utilized on the International Space Station (ISS) and Space Shuttle, enabling them to become personal crew dosimeters. The miniaturized TEPC prototype design has dimensions of 7.6 x 10.1 x 2.54 cm (3 x 4 x 1 in). It is composed of a 3 x 4 array of 1.27 cm (0.5 in) spherical detectors for measurements equivalent to a 4.39 cm (1.73 in) spherical detector, with an additional standalone sphere of diameter 1.27 cm (0.5 in) for taking measurements in high-flux environments. The detector simulates a tissue-equivalent diameter of 2 microns, is sensitive to lineal energies of 0.3 -- 1000 keV/micron, and can measure charged particles and neutrons ranging from 0.01 -- 100 mGy/hr.

  10. Comparison of different irrigation activation techniques on smear layer removal: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Akyuz Ekim, Sefika Nur; Erdemir, Ali

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of different irrigation activation techniques on smear layer removal. About 80 single-rooted human maxillary central teeth were decoronated to a standardized length.The samples were prepared by using ProTaper system to size F4 and divided into eight equal groups (n = 10) according to the final irrigation activation technique; distilled water was used as an irrigant in Group 1. The other groups were treated with 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA, respectively. Conventional syringe irrigation (CSI) was used in Group 2. Irrigation solutions were activated using passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI, Group 3), EndoVac apical negative pressure (ANP, Group 4), diode laser (Group 5), Nd:YAG laser (Group 6), Er:YAG laser (Group 7), and Er:YAG laser using with photon-induced photoacoustic streaming (PIPS™, Group 8). Teeth were split longitudinally and subjected to scanning electron microscope (SEM). PIPS showed the best removal of smear layer when compared with PUI, ANP, Nd:YAG, and Er:YAG, but the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Smear layer scores obtained with PIPS technique were statistically significant different from those of obtained with control, CSI and diode laser groups (P < 0.05). All experimental irrigation techniques except ANP and diode laser removed smear layer more effectively at the coronal and middle levels compared to the apical level (P < 0.05). Irrigation activated/delivered techniques except diode laser have a positive effect on removing of smear layer. PMID:25582378

  11. Experimental, theoretical and computational study of frequency upshift of electromagnetic radiation using plasma techniques. Annual technical report, January 15, 1992--January 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, C.

    1992-09-01

    This is a second year progress report on ``Experimental, Theoretical and Computational Study of Frequency Upshift of Electromagnetic Radiation Using Plasma Techniques.`` The highlights are: (I) Ionization fronts have been shown to frequency upshift e.m. radiation by greater than a factor 5. In the experiments, 33 GHz microwave radiation is upshifted to more than 175 GHz using a relativistically propagating ionization front created by a laser beam. (II) A Letter describing the results has been published in Physical Review Letters and an ``invited`` paper has been submitted to IEEE Trans. in Plasma Science.

  12. Thorium partitioning in Greek industrial bauxite investigated by synchrotron radiation and laser-ablation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamaletsos, P.; Godelitsas, A.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Göttlicher, J.; Steininger, R.; Xanthos, S.; Berndt, J.; Klemme, S.; Kuzmin, A.; Bárdossy, G.

    2011-12-01

    Typical red-brown (Fe-rich) and high-quality white-grey (Fe-depleted) bauxite samples from active mines of the Parnassos-Ghiona area, central Greece, were investigated. According to XRF and ICP-MS analyses their actinide content, and particularly of Th, is relatively increased. Fe-depleted samples contain up to 62.75 ppm Th corresponding to 220 Bq/kg due to 228Ac ( 232Th-series), whereas Fe-rich samples are less Th-radioactive (up to 58.25 ppm Th, 180 Bq/kg due to 228Ac). Powder-XRD patterns showed that Th-enriched (Fe-depleted) bauxite consists mostly of diaspore (AlOOH polymorph), anatase and rutile (TiO 2 polymorphs). SEM-EDS indicated the presence of Ti-Fe-containing phases (e.g. ilmenite, FeTiO 3), chromite (Cr-spinel) and besides LREE-minerals (mostly bastnäsite/parisite-group) and zircon (ZrSiO 4) hosting a part of the bulk Th. The presence of Th in diaspore and in Ti-containing phases (not detected by SEM-EDS as in the case of REE-minerals and zircon) was investigated, into distinct pisoliths of Fe-depleted bauxite, using μ-XRF and μ-XAFS in the SUL-X beamline of the ANKA Synchrotron facility (KIT, Germany). XAFS spectra of Th salts and Th-containing reference materials were obtained as well. Accordingly it was revealed, for the first time in the literature, that Ti-phases, and particularly anatase, host significant amounts of Th. This novel conclusion was complementary supported by LA-ICP-MS analyses indicated an average of 73 ppm Th in anatase grains together with abundant Nb (3356 ppm), Ta (247 ppm) and U (33 ppm). The Th LIII-edge XAFS spectra as compared to reference materials, give also evidence that Th 4+ may not replace Ti 4+ in distorted [TiO 6] fundamental octahedral units of anatase and ilmenite lattice (CN = 6). The occupation of either extraframework sites of higher coordination (CN = 6.9 or even CN = 7.4), according to EXAFS signals evaluation, or of defected/vacant (**) sites is more probable. This is likely explained by the difficulty of

  13. Combining active learning and semi-supervised learning techniques to extract protein interaction sentences

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI) extraction has been a focal point of many biomedical research and database curation tools. Both Active Learning and Semi-supervised SVMs have recently been applied to extract PPI automatically. In this paper, we explore combining the AL with the SSL to improve the performance of the PPI task. Methods We propose a novel PPI extraction technique called PPISpotter by combining Deterministic Annealing-based SSL and an AL technique to extract protein-protein interaction. In addition, we extract a comprehensive set of features from MEDLINE records by Natural Language Processing (NLP) techniques, which further improve the SVM classifiers. In our feature selection technique, syntactic, semantic, and lexical properties of text are incorporated into feature selection that boosts the system performance significantly. Results By conducting experiments with three different PPI corpuses, we show that PPISpotter is superior to the other techniques incorporated into semi-supervised SVMs such as Random Sampling, Clustering, and Transductive SVMs by precision, recall, and F-measure. Conclusions Our system is a novel, state-of-the-art technique for efficiently extracting protein-protein interaction pairs. PMID:22168401

  14. The Potential Radiative Forcing of Global Land Use and Land Cover Change Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Kloster, S.

    2014-12-01

    Given the expected increase in pressure on land resources over the next century, there is a need to understand the total impacts of activities associated with land use and land cover change (LULCC). Here we quantify these impacts using the radiative forcing metric, including forcings from changes in long-lived greenhouse gases, tropospheric ozone, aerosol effects, and land surface albedo. We estimate radiative forcings from the different agents for historical LULCC and for six future projections using simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model and Community Atmosphere Models and additional offline analyses. When all forcing agents are considered together we show that 45% (+30%, -20%) of the present-day (2010) anthropogenic radiative forcing can be attributed to LULCC. Changes in the emission of non-CO2 greenhouse gases and aerosols from LULCC enhance the total LULCC radiative forcing by a factor of 2 to 3 with respect to the forcing from CO2 alone. In contrast, the non-CO2 forcings from fossil fuel burning are roughly neutral, due largely to the negative (cooling) impact of aerosols from these sources. We partition the global LULCC radiative forcing into three major sources: direct modification of land cover (e.g. deforestation), agricultural activities, and fire regime changes. Contributions from deforestation and agriculture are roughly equal in the present day, while changes to wildfire activity impose a small negative forcing globally. In 2100, deforestation activities comprise the majority of the LULCC radiative forcing for all projections except one (Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5). This suggests that realistic scenarios of future forest area change are essential for projecting the contribution of LULCC to climate change. However, the commonly used RCP land cover change projections all include decreases in global deforestation rates over the next 85 years. To place an upper bound on the potential

  15. Influences of photosynthetically active radiation on cladode orientation, stem tilting, and height of cacti

    SciTech Connect

    Nobel, P.S.

    1981-08-01

    Stem orientation and morphology were investigated for 14 species of cacti in Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, and the United States. The interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was specifically considered for cladodes (flattened stems) of platyopuntias, for tilted cylindrical stems, and in the presence of surrounding vegetation.

  16. Persistent intense MIBG activity in the liver caused by prior radiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jigang; Codreanu, Ion; Servaes, Sabah; Zhuang, Hongming

    2014-10-01

    The positive predictive value of MIBG scintigraphy in the evaluation of neuroblastoma is very high, and false-positive findings are rare. We present here persistently elevated MIBG activity in the liver caused by external beam radiation, which could be misinterpreted as malignant involvement if history and prior studies were not carefully correlated. PMID:24999695

  17. Activating Photodynamic Therapy in vitro with Cerenkov Radiation Generated from Yttrium-90.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Brad A; Hirschberg, Henry; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    The translation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to the clinical setting has primarily been limited to easily accessible and/or superficial diseases, for which traditional light delivery can be performed noninvasively. Cerenkov radiation, as generated from medically relevant radionuclides, has been suggested as a means to deliver light to deeper tissues noninvasively to overcome this depth limitation. This article investigates the utility of Cerenkov radiation, as generated from the radionuclide yttrium-90, for activating the PDT process using clinically approved aminolevulinic acid at 1.0 mm and also the more efficient porphyrin-based photosensitizer mesotetraphenylporphine with two sulfonate groups on adjacent phenyl rings (TPPS2a) at 1.2 µm. Experiments were conducted with monolayer cultured glioma and breast tumor cell lines. Although aminolevulinic acid proved to be ineffective for generating a therapeutic effect at all but the highest activity levels, TPPS2a produced at least a 20% therapeutic effect at activities ranging from 6 to 60 µCi/well for the C6 glioma cell line. Importantly, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that Cerenkov radiation generated from a radionuclide can be used to activate PDT using clinically relevant photosensitizers. These results therefore provide evidence that it may be possible to generate a phototherapeutic effect in vivo using Cerenkov radiation and clinically relevant photosensitizers. PMID:27481495

  18. Covering Materials Incorporating Radiation-Preventing Techniques to Meet Greenhouse Cooling Challenges in Arid Regions: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Ghany, Ahmed M.; Al-Helal, Ibrahim M.; Alzahrani, Saeed M.; Alsadon, Abdullah A.; Ali, Ilias M.; Elleithy, Rabeh M.

    2012-01-01

    Cooling greenhouses is essential to provide a suitable environment for plant growth in arid regions characterized by brackish water resources. However, using conventional cooling methods are facing many challenges. Filtering out near infra-red radiation (NIR) at the greenhouse cover can significantly reduce the heating load and can solve the overheating problem of the greenhouse air. This paper is to review (i) the problems of using conventional cooling methods and (ii) the advantages of greenhouse covers that incorporate NIR reflectors. This survey focuses on how the cover type affects the transmittance of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), the reflectance or absorptance of NIR and the greenhouse air temperature. NIR-reflecting plastic films seem to be the most suitable, low cost and simple cover for greenhouses under arid conditions. Therefore, this review discusses how various additives should be incorporated in plastic film to increase its mechanical properties, durability and ability to stand up to extremely harsh weather. Presently, NIR-reflecting covers are able to reduce greenhouse air temperature by no more than 5°C. This reduction is not enough in regions where the ambient temperature may exceed 45°C in summer. There is a need to develop improved NIR-reflecting plastic film covers. PMID:22629223

  19. Covering materials incorporating radiation-preventing techniques to meet greenhouse cooling challenges in arid regions: a review.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghany, Ahmed M; Al-Helal, Ibrahim M; Alzahrani, Saeed M; Alsadon, Abdullah A; Ali, Ilias M; Elleithy, Rabeh M

    2012-01-01

    Cooling greenhouses is essential to provide a suitable environment for plant growth in arid regions characterized by brackish water resources. However, using conventional cooling methods are facing many challenges. Filtering out near infra-red radiation (NIR) at the greenhouse cover can significantly reduce the heating load and can solve the overheating problem of the greenhouse air. This paper is to review (i) the problems of using conventional cooling methods and (ii) the advantages of greenhouse covers that incorporate NIR reflectors. This survey focuses on how the cover type affects the transmittance of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), the reflectance or absorptance of NIR and the greenhouse air temperature. NIR-reflecting plastic films seem to be the most suitable, low cost and simple cover for greenhouses under arid conditions. Therefore, this review discusses how various additives should be incorporated in plastic film to increase its mechanical properties, durability and ability to stand up to extremely harsh weather. Presently, NIR-reflecting covers are able to reduce greenhouse air temperature by no more than 5 °C. This reduction is not enough in regions where the ambient temperature may exceed 45 °C in summer. There is a need to develop improved NIR-reflecting plastic film covers. PMID:22629223

  20. Advanced performance and scalability of Si nanowire field-effect transistors analyzed using noise spectroscopy and gamma radiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Vitusevich, S. A. Pud, S.; Offenhäusser, A.; Petrychuk, M. V.; Danilchenko, B. A.

    2013-11-28

    High-quality Si nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated using thermal nanoimprint and chemical wet etching technologies. FET structures of different lengths demonstrate high carrier mobility with values of about 750 cm{sup 2}/Vs and low volume densities of active traps in the dielectric layers of 5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} eV{sup −1}. We investigated the transport properties of these n-type channel structures using low-frequency noise spectroscopy before and after gamma radiation treatment. Before gamma irradiation, FET structures with lengths of less than 4 μm exhibited noise from contact regions with 1/(L{sup 2}) dependence for the relative 1/f noise. After gamma radiation, the spectra reflected the priority of channel noise with 1/L dependence for all samples. The transport characteristics show that the fabricated nanowire FETs improved scalability, decreased parameter scattering, and increased stability after treatment. The results demonstrate that these nanowire FETs are promising for nanoelectronic and biosensor applications due to the cost-efficient technology and advanced performance of FETs with improved stability and reliability.

  1. Loss of vascular fibrinolytic activity following irradiation of the liver - an aspect of late radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, B.W.; Bicher, H.I.; Johnson, R.J.

    1983-09-01

    The vascular fibrinolytic activity, known to originate from the endothelium, was studied histochemically by fibrinolysis autography in liver samples from beagles exposed to radiation treatment. Eighteen to thirty months prior to sacrifice, six dogs received x irradiation (4600 rad in 5 weeks) and three dogs received x irradiation plus aspirin (1 g/kg). Two dogs served as untreated controls. Control livers showed extensive fibrinolytic activity related to large and small vascular structures. The vascular fibrinolytic activity had been lost from all vessels except the major portal branches in five irradiated livers and was severaly diminished in three. One irradiated liver appeared to possess normal fibrinolytic activity.

  2. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-01

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion paths and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. This study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

  3. Experimental Study of Active Techniques for Blade/Vortex Interaction Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobiki, Noboru; Murashige, Atsushi; Tsuchihashi, Akihiko; Yamakawa, Eiichi

    This paper presents the experimental results of the effect of Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) and Active Flap on the Blade/Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise. Wind tunnel tests were performed with a 1-bladed rotor system to evaluate the simplified BVI phenomenon avoiding the complicated aerodynamic interference which is characteristically and inevitably caused by a multi-bladed rotor. Another merit to use this 1-bladed rotor system is that the several objective active techniques can be evaluated under the same condition installed in the same rotor system. The effects of the active techniques on the BVI noise reduction were evaluated comprehensively by the sound pressure, the blade/vortex miss distance obtained by Laser light Sheet (LLS), the blade surface pressure distribution and the tip vortex structure by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The correlation among these quantities to describe the effect of the active techniques on the BVI conditions is well obtained. The experiments show that the blade/vortex miss distance is more dominant for BVI noise than the other two BVI governing factors, such as blade lift and vortex strength at the moment of BVI.

