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Sample records for active solute transport

  1. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of an absorbing leaky epithelium is developed for analysis of solute coupled water transport. The non-charged driving solute diffuses into cells and is pumped from cells into the lateral intercellular space (lis). All membranes contain water channels with the solute passing those of tight junction and interspace basement membrane by convection-diffusion. With solute permeability of paracellular pathway large relative to paracellular water flow, the paracellular flux ratio of the solute (influx/outflux) is small (2–4) in agreement with experiments. The virtual solute concentration of fluid emerging from lis is then significantly larger than the concentration in lis. Thus, in absence of external driving forces the model generates isotonic transport provided a component of the solute flux emerging downstream lis is taken up by cells through the serosal membrane and pumped back into lis, i.e., the solute would have to be recirculated. With input variables from toad intestine (Nedergaard, S., E.H. Larsen, and H.H. Ussing, J. Membr. Biol. 168:241–251), computations predict that 60–80% of the pumped flux stems from serosal bath in agreement with the experimental estimate of the recirculation flux. Robust solutions are obtained with realistic concentrations and pressures of lis, and with the following features. Rate of fluid absorption is governed by the solute permeability of mucosal membrane. Maximum fluid flow is governed by density of pumps on lis-membranes. Energetic efficiency increases with hydraulic conductance of the pathway carrying water from mucosal solution into lis. Uphill water transport is accomplished, but with high hydraulic conductance of cell membranes strength of transport is obscured by water flow through cells. Anomalous solvent drag occurs when back flux of water through cells exceeds inward water flux between cells. Molecules moving along the paracellular pathway are driven by a translateral flow of water, i.e., the model

  2. Modeling preferential water flow and solute transport in unsaturated soil using the active region model

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, F.; Wang, K.; Zhang, R.; Liu, H.H.

    2009-03-15

    Preferential flow and solute transport are common processes in the unsaturated soil, in which distributions of soil water content and solute concentrations are often characterized as fractal patterns. An active region model (ARM) was recently proposed to describe the preferential flow and transport patterns. In this study, ARM governing equations were derived to model the preferential soil water flow and solute transport processes. To evaluate the ARM equations, dye infiltration experiments were conducted, in which distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration were measured. Predicted results using the ARM and the mobile-immobile region model (MIM) were compared with the measured distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration. Although both the ARM and the MIM are two-region models, they are fundamental different in terms of treatments of the flow region. The models were evaluated based on the modeling efficiency (ME). The MIM provided relatively poor prediction results of the preferential flow and transport with negative ME values or positive ME values less than 0.4. On the contrary, predicted distributions of soil water content and Cl- concentration using the ARM agreed reasonably well with the experimental data with ME values higher than 0.8. The results indicated that the ARM successfully captured the macroscopic behavior of preferential flow and solute transport in the unsaturated soil.

  3. Lateral transport of solutes in microfluidic channels using electrochemically generated gradients in redox-active surfactants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2011-04-15

    We report principles for a continuous flow process that can separate solutes based on a driving force for selective transport that is generated by a lateral concentration gradient of a redox-active surfactant across a microfluidic channel. Microfluidic channels fabricated with gold electrodes lining each vertical wall were used to electrochemically generate concentration gradients of the redox-active surfactant 11-ferrocenylundecyl-trimethylammonium bromide (FTMA) in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The interactions of three solutes (a hydrophobic dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthylamine (yellow AB), an amphiphilic molecule, 2-(4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-pentanoyl)-1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (BODIPY C(5)-HPC), and an organic salt, 1-methylpyridinium-3-sulfonate (MPS)) with the lateral gradients in surfactant/micelle concentration were shown to drive the formation of solute-specific concentration gradients. Two distinct physical mechanisms were identified to lead to the solute concentration gradients: solubilization of solutes by micelles and differential adsorption of the solutes onto the walls of the microchannels in the presence of the surfactant concentration gradient. These two mechanisms were used to demonstrate delipidation of a mixture of BODIPY C(5)-HPC (lipid) and MPS and purification of BODIPY C(5)-HPC from a mixture of BODIPY C(5)-HPC and yellow AB. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that lateral concentration gradients of redox-active surfactants formed within microfluidic channels can be used to transport solutes across the microfluidic channels in a solute-dependent manner. The approach employs electrical potentials (<1 V) that are sufficiently small to avoid electrolysis of water, can be performed in solutions having high ionic strength (>0.1M), and offers the basis of continuous processes for the purification or separation of solutes in microscale systems. PMID:21446653

  4. Active solute transport across frog skin and epithelial cell systems according to the association-induction hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ling, G N

    1981-01-01

    The phenomenon of transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, etc. across frog skin and other epithelial systems has been commonly interpreted on the basis of the membrane-pump theory, according to which asymmetry in solute distribution as well as transport into and out of all living cells results from the permeability properties and "pump" activities of the membrane. In the present review, certain findings in the field of transepithelial transport of solutes are given new interpretation on the basis of molecular mechanisms introduced in the association-induction hypothesis, according to which "active transport" of solutes occurs only across bifacial cell systems like frog skin and intestinal epithelium but not in the maintenance of steady levels of solutes in unifacial cell systems such as muscle, nerve, and red blood cells. PMID:7330099

  5. Use of Bioluminescence to Study Reactive Solute Transport and Biofilm Growth and Activity in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, R. R.; Gerlach, R.; Al, C. B.

    2004-12-01

    Using a meso-scale porous media flat plate reactor we utilized a naturally bioluminescent biofilm (V. fischeri) and tracer studies to obtain information on the interactions between biofilms and reactive flow in porous media. The growth and development of the V. fischeri biofilm in a porous media geometry was studied using digital time lapse images of the bioluminescent signal given off by the developing biofilm. The effect of biofilm development on porous media hydrodynamics was examined using dye tracer studies and image analysis. The natural bioluminescence of the V. fischeri allowed real-time, in-situ study of biofilm development in porous media, without destruction of the biofilm. Dye studies and image analysis enabled the study of effects of biofilm accumulation on porous media hydraulics, with comparisons to plug flow and completely mixed systems with varying degrees of biofilm accumulation. The hydraulic conductivity of the porous media/biofilm system was continuously monitored showing a 1 to 4 order of magnitude decrease in hydraulic conductivity as a function of biofilm thickness and accumulation. The real-time nature of the study permitted us to visualize dynamic flow channel formation within the biofilm/porous media system. In addition, the sensitivity of the V. fischeri biofilm to dissolved oxygen allowed us to capture real-time images of reactive transport within the system. Using bioluminescent imaging, the location of active biomass, as well as the relative degree of biological activity, could be visualized and monitored over time. This work is the first meso-scale visualization of the interactions between biofilm and flow in porous media.

  6. Mammalian ion-coupled solute transporters.

    PubMed Central

    Hediger, M A; Kanai, Y; You, G; Nussberger, S

    1995-01-01

    Active transport of solutes into and out of cells proceeds via specialized transporters that utilize diverse energy-coupling mechanisms. Ion-coupled transporters link uphill solute transport to downhill electrochemical ion gradients. In mammals, these transporters are coupled to the co-transport of H+, Na+, Cl- and/or to the countertransport of K+ or OH-. By contrast, ATP-dependent transporters are directly energized by the hydrolysis of ATP. The development of expression cloning approaches to select cDNA clones solely based on their capacity to induce transport function in Xenopus oocytes has led to the cloning of several ion-coupled transporter cDNAs and revealed new insights into structural designs, energy-coupling mechanisms and physiological relevance of the transporter proteins. Different types of mammalian ion-coupled transporters are illustrated by discussing transporters isolated in our own laboratory such as the Na+/glucose co-transporters SGLT1 and SGLT2, the H(+)-coupled oligopeptide transporters PepT1 and PepT2, and the Na(+)- and K(+)-dependent neuronal and epithelial high affinity glutamate transporter EAAC1. Most mammalian ion-coupled organic solute transporters studied so far can be grouped into the following transporter families: (1) the predominantly Na(+)-coupled transporter family which includes the Na+/glucose co-transporters SGLT1, SGLT2, SGLT3 (SAAT-pSGLT2) and the inositol transporter SMIT, (2) the Na(+)- and Cl(-)-coupled transporter family which includes the neurotransmitter transporters of gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA), serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, glycine and proline as well as transporters of beta-amino acids, (3) the Na(+)- and K(+)-dependent glutamate/neurotransmitter family which includes the high affinity glutamate transporters EAAC1, GLT-1, GLAST, EAAT4 and the neutral amino acid transporters ASCT1 and SATT1 reminiscent of system ASC and (4) the H(+)-coupled oligopeptide transporter family which includes the intestinal H

  7. Performance Analysis of Solution Transportation Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Behdad; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Thermally activated advanced absorption cycles are considered promising candidates to replace CFCs, HCFCs and HFCs for residential and commercial applications. In such absorption systems, it is desirable to utilize the waste heat from industries for heating and cooling applications in commercial and residential sectors. For this purpose, it is necessary to transport energy over some distance because the waste heat source and demand are generally located apart from each other. Transportation of steam, hot water or chilled water requires high construction costs for insulation. There is an efficient method of energy transportation using absorption system called “ Solution Transportation Absorption System (STA)”. The solution is transported at an ambient temperature so that tube-insulations not required. This paper shows the simulation of the abovementioned system and the optimal result, using mathematical optimization. The optimum system with industry‧s waste heat utilization is obtained. At the end, the effect on the pollution emission and energy conservation is obtained.

  8. Protein ProQ Influences Osmotic Activation of Compatible Solute Transporter ProP in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Kunte, H. Jörg; Crane, Rebecca A.; Culham, Doreen E.; Richmond, Deborah; Wood, Janet M.

    1999-01-01

    ProP is an osmoregulatory compatible solute transporter in Escherichia coli K-12. Mutation proQ220::Tn5 decreased the rate constant for and the extent of ProP activation by an osmotic upshift but did not alter proP transcription or the ProP protein level. Allele proQ220::Tn5 was isolated, and the proQ sequence was determined. Locus proQ is upstream from prc (tsp) at 41.2 centisomes on the genetic map. The proQ220::Tn5 and prc phenotypes were different, however. Gene proQ is predicted to encode a 232-amino-acid, basic, hydrophilic protein (molecular mass, 25,876 Da; calculated isoelectric point, 9.66; 32% D, E, R, or K; 54.5% polar amino acids). The insertion of PCR-amplified proQ into vector pBAD24 produced a plasmid containing the wild-type proQ open reading frame, the expression of which yielded a soluble protein with an apparent molecular mass of 30 kDa. Antibodies raised against the overexpressed ProQ protein detected cross-reactive material in proQ+ bacteria but not in proQ220::Tn5 bacteria. ProQ may be a structural element that influences the osmotic activation of ProP at a posttranslational level. PMID:10049386

  9. Transport solutions for cleaner air.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Frank J; Zhu, Tong

    2016-05-20

    In cities across the globe, road transport remains an important source of air pollutants that are linked with acute and chronic health effects. Decreasing vehicle emissions--while maintaining or increasing commuter journeys--remains a major challenge for city administrators. In London, congestion-charging and a citywide low-emission zone failed to bring nitrogen dioxide concentrations under control. In Beijing, controls on the purchase and use of cars have not decreased transport emissions to a sufficient extent. As cities continue to grow, not even zero-emission vehicles are the solution. Moving increasingly large numbers of people efficiently around a city can only be achieved by expanding mass transit systems. PMID:27199415

  10. Solute transport at fracture intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourzenko, V. V.; Yousefian, F.; Kolbah, B.; Thovert, J.-F.; Adler, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    A numerical study of three-dimensional solute transportat fracture intersections by using a particle tracking technique is presented.Two models of orthogonal fracture intersection are considered, namely, twoparallel-walled channels and two rough-walled Gaussian fractures. The fluidvelocity is calculated by solving the three-dimensional Stokes equation withno-slip boundary condition at the solid wall. Examples of individual trajectoriesof particles are first given in order to illustrate the main features of thephenomenon. Solute mass partitioning between outgoing fracture branches isconsidered for various transport regimes, characterized by the local Pécletnumber, and for various ratios of the flow rates in the intersecting channels.Generally speaking, it can be said that at dominant diffusion the influenceof the flow rates ratio is weak, while it is important in the opposite situation.Validity of the classical models of solute mixing, stream tube routing, andperfect mixing is analyzed by comparing their predictions with the numericaldata. Preliminary recommendations are made for the use of these results inlarge-scale modeling.

  11. Coupled Fluid Energy Solute Transport

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-13

    CFEST is a Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport code for the study of a multilayered, nonisothermal ground-water system. It can model discontinuous as well as continuous layers, time-dependent and constant source/sinks, and transient as well as steady-state flow. The finite element method is used for analyzing isothermal and nonisothermal events in a confined aquifer system. Only single-phase Darcian flow is considered. In the Cartesian coordinate system, flow in a horizontal plane, in a verticalmore » plane, or in a fully three-dimensional region can be simulated. An option also exists for the axisymmetric analysis of a vertical cross section. The code employs bilinear quadrilateral elements in all two dimensional analyses and trilinear quadrilateral solid elements in three dimensional simulations. The CFEST finite element formulation can approximate discontinuities, major breaks in slope or thickness, and fault zones in individual hydrogeologic units. The code accounts for heterogeneity in aquifer permeability and porosity and accommodates anisotropy (collinear with the Cartesian coordinates). The variation in the hydraulic properties is described on a layer-by-layer basis for the different hydrogeologic units. Initial conditions can be prescribed hydraulic head or pressure, temperature, or concentration. CFEST can be used to support site, repository, and waste package subsystem assessments. Some specific applications are regional hydrologic characterization; simulation of coupled transport of fluid, heat, and salinity in the repository region; consequence assessment due to natural disruption or human intrusion scenarios in the repository region; flow paths and travel-time estimates for transport of radionuclides; and interpretation of well and tracer tests.« less

  12. Solute transport by a volatile solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Glenn O.; McWhorter, David B.

    1990-05-01

    In relatively dry porous media, water is transported as both liquid and vapor. Exact knowledge of this two-phase transport, and the phase transfer of water associated with it, is required for the prediction of solute transport. Combined liquid and vapor transport is examined starting from basic principles. An analytic solution is presented for the case of isothermal, transient, one-dimensional sorption of water with constant liquid content boundaries. A relation is also obtained for the evaporation and condensation within the flow field. A numerical solution for the solute transport is obtained which takes maximum advantage of the analytical flow solution. Using the properties of Lurgi retorted oil shale, several special cases are examined which show the relative importance of the separate phases in the total transport of water, the effects on the phase transfer, and the solute transport. It is expected that these methods and results can be applied to other problems in multiple phase transport, such as hazardous waste disposal and pesticide transport.

  13. Electrofuels: Versatile Transportation Energy Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: ARPA-E’s Electrofuels Project is using microorganisms to create liquid transportation fuels in a new and different way that could be up to 10 times more energy efficient than current biofuel production methods. ARPA-E is the only U.S. government agency currently funding research on Electrofuels.

  14. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  15. Multilevel transport solution of LWR reactor cores

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Ignacio Marquez Damian; Cassiano R.E. de Oliveira; HyeonKae Park

    2008-09-01

    This work presents a multilevel approach for the solution of the transport equation in typical LWR assemblies and core configurations. It is based on the second-order, even-parity formulation of the transport equation, which is solved within the framework provided by the finite element-spherical harmonics code EVENT. The performance of the new solver has been compared with that of the standard conjugate gradient solver for diffusion and transport problems on structured and unstruc-tured grids. Numerical results demonstrate the potential of the multilevel scheme for realistic reactor calculations.

  16. Solute transporters in plant thylakoid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schoefs, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Plants utilize sunlight to drive photosynthetic energy conversion in the chloroplast thylakoid membrane. Here are located four major photosynthetic complexes, about which we have great knowledge in terms of structure and function. However, much less we know about auxiliary proteins, such as transporters, ensuring an optimum function and turnover of these complexes. The most prominent thylakoid transporter is the proton-translocating ATP-synthase. Recently, four additional transporters have been identified in the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana, namely one copper-transporting P-ATPase, one chloride channel, one phosphate transporter, and one ATP/ADP carrier. Here, we review the current knowledge on the function and physiological role of these transporters during photosynthesis and light stress in plants. Subsequently, we make a survey on the outlook of thylakoid activities awaiting identification of responsible proteins. Such knowledge is necessary to understand the thylakoid network of transporters, and to design strategies for bioengineering crop plants in the future. PMID:20585503

  17. Solute transport through a deforming porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Glen P.; Smith, David W.

    2002-06-01

    Solute transport through a porous medium is typically modelled assuming the porous medium is rigid. However, many applications exist where the porous medium is deforming, including, municipal landfill liners, mine tailings dams, and land subsidence. In this paper, mass balance laws are used to derive the flow and transport equations for a deforming porous medium. The equations are derived in both spatial and material co-ordinate systems. Solute transport through an engineered landfill liner is used as an illustrative example to show the differences between the theory for a rigid porous medium, and small and large deformation analysis of a deforming porous medium. It is found that the large deformation model produces shorter solute breakthrough times, followed by the small deformation model, and then the rigid porous medium model. It is also found that it is important to include spatial and temporal void ratio variations in the large deformation analysis. It is shown that a non-linear large deformation model may greatly reduce the solute breakthrough time, compared to a standard transport analysis typically employed by environmental engineers.

  18. Linear transport models for adsorbing solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K.; Jury, W. A.

    1993-04-01

    A unified linear theory for the transport of adsorbing solutes through soils is presented and applied to analyze movement of napropamide through undisturbed soil columns. The transport characteristics of the soil are expressed in terms of the travel time distribution of the mobile phase which is then used to incorporate local interaction processes. This approach permits the analysis of all linear transport processes, not only the small subset for which a differential description is known. From a practical point of view, it allows the direct use of measured concentrations or fluxes of conservative solutes to characterize the mobile phase without first subjecting them to any model. For complicated flow regimes, this may vastly improve the identification of models and estimation of their parameters for the local adsorption processes.

  19. Solute transport in heterogeneous porous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmy, George Gary, Jr.

    1999-10-01

    This work quantifies relationships between the spatial, or Eulerian, distribution of the properties of a chemically and physically heterogeneous porous medium and those as observed along the natural, or Lagrangian, trajectories that a fluid particle traces in a steady and irrotational flow. From these relationships, expressions that relate the transport of solutes through the porous medium along the natural trajectories to the aforementioned Eulerian distributions are developed. The effects of injection mode upon global measures of transport as reflected by the temporal moments of breakthrough curves and spatial moments of a solute plume are developed. The coupled effects of correlation of a linear equilibrium sorption to the underlying log hydraulic conductivity field and injection mode on the evolving temporal moments of mass breakthrough curve and the coupled effects of correlation of a first-order decay coefficient and injection mode upon the spatial moments of a solute plume are examined.

  20. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B.; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient. PMID:26534840

  1. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B.; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient.

  2. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient. PMID:26534840

  3. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  4. Compositional transport in solidifying aqueous binary solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Yin, Zuo-Chao; Xue, Qiwei; Wettlaufer, John

    2013-11-01

    We observe the formation of double-diffusive layers adjacent to mushy layers that form during the directional solidification of aqueous ammonium chloride. The plumes emerging from chimney's in the mushy layers continuously supply a buoyancy flux in the (finite) liquid region above, driving downward motion of double-diffusive layers. The downward velocity of the layers is found to be in good agreement with a filling box model that captures the crucial hydrodynamics of the entraining buoyant plumes and compositional transport. We demonstrate that the buoyancy flux through the system decays according to a similarity solution. We note that the experimental findings provide some insight into the brine transport in growing sea ice.

  5. Analytical solutions for anomalous dispersion transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, D.; Vesselinov, V. V.

    2014-06-01

    Groundwater flow and transport often occur in a highly heterogeneous environment (potentially heterogeneous at multiple spatial scales) and is impacted by geochemical reactions, advection, diffusion, and other pore scale processes. All these factors can give rise to large-scale anomalous dispersive behavior that can make complex model representation and prediction of plume concentrations challenging due to difficulties unraveling all the complexities associated with the governing processes, flow medium, and their parameters. An alternative is to use upscaled stochastic models of anomalous dispersion, and this is the approach used here. Within a probabilistic framework, we derive a number of analytical solutions for several anomalous dispersion models. The anomalous dispersion models are allowed to be either non-Gaussian (α-stable Lévy), correlated, or nonstationary from the Lagrangian perspective. A global sensitivity analysis is performed to gain a greater understanding of the extent to which uncertainty in the parameters associated with the anomalous behavior can be narrowed by examining concentration measurements from a network of monitoring wells and to demonstrate the computational speed of the solutions. The developed analytical solutions are encoded and available for use in the open source computational framework MADS (http://mads.lanl.gov).

