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Sample records for active site mutations

  1. Mutations Closer to the Active Site Improve the Promiscuous Aldolase Activity of 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase More Effectively than Distant Mutations.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehran; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Baas, Bert-Jan; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2016-07-01

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which catalyzes enol-keto tautomerization as part of a degradative pathway for aromatic hydrocarbons, promiscuously catalyzes various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. These include the aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde. Here, we demonstrate that 4-OT can be engineered into a more efficient aldolase for this condensation reaction, with a >5000-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) and a >10(7) -fold change in reaction specificity, by exploring small libraries in which only "hotspots" are varied. The hotspots were identified by systematic mutagenesis (covering each residue), followed by a screen for single mutations that give a strong improvement in the desired aldolase activity. All beneficial mutations were near the active site of 4-OT, thus underpinning the notion that new catalytic activities of a promiscuous enzyme are more effectively enhanced by mutations close to the active site. PMID:27238293

  2. A three-dimensional model of mammalian tyrosinase active site accounting for loss of function mutations.

    PubMed

    Schweikardt, Thorsten; Olivares, Concepción; Solano, Francisco; Jaenicke, Elmar; García-Borrón, José Carlos; Decker, Heinz

    2007-10-01

    Tyrosinases are the first and rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of melanin pigments responsible for colouring hair, skin and eyes. Mutation of tyrosinases often decreases melanin production resulting in albinism, but the effects are not always understood at the molecular level. Homology modelling of mouse tyrosinase based on recently published crystal structures of non-mammalian tyrosinases provides an active site model accounting for loss-of-function mutations. According to the model, the copper-binding histidines are located in a helix bundle comprising four densely packed helices. A loop containing residues M374, S375 and V377 connects the CuA and CuB centres, with the peptide oxygens of M374 and V377 serving as hydrogen acceptors for the NH-groups of the imidazole rings of the copper-binding His367 and His180. Therefore, this loop is essential for the stability of the active site architecture. A double substitution (374)MS(375) --> (374)GG(375) or a single M374G mutation lead to a local perturbation of the protein matrix at the active site affecting the orientation of the H367 side chain, that may be unable to bind CuB reliably, resulting in loss of activity. The model also accounts for loss of function in two naturally occurring albino mutations, S380P and V393F. The hydroxyl group in S380 contributes to the correct orientation of M374, and the substitution of V393 for a bulkier phenylalanine sterically impedes correct side chain packing at the active site. Therefore, our model explains the mechanistic necessity for conservation of not only active site histidines but also adjacent amino acids in tyrosinase. PMID:17850513

  3. A Ty1 Reverse Transcriptase Active-Site Aspartate Mutation Blocks Transposition but Not Polymerization†

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, Ozcan; Gabriel, Abram

    2001-01-01

    Reverse transcriptases (RTs) are found in a wide variety of mobile genetic elements including viruses, retrotransposons, and infectious organellar introns. An invariant triad of aspartates is thought to be required for the catalytic function of RTs. We generated RT mutants in the yeast retrotransposon Ty1, changing each of these active-site aspartates to asparagine or glutamate. All but one of the mutants lacked detectable polymerase activity. The novel exception, D211N, retained near wild-type in vitro polymerase activity within virus-like particles but failed to carry out in vivo transposition. For this mutant, minus-strand synthesis is impaired and formation of the plus-strand strong-stop intermediate is eliminated. Intragenic second-site suppressor mutations of the transposition defect map to the RNase H domain of the enzyme. Our results demonstrate that one of the three active-site aspartates in a retrotransposon RT is not catalytically critical. This implies a basic difference in the polymerase active-site geometry of Ty1 and human immunodeficiency virus RT and shows that subtle mutations in one domain can cause dramatic functional effects on a distant domain of the same enzyme. PMID:11413300

  4. Structural Characterization of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase Variants Bearing Active Site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Radom,C.; Banerjee, A.; Verdine, G.

    2007-01-01

    The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) protein is responsible for initiating base excision DNA repair of the endogenous mutagen 8-oxoguanine. Like nearly all DNA glycosylases, hOGG1 extrudes its substrate from the DNA helix and inserts it into an extrahelical enzyme active site pocket lined with residues that participate in lesion recognition and catalysis. Structural analysis has been performed on mutant versions of hOGG1 having changes in catalytic residues but not on variants having altered 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (oxoG) contact residues. Here we report high resolution structural analysis of such recognition variants. We found that Ala substitution at residues that contact the phosphate 5 to the lesion (H270A mutation) and its Watson-Crick face (Q315A mutation) simply removed key functionality from the contact interface but otherwise had no effect on structure. Ala substitution at the only residue making an oxoG-specific contact (G42A mutation) introduced torsional stress into the DNA contact surface of hOGG1, but this was overcome by local interactions within the folded protein, indicating that this oxoG recognition motif is 'hardwired'. Introduction of a side chain intended to sterically obstruct the active site pocket (Q315F mutation) led to two different structures, one of which (Q315F{sup *149}) has the oxoG lesion in an exosite flanking the active site and the other of which (Q315F{sup *292}) has the oxoG inserted nearly completely into the lesion recognition pocket. The latter structure offers a view of the latest stage in the base extrusion pathway yet observed, and its lack of catalytic activity demonstrates that the transition state for displacement of the lesion base is geometrically demanding.

  5. Structural Mutations that Probe the Interactions between the Catalytic and Dianion Activation Sites at Triosephosphate Isomerase‡

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Xiang; Amyes, Tina L.; Wierenga, Rik K.; Loria, J. Patrick; Richard, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) catalyzes the isomerization of dihydroxyacetone phosphate to form D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The effects of two structural mutations at TIM on the kinetic parameters for catalysis of the reaction of the truncated substrate glycolaldehyde (GA) and the activation of this reaction by phosphite dianion are reported. The P168A mutation results in similar 50-fold and 80-fold decreases, respectively, in (kcat/Km)E and (kcat/Km)E•HPi for deprotonation of GA catalyzed by free TIM and by the TIM•HPO32− complex. The mutation has little effect on the observed and intrinsic phosphite dianion binding energy, or on the magnitude of phosphite dianion activation of TIM for catalysis of deprotonation of GA. A loop 7 replacement mutant (L7RM) of TIM from chicken muscle was prepared by substitution of the archaeal sequence 208-TGAG for 208-YGGS. The L7RM exhibits a 25-fold decrease in (kcat/Km)E and a larger 170-fold decrease in (kcat/Km)E•HPi for reactions of GA. The mutation has little effect on the observed and intrinsic phosphodianion binding energy, and only a modest effect on phosphite dianion activation of TIM. The observation that both the P168A and loop 7 replacement mutations affect mainly the kinetic parameters for TIM-catalyzed deprotonation, but result in much smaller changes in the parameters for enzyme activation by phosphite dianion provide support for the conclusion that catalysis of proton transfer and dianion activation of TIM take place at separate, weakly interacting, sites in the protein catalyst. PMID:23909928

  6. Upregulation of RNase E activity by mutation of a site that uncompetitively interferes with RNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minho; Shin, Eunkyoung; Jeon, Che Ok; Cha, Chang-Jun; Han, Seung Hyun; Kim, Su-Jin; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Younghoon; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNase E contains a site that selectively binds to RNAs containing 5′-monophosphate termini, increasing the efficiency of endonucleolytic cleavage of these RNAs. Random mutagenesis of N-Rne, the N-terminal catalytic region of RNase E, identified a hyperactive variant that remains preferentially responsive to phosphorylation at 5′ termini. Biochemical analyses showed that the mutation (Q36R), which replaces glutamine with arginine at a position distant from the catalytic site, increases formation of stable RNA-protein complexes without detectably affecting the enzyme's secondary or tertiary structure. Studies of cleavage of fluorogenic substrate and EMSA experiments indicated that the Q36R mutation increases catalytic activity and RNA binding. however, UV crosslinking and mass spectrometry studies suggested that the mutant enzyme lacks an RNA binding site present in its wild-type counterpart. Two substrate-bound tryptic peptides, 65HGFLPLK71—which includes amino acids previously implicated in substrate binding and catalysis—and 24LYDLDIESPGHEQK37—which includes the Q36 locus—were identified in wild-type enzyme complexes, whereas only the shorter peptide was observed for complexes containing Q36R. Our results identify a novel RNase E locus that disparately affects the number of substrate binding sites and catalytic activity of the enzyme. We propose a model that may account for these surprising effects. PMID:22186084

  7. Mutation of Gly721 Alters DNA Topoisomerase I Active Site Architecture and Sensitivity to Camptothecin*

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Marie; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I (Top1p) catalyzes the relaxation of supercoiled DNA via a concerted mechanism of DNA strand cleavage and religation. Top1p is the cellular target of the anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT), which reversibly stabilizes a covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate. Top1p clamps around duplex DNA, wherein the core and C-terminal domains are connected by extended α-helices (linker domain), which position the active site Tyr of the C-terminal domain within the catalytic pocket. The physical connection of the linker with the Top1p clamp as well as linker flexibility affect enzyme sensitivity to CPT. Crystallographic data reveal that a conserved Gly residue (located at the juncture between the linker and C-terminal domains) is at one end of a short α-helix, which extends to the active site Tyr covalently linked to the DNA. In the presence of drug, the linker is rigid and this α-helix extends to include Gly and the preceding Leu. We report that mutation of this conserved Gly in yeast Top1p alters enzyme sensitivity to CPT. Mutating Gly to Asp, Glu, Asn, Gln, Leu, or Ala enhanced enzyme CPT sensitivity, with the acidic residues inducing the greatest increase in drug sensitivity in vivo and in vitro. By contrast, Val or Phe substituents rendered the enzyme CPT-resistant. Mutation-induced alterations in enzyme architecture preceding the active site Tyr suggest these structural transitions modulate enzyme sensitivity to CPT, while enhancing the rate of DNA cleavage. We postulate that this conserved Gly residue provides a flexible hinge within the Top1p catalytic pocket to facilitate linker dynamics and the structural alterations that accompany drug binding of the covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate. PMID:18056711

  8. Identification of a Tumor Specific, Active-Site Mutation in Casein Kinase 1α by Chemical Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Okerberg, Eric S.; Hainley, Anna; Brown, Heidi; Aban, Arwin; Alemayehu, Senait; Shih, Ann; Wu, Jane; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Kozarich, John W.; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon; Rosenblum, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the identification of a novel, tumor-specific missense mutation in the active site of casein kinase 1α (CSNK1A1) using activity-based proteomics. Matched normal and tumor colon samples were analyzed using an ATP acyl phosphate probe in a kinase-targeted LC-MS2 platform. An anomaly in the active-site peptide from CSNK1A1 was observed in a tumor sample that was consistent with an altered catalytic aspartic acid. Expression and analysis of the suspected mutant verified the presence of asparagine in the probe-labeled, active-site peptide for CSNK1A1. Genomic sequencing of the colon tumor samples confirmed the presence of a missense mutation in the catalytic aspartic acid of CSNK1A1 (GAC→AAC). To our knowledge, the D163N mutation in CSNK1A1 is a newly defined mutation to the conserved, catalytic aspartic acid of a protein kinase and the first missense mutation identified using activity-based proteomics. The tumorigenic potential of this mutation remains to be determined. PMID:27031502

  9. Mutational analysis of the active site of indoleglycerol phosphate synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Darimont, B.; Stehlin, C.; Szadkowski, H.; Kirschner, K.

    1998-01-01

    Indoleglycerol phosphate synthase catalyzes the ring closure of 1-(2-carboxyphenylamino)-1-deoxyribulose 5'-phosphate to indoleglycerol phosphate, the fifth step in the pathway of tryptophan biosynthesis from chorismate. Because chemical synthesis of indole derivatives from arylamino ketones requires drastic solvent conditions, it is interesting by what mechanism the enzyme catalyzes the same condensation reaction. Seven invariant polar residues in the active site of the enzyme from Escherichia coli have been mutated directly or randomly, to identify the catalytically essential ones. A strain of E. coli suitable for selecting and classifying active mutants by functional complementation was constructed by precise deletion of the trpC gene from the genome. Judged by growth rates of transformants on selective media, mutants with either S58 or S60 replaced by alanine were indistinguishable from the wild-type, but R186 replaced by alanine was still partially active. Saturation random mutagenesis of individual codons showed that E53 was partially replaceable by aspartate and cysteine, whereas K114, E163, and N184 could not be replaced by any other residue. Partially active mutant proteins were purified and their steady-state kinetic and inhibitor binding constants determined. Their relative catalytic efficiencies paralleled their relative complementation efficiencies. These results are compatible with the location of the essential residues in the active site of the enzyme and support a chemically plausible catalytic mechanism. It involves two enzyme-bound intermediates and general acid-base catalysis by K114 and E163 with the support of E53 and N184. PMID:9605328

  10. Rescue of Enzymatic Function for Disease-associated RPE65 Proteins Containing Various Missense Mutations in Non-active Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songhua; Izumi, Tadahide; Hu, Jane; Jin, Heather H.; Siddiqui, Ahmed-Abdul A.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Bok, Dean; Jin, Minghao

    2014-01-01

    Over 70 different missense mutations, including a dominant mutation, in RPE65 retinoid isomerase are associated with distinct forms of retinal degeneration; however, the disease mechanisms for most of these mutations have not been studied. Although some mutations have been shown to abolish enzyme activity, the molecular mechanisms leading to the loss of enzymatic function and retinal degeneration remain poorly understood. Here we show that the 26 S proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 13 (PSMD13), a newly identified negative regulator of RPE65, plays a critical role in regulating pathogenicity of three mutations (L22P, T101I, and L408P) by mediating rapid degradation of mutated RPE65s via a ubiquitination- and proteasome-dependent non-lysosomal pathway. These mutant RPE65s were misfolded and formed aggregates or high molecular complexes via disulfide bonds. Interaction of PSMD13 with mutant RPE65s promoted degradation of misfolded but not properly folded mutant RPE65s. Many mutations, including L22P, T101I, and L408P, were mapped on non-active sites. Although their activities were very low, these mutant RPE65s were catalytically active and could be significantly rescued at low temperature, whereas mutant RPE65s with a distinct active site mutation could not be rescued under the same conditions. Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate and glycerol displayed a significant synergistic effect on the low temperature rescue of the mutant RPE65s by promoting proper folding, reducing aggregation, and increasing membrane association. Our results suggest that a low temperature eye mask and sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, a United States Food and Drug Administration-approved oral medicine, may provide a promising “protein repair therapy” that can enhance the efficacy of gene therapy by reducing the cytotoxic effect of misfolded mutant RPE65s. PMID:24849605

  11. Active RNAP pre-initiation sites are highly mutated by cytidine deaminases in yeast, with AID targeting small RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin JM; Wu, Yee Ling; Rada, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Cytidine deaminases are single stranded DNA mutators diversifying antibodies and restricting viral infection. Improper access to the genome leads to translocations and mutations in B cells and contributes to the mutation landscape in cancer, such as kataegis. It remains unclear how deaminases access double stranded genomes and whether off-target mutations favor certain loci, although transcription and opportunistic access during DNA repair are thought to play a role. In yeast, AID and the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G preferentially mutate transcriptionally active genes within narrow regions, 110 base pairs in width, fixed at RNA polymerase initiation sites. Unlike APOBEC3G, AID shows enhanced mutational preference for small RNA genes (tRNAs, snoRNAs and snRNAs) suggesting a putative role for RNA in its recruitment. We uncover the high affinity of the deaminases for the single stranded DNA exposed by initiating RNA polymerases (a DNA configuration reproduced at stalled polymerases) without a requirement for specific cofactors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03553.001 PMID:25237741

  12. Asymmetric mutations in the tetrameric R67 dihydrofolate reductase reveal high tolerance to active-site substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Maximilian C C J C; Morley, Krista L; Volpato, Jordan P; Schmitzer, Andreea R; Pelletier, Joelle N

    2015-01-01

    Type II R67 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a bacterial plasmid-encoded enzyme that is intrinsically resistant to the widely-administered antibiotic trimethoprim. R67 DHFR is genetically and structurally unrelated to E. coli chromosomal DHFR and has an unusual architecture, in that four identical protomers form a single symmetrical active site tunnel that allows only one substrate binding/catalytic event at any given time. As a result, substitution of an active-site residue has as many as four distinct consequences on catalysis, constituting an atypical model of enzyme evolution. Although we previously demonstrated that no single residue of the native active site is indispensable for function, library selection here revealed a strong bias toward maintenance of two native protomers per mutated tetramer. A variety of such “half-native” tetramers were shown to procure native-like catalytic activity, with similar KM values but kcat values 5- to 33-fold lower, illustrating a high tolerance for active-site substitutions. The selected variants showed a reduced thermal stability (Tm ∼12°C lower), which appears to result from looser association of the protomers, but generally showed a marked increase in resilience to heat denaturation, recovering activity to a significantly greater extent than the variant with no active-site substitutions. Our results suggest that the presence of two native protomers in the R67 DHFR tetramer is sufficient to provide native-like catalytic rate and thus ensure cellular proliferation. PMID:25401264

  13. The Role of Distant Mutations and Allosteric Regulation on LovD Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Osuna, Sílvia; Gao, Xue; Sawaya, Michael R.; Gilson, Lynne; Collier, Steven J.; Huisman, Gjalt W.; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi; Houk, K. N.

    2014-01-01

    Natural enzymes have evolved to perform their cellular functions under complex selective pressures, which often require their catalytic activities to be regulated by other proteins. We contrasted a natural enzyme, LovD, which acts on a protein-bound (LovF) acyl substrate, with a laboratory-generated variant that was transformed by directed evolution to accept instead a small free acyl thioester, and no longer requires the acyl carrier protein. The resulting 29-mutant variant is 1000-fold more efficient in the synthesis of the drug simvastatin than the wild-type LovD. This is the first non-patent report of the enzyme currently used for the manufacture of simvastatin, as well as the intermediate evolved variants. Crystal structures and microsecond molecular dynamics simulations revealed the mechanism by which the laboratory-generated mutations free LovD from dependence on protein-protein interactions. Mutations dramatically altered conformational dynamics of the catalytic residues, obviating the need for allosteric modulation by the acyl carrier LovF. PMID:24727900

  14. Reductive half-reaction of nitroalkane oxidase: effect of mutation of the active site aspartate to glutamate.

    PubMed

    Valley, Michael P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2003-05-20

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitroalkanes to the respective aldehydes or ketones, releasing nitrite. The enzyme has recently been identified as being homologous to the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family of enzymes [Daubner, S. C., Gadda, G., Valley, M. P., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 2702-2707]. The glutamate which acts as an active site base in that family of enzymes aligns with Asp402 of nitroalkane oxidase. To evaluate the identification of Asp402 as an active site base, the effect of mutation of Asp402 to glutamate on the rate of cleavage of the nitroalkane C-H bond has been determined. Deuterium kinetic isotope effects on steady state kinetic parameters and direct measurement of the rate of flavin reduction establish that the mutation increases the DeltaG(++) for C-H bond cleavage by 1.6-1.9 kcal/mol. There is no effect on the rate of reaction of the reduced enzyme with oxygen. These results support the assignment of Asp402 as the active site base in nitroalkane oxidase. PMID:12741843

  15. Mutation of conserved active-site threonine residues in creatine kinase affects autophosphorylation and enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, Martin; Hornemann, Thorsten; Schlattner, Uwe; Wallimann, Theo

    2002-01-01

    Muscle-type creatine kinase (MM-CK) is a member of an isoenzyme family with key functions in cellular energetics. It has become a matter of debate whether the enzyme is autophosphorylated, as reported earlier [Hemmer, Furter-Graves, Frank, Wallimann and Furter (1995) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1251, 81-90], or exclusively nucleotidylated. In the present paper, we demonstrate unambiguously that CK is indeed autophosphorylated. However, this autophosphorylation is not solely responsible for the observed microheterogeneity of MM-CK on two-dimensional isoelectric focusing gels. Using phosphoamino-acid analysis of (32)P-labelled CK isoforms, phosphothreonine (P-Thr) residues were identified as the only product of autophosphorylation for all CK isoenzymes. The phosphorylated residues in chicken MM-CK were allocated to a region in the vicinity of the active site, where five putative phosphorylation sites were identified. Site-directed threonine-valine-replacement mutants reveal that autophosphorylation is not specific for one particular residue but occurs at all examined threonine residues. The enzyme kinetic parameters indicate that the autophosphorylation of CK exerts a modulatory effect on substrate binding and the equilibrium constant, rather than on the catalytic mechanism itself. PMID:11964180

  16. Inactivation of nitroalkane oxidase upon mutation of the active site base and rescue with a deprotonated substrate.

    PubMed

    Valley, Michael P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2003-07-23

    Mutation of Asp402 in nitroalkane oxidase to Asn or Ala inactivates the enzyme with neutral nitroethane as substrate, but the activity can be rescued with the nitroethane anion. The V/K values of the D402N and D402A enzymes with the nitroethane anion are independent of pH, whereas the V/K values of the wild-type and D402E enzymes are pH dependent with both the protonated and the deprotonated forms of nitroethane. Moreover, although the V/K value of the D402E enzyme with neutral nitroethane is 20-fold less than that of the wild-type enzyme, there is only a 2-fold difference in the V/K values with the nitroethane anion. These results are fully consistent with a primary role for Asp402 as the active site base in nitroalkane oxidase which abstracts the substrate alpha-proton. PMID:12862464

  17. Structural Characterization of Mutations at the Oxygen Activation Site in Monomeric Sarcosine Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman Jorns, Marilyn; Chen, Zhi-wei; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-04-30

    Oxygen reduction and sarcosine oxidation in monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) occur at separate sites above the si- and re-faces, respectively, of the flavin ring. Mutagenesis studies implicate Lys265 as the oxygen activation site. Substitution of Lys265 with a neutral (Met, Gln, or Ala) or basic (Arg) residue results in an {approx}10{sup 4}- or 250-fold decrease, respectively, in the reaction rate. The overall structure of MSOX and residue conformation in the sarcosine binding cavity are unaffected by replacement of Lys265 with Met or Arg. The side chain of Met265 exhibits the same configuration in each molecule of Lys265Met crystals and is nearly congruent with Lys265 in wild-type MSOX. The side chain of Arg265 is, however, dramatically shifted (4-5 {angstrom}) compared with Lys265, points in the opposite direction, and exhibits significant conformational variability between molecules of the same crystal. The major species in solutions of Lys265Arg is likely to contain a 'flipped-out' Arg265 and exhibit negligible oxygen activation, similar to Lys265Met. The 400-fold higher oxygen reactivity observed with Lys265Arg is attributed to a minor (<1%) 'flipped-in' Arg265 conformer whose oxygen reactivity is similar to that of wild-type MSOX. A structural water (WAT1), found above the si-face of the flavin ring in all previously determined MSOX structures, is part of an apparent proton relay system that extends from FAD N(5) to bulk solvent. WAT1 is strikingly absent in Lys265Met and Lys265Arg, a feature that may account for the apparent kinetic stabilization of a reductive half-reaction intermediate that is detectable with the mutants but not wild-type MSOX.

  18. Active site mutants of Escherichia coli dethiobiotin synthetase: effects of mutations on enzyme catalytic and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Sandalova, T; Lohman, K; Lindqvist, Y; Rendina, A R

    1997-04-22

    Five active site residues, Thr11, Glu12, Lys15, Lys37, and Ser41, implicated by the protein crystal structure studies of Escherichia coli DTBS, were mutated to determine their function in catalysis and substrate binding. Nine mutant enzymes, T11V, E12A, E12D, K15Q, K37L, K37Q, K37R, S41A, and S41C, were overproduced in an E. coli strain lacking a functional endogenous DTBS gene and purified to homogeneity. Replacement of Thr11 with valine resulted in a 24,000-fold increase in the Km(ATP) with little or no change in the Kd(ATP), KM(DAPA) and DTBS k(cat), suggesting an essential role for this residue in the steady-state affinity for ATP. The two Glu12 mutants showed essentially wild-type DTBS activity (slightly elevated k(cat)'s). Unlike wild-type DTBS, E12A had the same apparent KM(DAPA) at subsaturating and saturating ATP concentrations, indicating a possible role for Glu12 in the binding synergy between DAPA and ATP. The mutations in Lys15 and Lys37 resulted in loss of catalytic activity (0.01% and <0.9% of wild-type DTBS k(cat) for K15Q and the Lys37 mutant enzymes, respectively) and higher KM's for both DAPA (40-fold and >100-fold higher than wild-type for the K15Q and Lys37 mutant enzymes, respectively) and ATP (1800-fold and >10-fold higher than wild-type for K15Q and the K37 mutant enzymes, respectively). These results strongly suggest that Lys15 and Lys37 are crucial to both catalysis and substrate binding. S41A and S41C had essentially the same k(cat) as wild-type and had moderate increases in the DAPA and ATP KM and Kd (ATP) values. Replacement of Ser41 with cysteine resulted in larger effects than replacement with alanine. These data suggest that the H-bond between N7 of DAPA and the Ser41 side chain is not very important for catalysis. The catalytic behavior of these mutant enzymes was also studied by pulse-chase experiments which produced results consistent with the steady-state kinetic analyses. X-ray crystallographic studies of four mutant enzymes, S

  19. Dominant Mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 Identify the Mlh1-Pms1 Endonuclease Active Site and an Exonuclease 1-Independent Mismatch Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine E.; Mendillo, Marc L.; Bowen, Nikki; Hombauer, Hans; Campbell, Christopher S.; Desai, Arshad; Putnam, Christopher D.; Kolodner, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC) is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR) caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A) that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1Δ mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway. PMID:24204293

  20. Second-site suppressors of HIV-1 capsid mutations: restoration of intracellular activities without correction of intrinsic capsid stability defects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disassembly of the viral capsid following penetration into the cytoplasm, or uncoating, is a poorly understood stage of retrovirus infection. Based on previous studies of HIV-1 CA mutants exhibiting altered capsid stability, we concluded that formation of a capsid of optimal intrinsic stability is crucial for HIV-1 infection. Results To further examine the connection between HIV-1 capsid stability and infectivity, we isolated second-site suppressors of HIV-1 mutants exhibiting unstable (P38A) or hyperstable (E45A) capsids. We identified the respective suppressor mutations, T216I and R132T, which restored virus replication in a human T cell line and markedly enhanced the fitness of the original mutants as revealed in single-cycle infection assays. Analysis of the corresponding purified N-terminal domain CA proteins by NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the E45A and R132T mutations induced structural changes that are localized to the regions of the mutations, while the P38A mutation resulted in changes extending to neighboring regions in space. Unexpectedly, neither suppressor mutation corrected the intrinsic viral capsid stability defect associated with the respective original mutation. Nonetheless, the R132T mutation rescued the selective infectivity impairment exhibited by the E45A mutant in aphidicolin-arrested cells, and the double mutant regained sensitivity to the small molecule inhibitor PF74. The T216I mutation rescued the impaired ability of the P38A mutant virus to abrogate restriction by TRIMCyp and TRIM5α. Conclusions The second-site suppressor mutations in CA that we have identified rescue virus infection without correcting the intrinsic capsid stability defects associated with the P38A and E45A mutations. The suppressors also restored wild type virus function in several cell-based assays. We propose that while proper HIV-1 uncoating in target cells is dependent on the intrinsic stability of the viral capsid, the effects of stability

  1. A comparative study of drug resistance mechanism associated with active site and non-active site mutations: I388N and D425G mutants of acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2012-03-01

    A major concern in the development of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-inhibiting (ACCase; EC 6.4.1.2) herbicides is the emergence of resistance as a result of the selection of distinct mutations within the CT domain. Mutations associated with resistance have been demonstrated to include both active sites and non-active sites, including Ile-1781-Leu, Trp- 2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Gly-2096-Ala (numbered according to the Alopecurus myosuroides plastid ACCase). In the present study, extensive computational simulations, including molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) calculations, were carried out to compare the molecular mechanisms of active site mutation (I388N) and non-active site mutation (D425G) in Alopecurus myosuroides resistance to some commercial herbicides targeting ACCase, including haloxyfop (HF), diclofop (DF) and fenoxaprop (FR). All of the computational model and energetic results indicated that both I388N and D425G mutations have effects on the conformational change of the binding pocket. The π-π interaction between ligand and Phe377 and Tyr161' residues, which make an important contribution to the binding affinity, was decreased after mutation. As a result, the mutant-type ACCase has a lower affinity for the inhibitor than the wild-type enzyme, which accounts for the molecular basis of herbicidal resistance. The structural and mechanistic insights obtained from the present study will deepen our understanding of the interactions between ACCase and herbicides, which provides a molecular basis for the future design of a promising inhibitor with low resistance risk. PMID:22242795

  2. A Mutational Analysis of Active Site Residues in trans-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase

    PubMed Central

    Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Serrano, Hector; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    trans -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD) catalyzes the hydrolytic dehalogenation of trans-3-haloacrylates to yield malonate semialdehyde by a mechanism utilizing βPro-1, αArg-8, αArg-11, and αGlu-52. These residues are implicated in a promiscuous hydratase activity where 2-oxo-3-pentynoate is processed to acetopyruvate. The roles of three nearby residues (βAsn-39, αPhe-39, and αPhe-50) are unexplored. Mutants were constructed at these positions (βN39A, αF39A, αF39T, αF50A and αF50Y) and kinetic parameters determined along with those of the αR8K and αR11K mutants. Analysis indicates that αArg-8, αArg-11, and βAsn-39 are critical for dehalogenase activity whereas αArg-11 and αPhe-50 are critical for hydratase activity. Docking studies suggest structural bases for these observations. PMID:23851010

  3. Human single-chain urokinase is activated by the omptins PgtE of Salmonella enterica and Pla of Yersinia pestis despite mutations of active site residues.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Hanna M; Laakkonen, Liisa; Haiko, Johanna; Johansson, Tiira; Juuti, Katri; Suomalainen, Marjo; Buchrieser, Carmen; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Korhonen, Timo K

    2013-08-01

    Fibrinolysis is important in cell migration and tightly regulated by specific inhibitors and activators; of the latter, urokinase (uPA) associates with enhancement of cell migration. Active uPA is formed through cleavage of the single-chain uPA (scuPA). The Salmonella enterica strain 14028R cleaved human scuPA at the peptide bond Lys158-Ile159, the site cleaved also by the physiological activator human plasmin. The cleavage led to activation of scuPA, while no cleavage or activation were detected with the mutant strain 14028R lacking the omptin protease PgtE. Complementation and expression studies confirmed the role of PgtE in scuPA activation. Similar cleavage and activation of scuPA were detected with recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the omptin genes pla from Yersinia pestis, ompT and ompP from E. coli, sopA from Shigella flexneri, and leo from Legionella pneumophila. For these omptins the activation of scuPA is the only shared function so far detected. Only poor cleavage and activation of scuPA were seen with YcoA of Y. pestis and YcoB of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis that are considered to be proteolytically inactive omptin variants. Point mutations of active site residues in Pla and PgtE had different effects on the proteolysis of plasminogen and of scuPA, indicating versatility in omptin proteolysis. PMID:23763588

  4. Triazole resistance mediated by mutations of a conserved active site tyrosine in fungal lanosterol 14α-demethylase.

    PubMed

    Sagatova, Alia A; Keniya, Mikhail V; Wilson, Rajni K; Sabherwal, Manya; Tyndall, Joel D A; Monk, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of fungal strains showing resistance to triazole drugs can make treatment of fungal disease problematic. Triazole resistance can arise due to single mutations in the drug target lanosterol 14α-demethylase (Erg11p/CYP51). We have determined how commonly occurring single site mutations in pathogenic fungi affect triazole binding using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Erg11p (ScErg11p) as a target surrogate. The mutations Y140F/H were introduced into full-length hexahistidine-tagged ScErg11p. Phenotypes and high-resolution X-ray crystal structures were determined for the mutant enzymes complexed with short-tailed (fluconazole and voriconazole) or long-tailed (itraconazole and posaconazole) triazoles and wild type enzyme complexed with voriconazole. The mutations disrupted a water-mediated hydrogen bond network involved in binding of short-tailed triazoles, which contain a tertiary hydroxyl not present in long-tailed triazoles. This appears to be the mechanism by which resistance to these short chain azoles occurs. Understanding how these mutations affect drug affinity will aid the design of azoles that overcome resistance. PMID:27188873

  5. Triazole resistance mediated by mutations of a conserved active site tyrosine in fungal lanosterol 14α-demethylase

    PubMed Central

    Sagatova, Alia A.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Wilson, Rajni K.; Sabherwal, Manya; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Monk, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of fungal strains showing resistance to triazole drugs can make treatment of fungal disease problematic. Triazole resistance can arise due to single mutations in the drug target lanosterol 14α-demethylase (Erg11p/CYP51). We have determined how commonly occurring single site mutations in pathogenic fungi affect triazole binding using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Erg11p (ScErg11p) as a target surrogate. The mutations Y140F/H were introduced into full-length hexahistidine-tagged ScErg11p. Phenotypes and high-resolution X-ray crystal structures were determined for the mutant enzymes complexed with short-tailed (fluconazole and voriconazole) or long-tailed (itraconazole and posaconazole) triazoles and wild type enzyme complexed with voriconazole. The mutations disrupted a water-mediated hydrogen bond network involved in binding of short-tailed triazoles, which contain a tertiary hydroxyl not present in long-tailed triazoles. This appears to be the mechanism by which resistance to these short chain azoles occurs. Understanding how these mutations affect drug affinity will aid the design of azoles that overcome resistance. PMID:27188873

  6. Mutation at a Strictly-Conserved, Active-Site Tyrosine in the Copper Amine Oxidase Leads to Uncontrolled Oxygenase Activity†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-wei; Datta, Saumen; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Klinman, Judith P.; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-01-01

    The copper amine oxidases carry out two copper-dependent processes: production of their own redox-active cofactor (2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone, TPQ), and the subsequent oxidative deamination of substrate amines. Because the same active-site pocket must facilitate both reactions, individual active-site residues may serve multiple roles. We have examined the roles of a strictly-conserved active-site tyrosine Y305 in the copper amine oxidase from Hansenula polymorpha kinetically, spetroscopically, and, in the present work, structurally. While the Y305A enzyme is almost identical to the wild-type, a novel, highly oxygenated species replaces TPQ in the Y305F active sites. This new structure not only provides the first direct detection of peroxy-intermediates in cofactor biogenesis, but also indicates the critical control of oxidation chemistry that can be conferred by a single active-site residue. PMID:20684524

  7. Cytochrome P450 active site plasticity: attenuation of imidazole binding in cytochrome P450(cam) by an L244A mutation.

    PubMed

    Verras, Andreas; Alian, Akram; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2006-11-01

    We have identified a P450(cam) mutation, L244A, that mitigates the affinity for imidazole and substituted imidazoles while maintaining a high affinity for the natural substrate camphor. The P450(cam) L244A crystal structure solved in the absence of any ligand reveals that the I-helix is displaced inwards by over 1 A in response to the cavity created by the change from leucine to alanine. Furthermore, the crystal structures of imidazole-bound P450(cam) and the 1-methylimidazole-bound P450(cam) L244A mutant reveal that the ligands have distinct binding modes in the two proteins. Whereas in wild-type P450(cam) the imidazole coordinates to the iron in an orientation roughly perpendicular to the plane of the heme, in the L244A mutant the rearranged I helix, and specifically residue Val247, forces the imidazole into an orientation almost parallel to the heme that impairs its ability to coordinate to the heme iron. As a result, the imidazole is much more weakly bound to the mutant than it is to the wild-type enzyme. Despite the constriction of the active site by the mutation, previous work with the L244A mutant has shown that it oxidizes larger substrates than the wild-type enzyme. This paradoxical situation, in which a mutation that nominally increases the active site cavity appears to decrease it, suggests that the mutation actually increases the active site maleability, allowing it to better expand to oxidize larger substrates. PMID:16943206

  8. Activating and deactivating mutations in the receptor interaction site of GDF5 cause symphalangism or brachydactyly type A2.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Petra; Schwappacher, Raphaela; Kjaer, Klaus W; Krakow, Deborah; Lehmann, Katarina; Dawson, Katherine; Stricker, Sigmar; Pohl, Jens; Plöger, Frank; Staub, Eike; Nickel, Joachim; Sebald, Walter; Knaus, Petra; Mundlos, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    Here we describe 2 mutations in growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) that alter receptor-binding affinities. They cause brachydactyly type A2 (L441P) and symphalangism (R438L), conditions previously associated with mutations in the GDF5 receptor bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1b (BMPR1B) and the BMP antagonist NOGGIN, respectively. We expressed the mutant proteins in limb bud micromass culture and treated ATDC5 and C2C12 cells with recombinant GDF5. Our results indicated that the L441P mutant is almost inactive. The R438L mutant, in contrast, showed increased biological activity when compared with WT GDF5. Biosensor interaction analyses revealed loss of binding to BMPR1A and BMPR1B ectodomains for the L441P mutant, whereas the R438L mutant showed normal binding to BMPR1B but increased binding to BMPR1A, the receptor normally activated by BMP2. The binding to NOGGIN was normal for both mutants. Thus, the brachydactyly type A2 phenotype (L441P) is caused by inhibition of the ligand-receptor interaction, whereas the symphalangism phenotype (R438L) is caused by a loss of receptor-binding specificity, resulting in a gain of function by the acquisition of BMP2-like properties. The presented experiments have identified some of the main determinants of GDF5 receptor-binding specificity in vivo and open new prospects for generating antagonists and superagonists of GDF5. PMID:16127465

  9. Mutations within the agonist-binding site convert the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor into a Zn2+-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Grudzinska, Joanna; Schumann, Tanja; Schemm, Rudolf; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2008-01-01

    The divalent cation Zn2+ has been shown to regulate inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS by affecting the activation of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR). In spinal neurons and cells expressing recombinant GlyRs, low micromolar (<10 microM) concentrations of Zn2+ enhance glycine currents, whereas higher concentrations (>10 microM) have an inhibitory effect. Mutational studies have localized the Zn2+ binding sites mediating allosteric potentiation and inhibition of GlyRs in distinct regions of the N-terminal extracellular domain of the GlyR alpha-subunits. Here, we examined the Zn2+ sensitivity of different mutations within the agonist binding site of the homomeric alpha(1)-subunit GlyR upon heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. This revealed that six substitutions within the ligand-binding pocket result in a total loss of Zn2+ inhibition. Furthermore, substitution of the positively charged residues arginine 65 and arginine 131 by alanine (alpha(1)(R65A), alpha(1)(R131A), or of the aromatic residue phenylalanine 207 by histidine (alpha(1)(F207H)), converted the alpha(1) GlyR into a chloride channel that was activated by Zn2+ alone. Dose-response analysis of the alpha(1)(F207H) GlyR disclosed an EC(50) value of 1.2 microM for Zn2+ activation; concomitantly the apparent glycine affinity was 1000-fold reduced. Thus, single point mutations within the agonist-binding site of the alpha(1) subunit convert the inhibitory GlyR from a glycine-gated into a selectively Zn2+-activated chloride channel. This might be exploited for the design of metal-specific biosensors by modeling-assisted mutagenesis. PMID:18690053

  10. Effect of Active-site Mutation at Asn67 on the Proton Transfer Mechanism of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    PubMed Central

    Maupin, C. Mark; Zheng, Jiayin; Tu, Chingkuang; McKenna, Robert; Silverman, David N.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    The rate-limiting proton transfer (PT) event in the site-specific mutant N67L of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) has been examined by kinetic, x-ray, and simulation approaches. The x-ray crystallography, which were previously reported, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that the proton shuttling residue, His64, predominantly resides in the outward orientation with a significant disruption of the ordered water in the active site for the dehydration pathway. While disorder is seen in the active-site water, water cluster analysis indicates that the N67L mutant may form water clusters similar to those seen in the wild-type (WT). For the hydration pathway of the enzyme, the active site water cluster analysis reveals an inability of the N67L mutant to stabilize water clusters when His64 is in the inward orientation, thereby favoring PT when His64 is in the outward orientation. The preference of the N67L mutant to carry out the PT when His64 is in the outward orientation for both the hydration and dehydration pathway is reasoned to be the main cause of the observed reduction in the overall rate. To probe the mechanism of PT, solvent H/D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were experimentally studied with catalysis measured by the exchange of 18O between CO2 and water. The values obtained from the KIEs were determined as a function of the deuterium content of solvent, using the proton inventory method. No differences were detected in the overarching mechanism of PT between WT and N67L HCA II, despite changes in the active-site water structure and/or the orientation of His64. PMID:19634894

  11. Computational simulations of structural role of the active-site W374C mutation of acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase: multi-drug resistance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yu, Ning-Xi; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2011-03-01

    Herbicides targeting grass plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase, EC 6.4.1.2) are selectively effective against graminicides. The intensive worldwide use of this herbicide family has selected for resistance genes in a number of grass weed species. Recently, the active-site W374C mutation was found to confer multi-drug resistance toward haloxyfop (HF), fenoxaprop (FR), Diclofop (DF), and clodinafop (CF) in A. myosuroides. In order to uncover the resistance mechanism due to W374C mutation, the binding of above-mentioned four herbicides to both wild-type and the mutant-type ACCase was investigated in the current work by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The binding free energies were calculated by molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method. The calculated binding free energy values for four herbicides were qualitatively consistent with the experimental order of IC(50) values. All the computational model and energetic results indicated that the W374C mutation has great effects on the conformational change of the binding pocket and the ligand-protein interactions. The most significant conformational change was found to be associated with the aromatic amino acid residues, such as Phe377, Tyr161' and Trp346. As a result, the π-π interaction between the ligand and the residue of Phe377 and Tyr161', which make important contributions to the binding affinity, was decreased after mutation and the binding affinity for the inhibitors to the mutant-type ACCase was less than that to the wild-type enzyme, which accounts for the molecular basis of herbicidal resistance. The structural role and mechanistic insights obtained from computational simulations will provide a new starting point for the rational design of novel inhibitors to overcome drug resistance associated with W374C mutation. PMID:20499260

  12. Concerted action of target-site mutations and high EPSPS activity in glyphosate-resistant junglerice (Echinochloa colona) from California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate is the most widely used non-selective herbicide and Echinochloa colona is an annual weed affecting field crops and orchards in California. A population carrying a glyphosate-resistance-endowing mutation in the EPSPS gene was found in the Northern Sacramento Valley. We used selfed lines ...