  4. Mineral composition of TALDICE aeolian ice core dust by means of synchrotron radiation XAS and XRF techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelli, A.; Cibin, G.; Sala, M.; Hampai, D.; Maggi, V.; Marino, F.; Delmonte, B.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we present the first accurate non-destructive comparison of the mineral composition of atmospheric dusts contained in a deep ice core from Antarctica using synchrotron radiation. Different mineral assemblages reaching glaciated areas could be correlated to sources areas starting from the knowledge of the dust composition. In this investigation we demonstrate the possibility to characterize with SR the mineral composition of the dust in order to perform its geochemical characterization and to understand the pattern of the transport and the trajectories of the aerosol. This study has been focused on the elemental characterization and the identification of the iron oxidation state of aeolian Antarctic dust by means of synchrotron radiation X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy. A set of twelve ice samples from the TALDICE (TD, 72˚ 46'S, 159˚ 04'E, 2316 m a.s.l., mean accumulation rate 80 kg*m-2*yr-1) ice core, corresponding to the warm climatic period, Holocene, and to the cold climatic period, Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (MIS 3) have been measured. To obtain both the elemental composition and the iron oxidation state of the mineral dust we performed experiments on specially prepared samples at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) laboratory in the framework of the Proposal N.3082B. Actually, melted ice samples were filtered and then mineral particles were deposited onto Nuclepore polycarbonate membranes in a 1000 class clean room under a 100 class laminar flow bench for both XRF and XAS experiments. A dedicated HV experimental chamber, that allows performing different type of experimental technique on very low absorber concentration samples was developed and tested in Italy. The original experimental setup, including an in-vacuum sample micromanipulator and a special alignment and docking sample system was installed at the beamline 10-2 at SSRL. For the x-ray detection a 7 mm2 high sensitive Silicon Drift Detector was

  5. Technique for Configuring an Actively Cooled Thermal Shield in a Flight System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkfknecht, Peter; Mustafi, Shuvo

    2011-01-01

    Broad area cooling shields are a mass-efficient alternative to conductively cooled thermal radiation shielding. The shield would actively intercept a large portion of incident thermal radiation and transport the heat away using cryogenic helium gas. The design concept consists of a conductive and conformable surface that maximizes heat transfer and formability. Broad Area Cooled (BAC) shields could potentially provide considerable mass savings for spaceflight applications by eliminating the need for a rigid thermal radiation shield for cryogen tanks. The BAC consists of a network of capillary tubes that are thermally connected to a conductive shield material. Chilled helium gas is circulated through the network and transports unwanted heat away from the cryogen tanks. The cryogenic helium gas is pumped and chilled simultaneously using a specialized pulse-tube cryocooler, which further improves the mass efficiency of the system. By reducing the thermal environment temperature from 300 to 100 K, the radiative heat load on a cryogen tank could be reduced by an order of magnitude. For a cryogenic liquid propellant scenario of oxygen and hydrogen, the boiloff of hydrogen would be significantly reduced and completely eliminated for oxygen. A major challenge in implementing this technology on large tanks is that the BAC system must be easily scalable from lab demonstrations to full-scale missions. Also, the BAC shield must be conformable to complex shapes like spheres without losing the ability to maintain constant temperature throughout. The initial design maximizes thermal conductivity between the capillary tube and the conductive radiation shielding by using thin, corrugated aluminum foil with the tube running transverse to the folds. This configuration has the added benefit of enabling the foil to stretch and contract longitudinally. This allows the BAC to conform to the complex curvature of a cryogen tank, which is key to its success. To demonstrate a BAC shield

  6. Investigation of Essential Element Distribution in the Equine Metacarpophalangeal Joint using a Synchrotron Radiation Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kaabar, Wejdan; Gundogdu, O.; Attenburrow, D.; Bradley, D. A.; Tzaphlidou, M.; Janousch, M.

    2008-05-20

    In articular cartilage, Ca, P, K and S are among some of the well known co-factors of the metalloproteinases enzymatic family, the latter playing a pivotal role in the growth and degeneration of the collagenous bone-cartilage interface of articulating joints. Current study forms part of a larger investigation concerning the distribution of these and other key elements in such media. For the purpose of evaluating these low atomic number elements (Z{<=}20), use was made of the capabilities of the LUCIA Station, located at the synchrotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Using an incident radiation energy of 4.06 keV, a synchrotron radiation micro x-ray fluorescence (SR-{mu}XRF) technique was applied in examining the distribution of the essential elements Ca, P, K and S in the bone-cartilage interface of both healthy and diseased (osteoarthritic) areas of an equine metacarpophalangeal joint. The SR-{mu}XRF mappings and line profile patterns have revealed remarkable changes in both the pattern and absolute distributions of these elements, agreeing with the findings of others. The elemental presence shown in the individual area scans encompassing the lesion each reflect the visibly abraded outer surface of the cartilage and change in shape of the bone surface. One of the area scans for the bone-cartilage interface shows a marked change in both the pattern and absolute elemental presence for all three elements compared to that observed at two other scan sites. The observation of change in bone cartilage composition around the surface of the articulating joint is thought to be novel, the variation being almost certainly due to the differing weight-bearing role of the subchondral bone at each locati0008.

  7. Investigation of Essential Element Distribution in the Equine Metacarpophalangeal Joint using a Synchrotron Radiation Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaabar, Wejdan; Gundogdu, O.; Tzaphlidou, M.; Janousch, M.; Attenburrow, D.; Bradley, D. A.

    2008-05-01

    In articular cartilage, Ca, P, K and S are among some of the well known co-factors of the metalloproteinases enzymatic family, the latter playing a pivotal role in the growth and degeneration of the collagenous bone-cartilage interface of articulating joints. Current study forms part of a larger investigation concerning the distribution of these and other key elements in such media. For the purpose of evaluating these low atomic number elements (Z⩽20), use was made of the capabilities of the LUCIA Station, located at the synchrotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Using an incident radiation energy of 4.06 keV, a synchrotron radiation micro x-ray fluorescence (SR-μXRF) technique was applied in examining the distribution of the essential elements Ca, P, K and S in the bone-cartilage interface of both healthy and diseased (osteoarthritic) areas of an equine metacarpophalangeal joint. The SR-μXRF mappings and line profile patterns have revealed remarkable changes in both the pattern and absolute distributions of these elements, agreeing with the findings of others. The elemental presence shown in the individual area scans encompassing the lesion each reflect the visibly abraded outer surface of the cartilage and change in shape of the bone surface. One of the area scans for the bone-cartilage interface shows a marked change in both the pattern and absolute elemental presence for all three elements compared to that observed at two other scan sites. The observation of change in bone cartilage composition around the surface of the articulating joint is thought to be novel, the variation being almost certainly due to the differing weight-bearing role of the subchondral bone at each location.

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation on the blood brain barrier permeability to pharmacologically active substances

    SciTech Connect

    Trnovec, T.; Kallay, Z.; Bezek, S. )

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can impair the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB). Data on early and late damage after brain irradiation are usually reported separately, yet a gradual transition between these two types has become evident. Signs appearing within 3 weeks after irradiation are considered to be early manifestations. The mechanism of radiation-effected integrity impairment of the BBB is discussed in relation to changes in morphological structures forming the BBB, the endothelium of intracerebral vessels, and in the surrounding astrocytes. Alterations in the function of the BBB are manifested in the endothelium by changes in the ultrastructural location of the activity of phosphatases and by the activation of pinocytotic vesicular transport, and in astrocyte cytoplasm by glycogen deposition. The changes in ultrastructure were critically surveyed with regard to increasing doses of radiation to the brain in the range of 5 Gy to 960 Gy. The qualitative as well as the semiquantitative and quantitative observations on the passage of substances across the damaged BBB were treated separately. Qualitative changes are based mainly on findings of extravasation of vital stains and of labelled proteins. The quantitative studies established differences in radiation-induced changes in the permeability of the BBB depending on the structure and physico-chemical properties of the barrier penetrating tracers. Indirect evaluation of radiation-induced BBB changes is based on studies of pharmacological effects of substances acting on the CNS. In conclusion, radiation impairs significantly the integrity of the BBB following single irradiation of the brain with a dose exceeding 10-15 Gy. The response of the BBB to ionizing radiation is dependent both on the dose to which the brain is exposed and on specific properties of the tracer. 68 references.

  9. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  10. Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Akito; Izumi, Yudai; Ikenaga, Eiji; Ohkochi, Takuo; Kotsugi, Masato; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Muro, Takayuki; Kawabata, Akio; Murakami, Tomo; Nihei, Mizuhisa; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of the one-order-of-magnitude increase in the density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition process was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques. In the developed process, a Ti film is used as the underlayer for an Fe catalyst film. A characteristic point of this process is that C2H2 feeding for the catalyst starts at a low temperature of 450°C, whereas conventional feeding temperatures are ∼800°C. Photoemission spectroscopy using soft and hard X-rays revealed that the Ti underlayer reduced the initially oxidized Fe layer at 450°C. A photoemission intensity analysis also suggested that the oxidized Ti layer at 450°C behaved as a support for nanoparticle formation of the reduced Fe, which is required for dense CNT growth. In fact, a CNT growth experiment, where the catalyst chemical state was monitored in situ by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, showed that the reduced Fe yielded a CNT forest at 450°C. Contrarily, an Fe layer without the Ti underlayer did not yield such a CNT forest at 450°C. Photoemission electron microscopy showed that catalyst annealing at the conventional feeding temperature of 800°C caused excess catalyst agglomeration, which should lead to sparse CNTs. In conclusion, in the developed growth process, the low-temperature catalyst activation by the Ti underlayer before the excess Fe agglomeration realised the CNT densification. PMID:25075343

  11. Recording sympathetic nerve activity chronically in rats: surgery techniques, assessment of nerve activity, and quantification

    PubMed Central

    Muntzel, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system plays a pivotal role in homeostasis through its direct innervation and functional impact on a variety of end organs. In rats, a number of methods are available to assess sympathetic nervous system function. Traditionally, direct recording of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) has been restricted to acute, anesthetized preparations or conscious animals within a few days after electrode implantation. However, these approaches provide short-term data in studies designed to investigate changes in SNA during chronic disease states. Over the last several years, chronic SNA recording has been pioneered in rabbits and more recently in rats. The purpose of this article is to provide insights and a “how to” guide for chronic SNA recordings in rats based on experiences from two independent laboratories. We will present common methodologies used to chronically record SNA, characteristics and methods to distinguish sympathetic bursts versus electrical artifacts (and provide corresponding audio clips when available), and provide suggestions for analysis and presentation of data. In many instances, these same guidelines are applicable to acute SNA recordings. Using the surgical approaches described herein, both laboratories have been able to chronically record SNA in >50% of rats for a duration >3 wk. The ability to record SNA over the time course of several weeks will, undoubtedly, greatly impact the field of autonomic and cardiovascular physiology. PMID:24014674

  12. Recent Experience Using Active Love Wave Techniques to Characterize Seismographic Station Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. J.; Yong, A.; Salomone, L.

    2014-12-01

    Active-source Love waves recorded by the multi-channel analysis of surface wave (MASLW) technique were recently analyzed in two site characterization projects. Between 2010 and 2011, the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded GEOVision to conduct geophysical investigations at 189 seismographic stations—185 in California and 4 in the Central Eastern U.S. (CEUS). The original project plan was to utilize active and passive Rayleigh wave-based techniques to obtain shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles to a minimum depth of 30 m and the time-averaged VS of the upper 30 meters (VS30). Early in the investigation it became evident that Rayleigh wave techniques, such as multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASRW), were not effective at characterizing all sites. Shear-wave seismic refraction and MASLW techniques were therefore applied. The MASLW technique was deployed at a total of 38 sites, in addition to other methods, and used as the primary technique to characterize 22 sites, 5 of which were also characterized using Rayleigh wave techniques. In 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute funded characterization of 33 CEUS station sites. Based on experience from the ARRA investigation, both MASRW and MASLW data were acquired by GEOVision at 24 CEUS sites—the remaining 9 sites and 2 overlapping sites were characterized by University of Texas, Austin. Of the 24 sites characterized by GEOVision, 16 were characterized using MASLW data, 4 using both MASLW and MASRW data and 4 using MASRW data. Love wave techniques were often found to perform better, or at least yield phase velocity data that could be more readily modeled using the fundamental mode assumption, at shallow rock sites, sites with steep velocity gradients, and, sites with a thin, low velocity, surficial soil layer overlying stiffer sediments. These types of velocity structure often excite dominant higher modes in Rayleigh wave data, but not in Love wave data. At such sites, it may be possible

  13. Application of Avco data analysis and prediction techniques (ADAPT) to prediction of sunspot activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, H. E.; Amato, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of the application of Avco Data Analysis and Prediction Techniques (ADAPT) to derivation of new algorithms for the prediction of future sunspot activity. The ADAPT derived algorithms show a factor of 2 to 3 reduction in the expected 2-sigma errors in the estimates of the 81-day running average of the Zurich sunspot numbers. The report presents: (1) the best estimates for sunspot cycles 20 and 21, (2) a comparison of the ADAPT performance with conventional techniques, and (3) specific approaches to further reduction in the errors of estimated sunspot activity and to recovery of earlier sunspot historical data. The ADAPT programs are used both to derive regression algorithm for prediction of the entire 11-year sunspot cycle from the preceding two cycles and to derive extrapolation algorithms for extrapolating a given sunspot cycle based on any available portion of the cycle.

  14. Active-passive correlation spectroscopy - A new technique for identifying ocean color algorithm spectral regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    A new active-passive airborne data correlation technique has been developed which allows the validation of existing in-water oceoan color algorithms and the rapid search, identification, and evaluation of new sensor band locations and algorithm wavelength intervals. Thus far, applied only in conjunction with the spectral curvature algorithm (SCA), the active-passive correlation spectroscopy (APCS) technique shows that (1) the usual 490-nm (center-band) chlorophyll SCA could satisfactorily be placed anywhere within the nominal 460-510-nm interval, and (2) two other spectral regions, 645-660 and 680-695 nm, show considerable promise for chlorophyll pigment measurement. Additionally, the APCS method reveals potentially useful wavelength regions (at 600 and about 670 nm) of very low chlorophyll-in-water spectral curvature into which accessory pigment algorithms for phycoerythrin might be carefully positioned. In combination, the APCS and SCA methods strongly suggest that significant information content resides within the seemingly featureless ocean color spectrum.

  15. Figure analysis: A teaching technique to promote visual literacy and active Learning.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Amy M

    2016-07-01

    Learning often improves when active learning techniques are used in place of traditional lectures. For many of these techniques, however, students are expected to apply concepts that they have already grasped. A challenge, therefore, is how to incorporate active learning into the classroom of courses with heavy content, such as molecular-based biology courses. An additional challenge is that visual literacy is often overlooked in undergraduate science education. To address both of these challenges, a technique called figure analysis was developed and implemented in three different levels of undergraduate biology courses. Here, students learn content while gaining practice in interpreting visual information by discussing figures with their peers. Student groups also make connections between new and previously learned concepts on their own while in class. The instructor summarizes the material for the class only after students grapple with it in small groups. Students reported a preference for learning by figure analysis over traditional lecture, and female students in particular reported increased confidence in their analytical abilities. There is not a technology requirement for this technique; therefore, it may be utilized both in classrooms and in nontraditional spaces. Additionally, the amount of preparation required is comparable to that of a traditional lecture. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):336-344, 2016. PMID:26891952

  16. Differential activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases following high and low LET radiation in murine macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Narang, Himanshi; Bhat, Nagesh; Gupta, S K; Santra, S; Choudhary, R K; Kailash, S; Krishna, Malini

    2009-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases have been shown to respond to various stimuli including cytokines, mitogens and gamma irradiation, leading to cell proliferation, differentiation, or death. The duration of their activation determines the specificity of response to each stimulus in various cells. In this study, the crucial intracellular kinases, ERK, JNK, and p38 kinase involved in cell survival, death, or damage and repair were examined for their activity in RAW 264.7 cells at various time points after irradiation with 2 Gy doses of proton ions or X-rays. This is the first report that shows that the MAPK signaling induced after heavy ion or X-ray exposure is not the same. Unlike gamma irradiation, there was prolonged but marginal activation of prosurvival ERK pathway and significant activation of proapoptotic p38 pathway in response to high LET radiation. PMID:19112558

  17. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 5: Integrated radiator/expendable cooling system tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheps, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to gather data on a space shuttle active control system (ATCS) incorporating both radiators and an expendable cooling device to provide vehicle heat removal. Two systems were tested and design information was provided for both nominal and limit conditions. The tests verified the concept that an integrated radiator/expendable cooling system can adequately maintain desired water quantities while responding to variations in heat loads and environments. In addition, the need for duct heating was demonstrated, while exhaust nozzle heating was also shown to be unnecessary.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  19. Cooking techniques improve the levels of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity in kale and red cabbage.

    PubMed

    Murador, Daniella Carisa; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; de Rosso, Veridiana Vera

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different home cooking techniques (boiling, steaming, and stir-frying) in kale and red cabbage, on the levels of bioactive compounds (carotenoids, anthocyanins and phenolic compounds) determined by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array and mass spectrometry detectors (HPLC-DAD-MS(n)), and on the antioxidant activity evaluated by ABTS, ORAC and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assays. The steaming technique resulted in a significant increase in phenolic content in kale (86.1%; p<0.001) whereas in red cabbage it was significantly reduced (34.6%; p<0.001). In the kale, steaming resulted in significant increases in antioxidant activity levels in all of the evaluation methods. In the red cabbage, boiling resulted in a significant increase in antioxidant activity using the ABTS assay but resulted in a significant decrease using the ORAC assay. According to the CAA assay, the stir-fried sample displayed the highest levels of antioxidant activity. PMID:26593594

  20. Component greenhouse gas fluxes and radiative balance from two deltaic marshes in Louisiana: Pairing chamber techniques and eddy covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Cormier, Nicole; Moss, Rebecca F.; Johnson, Darren J.; Neubauer, Scott C.; Raynie, Richard C.