  6. Modeling reactive geochemical transport of concentrated aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Zheng, Zuoping; Wan, Jiamin

    2005-02-01

    Aqueous solutions with ionic strength larger than 1 M are usually considered concentrated aqueous solutions. These solutions can be found in some natural systems and are also industrially produced and released into accessible natural environments, and as such, they pose a big environmental problem. Concentrated aqueous solutions have unique thermodynamic and physical properties. They are usually strongly acidic or strongly alkaline, with the ionic strength possibly reaching 30 M or higher. Chemical components in such solutions are incompletely dissociated. The thermodynamic activities of both ionic and molecular species in these solutions are determined by the ionic interactions. In geological media the problem is further complicated by the interactions between the solutions and sediments and rocks. The chemical composition of concentrated aqueous solutions when migrating through the geological media may be drastically altered by these strong fluid-rock interactions. To effectively model reactive transport of concentrated aqueous solutions, we must take into account the ionic interactions. For this purpose we substantially extended an existing reactive transport code, BIO-CORE2D©, by incorporating a Pitzer ion interaction model to calculate the ionic activity. In the present paper, the model and two test cases of the model are briefly introduced. We also simulate a laboratory column experiment in which the leakage of highly alkaline waste fluid stored at Hanford (a U.S. Department of Energy site, located in Washington State) was studied. Our simulation captures the measured pH evolution and indicates that all the reactions controlling the pH evolution, including cation exchanges and mineral dissolution/precipitation, are coupled.

  7. Use of boundary fluxes when simulating solute transport with the MODFLOW ground-water transport process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes modifications to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) threedimensional solute-transport model (MODFLOWGWT), which is incorporated into the USGS MODFLOW ground-water model as the Ground- Water Transport (GWT) Process. The modifications improve the capability of MODFLOW-GWT to accurately simulate solute transport in simulations that represent a nonzero flux across an aquifer boundary. In such situations, the new Boundary Flux Package (BFLX) will allow the user flexibility to assign the flux to specific cell faces, although that flexibility is limited for certain types of fluxes (such as recharge and evapotranspiration, which can only be assigned to the top face if either is to be represented as a boundary flux). The approach is consistent with that used in the MODPATH model. The application of the BFLX Package was illustrated using a test case in which the Lake Package was active. The results using the BFLX Package showed noticeably higher magnitudes of velocity in the cells adjacent to the lake than previous results without the BFLX Package. Consequently, solute was transported slightly faster through the lake-aquifer system when the BFLX Package is active. However, the overall solute distributions did not differ greatly from simulations made without using the BFLX Package.

  8. Modeling flow and solute transport in irrigation furrows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents an internally coupled flow and solute transport model for free-draining irrigation furrows. Furrow hydraulics is simulated with a numerical zero-inertia model and solute transport is computed with a model based on a numerical solution of the cross-section averaged advection-dispe...

  9. Analytical Solutions for Sequentially Reactive Transport with Different Retardation Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y; Buscheck, T A; Mansoor, K; Lu, X

    2001-08-01

    Integral transforms have been widely used for deriving analytical solutions for solute transport systems. Often, analytical solutions can only be written in closed form in frequency domains and numerical inverse-transforms have to be involved to obtain semi-analytical solutions in the time domain. For this reason, previously published closed form solutions are restricted either to a small number of species or to the same retardation assumption. In this paper, we applied the solution scheme proposed by Bauer et al. in the time domain. Using available analytical solutions of a single species transport with first-order decay without coupling with its parent species concentration as fundamental solutions, a daughter species concentration can be expressed as a linear function of those fundamental solutions. The implementation of the solution scheme is straight forward and exact analytical solutions are derived for one- and three-dimensional transport systems.

  10. Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

  11. A quasilinear model for solute transport under unsaturated flow

    SciTech Connect

    Houseworth, J.E.; Leem, J.

    2009-05-15

    We developed an analytical solution for solute transport under steady-state, two-dimensional, unsaturated flow and transport conditions for the investigation of high-level radioactive waste disposal. The two-dimensional, unsaturated flow problem is treated using the quasilinear flow method for a system with homogeneous material properties. Dispersion is modeled as isotropic and is proportional to the effective hydraulic conductivity. This leads to a quasilinear form for the transport problem in terms of a scalar potential that is analogous to the Kirchhoff potential for quasilinear flow. The solutions for both flow and transport scalar potentials take the form of Fourier series. The particular solution given here is for two sources of flow, with one source containing a dissolved solute. The solution method may easily be extended, however, for any combination of flow and solute sources under steady-state conditions. The analytical results for multidimensional solute transport problems, which previously could only be solved numerically, also offer an additional way to benchmark numerical solutions. An analytical solution for two-dimensional, steady-state solute transport under unsaturated flow conditions is presented. A specific case with two sources is solved but may be generalized to any combination of sources. The analytical results complement numerical solutions, which were previously required to solve this class of problems.

  12. Innovative Solutions to Challenges in Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Jonathan; Burkybile, Sharon

    2000-01-01

    States have had to budget increasing amounts for mandated pupil-transportation services as their state transportation aid has been slashed dramatically. Among school districts, cooperation and coordination through shared services (consortia) have resulted in safer, more reliable, and more efficient transportation. Implementation advice is…

  13. Simulation models for conservative and nonconservative solute transport in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Solute transport in streams is governed by a suite of hydrologic and chemical processes. Interactions between hydrologic processes and chemical reactions may be quantified through a combination of field-scale experimentation and simulation modeling. Two mathematical models that simulate conservative and nonconservative solute transport in streams are presented. A model for conservative solutes that considers One Dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage (OTIS) may be used in conjunction with tracer-dilution methods to quantify hydrologic transport processes (advection, dispersion, lateral inflow and transient storage). For nonconservative solutes, a model known as OTEQ may be used to quantify chemical processes within the context of hydrologic transport. OTEQ combines the transport mechanisms in OTIS with a chemical equilibrium sub-model that considers complexation, precipitation/dissolution and sorption. OTEQ has been used to quantify processes affecting trace metals in two streams in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, USA.

  14. Regulators of Slc4 bicarbonate transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Thornell, Ian M.; Bevensee, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    The Slc4 family of transporters is comprised of anion exchangers (AE1-4), Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporters (NCBTs) including electrogenic Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCe1 and NBCe2), electroneutral Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCn1 and NBCn2), and the electroneutral Na-driven Cl-bicarbonate exchanger (NDCBE), as well as a borate transporter (BTR1). These transporters regulate intracellular pH (pHi) and contribute to steady-state pHi, but are also involved in other physiological processes including CO2 carriage by red blood cells and solute secretion/reabsorption across epithelia. Acid-base transporters function as either acid extruders or acid loaders, with the Slc4 proteins moving HCO−3 either into or out of cells. According to results from both molecular and functional studies, multiple Slc4 proteins and/or associated splice variants with similar expected effects on pHi are often found in the same tissue or cell. Such apparent redundancy is likely to be physiologically important. In addition to regulating pHi, a HCO−3 transporter contributes to a cell's ability to fine tune the intracellular regulation of the cotransported/exchanged ion(s) (e.g., Na+ or Cl−). In addition, functionally similar transporters or splice variants with different regulatory profiles will optimize pH physiology and solute transport under various conditions or within subcellular domains. Such optimization will depend on activated signaling pathways and transporter expression profiles. In this review, we will summarize and discuss both well-known and more recently identified regulators of the Slc4 proteins. Some of these regulators include traditional second messengers, lipids, binding proteins, autoregulatory domains, and less conventional regulators. The material presented will provide insight into the diversity and physiological significance of multiple members within the Slc4 gene family. PMID:26124722

  15. Biological solutions to transport network design.

    PubMed

    Bebber, Daniel P; Hynes, Juliet; Darrah, Peter R; Boddy, Lynne; Fricker, Mark D

    2007-09-22

    Transport networks are vital components of multicellular organisms, distributing nutrients and removing waste products. Animal and plant transport systems are branching trees whose architecture is linked to universal scaling laws in these organisms. In contrast, many fungi form reticulated mycelia via the branching and fusion of thread-like hyphae that continuously adapt to the environment. Fungal networks have evolved to explore and exploit a patchy environment, rather than ramify through a three-dimensional organism. However, there has been no explicit analysis of the network structures formed, their dynamic behaviour nor how either impact on their ecological function. Using the woodland saprotroph Phanerochaete velutina, we show that fungal networks can display both high transport capacity and robustness to damage. These properties are enhanced as the network grows, while the relative cost of building the network decreases. Thus, mycelia achieve the seemingly competing goals of efficient transport and robustness, with decreasing relative investment, by selective reinforcement and recycling of transport pathways. Fungal networks demonstrate that indeterminate, decentralized systems can yield highly adaptive networks. Understanding how these relatively simple organisms have found effective transport networks through a process of natural selection may inform the design of man-made networks. PMID:17623638

  16. Water activity in supersaturated aqueous solutions of organic solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Han-Soo; Arnold, Stephen; Myerson, Allan S.

    1995-04-01

    Measurements of water activity in supersaturated aqueous organic solutions of glycine, alanine, succinic acid and itaconic acid were made far into the metastable zone by levitating micron-sized droplets electrodynamically in a spherical void electrodynamic levitator trap (SVELT) with a water vapor reservoir. The concentration dependent behavior of the activity was examined in relationship to the molecular interactions for solutions.

  17. Solute Transport Across a Contact Interface in Deformable Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    A finite element formulation of neutral solute transport across a contact interface between deformable porous media is implemented and validated against analytical solutions. By reducing the integral statements of external virtual work on the two contacting surfaces into a single contact integral, the algorithm automatically enforces continuity of solute molar flux across the contact interface, whereas continuity of the effective solute concentration (a measure of the solute mechano-chemical potential) is achieved using a penalty method. This novel formulation facilitates the analysis of problems in biomechanics where the transport of metabolites across contact interfaces of deformable tissues may be of interest. This contact algorithm is the first to address solute transport across deformable interfaces, and is made available in the public domain, open-source finite element code FEBio (http://mrl.sci.utah.edu/software). PMID:22281406

  18. Solute transport across a contact interface in deformable porous media.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2012-04-01

    A finite element formulation of neutral solute transport across a contact interface between deformable porous media is implemented and validated against analytical solutions. By reducing the integral statements of external virtual work on the two contacting surfaces into a single contact integral, the algorithm automatically enforces continuity of solute molar flux across the contact interface, whereas continuity of the effective solute concentration (a measure of the solute mechano-chemical potential) is achieved using a penalty method. This novel formulation facilitates the analysis of problems in biomechanics where the transport of metabolites across contact interfaces of deformable tissues may be of interest. This contact algorithm is the first to address solute transport across deformable interfaces, and is made available in the public domain, open-source finite element code FEBio (http://www.febio.org). PMID:22281406

  19. Transport of Organic Solutes in Clay Formations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research is a pilot investigation for the SERDP (Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, DoD) founded project, Impact of Clay-DNAPL Interactions on Transport and Storage of Chlorinated Solvents in Low Permeability Zones, from 2010-2012. The report tries to s...

  20. A Thermodynamic Description of Active Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjelstrup, S.; Rubi, J. M.; Bedeaux, D.

    We present a solution to problems that were raised in the 1960s: How can the vectorial ion flux couple to the scalar energy of the reaction of ATP to ADP and P, to give active transport of the ion; i.e. transport against its chemical potential? And, is it possible, on thermodynamic grounds to obtain non-linear flux force relations for this transport? Using non-equilibrium thermodynamics (NET) on the stochastic (mesoscopic) level, we explain how the second law of thermodynamics gives a basis for the description of active transport of Ca2+ by the Ca-ATPase. Coupling takes place at the surface, because the symmetry of the fluxes changes here. The theory gives the energy dissipated as heat during transport and reaction. Experiments are defined to determine coupling coefficients. We propose that the coefficients for coupling between chemical reaction, ion flux and heat flux are named thermogenesis coefficients. They are all probably significant. We discuss that the complete set of coefficients can explain slippage in molecular pumps as well as thermogenesis that is triggered by a temperature jump.

  1. Future variability of solute transport in a macrotidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Peter E.; Lewis, Matt J.; Simpson, John H.; Howlett, Eleanor R.; Malham, Shelagh K.

    2014-12-01

    The physical controls on salt distribution and river-sourced conservative solutes, including the potential implications of climate change, are investigated referring to model simulations of a macrotidal estuary. In the UK, such estuaries typically react rapidly to rainfall events and, as such, are often in a state of non-equilibrium in terms of solute transport; hence are particularly sensitive to climate extremes. Sea levels are projected to rise over the 21st century, extending the salinity maximum upstream in estuaries, which will also affect downstream solute transport, promoting estuarine trapping and reducing offshore dispersal of material. Predicted 'drier summers' and 'wetter winters' in the UK will influence solute transport further still; we found that projected river flow climate changes were more influential than sea-level rise, especially for low flow conditions. Our simulations show that projected climate change for the UK is likely to increase variability in estuarine solute transport and, specifically, increase the likelihood of estuarine trapping during summer, mainly due to drier weather conditions. Future changes in solute transport were less certain during winter, since increased river flow will to some extent counter-act the effects of sea-level rise. Our results have important implications for non-conservative nutrient transport, water quality, coastal management and ecosystem resilience.

  2. Effects of Soil Behavior on Solute Transport in Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Huijie

    2010-05-01

    The evaluation of solute transport in groundwater is particularly important for environmental engineers involved in the design of urban environments. In general, the simulation of solute transport in porous medium has been linked with fluid flow, which has commonly based on Darcy law. Unlike previous work, we use a more generalized fluid flow model with poro-elastic theory, in which Darcy model is one of its special cases. The new feature of the new model is the inclusion of soil characteristics and behavior in the prediction of solute transport in aquifers. Based on the new model, numerical example demonstrates significant influence of poro-elastic soil behavior on the movement of zone of peak concentration of solute in groundwater.

  3. A Functional-Phylogenetic Classification System for Transmembrane Solute Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive classification system for transmembrane molecular transporters has been developed and recently approved by the transport panel of the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This system is based on (i) transporter class and subclass (mode of transport and energy coupling mechanism), (ii) protein phylogenetic family and subfamily, and (iii) substrate specificity. Almost all of the more than 250 identified families of transporters include members that function exclusively in transport. Channels (115 families), secondary active transporters (uniporters, symporters, and antiporters) (78 families), primary active transporters (23 families), group translocators (6 families), and transport proteins of ill-defined function or of unknown mechanism (51 families) constitute distinct categories. Transport mode and energy coupling prove to be relatively immutable characteristics and therefore provide primary bases for classification. Phylogenetic grouping reflects structure, function, mechanism, and often substrate specificity and therefore provides a reliable secondary basis for classification. Substrate specificity and polarity of transport prove to be more readily altered during evolutionary history and therefore provide a tertiary basis for classification. With very few exceptions, a phylogenetic family of transporters includes members that function by a single transport mode and energy coupling mechanism, although a variety of substrates may be transported, sometimes with either inwardly or outwardly directed polarity. In this review, I provide cross-referencing of well-characterized constituent transporters according to (i) transport mode, (ii) energy coupling mechanism, (iii) phylogenetic grouping, and (iv) substrates transported. The structural features and distribution of recognized family members throughout the living world are also evaluated. The tabulations should facilitate familial and functional

  4. Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Transport in Variably-Fractured Layered Media: 1. Solutes

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Moridis

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive solute tracers through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the non-flowing matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion, (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first-order chemical reactions. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity.

  5. Semianalytical solutions of radioactive or reactive transport invariably-fractured layered media: 1. Solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.

    2001-10-10

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive solute tracers through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the non-flowing matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion, (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first-order chemical reactions. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity.

  6. End-Member Formulation of Solid Solutions and Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, Peter C.

    2015-09-01

    A model for incorporating solid solutions into reactive transport equations is presented based on an end-member representation. Reactive transport equations are solved directly for the composition and bulk concentration of the solid solution. Reactions of a solid solution with an aqueous solution are formulated in terms of an overall stoichiometric reaction corresponding to a time-varying composition and exchange reactions, equivalent to reaction end-members. Reaction rates are treated kinetically using a transition state rate law for the overall reaction and a pseudo-kinetic rate law for exchange reactions. The composition of the solid solution at the onset of precipitation is assumed to correspond to the least soluble composition, equivalent to the composition at equilibrium. The stoichiometric saturation determines if the solid solution is super-saturated with respect to the aqueous solution. The method is implemented for a simple prototype batch reactor using Mathematica for a binary solid solution. Finally, the sensitivity of the results on the kinetic rate constant for a binary solid solution is investigated for reaction of an initially stoichiometric solid phase with an undersaturated aqueous solution.

  7. Signal focusing through active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  8. Insights into non-Fickian solute transport in carbonates

    PubMed Central

    Bijeljic, Branko; Mostaghimi, Peyman; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    [1] We study and explain the origin of early breakthrough and long tailing plume behavior by simulating solute transport through 3-D X-ray images of six different carbonate rock samples, representing geological media with a high degree of pore-scale complexity. A Stokes solver is employed to compute the flow field, and the particles are then transported along streamlines to represent advection, while the random walk method is used to model diffusion. We compute the propagators (concentration versus displacement) for a range of Peclet numbers (Pe) and relate it to the velocity distribution obtained directly on the images. There is a very wide distribution of velocity that quantifies the impact of pore structure on transport. In samples with a relatively narrow spread of velocities, transport is characterized by a small immobile concentration peak, representing essentially stagnant portions of the pore space, and a dominant secondary peak of mobile solute moving at approximately the average flow speed. On the other hand, in carbonates with a wider velocity distribution, there is a significant immobile peak concentration and an elongated tail of moving fluid. An increase in Pe, decreasing the relative impact of diffusion, leads to the faster formation of secondary mobile peak(s). This behavior indicates highly anomalous transport. The implications for modeling field-scale transport are discussed. Citation: Bijeljic, B., P. Mostaghimi, and M. J. Blunt (2013), Insights into non-Fickian solute transport in carbonates, Water Resour. Res., 49, 2714–2728, doi:10.1002/wrcr.20238. PMID:24223444

  9. Molecular level water and solute transport in reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Shen, Meng; Keten, Sinan

    2015-11-01

    The water permeability and rejection characteristics of six solutes, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, urea, Na+, and Cl-, were studied for a polymeric reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate that water flux increases with an increasing fraction of percolated free volume in the membrane polymer structure. Solute molecules display Brownian motion and hop from pore to pore as they pass through the membrane. The solute rejection depends on both the size of the solute molecule and the chemical interaction of the solute with water and the membrane. When the open spaces in the polymeric structure are such that solutes have to shed at least one water molecule from their solvation shell to pass through the membrane molecular structure, the water-solute pair interaction energy governs solute rejection. Organic solutes more easily shed water molecules than ions to more readily pass through the membrane. Hydrogen-bonding sites for molecules like urea also lead to a higher rejection. These findings underline the importance of the solute's solvation shell and solute-water-membrane chemistry in solute transport and rejection in RO membranes. Funded by the Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern with computing resources from XSEDE (NSF grant ACI-1053575).

  10. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 2. Transient storage and decay chain solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminant transport processes in streams, rivers, and other surface water bodies can be analyzed or predicted using the advection-dispersion equation and related transport models. In part 1 of this two-part series we presented a large number of one- and multi-dimensional analytical solutions of t...

  11. Analytical model of solute transport by unsteady unsaturated gravitational infiltration.

    PubMed

    Lessoff, S C; Indelman, P

    2004-08-01

    Penetration of reactive solute into a soil during a cycle of water infiltration and redistribution is investigated by deriving analytical closed form solutions for fluid flux, moisture content and contaminant concentration. The solution is developed for gravitational flow and advective transport and is applied to two scenarios of solute applications encountered in the applications: a finite pulse of solute dissolved in irrigation water and an instantaneous pulse broadcasted onto the soil surface. Through comparison to simulations of Richards' flow, capillary suction is shown to have contrasting effects on the upper and lower boundaries of the fluid pulse, speeding penetration of the wetting front and reducing the rate of drying. This leads to agreement between the analytical and numerical solutions for typical field and experimental conditions. The analytical solution is further incorporated into a stochastic column model of flow and transport to compute mean solute concentration in a heterogeneous field. An unusual phenomenon of plume contraction is observed at long times of solute propagation during the drying stage. The mean concentration profiles match those of the Monte-Carlo simulations for capillary length scales typical of sandy soils. PMID:15240168

  12. Influence of surfactants on unsaturated water flow and solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagunduz, Ahmet; Young, Michael H.; Pennell, Kurt D.

    2015-04-01

    Surfactants can reduce soil water retention by changing the surface tension of water and the contact angle between the liquid and solid phases. As a result, water flow and solute transport in unsaturated soil may be altered in the presence of surfactants. In this study, the effects of a representative nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100, on coupled water flow and nonreactive solute transport during unsaturated flow conditions were evaluated. Batch reactor experiments were conducted to measure the surfactant sorption characteristics, while unsaturated transport experiments were performed in columns packed with 40-270 mesh Ottawa sand at five initial water contents. Following the introduction of surfactant solution, the rate of water percolation through the sand increased; however, this period of rapid water drainage was followed by decreased water percolation due to the reduction in soil water content and the corresponding decrease in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity behind the surfactant front. The observed changes in water percolation occurred sequentially, and resulted in faster nonreactive solute transport than was observed in the absence of surfactant. A one-dimensional mathematical model accurately described coupled water flow, surfactant, and solute transport under most experimental conditions. Differences between model predictions and experimental data were observed in the column study performed at the lowest water content (0.115 cm3/cm3), which was attributed to surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface. These findings demonstrate the potential influence of surfactants additives on unsaturated water flow and solute transport in soils, and demonstrate a methodology to couple these processes in a predictive modeling tool.