  13. Mutation profiling of adenoid cystic carcinomas from multiple anatomical sites identifies mutations in the RAS pathway, but no KIT mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wetterskog, Daniel; Wilkerson, Paul M; Rodrigues, Daniel N; Lambros, Maryou B; Fritchie, Karen; Andersson, Mattias K; Natrajan, Rachael; Gauthier, Arnaud; Di Palma, Silvana; Shousha, Sami; Gatalica, Zoran; Töpfer, Chantal; Vukovic, Vesna; A’Hern, Roger; Weigelt, Britta; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Stenman, Göran; Rubin, Brian P; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    Aims The majority of adenoid cystic carcinomas (AdCCs), regardless of anatomical site, harbour the MYB–NFIB fusion gene. The aim of this study was to characterize the repertoire of somatic genetic events affecting known cancer genes in AdCCs. Methods and results DNA was extracted from 13 microdissected breast AdCCs, and subjected to a mutation survey using the Sequenom OncoCarta Panel v1.0. Genes found to be mutated in any of the breast AdCCs and genes related to the same canonical molecular pathways, as well as KIT, a proto-oncogene whose protein product is expressed in AdCCs, were sequenced in an additional 68 AdCCs from various anatomical sites by Sanger sequencing. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform and Sanger sequencing, mutations in BRAF and HRAS were identified in three and one cases, respectively (breast, and head and neck). KIT, which has previously been reported to be mutated in AdCCs, was also investigated, but no mutations were identified. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that mutations in genes pertaining to the canonical RAS pathway are found in a minority of AdCCs, and that activating KIT mutations are either absent or remarkably rare in these cancers, and unlikely to constitute a driver and therapeutic target for patients with AdCC. PMID:23398044

  14. Effects of vaccinia virus uracil DNA glycosylase catalytic site and deoxyuridine triphosphatase deletion mutations individually and together on replication in active and quiescent cells and pathogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Frank S; Moss, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background Low levels of uracil in DNA result from misincorporation of dUMP or cytosine deamination. Vaccinia virus (VACV), the prototype poxvirus, encodes two enzymes that can potentially reduce the amount of uracil in DNA. Deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase) hydrolyzes dUTP, generating dUMP for biosynthesis of thymidine nucleotides while decreasing the availability of dUTP for misincorporation; uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) cleaves uracil N-glycosylic bonds in DNA initiating base excision repair. Studies with actively dividing cells showed that the VACV UNG protein is required for DNA replication but the UNG catalytic site is not, whereas the dUTPase gene can be deleted without impairing virus replication. Recombinant VACV with an UNG catalytic site mutation was attenuated in vivo, while a dUTPase deletion mutant was not. However, the importance of the two enzymes for replication in quiescent cells, their possible synergy and roles in virulence have not been fully assessed. Results VACV mutants lacking the gene encoding dUTPase or with catalytic site mutations in UNG and double UNG/dUTPase mutants were constructed. Replication of UNG and UNG/dUTPase mutants were slightly reduced compared to wild type or the dUTPase mutant in actively dividing cells. Viral DNA replication was reduced about one-third under these conditions. After high multiplicity infection of quiescent fibroblasts, yields of wild type and mutant viruses were decreased by 2-logs with relative differences similar to those observed in active fibroblasts. However, under low multiplicity multi-step growth conditions in quiescent fibroblasts, replication of the dUTPase/UNG mutant was delayed and 5-fold lower than that of either single mutant or parental virus. This difference was exacerbated by 1-day serial passages on quiescent fibroblasts, resulting in 2- to 3-logs lower titer of the double mutant compared to the parental and single mutant viruses. Each mutant was more attenuated than a revertant

  15. Effect of the Active Site D25N Mutation on the Structure, Stability and Ligand Binding of the Mature HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, Jane M.; Liu, Fengling; Ishima, Rieko; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M.

    2008-09-03

    All aspartic proteases, including retroviral proteases, share the triplet DTG critical for the active site geometry and catalytic function. These residues interact closely in the active, dimeric structure of HIV-1 protease (PR). We have systematically assessed the effect of the D25N mutation on the structure and stability of the mature PR monomer and dimer. The D25N mutation (PR{sub D25N}) increases the equilibrium dimer dissociation constant by a factor >100-fold (1.3 {+-} 0.09 {mu}m) relative to PR. In the absence of inhibitor, NMR studies reveal clear structural differences between PR and PR{sub D25N} in the relatively mobile P1 loop (residues 79-83) and flap regions, and differential scanning calorimetric analyses show that the mutation lowers the stabilities of both the monomer and dimer folds by 5 and 7.3 C, respectively. Only minimal differences are observed in high resolution crystal structures of PR{sub D25N} complexed to darunavir (DRV), a potent clinical inhibitor, or a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle-r-Nle-Gln-Arg-NH{sub 2} (RPB), as compared with PR{center_dot}DRV and PR{center_dot}RPB complexes. Although complexation with RPB stabilizes both dimers, the effect on their T{sub m} is smaller for PR{sub D25N} (6.2 C) than for PR (8.7 C). The T{sub m} of PR{sub D25N}{center_dot}DRV increases by only 3 C relative to free PR{sub D25N}, as compared with a 22 C increase for PR{center_dot}DRV, and the mutation increases the ligand dissociation constant of PR{sub D25N}{center_dot}DRV by a factor of {approx}10{sup 6} relative to PR{center_dot}DRV. These results suggest that interactions mediated by the catalytic Asp residues make a major contribution to the tight binding of DRV to PR.

  16. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  17. The Synonymous Ala87 Mutation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Modifies Transcriptional Activation Through Both ERE and AP1 Sites.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Flouriot, Gilles; Marín, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) exerts regulatory actions through genomic mechanisms. In the classical pathway, ligand-activated ERα binds directly to DNA through estrogen response elements (ERE) located in the promoter of target genes. ERα can also exert indirect regulation of transcription via protein-protein interaction with other transcription factors such as AP-1.S everal ERα synonymous polymorphisms have been identified and efforts to understand their implications have been made. Nevertheless effects of synonymous polymorphisms are still neglected. This chapter focuses on the experimental procedure employed in order to characterize the transcriptional activity of a synonymous polymorphism of the ERα (rs746432) called Alanine 87 (Ala87). Activity of both WT and Ala87 ERα isoforms on transcriptional pathways can be analyzed in transiently transfected cells using different reporter constructs. ERα efficiency on the classical genomic pathway can be analyzed by determining its transactivation activity on an ERE-driven thymidine kinase (TK) promoter controlling the expression of the luciferase reporter gene. Transcriptional activity through the indirect genomic pathway can be analyzed by employing an AP-1 DNA response element-driven promoter also controlling the expression of luciferase reporter gene. PMID:26585143

  18. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-11-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ(70)-dependent and the contrasting σ(54)-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ(54)-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ(70)-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ(54)-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ(54) Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator. PMID:26365052

  19. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ70-dependent and the contrasting σ54-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ54-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ70-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ54-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ54 Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator. PMID:26365052

  20. The G115S mutation associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young impairs hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha activities and introduces a PKA phosphorylation site in its DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Oxombre, Bénédicte; Kouach, Mostafa; Moerman, Ericka; Formstecher, Pierre; Laine, Bernard

    2004-11-01

    HNF4alpha (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha) belongs to a complex transcription factor network that is crucial for the function of hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells. In these cells, it activates the expression of a very large number of genes, including genes involved in the transport and metabolism of glucose and lipids. Mutations in the HNF4alpha gene correlate with MODY1 (maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1), a form of type II diabetes characterized by an impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion. The MODY1 G115S (Gly115-->Ser) HNF4alpha mutation is located in the DNA-binding domain of this nuclear receptor. We show here that the G115S mutation failed to affect HNF4alpha-mediated transcription on apolipoprotein promoters in HepG2 cells. Conversely, in pancreatic beta-cell lines, this mutation resulted in strong impairments of HNF4alpha transcriptional activity on the promoters of LPK (liver pyruvate kinase) and HNF1alpha, with this transcription factor playing a key role in endocrine pancreas. We show as well that the G115S mutation creates a PKA (protein kinase A) phosphorylation site, and that PKA-mediated phosphorylation results in a decreased transcriptional activity of the mutant. Moreover, the G115E (Gly115-->Glu) mutation mimicking phosphorylation reduced HNF4alpha DNA-binding and transcriptional activities. Our results may account for the 100% penetrance of diabetes in human carriers of this mutation. In addition, they suggest that introduction of a phosphorylation site in the DNA-binding domain may represent a new mechanism by which a MODY1 mutation leads to loss of HNF4alpha function. PMID:15233628

  1. The G115S mutation associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young impairs hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α activities and introduces a PKA phosphorylation site in its DNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    HNF4α (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α) belongs to a complex transcription factor network that is crucial for the function of hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells. In these cells, it activates the expression of a very large number of genes, including genes involved in the transport and metabolism of glucose and lipids. Mutations in the HNF4α gene correlate with MODY1 (maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1), a form of type II diabetes characterized by an impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion. The MODY1 G115S (Gly115→Ser) HNF4α mutation is located in the DNA-binding domain of this nuclear receptor. We show here that the G115S mutation failed to affect HNF4α-mediated transcription on apolipoprotein promoters in HepG2 cells. Conversely, in pancreatic β-cell lines, this mutation resulted in strong impairments of HNF4α transcriptional activity on the promoters of LPK (liver pyruvate kinase) and HNF1α, with this transcription factor playing a key role in endocrine pancreas. We show as well that the G115S mutation creates a PKA (protein kinase A) phosphorylation site, and that PKA-mediated phosphorylation results in a decreased transcriptional activity of the mutant. Moreover, the G115E (Gly115→Glu) mutation mimicking phosphorylation reduced HNF4α DNA-binding and transcriptional activities. Our results may account for the 100% penetrance of diabetes in human carriers of this mutation. In addition, they suggest that introduction of a phosphorylation site in the DNA-binding domain may represent a new mechanism by which a MODY1 mutation leads to loss of HNF4α function. PMID:15233628

  2. Functional impact of HIV coreceptor-binding site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Biscone, Mark J.; Miamidian, John L.; Muchiri, John M.; Baik, Sarah S.W.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Reeves, Jacqueline D. . E-mail: jreeves@MonogramBio.com

    2006-07-20

    The bridging sheet region of the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 Env protein interacts with the major virus coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. We examined the impact of mutations in and adjacent to the bridging sheet region of an X4 tropic HIV-1 on membrane fusion and entry inhibitor susceptibility. When the V3-loop of this Env was changed so that CCR5 was used, the effects of these same mutations on CCR5 use were assayed as well. We found that coreceptor-binding site mutations had greater effects on CXCR4-mediated fusion and infection than when CCR5 was used as a coreceptor, perhaps related to differences in coreceptor affinity. The mutations also reduced use of the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and CCR8 to varying degrees, indicating that the bridging sheet region is important for the efficient utilization of both major and minor HIV coreceptors. As seen before with a primary R5 virus strain, bridging sheet mutations increased susceptibility to the CCR5 inhibitor TAK-779, which correlated with CCR5 binding efficiency. Bridging sheet mutations also conferred increased susceptibility to the CXCR4 ligand AMD-3100 in the context of the X4 tropic Env. However, these mutations had little effect on the rate of membrane fusion and little effect on susceptibility to enfuvirtide, a membrane fusion inhibitor whose activity is dependent in part on the rate of Env-mediated membrane fusion. Thus, mutations that reduce coreceptor binding and enhance susceptibility to coreceptor inhibitors can affect fusion and enfuvirtide susceptibility in an Env context-dependent manner.

  3. A single mutation in a tunnel to the active site changes the mechanism and kinetics of product release in haloalkane dehalogenase LinB.

    PubMed

    Biedermannová, Lada; Prokop, Zbyněk; Gora, Artur; Chovancová, Eva; Kovács, Mihály; Damborsky, Jiří; Wade, Rebecca C

    2012-08-17

    Many enzymes have buried active sites. The properties of the tunnels connecting the active site with bulk solvent affect ligand binding and unbinding and also the catalytic properties. Here, we investigate ligand passage in the haloalkane dehalogenase enzyme LinB and the effect of replacing leucine by a bulky tryptophan at a tunnel-lining position. Transient kinetic experiments show that the mutation significantly slows down the rate of product release. Moreover, the mechanism of bromide ion release is changed from a one-step process in the wild type enzyme to a two-step process in the mutant. The rate constant of bromide ion release corresponds to the overall steady-state turnover rate constant, suggesting that product release became the rate-limiting step of catalysis in the mutant. We explain the experimental findings by investigating the molecular details of the process computationally. Analysis of trajectories from molecular dynamics simulations with a tunnel detection software reveals differences in the tunnels available for ligand egress. Corresponding differences are seen in simulations of product egress using a specialized enhanced sampling technique. The differences in the free energy barriers for egress of a bromide ion obtained using potential of mean force calculations are in good agreement with the differences in rates obtained from the transient kinetic experiments. Interactions of the bromide ion with the introduced tryptophan are shown to affect the free energy barrier for its passage. The study demonstrates how the mechanism of an enzymatic catalytic cycle and reaction kinetics can be engineered by modification of protein tunnels. PMID:22745119

  4. A Single Mutation in a Tunnel to the Active Site Changes the Mechanism and Kinetics of Product Release in Haloalkane Dehalogenase LinB*

    PubMed Central

    Biedermannová, Lada; Prokop, Zbyněk; Gora, Artur; Chovancová, Eva; Kovács, Mihály; Damborský, Jiří; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-01-01

    Many enzymes have buried active sites. The properties of the tunnels connecting the active site with bulk solvent affect ligand binding and unbinding and also the catalytic properties. Here, we investigate ligand passage in the haloalkane dehalogenase enzyme LinB and the effect of replacing leucine by a bulky tryptophan at a tunnel-lining position. Transient kinetic experiments show that the mutation significantly slows down the rate of product release. Moreover, the mechanism of bromide ion release is changed from a one-step process in the wild type enzyme to a two-step process in the mutant. The rate constant of bromide ion release corresponds to the overall steady-state turnover rate constant, suggesting that product release became the rate-limiting step of catalysis in the mutant. We explain the experimental findings by investigating the molecular details of the process computationally. Analysis of trajectories from molecular dynamics simulations with a tunnel detection software reveals differences in the tunnels available for ligand egress. Corresponding differences are seen in simulations of product egress using a specialized enhanced sampling technique. The differences in the free energy barriers for egress of a bromide ion obtained using potential of mean force calculations are in good agreement with the differences in rates obtained from the transient kinetic experiments. Interactions of the bromide ion with the introduced tryptophan are shown to affect the free energy barrier for its passage. The study demonstrates how the mechanism of an enzymatic catalytic cycle and reaction kinetics can be engineered by modification of protein tunnels. PMID:22745119

  5. Probing the Effect of the Non-Active-Site Mutation Y229W in New Delhi Metallo-β-lactamase-1 by Site-Directed Mutagenesis, Kinetic Studies, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yun; Hu, Feng; Lao, Xingzhen; Gao, Xiangdong; Zheng, Heng; Yao, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactmase-1 (NDM-1) has attracted extensive attention for its high catalytic activities of hydrolyzing almost all β-lactam antibiotics. NDM-1 shows relatively higher similarity to subclass B1 metallo-β-lactmases (MβLs), but its residue at position 229 is identical to that of B2/B3 MβLs, which is a Tyr instead of a B1-MβL-conserved Trp. To elucidate the possible role of Y229 in the bioactivity of NDM-1, we performed mutagenesis study and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Although residue Y229 is spatially distant from the active site and not contacting directly with the substrate or zinc ions, the Y229W mutant was found to have higher kcat and Km values than those of wild-type NDM-1, resulting in 1∼7 fold increases in kcat/Km values against tested antibiotics. In addition, our MD simulations illustrated the enhanced flexibility of Loop 2 upon Y229W mutation, which could increase the kinetics of both substrate entrance (kon) and product egress (koff). The enhanced flexibility of Loop 2 might allow the enzyme to adjust the geometry of its active site to accommodate substrates with different structures, broadening its substrate spectrum. This study indicated the possible role of the residue at position 229 in the evolution of NDM-1. PMID:24339993

  6. Frequent PIK3CA-activating mutations in hidradenoma papilliferums.

    PubMed

    Liau, Jau-Yu; Lan, Jui; Hong, Jin-Bon; Tsai, Jia-Huei; Kuo, Kuan-Tin; Chu, Chia-Yu; Sheen, Yi-Shuan; Huang, Wen-Chang

    2016-09-01

    Hidradenoma papilliferum (HP) is a benign epithelial tumor most commonly seen in the vulva. It is proposed to be derived from the anogenital mammary-like glands and is histologically very similar to the mammary intraductal papilloma (IP). Approximately 60% of mammary IPs have activating mutations in either PIK3CA or AKT1, with each gene accounting for 30% of cases. In this study, we screened the mutation statuses of PIK3CA, AKT1, RAS, and BRAF in 30 HPs. The results showed that activating mutations in either PIK3CA or AKT1 were identified in 20 tumors (67%); 19 tumors had PIK3CA mutations (63%; 13 in exon 20 and 6 in exon 9), and 1 had an AKT1 E17K mutation (3%). BRAF V600E mutation was found in an HP that also had a PIK3CA H1047R mutation. No RAS mutation was found. The mutation status was not correlated with the degree of epithelial cell hyperplasia. We conclude that although there might be site-related variations in the mutation frequencies of PIK3CA and AKT1 genes, HP is histologically and also genetically very similar to the mammary IP, suggesting that HP can be viewed as the extramammary counterpart of mammary IP. PMID:27184479

  7. Autosomal recessive hyponatremia due to isolated salt wasting in sweat associated with a mutation in the active site of Carbonic Anhydrase 12.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Emad; Leventhal, Neta; Parvari, Galit; Hanukoglu, Aaron; Hanukoglu, Israel; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Feinstein, Yael; Weinbrand, Jenny; Jacoby, Harel; Manor, Esther; Nagar, Tal; Beck, John C; Sheffield, Val C; Hershkovitz, Eli; Parvari, Ruti

    2011-04-01

    Genetic disorders of excessive salt loss from sweat glands have been observed in pseudohypoaldosteronism type I (PHA) and cystic fibrosis that result from mutations in genes encoding epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) subunits and the transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), respectively. We identified a novel autosomal recessive form of isolated salt wasting in sweat, which leads to severe infantile hyponatremic dehydration. Three affected individuals from a small Bedouin clan presented with failure to thrive, hyponatremic dehydration and hyperkalemia with isolated sweat salt wasting. Using positional cloning, we identified the association of a Glu143Lys mutation in carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12) with the disease. Carbonic anhydrase is a zinc metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to form a bicarbonate anion and a proton. Glu143 in CA12 is essential for zinc coordination in this metalloenzyme and lowering of the protein-metal affinity reduces its catalytic activity. This is the first presentation of an isolated loss of salt from sweat gland mimicking PHA, associated with a mutation in the CA12 gene not previously implicated in human disorders. Our data demonstrate the importance of bicarbonate anion and proton production on salt concentration in sweat and its significance for sodium homeostasis. PMID:21184099

  8. Porocarcinomas harbor recurrent HRAS-activating mutations and tumor suppressor inactivating mutations.

    PubMed

    Harms, Paul W; Hovelson, Daniel H; Cani, Andi K; Omata, Kei; Haller, Michaela J; Wang, Michael L; Arps, David; Patel, Rajiv M; Fullen, Douglas R; Wang, Min; Siddiqui, Javed; Andea, Aleodor; Tomlins, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Porocarcinomas are a rare eccrine carcinoma with significant metastatic potential. Oncogenic drivers of porocarcinomas have been underexplored, with PIK3CA-activating mutation reported in 1 case. We analyzed 5 porocarcinomas by next-generation sequencing using the DNA component of the Oncomine Comprehensive Assay, which provides data on copy number changes and mutational events in 126 cancer-relevant genes through multiplex polymerase chain reaction. We detected an average of 3.3 high-confidence nonsynonymous mutations per tumor (range, 1-6), including a spectrum of oncogenic activation and tumor suppressor inactivation events. Tumor suppressor mutations included TP53 (4/5, 80%), RB1 (3/5, 60%), ATM (2/5, 40%), ARID1A (1/5, 20%), and CDKN2A (1/5, 20%). In 4 (80%) of 5 tumors, at least 1 potential oncogenic driver was identified. Activating HRAS mutations were detected in 2 (40%) of 5, including G13D and Q61L hotspot mutations. Mutations of EGFR were identified in 2 (40%) of 5; these mutations have been previously reported in cancer but did not affect classic activation hotspot sites. EGFR and HRAS mutations were mutually exclusive. HRAS mutations were detected by targeted sequencing in a minority of benign eccrine poromas (2/17; 11.7%), suggesting that HRAS activation may rarely be an early event in sweat gland neoplasia. Together, our data suggest roles for HRAS and EGFR as drivers in a subset of poroma and porocarcinoma. TP53 and RB1 inactivation events are also likely to contribute to tumorigenesis. These findings suggest that porocarcinomas display diversity with respect to oncogenic drivers, which may have implications for targeted therapy in metastatic or unresectable cases. PMID:27067779

  9. Deep Sequencing of Random Mutant Libraries Reveals the Active Site of the Narrow Specificity CphA Metallo-β-Lactamase is Fragile to Mutations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhizeng; Mehta, Shrenik C; Adamski, Carolyn J; Gibbs, Richard A; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    CphA is a Zn(2+)-dependent metallo-β-lactamase that efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenem antibiotics. To understand the sequence requirements for CphA function, single codon random mutant libraries were constructed for residues in and near the active site and mutants were selected for E. coli growth on increasing concentrations of imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. At high concentrations of imipenem that select for phenotypically wild-type mutants, the active-site residues exhibit stringent sequence requirements in that nearly all residues in positions that contact zinc, the substrate, or the catalytic water do not tolerate amino acid substitutions. In addition, at high imipenem concentrations a number of residues that do not directly contact zinc or substrate are also essential and do not tolerate substitutions. Biochemical analysis confirmed that amino acid substitutions at essential positions decreased the stability or catalytic activity of the CphA enzyme. Therefore, the CphA active - site is fragile to substitutions, suggesting active-site residues are optimized for imipenem hydrolysis. These results also suggest that resistance to inhibitors targeted to the CphA active site would be slow to develop because of the strong sequence constraints on function. PMID:27616327

  10. A single mutation in the hepta-peptide active site of Aspergillus niger PhyA phytase leads to myriad of biochemical changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The active site motif of proteins belonging to ‘Histidine Acid Phosphatase’ (HAP) contains a hepta-peptide region, RHGXRXP. A close comparison among fungal and yeast HAPs has revealed the fourth residue of the hepta-peptide to be E instead of A, which is the case with A. niger phyA phytase. However,...

  11. Protease susceptibility and toxicity of heat-labile enterotoxins with a mutation in the active site or in the protease-sensitive loop.

    PubMed Central

    Giannelli, V; Fontana, M R; Giuliani, M M; Guangcai, D; Rappuoli, R; Pizza, M

    1997-01-01

    To generate nontoxic derivatives of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), site-directed mutagenesis has been used to change either the amino acid residues located in the catalytic site (M. Pizza, M. Domenighini, W. Hol, V. Giannelli, M. R. Fontana, M. M. Giuliani, C. Magagnoli, S. Peppoloni, R. Manetti, and R. Rappuoli, Mol. Microbiol. 14:51-60, 1994) or those located in the proteolytically sensitive loop that joins the A1 and A2 moieties of the A subunit (C. C. R. Grant, R. J. Messer, and W. J. Cieplack, Infect. Immun. 62:4270-4278, 1994; B. L. Dickinson and J. D. Clements, Infect. Immun. 63:1617-1623, 1995). In this work, we compared the in vitro and in vivo toxic properties and the resistance to protease digestion of the prototype molecules obtained by both approaches (LT-K63 and LT-R192G, respectively). As expected, LT-K63 was normally processed by proteases, while LT-R192G showed increased resistance to trypsin in vitro and was digested by trypsin only under denaturing conditions (3.5 M urea) or by intestinal proteases. No toxicity was detected with the LT-K63 mutant, even when 40 micrograms and 1 mg were used in the in vitro and in vivo assays, respectively. In marked contrast, LT-R192G showed only a modest (10-fold) reduction in toxicity in Y1 cells with a delay in the appearance of the toxic activity and had toxicity comparable to that of wild-type LT in the rabbit ileal loop assay. We conclude that mutagenesis of the active site generates molecules that are fully devoid of toxicity, while mutagenesis of the A1-A2 loop generates molecules that are resistant to trypsin in vitro but still susceptible to proteolytic activation by proteases other than trypsin, and therefore they may still be toxic in tissue culture and in vivo. PMID:8975934

  12. Neurocognitive Profiles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Gene Mutation Site

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Magri, Francesca; Del Bo, Roberto; Guglieri, Michela; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nonprogressive cognitive impairment is recognized as a common feature in a substantial proportion of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To investigate the possible role of mutations along the dystrophin gene affecting different brain dystrophin isoforms and specific cognitive profiles, 42 school-age children affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, subdivided according to sites of mutations along the dystrophin gene, underwent a battery of tests tapping a wide range of intellectual, linguistic, and neuropsychologic functions. Full-scale intelligence quotient was approximately 1 S.D. below the population average in the whole group of dystrophic children. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the distal portion of the dystrophin gene (involving the 140-kDa brain protein isoform, called Dp140) were generally more severely affected and expressed different patterns of strengths and impairments, compared with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the proximal portion of the dystrophin gene (not involving Dp140). Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and distal mutations demonstrated specific impairments in visuospatial functions and visual memory (which seemed intact in proximally mutated patients) and greater impairment in syntactic processing. PMID:22000308

  13. Active Site Mutations as a Suitable Tool Contributing to Explain a Mechanism of Aristolochic Acid I Nitroreduction by Cytochromes P450 1A1, 1A2 and 1B1

    PubMed Central

    Milichovský, Jan; Bárta, František; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Frei, Eva; Stiborová, Marie; Martínek, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Aristolochic acid I (AAI) is a plant drug found in Aristolochia species that causes aristolochic acid nephropathy, Balkan endemic nephropathy and their associated urothelial malignancies. AAI is activated via nitroreduction producing genotoxic N-hydroxyaristolactam, which forms DNA adducts. The major enzymes responsible for the reductive bioactivation of AAI are NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase and cytochromes P450 (CYP) 1A1 and 1A2. Using site-directed mutagenesis we investigated the possible mechanisms of CYP1A1/1A2/1B1-catalyzed AAI nitroreduction. Molecular modelling predicted that the hydroxyl groups of serine122/threonine124 (Ser122/Thr124) amino acids in the CYP1A1/1A2-AAI binary complexes located near to the nitro group of AAI, are mechanistically important as they provide the proton required for the stepwise reduction reaction. In contrast, the closely related CYP1B1 with no hydroxyl group containing residues in its active site is ineffective in catalyzing AAI nitroreduction. In order to construct an experimental model, mutant forms of CYP1A1 and 1A2 were prepared, where Ser122 and Thr124 were replaced by Ala (CYP1A1-S122A) and Val (CYP1A2-T124V), respectively. Similarly, a CYP1B1 mutant was prepared in which Ala133 was replaced by Ser (CYP1B1-A133S). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed using a quickchange approach. Wild and mutated forms of these enzymes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and isolated enzymes characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy to verify correct protein folding. Their catalytic activity was confirmed with CYP1A1, 1A2 and 1B1 marker substrates. Using 32P-postlabelling we determined the efficiency of wild-type and mutant forms of CYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 reconstituted with NADPH:CYP oxidoreductase to bioactivate AAI to reactive intermediates forming covalent DNA adducts. The S122A and T124V mutations in CYP1A1 and 1A2, respectively, abolished the efficiency of CYP1A1 and 1A2 enzymes to generate AAI-DNA adducts. In contrast

  14. Active-Site Engineering of Benzaldehyde Lyase Shows That a Point Mutation Can Confer Both New Reactivity and Susceptibility to Mechanism-Based Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar; McLeish, Michael J.

    2010-02-11

    Benzaldehyde lyase (BAL) from Pseudomonas putida is a thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of (R)-benzoin. Here we report that a point mutant, BAL A28S, not only catalyzes the decarboxylation of benzoylformate but, like benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC), is also inactivated by the benzoylformate analogues methyl benzoylphosphonate (MBP) and benzoylphosphonate (BP). The latter has no effect on wild-type BAL, and the inactivation of the A28S variant is shown to result from phosphorylation of the newly introduced serine residue. This lends support to the proposal that an appropriately placed nucleophile facilitates the expulsion of carbon dioxide from the active site in many ThDP-dependent decarboxylases.

  15. A single mutation in the active site swaps the substrate specificity of N-acetyl-L-ornithine transcarbamylase and N-succinyl-L-ornithine transcarbamylase

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dashuang; Yu, Xiaolin; Cabrera-Luque, Juan; Chen, Tony Y.; Roth, Lauren; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2007-01-01

    Transcarbamylases catalyze the transfer of the carbamyl group from carbamyl phosphate (CP) to an amino group of a second substrate such as aspartate, ornithine, or putrescine. Previously, structural determination of a transcarbamylase from Xanthomonas campestris led to the discovery of a novel N-acetylornithine transcarbamylase (AOTCase) that catalyzes the carbamylation of N-acetylornithine. Recently, a novel N-succinylornithine transcarbamylase (SOTCase) from Bacteroides fragilis was identified. Structural comparisons of AOTCase from X. campestris and SOTCase from B. fragilis revealed that residue Glu92 (X. campestris numbering) plays a critical role in distinguishing AOTCase from SOTCase. Enzymatic assays of E92P, E92S, E92V, and E92A mutants of AOTCase demonstrate that each of these mutations converts the AOTCase to an SOTCase. Similarly, the P90E mutation in B. fragilis SOTCase (equivalent to E92 in X. campestris AOTCase) converts the SOTCase to AOTCase. Hence, a single amino acid substitution is sufficient to swap the substrate specificities of AOTCase and SOTCase. X-ray crystal structures of these mutants in complexes with CP and N-acetyl-L-norvaline (an analog of N-acetyl-L-ornithine) or N-succinyl-L-norvaline (an analog of N-succinyl-L-ornithine) substantiate this conversion. In addition to Glu92 (X. campestris numbering), other residues such as Asn185 and Lys30 in AOTCase, which are involved in binding substrates through bridging water molecules, help to define the substrate specificity of AOTCase. These results provide the correct annotation (AOTCase or SOTCase) for a set of the transcarbamylase-like proteins that have been erroneously annotated as ornithine transcarbamylase (OTCase, EC 2.1.3.3). PMID:17600144

  16. An analysis of the role of active site protic residues of cytochrome P-450s: mechanistic and mutational studies on 17alpha-hydroxylase-17,20-lyase (P-45017alpha also CYP17).

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Robichaud, P; Akhtar, M E; Akhtar, M

    1998-01-01

    Certain cytochrome P-450s involved in the transformation of steroids catalyse not only the hydroxylation process associated with the group of enzymes, but also an acyl-carbon cleavage reaction. The hydroxylation occurs using an iron-monooxygen species while the acyl-carbon cleavage has been suggested to be promoted by an iron peroxide. In this paper we have studied the role of active site protic residues, Glu305 and Thr306, in modulating the two activities. For this purpose, the kinetic parameters for the hydroxylation reaction (pregnenolone-->17alpha-hydroxypregnenolone) and two different versions of acyl-carbon cleavage (17alpha-hydroxypregnenolone-->dehydroepiandrosterone and 3beta-hydroxyandrost-5-ene-17beta-carbaldehyde-->3beta-hydroxya ndrost -5,16-diene+androst-5-ene-3beta,17alpha-diol) were determined using the wild-type human CYP17 and its eight different single and double mutants. In addition the propensity of the proteins to undergo a subtle rearrangement converting the 450 nm active-form into an inactive counterpart absorbing at 420 nm, was monitored by measuring the t12 of the P-450-->P-420 conversion. The results are interpreted to draw the following conclusions. The functional groups of Glu305 and Thr306 do not directly participate in the two proton delivery steps required for hydroxylation but may be important participants for the provision of a net work of hydrogen bonds for 'activating' water that then acts as a proton donor. The loss of any one of these residues is, therefore, only partially debilitating. That the mutation of Thr306 impairs the hydroxylation reaction more than it does the acyl-carbon cleavage is consistent with the detailed mechanistic scheme considered in this paper. Furthermore attention is drawn to the fact that the mutation of Glu305 and Thr306 subtly perturbed the architecture of the active site, which affects the geometry of this region of the protein and therefore its catalytic properties. PMID:9480917

  17. Conformational Tinkering Drives Evolution of a Promiscuous Activity through Indirect Mutational Effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gloria; Hong, Nansook; Baier, Florian; Jackson, Colin J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-16

    How remote mutations can lead to changes in enzyme function at a molecular level is a central question in evolutionary biochemistry and biophysics. Here, we combine laboratory evolution with biochemical, structural, genetic, and computational analysis to dissect the molecular basis for the functional optimization of phosphotriesterase activity in a bacterial lactonase (AiiA) from the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. We show that a 1000-fold increase in phosphotriesterase activity is caused by a more favorable catalytic binding position of the paraoxon substrate in the evolved enzyme that resulted from conformational tinkering of the active site through peripheral mutations. A nonmutated active site residue, Phe68, was displaced by ∼3 Å through the indirect effects of two second-shell trajectory mutations, allowing molecular interactions between the residue and paraoxon. Comparative mutational scanning, i.e., examining the effects of alanine mutagenesis on different genetic backgrounds, revealed significant changes in the functional roles of Phe68 and other nonmutated active site residues caused by the indirect effects of trajectory mutations. Our work provides a quantitative measurement of the impact of second-shell mutations on the catalytic contributions of nonmutated residues and unveils the underlying intramolecular network of strong epistatic mutational relationships between active site residues and more remote residues. Defining these long-range conformational and functional epistatic relationships has allowed us to better understand the subtle, but cumulatively significant, role of second- and third-shell mutations in evolution. PMID:27444875

  18. Activating STAT6 mutations in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Mehmet; Li, Hongxiu; Bernard, Denzil; Amin, Nisar A.; Ouillette, Peter; Jones, Siân; Saiya-Cork, Kamlai; Parkin, Brian; Jacobi, Kathryn; Shedden, Kerby; Wang, Shaomeng; Chang, Alfred E.; Kaminski, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the second most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the Western world. FL cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic factors influence FL biology and clinical outcome. To further our understanding of the genetic basis of FL, we performed whole-exome sequencing of 23 highly purified FL cases and 1 transformed FL case and expanded findings to a combined total of 114 FLs. We report recurrent mutations in the transcription factor STAT6 in 11% of FLs and identified the STAT6 amino acid residue 419 as a novel STAT6 mutation hotspot (p.419D/G, p.419D/A, and p.419D/H). FL-associated STAT6 mutations were activating, as evidenced by increased transactivation in HEK293T cell–based transfection/luciferase reporter assays, heightened interleukin-4 (IL-4) –induced activation of target genes in stable STAT6 transfected lymphoma cell lines, and elevated baseline expression levels of STAT6 target genes in primary FL B cells harboring mutant STAT6. Mechanistically, FL-associated STAT6 mutations facilitated nuclear residency of STAT6, independent of IL-4–induced STAT6-Y641 phosphorylation. Structural modeling of STAT6 based on the structure of the STAT1-DNA complex revealed that most FL-associated STAT6 mutants locate to the STAT6-DNA interface, potentially facilitating heightened interactions. The genetic and functional data combined strengthen the recognition of the IL-4/JAK/STAT6 axis as a driver of FL pathogenesis. PMID:25428220

  19. Base substitution mutations induced by metabolically activated aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Foster, P L; Eisenstadt, E; Miller, J H

    1983-05-01

    We have determined the base substitutions generated by metabolically activated aflatoxin B1 in the lacI gene of a uvrB- strain of Escherichia coli. By monitoring over 70 different nonsense mutation sites, we show that activated aflatoxin B1 specifically induced GxC leads to TxA transversions. One possible pathway leading to this base change involves depurination at guanine residues. We consider this mechanism of mutagenesis in the light of our other findings that the carcinogens benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide and N-acetoxyacetylaminofluorene also specifically induce GxC leads to TxA transversions. PMID:6405385

  20. Mutation of a Conserved Active Site Residue Converts Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase l Into a DNA Topoisomerase l-Dependent Poison

    SciTech Connect

    He,X.; van Waardenburg, R.; Babaoglu, K.; Price, A.; Nitiss, K.; Nitiss, J.; Bjornsti, M.; White, S.