    2016-06-01

    Coastal marshes take up atmospheric CO2 while emitting CO2, CH4, and N2O. This ability to sequester carbon (C) is much greater for wetlands on a per area basis than from most ecosystems, facilitating scientific, political, and economic interest in their value as greenhouse gas sinks. However, the greenhouse gas balance of Gulf of Mexico wetlands is particularly understudied. We describe the net ecosystem exchange (NEEc) of CO2 and CH4 using eddy covariance (EC) in comparison with fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O using chambers from brackish and freshwater marshes in Louisiana, USA. From EC, we found that 182 g C m-2 yr-1 was lost through NEEc from the brackish marsh. Of this, 11 g C m-2 yr-1 resulted from net CH4 emissions and the remaining 171 g C m-2 yr-1 resulted from net CO2 emissions. In contrast, -290 g C m2 yr-1 was taken up through NEEc by the freshwater marsh, with 47 g C m-2 yr-1 emitted as CH4 and -337 g C m-2 yr-1 taken up as CO2. From chambers, we discovered that neither site had large fluxes of N2O. Sustained-flux greenhouse gas accounting metrics indicated that both marshes had a positive (warming) radiative balance, with the brackish marsh having a substantially greater warming effect than the freshwater marsh. That net respiratory emissions of CO2 and CH4 as estimated through chamber techniques were 2-4 times different from emissions estimated through EC requires additional understanding of the artifacts created by different spatial and temporal sampling footprints between techniques.

  1. Rapidly rendering cells phagocytic through a cell surface display technique and concurrent Rac activation.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Hiroki; Komatsu, Toru; Arita, Makoto; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Nagano, Tetsuo; Inoue, Takanari

    2014-07-15

    Cell surfaces represent a platform through which extracellular signals that determine diverse cellular processes, including migration, division, adhesion, and phagocytosis, are transduced. Techniques to rapidly reconfigure the surface properties of living cells should thus offer the ability to harness these cellular functions. Although the molecular mechanism of phagocytosis is well characterized, the minimal molecular players that are sufficient to activate this elaborate process remain elusive. We developed and implemented a technique to present a molecule of interest at the cell surface in an inducible manner on a time scale of minutes. We simultaneously induced the cell surface display of the C2 domain of milk fat globule epidermal growth factor factor 8 (MFG-E8) and activated the intracellular small guanosine triphosphatase Rac, which stimulates actin polymerization at the cell periphery. The C2 domain binds to phosphatidylserine, a lipid exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells. By integrating the stimulation of these two processes, we converted HeLa cells into a phagocytic cell line that bound to and engulfed apoptotic human Jurkat cells. Inducing either the cell surface display of the C2 domain or activating Rac alone was not sufficient to stimulate phagocytosis, which suggests that attachment to the target cell and actin reorganization together constitute the minimal molecular events that are needed to induce phagocytosis. This cell surface display technique might be useful as part of a targeted, cell-based therapy in which unwanted cells with characteristic surface molecules could be rapidly consumed by engineered cells. PMID:25028719

  2. Rapidly rendering cells phagocytic through a cell-surface display technique and concurrent Rac activation

    PubMed Central

    Onuma, Hiroki; Arita, Makoto; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Cell surfaces represent a platform through which extracellular signals that determine diverse cellular processes, including migration, division, adhesion, and phagocytosis, are transduced. Techniques to rapidly reconfigure the surface properties of living cells should thus offer the ability to harness these cellular functions. Although the molecular mechanism of phagocytosis is well-characterized, the minimal molecular players that are sufficient to activate this elaborate process remain elusive. We developed and implemented a technique to present a molecule of interest at the cell surface in an inducible manner on a timescale of minutes. We simultaneously induced the cell-surface display of the C2 domain of milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) and activated the intracellular small guanosine triphosphatase Rac, which stimulates actin polymerization at the cell periphery. The C2 domain binds to phosphatidylserine, a lipid exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells. By integrating the stimulation of these two processes, we converted HeLa cells into a phagocytic cell line that bound to and engulfed apoptotic human Jurkat cells. Inducing either the cell-surface display of the C2 domain or activating Rac alone was not sufficient to stimulate phagocytosis, which suggests that attachment to the target cell and actin reorganization together constitute the minimal molecular events that are needed to induce phagocytosis. This cell-surface display technique might be useful as part of a targeted, cell-based therapy in which unwanted cells with characteristic surface molecules could be rapidly consumed by engineered cells. PMID:25028719

  3. A New Active Cavitation Mapping Technique for Pulsed HIFU Applications – Bubble Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Hwang, Joo Ha; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new active cavitation mapping technique for pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) applications termed bubble Doppler is proposed and its feasibility tested in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. pHIFU therapy uses short pulses, delivered at low pulse repetition frequency, to cause transient bubble activity that has been shown to enhance drug and gene delivery to tissues. The current gold standard for detecting and monitoring cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments is passive cavitation detection (PCD), which provides minimal information on the spatial distribution of the bubbles. B-mode imaging can detect hyperecho formation, but has very limited sensitivity, especially to small, transient microbubbles. The bubble Doppler method proposed here is based on a fusion of the adaptations of three Doppler techniques that had been previously developed for imaging of ultrasound contrast agents – color Doppler, pulse inversion Doppler, and decorrelation Doppler. Doppler ensemble pulses were interleaved with therapeutic pHIFU pulses using three different pulse sequences and standard Doppler processing was applied to the received echoes. The information yielded by each of the techniques on the distribution and characteristics of pHIFU-induced cavitation bubbles was evaluated separately, and found to be complementary. The unified approach - bubble Doppler – was then proposed to both spatially map the presence of transient bubbles and to estimate their sizes and the degree of nonlinearity. PMID:25265178

  4. An activated fluid stream--New techniques for cold water cleaning.

    PubMed

    Birkin, Peter R; Offin, Douglas G; Leighton, Timothy G

    2016-03-01

    Electrochemical, acoustic and imaging techniques are used to characterise surface cleaning with particular emphasis on the understanding of the key phenomena relevant to surface cleaning. A range of novel techniques designed to enhance and monitor the effective cleaning of a solid/liquid interface is presented. Among the techniques presented, mass transfer of material to a sensor embedded in a surface is demonstrated to be useful in the further exploration of ultrasonic cleaning of high aspect ratio micropores. In addition the effect of micropore size on the cleaning efficacy is demonstrated. The design and performance of a new cleaning system reliant on the activation of bubbles within a free flowing stream is presented. This device utilised acoustic activation of bubbles within the stream and at a variety of substrates. Finally, a controlled bubble swarm is generated in the stream using electrolysis, and its effect on both acoustic output and cleaning performance are compared to the case when no bubbles are added. This will demonstrate the active role that the electrochemically generated bubble swarm can have in extending the spatial zone over which cleaning is achieved. PMID:26522990

  5. Activities in connection with quality assurance in radiation therapy performed in Argentina: physical aspects.

    PubMed

    González, R O

    1984-06-01

    Quality assurance in radiotherapy is performed in different ways in Argentina than in other countries. A part of this program is carried out by the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL-WHO/IAEA), which is a part of the Atomic Energy Commission. This laboratory organizes TLD postal intercomparison; calibrates and checks radiotherapy units and dosimeters; gives education in the physics of radiotherapy; has collaborated in the production of rules for the operation of radiation therapy units and maintains the application of these rules. Other activities in connection with quality assurance, such as personnel, dosimetry, radiation surveys or those related to treatment planning are performed by other groups of the Atomic Energy Commission, by other institutions or by people working in radiotherapy centers. A description of the activities of the SSDL and a brief explanation about the other activities, the present situation and future plans are discussed. PMID:6735801

  6. Neutron radiation can activate K-ras via a point mutation in codon 146 and induces a different spectrum of ras mutations than does gamma radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, S R; Newcomb, E W; Pellicer, A

    1990-01-01

    Neutron radiation is known to produce tumors in animals and cause cell transformation. We have developed a protocol to efficiently induce thymic lymphomas in RF/J mice by a single acute dose of neutron irradiation. Activated ras genes were detected in 17% (4 of 24) of the tumors analyzed. One of the tumors contained a K-ras gene activated by a point mutation in codon 146. Activating ras mutations at position 146 have not been previously detected in any known human or animal tumors. The spectrum of ras mutations detected in neutron radiation-induced thymic lymphomas was different from that seen in thymic lymphomas induced by gamma radiation in the same strain of mice. These results may have important implications for the mechanisms by which different types of radiation damage DNA. Images PMID:2403644

  7. Soil zymography - A novel technique for mapping enzyme activity in the rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, Marie

    2014-05-01

    The effect plant roots on microbial activity in soil at the millimeter scale is poorly understood. One reason for this is that spatially explicit methods for the study of microbial activity in soil are limited. Here we present a quantitative in situ technique for mapping the distribution of exoenzymes in soil along with some results about the effects of roots on exoenzyme activity in soil. In the first study we showed that both acid and alkaline phosphatase activity were up to 5.4-times larger in the rhizosphere of Lupinus albus than in the bulk soil. While acid phosphatase activity (produced by roots and microorganisms) was closely associated with roots, alkaline phosphatase activity (produced only by microorganisms) was more widely distributed, leading to a 2.5-times larger area of activity of alkaline than of acid phosphatase. These results indicate a spatial differentiation of different ecophysiological groups of organic phosphorus mineralizing organisms in the rhizosphere which might alleviate a potential competition for phosphorus between them. In a second study cellulase, chitinase and phosphatase activities were analyzed in the presence of living Lupinus polyphyllus roots and dead/dying roots (in the same soils 10, 20 and 30 days after cutting the L. polyphyllus shoots). The activity of all three enzymes was 9.0 to 13.9-times higher at the living roots compared to the bulk soil. Microhotspots of cellulase, chitinase and phosphatase activity in the soil were found up to 60 mm away from the living roots. 10 days after shoot cutting, the areas of high activities of cellulase and phosphatase activity were extend up to 55 mm away from the next root, while the extension of the area of chitinase activity did not change significantly. At the root, cellulase and chitinase activity increased first at the root tips after shoot cutting and showed maximal activity 20 days after shoot cutting. The number and activity of microhotspots of chitinase activity was maximal 10

  8. High NOTCH activity induces radiation resistance in non small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Habets, Roger; Span, Paul; Dubois, Ludwig; Paesmans, Kim; Kattenbeld, Bo; Cleutjens, Jack; Groot, Arjan J.; Schuurbiers, Olga C.J.; Lambin, Philippe; Bussink, Jan; Vooijs, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Patients with advanced NSCLC have survival rates <15%. The NOTCH pathway plays an important role during lung development and physiology but is often deregulated in lung cancer, making it a potential therapeutic target. We investigated NOTCH signaling in NSCLC and hypothesized that high NOTCH activity contributes to radiation resistance. Materials and methods NOTCH signaling in NSCLC patient samples was investigated using quantitative RT-PCR. H460 NSCLC cells with either high or blocked NOTCH activity were generated and their radiation sensitivity monitored using clonogenic assays. In vivo, xenograft tumors were irradiated and response assessed using growth delay. Microenvironmental parameters were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Results Patients with high NOTCH activity in tumors showed significantly worse disease-free survival. In vitro, NOTCH activity did not affect the proliferation or intrinsic radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells. In contrast, xenografts with blocked NOTCH activity grew slower than wild type tumors. Tumors with high NOTCH activity grew significantly faster, were more hypoxic and showed a radioresistant phenotype. Conclusions We demonstrate an important role for NOTCH in tumor growth and correlate high NOTCH activity with poor prognosis and radioresistance. Blocking NOTCH activity in NSCLC might be a promising intervention to improve outcome after radiotherapy. PMID:23891097

  9. A framework for the implementation of new radiation therapy technologies and treatment techniques in low-income countries.

    PubMed

    Brown, Derek W; Shulman, Adam; Hudson, Alana; Smith, Wendy; Fisher, Brandon; Hollon, Jon; Pipman, Yakov; Van Dyk, Jacob; Einck, John

    2014-11-01

    We present a practical, generic, easy-to-use framework for the implementation of new radiation therapy technologies and treatment techniques in low-income countries. The framework is intended to standardize the implementation process, reduce the effort involved in generating an implementation strategy, and provide improved patient safety by reducing the likelihood that steps are missed during the implementation process. The 10 steps in the framework provide a practical approach to implementation. The steps are, 1) Site and resource assessment, 2) Evaluation of equipment and funding, 3) Establishing timelines, 4) Defining the treatment process, 5) Equipment commissioning, 6) Training and competency assessment, 7) Prospective risk analysis, 8) System testing, 9) External dosimetric audit and incident learning, and 10) Support and follow-up. For each step, practical advice for completing the step is provided, as well as links to helpful supplementary material. An associated checklist is provided that can be used to track progress through the steps in the framework. While the emphasis of this paper is on addressing the needs of low-income countries, the concepts also apply in high-income countries. PMID:25096162

  10. Insights into metals in individual fine particles from municipal solid waste using synchrotron radiation-based micro-analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yumin; Zhang, Hua; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2015-01-01

    Excessive inter-contamination with heavy metals hampers the application of biological treatment products derived from mixed or mechanically-sorted municipal solid waste (MSW). In this study, we investigated fine particles of <2mm, which are small fractions in MSW but constitute a significant component of the total heavy metal content, using bulk detection techniques. A total of 17 individual fine particles were evaluated using synchrotron radiation-based micro-X-ray fluorescence and micro-X-ray diffraction. We also discussed the association, speciation and source apportionment of heavy metals. Metals were found to exist in a diffuse distribution with heterogeneous intensities and intense hot-spots of <10 μm within the fine particles. Zn-Cu, Pb-Fe and Fe-Mn-Cr had significant correlations in terms of spatial distribution. The overlapped enrichment, spatial association, and the mineral phases of metals revealed the potential sources of fine particles from size-reduced waste fractions (such as scraps of organic wastes or ceramics) or from the importation of other particles. The diverse sources of heavy metal pollutants within the fine particles suggested that separate collection and treatment of the biodegradable waste fraction (such as food waste) is a preferable means of facilitating the beneficial utilization of the stabilized products. PMID:25597689

  11. NASA Crew Personal Active Dosimeters (CPADs): Leveraging Novel Terrestrial Personal Radiation Monitoring Capabilities for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitgab, Martin; Semones, Edward; Lee, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) is developing novel Crew Personal Active Dosimeters (CAPDs) for upcoming crewed space exploration missions and beyond. To reduce the resource footprint of the project a COTS dosimeter base is used for the development of CPADs. This base was identified from evaluations of existing COTS personal dosimeters against the concept of operations of future crewed missions and tests against detection requirements for radiation characteristic of the space environment. CPADs exploit operations efficiencies from novel features for space flight personal dosimeters such as real-time dose feedback, and autonomous measuring and data transmission capabilities. Preliminary CPAD design, results of radiation testing and aspects of operational integration will be presented.

  12. Activated barrier crossing dynamics in the non-radiative decay of NADH and NADPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacker, Thomas S.; Marsh, Richard J.; Duchen, Michael R.; Bain, Angus J.

    2013-08-01

    In live tissue, alterations in metabolism induce changes in the fluorescence decay of the biological coenzyme NAD(P)H, the mechanism of which is not well understood. In this work, the fluorescence and anisotropy decay dynamics of NADH and NADPH were investigated as a function of viscosity in a range of water-glycerol solutions. The viscosity dependence of the non-radiative decay is well described by Kramers and Kramers-Hubbard models of activated barrier crossing over a wide viscosity range. Our combined lifetime and anisotropy analysis indicates common mechanisms of non-radiative relaxation in the two emitting states (conformations) of both molecules. The low frequencies associated with barrier crossing suggest that non-radiative decay is mediated by small scale motion (e.g. puckering) of the nicotinamide ring. Variations in the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and NADPH when bound to different enzymes may therefore be attributed to differing levels of conformational restriction upon binding.