  13. The secret to successful solute-transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Konikow, Leonard F

    2011-01-01

    Modeling subsurface solute transport is difficult-more so than modeling heads and flows. The classical governing equation does not always adequately represent what we see at the field scale. In such cases, commonly used numerical models are solving the wrong equation. Also, the transport equation is hyperbolic where advection is dominant, and parabolic where hydrodynamic dispersion is dominant. No single numerical method works well for all conditions, and for any given complex field problem, where seepage velocity is highly variable, no one method will be optimal everywhere. Although we normally expect a numerically accurate solution to the governing groundwater-flow equation, errors in concentrations from numerical dispersion and/or oscillations may be large in some cases. The accuracy and efficiency of the numerical solution to the solute-transport equation are more sensitive to the numerical method chosen than for typical groundwater-flow problems. However, numerical errors can be kept within acceptable limits if sufficient computational effort is expended. But impractically long simulation times may promote a tendency to ignore or accept numerical errors. One approach to effective solute-transport modeling is to keep the model relatively simple and use it to test and improve conceptual understanding of the system and the problem at hand. It should not be expected that all concentrations observed in the field can be reproduced. Given a knowledgeable analyst, a reasonable description of a hydrogeologic framework, and the availability of solute-concentration data, the secret to successful solute-transport modeling may simply be to lower expectations. PMID:21039449

  14. A fracture network model for water flow and solute transport

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes code development work and sample calculations for FRACNET, a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and solute transport in fractured porous media. The model analyzes flow and transport by generating a fracture network based on statistical characteristics of fractures obtained from well logs and other data. After a network is generated, flow and tracer transport are computed for appropriate boundary conditions and wellbore source/sink terms. In addition, for a given realization, the code can be used to indicate whether the medium can be treated as an equivalent porous medium. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Solute transport along preferential flow paths in unsaturated fractures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, G.W.; Geller, J.T.; Pruess, K.; Hunt, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to study solute transport along preferential flow paths in unsaturated, inclined fractures. Qualitative aspects of solute transport were identified in a miscible dye tracer experiment conducted in a transparent replica of a natural granite fracture. Additional experiments were conducted to measure the breakthrough curves of a conservative tracer introduced into an established preferential flow path in two different fracture replicas and a rock-replica combination. The influence of gravity was investigated by varying fracture inclination. The relationship between the travel times of the solute and the relative influence of gravity was substantially affected by two modes of intermittent flow that occurred: the snapping rivulet and the pulsating blob modes. The measured travel times of the solute were evaluated with three transfer function models: the axial dispersion, the reactors-in-series, and the lognormal models. The three models described the solute travel times nearly equally well. A mechanistic model was also formulated to describe transport when the pulsating blob mode occurred which assumed blobs of water containing solute mixed with residual pools of water along the flow path.

  16. Insights into non-Fickian solute transport in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijeljic, Branko; Mostaghimi, Peyman; Blunt, Martin J.

    2013-05-01

    We study and explain the origin of early breakthrough and long tailing plume behavior by simulating solute transport through 3-D X-ray images of six different carbonate rock samples, representing geological media with a high degree of pore-scale complexity. A Stokes solver is employed to compute the flow field, and the particles are then transported along streamlines to represent advection, while the random walk method is used to model diffusion. We compute the propagators (concentration versus displacement) for a range of Peclet numbers (Pe) and relate it to the velocity distribution obtained directly on the images. There is a very wide distribution of velocity that quantifies the impact of pore structure on transport. In samples with a relatively narrow spread of velocities, transport is characterized by a small immobile concentration peak, representing essentially stagnant portions of the pore space, and a dominant secondary peak of mobile solute moving at approximately the average flow speed. On the other hand, in carbonates with a wider velocity distribution, there is a significant immobile peak concentration and an elongated tail of moving fluid. An increase in Pe, decreasing the relative impact of diffusion, leads to the faster formation of secondary mobile peak(s). This behavior indicates highly anomalous transport. The implications for modeling field-scale transport are discussed.

  17. Effect of proteolytic enzymes on transepithelial solute transport

    SciTech Connect

    Niewoehner, D.E.; Sinha, A.A.; Rice, K.; Cadman, S.; Wangensteen, D.

    1986-10-01

    The effects of proteases on air-space clearance (AC) of small ((/sup 14/C)sucrose, 342 daltons) and large (/sup 125/I-neutral dextran, 70,000 daltons) solutes were studied in isolated, fluid-filled hamster lungs that were perfused in a nonrecirculating system. When instilled into the air spaces, porcine pancreatic elastase (0.1-0.4 mg/ml) and bovine pancreatic trypsin (BPT) (0.5-2.0 mg/ml), but neither Clostridium histolyticum collagenase (5.0 mg/ml) nor phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride-inactivated BPT caused large increases in the AC of both tracer molecules. BPT-induced solute clearance was further characterized functionally and morphologically. The functional characteristics of solute AC under steady-state conditions did not indicate that transepithelial transport was diffusion-limited. Inhibition by millimolar concentrations of Zn/sup 2 +/ and by lung cooling, along with electron microscopic studies employing horseradish peroxidase as a macromolecule tracer, were consistent with epithelial solute transport by a vesicular mechanism (transcytosis). Solute transport from the interstitial compartment to the lung exterior was shown to occur via two pathways. By unknown mechanisms BPT caused small amounts of water to flow through an incompletely identified, extravascular pathway. In BPT-exposed lungs efflux of /sup 125/I-dextran 70 occurred almost exclusively through this pathway, whereas (/sup 14/C)sucrose was transported to the lung exterior partly through this same pathway and partly through the vasculature. The large differences in the diffusion coefficients of the two tracers may have accounted for these observed patterns of solute efflux from the lung. The possible significance of our findings to the pathogenesis of experimental emphysema are discussed.

  18. Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes.

  19. Energetics of active transport processes.

    PubMed

    Essig, A; Caplan, S R

    1968-12-01

    Discussions of active transport usually assume stoichiometry between the rate of transport J(+) and the metabolic rate J(r). However, the observation of a linear relationship between J(+) and J(r) does not imply a stoichiometric relationship, i.e., complete coupling. Since coupling may possibly be incomplete, we examine systems of an arbitrary degree of coupling q, regarding stoichiometry as a limiting case. We consider a sodium pump, with J(+) and J(r) linear functions of the electrochemical potential difference, -X(+), and the chemical affinity of the metabolic driving reaction, A. The affinity is well defined even for various complex reaction pathways. Incorporation of a series barrier and a parallel leak does not affect the linearity of the composite observable system. The affinity of some region of the metabolic chain may be maintained constant, either by large pools of reactants or by regulation. If so, this affinity can be evaluated by two independent methods. Sodium transport is conveniently characterized by the open-circuit potential (Deltapsi)(I=0) and the natural limits, level flow (J(+))(X+=0), and static head X(0) (+) = (X(+))(J+=0). With high degrees of coupling -X(0) (+)/F approaches the electromotive force E(Na) (Ussing); -X(0) (+)/F cannot be identified with ((RT/F) ln f)(X+=0), where f is the flux ratio. The efficiency eta = -J(+)X(+)/J(r)A is of significance only when appreciable energy is being converted from one form to another. When either J(+) or -X(+) is small eta is low; the significant parameters are then the efficacies epsilon(J+) = J(+)/J(r)A and epsilon(X+) = -X(+)/J(r)A, respectively maximal at level flow and static head. Leak increases both J(+) and epsilon(J+) for isotonic saline reabsorption, but diminishes -X(0) (+) and epsilon(Xfemale symbol). Electrical resistance reflects both passive parameters and metabolism. Various fundamental relations are preserved despite coupling of passive ion and water flows. PMID:5713453

  20. Conservative and reactive solute transport in constructed wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keefe, S.H.; Barber, L.B.; Runkel, R.L.; Ryan, J.N.; McKnight, Diane M.; Wass, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    The transport of bromide, a conservative tracer, and rhodamine WT (RWT), a photodegrading tracer, was evaluated in three wastewater-dependent wetlands near Phoenix, Arizona, using a solute transport model with transient storage. Coupled sodium bromide and RWT tracer tests were performed to establish conservative transport and reactive parameters in constructed wetlands with water losses ranging from (1) relatively impermeable (15%), (2) moderately leaky (45%), and (3) significantly leaky (76%). RWT first-order photolysis rates and sorption coefficients were determined from independent field and laboratory experiments. Individual wetland hydraulic profiles influenced the extent of transient storage interaction in stagnant water areas and consequently RWT removal. Solute mixing and transient storage interaction occurred in the impermeable wetland, resulting in 21% RWT mass loss from main channel and storage zone photolysis (10%) and sorption (11%) reactions. Advection and dispersion governed solute transport in the leaky wetland, limiting RWT photolysis removal (1.2%) and favoring main channel sorption (3.6%). The moderately leaky wetland contained islands parallel to flow, producing channel flow and minimizing RWT losses (1.6%).

  1. Heterogeneous solute transport in a tile-drained field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, A.; Comegna, A.; Coppola, A.; Hassan, S.; Haikal, M. A.; Kassab, M.; Lamaddalena, N.

    2009-04-01

    Preferential flow and its diverse attributes: i) macropore flow; ii) fingered flow; iii) funnel flow, cannot be described by a single process hypothesis and are unpredictable from a priori analysis of field characteristics due to the inability of sampling methods to capture minute features triggering such flows. Most solute transport techniques are expensive and require extensive soil disturbance. Moreover, solute transport in heterogeneous porous media cannot always be conceptualized as being either a convective-dispersive or a stochastic-convective process. One approach to predict subsurface leaching could be the coupling of near surface measurements with a generalized transport model. A steady state field tracer experiment was conducted on a tile-drained "Terra Rossa" plot located in Valenzano (Bari - Italy), to test whether TDR BTCs measured 1 m a part along a transect of 40 m can be used in such a way for accurate prediction of tile's BTC. A Generalized Transfer Function (GTF) (Zhang, 2000) was fitted to the observed concentration a three depths for each site along the transect to identify the transfer function parameters. To account for vertical transport in the unsaturated zone and lateral divergence near the tile, these parameters were used in a 2D model (Utermann, 1990) to predict earlier breakthrough of tile flux concentration. The 2D model predictions of the flux concentrations were similar to the observed values, nearly reproducing the channel-like nature of solute flow.

  2. Solute transport in dual-permeability porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leij, Feike J.; Toride, Nobuo; Field, Malcolm S.; Sciortino, Antonella

    2012-04-01

    A dual-advection dispersion equation (DADE) is presented and solved to describe solute transport in structured or layered porous media with different nonzero flow rates in two distinct pore domains with linear solute transfer between them. This dual-permeability model constitutes a generalized version of the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) for transport in uniform porous media and the mobile-immobile model (MIM) for transport in media with a mobile and an immobile pore domain. Analytical tools for the DADE have mostly been lacking. An analytical solution has therefore been derived using Laplace transformation with time and modal decomposition based on matrix diagonalization, assuming the same dispersivity for both domains. Temporal moments are derived for the DADE and contrasted with those for the ADE and the MIM. The effective dispersion coefficient for the DADE approaches that of the ADE for a similar velocity in both pore domains and large values for the first-order transfer parameter, and approaches that of the MIM for the opposite conditions. The solution of the DADE is used to illustrate how differences in pore water velocity between the domains and low transfer rates will lead to double peaks in the volume- or flux-averaged concentration profiles versus time or position. The DADE is applied to optimize experimental breakthrough curves for an Andisol with a distinct intra- and interaggregate porosity. The DADE improved the description of the breakthrough data compared to the ADE and the MIM.

  3. Stochastic analysis of transport of conservative solutes in caisson experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dagan, G.

    1995-02-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has conducted in the past a series of experiments of transport of conservative and reactive solutes. The experimental setup and the experimental results are presented in a series of reports. The main aim of the experiments was to validate models of transport of solutes in unsaturated flow at the caisson intermediate scale, which is much larger than the one pertaining to laboratory columns. First attempts to analyze the experimental results were by one-dimensional convective-dispersion models. These models could not explain the observed solute breakthrough curves and particularly the large solute dispersion in the caisson effluent Since there were some question marks about the uniformity of water distribution at the caisson top, the transport experiments were repeated under conditions of saturated flow. In these experiments constant heads were applied at the top and the bottom of the caisson and the number of concentration monitoring stations was quadrupled. The analysis of the measurements by the same one-dimensional model indicated clearly that the fitted dispersivity is much larger than the pore-sole dispersivity and that it grows with the distance in an approximately linear fashion. This led to the conclusion, raised before, that transport in the caisson is dominated by heterogeneity effects, i.e. by spatial variability of the material Such effects cannot be captured by traditional one-dimensional models. In order to account for the effect of heterogeneity, the saturated flow experiments have been analyzed by using stochastic transport modeling. The apparent linear growth of dispersivity with distance suggested that the system behaves like a stratified one. Consequently, the model of Dagan and Bresier has been adopted in order to interpret concentration measurements. In this simple model the caisson is viewed as a bundle of columns of different permeabilities, which are characterized by a p.d.f. (probability denasity function).

  4. Antitubercular Agent Delamanid and Metabolites as Substrates and Inhibitors of ABC and Solute Carrier Transporters.

    PubMed

    Sasabe, Hiroyuki; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Masakazu; Hashizume, Kenta; Hamasako, Yusuke; Ohzone, Yoshihiro; Kashiyama, Eiji; Umehara, Ken

    2016-06-01

    Delamanid (Deltyba, OPC-67683) is the first approved drug in a novel class of nitro-dihydro-imidazooxazoles developed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Patients with tuberculosis require treatment with multiple drugs, several of which have known drug-drug interactions. Transporters regulate drug absorption, distribution, and excretion; therefore, the inhibition of transport by one agent may alter the pharmacokinetics of another, leading to unexpected adverse events. Therefore, it is important to understand how delamanid affects transport activity. In the present study, the potencies of delamanid and its main metabolites as the substrates and inhibitors of various transporters were evaluated in vitro Delamanid was not transported by the efflux ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), solute carrier (SLC) transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides, or organic cation transporter 1. Similarly, metabolite 1 (M1) was not a substrate for any of these transporters except P-gp. Delamanid showed no inhibitory effect on ABC transporters MDR1, BCRP, and bile salt export pump (BSEP; ABCB11), SLC transporters, or organic anion transporters. M1 and M2 inhibited P-gp- and BCRP-mediated transport but did so only at the 50% inhibitory concentrations (M1, 4.65 and 5.71 μmol/liter, respectively; M2, 7.80 and 6.02 μmol/liter, respectively), well above the corresponding maximum concentration in plasma values observed following the administration of multiple doses in clinical trials. M3 and M4 did not affect the activities of any of the transporters tested. These in vitro data suggest that delamanid is unlikely to have clinically relevant interactions with drugs for which absorption and disposition are mediated by this group of transporters. PMID:27021329

  5. Generic transport coefficients of a confined electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-11-01

    Physical parameters characterizing electrokinetic transport in a confined electrolyte solution are reconstructed from the generic transport coefficients obtained within the classical nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamic framework. The electro-osmotic flow, the diffusio-osmotic flow, the osmotic current, as well as the pressure-driven Poiseuille-type flow, the electric conduction, and the ion diffusion are described by this set of transport coefficients. The reconstruction is demonstrated for an aqueous NaCl solution between two parallel charged surfaces with a nanoscale gap, by using the molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. A Green-Kubo approach is employed to evaluate the transport coefficients in the linear-response regime, and the fluxes induced by the pressure, electric, and chemical potential fields are compared with the results of nonequilibrium MD simulations. Using this numerical scheme, the influence of the salt concentration on the transport coefficients is investigated. Anomalous reversal of diffusio-osmotic current, as well as that of electro-osmotic flow, is observed at high surface charge densities and high added-salt concentrations. PMID:25493746

  6. Generic transport coefficients of a confined electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-11-01

    Physical parameters characterizing electrokinetic transport in a confined electrolyte solution are reconstructed from the generic transport coefficients obtained within the classical nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamic framework. The electro-osmotic flow, the diffusio-osmotic flow, the osmotic current, as well as the pressure-driven Poiseuille-type flow, the electric conduction, and the ion diffusion are described by this set of transport coefficients. The reconstruction is demonstrated for an aqueous NaCl solution between two parallel charged surfaces with a nanoscale gap, by using the molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. A Green-Kubo approach is employed to evaluate the transport coefficients in the linear-response regime, and the fluxes induced by the pressure, electric, and chemical potential fields are compared with the results of nonequilibrium MD simulations. Using this numerical scheme, the influence of the salt concentration on the transport coefficients is investigated. Anomalous reversal of diffusio-osmotic current, as well as that of electro-osmotic flow, is observed at high surface charge densities and high added-salt concentrations.

  7. Calculation of solute transport parameters from the breakthrough experimental data using solute transport models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditionally, a two-parameter partial differential equation has been used to describe the one-dimensional convective-dispersive transport of chemicals in field soils. The parameters in this equation include the dispersion coefficient and a distribution coefficient, the latter accounting for interac...

  8. Scaling and predicting solute transport processes in riverine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Pinzon, R.; Haggerty, R.; Camacho Botero, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    In the last three decades, research on solute transport and nutrient processing has revealed complex interactions between landscapes and stream ecosystems, and numerous attempts to scale and predict these processes have been primarily limited by the difficulty of measuring and extrapolating hydrodynamic and geomorphic characteristics. We hypothesize that there should be predictable patterns in the way that streams interact with their landscapes, because those interactions are in the form of energy, mass and momentum, which are conservative and interrelated properties. Therefore, despite local hydrogeomorphic characteristics define the actual extent of solute transport processes in a given riverine ecosystem, the physical imprints marked-up in breakthrough curves (BTCs) should have scaling properties. To evaluate our hypothesis we created an extensive database that includes 133 BTCs from conservative tracer experiments conducted under different hydrologic conditions (1 lt/s to 1197 m3/s), different experimental conditions (10s of meters to 10s of kilometers), different geographic positions (South and North America, Europe, Australia, Antarctica), and different types of lotic environments, i.e., urban manmade channels, forested headwater streams, desert-like streams, hyporheic wells, and major rivers. We investigated the existence of patterns in conservative solute transport using a model-independent approach, i.e., temporal moments of the histories of tracer experiments. Our results show that the normalized first absolute moment is correlated with the second and third moments with R2>0.99 for all riverine ecosystems. Most importantly, the first central temporal moment of the distributions (mean travel time) is correlated with the second (variance) with an R2>0.93, and the correlation between the second central moment and the third central moment (skewness) takes the form of the coefficient of skewness (CSK) with an R2>0.98, defining a statistically averaged CSK= 1

  9. Modeling of Active Transmembrane Transport in a Mixture Theory Framework

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Morrison, Barclay; Hung, Clark T.

    2010-01-01

    This study formulates governing equations for active transport across semi-permeable membranes within the framework of the theory of mixtures. In mixture theory, which models the interactions of any number of fluid and solid constituents, a supply term appears in the conservation of linear momentum to describe momentum exchanges among the constituents. In past applications, this momentum supply was used to model frictional interactions only, thereby describing passive transport processes. In this study, it is shown that active transport processes, which impart momentum to solutes or solvent, may also be incorporated in this term. By projecting the equation of conservation of linear momentum along the normal to the membrane, a jump condition is formulated for the mechano-electrochemical potential of fluid constituents which is generally applicable to nonequilibrium processes involving active transport. The resulting relations are simple and easy to use, and address an important need in the membrane transport literature. PMID:20213212

  10. Radial reactive solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quanrong; Zhan, Hongbin

    2013-11-01

    Radial reactive transport is investigated in an aquifer-aquitard system considering the important processes such as advection, radial and vertical dispersions for the aquifer, vertical advection and dispersion for the aquitards, and first-order biodegradation or radioactive decay. We solved the coupled governing equations of transport in the aquifer and the aquitards by honoring the continuity of concentration and mass flux across the aquifer-aquitard interfaces and recognizing the concentration variation along the aquifer thickness. This effort improved the averaged-approximation (AA) model, which dealt with radial dispersion in an aquifer-aquitard system by excluding the aquitard advection. To compare with our new solution, we expanded the AA model by including the aquitard advection. The expanded AA model considerably overestimated the mass in the upper aquitard when an upward advection existed there. The rates of mass change in the upper aquitard from the new solution and the AA model solution increased with time following sub-linear fashions. The times corresponding to the peak values of the residence time distributions for the AA model, the expanded AA model, and the new model were almost the same. The residence time distributions seemed to follow the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution closely when plotting the time in logarithmic scale. In addition, we developed a finite-element COMSOL Multiphysics simulation of the problem, and found that the COMSOL solution agreed with the new solution well.

  11. EFFECTIVE POROSITY IMPLIES EFFECTIVE BULK DENSITY IN SORBING SOLUTE TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.