    2007-01-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (Tdp1) catalyzes the resolution of 3' and 5' phospho-DNA adducts. A defective mutant, associated with the recessive neurodegenerative disease SCAN1, accumulates Tdp1-DNA complexes in vitro. To assess the conservation of enzyme architecture, a 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of yeast Tdp1 was determined that is very similar to human Tdp1. Poorly conserved regions of primary structure are peripheral to an essentially identical catalytic core. Enzyme mechanism was also conserved, because the yeast SCAN1 mutant (H{sub 432}R) enhanced cell sensitivity to the DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) poison camptothecin. A more severe Top1-dependent lethality of Tdp1H{sub 432}N was drug-independent, coinciding with increased covalent Top1-DNA and Tdp1-DNA complex formation in vivo. However, both H432 mutants were recessive to wild-type Tdp1. Thus, yeast H{sub 432} acts in the general acid/base catalytic mechanism of Tdp1 to resolve 3' phosphotyrosyl and 3' phosphoamide linkages. However, the distinct pattern of mutant Tdp1 activity evident in yeast cells, suggests a more severe defect in Tdp1H{sub 432}N-catalyzed resolution of 3' phospho-adducts.

  1. Mutational Biases Drive Elevated Rates of Substitution at Regulatory Sites across Cancer Types.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Vera B; Taylor, Martin S; Semple, Colin A

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of gene regulation is known to play major roles in carcinogenesis and tumour progression. Here, we comprehensively characterize the mutational profiles of diverse transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) across 1,574 completely sequenced cancer genomes encompassing 11 tumour types. We assess the relative rates and impact of the mutational burden at the binding sites of 81 transcription factors (TFs), by comparing the abundance and patterns of single base substitutions within putatively functional binding sites to control sites with matched sequence composition. There is a strong (1.43-fold) and significant excess of mutations at functional binding sites across TFs, and the mutations that accumulate in cancers are typically more disruptive than variants tolerated in extant human populations at the same sites. CTCF binding sites suffer an exceptionally high mutational load in cancer (3.31-fold excess) relative to control sites, and we demonstrate for the first time that this effect is seen in essentially all cancer types with sufficient data. The sub-set of CTCF sites involved in higher order chromatin structures has the highest mutational burden, suggesting a widespread breakdown of chromatin organization. However, we find no evidence for selection driving these distinctive patterns of mutation. The mutational load at CTCF-binding sites is substantially determined by replication timing and the mutational signature of the tumor in question, suggesting that selectively neutral processes underlie the unusual mutation patterns. Pervasive hyper-mutation within transcription factor binding sites rewires the regulatory landscape of the cancer genome, but it is dominated by mutational processes rather than selection. PMID:27490693

  2. Mutational Biases Drive Elevated Rates of Substitution at Regulatory Sites across Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of gene regulation is known to play major roles in carcinogenesis and tumour progression. Here, we comprehensively characterize the mutational profiles of diverse transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) across 1,574 completely sequenced cancer genomes encompassing 11 tumour types. We assess the relative rates and impact of the mutational burden at the binding sites of 81 transcription factors (TFs), by comparing the abundance and patterns of single base substitutions within putatively functional binding sites to control sites with matched sequence composition. There is a strong (1.43-fold) and significant excess of mutations at functional binding sites across TFs, and the mutations that accumulate in cancers are typically more disruptive than variants tolerated in extant human populations at the same sites. CTCF binding sites suffer an exceptionally high mutational load in cancer (3.31-fold excess) relative to control sites, and we demonstrate for the first time that this effect is seen in essentially all cancer types with sufficient data. The sub-set of CTCF sites involved in higher order chromatin structures has the highest mutational burden, suggesting a widespread breakdown of chromatin organization. However, we find no evidence for selection driving these distinctive patterns of mutation. The mutational load at CTCF-binding sites is substantially determined by replication timing and the mutational signature of the tumor in question, suggesting that selectively neutral processes underlie the unusual mutation patterns. Pervasive hyper-mutation within transcription factor binding sites rewires the regulatory landscape of the cancer genome, but it is dominated by mutational processes rather than selection. PMID:27490693

  3. Identification of factor-binding sites in the duck hepatitis B virus enhancer and in vivo effects of enhancer mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C; Mason, W S; Burch, J B

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B viruses (hepadnaviruses) can cause chronic, productive infections of hepatocytes. Analyses of the enhancers and promoters of these viruses in cell lines have suggested a requirement of these elements for liver-enriched transcription factors. In this study, a minimum of seven factor-binding sites on the duck hepatitis B virus enhancer were detected by DNase I footprinting using duck liver nuclear extracts. Among the sites that were tentatively identified were one C/EBP-, one HNF1-, and two HNF3-binding sites. Mutations of the HNF1- and HNF3-like sites, which eliminated factor binding, as assessed by both DNase I footprinting and competitive gel shift assays, were evaluated for their effects on enhancer activity. Using a construct in which human growth hormone was expressed from the viral enhancer and core gene promoter, we found that all of the mutations, either alone or in combination, reduced expression two- to fourfold in LMH chicken hepatoma cells. The mutations in the HNF1 site and one of the HNF3 sites, when inserted into the intact viral genome, also suppressed virus RNA synthesis in primary hepatocyte cultures. Virus carrying the latter HNF3 mutation was also examined for its ability to infect and replicate in ducks. No significant inhibition of virus replication was observed in a short-term assay; however, virus with the HNF3 mutation was apparently unable to grow in the pancreas, a second site of duck hepatitis B virus replication in the duck. Images PMID:8139013

  4. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency. PMID:26168032

  5. Differential DNA repair underlies mutation hotspots at active promoters in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Perera, Dilmi; Poulos, Rebecca C; Shah, Anushi; Beck, Dominik; Pimanda, John E; Wong, Jason W H

    2016-04-14

    Promoters are DNA sequences that have an essential role in controlling gene expression. While recent whole cancer genome analyses have identified numerous hotspots of somatic point mutations within promoters, many have not yet been shown to perturb gene expression or drive cancer development. As such, positive selection alone may not adequately explain the frequency of promoter point mutations in cancer genomes. Here we show that increased mutation density at gene promoters can be linked to promoter activity and differential nucleotide excision repair (NER). By analysing 1,161 human cancer genomes across 14 cancer types, we find evidence for increased local density of somatic point mutations within the centres of DNase I-hypersensitive sites (DHSs) in gene promoters. Mutated DHSs were strongly associated with transcription initiation activity, in which active promoters but not enhancers of equal DNase I hypersensitivity were most mutated relative to their flanking regions. Notably, analysis of genome-wide maps of NER shows that NER is impaired within the DHS centre of active gene promoters, while XPC-deficient skin cancers do not show increased promoter mutation density, pinpointing differential NER as the underlying cause of these mutation hotspots. Consistent with this finding, we observe that melanomas with an ultraviolet-induced DNA damage mutation signature show greatest enrichment of promoter mutations, whereas cancers that are not highly dependent on NER, such as colon cancer, show no sign of such enrichment. Taken together, our analysis has uncovered the presence of a previously unknown mechanism linking transcription initiation and NER as a major contributor of somatic point mutation hotspots at active gene promoters in cancer genomes. PMID:27075100

  6. Mutational analysis of the major soybean UreF paralogue involved in urease activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In soybean, mutation at Eu2 or Eu3 eliminates the urease activities of both the embryo-specific and the tissue-ubiquitous (assimilatory) isozymes, encoded by Eu1 and Eu4, respectively. Eu3 encodes UreG, a GTP’ase necessary for proper emplacement of Ni and carbon dioxide in the urease active site. ...

  7. Glucocerebrosidase enzyme activity in GBA mutation Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Roberto A; Torres, Paola A; Swan, Matthew; Nichols, William; Boschung, Sarah; Raymond, Deborah; Barrett, Matthew J; Johannes, Brooke A; Severt, Lawrence; Shanker, Vicki; Hunt, Ann L; Bressman, Susan; Pastores, Gregory M; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) gene, the most common genetic contributor to Parkinson's disease (PD), are associated with an increased risk of PD in heterozygous and homozygous carriers. While glucocerebrosidase enzyme (GCase) activity is consistently low in Gaucher disease, there is a range of leukocyte GCase activity in healthy heterozygous GBA1 mutation carriers. To determine whether GCase activity may be a marker for PD with heterozygous GBA1 mutations (GBA1 mutation PD, GBA PD), GBA PD patients (n=15) were compared to PD patients without heterozygous GBA1 mutations (idiopathic PD; n=8), heterozygous GBA1 carriers without PD (asymptomatic carriers; n=4), and biallelic mutation carriers with PD (Gaucher disease with PD, GD1 PD; n=3) in a pilot study. GCase activity (nmol/mg protein/hour) in GD1 PD (median [interquartile range]; minimum-maximum: 6.4 [5.7]; 5.3-11) was lower than that of GBA PD (16.0 [7.0]; 11-40) (p=0.01), while GCase activity in GBA PD was lower than idiopathic PD (28.5 [15.0]; 16-56) (p=0.01) and asymptomatic carriers (25.5 [2.5]; 23-27) (p=0.04). Therefore, GCase activity appears to be a possible marker of heterozygous GBA1 mutation PD, and larger studies are warranted. Prospective studies are also necessary to determine whether lower GCase activity precedes development of PD. PMID:26857292

  8. Rhodopsin mutations in a Scottish retinitis pigmentosa population, including a novel splice site mutation in intron four.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, C; Converse, C A; Hammer, H M; Osborne, A; Haites, N E

    1994-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to a group of disorders, both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, that primarily affect the photoreceptor function of the eye. Mutations in the genes encoding for rhodopsin, RDS-peripherin, or the beta subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase enzyme can be responsible for the phenotype. In this study the rhodopsin gene has been screened for mutations in a panel of RP individuals and five different sequence changes have been detected to date in three dominantly inherited and two unclassified families. One of these, a base substitution in the 3'UTR, has not yet been confirmed as disease specific, while three missense substitutions have previously been reported and are likely to be responsible for the phenotype. The fifth change, a base substitution at the intron 4 acceptor splice site, represents a novel mutation and is assumed to be the causative mutation. Images PMID:7819178

  9. Mutations in the Dimer Interface of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Promote Site-specific Oxidative Damages in Yeast and Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Vaubel, Rachael A.; Rustin, Pierre; Isaya, Grazia

    2011-01-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD) is a multifunctional protein well characterized as the E3 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes. Previously, conditions predicted to destabilize the DLD dimer revealed that DLD could also function as a diaphorase and serine protease. However, the relevance of these cryptic activities remained undefined. We analyzed human DLD mutations linked to strikingly different clinical phenotypes, including E340K, D444V, R447G, and R460G in the dimer interface domain that are responsible for severe multisystem disorders of infancy and G194C in the NAD+-binding domain that is typically associated with milder presentations. In vitro, all of these mutations decreased to various degrees dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity, whereas dimer interface mutations also enhanced proteolytic and/or diaphorase activity. Human DLD proteins carrying each individual mutation complemented fully the respiratory-deficient phenotype of yeast cells lacking endogenous DLD even when residual dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity was as low as 21% of controls. However, under elevated oxidative stress, expression of DLD proteins with dimer interface mutations greatly accelerated the loss of respiratory function, resulting from enhanced oxidative damage to the lipoic acid cofactor of pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and other mitochondrial targets. This effect was not observed with the G194C mutation or a mutation that disrupts the proteolytic active site of DLD. As in yeast, lipoic acid cofactor was damaged in human D444V-homozygous fibroblasts after exposure to oxidative stress. We conclude that the cryptic activities of DLD promote oxidative damage to neighboring molecules and thus contribute to the clinical severity of DLD mutations. PMID:21930696

  10. Error-prone polymerase activity causes multinucleotide mutations in humans.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kelley; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-09-01

    About 2% of human genetic polymorphisms have been hypothesized to arise via multinucleotide mutations (MNMs), complex events that generate SNPs at multiple sites in a single generation. MNMs have the potential to accelerate the pace at which single genes evolve and to confound studies of demography and selection that assume all SNPs arise independently. In this paper, we examine clustered mutations that are segregating in a set of 1092 human genomes, demonstrating that the signature of MNM becomes enriched as large numbers of individuals are sampled. We estimate the percentage of linked SNP pairs that were generated by simultaneous mutation as a function of the distance between affected sites and show that MNMs exhibit a high percentage of transversions relative to transitions, findings that are reproducible in data from multiple sequencing platforms and cannot be attributed to sequencing error. Among tandem mutations that occur simultaneously at adjacent sites, we find an especially skewed distribution of ancestral and derived alleles, with GC → AA, GA → TT, and their reverse complements making up 27% of the total. These mutations have been previously shown to dominate the spectrum of the error-prone polymerase Pol ζ, suggesting that low-fidelity DNA replication by Pol ζ is at least partly responsible for the MNMs that are segregating in the human population. We develop statistical estimates of MNM prevalence that can be used to correct phylogenetic and population genetic inferences for the presence of complex mutations. PMID:25079859

  11. Error-prone polymerase activity causes multinucleotide mutations in humans

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    About 2% of human genetic polymorphisms have been hypothesized to arise via multinucleotide mutations (MNMs), complex events that generate SNPs at multiple sites in a single generation. MNMs have the potential to accelerate the pace at which single genes evolve and to confound studies of demography and selection that assume all SNPs arise independently. In this paper, we examine clustered mutations that are segregating in a set of 1092 human genomes, demonstrating that the signature of MNM becomes enriched as large numbers of individuals are sampled. We estimate the percentage of linked SNP pairs that were generated by simultaneous mutation as a function of the distance between affected sites and show that MNMs exhibit a high percentage of transversions relative to transitions, findings that are reproducible in data from multiple sequencing platforms and cannot be attributed to sequencing error. Among tandem mutations that occur simultaneously at adjacent sites, we find an especially skewed distribution of ancestral and derived alleles, with GC → AA, GA → TT, and their reverse complements making up 27% of the total. These mutations have been previously shown to dominate the spectrum of the error-prone polymerase Pol ζ, suggesting that low-fidelity DNA replication by Pol ζ is at least partly responsible for the MNMs that are segregating in the human population. We develop statistical estimates of MNM prevalence that can be used to correct phylogenetic and population genetic inferences for the presence of complex mutations. PMID:25079859

  12. Gain-Of-Function Mutational Activation of Human TRNA Synthetase Procytokine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.L.; Kapoor, M.; Otero, F.J.; Slike, B.M.; Tsuruta, H.; Frausto, R.; Bates, A.; Ewalt, K.L.; Cheresh, D.A.; Schimmel, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Disease-causing mutations occur in genes for aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. That some mutations are dominant suggests a gain of function. Native tRNA synthetases, such as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, catalyze aminoacylation and are also procytokines that are activated by natural fragmentation. In principle, however, gain-of-function phenotypes could arise from mutational activation of synthetase procytokines. From crystal structure analysis, we hypothesized that a steric block of a critical Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif in full-length TyrRS suppresses the cytokine activity of a natural fragment. To test this hypothesis, we attempted to uncover ELR in the procytokine by mutating a conserved tyrosine (Y341) that tethers ELR. Site-specific proteolytic cleavage and small-angle X-ray scattering established subtle opening of the structure by the mutation. Strikingly, four different assays demonstrated mutational activation of cytokine functions. The results prove the possibilities for constitutive gain-of-function mutations in tRNA synthetases.

  13. Gain-of-Function Mutational Activation of Human tRNA Synthetase Procytokine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiang-Lei; Kapoor, Mili; Otero, Francella J.; Slike, Bonnie M.; Tsuruta, Hiro; Frausto, Ricardo; Bates, Alison; Ewalt, Karla L.; Cheresh, David A.; Schimmel, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Summary Disease-causing mutations occur in genes for aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. That some mutations are dominant suggests a gain-of-function. Native tRNA synthetases, like TyrRS and TrpRS, catalyze aminoacylation and are also procytokines that are activated by natural fragmentation. In principle, however, gain-of-function phenotypes could arise from mutational activation of synthetase procytokines. From crystal structure analysis we hypothesized that a steric block of a critical ELR motif in full-length TyrRS suppresses the cytokine activity of a natural fragment. To test this hypothesis, we attempted to uncover ELR in the procytokine by mutating a conserved tyrosine (Y341) that tethers ELR. Site-specific proteolytic cleavage and small angle X-ray scattering established subtle opening of the structure by the mutation. Strikingly, four different assays demonstrated mutational activation of cytokine functions. The results prove the possibilities for constitutive gain-of-function mutations in tRNA synthetases. PMID:18096501

  14. Gain-of-function mutational activation of human tRNA synthetase procytokine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang-Lei; Kapoor, Mili; Otero, Francella J; Slike, Bonnie M; Tsuruta, Hiro; Frausto, Ricardo; Bates, Alison; Ewalt, Karla L; Cheresh, David A; Schimmel, Paul

    2007-12-01

    Disease-causing mutations occur in genes for aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. That some mutations are dominant suggests a gain of function. Native tRNA synthetases, such as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, catalyze aminoacylation and are also procytokines that are activated by natural fragmentation. In principle, however, gain-of-function phenotypes could arise from mutational activation of synthetase procytokines. From crystal structure analysis, we hypothesized that a steric block of a critical Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif in full-length TyrRS suppresses the cytokine activity of a natural fragment. To test this hypothesis, we attempted to uncover ELR in the procytokine by mutating a conserved tyrosine (Y341) that tethers ELR. Site-specific proteolytic cleavage and small-angle X-ray scattering established subtle opening of the structure by the mutation. Strikingly, four different assays demonstrated mutational activation of cytokine functions. The results prove the possibilities for constitutive gain-of-function mutations in tRNA synthetases. PMID:18096501

  15. Splice-acceptor site mutation in p53 gene of hu888 zebrafish line.

    PubMed

    Piasecka, Alicja; Brzuzan, Paweł; Woźny, Maciej; Ciesielski, Sławomir; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz

    2015-02-01

    The p53 transcription factor is a key tumor suppressor and a central regulator of the stress response, which has been a subject of intense research for over 30 years. Recently, a zebrafish line which carries splice site mutation (G>T) in intron 8 of p53 gene (p53 (hu888) ), encoding the p53 paralogue, was developed (The Zebrafish Mutation Project). To uncover molecular effects of the mutation, we raised hu888 zebrafish line to adulthood and analyzed DNA, mRNA data, and protein levels of p53 to assess their potential contribution in molecular mechanisms of the mutant fish. To obtain zebrafish individuals homozygous for the point mutation, p53 (hu888) carriers were repeatedly incrossed but only heterozygous mutants (p53 (hu888/+) ) or p53-wild type hu888 zebrafish (p53 (+/+) ) were identified in their progeny. By evaluation of p53 expression changes in the liver of mutant and wild type hu888 zebrafish as well as of Tübingen reference strain, we demonstrated that two types of splicing occurred in each case: a classical one and the alternative splicing which involves the activation of cryptic splice-acceptor site in the exon 9 of zebrafish p53 pre-mRNA. The alternative splicing event results in a deletion 12 nucleotides in the mature mRNA, and produces a shortened variant of p53 protein. Interestingly, expression of p53 protein in liver of both heterozygous and wild type hu888 zebrafish was highly reduced compared to that in the reference strain. PMID:25183022

  16. Mutation of Glycosylation Sites in BST-2 Leads to Its Accumulation at Intracellular CD63-Positive Vesicles without Affecting Its Antiviral Activity against Multivesicular Body-Targeted HIV-1 and Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhu; Lv, Mingyu; Shi, Ying; Yu, Jinghua; Niu, Junqi; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Wenyan

    2016-01-01

    BST-2/tetherin blocks the release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1 with a “physical tethering” model. The detailed contribution of N-linked glycosylation to this model is controversial. Here, we confirmed that mutation of glycosylation sites exerted an effect of post-translational mis-trafficking, leading to an accumulation of BST-2 at intracellular CD63-positive vesicles. BST-2 with this phenotype potently inhibited the release of multivesicular body-targeted HIV-1 and hepatitis B virus, without affecting the co-localization of BST-2 with EEA1 and LAMP1. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation of human BST-2 is dispensable for intracellular virion retention and imply that this recently discovered intracellular tethering function may be evolutionarily distinguished from the canonical antiviral function of BST-2 by tethering nascent virions at the cell surface. PMID:26938549

  17. Analyses of disease-related GNPTAB mutations define a novel GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase interaction domain and an alternative site-1 protease cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Renata Voltolini; De Pace, Raffaella; Klünder, Sarah; Sperb-Ludwig, Fernanda; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Schwartz, Ida V. D.; Braulke, Thomas; Pohl, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (MLII) and III alpha/beta are autosomal-recessive diseases of childhood caused by mutations in GNPTAB encoding the α/β-subunit precursor protein of the GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase complex. This enzyme modifies lysosomal hydrolases with mannose 6-phosphate targeting signals. Upon arrival in the Golgi apparatus, the newly synthesized α/β-subunit precursor is catalytically activated by site-1 protease (S1P). Here we performed comprehensive expression studies of GNPTAB mutations, including two novel mutations T644M and T1223del, identified in Brazilian MLII/MLIII alpha/beta patients. We show that the frameshift E757KfsX1 and the non-sense R587X mutations result in the retention of enzymatically inactive truncated precursor proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) due to loss of cytosolic ER exit motifs consistent with a severe clinical phenotype in homozygosity. The luminal missense mutations, C505Y, G575R and T644M, partially impaired ER exit and proteolytic activation in accordance with less severe MLIII alpha/beta disease symptoms. Analogous to the previously characterized S399F mutant, we found that the missense mutation I403T led to retention in the ER and loss of catalytic activity. Substitution of further conserved residues in stealth domain 2 (I346 and W357) revealed similar biochemical properties and allowed us to define a putative binding site for accessory proteins required for ER exit of α/β-subunit precursors. Interestingly, the analysis of the Y937_M972del mutant revealed partial Golgi localization and formation of abnormal inactive β-subunits generated by S1P which correlate with a clinical MLII phenotype. Expression analyses of mutations identified in patients underline genotype–phenotype correlations in MLII/MLIII alpha/beta and provide novel insights into structural requirements of proper GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase activity. PMID:25788519

  18. Mutations in Gcr1, a Transcriptional Activator of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Glycolytic Genes, Function as Suppressors of Gcr2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, H.; Jigami, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCR1 and GCR2 genes affect expression of most of the glycolytic genes. Evidence for Gcr1p/Gcr2p interaction has been presented earlier and is now supported by the isolation of mutations in Gcr1p suppressing gcr2, as assessed by growth and enzyme assay. Four specific mutation sites were identified. Together with use of the two-hybrid system of FIELDS and SONG, they show that Gcr1p in its N-terminal half has a potential transcriptional activating function as well as elements for interaction with Gcr2p, which perhaps acts normally to expose an otherwise cryptic activation domain on Gcr1p. Complementation of various gcr1 mutant alleles and results with the two-hybrid system also indicate that Gcr1p itself normally functions as an oligomer. PMID:7713414

  19. Bacteriophage lambda cro mutations: effects on activity and intracellular degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Pakula, A A; Young, V B; Sauer, R T

    1986-01-01

    Following random mutagenesis of the bacteriophage lambda cro gene, we have isolated missense mutations that affect approximately half of the 66 residue positions of Cro. About two-thirds of the mutations change residues involved in the maintenance of Cro structure and stability. The corresponding mutant proteins are severely degraded in the cell but often have specific activities near that of wild-type Cro. The remaining mutations affect residues involved in DNA binding. These mutant proteins are present at moderately reduced intracellular levels, but their specific activities are much lower than that of wild type. Images PMID:2947238

  20. An Insertion Mutation That Distorts Antibody Binding Site Architecture Enhances Function of a Human Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Jens C.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Smith, Patricia B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Crowe, Jr., James E.

    2011-09-02

    The structural and functional significance of somatic insertions and deletions in antibody chains is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a naturally occurring three-amino-acid insertion within the influenza virus-specific human monoclonal antibody 2D1 heavy-chain variable region reconfigures the antibody-combining site and contributes to its high potency against the 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses. The insertion arose through a series of events, including a somatic point mutation in a predicted hot-spot motif, introduction of a new hot-spot motif, a molecular duplication due to polymerase slippage, a deletion due to misalignment, and additional somatic point mutations. Atomic resolution structures of the wild-type antibody and a variant in which the insertion was removed revealed that the three-amino-acid insertion near the base of heavy-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) H2 resulted in a bulge in that loop. This enlarged CDR H2 loop impinges on adjacent regions, causing distortion of the CDR H1 architecture and its displacement away from the antigen-combining site. Removal of the insertion restores the canonical structure of CDR H1 and CDR H2, but binding, neutralization activity, and in vivo activity were reduced markedly because of steric conflict of CDR H1 with the hemagglutinin antigen.

  1. His499 Regulates Dimerization and Prevents Oncogenic Activation by Asparagine Mutations of the Human Thrombopoietin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Emilie; Defour, Jean-Philippe; Sato, Takeshi; Dass, Sharmila; Gryshkova, Vitalina; Shwe, Myat M; Staerk, Judith; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Smith, Steven O

    2016-02-01

    Ligand binding to the extracellular domain of the thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) imparts a specific orientation on the transmembrane (TM) and intracellular domains of the receptors that is required for physiologic activation via receptor dimerization. To map the inactive and active dimeric orientations of the TM helices, we performed asparagine (Asn)-scanning mutagenesis of the TM domains of the murine and human TpoR. Substitution of Asn at only one position (S505N) activated the human receptor, whereas Asn substitutions at several positions activated the murine receptor. Second site mutational studies indicate that His(499) near the N terminus of the TM domain is responsible for protecting the human receptor from activation by Asn mutations. Structural studies reveal that the sequence preceding His(499) is helical in the murine receptor but non-helical in peptides corresponding to the TM domain of the inactive human receptor. The activating S505N mutation and the small molecule agonist eltrombopag both induce helix in this region of the TM domain and are associated with dimerization and activation of the human receptor. Thus, His(499) regulates the activation of human TpoR and provides additional protection against activating mutations, such as oncogenic Asn mutations in the TM domain. PMID:26627830

  2. Quantitation of normal CFTR mRNA in CF patients with splice-site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Z.; Olsen, J.C.; Silverman, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified two mutations in introns of the CFTR gene associated with partially active splice sites and unusual clinical phenotypes. One mutation in intron 19 (3849+10 kb C to T) is common in CF patients with normal sweat chloride values; an 84 bp sequence from intron 19, which contains a stop codon, is inserted between exon 19 and exon 20 in most nasal CFTR transcripts. The other mutation in intron 14B (2789+5 G to A) is associated with elevated sweat chloride levels, but mild pulmonary disease; exon 14B (38 bp) is spliced out of most nasal CFTR transcipts. The remaining CFTR cDNA sequences, other than the 84 bp insertion of exon 14B deletion, are identical to the published sequence. To correlate genotype and phenotype, we used quantitative RT-PCR to determine the levels of normally-spliced CFTR mRNA in nasal epithelia from these patients. CFTR cDNA was amplified (25 cycles) by using primers specific for normally-spliced species, {gamma}-actin cDNA was amplified as a standard.

  3. Activating mutations in CTNNB1 in aldosterone producing adenomas.

    PubMed

    Åkerström, Tobias; Maharjan, Rajani; Sven Willenberg, Holger; Cupisti, Kenko; Ip, Julian; Moser, Ana; Stålberg, Peter; Robinson, Bruce; Alexander Iwen, K; Dralle, Henning; Walz, Martin K; Lehnert, Hendrik; Sidhu, Stan; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso; Hellman, Per; Björklund, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of secondary hypertension with a prevalence of 5-10% in unreferred hypertensive patients. Aldosterone producing adenomas (APAs) constitute a large proportion of PA cases and represent a surgically correctable form of the disease. The WNT signaling pathway is activated in APAs. In other tumors, a frequent cause of aberrant WNT signaling is mutation in the CTNNB1 gene coding for β-catenin. Our objective was to screen for CTNNB1 mutations in a well-characterized cohort of 198 APAs. Somatic CTNNB1 mutations were detected in 5.1% of the tumors, occurring mutually exclusive from mutations in KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 and CACNA1D. All of the observed mutations altered serine/threonine residues in the GSK3β binding domain in exon 3. The mutations were associated with stabilized β-catenin and increased AXIN2 expression, suggesting activation of WNT signaling. By CYP11B2 mRNA expression, CYP11B2 protein expression, and direct measurement of aldosterone in tumor tissue, we confirmed the ability for aldosterone production. This report provides compelling evidence that aberrant WNT signaling caused by mutations in CTNNB1 occur in APAs. This also suggests that other mechanisms that constitutively activate the WNT pathway may be important in APA formation. PMID:26815163

  4. Activating mutations in CTNNB1 in aldosterone producing adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Åkerström, Tobias; Maharjan, Rajani; Sven Willenberg, Holger; Cupisti, Kenko; Ip, Julian; Moser, Ana; Stålberg, Peter; Robinson, Bruce; Alexander Iwen, K.; Dralle, Henning; Walz, Martin K.; Lehnert, Hendrik; Sidhu, Stan; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso; Hellman, Per; Björklund, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of secondary hypertension with a prevalence of 5–10% in unreferred hypertensive patients. Aldosterone producing adenomas (APAs) constitute a large proportion of PA cases and represent a surgically correctable form of the disease. The WNT signaling pathway is activated in APAs. In other tumors, a frequent cause of aberrant WNT signaling is mutation in the CTNNB1 gene coding for β-catenin. Our objective was to screen for CTNNB1 mutations in a well-characterized cohort of 198 APAs. Somatic CTNNB1 mutations were detected in 5.1% of the tumors, occurring mutually exclusive from mutations in KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 and CACNA1D. All of the observed mutations altered serine/threonine residues in the GSK3β binding domain in exon 3. The mutations were associated with stabilized β-catenin and increased AXIN2 expression, suggesting activation of WNT signaling. By CYP11B2 mRNA expression, CYP11B2 protein expression, and direct measurement of aldosterone in tumor tissue, we confirmed the ability for aldosterone production. This report provides compelling evidence that aberrant WNT signaling caused by mutations in CTNNB1 occur in APAs. This also suggests that other mechanisms that constitutively activate the WNT pathway may be important in APA formation. PMID:26815163

  5. Somatic Activating PIK3CA Mutations Cause Venous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Nisha; Kangas, Jaakko; Mendola, Antonella; Godfraind, Catherine; Schlögel, Matthieu J; Helaers, Raphael; Eklund, Lauri; Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2015-12-01

    Somatic mutations in TEK, the gene encoding endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2, cause more than half of sporadically occurring unifocal venous malformations (VMs). Here, we report that somatic mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the catalytic p110α subunit of PI3K, cause 54% (27 out of 50) of VMs with no detected TEK mutation. The hotspot mutations c.1624G>A, c.1633G>A, and c.3140A>G (p.Glu542Lys, p.Glu545Lys, and p.His1047Arg), frequent in PIK3CA-associated cancers, overgrowth syndromes, and lymphatic malformation (LM), account for >92% of individuals who carry mutations. Like VM-causative mutations in TEK, the PIK3CA mutations cause chronic activation of AKT, dysregulation of certain important angiogenic factors, and abnormal endothelial cell morphology when expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The p110α-specific inhibitor BYL719 restores all abnormal phenotypes tested, in PIK3CA- as well as TEK-mutant HUVECs, demonstrating that they operate via the same pathogenic pathways. Nevertheless, significant genotype-phenotype correlations in lesion localization and histology are observed between individuals with mutations in PIK3CA versus TEK, pointing to gene-specific effects. PMID:26637981

  6. Clustered mutations in hominid genome evolution are consistent with APOBEC3G enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Yishay; Gabay, Orshay; Arbiza, Leonardo; Sams, Aaron J; Keinan, Alon; Levanon, Erez Y

    2016-05-01

    The gradual accumulation of mutations by any of a number of mutational processes is a major driving force of divergence and evolution. Here, we investigate a potentially novel mutational process that is based on the activity of members of the AID/APOBEC family of deaminases. This gene family has been recently shown to introduce-in multiple types of cancer-enzyme-induced clusters of co-occurring somatic mutations caused by cytosine deamination. Going beyond somatic mutations, we hypothesized that APOBEC3-following its rapid expansion in primates-can introduce unique germline mutation clusters that can play a role in primate evolution. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by performing a comprehensive comparative genomic screen for APOBEC3-induced mutagenesis patterns across different hominids. We detected thousands of mutation clusters introduced along primate evolution which exhibit features that strongly fit the known patterns of APOBEC3G mutagenesis. These results suggest that APOBEC3G-induced mutations have contributed to the evolution of all genomes we studied. This is the first indication of site-directed, enzyme-induced genome evolution, which played a role in the evolution of both modern and archaic humans. This novel mutational mechanism exhibits several unique features, such as its higher tendency to mutate transcribed regions and regulatory elements and its ability to generate clusters of concurrent point mutations that all occur in a single generation. Our discovery demonstrates the exaptation of an anti-viral mechanism as a new source of genomic variation in hominids with a strong potential for functional consequences. PMID:27056836

  7. Clustered mutations in hominid genome evolution are consistent with APOBEC3G enzymatic activity

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Yishay; Gabay, Orshay; Arbiza, Leonardo; Sams, Aaron J.; Keinan, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The gradual accumulation of mutations by any of a number of mutational processes is a major driving force of divergence and evolution. Here, we investigate a potentially novel mutational process that is based on the activity of members of the AID/APOBEC family of deaminases. This gene family has been recently shown to introduce—in multiple types of cancer—enzyme-induced clusters of co-occurring somatic mutations caused by cytosine deamination. Going beyond somatic mutations, we hypothesized that APOBEC3—following its rapid expansion in primates—can introduce unique germline mutation clusters that can play a role in primate evolution. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by performing a comprehensive comparative genomic screen for APOBEC3-induced mutagenesis patterns across different hominids. We detected thousands of mutation clusters introduced along primate evolution which exhibit features that strongly fit the known patterns of APOBEC3G mutagenesis. These results suggest that APOBEC3G-induced mutations have contributed to the evolution of all genomes we studied. This is the first indication of site-directed, enzyme-induced genome evolution, which played a role in the evolution of both modern and archaic humans. This novel mutational mechanism exhibits several unique features, such as its higher tendency to mutate transcribed regions and regulatory elements and its ability to generate clusters of concurrent point mutations that all occur in a single generation. Our discovery demonstrates the exaptation of an anti-viral mechanism as a new source of genomic variation in hominids with a strong potential for functional consequences. PMID:27056836

  8. HER2 activating mutations are targets for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kavuri, Shyam M.; Jain, Naveen; Galimi, Francesco; Cottino, Francesca; Leto, Simonetta M.; Migliardi, Giorgia; Searleman, Adam C.; Shen, Wei; Monsey, John; Trusolino, Livio; Jacobs, Samuel A.; Bertotti, Andrea; Bose, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified HER2 somatic mutations and gene amplification in 7% of colorectal cancer patients. Introduction of the HER2 mutations, S310F, L755S, V777L, V842I, and L866M, into colon epithelial cells increased signaling pathways and anchorage-independent cell growth, indicating that they are activating mutations. Introduction of these HER2 activating mutations into colorectal cancer cell lines produced resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab by sustaining MAPK phosphorylation. HER2 mutations are potently inhibited by low nanomolar doses of the irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors, neratinib and afatinib. HER2 gene sequencing of 48 cetuximab resistant, quadruple (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA) WT colorectal cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX’s) identified 4 PDX’s with HER2 mutations. HER2 targeted therapies were tested on two PDX’s. Treatment with a single HER2 targeted drug (trastuzumab, neratinib, or lapatinib) delayed tumor growth, but dual HER2 targeted therapy with trastuzumab plus tyrosine kinase inhibitors produced regression of these HER2 mutated PDX’s. PMID:26243863

  9. Bi-Directional SIFT Predicts a Subset of Activating Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, William; Lazarus, Robert A.; Zhang, Zemin

    2009-01-01

    Advancements in sequencing technologies have empowered recent efforts to identify polymorphisms and mutations on a global scale. The large number of variations and mutations found in these projects requires high-throughput tools to identify those that are most likely to have an impact on function. Numerous computational tools exist for predicting which mutations are likely to be functional, but none that specifically attempt to identify mutations that result in hyperactivation or gain-of-function. Here we present a modified version of the SIFT (Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant) algorithm that utilizes protein sequence alignments with homologous sequences to identify functional mutations based on evolutionary fitness. We show that this bi-directional SIFT (B-SIFT) is capable of identifying experimentally verified activating mutants from multiple datasets. B-SIFT analysis of large-scale cancer genotyping data identified potential activating mutations, some of which we have provided detailed structural evidence to support. B-SIFT could prove to be a valuable tool for efforts in protein engineering as well as in identification of functional mutations in cancer. PMID:20011534

  10. A novel splice site mutation in the GNPTAB gene in an Iranian patient with mucolipidosis II α/β.

    PubMed

    Hashemi-Gorji, Feyzollah; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Salehpour, Shadab; Yassaee, Vahid Reza; Miryounesi, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Mucolipidosis type II α/β (ML II α/β) and mucolipidosis type III α/β (ML III α/β) have been shown to be caused by an absence or reduced level of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase enzyme (EC 2.7.8.17) activity, respectively. Both disorders are caused by mutations in the GNPTAB gene and are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Here we report a 2-year-old female patient being diagnosed as a case of ML II α/β due to coarse face, severe developmental delay, multiple dysostosis, noticeable increase of multiple lysosomal enzymes activity in plasma and normal acid mucopolysaccharides in urine. Mutational analysis of the GNPTAB gene has revealed a novel homozygous mutation in the patient (c.3250-2A>G) with both parents being heterozygote. Transcript analyses showed that this novel splice site mutation leads to exon 17 skipping and a frameshift afterwards (p.P1084_R1112del F1113Vfs*1). Consequently, we confirmed the association of this mutation with ML II α/β. Our finding expands the number of reported cases of this rare metabolic disorder and adds to the GNPTAB mutation database. PMID:27180337

  11. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  12. TERT promoter mutations and monoallelic activation of TERT in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, F W; Bielski, C M; Rinne, M L; Hahn, W C; Sellers, W R; Stegmeier, F; Garraway, L A; Kryukov, G V

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that promoter mutations in telomerase (TERT), the most common noncoding mutations in cancer, give rise to monoallelic expression of TERT. Through deep RNA sequencing, we find that TERT activation in human cancer cell lines can occur in either mono- or biallelic manner. Without exception, hotspot TERT promoter mutations lead to the re-expression of only one allele, accounting for approximately half of the observed cases of monoallelic TERT expression. Furthermore, we show that monoallelic TERT expression is highly prevalent in certain tumor types and widespread across a broad spectrum of cancers. Taken together, these observations provide insights into the mechanisms of TERT activation and the ramifications of noncoding mutations in cancer. PMID:26657580

  13. MNGIE with lack of skeletal muscle involvement and a novel TP splice site mutation.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, K; Wong, L-J C; Perng, C-L; Saifi, G M; Eldin, K; Adesina, A M; Cass, D L; Hirano, M; Lupski, J R; Scaglia, F

    2004-02-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder caused by thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficiency, resulting in severe gastrointestinal dysmotility and skeletal muscle abnormalities. A patient is reported with a classical MNGIE clinical presentation but without skeletal muscle involvement at morphological, enzymatic, or mitochondrial DNA level, though gastrointestinal myopathy was present. MNGIE was diagnosed by markedly raised plasma thymidine and reduced thymidine phosphorylase activity. Molecular genetic analysis showed a homozygous novel splice site mutation in TP. On immunohistochemical studies there was marked TP expression in the CNS, in contrast to what has been observed in rodents. It is important to examine the most significantly affected tissue and to measure TP activity and plasma thymidine in order to arrive at an accurate diagnosis in this condition. PMID:14757860

  14. Enhancing Human Spermine Synthase Activity by Engineered Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Zheng, Yueli; Petukh, Margo; Pegg, Anthony; Ikeguchi, Yoshihiko; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Spermine synthase (SMS) is an enzyme which function is to convert spermidine into spermine. It was shown that gene defects resulting in amino acid changes of the wild type SMS cause Snyder-Robinson syndrome, which is a mild-to-moderate mental disability associated with osteoporosis, facial asymmetry, thin habitus, hypotonia, and a nonspecific movement disorder. These disease-causing missense mutations were demonstrated, both in silico and in vitro, to affect the wild type function of SMS by either destabilizing the SMS dimer/monomer or directly affecting the hydrogen bond network of the active site of SMS. In contrast to these studies, here we report an artificial engineering of a more efficient SMS variant by transferring sequence information from another organism. It is confirmed experimentally that the variant, bearing four amino acid substitutions, is catalytically more active than the wild type. The increased functionality is attributed to enhanced monomer stability, lowering the pKa of proton donor catalytic residue, optimized spatial distribution of the electrostatic potential around the SMS with respect to substrates, and increase of the frequency of mechanical vibration of the clefts presumed to be the gates toward the active sites. The study demonstrates that wild type SMS is not particularly evolutionarily optimized with respect to the reaction spermidine → spermine. Having in mind that currently there are no variations (non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism, nsSNP) detected in healthy individuals, it can be speculated that the human SMS function is precisely tuned toward its wild type and any deviation is unwanted and disease-causing. PMID:23468611

  15. Mutations that alter the ability of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein to activate transcription.