  13. Radiative transfer theory for active remote sensing of a layer of nonspherical particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, L.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied to calculate the scattering by a layer of randomly positioned and oriented nonspherical particles. The scattering amplitude functions of each individual particle are calculated with Waterman's T matrix method, which utilizes vector spherical wave functions for expansion of incident, scattered, and surface fields. The orientation of the particles is described by a probability density function of the Eulerian angles of rotation. A rotation matrix is used to relate the T matrix of the principal frame to that of the natural frame of the particle. The extinction matrix and phase matrix of the radiative transfer equations are expressed in terms of the T matrix elements. The extinction matrix for nonspherical particles is generally nondiagonal. There are only two attenuation rates in a specified direction of propagation. The radiative transfer equations are solved by an iterative method to first order in albedo. Numerical results are illustrated as functions of incidence angle and frequency with applications to active remote sensing.

  14. Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol-gel and rf-sputtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Alombert-Goget, G.; Armellini, C.; Berneschi, S.; Bhaktha, S. N. B.; Boulard, B.; Brenci, M.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Duverger-Arfuso, C.; Féron, P.; Gonçalves, R. R.; Jestin, Y.; Minati, L.; Moser, E.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Rao, D. N.; Retoux, R.; Righini, G. C.; Speranza, G.

    2009-05-01

    The realization of photonic structures operating at visible and near infrared frequencies is a highly attractive scientific and technological challenge. Since optical fiber innovation, a huge of activity has been performed leading to interesting results, such as optical waveguides and planar lightwave circuits, microphotonic devices, optical microcavities, nanowires, plasmonic structures, and photonic crystals. These systems have opened new possibilities in the field of both basic and applied physics, in a large area covering Information Communication Technologies, Health and Biology, Structural Engineering, and Environment Monitoring Systems. Several materials and techniques are employed to successfully fabricate photonic structures. Concerning materials, Er3+-activated silica-based glasses still play an important role, although recently interesting results have been published about fluoride glass-ceramic waveguides. As far as regards the fabrication methods sol-gel route and rf sputtering have proved to be versatile and reliable techniques. In this article we will present a review of some Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol gel route and rf sputtering deposition. In the discussion on the sol-gel approach we focus our attention on the silica-hafnia binary system presenting an overview concerning fabrication protocols and structural, optical and spectroscopic assessment of SiO2-HfO2 waveguides activated by Er3+ ions. In order to put in evidence the reliability and versatility of the sol-gel route for photonics applications four different confined structures are briefly presented: amorphous waveguides, coated microspheres, monolithic waveguide laser, and core-shell nanospheres. As examples of rf sputtering technique, we will discuss Er3+-activated silica-hafnia and silica-germania waveguides, the latter system allowing fabrication of integrated optics structures by UV photo-imprinting. Finally, two examples of photonic crystal structures, one

  15. Introduction to Radiation Issues for International Space Station Extravehicular Activities. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Saganti, P. B.; Miller, J.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides significant challenges for radiation protection of the crew due to a combination of circumstances including: the extended duration of missions for many crewmembers, the exceptionally dynamic nature of the radiation environment in ISS orbit, and the necessity for numerous planned extravehicular activities (EVA) for station construction and maintenance. Radiation protection requires accurate radiation dose measurements and precise risk modeling of the transmission of high fluxes of energetic electrons and protons through the relatively thin shielding provided by the space suits worn during EVA. Experiments and analyses have been performed due to the necessity to assure complete radiation safety for the EVA crew and thereby ensure mission success. The detailed characterization described of the material and topological properties of the ISS space suits can be used as a basis for design of space suits used in future exploration missions. In radiation protection practices, risk from exposure to ionizing radiation is determined analytically by the level of exposure, the detrimental quality of the radiation field, the inherent radiosensitivity of the tissues or organs irradiated, and the age and gender of the person at the time of exposure. During low Earth orbit (LEO) EVA, the relatively high fluxes of low-energy electrons and protons lead to large variations in exposure of the skin, lens of the eye, and tissues in other shallow anatomical locations. The technical papers in this publication describe a number of ground-based experiments that precisely measure the thickness of the NASA extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and Russian Zvezda Orlan-M suits using medical computerized tomography (CT) X-ray analysis, and particle accelerator experiments that measure the minimum kinetic energy required by electrons and photons to penetrate major components of the suits. These studies provide information necessary for improving the

  16. Blueberry anthocyanins ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury through the protein kinase RNA-activated pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunen; Tan, Dehong; Tong, Changci; Zhang, Yubiao; Xu, Ying; Liu, Xinwei; Gao, Yan; Hou, Mingxiao

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of blueberry anthocyanins (BA) on radiation-induced lung injury and investigate the mechanism of action. Seven days after BA(20 and 80 mg/kg/d)administration, 6 weeks old male Sprague-Dawley rats rats were irradiated by LEKTA precise linear accelerator at a single dose of 20 Gy only once. and the rats were continuously treated with BA for 4 weeks. Moreover, human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiC) were transfected with either control-siRNA or siRNA targeting protein kinase R (PKR). Cells were then irradiated and treated with 75 μg/mL BA for 72 h. The results showed that BA significantly ameliorated radiation-induced lung inflammation, lung collagen deposition, apoptosis and PKR expression and activation. In vitro, BA significantly protected cells from radiation-induced cell death through modulating expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3. Suppression of PKR by siRNA resulted in ablation of BA protection on radiation-induced cell death and modulation of anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic proteins, as well as Caspase-3 expression. These findings suggest that BA is effective in ameliorating radiation-induced lung injury, likely through the PKR signaling pathway. PMID:26551926

  17. Quantitation of microbicidal activity of mononuclear phagocytes: an in vitro technique.

    PubMed

    Rege, N N; Dahanukar, S A

    1993-01-01

    An in vitro assay technique was set up to determine the phagocytic and microbicidal activity of a monocyte-macrophage cell line using Candida species as test organisms. The norms were determined for the activity of peritoneal macrophages of rats (24.69 +/- 2.6% phagocytosis and 35.4 +/- 5.22% ICK) and human (27.89 +/- 3.63% phagocytosis and 50.91 +/- 6.3% ICK). The assay technique was used to test the degree of activation of macrophages induced by metronidazole, Tinospora cordifolia and Asparaqus racemousus and to compare their effects with a standard immunomodulator muramyl-dipeptide. All the three test agents increased the phagocytic and killing capacity of macrophages in a dose dependent manner upto a certain dose, beyond which either these activities were found to have plateaued or decreased. The optimal doses for MDP, Metronidazole, Asparagus racemosus and Tinospora cordifolia were found to be 100 micrograms, 300 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg respectively. Patients with cirrhosis were screened for defects in monocyte function. The depressed monocyte function (20.58 +/- 5% phago and 41.24 +/- 12.19% ICK; P < 0.05) was observed indicating a compromised host defense. The utility of this candidicidal assay in experimental and clinical studies is discussed. PMID:8295140

  18. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for pancreatic and prostate cancer using pulsed low–dose rate delivery techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Kang, Shengwei; Lin, Mu-han; Chen, Xiaoming; Chen, Fu; Guo, Ming; Chen, Lili; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Reirradiation of patients who were previously treated with radiotherapy is vastly challenging. Pulsed low–dose rate (PLDR) external beam radiotherapy has the potential to reduce normal tissue toxicities while providing significant tumor control for recurrent cancers. This work investigates treatment planning techniques for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-based PLDR treatment of various sites, including cases with pancreatic and prostate cancer. A total of 20 patients with clinical recurrence were selected for this study, including 10 cases with pancreatic cancer and 10 with prostate cancer. Large variations in the target volume were included to test the ability of IMRT using the existing treatment planning system and optimization algorithm to deliver uniform doses in individual gantry angles/fields for PLDR treatments. Treatment plans were generated with 10 gantry angles using the step-and-shoot IMRT delivery technique, which can be delivered in 3-minute intervals to achieve an effective low dose rate of 6.7 cGy/min. Instead of dose constraints on critical structures, ring structures were mainly used in PLDR-IMRT optimization. In this study, the PLDR-IMRT plans were compared with the PLDR-3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) plans and the PLDR-RapidArc plans. For the 10 cases with pancreatic cancer that were investigated, the mean planning target volume (PTV) dose for each gantry angle in the PLDR-IMRT plans ranged from 17.6 to 22.4 cGy. The maximum doses ranged between 22.9 and 34.8 cGy. The minimum doses ranged from 8.2 to 17.5 cGy. For the 10 cases with prostate cancer that were investigated, the mean PTV doses for individual gantry angles ranged from 18.8 to 22.6 cGy. The maximum doses per gantry angle were between 24.0 and 34.7 cGy. The minimum doses per gantry angle ranged from 4.4 to 17.4 cGy. A significant reduction in the organ at risk (OAR) dose was observed with the PLDR-IMRT plan when compared with that using the PLDR-3DCRT

  19. Nrf2 activation protects against solar-simulated ultraviolet radiation in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Knatko, Elena V.; Ibbotson, Sally H.; Zhang, Ying; Higgins, Maureen; Fahey, Jed W.; Talalay, Paul; Dawe, Robert S.; Ferguson, James; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Clarke, Rosemary; Zheng, Suqing; Saito, Akira; Kalra, Sukirti; Benedict, Andrea L.; Honda, Tadashi; Proby, Charlotte M.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Nrf2 determines the ability to adapt and survive under conditions of electrophilic, oxidative and inflammatory stress by regulating the expression of elaborate networks comprising nearly 500 genes encoding proteins with versatile cytoprotective functions. In mice, disruption of Nrf2 increases susceptibility to carcinogens and accelerates disease pathogenesis. Paradoxically, Nrf2 is upregulated in established human tumors, but whether this upregulation drives carcinogenesis is not known. Here we show that the incidence, multiplicity and burden of solar-simulated UV radiation-mediated cutaneous tumors that form in SKH-1 hairless mice in which Nrf2 is genetically constitutively activated, are lower than those that arise in their wild-type counterparts. Pharmacological Nrf2 activation by topical bi-weekly applications of small (40 nmol) quantities of the potent bis(cyano enone) inducer TBE-31 has a similar protective effect against solar-simulated UV radiation in animals receiving long-term treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine. Genetic or pharmacological Nrf2 activation lowers the expression of the pro-inflammatory factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β, and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 after acute exposure of mice to UV radiation. In healthy human subjects, topical applications of extracts delivering the Nrf2 activator sulforaphane, reduced the degree of solar-simulated UV radiation-induced skin erythema, a quantifiable surrogate end-point for cutaneous damage and skin cancer risk. Collectively, these data show that Nrf2 is not a driver for tumorigenesis even upon exposure to a very potent and complete carcinogen, and strongly suggest that the frequent activation of Nrf2 in established human tumors is a marker of metabolic adaptation. PMID:25804610

  20. Active Path Selection of Fluid Microcapsules in Artificial Blood Vessel by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kohji; Muramatsu, Yusuke; Ueda, Sawami; Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakayashiki, Yusuke; Ishihara, Ken

    2009-07-01

    Micrometer-sized microcapsules collapse upon exposure to ultrasound. Use of this phenomenon for a drug delivery system (DDS), not only for local delivery of medication but also for gene therapy, should be possible. However, enhancing the efficiency of medication is limited because capsules in suspension diffuse in the human body after injection, since the motion of capsules in blood flow cannot be controlled. To control the behavior of microcapsules, acoustic radiation force was introduced. We detected local changes in microcapsule density by producing acoustic radiation force in an artificial blood vessel. Furthermore, we theoretically estimated the conditions required for active path selection of capsules at a bifurcation point in the artificial blood vessel. We observed the difference in capsule density at both in the bifurcation point and in alternative paths downstream of the bifurcation point for different acoustic radiation forces. Comparing the experimental results with those obtained theoretically, the conditions for active path selection were calculated from the acoustic radiation force and fluid resistance of the capsules. The possibility of controlling capsule flow towards a specific point in a blood vessel was demonstrated.

  1. Absorbed photosynthetically active radiation of steppe vegetation and sun-view geometry effects on APAR estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter-Shea, E. A.; Blad, B. L.; Mesarch, M. A.; Hays, C. J.; Deering, D. W.; Eck, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    Instantaneous fractions of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) were measured at the Streletskaya Steppe Reserve in conjunction with canopy bidirectional-reflected radiation measured at solar zenith angles ranging between 37 and 74 deg during the Kursk experiment (KUREX-91). APAR values were higher for KUREX-91 than those for the first ISLSCP field experiment (FIFE-89) and the amount of APAR of a canopy was a function of solar zenith angle, decreasing as solar zenith angle increased at the resrve. Differences in absorption are attributed to leaf area index (LAI) and leaf angle distribution and subsequently transmitted radiation interactions. LAIs were considerably higher at the reserve than those at the FIFE site. Leaf angle distributions of the reserve approach a uniform distribution while distributions at the FIFE site more closely approximate erectophile distributions. Reflected photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) components at KUREX-91 and FIFE-89 were similar in magnitude and in their response to solar zenith angle. Transmitted PAR increased with increasing solar zenith angle at KUREX-91 and decreased with increasing solar zenith angle at FIFE-89. Transmitted PAR at FIFE-89 was considerably larger than those at KUREX-91.

  2. Active Control of Turbulent Boundary Layer Induced Sound Radiation from Multiple Aircraft Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to experimentally investigate active structural acoustic control of turbulent boundary layer (TBL) induced sound radiation from multiple panels on an aircraft sidewall. One possible approach for controlling sound radiation from multiple panels is a multi-input/multi-output scheme which considers dynamic coupling between the panels. Unfortunately, this is difficult for more than a few panels, and is impractical for a typical aircraft which contains several hundred such panels. An alternative is to implement a large number of independent control systems. Results from the current work demonstrate the feasibility of reducing broadband radiation from multiple panels utilizing a single-input/single-output (SISO) controller per bay, and is the first known demonstration of active control of TBL induced sound radiation on more than two bays simultaneously. The paper compares sound reduction for fully coupled control of six panels versus independent control on each panel. An online adaptive control scheme for independent control is also demonstrated. This scheme will adjust for slow time varying dynamic systems such as fuselage response changes due to aircraft pressurization, etc.

  3. Effect of Solar Particle Event Radiation on Gastrointestinal Tract Bacterial Translocation and Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Houping; Balint, Klara; Zhou, Yu; Gridley, Daila S.; Maks, Casey; Kennedy, Ann R.; Weissman, Drew

    2013-01-01

    Space flight conditions within the protection of Earth’s gravitational field have been shown to alter immune responses, which could lead to potentially detrimental pathology. An additional risk of extended space travel outside the Earth’s gravitational field is the effect of solar particle event (SPE) radiation exposure on the immune system. Organisms that could lead to infection include endogenous, latent viruses, colonizing pathogenics, and commensals, as well as exogenous microbes present in the spacecraft or other astronauts. In this report, the effect of SPE-like radiation on containment of commensal bacteria and the innate immune response induced by its breakdown was investigated at the radiation energies, doses and dose rates expected during an extravehicular excursion outside the Earth’s gravitational field. A transient increase in serum lipopolysaccharide was observed 1 day after irradiation and was accompanied by an increase in acute-phase reactants and circulating proinflammatory cytokines, indicating immune activation. Baseline levels were reestablished by 5 days postirradiation. These findings suggest that astronauts exposed to SPE radiation could have impaired containment of colonizing bacteria and associated immune activation. PMID:21294608

  4. Proton Radiation Belt Dynamics in Low Earth Orbits Interrelated with Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhov, Vitaly; Aleksandrin, Sergey; Mikhailov, Vladimir; Bakaldin, Alexey; Mayorov, Andrey; Mayorova, Marina; Koldashov, Sergey; Sharonova, Nadezhda; Galper, Arkady; Zharaspaev, Temir; Batischev, Alexey

    Existing empirical radiation belt models do not able to calculate trapped particle fluxes with taking into account changing solar activity. Widely using AP-8 model allows to evaluate proton fluxes just in two cases: for minimum or maximum of a solar cycle. New AP-9 model is under developing. Also new additional possibilities for experimental study of radiation belt dynamics is opened up. Since 2006 year PAMELA and ARINA experiments onboard satelite RESURS-DK1 are carried out. PAMELA is in the first place spectrometer to study antiparticles in cosmic rays. The ARINA instrument is intended studying high-energy charged particle bursts in the magnetosphere. Along with such fundamental goals these instruments give opportunity to carry out measurements of trapped particles in the inner radiation belt. Complex of two mentioned instruments covers proton energy range from 30 MeV up to energy limit for trapping (~2 GeV). Continuous measurements with PAMELA and ARINA include falling and rising phases of 23/24 solar cycles. In this report we present temporal profile of proton fluxes in the inner zone of the radiation belt (1.11activity (sunspot number) was revealed. At that it was shown that proton fluxes of energies >30MeV at the solar minimum several times greater than at the solar maximum.