    2012-02-27

    The concept of an effective porosity is widely used in solute transport modeling to account for the presence of a fraction of the medium that effectively does not influence solute migration, apart from taking up space. This non-participating volume or ineffective porosity plays the same role as the gas phase in single-phase liquid unsaturated transport: it increases pore velocity, which is useful towards reproducing observed solute travel times. The prevalent use of the effective porosity concept is reflected by its prominent inclusion in popular texts, e.g., de Marsily (1986), Fetter (1988, 1993) and Zheng and Bennett (2002). The purpose of this commentary is to point out that proper application of the concept for sorbing solutes requires more than simply reducing porosity while leaving other material properties unchanged. More specifically, effective porosity implies the corresponding need for an effective bulk density in a conventional single-porosity model. The reason is that the designated non-participating volume is composed of both solid and fluid phases, both of which must be neglected for consistency. Said another way, if solute does not enter the ineffective porosity then it also cannot contact the adjoining solid. Conceptually neglecting the fluid portion of the non-participating volume leads to a lower (effective) porosity. Likewise, discarding the solid portion of the non-participating volume inherently leads to a lower or effective bulk density. In the author's experience, practitioners virtually never adjust bulk density when adopting the effective porosity approach.

  12. Some Exact Solutions in Energy Dependent Transport Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. M. R.

    1980-01-01

    Some exact solutions are obtained for energy dependent slowing down problems with energy dependent cross sections. The transport equation is solved using the backward-forward model of Fermi. Also studied is the energy dependent diffusion equation. Using these models, and a novel technique involving difference equations, it has been possible to find explicit, and numerically useful, solutions for slowing down from a plane, monoenergetic source in an infinite medium. The slowing down density and the energy deposition function are obtained which are of value in reactor physics and radiation damage calculations.

  13. From analytical solutions of solute transport equations to multidimensional time-domain random walk (TDRW) algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    In this study, new multi-dimensional time-domain random walk (TDRW) algorithms are derived from approximate one-dimensional (1-D), two-dimensional (2-D), and three-dimensional (3-D) analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and from exact 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D analytical solutions of the pure-diffusion equation. These algorithms enable the calculation of both the time required for a particle to travel a specified distance in a homogeneous medium and the mass recovery at the observation point, which may be incomplete due to 2-D or 3-D transverse dispersion or diffusion. The method is extended to heterogeneous media, represented as a piecewise collection of homogeneous media. The particle motion is then decomposed along a series of intermediate checkpoints located on the medium interface boundaries. The accuracy of the multi-dimensional TDRW method is verified against (i) exact analytical solutions of solute transport in homogeneous media and (ii) finite-difference simulations in a synthetic 2-D heterogeneous medium of simple geometry. The results demonstrate that the method is ideally suited to purely diffusive transport and to advection-dispersion transport problems dominated by advection. Conversely, the method is not recommended for highly dispersive transport problems because the accuracy of the advection-dispersion TDRW algorithms degrades rapidly for a low Péclet number, consistent with the accuracy limit of the approximate analytical solutions. The proposed approach provides a unified methodology for deriving multi-dimensional time-domain particle equations and may be applicable to other mathematical transport models, provided that appropriate analytical solutions are available.

  14. Numerical error in groundwater flow and solute transport simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Juliette A.; Teubner, Michael D.; Simmons, Craig T.; Narayan, Kumar A.

    2003-06-01

    Models of groundwater flow and solute transport may be affected by numerical error, leading to quantitative and qualitative changes in behavior. In this paper we compare and combine three methods of assessing the extent of numerical error: grid refinement, mathematical analysis, and benchmark test problems. In particular, we assess the popular solute transport code SUTRA [Voss, 1984] as being a typical finite element code. Our numerical analysis suggests that SUTRA incorporates a numerical dispersion error and that its mass-lumped numerical scheme increases the numerical error. This is confirmed using a Gaussian test problem. A modified SUTRA code, in which the numerical dispersion is calculated and subtracted, produces better results. The much more challenging Elder problem [Elder, 1967; Voss and Souza, 1987] is then considered. Calculation of its numerical dispersion coefficients and numerical stability show that the Elder problem is prone to error. We confirm that Elder problem results are extremely sensitive to the simulation method used.

  15. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport.

    PubMed

    Hunt, A G; Ghanbarian, B; Skinner, T E; Ewing, R P

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture. PMID:26232976

  16. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, A. G.; Ghanbarian, B.; Skinner, T. E.; Ewing, R. P.

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture.

  17. APPROXIMATE AND ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT FROM AN INJECTION WELL INTO A SINGLE FRACTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In dealing with problems related to land-based nuclear waste management, a number of analytical and approximate solutions were developed to quantify radionuclide transport through fractures contained in the porous formation. t has been reported that by treating the radioactive de...

  18. SOLUTIONS APPROXIMATING SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A LEAKY AQUIFER RECEIVING WASTEWATER INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model amenable to analytical solution techniques is developed for the investigation of contaminant transport from an injection well into a leaky aquifer system, which comprises a pumped and an unpumped aquifer connected to each other by an aquitard. A steady state ...

  19. SOLUTIONS APPROXIMATING SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A LEAKY AQUIFER RECEIVING WASTEWATER INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model amenable to analytical solution techniques is developed for the investigation of contaminant transport from an injection well into a leaky aquifer system, which comprises a pumped and an unpumped aquifer connected to each other by an aquitard. teady state gro...

  20. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of {sup 3}H-inulin and {sup 14}C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients.

  1. Hydrogeochemistry and simulated solute transport, Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, S.G.; Saulnier, G.J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Oil-shale mining activities in Piceance basin in northwestern Colorado could adversely affect the ground- and surface-water quality in the basin. This study of the hydrology and geochemistry of the area used ground-water solute-transport-modeling techniques to investigate the possible impact of the mines on water quality. Maps of the extent and structure of the aquifer were prepared and show that a saturated thickness of 2,000 feet occurs in the northeast part of the basin. Ground-water recharge in the upland areas in the east, south, and west parts of the basin moves down into deeper zones in the aquifer and laterally to the discharge areas along Piceance and Yellow Creeks. The saline zone and the unsaturated zone provide the majority of the dissolved solids found in the ground water. Precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions are also occuring in the aquifer. Model simulations of ground-water pumpage in tracts C-a and C-b indicate that the altered direction of ground-water movement near the pumped mines will cause an improvement in ground-water quality near the mines and a degradation of water quality downgradient from the tracts. Model simulations of mine leaching in tract C-a and C-b indicate that equal rates of mine leaching in the tracts will produce much different effects on the water quality in the basin. Tract C-a, by virtue of its remote location from perennial streams, will primarily degrade the ground-water quality over a large area to the northeast of the tract. Tract C-b, by contrast, will primarily degrade the surface-water quality in Piceance Creek, with only localized effects on the ground-water quality. (USGS)

  2. Hydrogeochemistry and simulated solute transport, Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.; Saulnier, George J.

    1980-01-01

    Oil-shale mining activities in Piceance basin in northwestern Colorado could adversely affect the ground- and surface-water quality in the basin. This study of the hydrology and geochemistry of the area used groundwater solute-transport-modeling techniques to investigate the possible impact of the mines on water quality. Maps of the extent and structure of the aquifer were prepared and show that a saturated thickness of 2,000 feet occurs in the northeast part of the basin. Ground-water recharge in the upland areas in the east, south, and west parts of the basin moves down into deeper zones in the aquifer and laterally to the discharge areas along Piceance and Yellow Creeks. The saline zone and the unsaturated zone provide the majority of the dissolved solids found in the ground water. Precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions are also occurring in the aquifer. Model simulations of groundwater pumpage in tracts C-a and C-b indicate that the altered direction of groundwater movement near the pumped mines will cause an improvement in groundwater quality near the mines and a degradation of water quality downgradient from the tracts. Model simulations of mine leaching in tract C-a and C-b indicate that equal rates of mine leaching in the tracts will produce much different effects on the water quality in the basin. Tract C-a, by virtue of its remote location from perennial streams, will primarily degrade the groundwater quality over a large area to the northeast of the tract. Tract C-b, by contrast, will primarily degrade the surface-water quality in Piceance Creek, with only localized effects on the groundwater quality. (USGS)

  3. Ground-water solute transport with hydrogeochemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Delgado, R.A.; Koussis, A.D.

    1997-03-01

    Chemical contamination of ground water is typically associated with multicomponent solutions of reactive substances, the mobility of which is affected by their reactivity. In predicting geochemical transport, it is therefore important that the liquid and solid phase reactions be modeled, along with the flow-controlled processes. This demanding task is typically carried out on powerful computers. Frequently, however, field data are available for a limited number of species, or, a small number of species suffices to characterize ground-water quality. In such cases it is desirable to be able to model the transport on a widely available class of inexpensive computers. The authors report on the development of a 2-D model for the transport of reactive species that runs efficiently on PCs. The model follows a modified one-step procedure that adopts total (aqueous and adsorbed) concentrations and aqueous concentrations of components, and accounts for aqueous complexation and for competitive sorption via isotherms or selectivity coefficients. The use of principal directions of transport coordinates, dimensional splitting, and a specialized algorithm for handling advection-dominated transport render it compact and efficient. Mass conservation is satisfied with high accuracy.

  4. Biotic controls on solute distribution and transport in headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, E. M.; Dere, A. L.; Sullivan, P. L.; Norris, D.; Reynolds, B.; Brantley, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Solute concentrations in stream water vary with discharge in patterns that record complex feedbacks between hydrologic and biogeochemical processes. In a comparison of headwater catchments underlain by shale in Pennsylvania, USA (Shale Hills) and Wales, UK (Plynlimon), dissimilar concentration-discharge behaviors are best explained by contrasting landscape distributions of soil solution chemistry - especially dissolved organic carbon (DOC) - that have been established by patterns of vegetation. Specifically, elements that are concentrated in organic-rich soils due to biotic cycling (Mn, Ca, K) or that form strong complexes with DOC (Fe, Al) are spatially heterogeneous in pore waters because organic matter is heterogeneously distributed across the catchments. These solutes exhibit non-chemostatic "bioactive" behavior in the streams, and solute concentrations either decrease (Shale Hills) or increase (Plynlimon) with increasing discharge. In contrast, solutes that are concentrated in soil minerals and form only weak complexes with DOC (Na, Mg, Si) are spatially homogeneous in pore waters across each catchment. These solutes are chemostatic in that their stream concentrations vary little with stream discharge, likely because these solutes are released quickly from exchange sites in the soils during rainfall events. Differences in the hydrologic connectivity of organic-rich soils to the stream drive differences in concentration behavior between catchments. As such, in catchments where soil organic matter (SOM) is dominantly in lowlands (e.g., Shale Hills), bioactive elements are released to the stream early during rainfall events, whereas in catchments where SOM is dominantly in uplands (e.g., Plynlimon), bioactive elements are released later during rainfall events. The distribution of vegetation and SOM across the landscape is thus a key component for predictive models of solute transport in headwater catchments.

  5. Analytical solution of two-dimensional solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Hongbin; Wen, Zhang; Huang, Guanhua; Sun, Dongmin

    2009-07-21

    This study deals with two-dimensional solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system by maintaining rigorous mass conservation at the aquifer-aquitard interface. Advection, longitudinal dispersion, and transverse vertical dispersion are considered in the aquifer. Vertical advection and diffusion are considered in the aquitards. The first-type and the third-type boundary conditions are considered in the aquifer. This study differs from the commonly used averaged approximation (AA) method that treats the mass flux between the aquifer and aquitard as an averaged volumetric source/sink term in the governing equation of transport in the aquifer. Analytical solutions of concentrations in the aquitards and aquifer and mass transported between the aquifer and upper or lower aquitard are obtained in the Laplace domain, and are subsequently inverted numerically to yield results in the real time domain (the Zhan method). The breakthrough curves (BTCs) and distribution profiles in the aquifer obtained in this study are drastically different from those obtained using the AA method. Comparison of the numerical simulation using the model MT3DMS and the Zhan method indicates that the numerical result differs from that of the Zhan method for an asymmetric case when aquitard advections are at the same direction. The AA method overestimates the mass transported into the upper aquitard when an upward advection exists in the upper aquitard. The mass transported between the aquifer and the aquitard is sensitive to the aquitard Peclet number, but less sensitive to the aquitard diffusion coefficient. PMID:19477033

  6. JOVIAN STRATOSPHERE AS A CHEMICAL TRANSPORT SYSTEM: BENCHMARK ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xi; Shia Runlie; Yung, Yuk L.

    2013-04-20

    We systematically investigated the solvable analytical benchmark cases in both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) chemical-advective-diffusive systems. We use the stratosphere of Jupiter as an example but the results can be applied to other planetary atmospheres and exoplanetary atmospheres. In the 1D system, we show that CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} are mainly in diffusive equilibrium, and the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} profile can be approximated by modified Bessel functions. In the 2D system in the meridional plane, analytical solutions for two typical circulation patterns are derived. Simple tracer transport modeling demonstrates that the distribution of a short-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) is dominated by the local chemical sources and sinks, while that of a long-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) is significantly influenced by the circulation pattern. We find that an equator-to-pole circulation could qualitatively explain the Cassini observations, but a pure diffusive transport process could not. For slowly rotating planets like the close-in extrasolar planets, the interaction between the advection by the zonal wind and chemistry might cause a phase lag between the final tracer distribution and the original source distribution. The numerical simulation results from the 2D Caltech/JPL chemistry-transport model agree well with the analytical solutions for various cases.

  7. Increased Ribozyme Activity in Crowded Solutions*

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ravi; Kilburn, Duncan; Lee, Hui-Ting; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs must function in the crowded environment of the cell. Previous small-angle x-ray scattering experiments showed that molecular crowders stabilize the structure of the Azoarcus group I ribozyme, allowing the ribozyme to fold at low physiological Mg2+ concentrations. Here, we used an RNA cleavage assay to show that the PEG and Ficoll crowder molecules increased the biochemical activity of the ribozyme, whereas sucrose did not. Crowding lowered the Mg2+ threshold at which activity was detected and increased total RNA cleavage at high Mg2+ concentrations sufficient to fold the RNA in crowded or dilute solution. After correcting for solution viscosity, the observed reaction rate was proportional to the fraction of active ribozyme. We conclude that molecular crowders stabilize the native ribozyme and favor the active structure relative to compact inactive folding intermediates. PMID:24337582

  8. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  9. TRANSPORT OF REACTING SOLUTES SUBJECT TO A MOVING DISSOLUTION BOUNDARY: NUMERICAL METHODS AND SOLUTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willis, Catherine; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    In this paper we consider examples of chemistry-affected transport processes in porous media. A moving boundary problem which arises during transport with precipitation-dissolution reactions is solved by three different numerical methods. Two of these methods (one explicit and one implicit) are based on an integral formulation of mass balance and lead to an approximation of a weak solution. These methods are compared to a front-tracking scheme. Although the two approaches are conceptually different, the numerical solutions showed good agreement. As the ratio of dispersion to convection decreases, the methods based on the integral formulation become computationally more efficient. Specific reactions were modeled to examine the dependence of the system on the physical and chemical parameters.

  10. Phononic heat transport in the transient regime: An analytic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuovinen, Riku; Säkkinen, Niko; Karlsson, Daniel; Stefanucci, Gianluca; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the time-resolved quantum transport properties of phonons in arbitrary harmonic systems connected to phonon baths at different temperatures. We obtain a closed analytic expression of the time-dependent one-particle reduced density matrix by explicitly solving the equations of motion for the nonequilibrium Green's function. This is achieved through a well-controlled approximation of the frequency-dependent bath self-energy. Our result allows for exploring transient oscillations and relaxation times of local heat currents, and correctly reduces to an earlier known result in the steady-state limit. We apply the formalism to atomic chains, and benchmark the validity of the approximation against full numerical solutions of the bosonic Kadanoff-Baym equations for the Green's function. We find good agreement between the analytic and numerical solutions for weak contacts and baths with a wide energy dispersion. We further analyze relaxation times from low to high temperature gradients.

  11. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  12. Proton-associated sucrose transport of mammalian solute carrier family 45: an analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bartölke, Rabea; Heinisch, Jürgen J; Wieczorek, Helmut; Vitavska, Olga

    2014-12-01

    The members of the solute carrier 45 (SLC45) family have been implicated in the regulation of glucose homoeostasis in the brain (SLC45A1), with skin and hair pigmentation (SLC45A2), and with prostate cancer and myelination (SLC45A3). However, apart from SLC45A1, a proton-associated glucose transporter, the function of these proteins is still largely unknown, although sequence similarities to plant sucrose transporters mark them as a putative sucrose transporter family. Heterologous expression of the three members SLC45A2, SLC45A3 and SLC45A4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed that they are indeed sucrose transporters. [(14)C]Sucrose-uptake measurements revealed intermediate transport affinities with Km values of approximately 5 mM. Transport activities were best under slightly acidic conditions and were inhibited by the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, demonstrating an H(+)-coupled transport mechanism. Na(+), on the other hand, had no effect on sucrose transport. Competitive inhibition assays indicated a possible transport also of glucose and fructose. Real-time PCR of mouse tissues confirmed mRNA expression of SLC45A2 in eyes and skin and of SLC45A3 primarily in the prostate, but also in other tissues, whereas SLC45A4 showed a predominantly ubiquitous expression. Altogether the results provide new insights into the physiological significance of SLC45 family members and challenge existing concepts of mammalian sugar transport, as they (i) transport a disaccharide, and (ii) perform secondary active transport in a proton-dependent manner. PMID:25164149

  13. Solute transport in solution conduits exhibiting multi-peaked breakthrough curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Malcolm S.; Leij, Feike J.

    2012-05-01

    SummarySolute transport in karst aquifers is primarily constrained to solution conduits where transport is rapid, turbulent, and relatively unrestrictive. Breakthrough curves generated from tracer tests are typically positively-skewed and may exhibit multiple peaks. In order to understand the circumstances under which multi-peaked positively skewed breakthrough curves occur, physical experiments utilizing single- and multiple-flow channels were conducted. Experiments also included waterfalls, short-term solute detention in pools, and flow obstructions. Results demonstrated that breakthrough curve skewness nearly always occurs to some degree but is magnified as immobile-flow regions are encountered. Multi-peaked breakthrough curves occurred when flow in the main channel became partially occluded from blockage in the main channel that forced divergence of solute into auxiliary channels and when waterfalls and detention in pools occurred. Currently, multi-peaked breakthrough curves are fitted by a multi-dispersion model in which a series of curves generated by the advection-dispersion equation are fitted to each measured peak by superimposing the measured breakthrough curve to obtain a combined model fit with a consequent set of estimated velocities and dispersions. In this paper, a dual-advection dispersion equation with first-order mass transfer between conduits was derived. The dual-advection dispersion equation was then applied to the multi-peaked breakthrough curves obtained from the physical experiments in order to obtain some insight into the operative solute-transport processes through the acquisition of a consequent set of velocities, dispersions, and related parameters. Successful application of the dual-advection, dispersion equation to a tracer test that exhibited dual peaks for a karst aquifer known to consist of two connected but mostly separate conduits confirmed the appropriateness of using a multi-dispersion type model when conditions warrant.

  14. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  15. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Microbial Growth, Water Flow, and Solute Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Bottomley, P. J.; Selker, J. S.

    2004-05-01

    We present an investigation that studied interactions between microbial growth, water flow, and solute transport in variably saturated porous media. The experimental system provided for continuous, noninvasive observation of microbial activity, while simultaneously monitoring water content and solute flow paths in a two-dimensional porous matrix. The spatial and temporal development of microbial colonization by a Pseudomonas fluorescens bacterium was monitored by induction of a bioluminescent phenotype. A model was developed that allowed quantification of population density from bioluminescence measurements. Liquid saturation was quantified from the transmission of light through the system, and solute flow paths were determined with a dye tracer. Dramatic changes in microbial colonization were observed, including upward migration against flow. This migration was particularly interesting because it cannot be explained by passive transport. Bacterial growth and accumulation significantly impacted the hydrologic properties of the media, including apparent desaturation within the colonized region, diversion of flow around the colonized region, and lowering of the capillary fringe height.