    PubMed

    Bell, A; Gaston, K; Williams, R; Chapman, K; Kolb, A; Buc, H; Minchin, S; Williams, J; Busby, S

    1990-12-25

    The effects of a number of mutations in the E. coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) have been determined by monitoring the in vivo expression and in vitro open complex formation at two semi-synthetic promoters that are totally CRP-dependent. At one promoter the CRP-binding site is centered around 41.5 base pairs upstream from the transcription start whilst at the other promoter it is 61.5 base pairs upstream. The CRP mutation E171K reduces expression from both promoters whilst H159L renders CRP totally inactive: neither mutation stops CRP binding at either promoter. The mutations K52N and K52Q reverse the effect of H159L and 'reeducate' CRP to activate transcription. CRP carrying both H159L and K52N activates transcription from the promoter with the CRP site at -41.5 better than wild type CRP. In sharp contrast, this doubly changed CRP is totally inactive with respect to the activation of transcription from the promoter carrying the CRP site at -61.5. Our results suggest that CRP can use different contacts and/or conformations during transcription activation at promoters with different architectures. PMID:2259621

  16. Mutations that alter the ability of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein to activate transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, A; Gaston, K; Williams, R; Chapman, K; Kolb, A; Buc, H; Minchin, S; Williams, J; Busby, S

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a number of mutations in the E. coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) have been determined by monitoring the in vivo expression and in vitro open complex formation at two semi-synthetic promoters that are totally CRP-dependent. At one promoter the CRP-binding site is centered around 41.5 base pairs upstream from the transcription start whilst at the other promoter it is 61.5 base pairs upstream. The CRP mutation E171K reduces expression from both promoters whilst H159L renders CRP totally inactive: neither mutation stops CRP binding at either promoter. The mutations K52N and K52Q reverse the effect of H159L and 'reeducate' CRP to activate transcription. CRP carrying both H159L and K52N activates transcription from the promoter with the CRP site at -41.5 better than wild type CRP. In sharp contrast, this doubly changed CRP is totally inactive with respect to the activation of transcription from the promoter carrying the CRP site at -61.5. Our results suggest that CRP can use different contacts and/or conformations during transcription activation at promoters with different architectures. Images PMID:2259621

  17. Space environment induced mutations prefer to occur at polymorphic sites of rice genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Liu, M.; Cheng, Z.; Sun, Y.

    To explore the genomic characteristics of rice mutants induced by space environment, space-induced mutants 971-5, 972-4, and R955, which acquired new traits after space flight such as increased yield, reduced resistance to rice blast, and semi-dwarfism compared with their on-ground controls, 971ck, 972ck, and Bing95-503, respectively, together with other 8 japonica and 3 indica rice varieties, 17 in total, were analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method. We chose 16 AFLP primer-pairs which generated a total of 1251 sites, of which 745 (59.6%) were polymorphic over all the genotypes. With the 16 pairs of primer combinations, 54 space-induced mutation sites were observed in 971-5, 86 in 972-4, and 5 in R955 compared to their controls, and the mutation rates were 4.3%, 6.9% and 0.4%, respectively. Interestingly, 75.9%, 84.9% and 100% of the mutation sites identified in 971-5, 972-4, and R955 occurred in polymorphic sites. This result suggests that the space environment preferentially induced mutations at polymorphic sites in rice genomes and might share a common mechanism with other types of mutagens. It also implies that polymorphic sites in genomes are potential "hotspots" for mutations induced by the space environment.

  18. Mutation of potential phosphorylation sites in the recombinant R domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator has significant effects on domain conformation.

    PubMed

    Dulhanty, A M; Chang, X B; Riordan, J R

    1995-01-01

    Mutation of potential cAMP dependent protein kinase sites in the R domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator has significant effects on protein function. Mutation of the potential phosphorylation sites from serine to alanine, to abolish the site, reduced sensitivity to activation, or to glutamic acid, to mimic phosphorylation, caused some constitutive activity. To explore the structural effects of these mutations, recombinant R domain peptides were studied: the wild type, a mutant with nine serine residues changed to alanine, and a mutant with eight serine residues changed to glutamic acid. As assessed by C.D. spectroscopy, the mutants have substantially different secondary structure than the wild type, in agreement with the predictive algorithm of Gascuel and Golmard. The results show that mutagenesis of residues alters the polypeptide structurally as well as preventing it from serving as a phosphorylation substrate. Hence, the functional consequences of the mutations may not be entirely due to effects on phosphorylation. PMID:7529497

  19. Mutations that bypass tRNA binding activate the intrinsically defective kinase domain in GCN2

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongfang; Hu, Cuihua; Dong, Jinsheng; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2002-01-01

    The protein kinase GCN2 is activated in amino acid-starved cells on binding of uncharged tRNA to a histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS)-related domain. We isolated two point mutations in the protein kinase (PK) domain, R794G and F842L, that permit strong kinase activity in the absence of tRNA binding. These mutations also bypass the requirement for ribosome binding, dimerization, and association with the GCN1/GCN20 regulatory complex, suggesting that all of these functions facilitate tRNA binding to wild-type GCN2. While the isolated wild-type PK domain was completely inert, the mutant PK was highly active in vivo and in vitro. These results identify an inhibitory structure intrinsic to the PK domain that must be overcome on tRNA binding by interactions with a regulatory region, most likely the N terminus of the HisRS segment. As Arg 794 and Phe 842 are predicted to lie close to one another and to the active site, they may participate directly in misaligning active site residues. Autophosphorylation of the activation loop was stimulated by R794G and F842L, and the autophosphorylation sites remained critical for GCN2 function in the presence of these mutations. Our results imply a two-step activation mechanism involving distinct conformational changes in the PK domain. PMID:12023305

  20. Functional consequences of site-directed mutation of conserved histidyl residues of the bacterial luciferase alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Xin, X; Xi, L; Tu, S C

    1991-11-26

    The available sequences for the different bacterial luciferases reveal five conserved histidyl residues at positions 44, 45, 82, 224, and 285 of the alpha subunit. Ten variants of Vibrio harveyi luciferase were obtained by selective site-directed mutations of these five histidines. The essentiality of alpha His44 and alpha His45 was indicated by 4-7 orders of magnitude of bioluminescence activity reductions resulting from the substitution of either histidine by alanine (alpha H44A or alpha H45A), aspartate (alpha H44D or alpha H45D), or lysine (alpha H45K). Moreover, alpha H44A and alpha H45A were distinct from the native luciferase in thermal stabilities. Mutations at the other three positions also resulted in activity reductions ranging from a fewfold to 3 orders of magnitude. Despite these widely different bioluminescence light outputs, mutated luciferases exhibited, in nonturnover in vitro assays, light emission decay rates mostly similar to that of the native luciferase using octanal, decanal, or dodecanal as a substrate. This is attributed to a similarity in the catalytic rate constants of the light-emitting pathway for the native and mutated luciferases, but various mutated luciferases suffer in different degrees from competing dark reaction(s). In accord with this interpretation, the bioluminescence activities of mutated luciferases showed a general parallel with the relative stabilities of their 4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate species. Furthermore, the drastically reduced bioluminescence activities for luciferases with the alpha His44 or alpha His45 substituted by aspartate, alanine, or lysine were accompanied by little or no activities for consuming the aldehyde substrate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1958663

  1. Characterization of a novel TYMP splice site mutation associated with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE).

    PubMed

    Taanman, Jan-Willem; Daras, Mariza; Albrecht, Juliane; Davie, Charles A; Mallam, Elizabeth A; Muddle, John R; Weatherall, Mark; Warner, Thomas T; Schapira, Anthony H V; Ginsberg, Lionel

    2009-02-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the thymidine phosphorylase gene (TYMP). We report here a patient compound heterozygous for two TYMP mutations: a novel g.4009G>A transition affecting the consensus splice donor site of intron 9, and a previously reported g.675G>C splice site mutation. The novel mutation causes exon 9 skipping but leaves the reading frame intact; however, TYMP protein was not detected by immunoblot analysis, suggesting that neither mutant allele is expressed as protein. The patient's fibroblasts showed gradual loss of the mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunit I of cytochrome-c oxidase, suggesting a progressive mitochondrial DNA defect in culture. PMID:19056268

  2. Association of Carney Complex with an Intronic Splice Site Mutation in the PRKAR1A Gene.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Xiong, H; Li, Z; Xu, J; Zhang, H; Chen, X; Hu, S

    2016-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the clinical features and mutations in the PRKAR1A gene of a multigenerational kindred including 17 individuals at risk for Carney complex. Eight patients were diagnosed with Carney complex among the 17 individuals (47.1%). Among the 8 affected patients, 4 had cardiac myxomas, 8 had skin pigmentation, and 3 had diabetes. Genomic DNA sequencing in 14 surviving patients showed 6 had the same germline mutation in the sixth intron and affected the splice site. cDNA sequencing and DNAMAN software showed 159 bases were absent, resulting in the absence of the amino acids 249 to 301 from the protein. All 6 patients with this PRKAR1A gene mutation had skin pigmentation. In conclusion, the present study reported for the first time an intronic splice site mutation in the PRKAR1A gene of a Chinese family with Carney complex, which probably caused skin pigmentation observed in affected family members. PMID:26788925

  3. Mutations in the Catalytic Loop HRD Motif Alter the Activity and Function of Drosophila Src64

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Taylor C.; Kaur, Gurvinder; Thomas, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic loop HRD motif is found in most protein kinases and these amino acids are predicted to perform functions in catalysis, transition to, and stabilization of the active conformation of the kinase domain. We have identified mutations in a Drosophila src gene, src64, that alter the three HRD amino acids. We have analyzed the mutants for both biochemical activity and biological function during development. Mutation of the aspartate to asparagine eliminates biological function in cytoskeletal processes and severely reduces fertility, supporting the amino acid's critical role in enzymatic activity. The arginine to cysteine mutation has little to no effect on kinase activity or cytoskeletal reorganization, suggesting that the HRD arginine may not be critical for coordinating phosphotyrosine in the active conformation. The histidine to leucine mutant retains some kinase activity and biological function, suggesting that this amino acid may have a biochemical function in the active kinase that is independent of its side chain hydrogen bonding interactions in the active site. We also describe the phenotypic effects of other mutations in the SH2 and tyrosine kinase domains of src64, and we compare them to the phenotypic effects of the src64 null allele. PMID:22132220

  4. Mutation of the Zinc-Binding Metalloprotease Motif Affects Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Activity but Does Not Affect Propeptide Processing

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Augusto A.; Buckwold, Simy L.; Shin, Jai W.; Ascon, Miguel; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the zinc-binding metalloprotease in Bacteroides fragilis toxin (BFT) processing and activity, the zinc-binding consensus sequences (H348, E349, H352, G355, H358, and M366) were mutated by site-directed-mutagenesis. Our results indicated that single point mutations in the zinc-binding metalloprotease motif do not affect BFT processing but do reduce or eliminate BFT biologic activity in vitro. PMID:16041055

  5. Mutational separation of aminoacylation and cytokine activities of human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mili; Otero, Francella J; Slike, Bonnie M; Ewalt, Karla L; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2009-05-29

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are known for catalysis of aminoacylation. Significantly, some mammalian synthetases developed cytokine functions possibly linked to disease-causing mutations in tRNA synthetases. Not understood is how epitopes for cytokine signaling were introduced into catalytic scaffolds without disturbing aminoacylation. Here we investigate human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, where a catalytic-domain surface helix, next to the active site, was recruited for interleukin-8-like cytokine signaling. Taking advantage of our high resolution structure, the reciprocal impact of rational mutations designed to disrupt aminoacylation or cytokine signaling was investigated with multiple assays. The collective analysis demonstrated a protective fine-structure separation of aminoacylation from cytokine activities within the conserved catalytic domain. As a consequence, disease-causing mutations affecting cell signaling can arise without disturbing aminoacylation. These results with TyrRS also predict the previously unknown binding conformation of interleukin-8-like CXC cytokines. PMID:19477417

  6. Changed membrane integration and catalytic site conformation are two mechanisms behind the increased Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio by presenilin 1 familial Alzheimer-linked mutations.

    PubMed

    Wanngren, Johanna; Lara, Patricia; Ojemalm, Karin; Maioli, Silvia; Moradi, Nasim; Chen, Lu; Tjernberg, Lars O; Lundkvist, Johan; Nilsson, IngMarie; Karlström, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme complex γ-secretase generates amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), a 37-43-residue peptide associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). Mutations in presenilin 1 (PS1), the catalytical subunit of γ-secretase, result in familial AD (FAD). A unifying theme among FAD mutations is an alteration in the ratio Aβ species produced (the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio), but the molecular mechanisms responsible remain elusive. In this report we have studied the impact of several different PS1 FAD mutations on the integration of selected PS1 transmembrane domains and on PS1 active site conformation, and whether any effects translate to a particular amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing phenotype. Most mutations studied caused an increase in the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio, but via different mechanisms. The mutations that caused a particular large increase in the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio did also display an impaired APP intracellular domain (AICD) formation and a lower total Aβ production. Interestingly, seven mutations close to the catalytic site caused a severely impaired integration of proximal transmembrane/hydrophobic sequences into the membrane. This structural defect did not correlate to a particular APP processing phenotype. Six selected FAD mutations, all of which exhibited different APP processing profiles and impact on PS1 transmembrane domain integration, were found to display an altered active site conformation. Combined, our data suggest that FAD mutations affect the PS1 structure and active site differently, resulting in several complex APP processing phenotypes, where the most aggressive mutations in terms of increased Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio are associated with a decrease in total γ-secretase activity. PMID:24918054

  7. Aberrant 5′ splice sites in human disease genes: mutation pattern, nucleotide structure and comparison of computational tools that predict their utilization

    PubMed Central

    Buratti, Emanuele; Chivers, Martin; Královičová, Jana; Romano, Maurizio; Baralle, Marco; Krainer, Adrian R.; Vořechovský, Igor

    2007-01-01

    Despite a growing number of splicing mutations found in hereditary diseases, utilization of aberrant splice sites and their effects on gene expression remain challenging to predict. We compiled sequences of 346 aberrant 5′splice sites (5′ss) that were activated by mutations in 166 human disease genes. Mutations within the 5′ss consensus accounted for 254 cryptic 5′ss and mutations elsewhere activated 92 de novo 5′ss. Point mutations leading to cryptic 5′ss activation were most common in the first intron nucleotide, followed by the fifth nucleotide. Substitutions at position +5 were exclusively G>A transitions, which was largely attributable to high mutability rates of C/G>T/A. However, the frequency of point mutations at position +5 was significantly higher than that observed in the Human Gene Mutation Database, suggesting that alterations of this position are particularly prone to aberrant splicing, possibly due to a requirement for sequential interactions with U1 and U6 snRNAs. Cryptic 5′ss were best predicted by computational algorithms that accommodate nucleotide dependencies and not by weight-matrix models. Discrimination of intronic 5′ss from their authentic counterparts was less effective than for exonic sites, as the former were intrinsically stronger than the latter. Computational prediction of exonic de novo 5′ss was poor, suggesting that their activation critically depends on exonic splicing enhancers or silencers. The authentic counterparts of aberrant 5′ss were significantly weaker than the average human 5′ss. The development of an online database of aberrant 5′ss will be useful for studying basic mechanisms of splice-site selection, identifying splicing mutations and optimizing splice-site prediction algorithms. PMID:17576681

  8. BRAF mutations in cutaneous melanoma are independently associated with age, anatomic site of the primary tumor and the degree of solar elastosis at the primary tumor site

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Jürgen; Büttner, Petra; Murali, Rajmohan; Okamoto, Ichiro; Kolaitis, Nicholas A; Landi, Maria Teresa; Scolyer, Richard A.; Bastian, Boris C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Oncogenic BRAF mutations are more frequent in cutaneous melanoma from sites with little or moderate sun-induced damage than from sites with severe cumulative solar ultraviolet (UV) damage. We studied cutaneous melanomas from geographic regions with different levels of ambient UV radiation to delineate the relative effects of cumulative UV damage, age and anatomic site on the frequency of BRAF mutations. We show that BRAF-mutated melanomas occur in a younger age group on skin without marked solar elastosis, and less frequently affect the head and neck area, compared to melanomas without BRAF mutations. The findings indicate that BRAF-mutated melanomas arise early in life at low cumulative UV doses, whereas melanomas without BRAF mutations require accumulation of high UV doses over time. The effect of anatomic site on the mutation spectrum further suggests regional differences among cutaneous melanocytes. PMID:21324100

  9. Impact of Nucleotide Mutations at the HNF3- and HNF4-Binding Sites in Enhancer 1 on Viral Replication in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-young; Kim, Hyung-jin; Park, Channy; So, Hong-seob; Park, Rae Kil

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome contains binding sites for hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF) 3 and 4 in the core domain of enhancer 1 (Enh1), and mutations in this domain have a strong impact on virus replication. We aimed to identify frequent base-mutation sites in the core domain of Enh1 and to examine the impact of these mutations on viral replication. Methods We studied virological characteristics and genetic sequences in 387 patients with chronic hepatitis B. We evaluated functional differences associated with specific mutations within the core domain of Enh1. Results Mutations in the core domain were found with significant frequency in C1126 (122/387 [31.5%], the binding site for HNF3) and in C1134 (106/387 [27.4%], the binding site for HNF4). A single mutation at nt 1126 (C1126) was identified in 17/123 (13.8%), and 105/123 (85.4%) had double mutations (C1126/1134). The level of HBV DNA (log10 copies/mL) was lower in single mutants (C1126, 5.81±1.25) than in wild (6.80±1.65) and double mutants (C1126/1134, 6.81±1.54). Similarly, the relative luciferase activity of C1126 and C1126/C1134 was 0.18 and 1.12 times that of the wild-type virus, respectively. Conclusions Mutations in the HNF3 binding site inhibit viral replication, whereas mutations at the HNF4 binding site restore viral replication. PMID:24073315

  10. Site-specific somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations in patients with thymidine phosphorylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Martí, Ramon; Copeland, William C.; Hirano, Michio

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). This deficiency of TP leads to increased circulating levels of thymidine (deoxythymidine, dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd) and has been associated with multiple deletions and depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Here we describe 36 point mutations in mtDNA of tissues and cultured cells from MNGIE patients. Thirty-one mtDNA point mutations (86%) were T-to-C transitions, and of these, 25 were preceded by 5′-AA sequences. In addition, we identified a single base-pair mtDNA deletion and a TT-to-AA mutation. Next-nucleotide effects and dislocation mutagenesis may contribute to the formation of these mutations. These results provide the first demonstration that alterations of nucleoside metabolism can induce multiple sequence-specific point mutations in humans. We hypothesize that, in patients with TP deficiency, increased levels of dThd and dUrd cause mitochondrial nucleotide pool imbalances, which, in turn, lead to mtDNA abnormalities including site-specific point mutations. PMID:12813027

  11. Site-specific somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations in patients with thymidine phosphorylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Martí, Ramon; Copeland, William C; Hirano, Michio

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). This deficiency of TP leads to increased circulating levels of thymidine (deoxythymidine, dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd) and has been associated with multiple deletions and depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Here we describe 36 point mutations in mtDNA of tissues and cultured cells from MNGIE patients. Thirty-one mtDNA point mutations (86%) were T-to-C transitions, and of these, 25 were preceded by 5'-AA sequences. In addition, we identified a single base-pair mtDNA deletion and a TT-to-AA mutation. Next-nucleotide effects and dislocation mutagenesis may contribute to the formation of these mutations. These results provide the first demonstration that alterations of nucleoside metabolism can induce multiple sequence-specific point mutations in humans. We hypothesize that, in patients with TP deficiency, increased levels of dThd and dUrd cause mitochondrial nucleotide pool imbalances, which, in turn, lead to mtDNA abnormalities including site-specific point mutations. PMID:12813027

  12. Predicting the Mutating Distribution at Antigenic Sites of the Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyang; Yang, Yiyan; Wang, Shuning; Zhu, Ruixin; Qiu, Tianyi; Qiu, Jingxuan; Zhang, Qingchen; Jin, Li; He, Yungang; Tang, Kailin; Cao, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the influenza virus lead to antigenic changes that cause recurrent epidemics and vaccine resistance. Preventive measures would benefit greatly from the ability to predict the potential distribution of new antigenic sites in future strains. By leveraging the extensive historical records of HA sequences for 90 years, we designed a computational model to simulate the dynamic evolution of antigenic sites in A/H1N1. With templates of antigenic sequences, the model can effectively predict the potential distribution of future antigenic mutants. Validation on 10932 HA sequences from the last 16 years showing that the mutated antigenic sites of over 94% of reported strains fell in our predicted profile. Meanwhile, our model can successfully capture 96% of antigenic sites in those dominant epitopes. Similar results are observed on the complete set of H3N2 historical data, supporting the general applicability of our model to multiple sub-types of influenza. Our results suggest that the mutational profile of future antigenic sites can be predicted based on historical evolutionary traces despite the widespread, random mutations in influenza. Coupled with closely monitored sequence data from influenza surveillance networks, our method can help to forecast changes in viral antigenicity for seasonal flu and inform public health interventions. PMID:26837263

  13. Protein stability: a single recorded mutation aids in predicting the effects of other mutations in the same amino acid site

    PubMed Central

    Wainreb, Gilad; Wolf, Lior; Ashkenazy, Haim; Dehouck, Yves; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Accurate prediction of protein stability is important for understanding the molecular underpinnings of diseases and for the design of new proteins. We introduce a novel approach for the prediction of changes in protein stability that arise from a single-site amino acid substitution; the approach uses available data on mutations occurring in the same position and in other positions. Our algorithm, named Pro-Maya (Protein Mutant stAbilitY Analyzer), combines a collaborative filtering baseline model, Random Forests regression and a diverse set of features. Pro-Maya predicts the stability free energy difference of mutant versus wild type, denoted as ΔΔG. Results: We evaluated our algorithm extensively using cross-validation on two previously utilized datasets of single amino acid mutations and a (third) validation set. The results indicate that using known ΔΔG values of mutations at the query position improves the accuracy of ΔΔG predictions for other mutations in that position. The accuracy of our predictions in such cases significantly surpasses that of similar methods, achieving, e.g. a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.79 and a root mean square error of 0.96 on the validation set. Because Pro-Maya uses a diverse set of features, including predictions using two other methods, it also performs slightly better than other methods in the absence of additional experimental data on the query positions. Availability: Pro-Maya is freely available via web server at http://bental.tau.ac.il/ProMaya. Contact: nirb@tauex.tau.ac.il; wolf@cs.tau.ac.il Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21998155

  14. Stability junction at a common mutation site in the collagenous domain of the mannose binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Mohs, Angela; Li, Yingjie; Doss-Pepe, Ellen; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2005-02-15

    Missense mutations in the collagen triple-helix that replace one of the required Gly residues in the (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)(n)() repeating sequence have been implicated in various disorders. Although most hereditary collagen disorders are rare, a common occurrence of a Gly replacement mutation is found in the collagenous domain of mannose binding lectin (MBL). A Gly --> Asp mutation at position 54 in MBL is found at a frequency as high as 30% in certain populations and leads to increased susceptibility to infections. The structural and energetic consequences of this mutation are investigated by comparing a triple-helical peptide containing the N-terminal Gly-X-Y units of MBL with the homologous peptide containing the Gly to Asp replacement. The mutation leads to a loss of triple-helix content but only a small decrease in the stability of the triple-helix (DeltaT(m) approximately 2 degrees C) and no change in the calorimetric enthalpy. NMR studies on specifically labeled residues indicate the portion of the peptide C-terminal to residue 54 is in a highly ordered triple-helix in both peptides, while residues N-terminal to the mutation site have a weak triple-helical signal in the parent peptide and are completely disordered in the mutant peptide. These results suggest that the N-terminal triplet residues are contributing little to the stability of this peptide, a hypothesis confirmed by the stability and enthalpy of shorter peptides containing only the region C-terminal to the mutation site. The Gly to Asp replacement at position 54 in MBL occurs at the boundary of a highly stable triple-helix region and a very unstable sequence. The junctional position of this mutation minimizes its destabilizing effect, in contrast with the significant destabilization seen for Gly replacements in peptides modeling collagen diseases. PMID:15697204

  15. Analysis of cleavage site mutations between the NC and PR Gag domains of Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, G; Pichova, I; Vogt, V M

    1997-01-01

    In retroviruses, the viral protease (PR) is released as a mature protein by cleavage of Gag, Gag-Pro, or Gag-Pro-Pol precursor polypeptides. In avian sarcoma and leukemia viruses (ASLV), PR forms the C-terminal domain of Gag. Based on the properties of a mutation (cs22) in the cleavage site between the upstream NC domain and the PR domain, the proteolytic liberation of PR previously was inferred to be essential for processing of Gag and Pol proteins. To study this process in more detail, we have analyzed the effects that several mutations at the NC-PR cleavage site have on proteolytic processing in virus-like particles expressed in COS and quail cells. Mutant Gag proteins carrying the same mutations also were synthesized in vitro and tested for processing with purified PR. In both types of studies, N-terminal sequencing of the liberated PR domain was carried out to exactly identify the site of cleavage. Finally, synthetic peptides corresponding to the mutant proteins were assessed for the ability to act as substrates for PR. The results were all consistent and led to the following conclusions. (i) In vivo, if normal processing between NC and PR is prevented by mutations, limited cleavage occurs at a previously unrecognized alternative site three amino acids downstream, i.e., in PR. This N-terminally truncated PR is inactive as an enzyme, as inferred from the global processing defect in cs22 and a similar mutant. (ii) In Gag proteins translated in vitro, purified PR cleaves this alternative site as rapidly as it does the wild-type site. (iii) Contrary to previously accepted rules describing retroviral cleavage sites, an isoleucine residue placed at the P1 position of the NC-PR cleavage site does not hinder normal processing. (iv) A proline residue placed at the P2 position in this cleavage site blocks normal processing. PMID:8985369

  16. Identification of novel splice site mutation IVS9 + 1(G > A) and novel complex allele G355R/R359X in Type 1 Gaucher patients heterozygous for mutation N370S.

    PubMed

    Hoitsema, Kourtnee; Amato, Dominick; Khan, Aneal; Sirrs, Sandra; Choy, Francis Y M

    2016-09-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficient glucocerebrosidase activity. More than 350 mutations that cause Gaucher disease have been described to date. Novel mutations can potentially provide insight into the glucocerebrosidase structure-function relationship and biochemical basis of the disease. Here, we report the identification of two novel mutations in two unrelated patients with type I (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease: 1) a splice site mutation IVS9 + 1G > A; and (2) a complex allele (cis) G355R/R359X. Both patients have a common N370S mutation in the other allele. The splice site mutation results from an intronic base substitution (G to A, c.1328 + 1, g.5005) at the donor splice site of exon and intron 9. The complex allele results from two point mutations in exon 8 of glucocerebrosidase (G to C at c.1180, g.4396, and T to C at c. 1192, g.4408) substituting glycine by arginine (G355R) and arginine by a premature termination (R359X), respectively. In order to demonstrate that G355R/R359X are in cis arrangement, PCR-amplified glucocerebrosidase exon 8 genomic DNA from the patient was cloned into the vector pJET1.2 in Escherichia coli TOP10® strain. Out of the 15 clones that were sequence analyzed, 10 contained the normal allele sequence and 5 contained the complex allele G355R/R359X sequence showing both mutations in cis arrangement. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis using Hph1 restriction endonuclease digest was established for the IVS9 + 1G > A mutation for confirmation and efficient identification of this mutation in future patients. Past literature suggests that mutations affecting splicing patterns of the glucocerebrosidase transcript as well as mutations in Gaucher complex alleles are detrimental to enzyme activity. However, compound heterozygosity with N370S, a mild mutation, will lead to a mild phenotype. The cases reported here support these past findings. PMID:27222815

  17. Identification of novel splice site mutation IVS9 + 1(G > A) and novel complex allele G355R/R359X in Type 1 Gaucher patients heterozygous for mutation N370S☆

    PubMed Central

    Hoitsema, Kourtnee; Amato, Dominick; Khan, Aneal; Sirrs, Sandra; Choy, Francis Y.M.

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficient glucocerebrosidase activity. More than 350 mutations that cause Gaucher disease have been described to date. Novel mutations can potentially provide insight into the glucocerebrosidase structure–function relationship and biochemical basis of the disease. Here, we report the identification of two novel mutations in two unrelated patients with type I (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease: 1) a splice site mutation IVS9 + 1G > A; and (2) a complex allele (cis) G355R/R359X. Both patients have a common N370S mutation in the other allele. The splice site mutation results from an intronic base substitution (G to A, c.1328 + 1, g.5005) at the donor splice site of exon and intron 9. The complex allele results from two point mutations in exon 8 of glucocerebrosidase (G to C at c.1180, g.4396, and T to C at c. 1192, g.4408) substituting glycine by arginine (G355R) and arginine by a premature termination (R359X), respectively. In order to demonstrate that G355R/R359X are in cis arrangement, PCR-amplified glucocerebrosidase exon 8 genomic DNA from the patient was cloned into the vector pJET1.2 in Escherichia coli TOP10® strain. Out of the 15 clones that were sequence analyzed, 10 contained the normal allele sequence and 5 contained the complex allele G355R/R359X sequence showing both mutations in cis arrangement. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis using Hph1 restriction endonuclease digest was established for the IVS9 + 1G > A mutation for confirmation and efficient identification of this mutation in future patients. Past literature suggests that mutations affecting splicing patterns of the glucocerebrosidase transcript as well as mutations in Gaucher complex alleles are detrimental to enzyme activity. However, compound heterozygosity with N370S, a mild mutation, will lead to a mild phenotype. The cases reported here support these past findings. PMID:27222815

  18. Molecular characterization of novel splice site mutation causing protein C deficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamed, Mohamed H; AlBatniji, Fatma; AlDakheel, Ghadah A; El-Faraidi, Huda; Al-Zahrani, Azzah; Al-Abbass, Fahed; Imtiaz, Faiqa

    2016-07-01

    Congenital protein C deficiency is an inherited coagulation disorder associated with an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism. A Saudi Arabian male from a consanguineous family was admitted to neonatal intensive care unit in his first days of life because of transient tachypnea and hematuria. Laboratory investigations determined low platelet and protein C deficiency. Direct sequencing of PROC gene and RNA analysis were performed. Analysis of factor V Leiden (G1691A) and factor II (G20210A) mutations was also done. Novel homozygous splice site mutation c.796+3A>T was detected in the index case and segregation was confirmed in the family. RNA analysis revealed the pathogenicity of the mutation by skipping exon 8 of PROC gene and changing the donor splice site of the exon. Detection of the molecular cause of protein C deficiency reduces life threatening and facilitates inductive carrier testing, prenatal and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for families. PMID:26656900

  19. Oncogenically active MYD88 mutations in human lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Vu N.; Young, Ryan M.; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Xiao, Wenming; Lim, Kian-Huat; Kohlhammer, Holger; Xu, Weihong; Yang, Yandan; Zhao, Hong; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Romesser, Paul; Wright, George; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Fisher, Richard I.; Braziel, Rita M.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Cook, J. R.; Weisenburger, Denny D.; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains the least curable form of this malignancy despite recent advances in therapy1. Constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-κB and JAK kinase signalling promotes malignant cell survival in these lymphomas, but the genetic basis for this signalling is incompletely understood. Here we describe the dependence of ABC DLBCLs on MYD88, an adaptor protein that mediates toll and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor signalling2,3, and the discovery of highly recurrent oncogenic mutations affecting MYD88 in ABC DLBCL tumours. RNA interference screening revealed that MYD88 and the associated kinases IRAK1 and IRAK4 are essential for ABC DLBCL survival. High-throughput RNA resequencing uncovered MYD88 mutations in ABC DLBCL lines. Notably, 29% of ABC DLBCL tumours harboured the same amino acid substitution, L265P, in the MYD88 Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain at an evolutionarily invariant residue in its hydrophobic core. This mutation was rare or absent in other DLBCL subtypes and Burkitt’s lymphoma, but was observed in 9% of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. At a lower frequency, additional mutations were observed in the MYD88 TIR domain, occurring in both the ABC and germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL subtypes. Survival of ABC DLBCL cells bearing the L265P mutation was sustained by the mutant but not the wild-type MYD88 isoform, demonstrating that L265P is a gain-of-function driver mutation. The L265P mutant promoted cell survival by spontaneously assembling a protein complex containing IRAK1 and IRAK4, leading to IRAK4 kinase activity, IRAK1 phosphorylation, NF-κB signalling, JAK kinase activation of STAT3, and secretion of IL-6, IL-10 and interferon-β. Hence, theMYD88 signalling pathway is integral to the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL, supporting the development of inhibitors of IRAK4 kinase and other components of this pathway for the treatment of tumours bearing oncogenic MYD88 mutations

  20. Mutational activation of CheA, the protein kinase in the chemotaxis system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Tawa, P.; Stewart, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    In Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, appropriate changes of cell swimming patterns are mediated by CheA, an autophosphorylating histidine protein kinase whose activity is regulated by receptor/transducer proteins. The molecular mechanism underlying this regulation remains unelucidated but may involve CheA shifting between high-activity and low-activity conformations. We devised an in vivo screen to search for potential hyperkinase variants of CheA and used this screen to identify two cheA point mutations that cause the CheA protein to have elevated autokinase activity. Each point mutation resulted in alteration of proline 337. In vitro, CheA337PL and CheA337PS autophosphorylated significantly more rapidly than did wild-type CheA. This rate enhancement reflected the higher affinities of the mutant proteins for ATP and an increased rate constant for acquisition by CheA of the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP within a kinetically defined CheA.ATP complex. In addition, the mutant proteins reacted with ADP more rapidly than did wild-type CheA. We considered the possibility that the mutations served to lock CheA into an activated signaling conformation; however, we found that both mutant proteins were regulated in a normal fashion by the transducer Tsr in the presence of CheW. We exploited the activated properties of one of these mutants to investigate whether the CheA subunits within a CheA dimer make equivalent contributions to the mechanism of trans phosphorylation. Our results indicate that CheA trans phosphorylation may involve active-site residues that are located both in cis and in trans to the autophosphorylation site and that the two protomers of a CheA dimer make nonequivalent contributions in determining the affinity of the ATP-binding site(s) of CheA. Images PMID:8021207

  1. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  2. Activating Mutations in PIK3CA Lead to Widespread Modulation of the Tyrosine Phosphoproteome

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Brian G.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Nirujogi, Raja S.; Jelinek, Christine A.; Malhotra, Radhika; Kim, Min-Sik; Park, Ben Ho; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    The human oncogene PIK3CA is frequently mutated in human cancers. Two hotspot mutations in PIK3CA, E545K and H1047R, have been shown to regulate widespread signaling events downstream of AKT, leading to increased cell proliferation, growth, survival, and motility. We used quantitative mass spectrometry to profile the global phosphotyrosine proteome of isogenic knock-in cell lines containing these activating mutations, where we identified 824 unique phosphopeptides. Although it is well understood that these mutations result in hyperactivation of the serine/threonine kinase AKT, we found a surprisingly widespread modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation levels of proteins in the mutant cells. In the tyrosine kinome alone, 29 tyrosine kinases were altered in their phosphorylation status. Many of the regulated phosphosites that we identified were located in the kinase domain or the canonical activation sites, indicating that these kinases and their downstream signaling pathways were activated. Our study demonstrates that there is frequent and unexpected cross-talk that occurs between tyrosine signaling pathways and serine/threonine signaling pathways activated by the canonical PI3K-AKT axis. PMID:26267517

  3. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  4. Revealing the function of a novel splice-site mutation of CHD7 in CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeonghyeon; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Sagong, Borum; Koparir, Asuman; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Choi, Jae Young; Seven, Mehmet; Yuksel, Adnan; Kim, Un-Kyung; Ozen, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Most cases of CHARGE syndrome are sporadic and autosomal dominant. CHD7 is a major causative gene of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we screened CHD7 in two Turkish patients demonstrating symptoms of CHARGE syndrome such as coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth, genital abnomalities and ear anomalies. Two mutations of CHD7 were identified including a novel splice-site mutation (c.2443-2A>G) and a previously known frameshift mutation (c.2504_2508delATCTT). We performed exon trapping analysis to determine the effect of the c.2443-2A>G mutation at the transcriptional level, and found that it caused a complete skip of exon 7 and splicing at a cryptic splice acceptor site. Our current study is the second study demonstrating an exon 7 deficit in CHD7. Results of previous studies suggest that the c.2443-2A>G mutation affects the formation of nasal tissues and the neural retina during early development, resulting in choanal atresia and coloboma, respectively. The findings of the present study will improve our understanding of the genetic causes of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26551301

  5. A mutational analysis of the acetylcholine receptor channel transmitter binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Akk, G; Zhou, M; Auerbach, A

    1999-01-01

    Mutagenesis and single-channel kinetic analysis were used to investigate the roles of four acetylcholine receptor channel (AChR) residues that are candidates for interacting directly with the agonist. The EC50 of the ACh dose-response curve was increased following alpha-subunit mutations Y93F and Y198F and epsilon-subunit mutations D175N and E184Q. Single-channel kinetic modeling indicates that the increase was caused mainly by a reduced gating equilibrium constant (Theta) in alphaY198F and epsilonD175N, by an increase in the equilibrium dissociation constant for ACh (KD) and a reduction in Theta in alphaY93F, and only by a reduction in KD in epsilonE184Q. This mutation altered the affinity of only one of the two binding sites and was the only mutation that reduced competition by extracellular K+. Additional mutations of epsilonE184 showed that K+ competition was unaltered in epsilonE184D and was virtually eliminated in epsilonE184K, but that neither of these mutations altered the intrinsic affinity for ACh. Thus there is an apparent electrostatic interaction between the epsilonE184 side chain and K+ ( approximately 1.7kBT), but not ACh+. The results are discussed in terms of multisite and induced-fit models of ligand binding to the AChR. PMID:9876135

  6. DNA fingerprinting reveals elevated mutation rates in herring gulls inhabiting a genotoxically contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Yauk, C.L.; Quinn, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The authors used multi-locus DNA fingerprinting to examine families of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) from a genotoxically contaminated site (Hamilton Harbour) and from a pristine location (Kent Island, Bay of Fundy) to show significant differences in mutation rates between the locations. Overall the authors identified 17 mutant bands from 15 individuals of the 35 examined from Hamilton Harbour, and 7 mutant fragments from 7 individuals, of the 43 examined from Kent Island; a mutation frequency of 0.429 per nestling for Hamilton Harbour and 0.163 for Kent Island. The total number of individuals with mutant bands was significantly higher at Hamilton Harbour than at Kent Island (X{sup 2}=6.734; df = 1; P < 0.01). Ongoing analysis of other less contaminated sites also reveals lower mutation rates than those seen in Hamilton Harbour. With multi-locus DNA fingerprinting many regions of the genome can be surveyed simultaneously. The tandemly repeated arrays of nucleotides examined with DNA fingerprinting are known to have elevated rates of mutation. Furthermore, the mutations seen with DNA fingerprinting are predominantly heritable. Other biomarkers currently used in situ are not able to monitor direct and heritable DNA mutation, or measure biological endpoints that frequently result in spontaneous abortion creating difficulty in observing significantly elevated levels in viable offspring. The authors suggest that multilocus DNA fingerprinting can be used as a biomarker to identify potentially heritable risks before the onset of other types of ecological damage. This approach provides a direct measure of mutation in situ and in vivo in a vertebrate species under ambient conditions.