  5. Fluorous-assisted metal chelate affinity extraction technique for analysis of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Tadashi; Kiyokawa, Ena; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Imakyure, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi

    2016-08-15

    We have developed a fluorous affinity-based extraction method for measurement of protein kinase activity. In this method, a fluorescent peptide substrate was phosphorylated by a protein kinase, and the obtained phosphopeptide was selectively captured with Fe(III)-immobilized perfluoroalkyliminodiacetic acid reagent via a metal chelate affinity technique. Next, the captured phosphopeptide was selectively extracted into a fluorous solvent mixture, tetradecafluorohexane and 1H,1H,2H,2H-tridecafluoro-1-n-octanol (3:1, v/v), using the specificity of fluorous affinity (fluorophilicity). In contrast, the remained substrate peptide in the aqueous (non-fluorous) phase was easily measured fluorimetrically. Finally, the enzyme activity could be assayed by measuring the decrease in fluorescence. The feasibility of this method was demonstrated by applying the method for measurement of the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) using its substrate peptide (kemptide) pre-labeled with carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA). PMID:27260427

  6. A brief review on anti diabetic plants: Global distribution, active ingredients, extraction techniques and acting mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chung-Hung; Ngoh, Gek-Cheng; Yusoff, Rozita

    2012-01-01

    A study has been conducted with the aim to provide researchers with general information on anti diabetic extracts based on relevant research articles collected from 34 reliable medical journals. The study showed that Asian and African continents have 56% and 17% share of the worldwide distribution of therapeutic herbal plants, respectively. In Asia, India and China are the leading countries in herbal plants research, and there has been an increase in medicinal research on plants extract for diabetes treatment since 1995 in these regions. The information collected shows that plant leaves are about 20% more favorable for storing active ingredients, as compared to other parts of herbal plants. A brief review on the extraction techniques for the mentioned parts is also included. Furthermore, the acting mechanisms for the anti diabetic activity were described, and the related active ingredients were identified. The findings reveal that most of the anti diabetic research is focused on the alteration of glucose metabolism to prevent diabetes. PMID:22654401

  7. Beams, brightness, and background: Using active spectroscopy techniques for precision measurements in fusion plasma research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dan M.

    2012-05-15

    The use of an injected neutral beam-either a dedicated diagnostic beam or the main heating beams-to localize and enhance plasma spectroscopic measurements can be exploited for a number of key physics issues in magnetic confinement fusion research, yielding detailed profile information on thermal and fast ion parameters, the radial electric field, plasma current density, and turbulent transport. The ability to make these measurements has played a significant role in much of our recent progress in the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas. The measurements can utilize emission from excited state transitions either from plasma ions or from the beam atoms themselves. The primary requirement is that the beam 'probe' interacts with the plasma in a known fashion. Advantages of active spectroscopy include high spatial resolution due to the enhanced localization of the emission and the use of appropriate imaging optics, background rejection through the appropriate modulation and timing of the beam and emission collection/detection system, and the ability of the beam to populate emitter states that are either nonexistent or too dim to utilize effectively in the case of standard or passive spectroscopy. In addition, some active techniques offer the diagnostician unique information because of the specific quantum physics responsible for the emission. This paper will describe the general principles behind a successful active spectroscopic measurement, emphasize specific techniques that facilitate the measurements and include several successful examples of their implementation, briefly touching on some of the more important physics results. It concludes with a few remarks about the relevance and requirements of active spectroscopic techniques for future burning plasma experiments.

  8. Performance comparison of active balancing techniques for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronti, Federico; Roncella, Roberto; Saletti, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    A simple but effective analysis to calculate the performances achievable by a balancing circuit for series-connected lithium-ion batteries (i.e., the time required to equalise the battery and the energy lost during this process) is described in this paper. Starting from the simple passive technique, in which extra energy is dissipated on a shunt resistor, active techniques, aiming at an efficient energy transfer between battery cells, are investigated. The basic idea is to consider the balancing circuit as a DC/DC converter capable of transferring energy between its input and output with a certain efficiency and speed. As the input and output of the converter can be either a single cell or the entire battery pack, four main active topologies are identified: cell to cell, cell to pack, pack to cell and cell to/from pack (i.e., the combination of the cell to pack and pack to cell topologies when the converter is bidirectional). The different topologies are compared by means of statistical simulations. They clearly show that the cell to cell topology is the quickest and most efficient one. Moreover, the pack to cell topology is the least effective one and surprisingly dissipates more energy than the passive technique, if the converter efficiency is below 50%.

  9. ACL reconstruction in sports active people: transtibial DB technique with ST/G vs. transtibial SB technique with BPTB: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Volpi, Piero; Cervellin, Matteo; Denti, Matteo; Bait, Corrado; Melegati, Gianluca; Quaglia, Alessandro; de Girolamo, Laura

    2010-11-01

    The single-bundle ACL reconstruction ensures good outcomes and it is a well-established and widespread technique. Nevertheless, some patients still present residual pain and instability. Recent studies have showed that the double-bundle technique restores better natural ACL-fitting kinematics. Long-term clinical studies comparing the two surgical techniques are not frequent and there is no instrument to evaluate function and kinematics during the knee rotation in vivo. In this randomised prospective study performed on sportive people, we compare the BPTB single-bundle ACL reconstruction technique, which is the most common surgical technique performed on these patients' category, with the ACL double-bundle reconstruction technique (DB), in order to evaluate possible differences between the groups. Comparing the two groups, no statistically significant difference regarding the post-operative Lysholm score (p=0.368) the Tegner activity scale (p=0.519) and the arthrometric evaluation with KT-1000 (p=0.74) have been observed. On the contrary, the IKDC evaluation showed a statistically significant difference (p=0.004) better results of the DB group. Moreover, as assessed by the Tegner activity scale, only patients of the DB group were able to return to sports at a pre-injury level. Our data suggest that the double bundle ST/G ACL reconstruction technique results into slightly better outcome than the traditional technique of single-bundle BPTB. The verification and quantification of the advantages of this technique is anticipated with future studies focusing to the accurate measurement of knee rotation during different activities. PMID:20934698

  10. Radiation-induced hypomethylation triggers urokinase plasminogen activator transcription in meningioma cells.

    PubMed

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Nalla, Arun Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2013-02-01

    Our previous studies have shown the role of radiation-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) expression in the progression of meningioma. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of DNA methylation profiles could regulate uPA expression. Initially, radiation treatment was found to induce hypomethylation in meningioma cells with a decrease in DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (MBD) expression. However, oxidative damage by H(2)O(2) or pretreatment of irradiated cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) did not show any influence on these proteins, thereby indicating a radiation-specific change in the methylation patterns among meningioma cells. Further, we identified that hypomethylation is coupled to an increase in uPA expression in these cells. Azacytidine treatment induced a dose-dependent surge of uPA expression, whereas pre-treatment with sodium butyrate inhibited radiation-induced uPA expression, which complemented our prior results. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction on bisulfite-treated genomic DNA revealed a diminished methylation of uPA promoter in irradiated cells. Transfection with small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing plasmids targeting CpG islands of the uPA promoter showed a marked decline in uPA expression with subsequent decrease in invasion and proliferation of meningioma cells. Further, radiation treatment was found to recruit SP1 transcription factor, which was abrogated by shRNA treatment. Analysis on signaling events demonstrated the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in radiation-treated cells, while U0126 (MEK/ERK inhibitor) blocked hypomethylation, recruitment of SP1, and uPA expression. In agreement with our in vitro data, low DNMT1 levels and high uPA were found in intracranial tumors treated with radiation compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, our data suggest that radiation-mediated hypomethylation triggers u

  11. Radiation-Induced Hypomethylation Triggers Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Transcription in Meningioma Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Nalla, Arun Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown the role of radiation-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) expression in the progression of meningioma. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of DNA methylation profiles could regulate uPA expression. Initially, radiation treatment was found to induce hypomethylation in meningioma cells with a decrease in DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (MBD) expression. However, oxidative damage by H2O2 or pretreatment of irradiated cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) did not show any influence on these proteins, thereby indicating a radiation-specific change in the methylation patterns among meningioma cells. Further, we identified that hypomethylation is coupled to an increase in uPA expression in these cells. Azacytidine treatment induced a dose-dependent surge of uPA expression, whereas pre-treatment with sodium butyrate inhibited radiation-induced uPA expression, which complemented our prior results. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction on bisulfite-treated genomic DNA revealed a diminished methylation of uPA promoter in irradiated cells. Transfection with small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing plasmids targeting CpG islands of the uPA promoter showed a marked decline in uPA expression with subsequent decrease in invasion and proliferation of meningioma cells. Further, radiation treatment was found to recruit SP1 transcription factor, which was abrogated by shRNA treatment. Analysis on signaling events demonstrated the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in radiation-treated cells, while U0126 (MEK/ERK inhibitor) blocked hypomethylation, recruitment of SP1, and uPA expression. In agreement with our in vitro data, low DNMT1 levels and high uPA were found in intracranial tumors treated with radiation compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, our data suggest that radiation-mediated hypomethylation triggers u

  12. Comparison of Penetration of Irrigant Activated by Traditional Methods with A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kanumuru, Pavan Kumar; Sooraparaju, Sujatha Gopal; Nujella, Surya Kumari; Reddy, Bala Kasi; Penigalapati, Siva Ram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The effectiveness of irrigation depends upon various irrigation activation methods & devices used. Aim To compare and evaluate the penetration of irrigant upto working length and into simulated lateral canals using four different irrigation activation techniques. Materials and Methods The root canals of 60 single-rooted teeth were instrumented using the proTaper rotary system. After decalcification of each sample tooth, three simulated lateral canals were created at 2mm, 4mm and 6mm levels from the root apex using a 06-size C+ file. After clearing the samples they were randomly assigned into four experimental groups (n=15) and 1ml of Irrigating Contrast Solution (ICS) was delivered into all samples and then it is activated with 4 different methods Group I-Conventional syringe and needle, Group II - Sonic activation with Endo activator, Group III – Ultrasonic activation with ultrasonic tips and Group IV - Activation using reciprocation movement. All the samples were examined under a stereomicroscope and irrigant penetration was evaluated by means of penetration of ICS. Results Group III and Group IV resulted in better penetration of ICS into lateral canals at 2mm and 4mm depth (p<0.001), when compared with Group I and II. At lateral canals 6mm all the groups except Group I, had shown 100 % penetration. Conclusion The activation of irrigant using reciprocation was able to achieve penetration of irrigating contrast solution both up to the working length and into lateral canals. Hence the clinical significance of this method of irrigant activation is that it can be used for effective penetration of irrigants both upto working length and into lateral canals. PMID:26674879

  13. Active Thermal Extraction and Temperature Sensing of Near-field Thermal Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, D.; Kim, T.; Minnich, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we proposed an active thermal extraction (ATX) scheme that enables thermally populated surface phonon polaritons to escape into the far-field. The concept is based on a fluorescence upconversion process that also occurs in laser cooling of solids (LCS). Here, we present a generalized analysis of our scheme using the theoretical framework for LCS. We show that both LCS and ATX can be described with the same mathematical formalism by replacing the electron-phonon coupling parameter in LCS with the electron-photon coupling parameter in ATX. Using this framework, we compare the ideal efficiency and power extracted for the two schemes and examine the parasitic loss mechanisms. This work advances the application of ATX to manipulate near-field thermal radiation for applications such as temperature sensing and active radiative cooling. PMID:27595609

  14. Cloud and radiation mission with active and passive sensing from the space station

    SciTech Connect

    Spinhirne, James D.

    1999-01-22

    A cloud and aerosol radiative forcing and physical process study involving active laser and radar profiling with a combination of passive radiometric sounders and imagers would use the space station as an observation platform. The objectives are to observe the full three dimensional cloud and aerosol structure and the associated physical parameters leading to a complete measurement of radiation forcing processes. The instruments would include specialized radar and lidar for cloud and aerosol profiling, visible, infrared and microwave imaging radiometers with comprehensive channels for cloud and aerosol observation and specialized sounders. The low altitude, available power and servicing capability of the space station are significant advantages for the active sensors and multiple passive instruments.

  15. Active Thermal Extraction and Temperature Sensing of Near-field Thermal Radiation.

    PubMed

    Ding, D; Kim, T; Minnich, A J

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we proposed an active thermal extraction (ATX) scheme that enables thermally populated surface phonon polaritons to escape into the far-field. The concept is based on a fluorescence upconversion process that also occurs in laser cooling of solids (LCS). Here, we present a generalized analysis of our scheme using the theoretical framework for LCS. We show that both LCS and ATX can be described with the same mathematical formalism by replacing the electron-phonon coupling parameter in LCS with the electron-photon coupling parameter in ATX. Using this framework, we compare the ideal efficiency and power extracted for the two schemes and examine the parasitic loss mechanisms. This work advances the application of ATX to manipulate near-field thermal radiation for applications such as temperature sensing and active radiative cooling. PMID:27595609

  16. Proton-synchrotron radiation of large-scale jets in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, F. A.

    2002-05-01

    The X-radiation of large-scale extragalactic jets poses a serious challenge for the conventional electron-synchrotron or inverse Compton models suggested to explain the overall non-thermal emission of the resolved knots and hotspots. In this paper I propose an alternative mechanism for X-ray emission - synchrotron radiation by extremely high-energy protons - and discuss implications of this model for the extended jet features resolved by Chandra in several prominent radio galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) - Pictor A, 3C 120, PKS 0637-752 and 3C 273. I show that if protons are indeed accelerated to energies E p >=1018 eV, it is possible to construct a realistic model that allows an effective cooling of protons via synchrotron radiation on quite `comfortable' time-scales of about 107 -108 yr, i.e. on time-scales that provide effective propagation of protons over the jet structures on kpc scales. This explains quite naturally the diffuse character of the observed X-ray emission, as well as the broad range of spectral X-ray indices observed from different objects. Yet, as long as the proton synchrotron cooling time is comparable with both the particle escape time and the age of the jet, the proton-synchrotron model offers an adequate radiation efficiency. The model requires relatively large magnetic field of about 1mG, and proton acceleration rates ranging from L p ~1043 to 1046 ergs-1 . These numbers could be reduced significantly if the jet structures are moving relativistically towards the observer. I discuss also possible contributions of synchrotron radiation by secondary electrons produced at interactions of relatively low energy (E p <=1013 eV) protons with the compressed gas in the jet structures. This is an interesting possibility which however requires a very large product of the ambient gas density and total amount of accelerated protons. Therefore it could be treated as a viable working hypothesis only if one can reduce the intrinsic X

  17. Monitoring of Landslide Activity in Slovakia Territory Using Multi-Temporal InSAR Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakon, M.; Papco, J.; Perissin, D.; Lazecky, M.; Sousa, J. J.; Hlavacova, I.; Batorova, K.; Ondrejka, P.; Liscak, P.; Paudits, P.; Real, N.

    2015-05-01

    Slope deformations are the most important geohazards in Slovakia which annually cause an extensive economic damage of significant influence. About 22000 slope deformations have been registered so far, covering an area of almost 2600 km2 . Since 2010, 639 new slope failures have been witnessed and their activation was driven mainly by the climatic anomalies such as extraordinary rainfalls. Many of these landslides currently represent a direct threat to the lives, health and property of the residents in the affected areas. The landslide Nizna Mysla is considered to be the second most catastrophic landslide in the history of Slovakia. Damages to buildings and engineering networks had not been identified in the ‘90s of the last century when the first problems with the slope stability appeared. Up-to-now monitoring techniques has currently been reassessed to account for the results from satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) techniques.

  18. Actively stabilized optical fiber interferometry technique for online/in-process surface measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Kaiwei; Martin, Haydn; Jiang Xiangqian

    2008-02-15

    In this paper, we report the recent progress in optical-beam scanning fiber interferometry for potential online nanoscale surface measurement based on the previous research. It attempts to generate a robust and miniature measurement device for future development into a multiprobe array measurement system. In this research, both fiber-optic-interferometry and the wavelength-division-multiplexing techniques have been used, so that the optical probe and the optical interferometer are well spaced and fast surface scanning can be carried out, allowing flexibility for online measurement. In addition, this system provides a self-reference signal to stabilize the optical detection with high common-mode noise suppression by adopting an active phase tracking and stabilization technique. Low-frequency noise was significantly reduced compared with unstabilized result. The measurement of a sample surface shows an attained repeatability of 3.3 nm.