  17. Modeling solute transport by DLA in soils of northeastern Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Yasser Ahmed; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Persson, Magnus; Berndtsson, Ronny; Wang, Xin-ping

    2015-01-01

    Arid soils in Egypt display large variability in solute transport properties, causing problems in soil management. To characterize this variability, dye infiltration experiments were conducted on four plots representing three main soil types in northeastern Egypt. The plots represented both cultivated and uncultivated land use. The observed dye patterns displayed a large variability and especially the clay soils indicated a high degree of preferential flow. The loamy sand and sandy soils displayed a more uniform dye distribution indicating more homogeneous soil properties. The observed dye patterns were modeled using a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model. The DLA is a random walk model where model parameters can be optimized using genetic algorithms (GA). The DLA model reproduced the observed dye patterns for all soils in an excellent way. The best fit was obtained with a specific combination of directional random walk probabilities Pu, Pd, Pr, and Pl for each plot (correlation 0.97-0.99). To account for soil layers with different hydraulic properties a two layer DLA model was developed. For all plots the Pu (upward random walk probability) was higher for the upper more homogeneous soil layer. The overall results showed that spatial variability resulting from solute transport for the investigated soils can be modeled using a DLA approach. PMID:25790463

  18. Modeling Solute Transport by DLA in Soils of Northeastern Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Yasser Ahmed; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Persson, Magnus; Berndtsson, Ronny; Wang, Xin-ping

    2015-01-01

    Arid soils in Egypt display large variability in solute transport properties, causing problems in soil management. To characterize this variability, dye infiltration experiments were conducted on four plots representing three main soil types in northeastern Egypt. The plots represented both cultivated and uncultivated land use. The observed dye patterns displayed a large variability and especially the clay soils indicated a high degree of preferential flow. The loamy sand and sandy soils displayed a more uniform dye distribution indicating more homogeneous soil properties. The observed dye patterns were modeled using a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model. The DLA is a random walk model where model parameters can be optimized using genetic algorithms (GA). The DLA model reproduced the observed dye patterns for all soils in an excellent way. The best fit was obtained with a specific combination of directional random walk probabilities Pu, Pd, Pr, and Pl for each plot (correlation 0.97–0.99). To account for soil layers with different hydraulic properties a two layer DLA model was developed. For all plots the Pu (upward random walk probability) was higher for the upper more homogeneous soil layer. The overall results showed that spatial variability resulting from solute transport for the investigated soils can be modeled using a DLA approach. PMID:25790463

  19. Polymer Dynamics Effects on Solute Transport in Hairy Nanoparticle Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buenning, Eileen; Bilchak, Connor; Durning, Christopher; Benicewicz, Brian; Sokolov, Alexei; Kumar, Sanat

    Molecular transport measurements in matrix-free grafted nanoparticle (MFGNP) films have shown remarkable enhancement of permeability and ideal selectivity of small condensable molecules and simple gases over the neat polymer melts and conventional, dispersed nanoparticle composites. Films comprised of covalently-attached poly(methyl acrylate) PMA chains to the surface of 14nm silica particles self-assemble into ordered arrays, and we postulate this structure plays an important role in regulating solute transport. This self-assembly creates interstitial spaces between the nanoparticle cores, which the polymer chains can only fill by stretching. Here we use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS), rheology and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) to probe polymer chain and segmental dynamics and investigate this hypothesis of chain stretching in MFGNP materials. We found that grafting slows both chain and segmental relaxation, and increases fragility, indicating that the chains are more ``frustrated'' in the grafted systems. We propose that the effects of the chain/surface interactions on chain dynamics leads to an increase in available free volume and thus enhances transport properties in MFGNP systems. Special thanks to the NSF GRFP and the DOE SCGSR programs.

  20. Soil properties and preferential solute transport at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestel, J. K.; Luong, N. M.; Nørgaard, T.; Vendelboe, A. L.; Moldrup, P.; Jarvis, N. J.; Lamandé, M.; Iversen, B. V.; Wollesen de Jonge, L.

    2012-04-01

    An important fraction of water flow and solute transport through soil takes place through preferential flow paths. Although this had been already observed in the nineteenth century, it had been forgotten by the scientific community until it was rediscovered during the 1970s. The awareness of the relevance of preferential flow was broadly re-established in the community by the early 1990s. However, since then, the notion remains widespread among soil scientists that the occurrence and strength of preferential flow cannot be predicted from measurable proxy variables such as soil properties or land management practices (e.g. Beven, K., 1991, Modeling preferential flow - an uncertain future, Preferential Flow, 1-11). In our study, we present evidence that disproves this notion. We evaluated breakthrough curve experiments under a constant irrigation rate of 1 cm/h conducted on 65 soil columns (20 cm diameter and 20 height) which had been sampled from an approximately 1 ha large loamy field-site in Silstrup, Denmark. We show that the holdback factor, which is an indicator for the strength of preferential transport, is strongly correlated to the bulk density, which in turn is correlated to the organic matter content. By applying multiple linear regression in a bootstrapping framework, we could estimate the holdback factor from the bulk density and the very fine sand fraction with a coefficient of determination of 0.65. Our results raise hopes that it is indeed possible to establish pedotransfer functions for soil susceptibility to preferential flow and transport.

  1. Analytical solutions of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion solute transport equation subject to time-dependent boundary conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion solute transport equation remain useful for a large number of applications in science and engineering. In this paper we extend the Duhamel theorem, originally established for diffusion type problems, to the case of advective-dispersive transport subj...

  2. Interactions of solutes and streambed sediment. 2. A dynamic analysis of coupled hydrologic and chemical processes that determine solute transport.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bencala, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Solute transport in streams is determined by the interaction of physical and chemical processes. Data from an injection experiment for chloride and several cations indicate significant influence of solute-streambed processes on transport in a mountain stream. These data are interpreted in terms of transient storage processes for all tracers and sorption processes for the cations. Process parameter values are estimated with simulations based on coupled quasi-two-dimensional transport and first-order mass transfer sorption. Comparative simulations demonstrate the relative roles of the physical and chemical processes in determining solute transport. -from Author

  3. A comparison of solute-transport solution techniques based on inverse modelling results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Five common numerical techniques (finite difference, predictor-corrector, total-variation-diminishing, method-of-characteristics, and modified-method-of-characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using randomly distributed homogeneous blocks of five sand types. This experimental model provides an outstanding opportunity to compare the solution techniques because of the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution of known structure, and the availability of detailed measurements with which to compare simulated concentrations. The present work uses this opportunity to investigate how three common types of results-simulated breakthrough curves, sensitivity analysis, and calibrated parameter values-change in this heterogeneous situation, given the different methods of simulating solute transport. The results show that simulated peak concentrations, even at very fine grid spacings, varied because of different amounts of numerical dispersion. Sensitivity analysis results were robust in that they were independent of the solution technique. They revealed extreme correlation between hydraulic conductivity and porosity, and that the breakthrough curve data did not provide enough information about the dispersivities to estimate individual values for the five sands. However, estimated hydraulic conductivity values are significantly influenced by both the large possible variations in model dispersion and the amount of numerical dispersion present in the solution technique.Five common numerical techniques (finite difference, predictor-corrector, total-variation-diminishing, method-of-characteristics, and modified-method-of-characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using randomly

  4. KCNQ1, KCNE2, and Na+-Coupled Solute Transporters Form Reciprocally Regulating Complexes that Affect Neuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.; Tai, Kwok-Keung; Neverisky, Daniel; Hansler, Alex; Hu, Zhaoyang; Roepke, Torsten K.; Lerner, Daniel J.; Chen, Qiuying; Liu, Li; Zupan, Bojana; Toth, Miklos; Haynes, Robin; Huang, Xiaoping; Demirbas, Didem; Buccafusca, Roberto; Gross, Steven S.; Kanda, Vikram A.; Berry, Gerard T.

    2014-01-01

    Na+-coupled solute transport is crucial for the uptake of nutrients and metabolic precursors, such as myo-inositol, an important osmolyte and precursor for various cell signaling molecules. Here, we found that various solute transporters and potassium channel subunits formed complexes and reciprocally regulated each other in vitro and in vivo. Global metabolite profiling revealed that mice lacking KCNE2, a K+ channel β subunit, showed a reduction in the myo-inositol concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but not in serum. Increased behavorial responsiveness to stress and seizure susceptibility in Kcne2−/− mice were alleviated by injections of myo-inositol. Suspecting a defect in myo-inositol transport, we found that KCNE2 and KCNQ1, a voltage-gated potassium channel α subunit, colocalized and coimmunoprecipitated with SMIT1, a Na+-coupled myo-inositol transporter, in the choroid plexus epithelium. Heterologous coexpression demonstrated that myo-inositol transport by SMIT1 was augmented by coexpression of KCNQ1 but inhibited by coexpression of both KCNQ1 and KCNE2, which form a constitutively active, heteromeric K+ channel. SMIT1 and the related transporter SMIT2 were also inhibited by a constitutively active mutant form of KCNQ1. The activity of KCNQ1 and KCNQ1-KCNE2 were augmented by SMIT1 and the glucose transporter SGLT1, but suppressed by SMIT2. Channel-transporter signaling complexes may be a widespread mechanism to facilitate solute transport and electrochemical crosstalk. PMID:24595108

  5. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Bao-Quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles.

  6. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a 'sea' of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  7. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  8. Coupling of solute transport and cell expansion in pea stems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalstig, J. G.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    As cells expand and are displaced through the elongation zone of the epicotyl of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. var Alaska) seedlings, there is little net dilution of the cell sap, implying a coordination between cell expansion and solute uptake from the phloem. Using [14C] sucrose as a phloem tracer (applied to the hypogeous cotyledons), the pattern of label accumulation along the stem closely matched the growth rate pattern: high accumulation in the growing zone, little accumulation in nongrowing regions. Several results suggest that a major portion of phloem contents enters elongating cells through the symplast. We propose that the coordination between phloem transport and cell expansion is accomplished via regulatory pathways affecting both plasmodesmata conductivity and cell expansion.

  9. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses of Model Predictions of Solute Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaggs, T. H.; Suarez, D. L.; Goldberg, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    Soil salinity reduces crop production on about 50% of irrigated lands worldwide. One roadblock to increased use of advanced computer simulation tools for better managing irrigation water and soil salinity is that the models usually do not provide an estimate of the uncertainty in model predictions, which can be substantial. In this work, we investigate methods for putting confidence bounds on HYDRUS-1D simulations of solute leaching in soils. Uncertainties in model parameters estimated with pedotransfer functions are propagated through simulation model predictions using Monte Carlo simulation. Generalized sensitivity analyses indicate which parameters are most significant for quantifying uncertainty. The simulation results are compared with experimentally observed transport variability in a number of large, replicated lysimeters.

  10. Effects of isotope selection on solution convergence in HZE transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wilson, John W.; Kiefer, Richard L.; Thibeault, Sheila A.

    1994-01-01

    A fragmenting iron ion produces hundreds of isotopes during nuclear reactions. These isotopes are represented in the solution of the transport problem. A reduced set of isotopes is selected to minimize the computational burden but introduces error in the final result. A minimum list of 122 isotopes is required for adequate representation of the mass and charge distributions of the secondary radiation fields. A reduced set of 80 isotopes is sufficient to represent the charge distribution alone and represents reasonably well the linear energy transfer properties of the iron beam. Because iron fragmentation produces nearly every isotope lighter than iron, the resulting 122-isotope list should be adequate for ion beams with charges equal to or less than 26.

  11. An exact solution of solute transport by one-dimensional random velocity fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cvetkovic, V.D.; Dagan, G.; Shapiro, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of one-dimensional transport of passive solute by a random steady velocity field is investigated. This problem is representative of solute movement in porous media, for example, in vertical flow through a horizontally stratified formation of variable porosity with a constant flux at the soil surface. Relating moments of particle travel time and displacement, exact expressions for the advection and dispersion coefficients in the Focker-Planck equation are compared with the perturbation results for large distances. The first- and second-order approximations for the dispersion coefficient are robust for a lognormal velocity field. The mean Lagrangian velocity is the harmonic mean of the Eulerian velocity for large distances. This is an artifact of one-dimensional flow where the continuity equation provides for a divergence free fluid flux, rather than a divergence free fluid velocity. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Hierarchical Adaptive Solution of Radiation Transport Problems on Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Cassiano R. E de Oliveira

    2008-06-30

    Computational radiation transport has steadily gained acceptance in the last decade as a viable modeling tool due to the rapid advancements in computer software and hardware technologies. It can be applied for the analysis of a wide range of problems which arise in nuclear reactor physics, medical physics, atmospheric physics, astrophysics and other areas of engineering physics. However, radiation transport is an extremely chanllenging computational problem since the governing equation is seven-deimensional (3 in space, 2 in direction, 1 in energy, and 1 in time) with a high degree of coupleing betwen these variables. If not careful, this relatively large number of independent variables when discretized can potentially lead to sets of linear equations of intractable size. Though parallel computing has allowed the solution of very large problems, avaliable computational resources will always be finite due to the fact that every more sophisticated multiphysics models are being demanded by industry. There is thus the pressing requirement to optimize the discretizations so as to minimize the effort and maximize the accuracy.

  13. Improved parallel solution techniques for the integral transport matrix method

    SciTech Connect

    Zerr, Robert J; Azmy, Yousry Y

    2010-11-23

    Alternative solution strategies to the parallel block Jacobi (PBJ) method for the solution of the global problem with the integral transport matrix method operators have been designed and tested. The most straightforward improvement to the Jacobi iterative method is the Gauss-Seidel alternative. The parallel red-black Gauss-Seidel (PGS) algorithm can improve on the number of iterations and reduce work per iteration by applying an alternating red-black color-set to the subdomains and assigning multiple sub-domains per processor. A parallel GMRES(m) method was implemented as an alternative to stationary iterations. Computational results show that the PGS method can improve on the PBJ method execution by up to {approx}50% when eight sub-domains per processor are used. However, compared to traditional source iterations with diffusion synthetic acceleration, it is still approximately an order of magnitude slower. The best-performing case are opticaUy thick because sub-domains decouple, yielding faster convergence. Further tests revealed that 64 sub-domains per processor was the best performing level of sub-domain division. An acceleration technique that improves the convergence rate would greatly improve the ITMM. The GMRES(m) method with a diagonal block preconditioner consumes approximately the same time as the PBJ solver but could be improved by an as yet undeveloped, more efficient preconditioner.

  14. Stochastic steps in secondary active sugar transport.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Joshua L; Ghezzi, Chiara; Bisignano, Paola; Loo, Donald D F; Choe, Seungho; Abramson, Jeff; Rosenberg, John M; Wright, Ernest M; Grabe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Secondary active transporters, such as those that adopt the leucine-transporter fold, are found in all domains of life, and they have the unique capability of harnessing the energy stored in ion gradients to accumulate small molecules essential for life as well as expel toxic and harmful compounds. How these proteins couple ion binding and transport to the concomitant flow of substrates is a fundamental structural and biophysical question that is beginning to be answered at the atomistic level with the advent of high-resolution structures of transporters in different structural states. Nonetheless, the dynamic character of the transporters, such as ion/substrate binding order and how binding triggers conformational change, is not revealed from static structures, yet it is critical to understanding their function. Here, we report a series of molecular simulations carried out on the sugar transporter vSGLT that lend insight into how substrate and ions are released from the inward-facing state of the transporter. Our simulations reveal that the order of release is stochastic. Functional experiments were designed to test this prediction on the human homolog, hSGLT1, and we also found that cytoplasmic release is not ordered, but we confirmed that substrate and ion binding from the extracellular space is ordered. Our findings unify conflicting published results concerning cytoplasmic release of ions and substrate and hint at the possibility that other transporters in the superfamily may lack coordination between ions and substrate in the inward-facing state. PMID:27325773

  15. Solute transport and retention in three-dimensional fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Frampton, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Resolving the hydrodynamic control of retention is an important step in predictive modeling of transport of sorbing tracers in fractured rock. The statistics of the transport resistance parameter β [T/L] and the related effective active specific surface area sf [1/L] are studied in a crystalline rock volume on a 100 m scale. Groundwater flow and advective transport are based on generic boundary conditions and realistic discrete fracture networks inferred from the Laxemar site, southeast Sweden. The overall statistics of β are consistent with statistics of the water residence time τ; the moments of β vary linearly with distance, at least up to 100 m. The correlation between log τ and log β is predominantly linear, however, there is significant dispersion; the parameter sf strongly depends on the assumed hydraulic law (theoretical cubic or empirical quadratic). Fast and slow trajectories/segments in the network determine the shape of the β distribution that cannot be reproduced by infinitely divisible model over the entire range; the low value range and median can be reproduced reasonably well with the tempered one-sided stable density using the exponent in the range 0.35-0.7. The low percentiles of the β distribution seems to converge to a Fickian type of behavior from a 50 to 100 m scale.

  16. Dual radiotracer measurement of zoobenthos-mediated solute and particle transport in freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Krezoski, J.R.; Robbins, J.A.; White, D.S.

    1984-09-01

    ..gamma.. spectroscopy methods have been applied to determine the effects of two freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates, on reworking of sediments and the transfer of solutes across the sediment-water interface. Natural lake sediments and overlying water were contained in temperature-regulated rectangular plastic cells. After addition of Stylodrilus (oligochaete worms) and Pontoporeia (crustacean amphipods) to these microcosms, the vertical distribution of Cs-137 (a tracer of particle transport) and Na-22 (a tracer of solute transport) were determined. In cells with Stylodrilus, the Cs-137 layer moved downward at a rate that decreased exponentially with time. In cells with Pontoporeia, Cs-137 activity was smeared downward in time owing to eddy diffusive mixing of sediments over a small range (1-2 cm). In cells without worms, the veneer of Cs active material remained at the interface while the penetration of Na-22 into sediments was consistent with diffusion in free solution with small corrections for sediment porosity and sorption. In cells with live Stylodrilus, penetration of Na-22 within the feeding zone was considerably more rapid. Advective transport arises from the incorporation of Na-22 into pore fluids moved downward as a result of conveyor-belt feeding. In cells with Pontoporeia, De is approximately twice that in control cells. In these cells, Na-22 profiles may be treated theoretically without advection. 47 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Impact of degrading permafrost on subsurface solute transport pathways and travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-09-01

    Subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in the subsurface water and inert solute pathways and travel times are analyzed for different modeled geological configurations. For all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase nonlinearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The timing of the start of increase in travel time depends on heterogeneity structure, combined with the rate of permafrost degradation that also depends on material thermal and hydrogeological properties. The travel time changes depend on combined warming effects of: i) increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, ii) reduced transport velocities due to a shift from horizontal saturated groundwater flow near the surface to vertical water percolation deeper into the subsurface, and iii) pathway length increase and temporary immobilization caused by cryosuction-induced seasonal freeze cycles.

  18. Active water transport in unicellular algae: where, why, and how.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Doblin, Martina A

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of active water transport (net transport against a free energy gradient) in photosynthetic organisms has been debated for several decades. Here, active water transport is considered in terms of its roles, where it is found, and the mechanisms by which it could occur. First there is a brief consideration of the possibility of active water transport into plant xylem in the generation of root pressure and the refilling of embolized xylem elements, and from an unsaturated atmosphere into terrestrial organisms living in habitats with limited availability of liquid water. There is then a more detailed consideration of volume and osmotic regulation in wall-less freshwater unicells, and the possibility of generation of buoyancy in marine phytoplankton such as large-celled diatoms. Calculations show that active water transport is a plausible mechanism to assist cells in upwards vertical movements, requires less energy than synthesis of low-density organic solutes, and potentially on a par with excluding certain ions from the vacuole. PMID:25205578

  19. Development of novel active transport membrande devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-11-01

    Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

  20. Health Impacts of Active Transportation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Rueda, David; de Nazelle, Audrey; Andersen, Zorana J; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Bruha, Jan; Bruhova-Foltynova, Hana; Desqueyroux, Hélène; Praznoczy, Corinne; Ragettli, Martina S; Tainio, Marko; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Policies that stimulate active transportation (walking and bicycling) have been related to heath benefits. This study aims to assess the potential health risks and benefits of promoting active transportation for commuting populations (age groups 16-64) in six European cities. We conducted a health impact assessment using two scenarios: increased cycling and increased walking. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality related to changes in physical activity level, exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution with a diameter <2.5 μm, as well as traffic fatalities in the cities of Barcelona, Basel, Copenhagen, Paris, Prague, and Warsaw. All scenarios produced health benefits in the six cities. An increase in bicycle trips to 35% of all trips (as in Copenhagen) produced the highest benefits among the different scenarios analysed in Warsaw 113 (76-163) annual deaths avoided, Prague 61 (29-104), Barcelona 37 (24-56), Paris 37 (18-64) and Basel 5 (3-9). An increase in walking trips to 50% of all trips (as in Paris) resulted in 19 (3-42) deaths avoided annually in Warsaw, 11(3-21) in Prague, 6 (4-9) in Basel, 3 (2-6) in Copenhagen and 3 (2-4) in Barcelona. The scenarios would also reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities by 1,139 to 26,423 (metric tonnes per year). Policies to promote active transportation may produce health benefits, but these depend of the existing characteristics of the cities. Increased collaboration between health practitioners, transport specialists and urban planners will help to introduce the health perspective in transport policies and promote active transportation. PMID:26930213

  1. Health Impacts of Active Transportation in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Rueda, David; de Nazelle, Audrey; Andersen, Zorana J.; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Bruha, Jan; Bruhova-Foltynova, Hana; Desqueyroux, Hélène; Praznoczy, Corinne; Ragettli, Martina S.; Tainio, Marko; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Policies that stimulate active transportation (walking and bicycling) have been related to heath benefits. This study aims to assess the potential health risks and benefits of promoting active transportation for commuting populations (age groups 16–64) in six European cities. We conducted a health impact assessment using two scenarios: increased cycling and increased walking. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality related to changes in physical activity level, exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution with a diameter <2.5 μm, as well as traffic fatalities in the cities of Barcelona, Basel, Copenhagen, Paris, Prague, and Warsaw. All scenarios produced health benefits in the six cities. An increase in bicycle trips to 35% of all trips (as in Copenhagen) produced the highest benefits among the different scenarios analysed in Warsaw 113 (76–163) annual deaths avoided, Prague 61 (29–104), Barcelona 37 (24–56), Paris 37 (18–64) and Basel 5 (3–9). An increase in walking trips to 50% of all trips (as in Paris) resulted in 19 (3–42) deaths avoided annually in Warsaw, 11(3–21) in Prague, 6 (4–9) in Basel, 3 (2–6) in Copenhagen and 3 (2–4) in Barcelona. The scenarios would also reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities by 1,139 to 26,423 (metric tonnes per year). Policies to promote active transportation may produce health benefits, but these depend of the existing characteristics of the cities. Increased collaboration between health practitioners, transport specialists and urban planners will help to introduce the health perspective in transport policies and promote active transportation. PMID:26930213

  2. Modeling colloid and microorganism transport and release with transients in solution ionic strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transport and fate of colloids, microorganisms, and nanoparticles in subsurface environments is strongly influenced by transients in solution ionic strength (IS). A sophisticated dual-permeability transport model that is capable of simulating exponential, hyperexponential, uniform, and nonmonot...