  7. Phosphorylation of Mutationally Introduced Tyrosine in the Activation Loop of HER2 Confers Gain-of-Function Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zexi; Wan, Xiaobo; Hao, Rui; Zhang, Heng; Li, Li; Li, Lin; Xie, Qiang; Wang, Peng; Gao, Yibo; Chen, She; Wei, Min; Luan, Zhidong; Zhang, Aiqun; Huang, Niu; Chen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Amplification, overexpression, and somatic mutation of the HER2 gene have been reported to play a critical role in tumorigenesis of various cancers. The HER2 H878Y mutation was recently reported in 11% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. However, its functional impact on the HER2 protein and its role in tumorigenesis has not been determined. Here, we show that HER2 H878Y is a gain-of-function mutation. Y878 represents a phosphorylation site, and phospho-Y878 interacts with R898 residue to stabilize the active conformation of HER2, thereby enhancing its kinase activity. H878Y mutant is transforming and the transformed cells are sensitive to HER2 kinase inhibitors. Thus, our study reveals the following novel mechanism underlying the tumorigenic function of the HER2 H878Y mutation: the introduction of a tyrosine residue into the kinase activation loop via mutagenesis modulates the conformation of the kinase, thereby enhancing its activity. PMID:25853726

  8. A small ribozyme with dual-site kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Maxwell, Adam W.R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoryl transfer onto backbone hydroxyls is a recognized catalytic activity of nucleic acids. We find that kinase ribozyme K28 possesses an unusually complex active site that promotes (thio)phosphorylation of two residues widely separated in primary sequence. After allowing the ribozyme to radiolabel itself by phosphoryl transfer from [γ-32P]GTP, DNAzyme-mediated cleavage yielded two radiolabeled cleavage fragments, indicating phosphorylation sites within each of the two cleavage fragments. These sites were mapped by alkaline digestion and primer extension pausing. Enzymatic digestion and mutational analysis identified nucleotides important for activity and established the active structure as being a constrained pseudoknot with unusual connectivity that may juxtapose the two reactive sites. Nuclease sensitivities for nucleotides near the pseudoknot core were altered in the presence of GTPγS, indicating donor-induced folding. The 5′ target site was more strongly favored in full-length ribozyme K28 (128 nt) than in truncated RNAs (58 nt). Electrophoretic mobilities of self-thiophosphorylated products on organomercurial gels are distinct from the 5′ mono-thiophosphorylated product produced by reaction with polynucleotide kinase, potentially indicating simultaneous labeling of both sites within individual RNA strands. Our evidence supports a single, compact structure with local dynamics, rather than global rearrangement, as being responsible for dual-site phosphorylation. PMID:22618879

  9. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Novel PHEX Splice Site Mutations in Patients with Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Christopher; Sampson, Matthew G.; Kher, Vijay; Sethi, Sidharth K.; Otto, Edgar A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) is a heterogeneous genetic phosphate wasting disorder. The disease is most commonly caused by mutations in the PHEX gene located on the X-chromosome or by mutations in CLCN5, DMP1, ENPP1, FGF23, and SLC34A3. The aims of this study were to perform molecular diagnostics for four patients with HR of Indian origin (two independent families) and to describe their clinical features. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the affected mother of two boys who also displayed the typical features of HR, including bone malformations and phosphate wasting. B-lymphoblast cell lines were established by EBV transformation and subsequent RT-PCR to investigate an uncommon splice site variant found by WES. An in silico analysis was done to obtain accurate nucleotide frequency occurrences of consensus splice positions other than the canonical sites of all human exons. Additionally, we applied direct Sanger sequencing for all exons and exon/intron boundaries of the PHEX gene for an affected girl from an independent second Indian family. Results WES revealed a novel PHEX splice acceptor mutation in intron 9 (c.1080-3C>A) in a family with 3 affected individuals with HR. The effect on splicing of this mutation was further investigated by RT-PCR using RNA obtained from a patient’s EBV-transformed lymphoblast cell line. RT-PCR revealed an aberrant splice transcript skipping exons 10-14 which was not observed in control samples, confirming the diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemia (XLH). The in silico analysis of all human splice sites adjacent to all 327,293 exons across 81,814 transcripts among 20,345 human genes revealed that cytosine is, with 64.3%, the most frequent nucleobase at the minus 3 splice acceptor position, followed by thymidine with 28.7%, adenine with 6.3%, and guanine with 0.8%. We generated frequency tables and pictograms for the extended donor and acceptor splice consensus regions by analyzing all human

  10. Mutations Outside the Anisomycin-Binding Site Can Make Ribosomes Drug-Resistant

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha,G.; Gurel, G.; Schroeder, S.; Moore, P.; Steitz, T.

    2008-01-01

    Eleven mutations that make Haloarcula marismortui resistant to anisomycin, an antibiotic that competes with the amino acid side chains of aminoacyl tRNAs for binding to the A-site cleft of the large ribosomal unit, have been identified in 23S rRNA. The correlation observed between the sensitivity of H. marismortui to anisomycin and the affinity of its large ribosomal subunits for the drug indicates that its response to anisomycin is determined primarily by the binding of the drug to its large ribosomal subunit. The structures of large ribosomal subunits containing resistance mutations show that these mutations can be divided into two classes: (1) those that interfere with specific drug-ribosome interactions and (2) those that stabilize the apo conformation of the A-site cleft of the ribosome relative to its drug-bound conformation. The conformational effects of some mutations of the second kind propagate through the ribosome for considerable distances and are reversed when A-site substrates bind to the ribosome.

  11. Requirement for Host RNA-Silencing Components and the Virus-Silencing Suppressor when Second-Site Mutations Compensate for Structural Defects in the 3′ Untranslated Region

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Maitreyi; Stupina, Vera A.; Gao, Feng; Szarko, Christine R.; Kuhlmann, Micki M.; Yuan, Xuefeng; Shi, Kerong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) contains a structured 3′ region with hairpins and pseudoknots that form a complex network of noncanonical RNA:RNA interactions supporting higher-order structure critical for translation and replication. We investigated several second-site mutations in the p38 coat protein open reading frame (ORF) that arose in response to a mutation in the asymmetric loop of a critical 3′ untranslated region (UTR) hairpin that disrupts local higher-order structure. All tested second-site mutations improved accumulation of TCV in conjunction with a partial reversion of the primary mutation (TCV-rev1) but had neutral or a negative effect on wild-type (wt) TCV or TCV with the primary mutation. SHAPE (selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) structure probing indicated that these second-site mutations reside in an RNA domain that includes most of p38 (domain 2), and evidence for RNA:RNA interactions between domain 2 and 3′UTR-containing domain 1 was found. However, second-site mutations were not compensatory in the absence of p38, which is also the TCV silencing suppressor, or in dcl-2/dcl4 or ago1/ago2 backgrounds. One second-site mutation reduced silencing suppressor activity of p38 by altering one of two GW motifs that are required for p38 binding to double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) and interaction with RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-associated AGO1/AGO2. Another second-site mutation substantially reduced accumulation of TCV-rev1 in the absence of p38 or DCL2/DCL4. We suggest that the second-site mutations in the p38 ORF exert positive effects through a similar downstream mechanism, either by enhancing accumulation of beneficial DCL-produced viral small RNAs that positively regulate the accumulation of TCV-rev1 or by affecting the susceptibility of TCV-rev1 to RISC loaded with viral small RNAs. IMPORTANCE Genomes of positive-strand RNA viruses fold into high-order RNA structures. Viruses with mutations in regions

  12. Mosaic Activating Mutations in FGFR1 Cause Encephalocraniocutaneous Lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James T; Tan, Tiong Yang; Alcantara, Diana; Tétrault, Martine; Timms, Andrew E; Jensen, Dana; Collins, Sarah; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J M; Lindhurst, Marjorie J; Christensen, Katherine M; Braddock, Stephen R; Brandling-Bennett, Heather; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Chung, Brian; Lehman, Anna; Su, John; Ng, SuYuen; Amor, David J; Majewski, Jacek; Biesecker, Les G; Boycott, Kym M; Dobyns, William B; O'Driscoll, Mark; Moog, Ute; McDonell, Laura M

    2016-03-01

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a sporadic condition characterized by ocular, cutaneous, and central nervous system anomalies. Key clinical features include a well-demarcated hairless fatty nevus on the scalp, benign ocular tumors, and central nervous system lipomas. Seizures, spasticity, and intellectual disability can be present, although affected individuals without seizures and with normal intellect have also been reported. Given the patchy and asymmetric nature of the malformations, ECCL has been hypothesized to be due to a post-zygotic, mosaic mutation. Despite phenotypic overlap with several other disorders associated with mutations in the RAS-MAPK and PI3K-AKT pathways, the molecular etiology of ECCL remains unknown. Using exome sequencing of DNA from multiple affected tissues from five unrelated individuals with ECCL, we identified two mosaic mutations, c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) and c.1966A>G (p.Lys656Glu) within the tyrosine kinase domain of FGFR1, in two affected individuals each. These two residues are the most commonly mutated residues in FGFR1 in human cancers and are associated primarily with CNS tumors. Targeted resequencing of FGFR1 in multiple tissues from an independent cohort of individuals with ECCL identified one additional individual with a c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) mutation in FGFR1. Functional studies of ECCL fibroblast cell lines show increased levels of phosphorylated FGFRs and phosphorylated FRS2, a direct substrate of FGFR1, as well as constitutive activation of RAS-MAPK signaling. In addition to identifying the molecular etiology of ECCL, our results support the emerging overlap between mosaic developmental disorders and tumorigenesis. PMID:26942290

  13. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R; Hanrahan, John W

    2016-05-01

    The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  14. Dominant Splice Site Mutations in PIK3R1 Cause Hyper IgM Syndrome, Lymphadenopathy and Short Stature.

    PubMed

    Petrovski, Slavé; Parrott, Roberta E; Roberts, Joseph L; Huang, Hongxiang; Yang, Jialong; Gorentla, Balachandra; Mousallem, Talal; Wang, Endi; Armstrong, Martin; McHale, Duncan; MacIver, Nancie J; Goldstein, David B; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Buckley, Rebecca H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to use next generation sequencing to identify mutations in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases whose pathogenic gene mutations had not been identified. Remarkably, four unrelated patients were found by next generation sequencing to have the same heterozygous mutation in an essential donor splice site of PIK3R1 (NM_181523.2:c.1425 + 1G > A) found in three prior reports. All four had the Hyper IgM syndrome, lymphadenopathy and short stature, and one also had SHORT syndrome. They were investigated with in vitro immune studies, RT-PCR, and immunoblotting studies of the mutation's effect on mTOR pathway signaling. All patients had very low percentages of memory B cells and class-switched memory B cells and reduced numbers of naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. RT-PCR confirmed the presence of both an abnormal 273 base-pair (bp) size and a normal 399 bp size band in the patient and only the normal band was present in the parents. Following anti-CD40 stimulation, patient's EBV-B cells displayed higher levels of S6 phosphorylation (mTOR complex 1 dependent event), Akt phosphorylation at serine 473 (mTOR complex 2 dependent event), and Akt phosphorylation at threonine 308 (PI3K/PDK1 dependent event) than controls, suggesting elevated mTOR signaling downstream of CD40. These observations suggest that amino acids 435-474 in PIK3R1 are important for its stability and also its ability to restrain PI3K activity. Deletion of Exon 11 leads to constitutive activation of PI3K signaling. This is the first report of this mutation and immunologic abnormalities in SHORT syndrome. PMID:27076228

  15. Mutation status concordance between primary lesions and metastatic sites of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and the impact of mutation testing methodologies: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, James; Dearden, Simon; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Walker, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Increased understanding of the genetic aetiology of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (aNSCLC) has facilitated personalised therapies that target specific molecular aberrations associated with the disease. Biopsy samples for mutation testing may be taken from primary or metastatic sites, depending on which sample is most accessible, and upon differing diagnostic practices between territories. However, the mutation status concordance between primary tumours and corresponding metastases is the subject of debate. This review aims to ascertain whether molecular diagnostic testing of either the primary or metastatic tumours is equally suitable to determine patient eligibility for targeted therapies. A literature search was performed to identify articles reporting studies of mutations in matched primary and metastatic aNSCLC tumour samples. Clinical results of mutation status concordance between matched primary and metastatic tumour samples from patients with aNSCLC were collated. Articles included in this review (N =26) all reported mutation status data from matched primary and metastatic tumour samples obtained from adult patients with aNSCLC. Generally, substantial concordance was observed between primary and metastatic tumours in terms of EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, p16 and p53 mutations. However, some level of discordance was seen in most studies; mutation testing methodologies appeared to play a key role in this, along with underlying tumour heterogeneity. Substantial concordance in mutation status observed between primary and metastatic tumour sites suggests that diagnostic testing of either tumour type may be suitable to determine a patient's eligibility for personalised therapies. As with all diagnostic testing, highly sensitive and appropriately validated mutation analysis methodologies are desirable to ensure accuracy. Additional work is also required to define how much discordance is clinically significant given natural tumour heterogeneity. The ability of both

  16. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human septin 1 with site-directed mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hao; Yu, Wen-bo; Li, Shu-xing; Ding, Xiang-ming; Yu, Long; Bi, Ru-Chang

    2006-02-01

    The homogeneity of septin 1 has been improved by site-directed mutation of serine residues and only a small alteration in the secondary structure is observed to arise from the mutations. Crystals of the septin 1 mutant were grown and diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Septin 1 is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of GTP-binding and filament-forming proteins named septins, which function in diverse processes including cytokinasis, vesicle trafficking, apoptosis, remodelling of the cytoskeleton, infection, neurodegeneration and neoplasia. Human septin 1 has been expressed and purified, but suffers from severe aggregation. Studies have shown that septin 1 with site-directed mutations of five serine residues (Ser19, Ser206, Ser307, Ser312 and Ser315) has a much lower degree of aggregation and better structural homogeneity and that the mutations cause only slight perturbations in the secondary structure of septin 1. This septin 1 mutant was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The space group is P422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.028, c = 137.852 Å.

  17. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1990-10-01

    DOE Order 5820.2A requires that low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites active on or after September 1988 and all transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites be monitored periodically to assure that radioactive contamination does not escape from the waste sites and pose a threat to the public or to the environment. This plan describes such a monitoring program for the active LLW disposal sites in SWSA 6 and the TRU waste storage sites in SWSA 5 North. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly due to a novel splice site mutation in the FBN2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Mehar, Virendra; Yadav, Dinesh; Kumar, Ravindra; Yadav, Summi; Singh, Kuldeep; Callewaert, Bert; Pathan, Shahnawaz; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by crumpled ears, congenital contractures, arachnodactyly and scoliosis. Only few cases have been described to date. Here we report a newborn with congenital contractures, crumpled ears and scoliosis. Molecular analysis revealed a novel fibrillin-2 mutation at the donor splice site of intron 28. We discuss the differential diagnosis of neonates with congenital contractures and review the current knowledge on congenital contractural arachnodactyly.

  19. A Novel Splice-Site Mutation in the GJB2 Gene Causing Mild Postlingual Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, Marta; del Castillo, Francisco J.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Francisco J.; Garrido, Gema; Villamar, Manuela; Calderón, Manuela; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A.; Moreno, Felipe; del Castillo, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The DFNB1 subtype of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, caused by mutations affecting the GJB2 (connection-26) gene, is highly prevalent in most populations worldwide. DFNB1 hearing impairment is mostly severe or profound and usually appears before the acquisition of speech (prelingual onset), though a small number of hypomorphic missense mutations result in mild or moderate deafness of postlingual onset. We identified a novel GJB2 splice-site mutation, c. -22-2A>C, in three siblings with mild postlingual hearing impairment that were compound heterozygous for c. -22-2A>C and c.35delG. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments performed on total RNA extracted from saliva samples from one of these siblings confirmed that c. -22-2A>C abolished the acceptor splice site of the single GJB2 intron, resulting in the absence of normally processed transcripts from this allele. However, we did isolate transcripts from the c. -22-2A>C allele that keep an intact GJB2 coding region and that were generated by use of an alternative acceptor splice site previously unknown. The residual expression of wild-type connection-26 encoded by these transcripts probably underlies the mild severity and late onset of the hearing impairment of these subjects. PMID:24039984

  20. Disease Mutations in Rab7 Result in Unregulated Nucleotide Exchange and Inappropriate Activation

    SciTech Connect

    B McCray; E Skordalakes; J Taylor

    2011-12-31

    Rab GTPases are molecular switches that orchestrate vesicular trafficking, maturation and fusion by cycling between an active, GTP-bound form, and an inactive, GDP-bound form. The activity cycle is coupled to GTP hydrolysis and is tightly controlled by regulatory proteins. Missense mutations of the GTPase Rab7 cause a dominantly inherited axonal degeneration known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B through an unknown mechanism. We present the 2.8 A crystal structure of GTP-bound L129F mutant Rab7 which reveals normal conformations of the effector binding regions and catalytic site, but an alteration to the nucleotide binding pocket that is predicted to alter GTP binding. Through extensive biochemical analysis, we demonstrate that disease-associated mutations in Rab7 do not lead to an intrinsic GTPase defect, but permit unregulated nucleotide exchange leading to both excessive activation and hydrolysis-independent inactivation. Consistent with augmented activity, mutant Rab7 shows significantly enhanced interaction with a subset of effector proteins. In addition, dynamic imaging demonstrates that mutant Rab7 is abnormally retained on target membranes. However, we show that the increased activation of mutant Rab7 is counterbalanced by unregulated, GTP hydrolysis-independent membrane cycling. Notably, disease mutations are able to rescue the membrane cycling of a GTPase-deficient mutant. Thus, we demonstrate that disease mutations uncouple Rab7 from the spatial and temporal control normally imposed by regulatory proteins and cause disease not by a gain of novel toxic function, but by misregulation of native Rab7 activity.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase active centre and gorge conformations analysed by combinatorial mutations and enantiomeric phosphonates.

    PubMed Central

    Kovarik, Zrinka; Radić, Zoran; Berman, Harvey A; Simeon-Rudolf, Vera; Reiner, Elsa; Taylor, Palmer

    2003-01-01

    A series of eight double and triple mutants of mouse acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7), with substitutions corresponding to residues found largely within the butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; EC 3.1.1.8) active-centre gorge, was analysed to compare steady-state kinetic constants for substrate turnover and inhibition parameters for enantiomeric methylphosphonate esters. The mutations combined substitutions in the acyl pocket (Phe(295)-->Leu and Phe(297)-->Ile) with the choline-binding site (Tyr(337)-->Ala and Phe(338)-->Ala) and with a side chain (Glu(202)--> Gln) N-terminal to the active-site serine, Ser(203). The mutations affected catalysis by increasing K (m) and decreasing k (cat), but these constants were typically affected by an order of magnitude or less, a relatively small change compared with the catalytic potential of AChE. To analyse the constraints on stereoselective phosphonylation, the mutant enzymes were reacted with a congeneric series of S (P)- and R (P)-methylphosphonates of known absolute stereochemistry. Where possible, the overall reaction rates were deconstructed into the primary constants for formation of the reversible complex and intrinsic phosphonylation. The multiple mutations greatly reduced the reaction rates of the more reactive S (P)-methylphosphonates, whereas the rates of reaction with the R (P)-methylphosphonates were markedly enhanced. With the phosphonates of larger steric bulk, the enhancement of rates for the R (P) enantiomers, coupled with the reduction of the S (P) enantiomers, was sufficient to invert markedly the enantiomeric preference. The sequence of mutations to enlarge the size of the AChE active-centre gorge, resembling in part the more spacious gorge of BChE, did not show an ordered conversion into BChE reactivity as anticipated for a rigid template. Rather, the individual aromatic residues may mutually interact to confer a distinctive stereospecificity pattern towards organophosphates. PMID:12665427

  2. Novel splice site mutation in the growth hormone receptor gene in Turkish patients with Laron-type dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Arman, Ahmet; Ozon, Alev; Isguven, Pinar S; Coker, Ajda; Peker, Ismail; Yordam, Nursen

    2008-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is involved in growth, and fat and carbohydrate metabolism. Interaction of GH with the GH receptor (GHR) is necessary for systemic and local production of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) which mediates GH actions. Mutations in the GHR cause severe postnatal growth failure; the disorder is an autosomal recessive genetic disease resulting in GH insensitivity, called Laron syndrome. It is characterized by dwarfism with elevated serum GH and low levels of IGF-I. We analyzed the GHR gene for mutations and polymorphisms in eight patients with Laron-type dwarfism from six families. We found three missense mutations (S40L, V125A, I526L), one nonsense mutation (W157X), and one splice site mutation in the extracellular domain of GHR. Furthermore, G168G and exon 3 deletion polymorphisms were detected in patients with Laron syndrome. The splice site mutation, which is a novel mutation, was located at the donor splice site of exon 2/ intron 2 within GHR. Although this mutation changed the highly conserved donor splice site consensus sequence GT to GGT by insertion of a G residue, the intron splicing between exon 2 and exon 3 was detected in the patient. These results imply that the splicing occurs arthe GT site in intron 2, leaving the extra inserted G residue at the end of exon 2, thus changing the open reading frame of GHR resulting in a premature termination codon in exon 3. PMID:18404972

  3. A molecular dynamics examination on mutation-induced catalase activity in coral allene oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    De Luna, Phil; Bushnell, Eric A C; Gauld, James W

    2013-11-27

    Coral allene oxide synthase (cAOS) catalyzes the formation of allene oxides from fatty acid hydroperoxides. Interestingly, its active site differs from that of catalase by only a single residue yet is incapable of catalase activity. That is, it is unable to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to molecular oxygen and water. However, the single active-site mutation T66V allows cAOS to exhibit catalase activity. We have performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in order to gain insights into the differences in substrate (8R-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic) and H2O2 active site binding between wild-type cAOS and the T66V mutant cAOS. It is observed that in wild-type cAOS the active site Thr66 residue consistently forms a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction with H2O2 (catalase substrate) and, importantly, with the aid of His67 helps to pull H2O2 away from the heme Fe center. In contrast, in the T66V-cAOS mutant the H2O2 is much closer to the heme's Fe center and now forms a consistent Fe···O2H2 interaction. In addition, the His67···H2O2 distance shortens considerably, increasing the likelihood of a Cpd I intermediate and hence exhibiting catalase activity. PMID:24164352

  4. Estimation of the spontaneous mutation rate per nucleotide site in a Drosophila melanogaster full-sib family.

    PubMed

    Keightley, Peter D; Ness, Rob W; Halligan, Daniel L; Haddrill, Penelope R

    2014-01-01

    We employed deep genome sequencing of two parents and 12 of their offspring to estimate the mutation rate per site per generation in a full-sib family of Drosophila melanogaster recently sampled from a natural population. Sites that were homozygous for the same allele in the parents and heterozygous in one or more offspring were categorized as candidate mutations and subjected to detailed analysis. In 1.23 × 10(9) callable sites from 12 individuals, we confirmed six single nucleotide mutations. We estimated the false negative rate in the experiment by generating synthetic mutations using the empirical distributions of numbers of nonreference bases at heterozygous sites in the offspring. The proportion of synthetic mutations at callable sites that we failed to detect was <1%, implying that the false negative rate was extremely low. Our estimate of the point mutation rate is 2.8 × 10(-9) (95% confidence interval = 1.0 × 10(-9) - 6.1 × 10(-9)) per site per generation, which is at the low end of the range of previous estimates, and suggests an effective population size for the species of ∼1.4 × 10(6). At one site, point mutations were present in two individuals, indicating that there had been a premeiotic mutation cluster, although surprisingly one individual had a G→A transition and the other a G→T transversion, possibly associated with error-prone mismatch repair. We also detected three short deletion mutations and no insertions, giving a deletion mutation rate of 1.2 × 10(-9) (95% confidence interval = 0.7 × 10(-9) - 11 × 10(-9)). PMID:24214343

  5. Estimation of the Spontaneous Mutation Rate per Nucleotide Site in a Drosophila melanogaster Full-Sib Family

    PubMed Central

    Keightley, Peter D.; Ness, Rob W.; Halligan, Daniel L.; Haddrill, Penelope R.

    2014-01-01

    We employed deep genome sequencing of two parents and 12 of their offspring to estimate the mutation rate per site per generation in a full-sib family of Drosophila melanogaster recently sampled from a natural population. Sites that were homozygous for the same allele in the parents and heterozygous in one or more offspring were categorized as candidate mutations and subjected to detailed analysis. In 1.23 × 109 callable sites from 12 individuals, we confirmed six single nucleotide mutations. We estimated the false negative rate in the experiment by generating synthetic mutations using the empirical distributions of numbers of nonreference bases at heterozygous sites in the offspring. The proportion of synthetic mutations at callable sites that we failed to detect was <1%, implying that the false negative rate was extremely low. Our estimate of the point mutation rate is 2.8 × 10−9 (95% confidence interval = 1.0 × 10−9 − 6.1 × 10−9) per site per generation, which is at the low end of the range of previous estimates, and suggests an effective population size for the species of ∼1.4 × 106. At one site, point mutations were present in two individuals, indicating that there had been a premeiotic mutation cluster, although surprisingly one individual had a G→A transition and the other a G→T transversion, possibly associated with error-prone mismatch repair. We also detected three short deletion mutations and no insertions, giving a deletion mutation rate of 1.2 × 10−9 (95% confidence interval = 0.7 × 10−9 − 11 × 10−9). PMID:24214343

  6. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  7. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease. PMID:27570485

  8. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease. PMID:27570485

  9. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kristjansdottir, Karen; Petersen, Ulrika S. S.; Bang, Jeanne Mari V.; Guerra, Barbara; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Carey, John C.; Yu, Ping; Calhoun, Amy; Larsen, Martin R.; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Stevenson, David A.; Andresen, Brage S.

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE) and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS). We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3’ splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping. PMID:27195699

  10. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E; Lapin, Morten; Kristjansdottir, Karen; Petersen, Ulrika S S; Bang, Jeanne Mari V; Guerra, Barbara; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Carey, John C; Yu, Ping; Vaughn, Cecily; Calhoun, Amy; Larsen, Martin R; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Stevenson, David A; Andresen, Brage S

    2016-05-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE) and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS). We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping. PMID:27195699

  11. JAK-2 V617F mutation increases heparanase procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Inna; Chap, Dafna; Hoffman, Ron; Axelman, Elena; Brenner, Benjamin; Nadir, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Patients with polycythaemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythaemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are at increased risk of arterial and venous thrombosis. In patients with ET a positive correlation was observed between JAK-2 V617F mutation, that facilitates erythropoietin receptor signalling, and thrombotic events, although the mechanism involved is not clear. We previously demonstrated that heparanase protein forms a complex and enhances the activity of the blood coagulation initiator tissue factor (TF) which leads to increased factor Xa production and subsequent activation of the coagulation system. The present study was aimed to evaluate heparanase procoagulant activity in myeloproliferative neoplasms. Forty bone marrow biopsies of patients with ET, PV, PMF and chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) were immunostained to heparanase, TF and TF pathway inhibitor (TFPI). Erythropoietin receptor positive cell lines U87 human glioma and MCF-7 human breast carcinoma were studied. Heparanase and TFPI staining were more prominent in ET, PV and PMF compared to CML. The strongest staining was in JAK-2 positive ET biopsies. Heparanase level and procoagulant activity were higher in U87 cells transfected to over express JAK-2 V617F mutation compared to control and the effect was reversed using JAK-2 inhibitors (Ruxolitinib, VZ3) and hydroxyurea, although the latter drug did not inhibit JAK-2 phosphorylation. Erythropoietin increased while JAK-2 inhibitors decreased the heparanase level and procoagulant activity in U87 and MCF-7 parental cells. In conclusion, JAK-2 is involved in heparanase up-regulation via the erythropoietin receptor. The present findings may potentially point to a new mechanism of thrombosis in JAK-2 positive ET patients. PMID:26489695

  12. MUTATION SPECTRA OF GLU-P-1 IN SALMONELLA: INDUCTION OF HOTSPOT FRAMESHIFTS AND SITE-SPECIFIC BASE SUBSTITUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mutations induced in approximately 2,000 mutants of Salmonella by the heterocyclic@ amine Glu-P-1 were determined by colony probe hybridization and PCR/DNA sequence analysis. ll of the mutations were at sites containing guanine, which is the base at which Glu-P-1 forms DNA ad...