  19. Effects of autogamy in Paramecium tetraurelia on catalase activity and on radiosensitivity to natural ionizing radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Croute, F.; Dupouy, D.; Charley, J.P.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Planel, H.

    1980-02-01

    Catalase activity of Paramecium tetraurelia decreased during autogamy and recovered to normal 5 days later. Autogamy also caused changes in the ciliate's sensitivity sensitivity to natural ionizing radiations - the decrease in cell growth rate previously described in shielded cultures did not occur when autogamous cells were used. Maximum effect of shielding was observed in 11-day-old postautogamous cells. The role of the catalase in the mechanism of natural irradiation effect is discussed.

  20. A Simplified Supine Technique Expedites the Delivery of Effective Craniospinal Radiation to Medulloblastoma – Comparison with Other Techniques in the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Rashmi; Vu, Khanh; Edwards, Trent; Buwembo, Joseph; Teles, Alisson R; Salim, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    A 28-year-old man presented to the emergency room with a severe headache of one day's duration. A computerized tomography scan showed a hemorrhagic tumor measuring 3.9 x 4.4 cm in the left cerebellar hemisphere. The resection specimen revealed medulloblastoma. He had two episodes of rebleeding and multiple postoperative issues preventing the use of prone craniospinal radiotherapy. We designed a supine technique for this tall man, which was not complicated to set up. The rapid safe implementation of this technique allowed us to avoid further rebleeding and successfully treat the residual tumor. This technique is the described technique in this case report and is compared to other techniques. At 7.5 years after surgery, he is alive without cancer and with only a mild residual deficit. This case is unusual since the majority of patients with the diagnosis of hemorrhagic medulloblastoma died. PMID:26819866

  1. Is anterior cruciate ligament surgery technique important in rehabilitation and activity scores?

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Bekir Eray; Kara, Adnan; Celik, Haluk; Oc, Yunus; Camur, Savas

    2016-01-01

    To compare the two different anterior cruciate ligament surgery techniques’ effect in rehabilitation and activity performance. Fifty-five patients were evaluated. Twenty-seven patients with transtibial technique (TT), 28 with anatomic single-bundle technique (AT) included. Tegner Activity Scale (TAS) was performed at preoperation and follow-up. The returning time of the sport and work was evaluated at follow-up. Single-leg hop test was performed at follow-up. Outcomes were compared between the two groups. The determined length difference between the operated knee and the intact knee was compared between the two groups. Average age of TT and AT was 27.9±6.4 yr, 28.3±6 yr, respectively. There was a significant difference between the two groups in duration of returning to sport. TT group had higher duration to return to sport (P<0.01). No difference between the two groups in duration of returning to work (P>0.05). There was a significant difference between the two groups. TT group had significantly higher values than AT group (P<0.01). No difference in TAS between the two techniques at preoperation and at last follow-up (P>0.05). The increase of TAS in patients who had AT was higher than the patients who had TT (P>0.05). No difference in single-leg hop test at 55%–65%, 65%–75%, and 85%–95% level (P>0.05). In this test at 75%–85% TT group had higher values than AT group (P<0.05), AT group had higher values at 95%–105% level (P<0.05). Good short and long-term knee outcome scores depend on rehabilitation protocol after surgery. Surgery technique should provide the adequate stability in rehabilitation period. AT obtains better outcomes in rehabilitation. PMID:27419120

  2. Comparison of Selective Culturing and Biochemical Techniques for Measuring Biological Activity in Geothermal Process Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Pryfogle, Peter Albert

    2000-09-01

    For the past three years, scientists at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have been conducting studies aimed at determining the presence and influence of bacteria found in geothermal plant cooling water systems. In particular, the efforts have been directed at understanding the conditions that lead to the growth and accumulation of biomass within these systems, reducing the operational and thermal efficiency. Initially, the methods selected were based upon the current practices used by the industry and included the collection of water quality parameters, the measurement of soluble carbon, and the use of selective medial for the determination of the number density of various types of organisms. This data has been collected on a seasonal basis at six different facilities located at the Geysers’ in Northern California. While this data is valuable in establishing biological growth trends in the facilities and providing an initial determination of upset or off-normal conditions, more detailed information about the biological activity is needed to determine what is triggering or sustaining the growth in these facilities in order to develop improved monitoring and treatment techniques. In recent years, new biochemical approaches, based upon the analyses of phospholipid fatty acids and DNA recovered from environmental samples, have been developed and commercialized. These techniques, in addition to allowing the determination of the quantity of biomass, also provide information on the community composition and the nutritional status of the organisms. During the past year, samples collected from the condenser effluents of four of the plants from The Geysers’ were analyzed using these methods and compared with the results obtained from selective culturing techniques. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate the cost-benefit of implementing these techniques for tracking microbial activity in the plant study, in place of the selective culturing

  3. Effect of extraction solvent/technique on the antioxidant activity of selected medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Bushra; Anwar, Farooq; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    Theeffects of four extracting solvents [absolute ethanol, absolute methanol, aqueous ethanol (ethanol: water, 80:20 v/v) and aqueous methanol (methanol: water, 80:20 v/v)] and two extraction techniques (shaking and reflux) on the antioxidant activity of extracts of barks of Azadirachta indica, Acacia nilotica, Eugenia jambolana, Terminalia arjuna, leaves and roots of Moringa oleifera, fruit of Ficus religiosa,and leaves of Aloe barbadensis were investigated. The tested plant materials contained appreciable amounts of total phenolic contents (0.31-16.5 g GAE /100g DW), total flavonoid (2.63-8.66 g CE/100g DW); reducing power at 10 mg/mL extract concentration (1.36-2.91), DPPH(.) scavenging capacity (37.2-86.6%), and percent inhibition of linoleic acid (66.0-90.6%). Generally higher extract yields, phenolic contents and plant material antioxidant activity were obtained using aqueous organic solvents, as compared to the respective absolute organic solvents. Although higher extract yields were obtained by the refluxing extraction technique, in general higher amounts of total phenolic contents and better antioxidant activity were found in the extracts prepared using a shaker. PMID:19553890

  4. New Active Optical Technique Developed for Measuring Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton (DuPont) and Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials because of desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft performance and durability. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield E (the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is a passive technique based on mass-loss measurements of samples exposed to LEO atomic oxygen during a space flight experiment. There are certain disadvantages to this technique. First, because it is passive, data are not obtained until after the flight is completed. Also, obtaining the preflight and postflight mass measurements is complicated by the fact that many polymers absorb water and, therefore, the mass change due to water absorption can affect the E data. This is particularly true for experiments that receive low atomic oxygen exposures or for samples that have a very low E. An active atomic oxygen erosion technique based on optical measurements has been developed that has certain advantages over the mass-loss technique. This in situ technique can simultaneously provide the erosion yield data on orbit and the atomic oxygen exposure fluence, which is needed for erosion yield determination. In the optical technique, either sunlight or artificial light can be used to measure the erosion of semitransparent or opaque polymers as a result of atomic oxygen attack. The technique is simple and adaptable to a rather wide range of polymers, providing that they have a sufficiently high optical absorption coefficient. If one covers a photodiode with a

  5. Hornet flight activity and its correlation with UVB radiation, temperature and relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Volynchik, Stanislav; Plotkin, Marian; Bergman, David J; Ishay, Jacob S

    2008-01-01

    During the active season, extending from June to October, hornets emerge from their nest in the field in all the daytime hours. In the beginning of the season, when the number of workers is relatively small, the number of exits from the nest is fairly uniform numerically throughout the day. However, with the increase in hornet population from July onwards, the number of workers emerging from the nest entrance around noon (1100-1300 h) is by 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than the number of those emerging in the morning or evening hours. This disparity persists till September or October, at which time the workers revert to behave as in the beginning of the season. It appears, therefore, that in this period hornet activities outside the nest are coordinated with the meteorological conditions, and in this regard, the highest correlation is with the ultra violet B (UVB) radiation level and to a lesser extent with the temperature. Presumably, also, the greater noon-hour activity in the nests of hornets in the field stems from the digging hornets benefiting from the greater availability of solar energy at noon, mainly that of UVB radiation. We assume that the hornets are able to utilize the UVB radiation, but what part of their body is "absorbing" the UVB energy is still a matter of further investigation. PMID:18173706

  6. 9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings

    PubMed Central

    Steinhilber, Friedhelm; Beer, Jürg; Brunner, Irene; Christl, Marcus; Fischer, Hubertus; Heikkilä, Ulla; Kubik, Peter W.; Mann, Mathias; McCracken, Ken G.; Miller, Heinrich; Miyahara, Hiroko; Oerter, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the temporal variation of cosmic radiation and solar activity during the Holocene is essential for studies of the solar-terrestrial relationship. Cosmic-ray produced radionuclides, such as 10Be and 14C which are stored in polar ice cores and tree rings, offer the unique opportunity to reconstruct the history of cosmic radiation and solar activity over many millennia. Although records from different archives basically agree, they also show some deviations during certain periods. So far most reconstructions were based on only one single radionuclide record, which makes detection and correction of these deviations impossible. Here we combine different 10Be ice core records from Greenland and Antarctica with the global 14C tree ring record using principal component analysis. This approach is only possible due to a new high-resolution 10Be record from Dronning Maud Land obtained within the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica in Antarctica. The new cosmic radiation record enables us to derive total solar irradiance, which is then used as a proxy of solar activity to identify the solar imprint in an Asian climate record. Though generally the agreement between solar forcing and Asian climate is good, there are also periods without any coherence, pointing to other forcings like volcanoes and greenhouse gases and their corresponding feedbacks. The newly derived records have the potential to improve our understanding of the solar dynamics and to quantify the solar influence on climate. PMID:22474348

  7. Do physical activity and dietary smartphone applications incorporate evidence-based behaviour change techniques?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There has been a recent proliferation in the development of smartphone applications (apps) aimed at modifying various health behaviours. While interventions that incorporate behaviour change techniques (BCTs) have been associated with greater effectiveness, it is not clear to what extent smartphone apps incorporate such techniques. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of BCTs in physical activity and dietary apps and determine how reliably the taxonomy checklist can be used to identify BCTs in smartphone apps. Methods The top-20 paid and top-20 free physical activity and/or dietary behaviour apps from the New Zealand Apple App Store Health & Fitness category were downloaded to an iPhone. Four independent raters user-tested and coded each app for the presence/absence of BCTs using the taxonomy of behaviour change techniques (26 BCTs in total). The number of BCTs included in the 40 apps was calculated. Krippendorff’s alpha was used to evaluate interrater reliability for each of the 26 BCTs. Results Apps included an average of 8.1 (range 2-18) techniques, the number being slightly higher for paid (M = 9.7, range 2-18) than free apps (M = 6.6, range 3-14). The most frequently included BCTs were “provide instruction” (83% of the apps), “set graded tasks” (70%), and “prompt self-monitoring” (60%). Techniques such as “teach to use prompts/cues”, “agree on behavioural contract”, “relapse prevention” and “time management” were not present in the apps reviewed. Interrater reliability coefficients ranged from 0.1 to 0.9 (Mean 0.6, SD = 0.2). Conclusions Presence of BCTs varied by app type and price; however, BCTs associated with increased intervention effectiveness were in general more common in paid apps. The taxonomy checklist can be used by independent raters to reliably identify BCTs in physical activity and dietary behaviour smartphone apps. PMID:24965805

  8. What Are the Most Effective Intervention Techniques for Changing Physical Activity Self-Efficacy and Physical Activity Behaviour--and Are They the Same?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, S. L.; French, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    There is convincing evidence that targeting self-efficacy is an effective means of increasing physical activity. However, evidence concerning which are the most effective techniques for changing self-efficacy and thereby physical activity is lacking. The present review aims to estimate the association between specific intervention techniques used…

  9. Component greenhouse gas fluxes and radiative balance from two deltaic marshes in Louisiana: Pairing chamber techniques and eddy covariance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, Ken W.; Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Cormier, Nicole; Moss, Rebecca; Johnson, Darren; Neubauer, Scott C; Raynie, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Coastal marshes take up atmospheric CO2 while emitting CO2, CH4, and N2O. This ability to sequester carbon (C) is much greater for wetlands on a per-area basis than from most ecosystems, facilitating scientific, political, and economic interest in their value as greenhouse gas sinks. However, the greenhouse gas balance of Gulf of Mexico wetlands is particularly understudied. We describe the net ecosystem exchange (NEEc) of CO2 and CH4 using eddy covariance (EC) in comparison with fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O using chambers from brackish and freshwater marshes in Louisiana, USA. From EC, we found that 182 g C m-2 y-1 was lost through NEEc from the brackish marsh. Of this, 11 g C m-2 y-1 resulted from net CH4 emissions and the remaining 171 g C m-2 y-1 resulted from net CO2 emissions. In contrast, -290 g C m2 y-1 was taken up through NEEc by the freshwater marsh, with 47 g C m-2 y-1 emitted as CH4 and -337 g C m-2 y-1 taken up as CO2. From chambers, we discovered that neither site had large fluxes of N2O. Sustained-flux greenhouse gas accounting metrics indicated that both marshes had a positive (warming) radiative balance, with the brackish marsh having a substantially greater warming effect than the freshwater marsh. That net respiratory emissions of CO2 and CH4 as estimated through chamber techniques were 2-4 times different from emissions estimated through EC requires additional understanding of the artifacts created by different spatial and temporal sampling footprints between techniques.

  10. The potential of different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques in daily global solar radiation modeling based on meteorological data

    SciTech Connect

    Behrang, M.A.; Assareh, E.; Ghanbarzadeh, A.; Noghrehabadi, A.R.

    2010-08-15

    The main objective of present study is to predict daily global solar radiation (GSR) on a horizontal surface, based on meteorological variables, using different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. Daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation, and wind speed values between 2002 and 2006 for Dezful city in Iran (32 16'N, 48 25'E), are used in this study. In order to consider the effect of each meteorological variable on daily GSR prediction, six following combinations of input variables are considered: (I)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and relative humidity as inputs and daily GSR as output. (II)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (III)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (IV)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and evaporation as inputs and daily GSR as output. (V)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. (VI)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. Multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF) neural networks are applied for daily GSR modeling based on six proposed combinations. The measured data between 2002 and 2005 are used to train the neural networks while the data for 214 days from 2006 are used as testing data. The comparison of obtained results from ANNs and different conventional GSR prediction (CGSRP) models shows very good improvements (i.e. the predicted values of best ANN model (MLP-V) has a mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) about 5.21% versus 10.02% for best CGSRP model (CGSRP 5)). (author)

  11. Reducing the Cost of Proton Radiation Therapy: The Feasibility of a Streamlined Treatment Technique for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Zhang, Rui; Jones, Timothy G.; Giebeler, Annelise; Taddei, Phillip J.; Stewart, Robert D.; Lee, Andrew; Vassiliev, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiation therapy is an effective modality for cancer treatments, but the cost of proton therapy is much higher compared to conventional radiotherapy and this presents a formidable barrier to most clinical practices that wish to offer proton therapy. Little attention in literature has been paid to the costs associated with collimators, range compensators and hypofractionation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cost-saving modifications to the present standard of care for proton treatments for prostate cancer. In particular, we quantified the dosimetric impact of a treatment technique in which custom fabricated collimators were replaced with a multileaf collimator (MLC) and the custom range compensators (RC) were eliminated. The dosimetric impacts of these modifications were assessed for 10 patients with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and confirmed with corresponding Monte Carlo simulations. We assessed the impact on lifetime risks of radiogenic second cancers using detailed dose reconstructions and predictive dose-risk models based on epidemiologic data. We also performed illustrative calculations, using an isoeffect model, to examine the potential for hypofractionation. Specifically, we bracketed plausible intervals of proton fraction size and total treatment dose that were equivalent to a conventional photon treatment of 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions. Our results revealed that eliminating the RC and using an MLC had negligible effect on predicted dose distributions and second cancer risks. Even modest hypofractionation strategies can yield substantial cost savings. Together, our results suggest that it is feasible to modify the standard of care to increase treatment efficiency, reduce treatment costs to patients and insurers, while preserving high treatment quality. PMID:25920039

  12. A chromism-based assay (CHROBA) technique for in situ detection of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Jie, Xu; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2005-03-15

    A unique chromism-based assay technique (CHROBA) using photochromic spiropyran-containing peptides has been firstly established for detection of protein kinase A-catalyzed phosphorylation. The alternative method has advantages that avoid isolation and/or immobilization of kinase substrates to remove excess reagents including nonreactive isotope-labeled ATP or fluorescently-labeled anti-phosphoamino acid antibodies from the reaction mixture. Such a novel protocol based on thermocoloration of the spiropyran moiety in the peptide can offer not only an efficient screening method of potent kinase substrates but also a versatile analytical tool for monitoring other post-translational modification activities. PMID:15745830