  3. Product Lifecycle Management and the Quest for Sustainable Space Transportation Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Pamela W.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA Marshall's effort to sustain space transportation solutions through product lines that include: 1) Propulsion and Transportation Systems; 2) Life Support Systems; and 3) and Earth and Space Science Spacecraft Systems, and Operations.

  4. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  5. EVALUATION OF DMSO TRANSPORT IN HUMAN ARTICULAR CARTILAGE: VEHICLE SOLUTIONS AND EFFECTS ON CELL FUNCTION.

    PubMed

    Kay, A G; Rooney, P; Kearney, J; Pegg, D E

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondral allografting techniques are limited by the availability of suitable donor tissue; there is an urgent need for effective cryopreservation. A fundamental requirement is the need to establish initial conditions of exposure to cryoprotectant that the chondrocytes will tolerate and that load the tissue with an adequate concentration of cryoprotectant. Three vehicle solutions to transport DMSO into the tissue were studied. Knee joints were obtained from deceased donors with appropriate consent. Whole condyles were treated with 20% w/w DMSO in each of three vehicle solutions and chondrocyte function and tissue CPA content measured. The results showed that exposure to 20% DMSO in each vehicle solution for 2 hours at 0 degrees C was tolerated without loss of GAG synthetic activity. It was observed that penetration of DMSO increased little after 1 hour of CPA exposure at 0 degrees C but the final tissue concentration of CPA was markedly lower than that in the medium. PMID:26510337

  6. Long range transport of colloids in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florea, Daniel; Musa, Sami; Huyghe, Jacques M. R. J.; Wyss, Hans M.

    2013-03-01

    Colloids in aqueous suspensions can experience strong, extremely long range repulsive forces near interfaces such as biological tissues, gels, ion exchange resins or metals. As a result exclusion zones extending over several millimeters can be formed. While this phenomenon has been previously described, a physical understanding of this process is still lacking. This exclusion zone formation is puzzling because the typical forces acting on colloidal particles are limited to much shorter distances and external fields that could drive the particles are absent. Here we study the exclusion zone formation in detail by following the time and distance-dependent forces acting on the particles. We present a simple model that accounts for our experimental data and directly links the exclusion zone formation to an already known physical transport phenomenon. We show that the effect can be tuned by changing the zeta potential of the particles or by varying the species present in the aqueous solution. We thus provide a direct physical explanation for the intriguing exclusion zone formation and we illustrate how this effect can be exploited in a range of industrial applications.

  7. Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Tracer Transport in Layered Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Moridis; G. S. Bodvarsson

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

  8. Semianalytical solutions of radioactive or reactive tracer transport in layered fractured media

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2001-10-10

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

  9. Study of active cooling for supersonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential benefits of using the fuel heat sink of hydrogen fueled supersonic transports for cooling large portions of the aircraft wing and fuselage are examined. The heat transfer would be accomplished by using an intermediate fluid such as an ethylene glycol-water solution. Some of the advantages of the system are: (1) reduced costs by using aluminum in place of titanium, (2) reduced cabin heat loads, and (3) more favorable environmental conditions for the aircraft systems. A liquid hydrogen fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic transport aircraft design was used for the reference uncooled vehicle. The cooled aircraft designs were analyzed to determine their heat sink capability, the extent and location of feasible cooled surfaces, and the coolant passage size and spacing.

  10. Solute transport in eroded and rehabilitated prairie landforms. 1. Nonreactive solute.

    PubMed

    Papiernik, Sharon K; Koskinen, William C; Yates, Scott R

    2009-08-26

    Information regarding solute and water transport as affected by soil properties, topography, and climatic conditions is required to improve and validate transport models. This study evaluated the dissipation of bromide applied to the soil surface in the fall and spring to undisturbed (eroded) and rehabilitated landforms, in which topsoil was moved from depositional areas to the eroded upper slope. Despite large changes in soil properties, the amount and center of mass of bromide remaining in the top 1 m of soil was the same in undisturbed and rehabilitated plots. Approximately 60% of the fall-applied bromide was lost during the winter and early spring, presumably due to leaching and runoff. The center of mass of spring-applied bromide remained at depths of <30 cm. At the end of the experiment, 33% of the spring-applied bromide was detected in soil and 56% in corn plants. These results suggest that little bromide was leached out of the root zone in the spring and that plant uptake was a major route of bromide dissipation during the growing season. PMID:19653694

  11. The Major Facilitative Folate Transporters Solute Carrier 19A1 and Solute Carrier 46A1: Biology and Role in Antifolate Chemotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mike R.; Hou, Zhanjun

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the biology of the major facilitative membrane transporters, the reduced folate carrier (RFC) (Solute Carrier 19A1) and the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) (Solute Carrier 46A1). Folates are essential vitamins, and folate deficiency contributes to a variety of health disorders. RFC is ubiquitously expressed and is the major folate transporter in mammalian cells and tissues. PCFT mediates the intestinal absorption of dietary folates and appears to be important for transport of folates into the central nervous system. Clinically relevant antifolates for cancer, such as methotrexate and pralatrexate, are transported by RFC, and loss of RFC transport is an important mechanism of methotrexate resistance in cancer cell lines and in patients. PCFT is expressed in human tumors, and is active at pH conditions associated with the tumor microenvironment. Pemetrexed is an excellent substrate for both RFC and PCFT. Novel tumor-targeted antifolates related to pemetrexed with selective membrane transport by PCFT over RFC are being developed. In recent years, there have been major advances in understanding the structural and functional properties and the regulation of RFC and PCFT. The molecular bases for methotrexate resistance associated with loss of RFC transport and for hereditary folate malabsorption, attributable to mutant PCFT, were determined. Future studies should continue to translate molecular insights from basic studies of RFC and PCFT biology into new therapeutic strategies for cancer and other diseases. PMID:24396145

  12. COMPARING THE FRACTIONAL AND THE CLASSICAL SOLUTE TRANSPORT EQUATIONS WITH DATA ON SOLUTE BREAKTHROUGH IN SOIL COLUMNS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solute transport in soils and sediments is commonly simulated with the parabolic advective-dispersive equation, or ADE. In the last decades, it has been reported that this model cannot take in account several important features of solute movement through soil. Recently, a new model base on the assu...

  13. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Waniewski, Jacek; Antosiewicz, Stefan; Baczynski, Daniel; Poleszczuk, Jan; Pietribiasi, Mauro; Lindholm, Bengt; Wankowicz, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21-87) years; median time on PD 19 (3-100) months) underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient age did not correlate. Estimation of parameters of the two-pore model of peritoneal transport was performed. The estimated fluid transport parameters, including hydraulic permeability (LpS), fraction of ultrasmall pores (α u), osmotic conductance for glucose (OCG), and peritoneal absorption, were generally independent of solute transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters). Fluid transport parameters correlated whereas transport parameters for small solutes and proteins did not correlate with dialysis vintage and patient age. Although LpS and OCG were lower for older patients and those with long dialysis vintage, αu was higher. Thus, fluid transport parameters--rather than solute transport parameters--are linked to dialysis vintage and patient age and should therefore be included when monitoring processes linked to ageing of the peritoneal membrane. PMID:26989432

  14. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Waniewski, Jacek; Antosiewicz, Stefan; Baczynski, Daniel; Poleszczuk, Jan; Pietribiasi, Mauro; Lindholm, Bengt; Wankowicz, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21–87) years; median time on PD 19 (3–100) months) underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient age did not correlate. Estimation of parameters of the two-pore model of peritoneal transport was performed. The estimated fluid transport parameters, including hydraulic permeability (LpS), fraction of ultrasmall pores (αu), osmotic conductance for glucose (OCG), and peritoneal absorption, were generally independent of solute transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters). Fluid transport parameters correlated whereas transport parameters for small solutes and proteins did not correlate with dialysis vintage and patient age. Although LpS and OCG were lower for older patients and those with long dialysis vintage, αu was higher. Thus, fluid transport parameters—rather than solute transport parameters—are linked to dialysis vintage and patient age and should therefore be included when monitoring processes linked to ageing of the peritoneal membrane. PMID:26989432

  15. Demonstrations in Solute Transport Using Dyes: Part II. Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butters, Greg; Bandaranayake, Wije

    1993-01-01

    A solution of the convection-dispersion equation is used to describe the solute breakthrough curves generated in the demonstrations in the companion paper. Estimation of the best fit model parameters (solute velocity, dispersion, and retardation) is illustrated using the method of moments for an example data set. (Author/MDH)

  16. FRACTIONAL SOLUTE TRANSPORT EQUATION EVALUATED WITH THE MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT EXPERIMENTAL DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new solute transport model has been recently developed assuming that the movements of solute particles in hierarchically-structured porous media belongs to the family of Lévy motions rather than to the Brownian motion. The one-dimensional fractional advective-dispersive transport equation, or FADE...

  17. Redox activity distinguishes solid-state electron transport from solution-based electron transfer in a natural and artificial protein: cytochrome C and hemin-doped human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Amdursky, Nadav; Ferber, Doron; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2013-10-28

    Integrating proteins in molecular electronic devices requires control over their solid-state electronic transport behavior. Unlike "traditional" electron transfer (ET) measurements of proteins that involve liquid environments and a redox cycle, no redox cofactor is needed for solid-state electron transport (ETp) across the protein. Here we show the fundamental difference between these two approaches by macroscopic area measurements, which allow measuring ETp temperature dependence down to cryogenic temperatures, via cytochrome C (Cyt C), an ET protein with a heme (Fe-porphyrin) prosthetic group as a redox centre. We compare the ETp to electrochemical ET measurements, and do so also for the protein without the Fe (with metal-free porphyrin) and without porphyrin. As removing the porphyrin irreversibly alters the protein's conformation, we repeat these measurements with human serum albumin (HSA), 'doped' (by non-covalent binding) with a single hemin equivalent, i.e., these natural and artificial proteins share a common prosthetic group. ETp via Cyt C and HSA-hemin are very similar in terms of current magnitude and temperature dependence, which suggests similar ETp mechanisms via these two systems, thermally activated hopping (with ~0.1 eV activation energy) >190 K and tunneling by superexchange <190 K. Also, ET rates to and from the Fe redox centres (Fe(2+) <=> Fe(3+) + e(-)), measured by electrochemistry of HSA-hemin are only 4 times lower than those for Cyt C. However, while removing the Fe redox centre from the porphyrin ring markedly affects the ET rate, it hardly changes the ETp currents through these proteins, while removing the macrocycle (from HSA, which retains its conformation) significantly reduces ETp efficiency. These results show that solid-state ETp across proteins does not require the presence of a redox cofactor, and that while for ET the Fe ion is the main electron mediator, for ETp the porphyrin ring has this function. PMID:24008341

  18. An exploration of coupled surface-subsurface solute transport in a fully integrated catchment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggett, Jessica E.; Partington, Daniel; Frei, Sven; Werner, Adrian D.; Simmons, Craig T.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-10-01

    Coupling surface and subsurface water flow in fully integrated hydrological codes is becoming common in hydrological research; however, the coupling of surface-subsurface solute transport has received much less attention. Previous studies on fully integrated solute transport focus on small scales, simple geometric domains, and have not utilised many different field data sources. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the inclusion of both flow and solute transport in a 3D, fully integrated catchment model, utilising high resolution observations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export from a wetland complex during a rainfall event. A sensitivity analysis is performed to span a range of transport conditions for the surface-subsurface boundary (e.g. advective exchange only, advection plus diffusion, advection plus full mechanical dispersion) and subsurface dispersivities. The catchment model captures some aspects of observed catchment behaviour (e.g. solute discharge at the catchment outlet, increasing discharge from wetlands with increased stream discharge, and counter-clockwise concentration-discharge relationships), although other known behaviours are not well represented in the model (e.g. slope of concentration-discharge plots). Including surface-subsurface solute transport aids in evaluating internal model processes, however there are challenges related to the influence of dispersion across the surface-subsurface interface, and non-uniqueness of the solute transport solution. This highlights that obtaining solute field data is especially important for constraining integrated models of solute transport.

  19. Impact of 3D root uptake on solute transport: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, N.; Javaux, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Steffen, B.; Vereecken, H.

    2011-12-01

    Plant transpiration is an important component of the hydrological cycle. Through root water uptake, plants do not only affect the 3D soil water flow velocity distribution, but also solute movement in soil. This numerical study aims at investigating how solute fate is impacted by root uptake using the 3D biophysical model R-SWMS (Javaux et al., 2008). This model solves the Richards equation in 3D in the soil and the flow equation within the plant root xylem vessels. Furthermore, for solute transport simulations, the 3D particle tracker PARTRACE (Bechtold et al., 2011) was used. . We generated 3D virtual steady-state breakthrough curves (BTC) experiments in soils with transpiring plants. The averaged BTCs were then fitted with a 1D numerical flow model under steady-state conditions to obtain apparent CDE parameters. Two types of root architecture, a fibrous and a taprooted structure, were compared in virtual 3D experiments. The solute uptake type or the transpiration rate were also modified and we analyzed how these parameters affected apparent disperisivity and velocity profiles. Our simulation results show, that both, apparent velocity and dispersivity length are affected by water and solute root uptake. In addition, under high exclusion processes (slight or no active uptake), solute accumulates around roots and generates a long tailing to the breakthrough curves, which cannot be reproduced by 1D models that simulate root water uptake with solute exclusion. This observation may have an important impact on how to model pollutant mass transfer to groundwater at larger scales. Javaux, M., T. Schröder, J. Vanderborght, and H. Vereecken. 2008. Use of a three-dimensional detailed modeling approach for predicting root water uptake. Vadose Zone J. 7:1079-1088.doi: 10.2136/vzj2007.0115. Bechtold, M., S. Haber-Pohlmeier, J. Vanderborght, A. Pohlmeier, P.A. Ferre, and H. Vereecken. 2011. Near-surface solute redistribution during evaporation. Submitted to Geophys. Res. Lett

  20. Active sodium transport and the electrophysiology of rabbit colon.

    PubMed

    Schultz, S G; Frizzell, R A; Nellans, H N

    1977-05-12

    The electrophysiologic properties of rabbit colonic epithelial cells were investigated employing microelectrode techniques. Under open-circuit conditions, the transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) averaged 20 mV, serosa positive, and the intracellular electrical potential (psimc) averaged -32 mV, cell interior negative with respect to the mucosal solution; under short-circuit conditions, psimc averaged -46 mV. The addition of amiloride to the mucosal solution abolishes the transepithelial PD and active Na transport, and psimc is hyperpolarized to an average value of -53 mV. These results indicate that Na entry into the mucosal cell is a conductive process which, normally, depolarized psimc. The data obtained were interpreted using a double-membrane equivalent electrical circuit model of the "active Na transport pathway" involving two voltage-independent electromotive forces (emf's) and two voltage-independent resistances arrayed in series. Our observations are consistent with the notions that: (a) The emf's and resistances across the mucosal and baso-lateral membranes are determined predominantly by the emf (64 mV) and resistance of the Na entry process and the emf (53 mV) and resistance of the process responsible for active Na extrusion across the baso-lateral membranes: that is, the electrophysiological properties of the cell appear to be determined solely by the properties and processes responsible for transcellular active Na transport. The emf of the Na entry process is consistent with the notion that the Na activity in the intracellular transport pool is approximately one-tenth that in the mucosal solution or about 14 mM. (b) In the presence of amiloride, the transcellular conductance is essentially abolished and the total tissue conductance is the result of ionic diffusion through paracellular pathways. (c) The negative intracellular potential (with respect to the mucosal solution) is due primarily to the presence of a low resistance

  1. A modified two-state empirical valence bond model for proton transport in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabuchi, Takuya; Fukushima, Akinori; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    A detailed analysis of the proton solvation structure and transport properties in aqueous solutions is performed using classical molecular dynamics simulations. A refined two-state empirical valence bond (aTS-EVB) method, which is based on the EVB model of Walbran and Kornyshev and the anharmonic water force field, is developed in order to describe efficiently excess proton transport via the Grotthuss mechanism. The new aTS-EVB model clearly satisfies the requirement for simpler and faster calculation, because of the simplicity of the two-state EVB algorithm, while providing a better description of diffusive dynamics of the excess proton and water in comparison with the previous two-state EVB models, which significantly improves agreement with the available experimental data. The results of activation energies for the excess proton and water calculated between 300 and 340 K (the temperature range used in this study) are also found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

  2. A modified two-state empirical valence bond model for proton transport in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mabuchi, Takuya; Fukushima, Akinori; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2015-07-07

    A detailed analysis of the proton solvation structure and transport properties in aqueous solutions is performed using classical molecular dynamics simulations. A refined two-state empirical valence bond (aTS-EVB) method, which is based on the EVB model of Walbran and Kornyshev and the anharmonic water force field, is developed in order to describe efficiently excess proton transport via the Grotthuss mechanism. The new aTS-EVB model clearly satisfies the requirement for simpler and faster calculation, because of the simplicity of the two-state EVB algorithm, while providing a better description of diffusive dynamics of the excess proton and water in comparison with the previous two-state EVB models, which significantly improves agreement with the available experimental data. The results of activation energies for the excess proton and water calculated between 300 and 340 K (the temperature range used in this study) are also found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

  3. Water movement and solute transport in permafrost wetlands: implications for inorganic carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessen, Søren; Dahl Holmslykke, Hanne; Rasmussen, Kristine; Richardt, Niels; Engelund Holm, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions from thawing permafrost wetlands are an expected consequence of global warming. Addressing the pathways by which carbon is emitted, we investigated the hydrological and geochemical controls on the pore water chemistry of a permafrost wetland, with a shallow geological sequence comprising loam overlain by sphagnum peat, in Ilulissat, Greenland. A 400 m transect parallel to the general flow direction was established, along which water table measurements and slug tests were conducted, and the active layer thickness recorded (typically ~0.5 m). Also, in three detailed profiles along the transect, the vertical distributions of stable isotopes of water and major ion chemistry were investigated, by analysis of active layer pore water and water of melted core sections of permafrost. Concentrations of chloride (0.3-0.4 mM) did not show variation with depth, dismissing solute movement by ion freeze-out during fall freeze-up as a main control on the water chemistry. In addition, the observed vertical δ18O distribution did not to any extent conform to modelled Rayleigh distillation curves for the preferential inclusion of H218O into ice, which could be a scenario for fall freeze-up. The δ18O data therefore suggests either a rapid freeze-up or a simultaneous phase transition at all depths of the active layer, which in either case also would minimize potential ion freeze-out effects. Nevertheless, concentrations of major ions generally increased with depth. A conceptual model for water and solute transport was therefore established, according to which solutes are mobilized by weathering reactions in the loam and then transported upwards to the peat by diffusion. In the peat, lateral advective solute transport dominates. We applied the model to observed profiles of Ca, Mg, HCO3 and the partial CO2 pressure (PCO2). Concentrations of Ca, Mg and HCO3 increased with depth, reaching ~2 mM, ~2 mM and ~8 meq/L at the bottom of the active layer. Pore water at

  4. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    be very similar and likely functionally related. Our experimental field data were used for modelling water flow and solute transport in floating fens, using HYDRUS 2D. Fluctuations of surface water and root mat, as well as geometry and unsaturated zone parameters can have a major influence on groundwater fluctuations and the exchange between rain and surface water and the water in the root mats. In combination with the duration of salt pulses in surface water, and sensitivity of fen plants to salinity (Stofberg et al. 2014, submitted), risks for rare plants can be anticipated.

  5. Analytical solutions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional solute transport in ground-water systems with uniform flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the advective-dispersive solute transport equation are useful in predicting the fate of solutes in groundwater. Analytical solutions compiled from available literature or derived by the author are presented in this report for a variety of boundary condition types and solute-source configuration in one-, two-, and three-dimensional systems with uniform groundwater flow. A set of user-oriented computer programs was created to evaluate these solutions and to display the results in tabular and computer-graphics format. These programs incorporate many features that enhance their accuracy, ease of use, and versatility. Documentation for the programs describes their operation and required input data, and presents the results of sample problems. Derivations of select solutions, source codes for the computer programs, and samples of program input and output also are described. (USGS)

  6. Analytical solutions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional solute transport in ground-water systems with uniform flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the advective-dispersive solute-transport equation are useful in predicting the fate of solutes in ground water. Analytical solutions compiled from available literature or derived by the author are presented for a variety of boundary condition types and solute-source configurations in one-, two-, and three-dimensional systems having uniform ground-water flow. A set of user-oriented computer programs was created to evaluate these solutions and to display the results in tabular and computer-graphics format. These programs incorporate many features that enhance their accuracy, ease of use, and versatility. Documentation for the programs describes their operation and required input data, and presents the results of sample problems. Derivations of selected solutions, source codes for the computer programs, and samples of program input and output also are included.