  13. RNA Polymerase II Mutations Conferring Defects in Poly(A) Site Cleavage and Termination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kubicek, Charles E.; Chisholm, Robert D.; Takayama, Sachiko; Hawley, Diane K.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription termination by RNA polymerase (Pol) II is an essential but poorly understood process. In eukaryotic nuclei, the 3′ ends of mRNAs are generated by cleavage and polyadenylation, and the same sequence elements that specify that process are required for downstream release of the polymerase from the DNA. Although Pol II is known to bind proteins required for both events, few studies have focused on Pol II mutations as a means to uncover the mechanisms that couple polyadenylation and termination. We performed a genetic screen in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to isolate mutations in the N-terminal half of Rpb2, the second largest Pol II subunit, that conferred either a decreased or increased response to a well-characterized poly(A) site. Most of the mutant alleles encoded substitutions affecting either surface residues or conserved active site amino acids at positions important for termination by other RNA polymerases. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments revealed that transcript cleavage at the poly(A) site was impaired in both classes of increased readthrough mutants. Transcription into downstream sequences beyond where termination normally occurs was also probed. Although most of the tested readthrough mutants showed a reduction in termination concomitant with the reduced poly(A) usage, these processes were uncoupled in at least one mutant strain. Several rpb2 alleles were found to be similar or identical to published mutants associated with defective TFIIF function. Tests of these and additional mutations known to impair Rpb2−TFIIF interactions revealed similar decreased readthrough phenotypes, suggesting that TFIIF may have a role in 3′ end formation and termination. PMID:23390594

  14. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated influences cytochrome c oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Akshar Y; McDonald, Todd M; Spears, Larry D; Ching, James Kain; Fisher, Jonathan S

    2011-02-25

    Cells lacking ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) have impaired mitochondrial function. Furthermore, mammalian cells lacking ATM have increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions in the region encoding for cytochrome c oxidase (COX). We hypothesized that ATM specifically influences COX activity in skeletal muscle. COX activity was ∼40% lower in tibialis anterior from ATM-deficient mice than for wild-type mice (P < 0.01, n = 9/group). However, there were no ATM-related differences in activity of succinate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, or complex III. Incubation of wild-type extensor digitorum longus muscles for 1h with the ATM inhibitor KU55933 caused a ∼50% reduction (P<0.05, n = 5/group) in COX activity compared to muscles incubated with vehicle alone. Among the control muscles and muscles treated with the ATM inhibitor, COX activity was correlated (r = 0.61, P<0.05) with activity of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, a key determinant of antioxidant defense through production of NADPH. Overall, the findings suggest that ATM has a protective role for COX activity. PMID:21266166

  15. Mutation-selection models of coding sequence evolution with site-heterogeneous amino acid fitness profiles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigue, Nicolas; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2010-03-01

    Modeling the interplay between mutation and selection at the molecular level is key to evolutionary studies. To this end, codon-based evolutionary models have been proposed as pertinent means of studying long-range evolutionary patterns and are widely used. However, these approaches have not yet consolidated results from amino acid level phylogenetic studies showing that selection acting on proteins displays strong site-specific effects, which translate into heterogeneous amino acid propensities across the columns of alignments; related codon-level studies have instead focused on either modeling a single selective context for all codon columns, or a separate selective context for each codon column, with the former strategy deemed too simplistic and the latter deemed overparameterized. Here, we integrate recent developments in nonparametric statistical approaches to propose a probabilistic model that accounts for the heterogeneity of amino acid fitness profiles across the coding positions of a gene. We apply the model to a dozen real protein-coding gene alignments and find it to produce biologically plausible inferences, for instance, as pertaining to site-specific amino acid constraints, as well as distributions of scaled selection coefficients. In their account of mutational features as well as the heterogeneous regimes of selection at the amino acid level, the modeling approaches studied here can form a backdrop for several extensions, accounting for other selective features, for variable population size, or for subtleties of mutational features, all with parameterizations couched within population-genetic theory. PMID:20176949

  16. Omenn syndrome associated with a functional reversion due to a somatic second-site mutation in CARD11 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Pannicke, Ulrich; Lorenz, Myriam R; Fisch, Paul; Jeelall, Yogesh; Rohr, Jan; Speckmann, Carsten; Vraetz, Thomas; Farmand, Susan; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Krüger, Marcus; Strahm, Brigitte; Henneke, Philipp; Enders, Anselm; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher; Schwarz, Klaus; Ehl, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is a severe immunodeficiency associated with erythroderma, lymphoproliferation, elevated IgE, and hyperactive oligoclonal T cells. A restricted T-cell repertoire caused by defective thymic T-cell development and selection, lymphopenia with homeostatic proliferation, and lack of regulatory T cells are considered key factors in OS pathogenesis. We report 2 siblings presenting with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Pneumocystis jirovecii infections and recurrent sepsis; one developed all clinical features of OS. Both carried homozygous germline mutations in CARD11 (p.Cys150*), impairing NF-κB signaling and IL-2 production. A somatic second-site mutation reverting the stop codon to a missense mutation (p.Cys150Leu) was detected in tissue-infiltrating T cells of the OS patient. Expression of p.Cys150Leu in CARD11-deficient T cells largely reconstituted NF-κB signaling. The reversion likely occurred in a prethymic T-cell precursor, leading to a chimeric T-cell repertoire. We speculate that in our patient the functional advantage of the revertant T cells in the context of persistent CMV infection, combined with lack of regulatory T cells, may have been sufficient to favor OS. This first observation of OS in a patient with a T-cell activation defect suggests that severely defective T-cell development or homeostatic proliferation in a lymphopenic environment are not required for this severe immunopathology. PMID:26289640

  17. Omenn syndrome associated with a functional reversion due to a somatic second-site mutation in CARD11 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Pannicke, Ulrich; Lorenz, Myriam R.; Fisch, Paul; Jeelall, Yogesh; Rohr, Jan; Speckmann, Carsten; Vraetz, Thomas; Farmand, Susan; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Krüger, Marcus; Strahm, Brigitte; Henneke, Philipp; Enders, Anselm; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher; Schwarz, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is a severe immunodeficiency associated with erythroderma, lymphoproliferation, elevated IgE, and hyperactive oligoclonal T cells. A restricted T-cell repertoire caused by defective thymic T-cell development and selection, lymphopenia with homeostatic proliferation, and lack of regulatory T cells are considered key factors in OS pathogenesis. We report 2 siblings presenting with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Pneumocystis jirovecii infections and recurrent sepsis; one developed all clinical features of OS. Both carried homozygous germline mutations in CARD11 (p.Cys150*), impairing NF-κB signaling and IL-2 production. A somatic second-site mutation reverting the stop codon to a missense mutation (p.Cys150Leu) was detected in tissue-infiltrating T cells of the OS patient. Expression of p.Cys150Leu in CARD11-deficient T cells largely reconstituted NF-κB signaling. The reversion likely occurred in a prethymic T-cell precursor, leading to a chimeric T-cell repertoire. We speculate that in our patient the functional advantage of the revertant T cells in the context of persistent CMV infection, combined with lack of regulatory T cells, may have been sufficient to favor OS. This first observation of OS in a patient with a T-cell activation defect suggests that severely defective T-cell development or homeostatic proliferation in a lymphopenic environment are not required for this severe immunopathology. PMID:26289640

  18. The dark matter of the cancer genome: aberrations in regulatory elements, untranslated regions, splice sites, non-coding RNA and synonymous mutations.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Sven; Bartsch, Lorenz; Berkmann, Julia C; Fröse, Karin; Heitmann, Jana; Hoppe, Caroline; Iggena, Deetje; Jazmati, Danny; Karschnia, Philipp; Linsenmeier, Miriam; Maulhardt, Thomas; Möhrmann, Lino; Morstein, Johannes; Paffenholz, Stella V; Röpenack, Paula; Rückert, Timo; Sandig, Ludger; Schell, Maximilian; Steinmann, Anna; Voss, Gjendine; Wasmuth, Jacqueline; Weinberger, Maria E; Wullenkord, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of the genome caused by oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inhibition. Deep sequencing studies including large consortia such as TCGA and ICGC identified numerous tumor-specific mutations not only in protein-coding sequences but also in non-coding sequences. Although 98% of the genome is not translated into proteins, most studies have neglected the information hidden in this "dark matter" of the genome. Malignancy-driving mutations can occur in all genetic elements outside the coding region, namely in enhancer, silencer, insulator, and promoter as well as in 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR Intron or splice site mutations can alter the splicing pattern. Moreover, cancer genomes contain mutations within non-coding RNA, such as microRNA, lncRNA, and lincRNA A synonymous mutation changes the coding region in the DNA and RNA but not the protein sequence. Importantly, oncogenes such as TERT or miR-21 as well as tumor suppressor genes such as TP53/p53, APC, BRCA1, or RB1 can be affected by these alterations. In summary, coding-independent mutations can affect gene regulation from transcription, splicing, mRNA stability to translation, and hence, this largely neglected area needs functional studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. This review will focus on the important role and novel mechanisms of these non-coding or allegedly silent mutations in tumorigenesis. PMID:26992833

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human septin 1 with site-directed mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Yu, Wen-bo; Li, Shu-xing; Ding, Xiang-ming; Yu, Long; Bi, Ru-Chang

    2006-01-01

    Septin 1 is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of GTP-binding and filament-forming proteins named septins, which function in diverse processes including cytokinasis, vesicle trafficking, apoptosis, remodelling of the cytoskeleton, infection, neurodegeneration and neoplasia. Human septin 1 has been expressed and purified, but suffers from severe aggregation. Studies have shown that septin 1 with site-directed mutations of five serine residues (Ser19, Ser206, Ser307, Ser312 and Ser315) has a much lower degree of aggregation and better structural homogeneity and that the mutations cause only slight perturbations in the secondary structure of septin 1. This septin 1 mutant was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The space group is P422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.028, c = 137.852 Å. PMID:16511282

  20. A case of mild CHARGE syndrome associated with a splice site mutation in CHD7.

    PubMed

    Wells, Constance; Loundon, Natalie; Garabedian, Noël; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Cordier-Bouvier, Marie-Dominique; Goudeffroye, Géraldine; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Marlin, Sandrine

    2016-04-01

    CHARGE syndrome (MIM#214800) (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia of choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear abnormalities/deafness) is caused by heterozygous mutation of CHD7 transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. In this report, we describe a patient with bilateral hearing impairment, unusually-shaped ears, no intellectual disability and a patent ductus arteriosus. Further investigation showed abnormal semicircular canals and the presence of olfactory bulbs. He does not fulfill the Blake or the Verloes criteria for CHARGE. A de novo mutation at the donor splice site of intron 33 was identified (c.7164 + 1G > A). It is of importance to diagnose mildly affected patients for appropriate genetic counselling and to better understand the mild end of the phenotypic spectrum of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26921530

  1. Educational Activity Sites for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troutner, Joanne

    2005-01-01

    Finding quality Internet resources for high school students is a continuing challenge. Several high-quality web sites are presented for educators and students. These sites offer activities to learn how an art conservator looks at paintings, create a newspaper, research and develop an end product, build geometry and physics skills, explore science…

  2. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation. PMID:26689875

  3. Active site hydrophobicity is critical to the bioluminescence activity of Vibrio harveyi luciferase.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Hui; Tu, Shiao-Chun

    2005-10-01

    Vibrio harveyi luciferase is an alphabeta heterodimer containing a single active site, proposed earlier to be at a cleft in the alpha subunit. In this work, six conserved phenylalanine residues at this proposed active site were subjected to site-directed mutations to investigate their possible functional roles and to delineate the makeup of luciferase active site. After initial screening of Phe --> Ala mutants, alphaF46, alphaF49, alphaF114, and alphaF117 were chosen for additional mutations to Asp, Ser, and Tyr. Comparisons of the general kinetic properties of wild-type and mutated luciferases indicated that the hydrophobic nature of alphaF46, alphaF49, alphaF114, and alphaF117 was important to luciferase V(max) and V(max)/K(m), which were reduced by 3-5 orders of magnitude for the Phe --> Asp mutants. Both alphaF46 and alphaF117 also appeared to be involved in the binding of reduced flavin substrate. Additional studies on the stability and yield of the 4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate II and measurements of decanal substrate oxidation by alphaF46D, alphaF49D, alphaF114D, and alphaF117D revealed that their marked reductions in the overall quantum yield (phi( degrees )) were a consequence of diminished yields of luciferase intermediates and, with the exception of alphaF114D, emission quantum yield of the excited emitter due to the replacement of the hydrophobic Phe by the anionic Asp. The locations of these four critical Phe residues in relation to other essential and/or hydrophobic residues are depicted in a refined map of the active site. Functional implications of these residues are discussed. PMID:16185065

  4. A novel donor splice-site mutation of major intrinsic protein gene associated with congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lu; Liu, Wenqiang; Feng, Wenguo; Wang, Xing; Dang, Hui; Gao, Luna; Yao, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the disease-causing gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract. Methods Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on all members of a Chinese family with congenital cataract. Nine genes associated with congenital cataract were screened using direct DNA sequencing. Mutations were confirmed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The mutated major intrinsic protein (MIP) minigene, which carries the disease-causing splice-site mutation, and the wild-type (WT) MIP minigene were constructed using the pcDNA3.1 expression vector. Wild-type and mutant MIP minigene constructs were transiently transfected into HeLa cells. After 48 h of incubation at 37 °C, total RNA isolation and reverse transcription (RT)–PCR analysis were performed, and PCR products were separated and confirmed with sequencing. Results Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a novel splice-site mutation in intron 3 (c.606+1 G>A) of the MIP gene. To investigate the manner in which the splice donor mutation could affect mRNA splicing, WT and mutant MIP minigenes were inserted in the pcDNA3.1 (+) vector. Constructs were transfected into HeLa cells. RT–PCR analysis showed that the donor splice site mutation led to deletion of exon 3 in the mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. Conclusions The present study identified a novel donor splice-site mutation (c.606+1G>A) in the MIP gene in a Chinese family with congenital cataract. In vitro RT–PCR analysis showed that this splice-site mutation resulted in the deletion of exon 3 from mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. This is the first report to show that donor splice-site mutation in MIP gene can cause autosomal dominant congenital cataract. PMID:24319327

  5. PRKN, DJ-1, and PINK1 screening identifies novel splice site mutation in PRKN and two novel DJ-1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Ghazavi, Farzaneh; Fazlali, Zeinab; Banihosseini, Setareh Sadat; Hosseini, Sayed-Rzgar; Kazemi, Mohammad Hossein; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Parsa, Khosro; Sadeghi, Homa; Sina, Farzad; Rohani, Mohammad; Shahidi, Gholam-Ali; Ghaemi, Nasser; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2011-01-01

    We present results of mutation screening of PRKN gene in 93 Iranian Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with average age at onset (AAO) of 42.2 years. The gene was screened by direct sequencing and by a semi-quantitative PCR protocol for detection of sequence rearrangements. Heterozygous rearrangements were tested by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Nine different PRKN mutations were found. One of these, IVS9+1G>A, affects splicing and is novel. Two mutated PRKN alleles were observed in each of 6 patients whose average AAO was 25.7 years. Only 1 patient carried a single mutated allele and his AAO was 41 years. Among patients with AAO of <30 years, 31.3% had two mutated alleles, while only 2.6% with AAO of >30 years carried a PRKN mutation. Analysis of PRKN by RT-PCR led to identification of a novel exon expressed in leukocytes of control and PD individuals. The alternatively spliced transcript if translated would code a protein without a RING Finger 2 domain. Its functional relevance remains to be shown. DJ-I and PINK1 were also screened. Two novel DJ-1 mutations, c.91-2A>G affecting splicing and c.319G>C causing Ala107Pro, were observed among patients with AAO of <31 years, suggesting that PD in a high fraction (>12%) of this group of Iranian patients may be due to mutations in DJ-1. Mutations in PINK1 were not observed. Our results complement previous findings on LRRK2 mutations among Iranian PD patients. PMID:21322020

  6. Mutations in the araC regulatory gene of Escherichia coli B/r that affect repressor and activator functions of AraC protein.

    PubMed Central

    Cass, L G; Wilcox, G

    1986-01-01

    Mutations in the araC gene of Escherichia coli B/r were isolated which alter both activation of the araBAD operon expression and autoregulation. The mutations were isolated on an araC-containing plasmid by hydroxylamine mutagenesis of plasmid DNA. The mutant phenotype selected was the inability to autoregulate. The DNA sequence of 16 mutants was determined and found to consist of seven different missense mutations located within the distal third of the araC gene. Enzyme activities revealed that each araC mutation had altered both autoregulatory and activator functions of AraC protein. The mutational analysis presented in this paper suggests that both autoregulatory and activator functions are localized to the same determinants of the AraC protein and that the amino acid sequence within the carboxy-terminal region of AraC protein is important for site-specific DNA binding. Images PMID:3011750

  7. Structural and functional effects of hereditary hemolytic anemia-associated point mutations in the alpha spectrin tetramer site

    PubMed Central

    Gaetani, Massimiliano; Mootien, Sara; Harper, Sandra; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2008-01-01

    The most common hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) mutations are α-spectrin missense mutations in the dimer-tetramer self-association site. In this study, we systematically compared structural and functional properties of the 14 known HE/HPP mutations located in the α-spectrin tetramer binding site. All mutant α-spectrin recombinant peptides were well folded, stable structures, with only the R34W mutant exhibiting a slight structural destabilization. In contrast, binding affinities measured by isothermal titration calorimetry were greatly variable, ranging from no detectable binding observed for I24S, R28C, R28H, R28S, and R45S to approximately wild-type binding for R34W and K48R. Binding affinities for the other 7 mutants were reduced by approximately 10- to 100-fold relative to wild-type binding. Some sites, such as R28, were hot spots that were very sensitive to even relatively conservative substitutions, whereas other sites were only moderately perturbed by nonconservative substitutions. The R34W and K48R mutations were particularly intriguing mutations that apparently either destabilize tetramers through mechanisms not probed by the univalent tetramer binding assay or represent polymorphisms rather than the pathogenic mutations responsible for observed clinical symptoms. All α0 HE/HPP mutations studied here appear to exert their destabilizing effects through molecular recognition rather than structural mechanisms. PMID:18218854

  8. Active Site and Remote Contributions to Catalysis in Methylthioadenosine Nucleosidases

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Keisha; Cameron, Scott A.; Almo, Steven C.; Burgos, Emmanuel S.; Gulab, Shivali A.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2015-01-01

    5′-Methylthioadenosine/S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine nucleosidases (MTANs) catalyze the hydrolysis of 5′-methylthioadenosine to adenine and 5-methylthioribose. The amino acid sequences of the MTANs from Vibrio cholerae (VcMTAN) and Escherichia coli (EcMTAN) are 60% identical and 75% similar. Protein structure folds and kinetic properties are similar. However, binding of transition-state analogues is dominated by favorable entropy in VcMTAN and by enthalpy in EcMTAN. Catalytic sites of VcMTAN and EcMTAN in contact with reactants differ by two residues; Ala113 and Val153 in VcMTAN are Pro113 and Ile152, respectively, in EcMTAN. We mutated the VcMTAN catalytic site residues to match those of EcMTAN in anticipation of altering its properties toward EcMTAN. Inhibition of VcMTAN by transition-state analogues required filling both active sites of the homodimer. However, in the Val153Ile mutant or double mutants, transition-state analogue binding at one site caused complete inhibition. Therefore, a single amino acid, Val153, alters the catalytic site cooperativity in VcMTAN. The transition-state analogue affinity and thermodynamics in mutant VcMTAN became even more unlike those of EcMTAN, the opposite of expectations from catalytic site similarity; thus, catalytic site contacts in VcMTAN are unable to recapitulate the properties of EcMTAN. X-ray crystal structures of EcMTAN, VcMTAN, and a multiple-site mutant of VcMTAN most closely resembling EcMTAN in catalytic site contacts show no major protein conformational differences. The overall protein architectures of these closely related proteins are implicated in contributing to the catalytic site differences. PMID:25806409

  9. Characterization of site-specific mutations in a short-chain-length/medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase: in vivo and in vitro studies of enzymatic activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Tomizawa, Satoshi; Yamada, Miwa; Tsuge, Takeharu; Doi, Yoshiharu; Sudesh, Kumar; Numata, Keiji

    2013-06-01

    Saturation point mutagenesis was carried out at position 479 in the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase from Chromobacterium sp. strain USM2 (PhaC(Cs)) with specificities for short-chain-length (SCL) [(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) and (R)-3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV)] and medium-chain-length (MCL) [(R)-3-hydroxyhexanoate (3HHx)] monomers in an effort to enhance the specificity of the enzyme for 3HHx. A maximum 4-fold increase in 3HHx incorporation and a 1.6-fold increase in PHA biosynthesis, more than the wild-type synthase, was achieved using selected mutant synthases. These increases were subsequently correlated with improved synthase activity and increased preference of PhaC(Cs) for 3HHx monomers. We found that substitutions with uncharged residues were beneficial, as they resulted in enhanced PHA production and/or 3HHx incorporation. Further analysis led to postulations that the size and geometry of the substrate-binding pocket are determinants of PHA accumulation, 3HHx fraction, and chain length specificity. In vitro activities for polymerization of 3HV and 3HHx monomers were consistent with in vivo substrate specificities. Ultimately, the preference shown by wild-type and mutant synthases for either SCL (C(4) and C(5)) or MCL (C(6)) substrates substantiates the fundamental classification of PHA synthases. PMID:23584780

  10. Human ZMPSTE24 disease mutations: residual proteolytic activity correlates with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Barrowman, Jemima; Wiley, Patricia A.; Hudon-Miller, Sarah E.; Hrycyna, Christine A.; Michaelis, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24 plays a critical role in nuclear lamin biology by cleaving the prenylated and carboxylmethylated 15-amino acid tail from the C-terminus of prelamin A to yield mature lamin A. A defect in this proteolytic event, caused by a mutation in the lamin A gene (LMNA) that eliminates the ZMPSTE24 cleavage site, underlies the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS). Likewise, mutations in the ZMPSTE24 gene that result in decreased enzyme function cause a spectrum of diseases that share certain features of premature aging. Twenty human ZMPSTE24 alleles have been identified that are associated with three disease categories of increasing severity: mandibuloacral dysplasia type B (MAD-B), severe progeria (atypical ‘HGPS’) and restrictive dermopathy (RD). To determine whether a correlation exists between decreasing ZMPSTE24 protease activity and increasing disease severity, we expressed mutant alleles of ZMPSTE24 in yeast and optimized in vivo yeast mating assays to directly compare the activity of alleles associated with each disease category. We also measured the activity of yeast crude membranes containing the ZMPSTE24 mutant proteins in vitro. We determined that, in general, the residual activity of ZMPSTE24 patient alleles correlates with disease severity. Complete loss-of-function alleles are associated with RD, whereas retention of partial, measureable activity results in MAD-B or severe progeria. Importantly, our assays can discriminate small differences in activity among the mutants, confirming that the methods presented here will be useful for characterizing any new ZMPSTE24 mutations that are discovered. PMID:22718200

  11. Allelic mutations in noncoding genomic sequences construct novel transcription factor binding sites that promote gene overexpression.

    PubMed

    Tian, Erming; Børset, Magne; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Brede, Gaute; Våtsveen, Thea K; Hov, Håkon; Waage, Anders; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Epstein, Joshua; Sundan, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The growth and survival factor hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is expressed at high levels in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We report here that elevated HGF transcription in MM was traced to DNA mutations in the promoter alleles of HGF. Sequence analysis revealed a previously undiscovered single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and crucial single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the promoters of myeloma cells that produce large amounts of HGF. The allele-specific mutations functionally reassembled wild-type sequences into the motifs that affiliate with endogenous transcription factors NFKB (nuclear factor kappa-B), MZF1 (myeloid zinc finger 1), and NRF-2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2). In vitro, a mutant allele that gained novel NFKB-binding sites directly responded to transcriptional signaling induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) to promote high levels of luciferase reporter. Given the recent discovery by genome-wide sequencing (GWS) of numerous non-coding mutations in myeloma genomes, our data provide evidence that heterogeneous SNVs in the gene regulatory regions may frequently transform wild-type alleles into novel transcription factor binding properties to aberrantly interact with dysregulated transcriptional signals in MM and other cancer cells. PMID:26220195

  12. A mutation abolishing the ZMPSTE24 cleavage site in prelamin A causes a progeroid disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Shaw, Jessica E; Lu, Jonathan T; Östlund, Cecilia; Shin, Ji-Yeon; Clark, Lorraine N; Gundersen, Gregg G; Nagy, Peter L; Worman, Howard J

    2016-05-15

    In 1994 in the Journal of Cell Science, Hennekes and Nigg reported that changing valine to arginine at the endoproteolytic cleavage site in chicken prelamin A abolishes its conversion to lamin A. The consequences of this mutation in an organism have remained unknown. We now report that the corresponding mutation in a human subject leads to accumulation of prelamin A and causes a progeroid disorder. Next generation sequencing of the subject and her parents' exomes identified a de novo mutation in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) that resulted in a leucine to arginine amino acid substitution at residue 647 in prelamin A. The subject's fibroblasts accumulated prelamin A, a farnesylated protein, which led to an increased percentage of cultured cells with morphologically abnormal nuclei. Treatment with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor improved abnormal nuclear morphology. This case demonstrates that accumulation of prelamin A, independent of the loss of function of ZMPSTE24 metallopeptidase that catalyzes processing of prelamin A, can cause a progeroid disorder and that a cell biology assay could be used in precision medicine to identify a potential therapy. PMID:27034136

  13. A novel splice donor site mutation in EPHA2 caused congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Juan; He, Sijie; Wang, Lejin; Li, Jiankang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital cataract is a rare disorder characterized by crystallin denaturation, which becomes a major cause of childhood blindness. Although more than fifty pathogenic genes for congenital cataract have been reported, the genetic causes of many cataract patients remain unknown. In this study, the aim is to identify the genetic cause of a five-generation Chinese autosomal dominant congenital cataract family. Methods: Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on three affected and one unaffected member of the family, known causative genes were scanned first. Sanger sequencing was used to validate co-segregation of the candidate variant in the family. The impact on the transcript and amino acid sequences of the variant was further analyzed. Results: We identified a novel splice donor site mutation c. 2825+1G >A in EPHA2 that was absent in public and in-house databases and showed co-segregation in the family. This variant resulted in an altered splice that led to protein truncation. Conclusions: The mutation we identified was responsible for congenital cataract in our studied family. Our findings broaden the spectrum of causative mutations in EPHA2 gene for congenital cataract and suggest that WES is an efficient strategy to scan variants in known causative genes for genetically heterogeneous diseases. PMID:27380975

  14. Exome sequencing of desmoplastic melanoma identifies recurrent NFKBIE promoter mutations and diverse activating mutations in the MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Shain, A Hunter; Garrido, Maria; Botton, Thomas; Talevich, Eric; Yeh, Iwei; Sanborn, J Zachary; Chung, Jongsuk; Wang, Nicholas J; Kakavand, Hojabr; Mann, Graham J; Thompson, John F; Wiesner, Thomas; Roy, Ritu; Olshen, Adam B; Gagnon, Alexander; Gray, Joe W; Huh, Nam; Hur, Joe S; Busam, Klaus J; Scolyer, Richard A; Cho, Raymond J; Murali, Rajmohan; Bastian, Boris C

    2015-10-01

    Desmoplastic melanoma is an uncommon variant of melanoma with sarcomatous histology, distinct clinical behavior and unknown pathogenesis. We performed low-coverage genome and high-coverage exome sequencing of 20 desmoplastic melanomas, followed by targeted sequencing of 293 genes in a validation cohort of 42 cases. A high mutation burden (median of 62 mutations/Mb) ranked desmoplastic melanoma among the most highly mutated cancers. Mutation patterns strongly implicate ultraviolet radiation as the dominant mutagen, indicating a superficially located cell of origin. Newly identified alterations included recurrent promoter mutations of NFKBIE, encoding NF-κB inhibitor ɛ (IκBɛ), in 14.5% of samples. Common oncogenic mutations in melanomas, in particular in BRAF (encoding p.Val600Glu) and NRAS (encoding p.Gln61Lys or p.Gln61Arg), were absent. Instead, other genetic alterations known to activate the MAPK and PI3K signaling cascades were identified in 73% of samples, affecting NF1, CBL, ERBB2, MAP2K1, MAP3K1, BRAF, EGFR, PTPN11, MET, RAC1, SOS2, NRAS and PIK3CA, some of which are candidates for targeted therapies. PMID:26343386

  15. Potent and selective activation of abscisic acid receptors in vivo by mutational stabilization of their agonist-bound conformation

    PubMed Central

    Mosquna, Assaf; Peterson, Francis C.; Park, Sang-Youl; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Volkman, Brian F.; Cutler, Sean R.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrabactin resistance (PYR) 1 and its relatives belong to a family of soluble abscisic acid (ABA) receptors that inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2C) when in their agonist-stabilized conformation. Given their switch-like properties, we envisioned that mutations that stabilize their agonist-bound conformation could be used to activate signaling in vivo. To identify such mutations, we subjected PYR1 to site-saturation mutagenesis at 39 highly conserved residues that participate in ABA or PP2C contacts. All 741 possible single amino acid substitutions at these sites were tested to identify variants that increase basal PYR1-PP2C interactions, which uncovered activating mutations in 10 residues that preferentially cluster in PYR1's gate loop and C-terminal helix. The mutations cause measurable but incomplete receptor activation in vitro; however, specific triple and quadruple mutant combinations were constructed that promote an agonist-bound conformation, as measured by heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR, and lead to full receptor activation. Moreover, these mutations retain functionality when introduced into divergent family members, and can therefore be used to dissect individual receptor function in vivo, which has been problematic because of redundancy and family size. Expression of activated PYL2 in Arabidopsis seeds activates ABA signaling by a number of measures: modulation of ABA-regulated gene expression, induction of hyperdormancy, and suppression of ABA deficiency phenotypes in the aba2-1 mutant. Our results set the stage for systematic gain-of-function studies of PYR1 and related ABA receptors and reveal that, despite the large number of receptors, activation of a single receptor is sufficient to activate signaling in planta. PMID:22139369

  16. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  17. The binding site for channel blockers that rescue misprocessed human long QT syndrome type 2 ether-a-gogo-related gene (HERG) mutations.

    PubMed

    Ficker, Eckhard; Obejero-Paz, Carlos A; Zhao, Shuxia; Brown, Arthur M

    2002-02-15

    Mutations in the human ether-a-gogo-related gene (HERG) K(+) channel gene cause chromosome 7-linked long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2), which is characterized by a prolonged QT interval in the electrocardiogram and an increased susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. LQT2 mutations produce loss-of-function phenotypes and reduce I(Kr) currents either by the heteromeric assembly of non- or malfunctioning channel subunits with wild type subunits at the cell surface or by retention of misprocessed mutant HERG channels in the endoplasmic reticulum. Misprocessed mutations often encode for channel proteins that are functional upon incorporation into the plasma membrane. As a result the pharmacological correction of folding defects and restoration of protein function are of considerable interest. Here we report that the trafficking-deficient pore mutation HERG G601S was rescued by a series of HERG channel blockers that increased cell surface expression. Rescue by these pharmacological chaperones varied directly with their blocking potency. We used structure-activity relationships and site-directed mutagenesis to define the binding site of the pharmacological chaperones. We found that binding occurred in the inner cavity and correlated with hydrophobicity and cationic charge. Rescue was domain-restricted because the trafficking of two misprocessed mutations in the C terminus, HERG F805C and HERG R823W, was not restored by channel blockers. Our findings represent a first step toward the design of pharmacological chaperones that will rescue HERG K(+) channels without block. PMID:11741928

  18. Securin can have a separase cleavage site by substitution mutations in the domain required for stabilization and inhibition of separase.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Koji; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2006-03-01

    Securin-separase complex is required for sister chromatid separation. Securin degrades in an APC/cyclosome dependent manner. Separase is activated on the destruction of securin and cleaves cohesin. Fission yeast securin/Cut2 required for proper separase localization has the motifs for destruction and separase-binding at the N- and C-termini, respectively. We report here the third essential domain, which becomes toxic when the 76-amino acid fragment (81-156) in the middle is overproduced. The fragment inhibits separase, while separase is recruited normally and securin is destroyed. It may interfere with separase activation after destruction of securin. If the 127DIE129 stretch is substituted for AIA, the fragment toxicity and the full-length function are abolished. Interestingly, Cut2 is cleaved in a separase dependent manner if the cleavage consensus is introduced following the DIE sequence. This finding is consistent with the proposed model that the DIE region may mimic the cleavage site of separase and inhibit the activation of separase. Evidence for physical interaction between the fragment and separase is provided. A temperature sensitive mutation cut1-K73 isolated by its specific resistance to the fragment toxicity resides in the superhelical region of separase, suggesting that the catalytic site and the helical region in separase may cooperate for activation. PMID:16483313

  19. Mechanistic study of CuZn-SOD from Ipomoea carnea mutated at dimer interface: enhancement of peroxidase activity upon monomerization.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Panchanand; Dixit, Anshuman; Ray, Mamata; Sabat, Surendra Chandra

    2014-02-01

    The enzymatically active monomeric form of CuZn-superoxide dismutase has always been of interest to decipher the structure-function relationship in this class of enzymes. In the present study, spectroscopic and enzymatic characteristics of the dimeric and monomeric forms of recombinant Ipomoea carnea CuZn-superoxide dismutase were made to decipher their stability and altered catalytic properties. The monomeric form of protein was produced through site directed mutagenesis by replacing a conserved hydrophobic leucine with a polar lysine residue at the dimer-interface. Spectral characteristics of both the forms (monomer and dimer) showed the presence of novel electronic transitions. Superoxide scavenging activity of the mutated form was reduced to nearly half of the activity found in the native enzyme. Concomitantly, compared to native form the mutated enzyme showed an increase in peroxidase activity. High temperature dependent circular dichroism spectral analysis, differential scanning calorimetric profile, and the measurement of temperature dependent superoxide scavenging activity indicated an increased susceptibility of the mutated form to higher temperature as compared to the native form. The inhibitor studies like hydrogen peroxide, diethyldithiocarbamate and phenylglyoxal also indicate higher susceptibility, which might be due to, altered arrangement of active site residues as a consequence of the mutation. Molecular modeling and MD simulation studies further indicated that this specific mutation induces loss of hydrophobic interaction at dimer interface, resulting in the observed instability of the dimeric form. Increased peroxidative activity of the enzyme, upon monomerization may have physiological implication essentially in presence of high concentration of H2O2, as in case of plant cells specifically under stress conditions. PMID:24513093

  20. CAPN5 mutation in hereditary uveitis: the R243L mutation increases calpain catalytic activity and triggers intraocular inflammation in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Gakhar, Lokesh; Coglan, Diana; Mahajan, MaryAnn; Wu, Shu; Yang, Jing; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Tsang, Stephen H.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2015-01-01

    A single amino acid mutation near the active site of the CAPN5 protease was linked to the inherited blinding disorder, autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV, OMIM #193235). In homology modeling with other calpains, this R243L CAPN5 mutation was situated in a mobile loop that gates substrate access to the calcium-regulated active site. In in vitro activity assays, the mutation increased calpain protease activity and made it far more active at low concentrations of calcium. To test whether the disease allele could yield an animal model of ADNIV, we created transgenic mice expressing human (h) CAPN5R243L only in the retina. The resulting hCAPN5R243L transgenic mice developed a phenotype consistent with human uveitis and ADNIV, at the clinical, histological and molecular levels. The fundus of hCAPN5R243L mice showed enhanced autofluorescence (AF) and pigment changes indicative of reactive retinal pigment epithelial cells and photoreceptor degeneration. Electroretinography showed mutant mouse eyes had a selective loss of the b-wave indicating an inner-retina signaling defect. Histological analysis of mutant mouse eyes showed protein extravasation from dilated vessels into the anterior chamber and vitreous, vitreous inflammation, vitreous and retinal fibrosis and retinal degeneration. Analysis of gene expression changes in the hCAPN5R243L mouse retina showed upregulation of several markers, including members of the Toll-like receptor pathway, chemokines and cytokines, indicative of both an innate and adaptive immune response. Since many forms of uveitis share phenotypic characteristics of ADNIV, this mouse offers a model with therapeutic testing utility for ADNIV and uveitis patients. PMID:25994508

  1. CAPN5 mutation in hereditary uveitis: the R243L mutation increases calpain catalytic activity and triggers intraocular inflammation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wert, Katherine J; Bassuk, Alexander G; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Gakhar, Lokesh; Coglan, Diana; Mahajan, MaryAnn; Wu, Shu; Yang, Jing; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Tsang, Stephen H; Mahajan, Vinit B

    2015-08-15

    A single amino acid mutation near the active site of the CAPN5 protease was linked to the inherited blinding disorder, autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV, OMIM #193235). In homology modeling with other calpains, this R243L CAPN5 mutation was situated in a mobile loop that gates substrate access to the calcium-regulated active site. In in vitro activity assays, the mutation increased calpain protease activity and made it far more active at low concentrations of calcium. To test whether the disease allele could yield an animal model of ADNIV, we created transgenic mice expressing human (h) CAPN5(R243L) only in the retina. The resulting hCAPN5(R243L) transgenic mice developed a phenotype consistent with human uveitis and ADNIV, at the clinical, histological and molecular levels. The fundus of hCAPN5(R243L) mice showed enhanced autofluorescence (AF) and pigment changes indicative of reactive retinal pigment epithelial cells and photoreceptor degeneration. Electroretinography showed mutant mouse eyes had a selective loss of the b-wave indicating an inner-retina signaling defect. Histological analysis of mutant mouse eyes showed protein extravasation from dilated vessels into the anterior chamber and vitreous, vitreous inflammation, vitreous and retinal fibrosis and retinal degeneration. Analysis of gene expression changes in the hCAPN5(R243L) mouse retina showed upregulation of several markers, including members of the Toll-like receptor pathway, chemokines and cytokines, indicative of both an innate and adaptive immune response. Since many forms of uveitis share phenotypic characteristics of ADNIV, this mouse offers a model with therapeutic testing utility for ADNIV and uveitis patients. PMID:25994508

  2. Differential Active Site Loop Conformations Mediate Promiscuous Activities in the Lactonase SsoPox

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Mikael; Chabriere, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes are proficient catalysts that enable fast rates of Michaelis-complex formation, the chemical step and products release. These different steps may require different conformational states of the active site that have distinct binding properties. Moreover, the conformational flexibility of the active site mediates alternative, promiscuous functions. Here we focused on the lactonase SsoPox from Sulfolobus solfataricus. SsoPox is a native lactonase endowed with promiscuous phosphotriesterase activity. We identified a position in the active site loop (W263) that governs its flexibility, and thereby affects the substrate specificity of the enzyme. We isolated two different sets of substitutions at position 263 that induce two distinct conformational sampling of the active loop and characterized the structural and kinetic effects of these substitutions. These sets of mutations selectively and distinctly mediate the improvement of the promiscuous phosphotriesterase and oxo-lactonase activities of SsoPox by increasing active-site loop flexibility. These observations corroborate the idea that conformational diversity governs enzymatic promiscuity and is a key feature of protein evolvability. PMID:24086491

  3. Altered intrinsic brain activity in patients with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia by PRRT2 mutation: altered brain activity by PRRT2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Luo, ChunYan; Chen, Yongping; Song, Wei; Chen, Qin; Gong, QiYong; Shang, Hui-Fang

    2013-11-01

    The proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) gene has been recently identified as a causative gene of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), with an insertion mutation c.649_650insC (p.P217fsX7) reported as the most common mutation. However, the pathogenic mechanism of the mutation of PRRT2 remains largely unknown. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging is a promising approach to assess cerebral function and reveals underlying functional changes. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 4 Chinese PKD patients with p.P217fsX7 mutation, 6 Chinese PKD patients without the mutation, and 10 healthy control subjects. Voxel-based analysis was used to characterize alterations in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF). When compared with the healthy control subjects, both groups of PKD patients showed alterations in spontaneous brain activities within cortical-basal ganglia circuitry. Besides, the group of patients with p.P217fsX7 mutation also exhibited increased ALFF in the right postcenral gyrus and right rolandic operculum area, while the alteration of ALFF in group of patients without the mutation additionally involved the middle orbitofrontal cortex. Direct comparative analysis between these two patient groups revealed significantly increased ALFF in the right postcentral gyrus in the group with p.P217fsX7 mutation. Increased spontaneous brain activity in the cortical-basal ganglia circuitry, especially in the motor preparation areas, is a common pathophysiology in PKD. Differences in the spatial patterns of increased ALFF between patients with and those without the mutation might reflect the distinct pathological mechanism resulting from PRRT2 mutation. PMID:23532549

  4. An ENU Mutagenesis Screen in Zebrafish for Visual System Mutants Identifies a Novel Splice-Acceptor Site Mutation in patched2 that Results in Colobomas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiwoon; Cox, Ben D.; Daly, Christina M. S.; Lee, Chanjae; Nuckels, Richard J.; Tittle, Rachel K.; Uribe, Rosa A.; Gross, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To identify recessive mutations affecting development and/or maintenance of the zebrafish visual system. Methods. A three-generation ENU (N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea)-based forward genetic screen was performed. F3 embryos were screened visually from 1 to 5 days postfertilization (dpf) for ocular abnormalities, and 5 dpf embryos were fixed and processed for cryosectioning, after which eye sections were screened for defects in cellular organization within the retina, lens, and cornea. A combination of PCR and DNA sequencing, in situ hybridization, and pharmacological treatments were used to clone and characterize a coloboma mutant. Results. A total of 126 F2 families were screened, and, from these, 18 recessive mutations were identified that affected eye development. Phenotypes included lens malformations and cataracts, photoreceptor defects, oculocutaneous albinism, microphthalmia, and colobomas. Analysis of one such coloboma mutant, uta1, identified a splice-acceptor mutation in the patched2 gene that resulted in an in-frame deletion of 19 amino acids that are predicted to contribute to the first extracellular loop of Patched2. ptch2uta1 mutants possessed elevated Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activity, and blocking the Hh pathway with cyclopamine prevented colobomas in ptch2uta1 mutant embryos. Conclusions. We have identified 18 recessive mutations affecting development of the zebrafish visual system and we have characterized a novel splice-acceptor site mutation in patched2 that results in enhanced Hh pathway activity and colobomas. PMID:23150614

  5. Improving upon Nature: Active site remodeling produces highly efficient aldolase activity towards hydrophobic electrophilic substrates

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Manoj; Toone, Eric J.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Substrate specificity of enzymes is frequently narrow and constrained by multiple interactions, limiting the use of natural enzymes in biocatalytic applications. Aldolases have important synthetic applications, but the usefulness of these enzymes is hampered by their narrow reactivity profile with unnatural substrates. To explore the determinants of substrate selectivity and alter the specificity of E. coli 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) aldolase, we employed structure-based mutagenesis coupled with library screening of mutant enzymes localized to the bacterial periplasm. We identified two active site mutations (T161S/S184L) that work additively to enhance the substrate specificity of this aldolase to include catalysis of retro-aldol cleavage of (4S)-2-keto-4-hydroxy-4-(2′-pyridyl)butyrate (S-KHPB). These mutations improve the value of kcat/KMS-KHPB by >450-fold, resulting in a catalytic efficiency that is comparable to that of the wild-type enzyme with the natural substrate while retaining high stereoselectivity. Moreover, the value of kcatS-KHPB for this mutant enzyme, a parameter critical for biocatalytic applications, is 3-fold higher than the maximum value achieved by the natural aldolase with any substrate. This mutant also possesses high catalytic efficiency for the retro-aldol cleavage of the natural substrate, KDPG, and a >50-fold improved activity for cleavage of 2-keto-4-hydroxy-octonoate (KHO), a non-functionalized hydrophobic analog. These data suggest a substrate binding mode that illuminates the origin of facial selectivity in aldol addition reactions catalyzed by KDPG and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogalactonate (KDPGal) aldolases. Furthermore, targeting mutations to the active site provides marked improvement in substrate selectivity, demonstrating that structure-guided active site mutagenesis combined with selection techniques can efficiently identify proteins with characteristics that compare favorably to naturally occurring enzymes. PMID

  6. Glycosylation of Phenolic Compounds by the Site-Mutated β-Galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lili; Xu, Lijuan; Guo, Yuchuan; Zhang, Dayu; Qi, Tingting; Jin, Lan; Gu, Guofeng; Xu, Li; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    β-Galactosidases can transfer the galactosyl from lactose or galactoside donors to various acceptors and thus are especially useful for the synthesis of important glycosides. However, these enzymes have limitations in the glycosylation of phenolic compounds that have many physiological functions. In this work, the β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3 was subjected to site-saturation mutagenesis at the W980 residue. The recombinant pET-21b plasmid carrying the enzyme gene was used as the template for mutation. The mutant plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli cells for screening. One recombinant mutant, W980F, exhibited increased yield of glycoside when using hydroquinone as the screening acceptor. The enzyme was purified and the effects of the mutation on enzyme properties were determined in detail. It showed improved transglycosylation activity on novel phenolic acceptors besides hydroquinone. The yields of the glycosides produced from phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol were increased by 7.6% to 53.1%. Moreover, it generated 32.3% glycosides from the pyrogallol that could not be glycosylated by the wild-type enzyme. Chemical structures of these glycoside products were further determined by MS and NMR analysis. Thus, a series of novel phenolic galactosides were achieved by β-galactosidase for the first time. This was a breakthrough in the enzymatic galactosylation of the challenging phenolic compounds of great values. PMID:25803778

  7. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mutation conferring target-site resistance to imidacloprid in Nilaparvata lugens (brown planthopper).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zewen; Williamson, Martin S; Lansdell, Stuart J; Denholm, Ian; Han, Zhaojun; Millar, Neil S

    2005-06-14

    Neonicotinoids, such as imidacloprid, are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists with potent insecticidal activity. Since its introduction in the early 1990s, imidacloprid has become one of the most extensively used insecticides for both crop protection and animal health applications. As with other classes of insecticides, resistance to neonicotinoids is a significant threat and has been identified in several pest species, including the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, a major rice pest in many parts of Asia. In this study, radioligand binding experiments have been conducted with whole-body membranes prepared from imidacloprid-susceptible and imidacloprid-resistant strains of N. lugens. The results reveal a much higher level of [3H]imidacloprid-specific binding to the susceptible strain than to the resistant strain (16.7 +/- 1.0 and 0.34 +/- 0.21 fmol/mg of protein, respectively). With the aim of understanding the molecular basis of imidacloprid resistance, five nAChR subunits (Nlalpha1-Nlalpha4 and Nlbeta1) have been cloned from N. lugens.A comparison of nAChR subunit genes from imidacloprid-sensitive and imidacloprid-resistant populations has identified a single point mutation at a conserved position (Y151S) in two nAChR subunits, Nlalpha1 and Nlalpha3. A strong correlation between the frequency of the Y151S point mutation and the level of resistance to imidacloprid has been demonstrated by allele-specific PCR. By expression of hybrid nAChRs containing N. lugens alpha and rat beta2 subunits, evidence was obtained that demonstrates that mutation Y151S is responsible for a substantial reduction in specific [3H]imidacloprid binding. This study provides direct evidence for the occurrence of target-site resistance to a neonicotinoid insecticide. PMID:15937112

  8. Dynamics and Mechanism of Efficient DNA Repair Reviewed by Active-Site Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2010-06-01

    Photolyases repair the UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in damage DNA via a photoreaction which includes a series of light-driven electron transfers between the two-electron-reduced flavin cofactor FADH^- and the dimer. We report here our systematic studies of the repair dynamics in E. coli photolyase with mutation of several active-site residues. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the significant change in the forward electron transfer from the excited FADH^- to the dimer and the back electron transfer from the repaired thymines by mutation of E274A, R226A, R342A, N378S and N378C. We also found that the mutation of E274A accelerates the bond-breaking of the thymine dimer. The dynamics changes are consistent with the quantum yield study of these mutants. These results suggest that the active-site residues play a significant role, structurally and chemically, in the DNA repair photocycle.