  13. Analyzing Activity Behavior and Movement in a Naturalistic Environment Using Smart Home Techniques.

    PubMed

    Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Dawadi, Prafulla

    2015-11-01

    One of the many services that intelligent systems can provide is the ability to analyze the impact of different medical conditions on daily behavior. In this study, we use smart home and wearable sensors to collect data, while ( n = 84) older adults perform complex activities of daily living. We analyze the data using machine learning techniques and reveal that differences between healthy older adults and adults with Parkinson disease not only exist in their activity patterns, but that these differences can be automatically recognized. Our machine learning classifiers reach an accuracy of 0.97 with an area under the ROC curve value of 0.97 in distinguishing these groups. Our permutation-based testing confirms that the sensor-based differences between these groups are statistically significant. PMID:26259225

  14. Following atomistic kinetics on experimental timescales with the kinetic Activation Relaxation Technique

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mousseau, Normand; Beland, Laurent K; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-Francois; N'Tsouaglo, Gawonou Kokou; Restrepo, Oscar; Trochet, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    The properties of materials, even at the atomic level, evolve on macroscopic time scales. Following this evolution through simulation has been a challenge for many years. For lattice-based activated diffusion, kinetic Monte Carlo has turned out to be an almost perfect solution. Various accelerated molecular dynamical schemes, for their part, have allowed the study on long time scale of relatively simple systems. There is still a need, however, for methods able to handle complex materials such as alloys and disordered systems. Here, we review the kinetic Activation Relaxation Technique (k-ART), one of a handful of off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo methods,more » with on-the-fly cataloging, that have been proposed in the last few years.« less

  15. Measurement of energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activities by a sounding balloon and ground observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, T.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activity is observed at various places, such as the ground, high mountain areas, and artificial satellites. In order to investigate the radiation source and its energy distribution, we measured energetic radiation by a sounding balloon, and the ground observation. On the measurement inside/above the thundercloud, we conducted a sounding observation using a radiosonde mounted two GM tubes (for gamma-rays, and for beta/gamma-rays), in addition to meteorological instruments. The balloon passed through a region of strong echoes in a thundercloud shown by radar image, at which time an increase in counting rate of the GM tube about 2 orders of magnitude occurred at the altitude from 5 km to 7.5 km. Furthermore, the counting rate of two GM tubes indicated the tendency different depending on movement of a balloon. This result suggests that the ratio for the gamma-rays (energetic photons) of the beta-rays (energetic electrons) varies according to the place in the thundercloud. Furthermore, we carried out a ground observation of the energetic gamma rays during winter thunderstorm at a coastal area facing the Sea of Japan. Two types of the energetic radiation have been observed at this time. We report the outline of these measurements and analysis in the session of the AGU meeting.

  16. Activities of the National Academy of Sciences in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, C.W.

    1991-02-01

    The activities of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), has a long history and the specific time period supported by this contract is but a small piece of the long-term continuing program. As a background, in August 1945, atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima (6 August) and Nagasaki (9 August). Shortly after the bombings, US medical teams joined forces with their Japanese counterparts to form a Joint Commission for the Investigation of the Effects of the Atomic Bombs. As a result of the Joint Commission's investigations, it was determined that consideration should be given to the establishment of a long-term study of the potential late health effects of exposure of the survivors to radiation from the bombs. The results obtained from RERF studies contribute the vast majority of information that provides a better understanding of radiation effects on humans. This information has been used extensively by national organizations and international committees for estimating risks associated with radiation exposures. The estimated risks developed by these independent organizations are used by government agencies around the world to establish standards for protection of individuals exposed in the occupational, medical, and general environment. Some of these results are described briefly in this report.

  17. Photosynthetically active radiation and comparison of methods for its estimation in equatorial Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Puay Yok; Ismail, Mirza Rifqi Bin

    2016-02-01

    Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is an important input variable for urban climate, crop modelling and ecosystem services studies. Despite its importance, only a few empirical studies have been conducted on PAR, its relationship to global solar radiation and sky conditions and its estimation in the tropics. We report in this study, the characterisation of PAR in Singapore through direct measurements and development of models for its estimation using input variables of global solar radiation ( H), photometric radiation ( L), clearness index ( k t ) and sky view factor (SVF). Daily PAR showed a good correlation with daily H and had a comparatively small seasonal variation in PAR due to Singapore's equatorial position. The ratio of PAR to H ( PAR/ H) showed a slight depression in midyear from May to August, which correlated well with seasonal patterns in rainfall over the study period. Hourly PAR/ H increased throughout the day. Three empirical models developed in this study were able to predict daily PAR satisfactorily, with the most accurate model being one which included both H and k t as independent variables. A regression model for estimation of PAR under shaded conditions using SVF produced satisfactory estimation of daily PAR but was prone to high mean percentage error at low PAR levels.

  18. Simulation of TGF-Beta Activation by Low-Dose HZE Radiation in a Cell Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    High charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) nuclei comprised in the galactic cosmic rays are main contributors to space radiation risk. They induce many lesions in living matter such as non-specific oxidative damage and the double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are considered key precursors of early and late effects of radiation. There is increasing evidence that cells respond collectively rather than individually to radiation, suggesting the importance of cell signaling1. The transforming growth factor (TGF ) is a signaling peptide that is expressed in nearly all cell type and regulates a large array of cellular processes2. TGF have been shown to mediate cellular response to DNA damage3 and to induce apoptosis in non-irradiated cells cocultured with irradiated cells4. TFG molecules are secreted by cells in an inactive complex known as the latency-associated peptide (LAP). TGF is released from the LAP by a conformational change triggered by proteases, thrombospondin-1, integrins, acidic conditions and .OH radical5. TGF then binds to cells receptors and activates a cascade of events mediated by Smad proteins6, which might interfere with the repair of DNA. Meanwhile, increasingly sophisticated Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms have appeared recently in the literature7 and can be applied to study the interaction of molecules with receptors. These BD computer models have contributed to the elucidation of signal transduction, ligand accumulation and autocrine loops in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor (EFGR) system8. To investigate the possible roles of TGF in an irradiated cell culture, our Monte-Carlo simulation codes of the radiation track structure9 will be used to calculate the activation of TFG triggered by .OH produced by low doses of HZE ions. The TGF molecules will then be followed by a BD algorithm in a medium representative of a cell culture to estimate the number of activated receptors.

  19. Devices Materials and Processes for Nanoelectronics: Characterization with Advanced X-Ray Techniques Using Lab-Based and Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    SciTech Connect

    E Zschech; C Wyon; C Murray; G Schneider

    2011-12-31

    Future nanoelectronics manufacturing at extraordinary length scales, new device structures, and advanced materials will provide challenges to process development and engineering but also to process control and physical failure analysis. Advanced X-ray techniques, using lab systems and synchrotron radiation sources, will play a key role for the characterization of thin films, nanostructures, surfaces, and interfaces. The development of advanced X-ray techniques and tools will reduce risk and time for the introduction of new technologies. Eventually, time-to-market for new products will be reduced by the timely implementation of the best techniques for process development and process control. The development and use of advanced methods at synchrotron radiation sources will be increasingly important, particularly for research and development in the field of advanced processes and new materials but also for the development of new X-ray components and procedures. The application of advanced X-ray techniques, in-line, in out-of-fab analytical labs and at synchrotron radiation sources, for research, development, and manufacturing in the nanoelectronics industry is reviewed. The focus of this paper is on the study of nanoscale device and on-chip interconnect materials, and materials for 3D IC integration as well.

  20. Evaluation of genotoxicity of the acute gamma radiation on earthworm Eisenia fetida using single cell gel electrophoresis technique (Comet assay).

    PubMed

    Sowmithra, K; Shetty, N J; Jha, S K; Chaubey, R C

    2015-12-01

    Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) most suitable biological indicators of radioactive pollution. Radiation-induced lesions in DNA can be considered to be molecular markers for early effects of ionizing radiation. Gamma radiation produces a wide spectrum of DNA. Some of these lesions, i.e., DNA strand breaks and alkali labile sites can be detected by the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay by measuring the migration of DNA from immobilized nuclear DNA. E. fetida were exposed to different doses of gamma radiation, i.e., 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50Gy, and comet assay was performed for all the doses along with control at 1, 3 and 5h post irradiation to evaluate the genotoxicity of gamma radiation in this organism. The DNA damage was measured as percentage of comet tail DNA. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in samples exposed to 5Gy and above, and the increase in DNA damage was dose dependent i.e., DNA damage was increased with increased doses of radiation. The highest DNA damage was noticed at 1h post irradiation and gradually decreased with time, i.e., at 3 and 5h post irradiation. The present study reveals that gamma radiation induces DNA damage in E. fetida and the comet assay is a sensitive and rapid method for its detection to detect genotoxicity of gamma radiation. PMID:26653984

  1. Overview of passive and active vision techniques for hand-held 3D data acquistion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mada, Sreenivasa K.; Smith, Melvyn L.; Smith, Lyndon N.; Midha, Prema S.

    2003-03-01

    The digitization of the 3D shape of real objects is a rapidly expanding discipline, with a wide variety of applications, including shape acquisition, inspection, reverse engineering, gauging and robot navigation. Developments in computer product design techniques, automated production, and the need for close manufacturing tolerances will be facts of life for the foreseeable future. A growing need exists for fast, accurate, portable, non-contact 3D sensors. However, in order for 3D scanning to become more commonplace, new methods are needed for easily, quickly and robustly acquiring accurate full geometric models of complex objects using low cost technology. In this paper, a brief survey is presented of current scanning technologies available for acquiring range data. An overview is provided of current 3D-shape acquisition using both active and passive vision techniques. Each technique is explained in terms of its configuration, principle of operation, and the inherent advantages and limitations. A separate section then focuses on the implications of scannerless scanning for hand held technology, after which the current status of 3D acquisition using handheld technology, together with related issues concerning implementation, is considered more fully. Finally, conclusions for further developments in handheld devices are discussed. This paper may be of particular benefit to new comers in this field.

  2. A preliminary study of air-pollution measurement by active remote-sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. L.; Proctor, E. K.; Gasiorek, L. S.; Liston, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    Air pollutants are identified, and the needs for their measurement from satellites and aircraft are discussed. An assessment is made of the properties of these pollutants and of the normal atmosphere, including interactions with light of various wavelengths and the resulting effects on transmission and scattering of optical signals. The possible methods for active remote measurement are described; the relative performance capabilities of double-ended and single-ended systems are compared qualitatively; and the capabilities of the several single-ended or backscattering techniques are compared quantitatively. The differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is shown to be superior to the other backscattering techniques. The lidar system parameters and their relationships to the environmental factors and the properties of pollutants are examined in detail. A computer program that models both the atmosphere (including pollutants) and the lidar system is described. The performance capabilities of present and future lidar components are assessed, and projections are made of prospective measurement capabilities for future lidar systems. Following a discussion of some important operational factors that affect both the design and measurement capabilities of airborne and satellite-based lidar systems, the extensive analytical results obtained through more than 1000 individual cases analyzed with the aid of the computer program are summarized and discussed. The conclusions are presented. Recommendations are also made for additional studies to investigate cases that could not be explored adequately during this study.

  3. Airborne gamma radiation measurements of soil moisture during FIFE: Activities and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Eugene L.

    1992-01-01

    Soil moisture measurements were obtained during the summer of 1987 and 1989 near Manhattan, Kansas, using the National Weather Service (NWS) airborne gamma radiation system. A network of 24 flight lines were established over the research area. Airborne surveys were flown daily during two intensive field campaigns. The data collected was sufficient to modify the NWS standard operational method for estimating soil moisture for the Field Experiment (FIFE) flight lines. The average root mean square error of the soil moisture estimates for shorter FIFE flight lines was found to be 2.5 percent, compared with a reported value of 3.9 percent for NWS flight lines. Techniques were developed to compute soil moisture estimates for portions of the flight lines. Results of comparisons of the airborne gamma radiation soil moisture estimates with those obtained using the NASA Pushbroom Microwave Radiation (PBMR) system and hydrological model are presented. The airborne soil moisture measurements, and real averages computed using all remotely sensed and ground data, have been in support of the research of the many FIFE investigators whose overall goal was the upscale integration of models and the application of satellite remote sensing.

  4. Robust Satellite Techniques for monitoring earth emitted radiation in the Japanese seismic area by using MTSAT observations in the TIR spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzano, Nicola; Filizzola, Carolina; Hattori, Katsumi; Lisi, Mariano; Paciello, Rossana; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Since eighties, the fluctuations of Earth's thermally emitted radiation, measured by satellite sensors operating in the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral range, have been associated with the complex process of preparation for major earthquakes. But, like other claimed earthquake precursors (seismological, physical, chemical, biological, etc.) they have been for long-time considered with some caution by scientific community. The lack of a rigorous definition of anomalous TIR signal fluctuations and the scarce attention paid to the possibility that other causes (e.g. meteorological) different from seismic activity could be responsible for the observed TIR variations were the main causes of such skepticism. Compared with previously proposed approaches the general change detection approach, named Robust Satellite Techniques (RST), showed good ability to discriminate anomalous TIR signals possibly associated to seismic activity, from the normal variability of TIR signal due to other causes. Thanks to its full exportability on different satellite packages, since 2001 RST has been implemented on TIR images acquired by polar (e.g. NOAA-AVHRR, EOS -MODIS) and geostationary (e.g. MSG-SEVIRI, NOAA-GOES/W, GMS-5/VISSR) satellite sensors, in order to verify the presence (or absence) of TIR anomalies in presence (absence) of earthquakes (with M>4) in different seismogenic areas around the world (e.g. Italy, Greece, Turkey, India, Taiwan, etc.). In this paper, the RST data analysis approach has been implemented on TIR satellite records collected over Japan by the geostationary satellite sensor MTSAT (Multifunctional Transport SATellites) and RETIRA (Robust Estimator of TIR Anomalies) index was used to identify Significant Sequences of TIR Anomalies (SSTAs) in a possible space-time relations with seismic events. Achieved results will be discussed in the perspective of a multi-parametric approach for a time-Dependent Assessment of Seismic Hazard (t-DASH).

  5. Radiation-induced Akt activation modulates radioresistance in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Fang; Kim, Jung-Sik; Waldman, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Background Ionizing radiation (IR) therapy is a primary treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a common and devastating brain tumor in humans. IR has been shown to induce PI3K-Akt activation in many cell types, and activation of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway has been correlated with radioresistance. Methods Initially, the effects of IR on Akt activation were assessed in multiple human GBM cell lines. Next, to evaluate a potential causative role of IR-induced Akt activation on radiosensitivity, Akt activation was inhibited during IR with several complementary genetic and pharmacological approaches, and radiosensitivity measured using clonogenic survival assays. Results Three of the eight cell lines tested demonstrated IR-induced Akt activation. Further studies revealed that IR-induced Akt activation was dependent upon the presence of a serum factor, and could be inhibited by the EGFR inhibitor AG1478. Inhibition of PI3K activation with LY294002, or with inducible wild-type PTEN, inhibition of EGFR, as well as direct inhibition of Akt with two Akt inhibitors during irradiation increased the radiosensitivity of U87MG cells. Conclusion These results suggest that Akt may be a central player in a feedback loop whereby activation of Akt induced by IR increases radioresistance of GBM cells. Targeting the Akt signaling pathway may have important therapeutic implications when used in combination with IR in the treatment of a subset of brain tumor patients. PMID:19828040

  6. Dry etching techniques for active devices based on hexagonal boron nitride epilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Grenadier, Samuel; Li, Jing; Lin, Jingyu; Jiang, Hongxing

    2013-11-15

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as a fundamentally and technologically important material system owing to its unique physical properties including layered structure, wide energy bandgap, large optical absorption, and neutron capture cross section. As for any materials under development, it is necessary to establish device processing techniques to realize active devices based on hBN. The authors report on the advancements in dry etching techniques for active devices based on hBN epilayers via inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The effect of ICP radio frequency (RF) power on the etch rate and vertical side wall profile was studied. The etching depth and angle with respect to the surface were measured using atomic force microscopy showing that an etching rate ∼1.25 μm/min and etching angles >80° were obtained. Profilometer data and scanning electron microscope images confirmed these results. This work demonstrates that SF{sub 6} is very suitable for etching hBN epilayers in RF plasma environments and can serve as a guide for future hBN device processing.