  7. Active transporters as enzymes: an energetic framework applied to major facilitator superfamily and ABC importer systems.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Brian H

    2015-04-15

    Active membrane transporters are dynamic molecular machines that catalyse transport across a membrane by coupling solute movement to a source of energy such as ATP or a secondary ion gradient. A central question for many active transporters concerns the mechanism by which transport is coupled to a source of energy. The transport process and associated energetic coupling involve conformational changes in the transporter. For efficient transport, the conformational changes must be tightly regulated and they must link energy use to movement of the substrate across the membrane. The present review discusses active transport using the well-established energetic framework for enzyme-mediated catalysis. In particular, membrane transport systems can be viewed as ensembles consisting of low-energy and high-energy conformations. The transport process involves binding interactions that selectively stabilize the higher energy conformations, and in this way promote conformational changes in the system that are coupled to decreases in free energy and substrate translocation. The major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters is used to illustrate these ideas, which are then be expanded to primary active transport mediated by ABC (ATP-binding cassette) import systems, with a focus on the well-studied maltose transporter. PMID:25837849

  8. An Analytical Model for Solute Transport in Unsaturated Flowthrough a Single Fracture and Porous Rock Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Houseworth, J.E.

    2004-09-16

    Exact analytical solutions are presented for solute transport in an unsaturated fracture and porous rock matrix. The problem includes advective transport in the fracture and rock matrix as well as advective and diffusive fracture-matrix exchange. Linear sorption in the fracture and matrix and radioactive decay are also treated. The solution is for steady, uniform transport velocities within the fracture and matrix, but allows for independent specification of each of the velocities. The problem is first solved in terms of the solute concentrations that result from an instantaneous point source. Superposition integrals are then used to derive the solute mass flux at a fixed downstream position from an instantaneous point source and for the solute concentrations that result from a continuous point source. Solutions are derived for cases with the solute source in the fracture and the solute source in the matrix. The analytical solutions are closed-form and are expressed in terms of algebraic functions, exponentials, and error functions. Comparisons between the analytical solutions and numerical simulations, as well as sensitivity studies, are presented. Increased sensitivity to cross-flow and solute source location is found for increasing Peclet number. The numerical solutions are found to compare well with the analytical solutions at lower Peclet numbers ,but show greater deviation at higher Peclet numbers.

  9. Solute transport and storage mechanisms in wetlands of the Everglades, south Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Saiers, James E.; Newlin, Jessica T.

    2005-05-01

    Solute transport and storage processes in wetlands play an important role in biogeochemical cycling and in wetland water quality functions. In the wetlands of the Everglades, there are few data or guidelines to characterize transport through the heterogeneous flow environment. Our goal was to conduct a tracer study to help quantify solute exchange between the relatively fast flowing water in the open part of the water column and much more slowly moving water in thick floating vegetation and in the pore water of the underlying peat. We performed a tracer experiment that consisted of a constant-rate injection of a sodium bromide (NaBr) solution for 22 hours into a 3 m wide, open-ended flume channel in Everglades National Park. Arrival of the bromide tracer was monitored at an array of surface water and subsurface samplers for 48 hours at a distance of 6.8 m downstream of the injection. A one-dimensional transport model was used in combination with an optimization code to identify the values of transport parameters that best explained the tracer observations. Parameters included dimensions and mass transfer coefficients describing exchange with both short (hours) and longer (tens of hours) storage zones as well as the average rates of advection and longitudinal dispersion in the open part of the water column (referred to as the ``main flow zone''). Comparison with a more detailed set of tracer measurements tested how well the model's storage zones approximated the average characteristics of tracer movement into and out of the layer of thick floating vegetation and the pore water in the underlying peat. The rate at which the relatively fast moving water in the open water column was exchanged with slowly moving water in the layer of floating vegetation and in sediment pore water amounted to 50 and 3% h-1, respectively. Storage processes decreased the depth-averaged velocity of surface water by 50% relative to the water velocity in the open part of the water column. As a

  10. Solute transport and storage mechanisms in wetlands of the Everglades, south Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Saiers, James E.; Newlin, Jessica T.

    2005-05-01

    Solute transport and storage processes in wetlands play an important role in biogeochemical cycling and in wetland water quality functions. In the wetlands of the Everglades, there are few data or guidelines to characterize transport through the heterogeneous flow environment. Our goal was to conduct a tracer study to help quantify solute exchange between the relatively fast flowing water in the open part of the water column and much more slowly moving water in thick floating vegetation and in the pore water of the underlying peat. We performed a tracer experiment that consisted of a constant-rate injection of a sodium bromide (NaBr) solution for 22 hours into a 3 m wide, open-ended flume channel in Everglades National Park. Arrival of the bromide tracer was monitored at an array of surface water and subsurface samplers for 48 hours at a distance of 6.8 m downstream of the injection. A one-dimensional transport model was used in combination with an optimization code to identify the values of transport parameters that best explained the tracer observations. Parameters included dimensions and mass transfer coefficients describing exchange with both short (hours) and longer (tens of hours) storage zones as well as the average rates of advection and longitudinal dispersion in the open part of the water column (referred to as the "main flow zone"). Comparison with a more detailed set of tracer measurements tested how well the model's storage zones approximated the average characteristics of tracer movement into and out of the layer of thick floating vegetation and the pore water in the underlying peat. The rate at which the relatively fast moving water in the open water column was exchanged with slowly moving water in the layer of floating vegetation and in sediment pore water amounted to 50 and 3% h-1, respectively. Storage processes decreased the depth-averaged velocity of surface water by 50% relative to the water velocity in the open part of the water column. As a

  11. VERIFICATION OF TRANSPORT CODES BY THE METHOD OF MANUFACTURED SOLUTIONS: THE ATTILA EXPERIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    S. D. PAUTZ

    2001-03-19

    We extend the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) to the verification of transport codes. We derive analytic fixed sources required by the MMS procedure for several types of transport problems and apply the method to the Attila transport code. By means of this method we discover and correct several coding mistakes in Attila and ultimately verify its correct implementation for the problems studied. Our studies reveal that the MMS procedure is a useful tool for transport code development.

  12. An active matter analysis of intracellular Active Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Kejia; Bae, Sung Chul; Granick, Steve

    2012-02-01

    Tens of thousands of fluorescence-based trajectories at nm resolution have been analyzed, regarding active transport along microtubules in living cells. The following picture emerges. Directed motion to pre-determined locations is certainly an attractive idea, but cannot be pre-programmed as to do so would sacrifice adaptability. The polarity of microtubules is inadequate to identify these directions in cells, and no other mechanism is currently known. We conclude that molecular motors carry cargo through disordered intracellular microtubule networks in a statistical way, with loud cellular ``noise'' both in directionality and speed. Programmed random walks describe how local 1D active transport traverses crowded cellular space efficiently, rapidly, minimizing the energy waste that would result from redundant activity. The mechanism of statistical regulation is not yet understood, however.

  13. Simulating water, solute, and heat transport in the subsurface with the VS2DI software package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The software package VS2DI was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for simulating water, solute, and heat transport in variably saturated porous media. The package consists of a graphical preprocessor to facilitate construction of a simulation, a postprocessor for visualizing simulation results, and two numerical models that solve for flow and solute transport (VS2DT) and flow and heat transport (VS2DH). The finite-difference method is used to solve the Richards equation for flow and the advection-dispersion equation for solute or heat transport. This study presents a brief description of the VS2DI package, an overview of the various types of problems that have been addressed with the package, and an analysis of the advantages and limitations of the package. A review of other models and modeling approaches for studying water, solute, and heat transport also is provided. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  14. Dual radiotracer measurement of zoobenthos-mediated solute and particle transport in freshwater sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezoski, John R.; Robbins, John A.; White, David S.

    1984-09-01

    Gamma spectroscopy methods have been applied to determine the effects of Stylodrilus heringianus and Pontoporeia hoyi, two freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates, on the reworking of sediments and the transfer of solutes across the sediment-water interface. Natural lake sediments (sieved to remove organisms) and overlying water were contained in temperature-regulated rectangular plastic cells. A submillimeter layer of sediment solids labeled with 137Cs was deposited on the sediment interface while overlying water was spiked with 22Na. After addition of Stylodrilus (oligochaete worms) and Pontoporeia (crustacean amphipods) to these microcosms, the vertical distributions of 137Cs (a tracer of particle transport) and 22Na (a tracer of solute transport) were determined at daily to weekly intervals for 3 months by scanning the length of the cells with a well-collimated NaI detector. In cells with Stylodrilus, the 137Cs layer moved downward at a rate that decreased exponentially with time. The displacement of the layer is the result of the conveyor-belt feeding mode of this organism. The rate of marked layer burial is consistent with that of other freshwater annelids (0.18×10-5 cm d-1 individual-1 m-2; 11.6°C). The exponential decrease in burial rate is ascribed to uniformly distributed feeding of Stylodrilus within the feeding zone of 4.4 cm. In cells with Pontoporeia, 137Cs activity was smeared downward in time owing to eddy diffusive mixing of sediments over a small range (1-2 cm). In cells without worms, the veneer of Cs active material remained at the interface while the penetration of 22Na into sediments was consistent with diffusion in free solution with small corrections for sediment porosity and sorption (KD = 0.17). The effective diffusion coefficient De for 22Na in this cell (8.2×10-6 cm2 s-1) was essentially the same as that for a cell that had been inhabited by worms for 3 weeks and then poisoned with formalin just before addition of 22Na. Thus the

  15. All-solution-processed inverted organic solar cell with a stacked hole-transporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wen-Kai; Su, Shui-Hsiang; Liu, Che-Chun; Yokoyama, Meiso

    2014-11-01

    In this study, inverted organic solar cells (IOSCs) have been fabricated and characterized. A sol-gel zinc oxide (ZnO) film is used as a hole-blocking layer (HBL). Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) are used as a hole-transporting layer (HTL). The HBL, active layer, and HTL films are fabricated by spin-coating technique. The anode is fabricated from Ag nanoparticles by drop titration using a Pasteur burette. Experimental results show that the PEDOT:PSS/CuPc stacked HTL provides a stepwise hole-transporting energy diagram configuration, which subsequently increases the charge carrier transporting capability and extracts holes from the active layer to the anode. The characteristics of the IOSCs were optimized and exhibited an open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current density (Jsc), fill factor (FF), and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.53 V, 6.13 mA/cm2, 37.53%, and 1.24%, respectively, under simulated AM1.5G illumination of 100 mW/cm2. Hence, a solution process is feasible for fabricating low-cost and large-area solar energy devices.

  16. Pore connectivity effects on solute transport in rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.

    2001-11-30

    Retardation of nuclear contaminants in rock matrices can lead to long retention times, allowing substantial radionuclide decay prior to eventual release. Imbibition and diffusion into the rock matrix can move contaminants away from an active fracture, thereby contributing to their retardation. However, diffusive transport in some rocks may behave anomalously because of their sparsely connected porespace, in contrast to diffusion in rocks with denser pore connections. We examined imbibition of weakly sorbing tracers into welded tuff and Indiana sandstone, and water imbibition into metagraywacke and Berea sandstone. Tuff samples were initially equilibrated to 12% and 76% water (v/v) within controlled humidity chambers, while the other rocks were air-dried. For imbibition, one face was exposed to water, with or without tracer, and uptake was measured over time. Following imbibition, tracer concentration measurements were made at fine (1 mm) increments. Three anomalous results were observed: (1) Indiana sandstone and metagraywacke showed mass of imbibed water scaling as time{sup 0.26}, while tuff and Berea sandstone showed the more classical scaling with time{sup 0.5}; (2) tracer movement into dry (2% initial saturation) Indiana sandstone showed a dispersion pattern similar to that expected during tracer movement into moist (76% initial saturation) tuff; and (3) tracer concentrations at the inlet face of the tuff sample were approximately twice those deeper inside the sample. The experiment was then modeled using random walk methods on a 3-D lattice with different values of pore coordination. Network model simulations that used a pore coordination of 1.49 for Indiana sandstone and 1.56 for metagraywacke showed similar temporal scaling, a result of their porespace being close to the percolation threshold. Tracer concentration profiles in Indiana sandstone and tuff were closely matched by simulations that used pore coordinations of 1.49 and 1.68, respectively, because of

  17. Light-driven solute transport in Halobacterium halobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    The cell membrane of Halobacterium halobium exhibits differential regions which contain crystalline arrays of a single kind of protein, termed bacteriorhodopsin. This bacterial retinal-protein complex resembles the visual pigment and, after the absorption of protons, translocates H(+) across the cell membrane, leading to an electrochemical gradient for protons between the inside and the outside of the cell. Thus, light is an alternate source of energy in these bacteria, in addition to terminal oxidation. The paper deals with work on light-driven transport in H. halobium with cell envelope vesicles. The discussion covers light-driven movements of H(+), Na(+), and K(+); light-driven amino acid transport; and apparent allosteric control of amino acid transport. The scheme of energy coupling in H. halobium vesicles appears simple, its quantitative details are quite complex and reveal regulatory phenomena. More knowledge is required of the way the coupling components are regulated by the ion gradients present.

  18. Numerical solution of the radiation transport equation in disk geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spagna, George F., Jr.; Leung, Chun Ming

    1987-01-01

    An efficient numerical method for solving the problem of radiation transport in a dusty medium with two dimensional (2-D) disk geometry is described. It is a generalization of the one-dimensional quasi-diffusion method in which the transport equation is cast in diffusion form and then solved as a boundary value problem. The method should be applicable to a variety of astronomical sources, the dynamics of which are angular-momentum dominated and hence not accurately treated by spherical geometry, e.g., protoplanetary nebulae, circumstellar disks, interstellar molecular clouds, accretion disks, and disk galaxies. The computational procedure and practical considerations for implementing the method are described in detail. To illustrate the effects of 2-D radiation transport, some model results (dust temperature distributions and IR flux spectra) for externally heated, interstellar dust clouds with spherically symmetric and disk geometry are compared.

  19. Activation product transport in fusion reactors. [RAPTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products will enter the coolant and/or tritium breeding material of fusion reactor power plants and experiments and cause personnel access problems. Radiation levels around plant components due to these products will cause difficulties with maintenance and repair operations throughout the plant. Similar problems are experienced around fission reactor systems. The determination of the transport of radioactive corrosion and neutron sputtering products through the system is achieved using the computer code RAPTOR. This code calculates the mass transfer of a number of activation products based on the corrosion and sputtering rates through the system, the deposition and release characteristics of various plant components, the neturon flux spectrum, as well as other plant parameters. RAPTOR assembles a system of first order linear differential equations into a matrix equation based upon the reactor system parameters. Included in the transfer matrix are the deposition and erosion coefficients, and the decay and activation data for the various plant nodes and radioactive isotopes. A source vector supplies the corrosion and neutron sputtering source rates. This matrix equation is then solved using a matrix operator technique to give the specific activity distribution of each radioactive species throughout the plant. Once the amount of mass transfer is determined, the photon transport due to the radioactive corrosion and sputtering product sources can be evaluated, and dose rates around the plant components of interest as a function of time can be determined. This method has been used to estimate the radiation hazards around a number of fusion reactor system designs.

  20. Boundary effects on solute transport in finite soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, R. C.; McInnes, K. J.; Juo, A. S. R.; Wilding, L. P.; Reddell, D. L.

    1999-03-01

    This study investigates the influence of inlet and outlet disturbances and formulated boundary conditions on the estimation of the dispersion coefficient and retardation factor for short soil columns. Unsaturated miscible displacement experiments utilizing a Br- tracer were carried out on undisturbed columns of a fine-textured Ultisol. Solutions were applied using either a fritted plate or an array of dispensing tips that produced droplets at a prescribed flow rate. One- and two-layer analytical solutions of the advective-dispersive equation were fitted to effluent concentrations using nonlinear least squares parameter optimization. Comparison of two-layer simulations with experimental data indicated that the analytical solution with a semi-infinite interface boundary best approximated effluent concentrations under the conditions of this study. This solution corresponds to a continuous flux concentration and a macroscopically discontinuous resident concentration at the interface between the soil and porous plates. Parameter estimates were not significantly different with respect to the application method used at the inlet. This may be attributed to a less uniform distribution of solution onto the soil surface by the drip apparatus and/or by the presence of stagnant regions within the inlet reservoir and hence increased dispersion within the inlet platen apparatus. Two-layer simulations indicated that the dispersion coefficient was underestimated by 14-27% when the influence of the inlet and outlet apparatus were not included in the fitted solution of the advective-dispersive equation. In addition, use of one-layer analytical solutions caused the retardation factor to be overestimated by no more than the fractional increase in pore volume imparted by the platen apparatus.

  1. Geomorphic and substrate controls on spatial variability in river solute transport and biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaen, Phillip; Kurz, Marie; Knapp, Julia; Mendoza-Lera, Clara; Lee-Cullin, Joe; Klaar, Megan; Drummond, Jen; Jaeger, Anna; Zarnetske, Jay; Lewandowski, Joerg; Marti, Eugenia; Ward, Adam; Fleckenstein, Jan; Datry, Thibault; Larned, Scott; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient concentrations in surface waters and groundwaters are increasing in many agricultural catchments worldwide as a result of anthropogenic activities. Increasing geomorphological heterogeneity in river channels may help to attenuate nutrient pollution by facilitating water exchange fluxes with the hyporheic zone; a site of intense microbial activity where biogeochemical transformation rates (e.g. denitrification) can be high. However, the controls on spatial variability in biogeochemical cycling, particularly at scales relevant for river managers, are not well understood. Here, we aimed to assess: 1) how differences in geomorphological heterogeneity control river solute transport and rates of biogeochemical cycling at sub-reach scales (102 m); and 2) the relative magnitude of these differences versus those relating to reach scale substrate variability (103 m). We used the reactive 'smart' tracer resazurin (Raz), a weakly fluorescent dye that transforms to highly fluorescent resorufin (Rru) under mildly reducing conditions, as a proxy to assess rates of biogeochemical cycling in a lowland river in southern England. Solute tracer tests were conducted in two reaches with contrasting substrates: one sand-dominated and the other gravel-dominated. Each reach was divided into sub-reaches that varied in geomorphic complexity (e.g. by the presence of pool-riffle sequences or the abundance of large woody debris). Slug injections of Raz and the conservative tracer fluorescein were conducted in each reach during baseflow conditions (Q ≈ 80 L/s) and breakthrough curves monitored using in-situ fluorometers. Preliminary results indicate overall Raz:Rru transformation rates in the gravel-dominated reach were more than 50% higher than those in the sand-dominated reach. However, high sub-reach variability in Raz:Rru transformation rates and conservative solute transport parameters suggests small-scale targeted management interventions to alter geomorphic heterogeneity may be

  2. Influence of spatial and temporal flow variability on solute transport in catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selroos, Jan-Olof; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-04-01

    The present study quantifies the separate and combined effects of spatial and temporal variability of waterborne solute transport through catchments. The questions addressed are whether, when and why different types of variability may dominate catchment-scale transport. We utilize a versatile numerical solute transport code with a particle-based Monte Carlo time domain random walk method to simulate waterborne transport through a generic catchment. The methodology is exemplified by performing simulations using data on spatiotemporal flow and transport variability from direct stream discharge observations and independently calculated advective solute travel time distributions for catchments within the water management district Northern Baltic Proper (NBP) in Mid-Eastern Sweden. A main conclusion of the study is that projections of catchment mass loading based on spatial variability alone are robust estimates of long-term average solute transport development. This is especially true when annually aggregated mass load rather than finer temporal resolution of mass flux is considered. Temporal variability yields short-term fluctuations around the long-term average solute breakthrough development, and earlier or later arrival than the latter, depending on the timing and duration of solute input relative to the temporal flow variability. The exact temporal characteristics of future solute breakthroughs are thus fundamentally uncertain but their statistical expectation may be well quantified by only spatial variability account.

  3. A dual-porosity model for simulating solute transport in oil shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glover, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    A model is described for simulating three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport in oil shale and associated geohydrologic units. The model treats oil shale as a dual-porosity medium by simulating flow and transport within fractures using the finite-element method. Diffusion of solute between fractures and the essentially static water of the shale matrix is simulated by including an analytical solution that acts as a source-sink term to the differential equation of solute transport. While knowledge of fracture orientation and spacing is needed to effectively use the model, it is not necessary to map the locations of individual fractures. The computer program listed in the report incorporates many of the features of previous dual-porosity models while retaining a practical approach to solving field problems. As a result the theory of solute transport is not extended in any appreciable way. The emphasis is on bringing together various aspects of solute transport theory in a manner that is particularly suited to the unusual groundwater flow and solute transport characteristics of oil shale systems. (Author 's abstract)

  4. Transport of solutes through unsaturated fractured media: Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dykhuizen, R.C.