  9. Target site insensitivity mutations in the AChE enzyme confer resistance to organophosphorous insecticides in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say).

    PubMed

    Malekmohammadi, M; Galehdari, H

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we demonstrated the use and optimization of the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR procedure to detect and analyze the frequency of the R30K and I392T mutations in resistant field populations of CPB. The R30K mutation was detected in 72%, 84%, 52% and 64% of Bahar, Dehpiaz, Aliabad and Yengijeh populations, respectively. Overall frequencies of the I392T mutation were 12%, 8% and 16% of Bahar, Aliabad and Yengijeh populations, respectively. No I392T point mutation was found among samples from Dehpiaz field population. Moreover, only 31% and 2% of samples from the resistant field populations were homozygous for R30K and I392T mutations, respectively. No individual simultaneously had both I392T and S291G/R30K point mutations. The incidence of individuals with both S291G and R30K point mutations in the samples from Bahar, Dehpiaz, Aliabad, and Yengijeh populations were 31.5%, 44.7%, 41.6%, and 27.3% respectively. Genotypes determined by the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR method were consistent with those determined by PCR sequencing. There was no significant correlation between the mutation frequencies and resistance levels in the resistant populations, indicating that other mutations may contribute to this variation. Polymorphism in the partial L. decemlineata cDNA AChE gene Ldace2 of four field populations was identified by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. Among 45 novel mutations detected in this study, T29P mutation was found across all four field populations that likely contribute to the AChE insensitivity. Site-directed mutagenesis and protein expression experiments are needed for a more complete evaluation. PMID:26778439

  10. Hop, an active Mutator-like element in the genome of the fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Chalvet, Fabienne; Grimaldi, Christine; Kaper, Fiona; Langin, Thierry; Daboussi, Marie-Josée

    2003-08-01

    A new type of active DNA transposon has been identified in the genome of Fusarium oxysporum by its transposition into the niaD target gene. Two insertions within the final exon, in opposite orientations at the same nucleotide site, have been characterized. These elements, called Hop, are 3,299 bp long, with perfect terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of 99 bp. The sequencing of genomic copies reveals a 9-bp target site duplication and no apparent sequence specificity at the insertion sites. The sequencing of a cDNA indicates that Hop does not contain an intron and encodes a putative transposase of 836 amino acids. The structural features (length, TIRs size, and 9-bp duplication), together with the presence of conserved domains in the transposase, strongly suggest that Hop is a Mutator-like element (MULE). Hop is thus the first active member of this family found beyond plants. The high rate of excision observed indicates that Hop is very active and thus represents a promising efficient tagging system for the isolation of fungal genes. The distribution of Hop elements within the Fusarium genus revealed that they are present in different species, suggesting that related elements could be present in other fungal genomes. In fact, Hop-related sequences have been identified in the survey of the entire genome sequence of three other ascomycetes, Magnaporthe grisea, Neurospora crassa, and Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:12777515

  11. Investigating the Role of Loop C Hydrophilic Residue ‘T244’ in the Binding Site of ρ1 GABAC Receptors via Site Mutation and Partial Agonism

    PubMed Central

    Naffaa, Moawiah M.; Absalom, Nathan; Solomon, V. Raja; Chebib, Mary; Hibbs, David E.; Hanrahan, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    The loop C hydrophilic residue, threonine 244 lines the orthosteric binding site of ρ1 GABAC receptors was studied by point mutation into serine, alanine and cysteine, and tested with GABA, some representative partial agonists and antagonists. Thr244 has a hydroxyl group essential for GABA activity that is constrained by the threonine methyl group, orienting it toward the binding site. Significant decreases in activation effects of the studied ligands at ρ1 T244S mutant receptors, suggests a critical role for this residue. Results of aliphatic and heteroaromatic partial agonists demonstrate different pharmacological effects at ρ1 T244S mutant receptors when co-applied with GABA EC50 responses. ρ1 T244A and ρ1 T244C mutant receptors have minimal sensitivity to GABA at high mM concentrations, whereas, the ρ1 WT partial agonists, β-alanine and MTSEA demonstrate more efficacy and potency, respectively, than GABA at these mutant receptors. This study explores the role of Thr244 in the binding of agonists as an initial step during channel gating by moving loop C towards the ligand. PMID:27244450

  12. A novel splice site mutation in EYA4 causes DFNA10 hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Coman, David; Yang, Tao; Gardner, R J McKinlay; Rose, Elizabeth; Smith, Richard J H; Bahlo, Melanie; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M

    2007-07-15

    Nonsyndromic autosomal dominant sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) at the DFNA10 locus was described in two families in 2001. Causative mutations that affect the EyaHR domain of the 'Eyes absent 4' (EYA4) protein were identified. We report on the clinical and genetic analyses of an Australian family with nonsyndromic SNHL. Screening of the EYA4 gene showed the novel polypyrimidine tract variation ca. 1,282-12T > A that introduces a new 3' splice acceptor site. This is the first report of a point mutation in EYA4 that is hypothesized to lead to aberrant pre-mRNA splicing and human disease. The DFNA10 family described is only the fourth to be identified. One individual presented with apparently the same phenotype as other affected members of the family. However, genotyping illustrated that he did not share the DFNA10 disease haplotype. Detailed clinical investigation showed differences in the onset and severity of his hearing loss and thus he is presumed to represent a phenocopy, perhaps resulting from long-term exposure to loud noise. PMID:17568404

  13. Mutation in spike protein cleavage site and pathogenesis of feline coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Licitra, Beth N; Millet, Jean K; Regan, Andrew D; Hamilton, Brian S; Rinaldi, Vera D; Duhamel, Gerald E; Whittaker, Gary R

    2013-07-01

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) exist as 2 biotypes: feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). FECV causes subclinical infections; FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a systemic and fatal disease. It is thought that mutations in FECV enable infection of macrophages, causing FIP. However, the molecular basis for this biotype switch is unknown. We examined a furin cleavage site in the region between receptor-binding (S1) and fusion (S2) domains of the spike of serotype 1 FCoV. FECV sequences were compared with FIPV sequences. All FECVs had a conserved furin cleavage motif. For FIPV, there was a correlation with the disease and >1 substitution in the S1/S2 motif. Fluorogenic peptide assays confirmed that the substitutions modulate furin cleavage. We document a functionally relevant S1/S2 mutation that arises when FIP develops in a cat. These insights into FIP pathogenesis may be useful in development of diagnostic, prevention, and treatment measures against coronaviruses. PMID:23763835

  14. Mutation in Spike Protein Cleavage Site and Pathogenesis of Feline Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Licitra, Beth N.; Millet, Jean K.; Regan, Andrew D.; Hamilton, Brian S.; Rinaldi, Vera D.; Duhamel, Gerald E.

    2013-01-01

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) exist as 2 biotypes: feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). FECV causes subclinical infections; FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a systemic and fatal disease. It is thought that mutations in FECV enable infection of macrophages, causing FIP. However, the molecular basis for this biotype switch is unknown. We examined a furin cleavage site in the region between receptor-binding (S1) and fusion (S2) domains of the spike of serotype 1 FCoV. FECV sequences were compared with FIPV sequences. All FECVs had a conserved furin cleavage motif. For FIPV, there was a correlation with the disease and >1 substitution in the S1/S2 motif. Fluorogenic peptide assays confirmed that the substitutions modulate furin cleavage. We document a functionally relevant S1/S2 mutation that arises when FIP develops in a cat. These insights into FIP pathogenesis may be useful in development of diagnostic, prevention, and treatment measures against coronaviruses. PMID:23763835

  15. CpG mutations in the reactive site of human C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Skriver, K; Radziejewska, E; Silbermann, J A; Donaldson, V H; Bock, S C

    1989-02-25

    C1 inhibitor plays an important role in the regulation of vascular permeability through its ability to inactivate enzymes which release polypeptide kinins. Dysfunctional C1 inhibitor molecules are present in the plasma of affected members of the Da and Ri hereditary angioneurotic edema kindreds. We constructed genomic libraries from Da and Ri patient DNAs which had been cleaved with BclI to generate a fragment containing 21 kilobases of the C1 inhibitor locus. C1 inhibitor gene-containing recombinants originating from mutant Da and Ri alleles were differentiated from those derived from normal alleles by linkage analysis using the intragenic HgiAI restriction fragment length polymorphism. Nucleotide sequencing of the complete protein-coding regions of the mutant alleles identified two different mutations in a CpG dinucleotide corresponding to the first two bases of arginine codon 444. These single base mutations changed the identity of the functionally critical P1 reactive site residue from arginine to cysteine (Da) or histidine (Ri). The additional cysteine residue in C1 inhibitor Da suggests how it is covalently bound to albumin in plasma. The presence of CpG dinucleotides in the codons specifying the P1 arginines of C1 inhibitor and antithrombin III explains the high incidence of histidine and cysteine substitutions observed among dysfunctional mutants of these serine protease inhibitors. PMID:2563376

  16. Adventitious match probability for autosomal profiles when primer binding site mutation is possible.

    PubMed

    Pope, Susan; Evett, Ian; Puch-Solis, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the situation where two DNA systems with differing primers have been used to produce DNA profiles for loading and searching of a DNA Database. With any profiling system there exists the possibility of a "primer binding site mutation" (PBSM). When such a mutation occurs at one of the loci in a profile, it has the effect that the associated allele is not visible in the profile. In the case where a person has two different alleles at a given locus (heterozygous) the effect of a PBSM would be that the profile would appear to be that of an individual with only one allele at that locus (homozygous). The paper investigates the potential for an adventitious match as a result of a PBSM when, for example, a crime profile and person profile that have originated from two different individuals are found to be the same as a result of a PBSM in one of the profiles. It is demonstrated, both by theory and using simulations, that the effect of PBSMs is to slightly decrease the adventitious match probability from what it would had the same DNA system been used. PMID:27420391

  17. Mutational studies on resurrected ancestral proteins reveal conservation of site-specific amino acid preferences throughout evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A; Gaucher, Eric A; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2015-02-01

    Local protein interactions ("molecular context" effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  18. Mutational Studies on Resurrected Ancestral Proteins Reveal Conservation of Site-Specific Amino Acid Preferences throughout Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Valeria A.; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Local protein interactions (“molecular context” effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  19. Active site specificity of plasmepsin II.

    PubMed Central

    Westling, J.; Cipullo, P.; Hung, S. H.; Saft, H.; Dame, J. B.; Dunn, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    Members of the aspartic proteinase family of enzymes have very similar three-dimensional structures and catalytic mechanisms. Each, however, has unique substrate specificity. These distinctions arise from variations in amino acid residues that line the active site subsites and interact with the side chains of the amino acids of the peptides that bind to the active site. To understand the unique binding preferences of plasmepsin II, an enzyme of the aspartic proteinase class from the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, chromogenic octapeptides having systematic substitutions at various positions in the sequence were analyzed. This enabled the design of new, improved substrates for this enzyme (Lys-Pro-Ile-Leu-Phe*Nph-Ala/Glu-Leu-Lys, where * indicates the cleavage point). Additionally, the crystal structure of plasmepsin II was analyzed to explain the binding characteristics. Specific amino acids (Met13, Ser77, and Ile287) that were suspected of contributing to active site binding and specificity were chosen for site-directed mutagenesis experiments. The Met13Glu and Ile287Glu single mutants and the Met13Glu/Ile287Glu double mutant gain the ability to cleave substrates containing Lys residues. PMID:10548045

  20. A Novel SLC27A4 Splice Acceptor Site Mutation in Great Danes with Ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Julia; Wöhlke, Anne; Mischke, Reinhard; Hoffmann, Annalena; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Küch, Eva-Maria; Naim, Hassan Y.; Distl, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    Ichthyoses are a group of various different types of hereditary disorders affecting skin cornification. They are characterized by hyperkeratoses of different severity levels and are associated with a dry and scaling skin. Genome-wide association analysis of nine affected and 13 unaffected Great Danes revealed a genome-wide significant peak on chromosome 9 at 57–58 Mb in the region of SLC27A4. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA of SLC27A4 revealed the non-synonymous SNV SLC27A4:g.8684G>A in perfect association with ichthyosis-affection in Great Danes. The mutant transcript of SLC27A4 showed an in-frame loss of 54 base pairs in exon 8 probably induced by a new splice acceptor site motif created by the mutated A- allele of the SNV. Genotyping 413 controls from 35 different breeds of dogs and seven wolves revealed that this mutation could not be found in other populations except in Great Danes. Affected dogs revealed high amounts of mutant transcript but only low levels of the wild type transcript. Targeted analyses of SLC27A4 protein from skin tissues of three affected and two unaffected Great Danes indicated a markedly reduced or not detectable wild type and truncated protein levels in affected dogs but a high expression of wild type SLC27A4 protein in unaffected controls. Our data provide evidence of a new splice acceptor site creating SNV that results in a reduction or loss of intact SLC27A4 protein and probably explains the severe skin phenotype in Great Danes. Genetic testing will allow selective breeding to prevent ichthyosis-affected puppies in the future. PMID:26506231

  1. Catalytically Active Guanylyl Cyclase B Requires Endoplasmic Reticulum-mediated Glycosylation, and Mutations That Inhibit This Process Cause Dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Deborah M; Edmund, Aaron B; Otto, Neil M; Chaffee, Thomas S; Robinson, Jerid W; Potter, Lincoln R

    2016-05-20

    C-type natriuretic peptide activation of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), also known as natriuretic peptide receptor B or NPR2, stimulates long bone growth, and missense mutations in GC-B cause dwarfism. Four such mutants (L658F, Y708C, R776W, and G959A) bound (125)I-C-type natriuretic peptide on the surface of cells but failed to synthesize cGMP in membrane GC assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy also indicated that the mutant receptors were on the cell surface. All mutant proteins were dephosphorylated and incompletely glycosylated, but dephosphorylation did not explain the inactivation because the mutations inactivated a "constitutively phosphorylated" enzyme. Tunicamycin inhibition of glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum or mutation of the Asn-24 glycosylation site decreased GC activity, but neither inhibition of glycosylation in the Golgi by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I gene inactivation nor PNGase F deglycosylation of fully processed GC-B reduced GC activity. We conclude that endoplasmic reticulum-mediated glycosylation is required for the formation of an active catalytic, but not ligand-binding domain, and that mutations that inhibit this process cause dwarfism. PMID:26980729

  2. Activating HER2 mutations in HER2 gene amplification negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Ron; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Searleman, Adam C.; Shen, Wei; Shen, Dong; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Monsey, John; Goel, Nicholas; Aronson, Adam B.; Li, Shunqiang; Ma, Cynthia X.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ellis, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Data from eight breast cancer genome sequencing projects identified 25 patients with HER2 somatic mutations in cancers lacking HER2 gene amplification. To determine the phenotype of these mutations, we functionally characterized thirteen HER2 mutations using in vitro kinase assays, protein structure analysis, cell culture and xenograft experiments. Seven of these mutations are activating mutations, including G309A, D769H, D769Y, V777L, P780ins, V842I, and R896C. HER2 in-frame deletion 755-759, which is homologous to EGFR exon 19 in-frame deletions, had a neomorphic phenotype with increased phosphorylation of EGFR or HER3. L755S produced lapatinib resistance, but was not an activating mutation in our experimental systems. All of these mutations were sensitive to the irreversible kinase inhibitor, neratinib. These findings demonstrate that HER2 somatic mutation is an alternative mechanism to activate HER2 in breast cancer and they validate HER2 somatic mutations as drug targets for breast cancer treatment. PMID:23220880

  3. Improving the neutral phytase activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Wang, Zupeng; Yan, Xiuhua

    2015-03-01

    Neutral phytase is used as a feed additive for degradation of anti-nutritional phytate in aquatic feed industry. Site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 phytase was performed with an aim to increase its activity. Mutation residues were chosen based on multiple sequence alignments and structure analysis of neutral phytsaes from different microorganisms. The mutation sites on surface (D148E, S197E and N156E) and around the active site (D52E) of phytase were selected. Analysis of the phytase variants showed that the specific activities of mutants D148E and S197E remarkably increased by about 35 and 13% over a temperature range of 40-75 °C at pH 7.0, respectively. The k cat of mutants D148E and S197E were 1.50 and 1.25 times than that of the wild-type phytase, respectively. Both D148E and S197E showed much higher thermostability than that of the wild-type phytase. However, mutants N156E and D52E led to significant loss of specific activity of the enzyme. Structural analysis revealed that these mutations may affect conformation of the active site of phytase. The present mutant phytases D148E and S197E with increased activities and thermostabilities have application potential as additives in aquaculture feed. PMID:25613522

  4. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein rescues activity of 5-lipoxygenase mutations that delay nuclear membrane association and disrupt product formation.

    PubMed

    Gerstmeier, Jana; Newcomer, Marcia E; Dennhardt, Sophie; Romp, Erik; Fischer, Jana; Werz, Oliver; Garscha, Ulrike

    2016-05-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are proinflammatory lipid mediators formed from arachidonic acid in a 2-step reaction catalyzed by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) requiring the formation of 5-HPETE [5(S)-hydroperoxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid] and its subsequent transformation to LTA4 5-LOX is thought to receive arachidonic acid from the nuclear membrane-embedded 5-LOX-activating protein (FLAP). The crystal structure of 5-LOX revealed an active site concealed by F177 and Y181 (FY cork). We examined the influence of the FY cork on 5-LOX activity and membrane binding in HEK293 cells in the absence and presence of FLAP. Uncapping the 5-LOX active site by mutation of F177 and/or Y181 to alanine (5-LOX-F177A, 5-LOX-Y181A, 5-LOX-F177/Y181A) resulted in delayed and diminished 5-LOX membrane association in A23187-stimulated cells. For 5-LOX-F177A and 5-LOX-F177/Y181A, formation of 5-LOX products was dramatically reduced relative to 5-LOX-wild type (wt). Strikingly, coexpression of FLAP in A23187-activated HEK293 cells effectively restored formation of 5-H(p)ETE (5-hydroxy- and 5-peroxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) by these same 5-LOX mutants (≈60-70% 5-LOX-wt levels) but not of LTA4 hydrolysis products. Yet 5-LOX-Y181A generated 5-H(p)ETE at levels comparable to 5-LOX-wt but reduced LTA4 hydrolysis products. Coexpression of FLAP partially restored LTA4 hydrolysis product formation by 5-LOX-Y181A. Together, the data suggest that the concealed FY cork impacts membrane association and that FLAP may help shield an uncapped active site.-Gerstmeier, J., Newcomer, M. E., Dennhardt, S., Romp, E., Fischer, J., Werz, O., Garscha, U. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein rescues activity of 5-lipoxygenase mutations that delay nuclear membrane association and disrupt product formation. PMID:26842853

  5. A novel splice site mutation in SMARCAL1 results in aberrant exon definition in a child with schimke immunoosseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Clinton; Hunley, Tracy E; Guo, Yan; Cortez, David

    2015-10-01

    Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of childhood characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and renal failure, T-cell immunodeficiency, and cancer in certain instances. Approximately half of patients with SIOD are reported to have biallelic mutations in SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1), which encodes a DNA translocase that localizes to sites of DNA replication and repairs damaged replication forks. We present a novel mutation (NM_014140.3:c.2070+2insT) that results in defective SMARCAL1 mRNA splicing in a child with SIOD. This mutation, within the donor site of intron 12, results in the skipping of exon 12, which encodes part of a critical hinge region connecting the two lobes of the ATPase domain. This mutation was not recognized as deleterious by diagnostic SMARCAL1 sequencing, but discovered through next generation sequencing and found to result in absent SMARCAL1 expression in patient-derived lymphoblasts. The splicing defect caused by this mutation supports the concept of exon definition. Furthermore, it illustrates the need to broaden the search for SMARCAL1 mutations in patients with SIOD lacking coding sequence variants. PMID:25943327

  6. G2385R and I2020T Mutations Increase LRRK2 GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jihoon; Joe, Eun-hye; Son, Ilhong; Seol, Wongi

    2016-01-01

    The LRRK2 mutation is a major causal mutation in familial Parkinson's disease. Although LRRK2 contains functional GTPase and kinase domains and their activities are altered by pathogenic mutations, most studies focused on LRRK2 kinase activity because the most prevalent mutant, G2019S, enhances kinase activity. However, the G2019S mutation is extremely rare in the Asian population. Instead, the G2385R mutation was reported as a major risk factor in the Asian population. Similar to other LRRK2 studies, G2385R studies have also focused on kinase activity. Here, we investigated GTPase activities of G2385R with other LRRK2 mutants, such as G2019S, R1441C, and I2020T, as well as wild type (WT). Our results suggest that both I2020T and G2385R contain GTPase activities stronger than that of WT. A kinase assay using the commercial recombinant proteins showed that I2020T harbored stronger activity, whereas G2385R had weaker activity than that of WT, as reported previously. This is the first report of LRRK2 I2020T and G2385R GTPase activities and shows that most of the LRRK2 mutations that are pathogenic or a risk factor altered either kinase or GTPase activity, suggesting that their physiological consequences are caused by altered enzyme activities. PMID:27314038

  7. Characterization of active site residues of nitroalkane oxidase.

    PubMed

    Valley, Michael P; Fenny, Nana S; Ali, Shah R; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2010-06-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Ser171 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by approximately 5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of approximately 2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  8. Identification of 31 novel mutations in the F8 gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients: structural analysis of 20 missense mutations suggests new intermolecular binding sites.

    PubMed

    Venceslá, Adoración; Corral-Rodríguez, María Angeles; Baena, Manel; Cornet, Mónica; Domènech, Montserrat; Baiget, Montserrat; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Tizzano, Eduardo F

    2008-04-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a wide variety of mutations in the factor 8 (F8) gene, leading to absent or deficient factor VIII (FVIII). We analyzed the F8 gene of 267 unrelated Spanish patients with HA. After excluding patients with the common intron-1 and intron-22 inversions and large deletions, we detected 137 individuals with small mutations, 31 of which had not been reported previously. Eleven of these were nonsense, frameshift, and splicing mutations, whereas 20 were missense changes. We assessed the impact of the 20 substitutions based on currently available information about FV and FVIII structure and function relationship, including previously reported results of replacements at these and topologically equivalent positions. Although most changes are likely to cause gross structural perturbations and concomitant cofactor instability, p.Ala375Ser is predicted to affect cofactor activation. Finally, 3 further mutations (p.Pro64Arg, p.Gly494Val, and p.Asp2267Gly) appear to affect cofactor interactions with its carrier protein, von Willebrand factor, with the scavenger receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), and/or with the substrate of the FVIIIapi*FIXa (Xase) complex, factor X. Characterization of these novel mutations is important for adequate genetic counseling in HA families, but also contributes to a better understanding of FVIII structure-function relationship. PMID:18184865

  9. Identification of 31 novel mutations in the F8 gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients: structural analysis of 20 missense mutations suggests new intermolecular binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Venceslá, Adoración; Corral-Rodríguez, María Ángeles; Baena, Manel; Cornet, Mónica; Domènech, Montserrat; Baiget, Montserrat; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a wide variety of mutations in the factor 8 (F8) gene, leading to absent or deficient factor VIII (FVIII). We analyzed the F8 gene of 267 unrelated Spanish patients with HA. After excluding patients with the common intron-1 and intron-22 inversions and large deletions, we detected 137 individuals with small mutations, 31 of which had not been reported previously. Eleven of these were nonsense, frameshift, and splicing mutations, whereas 20 were missense changes. We assessed the impact of the 20 substitutions based on currently available information about FV and FVIII structure and function relationship, including previously reported results of replacements at these and topologically equivalent positions. Although most changes are likely to cause gross structural perturbations and concomitant cofactor instability, p.Ala375Ser is predicted to affect cofactor activation. Finally, 3 further mutations (p.Pro64Arg, p.Gly494Val, and p.Asp2267Gly) appear to affect cofactor interactions with its carrier protein, von Willebrand factor, with the scavenger receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP), and/or with the substrate of the FVIIIapi•FIXa (Xase) complex, factor X. Characterization of these novel mutations is important for adequate genetic counseling in HA families, but also contributes to a better understanding of FVIII structure-function relationship. PMID:18184865

  10. Single-point mutation-mediated local amphipathic adjustment dramatically enhances antibacterial activity of a fungal defensin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiajia; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2016-07-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of multiresistant bacteria has lead to an urgent need for novel antimicrobials. Based on single-point substitutions, we generated a series of mutants of micasin, a dermatophytic defensin, with enhanced activities against multiple clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species, including 4 antibiotic-resistant strains. We first mapped the functional surface of micasin by alanine-scanning mutational analysis of its highly exposed residues, through which we found that substitution of site 8 (acidic Glu) dramatically enhanced bacterial killing of this peptide. Structural analysis indicates that this single point mutation could result in a functional local amphipathic architecture. Four different types of side chains (hydrophobic, cationic polar, neutral polar, and acidic polar) were introduced at site 8 to clarify the role of this local architecture in micasin function. The results show that all mutants displayed increased antibacterial activity with the exception of the acidic replacement. These mutants with enhanced activity exhibited low hemolysis and cytotoxicity and showed high serum stability, indicating their therapeutic potential. Our work represents the first example of structural fine-tuning to largely improve the antibacterial potency of a dermatophytic defensin.-Wu, J., Gao, B., Zhu, S. Single-point mutation-mediated local amphipathic adjustment dramatically enhances antibacterial activity of a fungal defensin. PMID:27084888

  11. In Silico and In Vitro Investigations of the Mutability of Disease-Causing Missense Mutation Sites in Spermine Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Norris, Joy; Schwartz, Charles; Alexov, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Background Spermine synthase (SMS) is a key enzyme controlling the concentration of spermidine and spermine in the cell. The importance of SMS is manifested by the fact that single missense mutations were found to cause Snyder-Robinson Syndrome (SRS). At the same time, currently there are no non-synonymous single nucleoside polymorphisms, nsSNPs (harmless mutations), found in SMS, which may imply that the SMS does not tolerate amino acid substitutions, i.e. is not mutable. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the mutability of the SMS, we carried out in silico analysis and in vitro experiments of the effects of amino acid substitutions at the missense mutation sites (G56, V132 and I150) that have been shown to cause SRS. Our investigation showed that the mutation sites have different degree of mutability depending on their structural micro-environment and involvement in the function and structural integrity of the SMS. It was found that the I150 site does not tolerate any mutation, while V132, despite its key position at the interface of SMS dimer, is quite mutable. The G56 site is in the middle of the spectra, but still quite sensitive to charge residue replacement. Conclusions/Significance The performed analysis showed that mutability depends on the detail of the structural and functional factors and cannot be predicted based on conservation of wild type properties alone. Also, harmless nsSNPs can be expected to occur even at sites at which missense mutations were found to cause diseases. PMID:21647366

  12. Mutations in the intellectual disability gene KDM5C reduce protein stability and demethylase activity

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Emily; Laurent, Benoit; Õunap, Katrin; Carroll, Renee; Moeschler, John B.; Field, Michael; Schwartz, Charles E.; Gecz, Jozef; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in KDM5C are an important cause of X-linked intellectual disability in males. KDM5C encodes a histone demethylase, suggesting that alterations in chromatin landscape may contribute to disease. We used primary patient cells and biochemical approaches to investigate the effects of patient mutations on KDM5C expression, stability and catalytic activity. We report and characterize a novel nonsense mutation, c.3223delG (p.V1075Yfs*2), which leads to loss of KDM5C protein. We also characterize two KDM5C missense mutations, c.1439C>T (p.P480L) and c.1204G>T (p.D402Y) that are compatible with protein production, but compromise stability and enzymatic activity. Finally, we demonstrate that a c.2T>C mutation in the translation initiation codon of KDM5C results in translation re-start and production of a N-terminally truncated protein (p.M1_E165del) that is unstable and lacks detectable demethylase activity. Patient fibroblasts do not show global changes in histone methylation but we identify several up-regulated genes, suggesting local changes in chromatin conformation and gene expression. This thorough examination of KDM5C patient mutations demonstrates the utility of examining the molecular consequences of patient mutations on several levels, ranging from enzyme production to catalytic activity, when assessing the functional outcomes of intellectual disability mutations. PMID:25666439

  13. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  14. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  15. Wobble Pairs of the HDV Ribozyme Play Specific Roles in Stabilization of Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Kamali N.; Banáš, Pavel; Reblova, Kamila; Šponer, Jiři; Otyepka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only known human pathogen whose genome contains a catalytic RNA motif (ribozyme). The overall architecture of the HDV ribozyme is that of a double-nested pseudoknot, with two GU pairs flanking the active site. Although extensive studies have shown that mutation of either wobble results in decreased catalytic activity, little work has focused on linking these mutations to specific structural effects on catalytic fitness. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations based on an activated structure to probe the active site dynamics as a result of wobble pair mutations. In both wild-type and mutant ribozymes, the in-line fitness of the active site (as a measure of catalytic proficiency) strongly depends on the presence of a C75(N3H3+)N1(O5′) hydrogen bond, which positions C75 as the general acid for the reaction. Our mutational analyses show that each GU wobble supports catalytically fit conformations in distinct ways; the reverse G25U20 wobble promotes high in-line fitness, high occupancy of the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) general-acid hydrogen bond and stabilization of the G1U37 wobble, while the G1U37 wobble acts more locally by stabilizing high in-line fitness and the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) hydrogen bond. We also find that stable type I A-minor and P1.1 hydrogen bonding above and below the active site, respectively, prevent local structural disorder from spreading and disrupting global conformation. Taken together, our results define specific, often redundant architectural roles for several structural motifs of the HDV ribozyme active site, expanding the known roles of these motifs within all HDV-like ribozymes and other structured RNAs. PMID:25631765

  16. Mutated human androgen receptor gene detected in a prostatic cancer patient is also activated by estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Elo, J.P.; Kvist, L.; Leinonen, K.; Isomaa, V.

    1995-12-01

    Androgens are necessary for the development of prostatic cancer. The mechanisms by which the originally androgen-dependent prostatic cancer cells are relieved of the requirement to use androgen for their growth are largely unknown. The human prostatic cancer cell line LNCaP has been shown to contain a point mutation in the human androgen receptor gene (hAR), suggesting that changes in the hAR may contribute to the abnormal hormone response of prostatic cells. To search for point mutations in the hAR, we used single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and a polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing method to screen 23 prostatic cancer specimens from untreated patients, 6 prostatic cancer specimens from treated patients, and 11 benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens. One mutation was identified in DNA isolated from prostatic cancer tissue, and the mutation was also detected in the leukocyte DNA of the patient and his offspring. The mutation changed codon 726 in exon E from arginine to leucine and was a germ line mutation. The mutation we found in exon E of the hAR gene does not alter the ligand binding specificity of the AR, but the mutated receptor was activated by estradiol to a significantly greater extent than the wild-type receptor. The AR gene mutation described in this study might be one explanation for the altered biological activity of prostatic cancer. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Missense Mutations in Collagen: Structural consequences of a glycine to alanine replacement at a highly charged site

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianxi; Cheng, Haiming; Silva, Teresita; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Glycine is required as every third residue in the collagen triple-helix, and a missense mutation leading to the replacement of even one Gly in the repeating (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)n sequence by a larger residue leads to a pathological condition. Gly to Ala missense mutations are highly underrepresented in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and other collagen diseases, suggesting that the smallest replacement residue Ala might cause the least structural perturbation and mildest clinical consequences. The relatively small number of Gly to Ala mutation sites that do lead to OI must have some unusual features, such as greater structural disruption due to local sequence environment or location at a biologically important site. Here, peptides are used to model a severe OI case where a Gly to Ala mutation is found within a highly stabilizing Lys-Gly-Asp sequence environment. NMR, CD and DSC studies indicate this Gly to Ala replacement leads to a substantial loss in triple-helix stability and non-equivalence of the Ala residues in the three chains such that only one of the three Ala residues is capable of form a good backbone hydrogen bond. Examination of reported OI Gly to Ala mutations suggests preferential location at known collagen binding sites, and we propose that structural defects due to Ala replacements may lead to pathology when interfering with interactions. PMID:22054507

  18. Splice-site mutation of the p53 gene in a family with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Jolly, K W; Malkin, D; Douglass, E C; Brown, T F; Sinclair, A E; Look, A T

    1994-01-01

    Germline mutations within evolutionary conserved exons of the p53 gene predispose to tumor development in several familial cancer syndromes. We now report identification of a novel p53 mutation affecting the splice acceptor site of exon 6 in the germline DNA of a family with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer. This splice-site mutation, which results in omission of exon 6 and creates a frame-shift and premature stop codon in transcripts from the mutant allele, was found in seven family members--four of whom have developed breast, ovarian or choroid plexus tumors before age 35. Our finding suggests the need to examine the entire p53 gene for splice-site, frame-shift, and nonsense (as well as missense) mutations in families with early-onset hereditary breast and breast-ovarian cancers not linked to the BRCA1 gene on chromosome 17q. We propose that the term 'p53 familial cancer syndrome' be applied to clusters of tumors in families with documented germline p53 mutations, regardless of the histopathologic findings or pattern of tumor development. PMID:8302608

  19. Structural insights into chaperone-activity enhancement by a K354E mutation in tomato acidic leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    DuPrez, Kevin T; Scranton, Melissa A; Walling, Linda L; Fan, Li

    2016-05-01

    Tomato plants express acidic leucine aminopeptidase (LAP-A) in response to various environmental stressors. LAP-A not only functions as a peptidase for diverse peptide substrates, but also displays chaperone activity. A K354E mutation has been shown to abolish the peptidase activity but to enhance the chaperone activity of LAP-A. To better understand this moonlighting function of LAP-A, the crystal structure of the K354E mutant was determined at 2.15 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the K354E mutation destabilizes an active-site loop and causes significant rearrangement of active-site residues, leading to loss of the catalytic metal-ion coordination required for the peptidase activity. Although the mutant was crystallized in the same hexameric form as wild-type LAP-A, gel-filtration chromatography revealed an apparent shift from the hexamer to lower-order oligomers for the K354E mutant, showing a mixture of monomers to trimers in solution. In addition, surface-probing assays indicated that the K354E mutant has more accessible hydrophobic areas than wild-type LAP-A. Consistently, computational thermodynamic estimations of the interfaces between LAP-A monomers suggest that increased exposure of hydrophobic surfaces occurs upon hexamer breakdown. These results suggest that the K354E mutation disrupts the active-site loop, which also contributes to the hexameric assembly, and destabilizes the hexamers, resulting in much greater hydrophobic areas accessible for efficient chaperone activity than in the wild-type LAP-A. PMID:27139632

  20. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Based Mutational Analysis of the bc1 Complex Qo Site Residue 279 To Study the Trade-Off between Atovaquone Resistance and Function

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zehua; Clain, Jérôme; Iorga, Bogdan I.; Yi, Zhou; Fisher, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    The bc1 complex is central to mitochondrial bioenergetics and the target of the antimalarial drug atovaquone that binds in the quinol oxidation (Qo) site of the complex. Structural analysis has shown that the Qo site residue Y279 (Y268 in Plasmodium falciparum) is key for atovaquone binding. Consequently, atovaquone resistance can be acquired by mutation of that residue. In addition to the probability of amino acid substitution, the level of atovaquone resistance and the loss of bc1 complex activity that are associated with the novel amino acid would restrict the nature of resistance-driven mutations occurring on atovaquone exposure in native parasite populations. Using the yeast model, we characterized the effect of all the amino acid replacements resulting from a single nucleotide substitution at codon 279: Y279C, Y279D, Y279F, Y279H, Y279N, and Y279S (Y279C, D, F, H, N, and S). Two residue changes that required a double nucleotide substitution, Y279A and W, were added to the series. We found that mutations Y279A, C, and S conferred high atovaquone resistance but decreased the catalytic activity. Y279F had wild-type enzymatic activity and sensitivity to atovaquone, while the other substitutions caused a dramatic respiratory defect. The results obtained with the yeast model were examined in regard to atomic structure and compared to the reported data on the evolution of acquired atovaquone resistance in P. falciparum. PMID:25918152

  1. Analysis of a splice-site mutation in the sap-precursor gene of a patient with metachromatic leukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Henseler, M.; Klein, A.; Reber, M.