  7. Anatomic and Pathologic Variability During Radiotherapy for a Hybrid Active Breath-Hold Gating Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K.; Gopan, Ellen; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intra- and interfraction variability of tumor and lung volume and position using a hybrid active breath-hold gating technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 159 repeat normal inspiration active breath-hold CTs were acquired weekly during radiotherapy for 9 lung cancer patients (12-21 scans per patient). A physician delineated the gross tumor volume (GTV), lungs, and spinal cord on the first breath-hold CT, and contours were propagated semiautomatically. Intra- and interfraction variability of tumor and lung position and volume were evaluated. Tumor centroid and border variability were quantified. Results: On average, intrafraction variability of lung and GTV centroid position was <2.0 mm. Interfraction population variability was 3.6-6.7 mm (systematic) and 3.1-3.9 mm (random) for the GTV centroid and 1.0-3.3 mm (systematic) and 1.5-2.6 mm (random) for the lungs. Tumor volume regressed 44.6% {+-} 23.2%. Gross tumor volume border variability was patient specific and demonstrated anisotropic shape change in some subjects. Interfraction GTV positional variability was associated with tumor volume regression and contralateral lung volume (p < 0.05). Inter-breath-hold reproducibility was unaffected by time point in the treatment course (p > 0.1). Increases in free-breathing tidal volume were associated with increases in breath-hold ipsilateral lung volume (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The breath-hold technique was reproducible within 2 mm during each fraction. Interfraction variability of GTV position and shape was substantial because of tumor volume and breath-hold lung volume change during therapy. These results support the feasibility of a hybrid breath-hold gating technique and suggest that online image guidance would be beneficial.

  8. A simple and efficient diffusion technique for assay of endo β-1,4-xylanase activity

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, A.K.; Kolte, Atul P.; Senani, S.; Sridhar, Manpal.; Jayapal, Natasha.

    2011-01-01

    Endo-β-1, 4-xylanases is thought to be of great significance for several industries namely paper, pharmaceuticals, food, feed etc. in addition to better utilization of lignocellulosic biomass. The present investigation was aimed to develop an easy, simple and efficient assay technique for endo-β-1, 4-xylanases secreted by the aerobic fungi. Under the proposed protocol, 9 g/L xylan containing agar was prepared in 100 mM phosphate buffer at different pH (4.5, 5.5 and 6.5). The sterilized xylan agar was dispensed in 90 mm petri dishes. 100 µl of culture supernatant of 12 fungal isolates was added to the wells and left overnight at 31±10C. The petri dishes were observed for zone of clearance by naked eye and diameter was measured. Congo red solution (1 g/L) was applied over the petri dishes as per the established protocol and thereafter plates were flooded with 1M Sodium chloride solution for the appearance of zone of clearance. The diameter for zone of clearance by the proposed method and the established protocol was almost identical and ranged from 21 to 42 mm at different pH depending upon the activity of endo-β-1, 4-xylanases. Change of pH towards alkaline side enabled similar or marginal decrease of diameter for the zone of clearance in most of the fungal isolates. The specific activities of these fungal isolates varied from 1.85 to 11.47 IU/mg protein. The present investigation revealed that the proposed simple diffusion technique gave similar results as compared to the established Congo red assay for endo-β-1, 4-xylanases. Moreover, the present technique avoided the cumbersome steps of staining by Congo red and de-staining by sodium chloride. PMID:24031763

  9. A highly sensitive technique for detecting catalytically active nanoparticles against a background of general workplace aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, N.; Weis, F.; Binder, A.; Seipenbusch, M.; Kasper, G.

    2011-07-01

    A new measurement technique was studied using catalysis to specifically detect airborne nanoparticles in presence of background particles in the workplace air. Catalytically active nanoparticles produced by spark discharge were used as aerosol catalysts. According to these particles suitable catalytic test reactions were chosen and investigated by two different approaches: catalysis on airborne nanoparticles and catalysis on deposited nanoparticles. The results indicate that catalysis is applicable for the specific measurement of nanoparticles in the workplace air. Catalysis on airborne particles is suitable for the specific detection of very active nanoparticles, e.g. platinum or nickel, at high concentrations of about 107 #/cm3. The approach of catalysis on deposited particles is better suited for nanoparticle aerosols at low concentrations, for slow catalytic reactions or less active nanoparticles like iron oxide (Fe2O3). On the basis of the experimental results detection limits in the range of μg or even ng were calculated which assure the good potential of catalysis for the specific detection of nanoparticles in the workplace air based on their catalytic activity.

  10. A non-contact technique for measuring eccrine sweat gland activity using passive thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Krzywicki, Alan T; Berntson, Gary G; O'Kane, Barbara L

    2014-10-01

    An approach for monitoring eccrine sweat gland activity using high resolution Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR) imaging (3-5 μm wave band) is described. This technique is non-contact, passive, and provides high temporal and spatial resolution. Pore activity was monitored on the face and on the volar surfaces of the distal and medial phalanges of the index and middle fingers while participants performed a series of six deep inhalation and exhalation exercises. Two metrics called the Pore Activation Index (PAI) and Pore Count (PC) were defined as size-weighted and unweighted measures of active sweat gland counts respectively. PAI transient responses on the finger tips were found to be positively correlated to Skin Conductance Responses (SCRs). PAI responses were also observed on the face, although the finger sites appeared to be more responsive. Results indicate that thermal imaging of the pore response may provide a useful, non-contact, correlate measure for electrodermal responses recorded from related sites. PMID:24956027

  11. RADIATION-DRIVEN FOUNTAIN AND ORIGIN OF TORUS AROUND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Keiichi

    2012-10-10

    We propose a plausible mechanism to explain the formation of the so-called obscuring tori around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) based on three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including radiative feedback from the central source. The X-ray heating and radiation pressure on the gas are explicitly calculated using a ray-tracing method. This radiation feedback drives a 'fountain', that is, a vertical circulation of gas in the central few to tens parsecs. Interaction between the non-steady outflows and inflows causes the formation of a geometrically thick torus with internal turbulent motion. As a result, the AGN is obscured for a wide range of solid angles. In a quasi-steady state, the opening angles for the column density toward a black hole <10{sup 23} cm{sup -2} are approximately {+-}30 Degree-Sign and {+-}50 Degree-Sign for AGNs with 10% and 1% Eddington luminosity, respectively. Mass inflows through the torus coexist with the outflow and internal turbulent motion, and the average mass accretion rate to the central parsec region is 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} {approx} 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}; this is about 10 times smaller than accretion rate required to maintain the AGN luminosity. This implies that relatively luminous AGN activity is intrinsically intermittent or that there are other mechanisms, such as stellar energy feedback, that enhance the mass accretion to the center.

  12. Evaluating a three dimensional model of diffuse photosynthetically active radiation in maize canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiping; Guo, Yan; Li, Baoguo; Wang, Xiyong; Ma, Yuntao

    2006-07-01

    Diffuse photosynthetically active radiation (DPAR) is important during overcast days and for plant parts shaded from the direct beam radiation. Simulation of DPAR interception by individual plant parts of a canopy, separately from direct beam photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), may give important insights into plant ecology. This paper presents a model to simulate the interception of DPAR in plant canopies. A sub-model of a virtual maize canopy was reconstructed. Plant surfaces were represented as small triangular facets positioned according to three-dimensionally (3D) digitized data collected in the field. Then a second sub-model to simulate the 3D DPAR distribution in the canopy was developed by dividing the sky hemisphere into a grid of fine cells that allowed for the anisotropic distribution of DPAR over the sky hemisphere. This model, DSHP (Dividing Sky Hemisphere with Projecting), simulates which DSH (Divided Sky Hemisphere) cells are directly visible from a facet in the virtual canopy, i.e. not obscured by other facets. The DPAR reaching the center of a facet was calculated by summing the amounts of DPAR present in every DSH cell. The distribution of DPAR in a canopy was obtained from the calculated DPARs intercepted by all facets in the canopy. This DSHP model was validated against DPAR measurements made in an actual maize ( Zea mays L.) canopy over selected days during the early filling stage. The simulated and measured DPAR at different canopy depths showed a good agreement with a R 2 equaling 0.78 ( n=120).

  13. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Dermatitis by Activation of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Using Topical Alda-1 in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Shoucheng; Budas, Grant R.; Churchill, Eric N.; Chen, Che-Hong; Knox, Susan J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2012-01-01

    Ning, S., Budas, G. R., Churchill, E. N., Chen, C., Knox, S. J. and Mochly-Rosen, D. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Dermatitis by Activation of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Using Topical Alda-1 in Mice. Radiation-induced dermatitis is a debilitating clinical problem in cancer patients undergoing cancer radiation therapy. It is also a possible outcome of exposure to high levels of radiation due to accident or hostile activity. We report that activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) enzymatic activity using the allosteric agonist, Alda-1, significantly reduced 4-hydroxynonenal adducts accumulation, delayed the onset of radiation dermatitis and substantially reduced symptoms in a clinically-relevant model of radiation-induced dermatitis. Importantly, Alda-1 did not radioprotect tumors in mice. Rather, it increased the sensitivity of the tumors to radiation therapy. This is the first report of reactive aldehydes playing a role in the intrinsic radiosensitivity of normal and tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that ALDH2 represents a novel target for the treatment of radiation dermatitis without reducing the benefit of radiotherapy. PMID:22404739

  14. TRADEOFFs in climate effects through aircraft routing: forcing due to radiatively active gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stordal, F.; Gauss, M.; Myhre, G.; Mancini, E.; Hauglustaine, D. A.; Köhler, M. O.; Berntsen, T.; . G Stordal, E. J.; Iachetti, D.; Pitari, G.; Isaksen, I. S. A.

    2006-10-01

    We have estimated impacts of alternative aviation routings on the radiative forcing. Changes in ozone and OH have been estimated in four Chemistry Transport Models (CTMs) participating in the TRADEOFF project. Radiative forcings due to ozone and methane have been calculated accordingly. In addition radiative forcing due to CO2 is estimated based on fuel consumption. Three alternative routing cases are investigated; one scenario assuming additional polar routes and two scenarios assuming aircraft cruising at higher (+2000 ft) and lower (-6000 ft) altitudes. Results from the base case in year 2000 are included as a reference. Taking first a steady state backward looking approach, adding the changes in the forcing from ozone, CO2 and CH4, the ranges of the models used in this work are -0.8 to -1.8 and 0.3 to 0.6 m Wm-2 in the lower (-6000 ft) and higher (+2000 ft) cruise levels, respectively. In relative terms, flying 6000ft lower reduces the forcing by 5-10% compared to the current flight pattern, whereas flying higher, while saving fuel and presumably flying time, increases the forcing by about 2-3%. Taking next a forward looking approach we have estimated the integrated forcing (m Wm-2 yr) over 20 and 100 years time horizons. The relative contributions from each of the three climate gases are somewhat different from the backward looking approach. The differences are moderate adopting 100 year time horizon, whereas under the 20 year horizon CO2 naturally becomes less important relatively. Thus the forcing agents impact climate differently on various time scales. Also, we have found significant differences between the models for ozone and methane. We conclude that we are not yet at a point where we can include non-CO2 effects of aviation in emission trading schemes. Nevertheless, the rerouting cases that have been studied here yield relatively small changes in the radiative forcing due to the radiatively active gases.

  15. Using a Simple Apparatus to Measure Direct and Diffuse Photosynthetically Active Radiation at Remote Locations

    PubMed Central

    Cruse, Michael J.; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Norman, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support

  16. Microdosimetric-based risk factors for radiation received in space activities during a trip to Mars.

    PubMed

    Zaider, M

    1996-06-01

    A system for evaluating quality factors, Q, based on the microdosimetric distribution of the radiation field of interest has been set up; it makes use of a specific quality function (SQF) to obtain--given microdosimetric spectra--values for Q. The advantages of a system based on lineal energy are well recognized. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that spectra in 1-microm diameter tissue-equivalent spherical volumes reproduce correctly (in the sense of this formalism) measured RBE values, and thus a proportional counter would be usable as a practical instrument for radiation protection. All specific quality functions, q(y), available to date have been calculated from in vitro cellular data. To extend this approach to radiations of interest in space activities we have recently obtained a new function q(y) for in vivo radiogenic neoplasia using data on the Harderian gland of the mouse. These data were obtained for charged particles and energies relevant to space exposures. Furthermore, we introduce a new procedure that allows one to obtain--here with the use of microdosimetric distributions for the Hiroshima-Nagasaki radiation fields--risk factors scaled from the A-bomb survivorship results. We apply these concepts to particles and energies representing the galactic spectrum. We estimate that for a trip to Mars (450 d) the excess lifetime cancer mortality due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) radiation is 0.037. This is about 50% lower than the risk coefficient obtained with the aid of standard (LET-based) quality factors. PMID:8635910

  17. Acoustic radiation from the submerged circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li-Yun; Xiang, Yu; Lu, Jing; Jiang, Hong-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Based on the transfer matrix method of exploring the circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping (i.e., ACLD), combined with the analytical solution of the Helmholtz equation for a point source, a multi-point multipole virtual source simulation method is for the first time proposed for solving the acoustic radiation problem of a submerged ACLD shell. This approach, wherein some virtual point sources are assumed to be evenly distributed on the axial line of the cylindrical shell, and the sound pressure could be written in the form of the sum of the wave functions series with the undetermined coefficients, is demonstrated to be accurate to achieve the radiation acoustic pressure of the pulsating and oscillating spheres respectively. Meanwhile, this approach is proved to be accurate to obtain the radiation acoustic pressure for a stiffened cylindrical shell. Then, the chosen number of the virtual distributed point sources and truncated number of the wave functions series are discussed to achieve the approximate radiation acoustic pressure of an ACLD cylindrical shell. Applying this method, different radiation acoustic pressures of a submerged ACLD cylindrical shell with different boundary conditions, different thickness values of viscoelastic and piezoelectric layer, different feedback gains for the piezoelectric layer and coverage of ACLD are discussed in detail. Results show that a thicker thickness and larger velocity gain for the piezoelectric layer and larger coverage of the ACLD layer can obtain a better damping effect for the whole structure in general. Whereas, laying a thicker viscoelastic layer is not always a better treatment to achieve a better acoustic characteristic. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11162001, 11502056, and 51105083), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. 2012GXNSFAA053207), the Doctor Foundation of Guangxi

  18. Using a simple apparatus to measure direct and diffuse photosynthetically active radiation at remote locations.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Michael J; Kucharik, Christopher J; Norman, John M

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation on the enzyme activities and ultrastructural changes of poultry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, H.-I.; Hau, L.-B.

    1995-02-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed changes are generally recognized as one of the major reasons for fresh meat deterioration after irradiation. In this study, the effects of ionizing radiation and storage on the enzyme activities of poultry as well as the ultrastructural change of muscle were evaluated. When chicken breasts were irradiated at 4°C and -20°C, both Ca 2+-dependent protease and cathepsin D showed some degree of resistance to irradiation. The activities of those two enzymes decreased with the increase of irradiation doses. During storage, Ca 2+-dependent proteases showed a marked decrease in activity. On the other hand, the cathepsin D activity was not significantly changed at either 4°C or -20°C after 20 days. Transmission electron microscope examination showed no structural changes of the myofibrils with a radiation dose of up to 10 kGy at either 4°C or -20°C. Freezing protected the irradiated chicken breasts from autolytic enzymes damage during storage. In contrast, considerable sarcomere degradation occurred in Z-line for irradiated samples when stored at 4°C for 20 days. The action of the proteolytic enzymes may have been responsible for the sarcomere degradation in irradiated chicken breasts.

  20. Oxidative mechanisms of biological activity of low-intensity radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Yakymenko, Igor; Tsybulin, Olexandr; Sidorik, Evgeniy; Henshel, Diane; Kyrylenko, Olga; Kyrylenko, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to cover experimental data on oxidative effects of low-intensity radiofrequency radiation (RFR) in living cells. Analysis of the currently available peer-reviewed scientific literature reveals molecular effects induced by low-intensity RFR in living cells; this includes significant activation of key pathways generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of peroxidation, oxidative damage of DNA and changes in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. It indicates that among 100 currently available peer-reviewed studies dealing with oxidative effects of low-intensity RFR, in general, 93 confirmed that RFR induces oxidative effects in biological systems. A wide pathogenic potential of the induced ROS and their involvement in cell signaling pathways explains a range of biological/health effects of low-intensity RFR, which include both cancer and non-cancer pathologies. In conclusion, our analysis demonstrates that low-intensity RFR is an expressive oxidative agent for living cells with a high pathogenic potential and that the oxidative stress induced by RFR exposure should be recognized as one of the primary mechanisms of the biological activity of this kind of radiation. PMID:26151230