    1996-01-01

    Sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs) are small, nonenzymatic glycoproteins required for the lysosomal degradation of various sphingolipids with a short oligosaccharide chain by their exohydrolases. Four of the five known activator proteins (sap-A-sap-D), also called {open_quotes}saposins,{close_quotes} are derived from a common precursor by proteolytic processing. sap-B stimulates hydrolysis of sulfatides by arylsulfatase A in vivo. Its recessively inherited deficiency results in a metabolic disorder similar to classical metachromatic leukodystrophy, which is caused by a defect of arylsulfatase A. Here we report on a patient with sap-B deficiency. Reverse-transcription-PCR studies on the patient`s mRNA revealed the occurrence of two distinct mutant species: one with an in-frame deletion of the first 21 bases of exon 6, the other with a complete in-frame deletion of this exon. The patient was homozygous for the underlying mutation, which was found to be a G-{yields}T transversion within the acceptor splice site between intron e and exon 6, abolishing normal RNA splicing. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization revealed that the parents and both grandfathers of the patient were carriers of this mutation. In order to analyze the fate of the mutant precursor proteins, both abnormal cDNAs were stably expressed in baby hamster kidney cells. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the deletion of 21 bp had no effect on the transport and the maturation of the encoded precursor. All sap forms except sap-B were detectable by immunochemical methods. The cDNA bearing a complete deletion of exon 6 encoded a shortened precursor of only 60 kD, and no mature SAPs were detectable. The carbohydrate chains of this polypeptide were of the high-mannose and hybrid type, indicating no transport of the mutant precursor beyond early Golgi apparatus. An endoplasmic-reticulum localization of this polypeptide was supported by indirect immunofluorescence analysis. 31 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Mutational analysis of acute-phase response factor/Stat3 activation and dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Sasse, J; Hemmann, U; Schwartz, C; Schniertshauer, U; Heesel, B; Landgraf, C; Schneider-Mergener, J; Heinrich, P C; Horn, F

    1997-01-01

    Signal transducer and transcription (STAT) factors are activated by tyrosine phosphorylation in response to a variety of cytokines, growth factors, and hormones. Tyrosine phosphorylation triggers dimerization and nuclear translocation of these transcription factors. In this study, the functional role of carboxy-terminal portions of the STAT family member acute-phase response factor/Stat3 in activation, dimerization, and transactivating potential was analyzed. We demonstrate that truncation of 55 carboxy-terminal amino acids causes constitutive activation of Stat3 in COS-7 cells, as is known for the Stat3 isoform Stat3beta. By the use of deletion and point mutants, it is shown that both carboxy- and amino-terminal portions of Stat3 are involved in this phenomenon. Dimerization of Stat3 was blocked by point mutations affecting residues both in the vicinity of the tyrosine phosphorylation site (Y705) and more distant from this site, suggesting that multiple interactions are involved in dimer formation. Furthermore, by reporter gene assays we demonstrate that carboxy-terminally truncated Stat3 proteins are incapable of transactivating an interleukin-6-responsive promoter in COS-7 cells. In HepG2 hepatoma cells, however, these truncated Stat3 forms transmit signals from the interleukin-6 signal transducer gp130 equally well as does full-length Stat3. We conclude that, dependent on the cell type, different mechanisms allow Stat3 to regulate target gene transcription either with or without involvement of its putative carboxy-terminal transactivation domain. PMID:9234724

  3. Mutations Proximal to Sites of Autoproteolysis and the α-Helix That Co-evolve under Drug Pressure Modulate the Autoprocessing and Vitality of HIV-1 Protease.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Deshmukh, Lalit; Sayer, Jane M; Aniana, Annie; Clore, G Marius

    2015-09-01

    N-Terminal self-cleavage (autoprocessing) of the HIV-1 protease precursor is crucial for liberating the active dimer. Under drug pressure, evolving mutations are predicted to modulate autoprocessing, and the reduced catalytic activity of the mature protease (PR) is likely compensated by enhanced conformational/dimer stability and reduced susceptibility to self-degradation (autoproteolysis). One such highly evolved, multidrug resistant protease, PR20, bears 19 mutations contiguous to sites of autoproteolysis in retroviral proteases, namely clusters 1-3 comprising residues 30-37, 60-67, and 88-95, respectively, accounting for 11 of the 19 mutations. By systematically replacing corresponding clusters in PR with those of PR20, and vice versa, we assess their influence on the properties mentioned above and observe no strict correlation. A 10-35-fold decrease in the cleavage efficiency of peptide substrates by PR20, relative to PR, is reflected by an only ∼4-fold decrease in the rate of Gag processing with no change in cleavage order. Importantly, optimal N-terminal autoprocessing requires all 19 PR20 mutations as evaluated in vitro using the model precursor TFR-PR20 in which PR is flanked by the transframe region. Substituting PR20 cluster 3 into TFR-PR (TFR-PR(PR20-3)) requires the presence of PR20 cluster 1 and/or 2 for autoprocessing. In accordance, substituting PR clusters 1 and 2 into TFR-PR20 affects the rate of autoprocessing more drastically (>300-fold) compared to that of TFR-PR(PR20-3) because of the cumulative effect of eight noncluster mutations present in TFR-PR20(PR-12). Overall, these studies imply that drug resistance involves a complex synchronized selection of mutations modulating all of the properties mentioned above governing PR regulation and function. PMID:26266692

  4. The USH1C 216G-->A splice-site mutation results in a 35-base-pair deletion.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer; Savas, Sevtap; Ng, San-San; Athas, Grace; Deininger, Prescott; Keats, Bronya

    2005-02-01

    Usher syndrome is characterized by profound hearing loss and retinal degeneration. A splice-site mutation, 216G-->A, in exon 3 of USH1C is associated with Acadian Usher type IC. This mutation was reported to create an in-frame deletion of 39 base pairs (bp), resulting in an unstable transcript. By RT-PCR analysis of 216A and 216G constructs transfected into HeLa cells and also of patient cell lines, we have demonstrated a frame-shift deletion of 35 bp, not 39 bp. Thus, the instability of the USH1C mRNA is explained by the 216G-->A out-of-frame splice site mutation. PMID:15578223

  5. Characterization of a Tumor-Associated Activating Mutation of the p110β PI 3-Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Dbouk, Hashem A.; Khalil, Bassem D.; Wu, Haiyan; Shymanets, Aliaksei; Nürnberg, Bernd; Backer, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    The PI3-kinase pathway is commonly activated in tumors, most often by loss of PTEN lipid phosphatase activity or the amplification or mutation of p110α. Oncogenic mutants have commonly been found in p110α, but rarely in any of the other catalytic subunits of class I PI3-kinases. We here characterize a p110β helical domain mutation, E633K, first identified in a Her2-positive breast cancer. The mutation increases basal p110β activity, but does not affect activation of p85/p110β dimers by phosphopeptides or Gβγ. Expression of the mutant causes increases in Akt and S6K1 activation, transformation, chemotaxis, proliferation and survival in low serum. E633 is conserved among class I PI3 Ks, and its mutation in p110β is also activating. Interestingly, the E633K mutant occurs near a region that interacts with membranes in activated PI 3-kinases, and its mutation abrogates the requirement for an intact Ras-binding domain in p110β-mediated transformation. We propose that the E633K mutant activates p110β by enhancing its basal association with membranes. This study presents the first analysis of an activating oncogenic mutation of p110β. PMID:23734178

  6. Characterization of a tumor-associated activating mutation of the p110β PI 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Dbouk, Hashem A; Khalil, Bassem D; Wu, Haiyan; Shymanets, Aliaksei; Nürnberg, Bernd; Backer, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    The PI3-kinase pathway is commonly activated in tumors, most often by loss of PTEN lipid phosphatase activity or the amplification or mutation of p110α. Oncogenic mutants have commonly been found in p110α, but rarely in any of the other catalytic subunits of class I PI3-kinases. We here characterize a p110β helical domain mutation, E633K, first identified in a Her2-positive breast cancer. The mutation increases basal p110β activity, but does not affect activation of p85/p110β dimers by phosphopeptides or Gβγ. Expression of the mutant causes increases in Akt and S6K1 activation, transformation, chemotaxis, proliferation and survival in low serum. E633 is conserved among class I PI3 Ks, and its mutation in p110β is also activating. Interestingly, the E633K mutant occurs near a region that interacts with membranes in activated PI 3-kinases, and its mutation abrogates the requirement for an intact Ras-binding domain in p110β-mediated transformation. We propose that the E633K mutant activates p110β by enhancing its basal association with membranes. This study presents the first analysis of an activating oncogenic mutation of p110β. PMID:23734178

  7. GNA14 Somatic Mutation Causes Congenital and Sporadic Vascular Tumors by MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young H; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; Qiu, Jingyao; Straub, Robert; Bruckner, Anna; Bercovitch, Lionel; Narayan, Deepak; McNiff, Jennifer; Ko, Christine; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Antaya, Richard; Halaban, Ruth; Choate, Keith A

    2016-08-01

    Vascular tumors are among the most common neoplasms in infants and children; 5%-10% of newborns present with or develop lesions within the first 3 months of life. Most are benign infantile hemangiomas that typically regress by 5 years of age; other vascular tumors include congenital tufted angiomas (TAs), kaposiform hemangioendotheliomas (KHEs), and childhood lobular capillary hemangiomas (LCHs). Some of these lesions can become locally invasive and unresponsive to pharmacologic intervention, leading to significant complications. Recent investigation has revealed that activating mutations in HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, GNAQ, and GNA11 can cause certain types of rare childhood vascular tumors, and we have now identified causal recurrent somatic activating mutations in GNA14 by whole-exome and targeted sequencing. We found somatic activating GNA14 c.614A>T (p.Gln205Leu) mutations in one KHE, one TA, and one LCH and a GNA11 c.547C>T (p.Arg183Cys) mutation in two LCH lesions. We examined mutation pathobiology via expression of mutant GNA14 or GNA11 in primary human endothelial cells and melanocytes. GNA14 and GNA11 mutations induced changes in cellular morphology and rendered cells growth-factor independent by upregulating the MAPK pathway. Our findings identify GNA14 mutations as a cause of childhood vascular tumors, offer insight into mechanisms of oncogenic transformation by mutations affecting Gaq family members, and identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27476652

  8. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  9. Splicing defects in the COL3A1 gene: marked preference for 5' (donor) spice-site mutations in patients with exon-skipping mutations and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, U; Goldstein, J A; Byers, P H

    1997-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV results from mutations in the COL3A1 gene, which encodes the constituent chains of type III procollagen. We have identified, in 33 unrelated individuals or families with EDS type IV, mutations that affect splicing, of which 30 are point mutations at splice junctions and 3 are small deletions that remove splice-junction sequences and partial exon sequences. Except for one point mutation at a donor site, which leads to partial intron inclusion, and a single base-pair substitution at an acceptor site, which gives rise to inclusion of the complete upstream intron into the mature mRNA, all mutations result in deletion of a single exon as the only splice alteration. Of the exon-skipping mutations that are due to single base substitutions, which we have identified in 28 separate individuals, only two affect the splice-acceptor site. The underrepresentation of splice acceptor-site mutations suggests that the favored consequence of 3' mutations is the use of an alternative acceptor site that creates a null allele with a premature-termination codon. The phenotypes of those mutations may differ, with respect to either their severity or their symptomatic range, from the usual presentation of EDS type IV and thus have been excluded from analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:9399899

  10. The influence of allosteric modulators and transmembrane mutations on desensitisation and activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chatzidaki, Anna; D'Oyley, Jarryl M.; Gill-Thind, JasKiran K.; Sheppard, Tom D.; Millar, Neil S.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by binding at an extracellular orthosteric site. Previous studies have described several positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that are selective for homomeric α7 nAChRs. These include type I PAMs, which exert little or no effect on the rate of receptor desensitisation, and type II PAMs, which cause a dramatic loss of agonist-induced desensitisation. Here we report evidence that transmembrane mutations in α7 nAChRs have diverse effects on receptor activation and desensitisation by allosteric ligands. It has been reported previously that the L247T mutation, located toward the middle of the second transmembrane domain (at the 9′ position), confers reduced levels of desensitisation. In contrast, the M260L mutation, located higher up in the TM2 domain (at the 22′ position), does not show any difference in desensitisation compared to wild-type receptors. We have found that in receptors containing the L247T mutation, both type I PAMs and type II PAMs are converted into non-desensitising agonists. In contrast, in receptors containing the M260L mutation, this effect is seen only with type II PAMs. These findings, indicating that the M260L mutation has a selective effect on type II PAMs, have been confirmed both with previously described PAMs and also with a series of novel α7-selective PAMs. The novel PAMs examined in this study have close chemical similarity but diverse pharmacological properties. For example, they include compounds displaying effects on receptor desensitisation that are typical of classical type I and type II PAMs but, in addition, they include compounds with intermediate properties. PMID:25998276

  11. Mutational Analysis of Cvab, an ABC Transporter Involved in the Secretion of Active Colicin V

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Phang C.

    2012-01-01

    CvaB is the central membrane transporter of the colicin V secretion system that belongs to an ATP-binding cassette superfamily. Previous data showed that the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of CvaB are essential for the function of CvaB. N-terminal domain of CvaB possesses Ca2+-dependent cysteine proteolytic activity, and two critical residues, Cys32 and His105, have been identified. In this study, we also identify Asp121 as being the third residue of the putative catalytic triad within the active site of the enzyme. The Asp121 mutants lose both their colicin V secretion activity and N-terminal proteolytic activity. The adjacent residue Pro122 also appears to play a critical role in the colicin V secretion. However, the reversal of the two residues D121P - P122D results in loss of activity. Based on molecular modeling and protein sequence alignment, several residues adjacent to the critical residues, Cys32 and His105, were also examined and characterized. Site-directed mutagenesis of Trp101, Asp102, Val108, Leu76, Gly77, and Gln26 indicate that the neighboring residues around the catalytic triad affect colicin V secretion. Several mutated CvaB proteins with defective secretion were also tested, including Asp121 and Pro122, and were found to be structurally stable. These results indicate that the residues surrounding the identified catalytic triad are functionally involved in the secretion of biologically active colicin V. PMID:22539970

  12. A new class of mutations reveals a novel function for the original phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase binding site

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Y. Kate; Mikami, Aki; Schaffhausen, Brian; Jun, Toni; Roberts, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the specificity of Src homology 2 (SH2) and phosphotyrosine-binding domain interactions are mediated by phosphorylated tyrosines and their neighboring amino acids. Two of the first phosphotyrosine-based binding sites were found on middle T antigen of polyoma virus. Tyr-250 acts as a binding site for ShcA, whereas Tyr-315 forms a binding site for the SH2 domain of the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. However, genetic analysis of a given phosphotyrosine's role in signaling can be complicated when it serves as a binding site for multiple proteins. The situation is particularly difficult when the phosphotyrosine serves as a secondary binding site for a protein with primary binding determinates elsewhere. Mutation of a tyrosine residue to phenylalanine blocks association of all bound proteins. Here we show that the mutation of the amino acids following the phosphorylated tyrosine to alanine can reveal phosphotyrosine function as a secondary binding site, while abrogating the phosphotyrosine motif's role as a primary binding site for SH2 domains. We tested this methodology by using middle T antigen. Our results suggest that Tyr-250 is a secondary binding site for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, whereas Tyr-315 is a secondary binding site for a yet-to-be-identified protein, which is critical for transformation. PMID:12881485

  13. Site-directed point mutations in embryonic stem cells: a gene-targeting tag-and-exchange strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Askew, G R; Doetschman, T; Lingrel, J B

    1993-01-01

    Sequential gene targeting was used to introduce point mutations into one alpha 2 isoform Na,K-ATPase homolog in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. In the first round of targeted replacement, the gene was tagged with selectable markers by insertion of a Neor/HSV-tk gene cassette, and this event was selected for by gain of neomycin (G418) resistance. In the second targeted replacement event, the tagged genomic sequence was exchanged with a vector consisting of homologous genomic sequences carrying five site-directed nucleotide substitutions. Embryonic stem cell clones modified by exchange with the mutation vector were selected for loss of the HSV-tk gene by resistance to ganciclovir. Candidate clones were further screened and identified by polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis. By this strategy, the endogenous alpha 2 isoform Na,K-ATPase gene was altered to encode two other amino acids so that the enzyme is resistant to inhibition by cardiac glycosides while maintaining its transmembrane ion-pumping function. Since the initial tagging event and the subsequent mutation-exchange event are independent of one another, a tagged cell line can be used to generate a variety of mutant lines by exchange with various mutation vectors at the tagged locus. This method should be useful for testing specific mutations introduced into the genomes of tissue culture cells and animals and for developing animal models encompassing the mutational variability of known genetic disorders. Images PMID:8391633

  14. Microcalorimetry is a sensitive method for studying the effect of nucleotide mutation on promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhu, Juncheng; Liu, Yi; Shen, Ping; Qu, Songsheng

    2005-03-31

    Microcalorimetric method was successfully used to study the effect of nucleotide mutations on promoter activity and identify the important nucleotide necessary for the promoter function in Escherichia coli. The thermokinetic parameters, such as k, I and IC(50), were calculated from the metabolic power-time curves obtained by microcalorimetric measurement using the TAM air Isothermal Microcalorimeter (manufactured by Thermometric AB company of Sweden). Analysis of these data revealed that different nucleotide mutations in -10 box sequence of RM07 fragment had different effect on the promoter activity. Our research also suggest that the microcalorimetric method is a very sensitive and easily performed method for investigation of promoter mutation. PMID:15733578

  15. Interplay of the Bacterial Ribosomal A-Site, S12 Protein Mutations and Paromomycin Binding: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Panecka, Joanna; Mura, Cameron; Trylska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The conformational properties of the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site (A-site), and its surroundings in the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit, are of great relevance in designing antibacterial agents. The 30S subunit A-site is near ribosomal protein S12, which neighbors helices h27 and H69; this latter helix, of the 50S subunit, is a functionally important component of an intersubunit bridge. Experimental work has shown that specific point mutations in S12 (K42A, R53A) yield hyper-accurate ribosomes, which in turn confers resistance to the antibiotic ‘paromomycin’ (even when this aminoglycoside is bound to the A-site). Suspecting that these effects can be elucidated in terms of the local atomic interactions and detailed dynamics of this region of the bacterial ribosome, we have used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the motion of a fragment of the E. coli ribosome, including the A-site. We found that the ribosomal regions surrounding the A-site modify the conformational space of the flexible A-site adenines 1492/93. Specifically, we found that A-site mobility is affected by stacking interactions between adenines A1493 and A1913, and by contacts between A1492 and a flexible side-chain (K43) from the S12 protein. In addition, our simulations reveal possible indirect pathways by which the R53A and K42A mutations in S12 are coupled to the dynamical properties of the A-site. Our work extends what is known about the atomistic dynamics of the A-site, and suggests possible links between the biological effects of hyper-accurate mutations in the S12 protein and conformational properties of the ribosome; the implications for S12 dynamics help elucidate how the miscoding effects of paromomycin may be evaded in antibiotic-resistant mutants of the bacterial ribosome. PMID:25379961

  16. Balancing Protein Stability and Activity in Cancer: A New Approach for Identifying Driver Mutations Affecting CBL Ubiquitin Ligase Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Kales, Stephen C; Ma, Ke; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Cangelosi, Andrew L; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-02-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the monomeric Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl) gene have been found in many tumors, but their significance remains largely unknown. Several human c-Cbl (CBL) structures have recently been solved, depicting the protein at different stages of its activation cycle and thus providing mechanistic insight underlying how stability-activity tradeoffs in cancer-related proteins-may influence disease onset and progression. In this study, we computationally modeled the effects of missense cancer mutations on structures representing four stages of the CBL activation cycle to identify driver mutations that affect CBL stability, binding, and activity. We found that recurrent, homozygous, and leukemia-specific mutations had greater destabilizing effects on CBL states than random noncancer mutations. We further tested the ability of these computational models, assessing the changes in CBL stability and its binding to ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, by performing blind CBL-mediated EGFR ubiquitination assays in cells. Experimental CBL ubiquitin ligase activity was in agreement with the predicted changes in CBL stability and, to a lesser extent, with CBL-E2 binding affinity. Two thirds of all experimentally tested mutations affected the ubiquitin ligase activity by either destabilizing CBL or disrupting CBL-E2 binding, whereas about one-third of tested mutations were found to be neutral. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that computational methods incorporating multiple protein conformations and stability and binding affinity evaluations can successfully predict the functional consequences of cancer mutations on protein activity, and provide a proof of concept for mutations in CBL. PMID:26676746

  17. Roles of s3 site residues of nattokinase on its activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuming; Feng, Chi; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-09-01

    Nattokinase (Subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with high fibrinolytic activity. To probe their roles on protease activity and substrate specificity, three residues of S3 site (Gly(100), Ser(101) and Leu(126)) were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetics parameters of 20 mutants were measured using tetrapeptides as substrates, and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. Results of mutation analysis showed that Gly(100) and Ser(101) had reverse steric and electrostatic effects. Residues with bulky or positively charged side chains at position 100 decreased the substrate binding and catalytic activity drastically, while residues with the same characters at position 101 could obviously enhance protease and fibrinolytic activity of NK. Mutation of Leu(126) might impair the structure of the active cleft and drastically decreased the activity of NK. Kinetics studies of the mutants showed that S3 residues were crucial to keep protease activity while they moderately affected substrate specificity of NK. The present study provided some original insight into the P3-S3 interaction in NK and other subtilisins, as well as showed successful protein engineering cases to improve NK as a potential therapeutic agent. PMID:17673485

  18. Active site of the replication protein of the rolling circle plasmid pC194.

    PubMed Central

    Noirot-Gros, M F; Bidnenko, V; Ehrlich, S D

    1994-01-01

    Mutation analysis of the rolling circle (RC) replication initiator protein RepA of plasmid pC194 was targeted to tyrosine and acidic amino acids (glutamate and aspartate) which are well conserved among numerous related plasmids. The effect of mutations was examined by an in vivo activity test. Mutations of one tyrosine and two glutamate residues were found to greatly impair or abolish activity, without affecting affinity for the origin, as deduced from in vitro gel mobility assays. We conclude that all three amino acids have a catalytic role. Tyrosine residues were found previously in active sites of different RC plasmid Rep proteins and topoisomerases, but not in association with acidic residues, which are a hallmark of the active sites of DNA hydrolyzing enzymes, such as the exo- and endonucleases. We propose that the active site of RepA contains two different catalytic centers, corresponding to a tyrosine and a glutamate. The former may be involved in the formation of the covalent DNA-protein intermediate at the initiation step of RC replication, and the latter may catalyze the release of the protein from the intermediate at the termination step. Images PMID:7925284

  19. Systematic mutagenesis of the active site omega loop of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, J F; Palzkill, T

    1996-01-01

    Beta-Lactamase is a bacterial protein that provides resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. TEM-1 beta-lactamase is the most prevalent plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. Normally, this enzyme has high levels of hydrolytic activity for penicillins, but mutant beta-lactamases have evolved with activity toward a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. It has been shown that active site substitutions are responsible for changes in the substrate specificity. Since mutant beta-lactamases pose a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy, the mechanisms by which mutations can alter the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase are of interest. Previously, screens of random libraries encompassing 31 of 55 active site amino acid positions enabled the identification of the residues responsible for maintaining the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. In addition to substitutions found in clinical isolates, many other specificity-altering mutations were also identified. Interestingly, many nonspecific substitutions in the N-terminal half of the active site omega loop were found to increase ceftazidime hydrolytic activity and decrease ampicillin hydrolytic activity. To complete the active sight study, eight additional random libraries were constructed and screened for specificity-altering mutations. All additional substitutions found to alter the substrate specificity were located in the C-terminal half of the active site loop. These mutants, much like the N-terminal omega loop mutants, appear to be less stable than the wild-type enzyme. Further analysis of a 165-YYG-167 triple mutant, selected for high levels of ceftazidime hydrolytic activity, provides an example of the correlation which exists between enzyme instability and increased ceftazidime hydrolytic activity in the ceftazidime-selected omega loop mutants. PMID:8606154

  20. Structured Regions of Alpha-synuclein Fibrils Include the Early Onset Parkinson's Disease Mutation Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Comellas Canal, Gemma; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Kloepper, Kathryn D.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Ebisu, Reika; Woods, Wendy S.; Lipton, Andrew S.; George, Julia M.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-08-26

    Alpha-Synuclein (AS) fibrils constitute the major proteinaceous component of Lewy bodies (LBs), the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Three single point mutations in the AS gene, as well as multiplication of the wild-type (WT) AS allele, have been previously identified in families with early-onset PD. Although AS fibrils have been the subject of intense study, critical details about their structure including the precise location of the B-strands and the extent of the core, the three-dimensional structure and the effects of the mutations—remain unknown. Here, we have used magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy to present a detailed characterization of the full-length WT AS fibrils. With improved sample preparations, isotopic labeling patterns and NMR experiments, we have confidently assigned more than 90% of the 13C and 15N backbone and sidechain chemical shifts of the detected residues from residue 39 to 97, and quantified the conformational dynamics throughout this region. Our results demonstrate that the core of AS fibrils extends with a repeated motif and that residues 30, 46 and 53-the early-onset PD mutant sites-are located in structured regions of AS fibrils.

  1. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Mutation-Independent Activation of the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Regairaz, Marie; Munier, Fabienne; Sartelet, Hervé; Castaing, Marine; Marty, Virginie; Renauleaud, Céline; Doux, Camille; Delbé, Jean; Courty, José; Fabre, Monique; Ohta, Shigeru; Viehl, Philippe; Michiels, Stefan; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Vassal, Gilles

    2016-02-01

    Activating mutations of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified as important players in neuroblastoma development. Our goal was to evaluate the significance of overall ALK activation in neuroblastoma. Expression of phosphorylated ALK, ALK, and its putative ligands, pleiotrophin and midkine, was screened in 289 neuroblastomas and 56 paired normal tissues. ALK was expressed in 99% of tumors and phosphorylated in 48% of cases. Pleiotrophin and midkine were expressed in 58% and 79% of tumors, respectively. ALK activation was significantly higher in tumors than in paired normal tissues, together with ALK and midkine expression. ALK activation was largely independent of mutations and correlated with midkine expression in tumors. ALK activation in tumors was associated with favorable features, including a younger age at diagnosis, hyperdiploidy, and detection by mass screening. Antitumor activity of the ALK inhibitor TAE684 was evaluated in wild-type or mutated ALK neuroblastoma cell lines and xenografts. TAE684 was cytotoxic in vitro in all cell lines, especially those harboring an ALK mutation. TAE684 efficiently inhibited ALK phosphorylation in vivo in both F1174I and R1275Q xenografts but demonstrated antitumor activity only against the R1275Q xenograft. In conclusion, ALK activation occurs frequently during neuroblastoma oncogenesis, mainly through mutation-independent mechanisms. However, ALK activation is not associated with a poor outcome and is not always a driver of cell proliferation and/or survival in neuroblastoma. PMID:26687816

  3. Mutational analysis of the transcription start site of the yeast tRNA(Leu3) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fruscoloni, P; Zamboni, M; Panetta, G; De Paolis, A; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1995-01-01

    In addition to the well-known internal promoter elements of tRNA genes, 5' flanking sequences can also influence the efficiency of transcription by Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts in vitro. A consensus sequence of yeast tRNA genes in the vicinity of the transcriptional start site can be derived. To determine whether the activity of this region can be attributed to particular sequence features we studied in vitro mutants of the start site region. We found that the start site can be shifted, but only to a limited extent, by moving the conserved sequence element. We found that both a pyrimidine-purine motif (with transcription initiating at the purine) and a small T:A base pair block upstream are important for efficient transcription in vitro. Thus the sequence surrounding the start site of transcription of the yeast tRNA(Leu3) gene does play a role in determining transcription efficiency and fixing the precise site of initiation by RNA polymerase III. Images PMID:7659514

  4. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  5. Relationship of PIK3CA mutation and pathway activity with antiproliferative response to aromatase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit α) somatic mutations are the most common genetic alteration in breast cancer (BC). Their prognostic value and that of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in BC remains only partly defined. The effect of PIK3CA mutations and alterations of the PI3K pathway on the antiproliferative response to aromatase inhibitor treatment was determined. Methods The Sequenom MassARRAY System was used to determine the presence of 20 somatic mutations across the PIK3CA gene in 85 oestrogen receptor–positive (ER+) BC patients treated with 2 weeks of anastrozole before surgery. Whole-genome expression profiles were used to interrogate gene signatures (GSs) associated with the PI3K pathway. Antiproliferative activity was assessed by the change in Ki67 staining between baseline and surgery. Three GSs representing the PI3K pathway were assessed (PIK3CA-GS (Loi), PI3K-GS (Creighton) and PTEN-loss-GS (Saal)). Results In our study sample, 29% of tumours presented with either a hotspot (HS, 71%) or a nonhotspot (non-HS, 29%) PIK3CA mutation. Mutations were associated with markers of good prognosis such as progesterone receptor positivity (PgR+) (P = 0.006), low grade (P = 0.028) and luminal A subtype (P = 0.039), with a trend towards significance with degree of ER positivity (P = 0.051) and low levels of Ki67 (P = 0.051). Non-HS mutations were associated with higher PgR (P = 0.014) and ER (P < 0.001) expression than both wild-type (WT) and HS-mutated samples, whereas neither biomarker differed significantly between WT and HS mutations or between HS and non-HS mutations. An inverse correlation was found between the Loi signature and both the Creighton and Saal signatures, and a positive correlation was found between the latter signatures. Lower pretreatment Ki67 levels were observed in mutation compared with WT samples (P = 0.051), which was confirmed in an

  6. Mutational Analysis of Rab3 Function for Controlling Active Zone Protein Composition at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Roche, John P.; Alsharif, Peter; Graf, Ethan R.

    2015-01-01

    At synapses, the release of neurotransmitter is regulated by molecular machinery that aggregates at specialized presynaptic release sites termed active zones. The complement of active zone proteins at each site is a determinant of release efficacy and can be remodeled to alter synapse function. The small GTPase Rab3 was previously identified as playing a novel role that controls the distribution of active zone proteins to individual release sites at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Rab3 has been extensively studied for its role in the synaptic vesicle cycle; however, the mechanism by which Rab3 controls active zone development remains unknown. To explore this mechanism, we conducted a mutational analysis to determine the molecular and structural requirements of Rab3 function at Drosophila synapses. We find that GTP-binding is required for Rab3 to traffick to synapses and distribute active zone components across release sites. Conversely, the hydrolytic activity of Rab3 is unnecessary for this function. Through a structure-function analysis we identify specific residues within the effector-binding switch regions that are required for Rab3 function and determine that membrane attachment is essential. Our findings suggest that Rab3 controls the distribution of active zone components via a vesicle docking mechanism that is consistent with standard Rab protein function. PMID:26317909

  7. A novel biallelic splice site mutation of TECTA causes moderate to severe hearing impairment in an Algerian family.

    PubMed

    Behlouli, Asma; Bonnet, Crystel; Abdi, Samia; Hasbellaoui, Mokhtar; Boudjenah, Farid; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Ammar-Khodja, Fatima; Zenati, Akila; Petit, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Congenital deafness is certainly one of the most common monogenic diseases in humans, but it is also one of the most genetically heterogeneous, which makes molecular diagnosis challenging in most cases. Whole-exome sequencing in two out of three Algerian siblings affected by recessively-inherited, moderate to severe sensorineural deafness allowed us to identify a novel splice donor site mutation (c.5272+1G > A) in the gene encoding α-tectorin, a major component of the cochlear tectorial membrane. The mutation was present at the homozygous state in the three affected siblings, and at the heterozygous state in their unaffected, consanguineous parents. To our knowledge, this is the first reported TECTA mutation leading to the DFNB21 form of hearing impairment among Maghrebian individuals suffering from congenital hearing impairment, which further illustrates the diversity of the genes involved in congenital deafness in the Maghreb. PMID:27368438

  8. Activating PI3Kδ mutations in a cohort of 669 patients with primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Elgizouli, M; Lowe, D M; Speckmann, C; Schubert, D; Hülsdünker, J; Eskandarian, Z; Dudek, A; Schmitt-Graeff, A; Wanders, J; Jørgensen, S F; Fevang, B; Salzer, U; Nieters, A; Burns, S; Grimbacher, B

    2016-02-01

    The gene PIK3CD codes for the catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ (PI3Kδ), and is expressed solely in leucocytes. Activating mutations of PIK3CD have been described to cause an autosomal dominant immunodeficiency that shares clinical features with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We screened a cohort of 669 molecularly undefined primary immunodeficiency patients for five reported mutations (four gain-of-function mutations in PIK3CD and a loss of function mutation in PIK3R1) using pyrosequencing. PIK3CD mutations were identified in three siblings diagnosed with CVID and two sporadic cases with a combined immunodeficiency (CID). The PIK3R1 mutation was not identified in the cohort. Our patients with activated PI3Kδ syndrome (APDS) showed a range of clinical and immunological findings, even within a single family, but shared a reduction in naive T cells. PIK3CD gain of function mutations are more likely to occur in patients with defective B and T cell responses and should be screened for in CVID and CID, but are less likely in patients with a pure B cell/hypogammaglobulinaemia phenotype. PMID:26437962

  9. Recurrent mTORC1-activating RRAGC mutations in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Araf, Shamzah; Wilkins, Lucy; Castellano, Brian M.; Escudero-Ibarz, Leire; Al Seraihi, Ahad Fahad; Richter, Julia; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Efeyan, Alejo; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Clear, Andrew; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Bödör, Csaba; Quentmeier, Hilmar; Mansbridge, Christopher; Johnson, Peter; Davies, Andrew; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Packham, Graham; Barrans, Sharon; Jack, Andrew; Du, Ming-Qing; Calaminici, Maria; Lister, T. Andrew; Auer, Rebecca; Montoto, Silvia; Gribben, John G.; Siebert, Reiner; Chelala, Claude; Zoncu, Roberto; Sabatini, David M.; Fitzgibbon, Jude

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma is an incurable B-cell malignancy1 characterized by the t(14;18) and mutations in one or more components of the epigenome2,3. Whilst frequent gene mutations in signaling pathways, including JAK-STAT, NOTCH and NF-κB, have also been defined2-7, the spectrum of these mutations typically overlap with the closely-related diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)6-13. A combination of discovery exome and extended targeted sequencing revealed recurrent somatic mutations in RRAGC uniquely enriched in FL patients (17%). More than half of the mutations preferentially co-occurred with ATP6V1B2 and ATP6AP1 mutations, components of the vacuolar H+-adenosine triphosphate ATPase (v-ATPase) known to be necessary for amino acid-induced mTORC1 activation. The RagC mutants increased raptor binding whilst rendering mTORC1 signaling resistant to amino acid deprivation. Collectively, the activating nature of the RRAGC mutations, their existence within the dominant clone and stability during disease progression supports their potential as an excellent candidate to be therapeutically exploited. PMID:26691987

  10. Recurrent mTORC1-activating RRAGC mutations in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Okosun, Jessica; Wolfson, Rachel L; Wang, Jun; Araf, Shamzah; Wilkins, Lucy; Castellano, Brian M; Escudero-Ibarz, Leire; Al Seraihi, Ahad Fahad; Richter, Julia; Bernhart, Stephan H; Efeyan, Alejo; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Clear, Andrew; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Bödör, Csaba; Quentmeier, Hilmar; Mansbridge, Christopher; Johnson, Peter; Davies, Andrew; Strefford, Jonathan C; Packham, Graham; Barrans, Sharon; Jack, Andrew; Du, Ming-Qing; Calaminici, Maria; Lister, T Andrew; Auer, Rebecca; Montoto, Silvia; Gribben, John G; Siebert, Reiner; Chelala, Claude; Zoncu, Roberto; Sabatini, David M; Fitzgibbon, Jude

    2016-02-01

    Follicular lymphoma is an incurable B cell malignancy characterized by the t(14;18) translocation and mutations affecting the epigenome. Although frequent gene mutations in key signaling pathways, including JAK-STAT, NOTCH and NF-κB, have also been defined, the spectrum of these mutations typically overlaps with that in the closely related diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Using a combination of discovery exome and extended targeted sequencing, we identified recurrent somatic mutations in RRAGC uniquely enriched in patients with follicular lymphoma (17%). More than half of the mutations preferentially co-occurred with mutations in ATP6V1B2 and ATP6AP1, which encode components of the vacuolar H(+)-ATP ATPase (V-ATPase) known to be necessary for amino acid-induced activation of mTORC1. The RagC variants increased raptor binding while rendering mTORC1 signaling resistant to amino acid deprivation. The activating nature of the RRAGC mutations, their existence in the dominant clone and their stability during disease progression support their potential as an excellent candidate for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26691987