    1988-03-01

    A numerical model is presented to represent the transport of solutes through a highly fractured unsaturated, porous medium. To accomplish this, the solute is tracked separately in two flow systems a matrix pore flow system and a fracture network, with interaction terms. Compatible hydraulic equations for such a dual system are also presented to enable solution of the solute trasport. The hydraulic equations chosen use the equivlaent porous media concept. These equations can also be applied to a saturated medium without modification. However, many of the transport terms will be negligible for such an application. A brief sample calculation illustates the method. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Impact of thin aquitards on two-dimensional solute transport in an aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Abolfazl; Zhan, Hongbin; Zare, Mohammad

    2013-09-01

    The influence of aquitards on solute transport in an aquifer is an important and often overlooked process for subsurface contaminant transport. In particular, slow advection (leakage) into an aquitard is often neglected in previous analytical treatment of solute transport, making such analytical solutions unsuitable for benchmarking numerical simulations of transport when aquitard leakage exists. In this study, a semi-analytical solution to the two-dimensional conservative solute transport in an aquifer bounded by thin aquitards is derived in the Laplace domain. The governing equation in the aquifer (not aquitard) incorporates terms accounting for advection, longitudinal dispersion, and transverse vertical dispersion. Both one-dimensional vertical advection and molecular diffusion are considered for aquitard transport. The solutions are derived under conditions of steady-state flow and the first- and third-type transport boundary conditions in the aquifer along with assuming the continuity of concentration and vertical mass flux at aquifer and aquitard interfaces. The solutions in the real time domain are obtained by numerically inverting the solutions in the Laplace domain using the Stehfest (1970) algorithm. The semi-analytical solutions are compared with those from Zhan et al. (2009b), which considered aquitard leakage in infinitively thick aquitards. The concentration profiles, breakthrough curves and distribution profiles in the aquifer are different from those of Zhan et al. (2009b) at small ratios of the aquitard/aquifer thickness; whereas, the results of both are consistent for thick bounding aquitards. This study reveals that the residence time distribution (RTD) in the main aquifer is related to the aquitard/aquifer thickness ratios, Peclet numbers and porosities of adjacent aquitards. The results also suggest that MT3DMS (a commonly applied transport code) cannot successfully simulate solute transport at the aquifer-aquitard interfaces. The presented

  6. Impact of thin aquitards on two-dimensional solute transport in an aquifer.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Abolfazl; Zhan, Hongbin; Zare, Mohammad

    2013-09-01

    The influence of aquitards on solute transport in an aquifer is an important and often overlooked process for subsurface contaminant transport. In particular, slow advection (leakage) into an aquitard is often neglected in previous analytical treatment of solute transport, making such analytical solutions unsuitable for benchmarking numerical simulations of transport when aquitard leakage exists. In this study, a semi-analytical solution to the two-dimensional conservative solute transport in an aquifer bounded by thin aquitards is derived in the Laplace domain. The governing equation in the aquifer (not aquitard) incorporates terms accounting for advection, longitudinal dispersion, and transverse vertical dispersion. Both one-dimensional vertical advection and molecular diffusion are considered for aquitard transport. The solutions are derived under conditions of steady-state flow and the first- and third-type transport boundary conditions in the aquifer along with assuming the continuity of concentration and vertical mass flux at aquifer and aquitard interfaces. The solutions in the real time domain are obtained by numerically inverting the solutions in the Laplace domain using the Stehfest (1970) algorithm. The semi-analytical solutions are compared with those from Zhan et al. (2009b), which considered aquitard leakage in infinitively thick aquitards. The concentration profiles, breakthrough curves and distribution profiles in the aquifer are different from those of Zhan et al. (2009b) at small ratios of the aquitard/aquifer thickness; whereas, the results of both are consistent for thick bounding aquitards. This study reveals that the residence time distribution (RTD) in the main aquifer is related to the aquitard/aquifer thickness ratios, Peclet numbers and porosities of adjacent aquitards. The results also suggest that MT3DMS (a commonly applied transport code) cannot successfully simulate solute transport at the aquifer-aquitard interfaces. The presented

  7. KINEMATIC MODELING OF MULTIPHASE SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN THE VADOSE ZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research was the development of a computationally efficient simulation model for multiphase flow of organic hazardous waste constituents in the shallow soil environment. Such a model is appropriate for investigation of fate and transport of organic chemicals intr...

  8. CHANGING GEARS: A SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION SOLUTION FOR UCSC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The University of California, Santa Cruz campus sees traffic in/out of campus that averages 22,576 vehicle trips per day. When examining the costs of automobile usage to the UC, students, and the environment it is clear that the primary mode of transportation of students and f...

  9. A Polymer "Pollution Solution" Classroom Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helser, Terry L.

    1996-01-01

    Explains an approach to presenting polymer chemistry to nonmajors that employs polystyrene foam, foam peanuts made from water soluble starch, and water soluble plastic bags. Students are presented with a pollution scenario and are guided to the discovery of solutions. (DDR)

  10. Modeling solute transport in distribution networks with variable demand and time step sizes.

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, Chad E.; Bilisoly, Roger Lee; Buchberger, Steven G.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Yarrington, Lane

    2004-06-01

    The effect of variable demands at short time scales on the transport of a solute through a water distribution network has not previously been studied. We simulate flow and transport in a small water distribution network using EPANET to explore the effect of variable demand on solute transport across a range of hydraulic time step scales from 1 minute to 2 hours. We show that variable demands at short time scales can have the following effects: smoothing of a pulse of tracer injected into a distribution network and increasing the variability of both the transport pathway and transport timing through the network. Variable demands are simulated for these different time step sizes using a previously developed Poisson rectangular pulse (PRP) demand generator that considers demand at a node to be a combination of exponentially distributed arrival times with log-normally distributed intensities and durations. Solute is introduced at a tank and at three different network nodes and concentrations are modeled through the system using the Lagrangian transport scheme within EPANET. The transport equations within EPANET assume perfect mixing of the solute within a parcel of water and therefore physical dispersion cannot occur. However, variation in demands along the solute transport path contribute to both removal and distortion of the injected pulse. The model performance measures examined are the distribution of the Reynolds number, the variation in the center of mass of the solute across time, and the transport path and timing of the solute through the network. Variation in all three performance measures is greatest at the shortest time step sizes. As the scale of the time step increases, the variability in these performance measures decreases. The largest time steps produce results that are inconsistent with the results produced by the smaller time steps.

  11. A transportronic solution to the problem of interorbital transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, William C.

    1992-01-01

    An all-electronic transportation system described by the term 'transportronics' is examined as a means of solving the current problem of the high cost of transporting material from low-Earth orbit (LEO) to geostationary orbit (GEO). In this transportation system, low cost electric energy at the surface of the Earth is efficiently converted into microwave power which is then efficiently formed into a narrow beam which is kept incident upon the orbital transfer vehicles (OTV's) by electronic tracking. The incident beam is efficiently captured and converted into DC power by a device which has a very high ratio of DC power output to its mass. Because the mass of the electric thruster is also low, the resulting acceleration is unprecedented for electric-propelled vehicles. However, the performance of the system in terms of transit times from LEO to GEO is penalized by the short time of contact between the beam and the vehicle in low-Earth orbits. This makes it necessary to place the Earth based transmitters and the vehicles in the equatorial plane thus introducing many geopolitical factors. Technically, however, such a system as described in the report may out-perform any other approach to transportation in the LEO to GEO regime. The report describes and analyzes all portions of the beamed microwave power transmission system in considerable detail. An economic analysis of the operating and capital costs is made with the aid of a reference system capable of placing about 130,000 kilograms of payload into GEO each year. More mature states of the system are then examined, to a level in which 60,000 metric tons per year could be placed into GEO.

  12. Effects of Temperature on Solute Transport Parameters in Differently-Textured Soils at Saturated Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, S.; Arihara, M.; Kawamoto, K.; Nishimura, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface warming driven by global warming, urban heat islands, and increasing use of shallow geothermal heating and cooling systems such as the ground source heat pump, potentially causes changes in subsurface mass transport. Therefore, understanding temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics is essential to accurately assess environmental risks due to increased subsurface temperature. In this study, one-dimensional solute transport experiments were conducted in soil columns under temperature control to investigate effects of temperature on solute transport parameters, such as solute dispersion and diffusion coefficients, hydraulic conductivity, and retardation factor. Toyoura sand, Kaolin clay, and intact loamy soils were used in the experiments. Intact loamy soils were taken during a deep well boring at the Arakawa Lowland in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. In the transport experiments, the core sample with 5-cm diameter and 4-cm height was first isotropically consolidated, whereafter 0.01M KCl solution was injected to the sample from the bottom. The concentrations of K+ and Cl- in the effluents were analyzed by an ion chromatograph to obtain solute breakthrough curves. The solute transport parameters were calculated from the breakthrough curves. The experiments were conducted under different temperature conditions (15, 25, and 40 oC). The retardation factor for the intact loamy soils decreased with increasing temperature, while water permeability increased due to reduced viscosity of water at higher temperature. Opposite, the effect of temperature on solute dispersivity for the intact loamy soils was insignificant. The effects of soil texture on the temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics will be further investigated from comparison of results from differently-textured samples.

  13. Solute transport with equilibrium aqueous complexation and either sorption or ion exchange: Simulation methodology and applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, F.M.; Voss, C.I.; Rubin, J.

    1987-01-01

    Methodologies that account for specific types of chemical reactions in the simulation of solute transport can be developed so they are compatible with solution algorithms employed in existing transport codes. This enables the simulation of reactive transport in complex multidimensional flow regimes, and provides a means for existing codes to account for some of the fundamental chemical processes that occur among transported solutes. Two equilibrium-controlled reaction systems demonstrate a methodology for accommodating chemical interaction into models of solute transport. One system involves the sorption of a given chemical species, as well as two aqueous complexations in which the sorbing species is a participant. The other reaction set involves binary ion exchange coupled with aqueous complexation involving one of the exchanging species. The methodology accommodates these reaction systems through the addition of nonlinear terms to the transport equations for the sorbing species. Example simulation results show (1) the effect equilibrium chemical parameters have on the spatial distributions of concentration for complexing solutes; (2) that an interrelationship exists between mechanical dispersion and the various reaction processes; (3) that dispersive parameters of the porous media cannot be determined from reactive concentration distributions unless the reaction is accounted for or the influence of the reaction is negligible; (4) how the concentration of a chemical species may be significantly affected by its participation in an aqueous complex with a second species which also sorbs; and (5) that these coupled chemical processes influencing reactive transport can be demonstrated in two-dimensional flow regimes. ?? 1987.

  14. Fractional Advective-Dispersive Equation as a Model of Solute Transport in Porous Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding and modeling transport of solutes in porous media is a critical issue in the environmental protection. The common model is the advective-dispersive equation (ADE) describing the superposition of the advective transport and the Brownian motion in water-filled pore space. Deviations from...

  15. Combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium transport model: Analytical solution, moments, and application to colloids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transport of solutes and colloids in porous media is influenced by a variety of physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes. A combined physical–chemical nonequilibrium (PCNE) model was therefore used to describe general mass transport. The model partitions the pore space into “mobile” and “i...

  16. The Governor's Challenge: "Building a Stronger Virginia Today": Transportation Visions and Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Using STM(Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) education, this emerging workforce will have the chance to creatively solve one of Virginia's biggest challenges: TRANSPORTATION. - Students will be asked to develop alternative transportation systems for the state. This competition will enable teams to work with business mentors to design creative solutions for regional gridlocks and develop other transportation systems to more easily and expediently reach all parts of the Commonwealth.

  17. Analytical solutions of solute transport in a fracture-matrix system with different reaction rates for fracture and matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yonghui; Zhan, Hongbin; Jin, Menggui

    2016-08-01

    This study deals with the problem of reactive solute transport in a fracture-matrix system using both analytical and numerical modeling methods. The groundwater flow velocity in the fracture is assumed to be high enough (no less than 0.1 m/day) to ensure the advection-dominant transport in the fracture. The problem includes advection along the fracture, transverse diffusion in the matrix, with linear sorption as well as first-order reactions operative in both the fracture and the matrix. A constant-concentration boundary condition and a decay source boundary condition in the fracture are considered. With a constant-concentration source, we obtain closed-form analytical solutions that account for the transport without reaction as well as steady-state solutions with different first-order reactions in the two media. With a decay source, a semi-analytical solution is obtained. The analytical and semi-analytical solutions are in excellent agreement with the numerical simulation results obtained using COMSOL Multiphysics. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to assess the relative importance of matrix diffusion coefficient, fracture aperture, and matrix porosity. We conclude that the first-order reaction as well as the matrix diffusion in the fractured rock would decrease the solute peak concentration and shorten the penetration distance into the fracture. The solutions can be applied to assess the spatial-temporal distribution of concentrations in the fracture and the matrix as well as to assess the contaminant mass stored in the rock matrix. All of these are useful for designing remediation plans for contaminated fractured rocks or for risk assessment of contaminated fracture-matrix systems.

  18. The Mechanism of Field-Scale Solute Transport: An insight from Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, David

    2014-05-01

    Field-scale transport of conservative (chloride) and reactive (nitrate) solutes was analyzed by means of two different model processes for the local description of the transport. The first is the classical, one-region advection dispersion equation (ADE) model, while the second is the two-region, mobile-immobile (MIM) model. The analyses were performed by means of detailed three-dimensional (3-D), numerical simulations of the flow and the transport considering realistic features of the soil-water-plant-atmosphere system, pertinent to a turf field located in the Glil Yam site, Israel, irrigated with treated waste water (TWW). Simulated water content and concentration profiles were compared with available measurements of their counterparts. Results of the analyses suggest that the behavior of both the conservative and the reactive solutes in the Glil Yam site is quantified better when the transport on the local scale is modeled as a two-region, MIM model, than when a single-region, ADE model is used. Reconstruction of the shape of the measured solute concentration profiles using the MIM transport model, required relatively large immobile water content fraction and relatively small mass transfer coefficient. These results suggest that in the case of initially non-zero solute concentration profile (e.g., chloride and nitrate), the 3-D ADE transport model may significantly overestimate the groundwater contamination hazard posed by the solutes moving through the vadose zone, as compared with the 3-D MIM transport model, while the opposite is true in the case of initially zero solute concentration profile (e.g., carbamazepine). These findings stem from the combination of relatively large immobile water content fraction and relatively small mass transfer coefficient taken into account in the MIM transport model. In the first case, this combination forces a considerable portion of the solute mass to remain in the immobile region of the water-filled pores, while the opposite

  19. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 1. The equilibrium advection-dispersion equation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and related models are indispensable for predicting or analyzing contaminant transport processes in streams and rivers, as well as in other surface water bodies. Many useful analytical solutions originated in disciplines other than surface-w...

  20. Modeling Solute Transport in Soil Columns Using Advective-Dispersive Equation with Fractional Spatial Derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been reported that this model cannot take into account several important features of solute movement through soil. Recently, a new model has been suggested that results in a solute transport equation with fractional spatial derivatives, or FADE. We have assembled a database on published solu...

  1. Solute transport through a pine-bark based substrate under saturated and unsaturated conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of how dissolved mineral nutrient ions (solutes) move through pine bark substrates during the application of irrigation water is vital to better understand nutrient transport and leaching from containerized crops during an irrigation event. However, current theories on solute transp...

  2. Derivation of the macroscopic solute transport equation for homogeneous, saturated, porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, S.Y.; Sposito, G.

    1980-06-01

    The macroscopic transport equation for a conservative solute in a homogeneous, water-saturated porous medium is derived on the basis of a rigorous cumulant expansion applied to the equation of mass balance. The essential physical conept underlying the derivation is that of a local volume-averaged solute velocity which fluctuates on a time scale that is orders of magnitude smaller than its autocorrelation time scale, which, in turn, is much smaller than the time scale of interest in a typical solute transport experiment. This clear separation of the scales is illustrated with representative data on solute transport in homogeneous, water-saturated soils and is employed to justify the truncation of an exact cumulant expansion of the divergence of the volume-averaged solute mass flux density. With the cumulant expansion terminated at first order in the ratio of the solute velocity autocorrelation time to the macroscopic solute transport time interval, an expression for the macroscopic solute mass flux density is produced which is the same as Fick's law extended to porous media. 26 references.

  3. General solution of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, M. C.; Plastino, A. R.; Plastino, A.; Ferri, G. L.; de Paoli, A.

    2016-04-01

    In this effort we exactly solve the fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport and give its general solution in terms of hypergeometric distributions. Numerical analysis of this equation shows that its solutions resemble power-laws.

  4. A conceptual framework for ground-water solute-transport studies with emphasis on physical mechanisms of solute movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.; Franke, O. Lehn; Buxton, Herbert T.; Bennett, Gordon D.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of solute transport in groundwater systems involves a complex, multi-discipline study that requires intensive and costly investigation. Groundwater contamination, particularly from point sources, has been growing in importance in recent years. This report examines the physical mechanisms of solute transport, advection and dispersion, and explains how they relate to one another and the scale of study. The approach uses a preliminary analysis prior to collection of new data to focus on the technical problems to be addressed and to direct the initial collection of new data if warranted. The field investigation (collection of new data) progresses in stages that use the new knowledge and understanding gained from the preceding data collection to aid in further data collection as the study proceeds. A major premise of the approach is that the foundation of any analysis is a detailed quantitative definition of: (1) the groundwater flow field in three dimensions, and (2) the distribution of solutes in the contaminant plume in three dimensions at one point in time, or preferably at more than features of the groundwater flow field, and is an important tool for analysis. However, the scale of analysis for solute transport studies is usually much finer than the scale of analysis for groundwater flow alone. Therefore, an increase in detail of the velocity field is needed to provide for accurate calculations of pathlines in three-dimensional heterogeneous groundwater systems. (Lantz-PTT)

  5. Implicitly causality enforced solution of multidimensional transient photon transport equation.

    PubMed

    Handapangoda, Chintha C; Premaratne, Malin

    2009-12-21

    A novel method for solving the multidimensional transient photon transport equation for laser pulse propagation in biological tissue is presented. A Laguerre expansion is used to represent the time dependency of the incident short pulse. Owing to the intrinsic causal nature of Laguerre functions, our technique automatically always preserve the causality constrains of the transient signal. This expansion of the radiance using a Laguerre basis transforms the transient photon transport equation to the steady state version. The resulting equations are solved using the discrete ordinates method, using a finite volume approach. Therefore, our method enables one to handle general anisotropic, inhomogeneous media using a single formulation but with an added degree of flexibility owing to the ability to invoke higher-order approximations of discrete ordinate quadrature sets. Therefore, compared with existing strategies, this method offers the advantage of representing the intensity with a high accuracy thus minimizing numerical dispersion and false propagation errors. The application of the method to one, two and three dimensional geometries is provided. PMID:20052050

  6. An Evaluation of Conditioning Data for Solute Transport Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2003-03-01

    The large and diverse body of subsurface characterization data generated at a field research site near Oyster, Virginia provides a unique opportunity to test the impact of conditioning data of various types on predictions of flow and transport. Bromide breakthrough curves (BTCs) were measured during a forced-gradient local-scale injection experiment conducted in 1999. Observed BTCs are available at 140 sampling points in a three dimensional array within the transport domain. A detailed three-dimensional numerical model is used to simulate breakthrough curves at the same locations as the observed BTCs under varying assumptions regarding the character of hydraulic conductivity spatial distributions, and variable amounts and types of conditioning data. We present comparative results of six different cases ranging from simple (deterministic homogeneous models) to complex (stochastic indicator simulation conditioned to cross-borehole geophysical observations). Quantitative measures of model goodness-of-fit are presented. The results show that conditioning to a large number of small-scale measurements does not significantly improve model predictions, and may lead to biased or overly confident predictions. However, conditioning to geophysical interpretations with larger spatial support significantly improves the accuracy and precision of model predictions. In all cases, the effects of model error appear to be significant in relation to parameter uncertainty.

  7. Associations between street connectivity and active transportation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Past studies of associations between measures of the built environment, particularly street connectivity, and active transportation (AT) or leisure walking/bicycling have largely failed to account for spatial autocorrelation of connectivity variables and have seldom examined both the propensity for AT and its duration in a coherent fashion. Such efforts could improve our understanding of the spatial and behavioral aspects of AT. We analyzed spatially identified data from Los Angeles and San Diego Counties collected as part of the 2001 California Health Interview Survey. Results Principal components analysis indicated that ~85% of the variance in nine measures of street connectivity are accounted for by two components representing buffers with short blocks and dense nodes (PRIN1) or buffers with longer blocks that still maintain a grid like structure (PRIN2). PRIN1 and PRIN2 were positively associated with active transportation (AT) after adjustment for diverse demographic and health related variables. Propensity and duration of AT were correlated in both Los Angeles (r = 0.14) and San Diego (r = 0.49) at the zip code level. Multivariate analysis could account for the correlation between the two outcomes. After controlling for demography, measures of the built environment and other factors, no spatial autocorrelation remained for propensity to report AT (i.e., report of AT appeared to be independent among neighborhood residents). However, very localized correlation was evident in duration of AT, particularly in San Diego, where the variance of duration, after accounting for spatial autocorrelation, was 5% smaller within small neighborhoods (~0.01 square latitude/longitude degrees = 0.6 mile diameter) compared to within larger zip code areas. Thus a finer spatial scale of analysis seems to be more appropriate for explaining variation in connectivity and AT. Conclusions Joint analysis of the propensity and duration of AT behavior and an explicitly

  8. Active transport and accumulation of bicarbonate by a unicellular cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Miller, A G; Colman, B

    1980-09-01

    The rates of inorganic carbon accumulation and carbon fixation in light by the unicellular cyanobacterim Coccohloris peniocystis have been determined. Cells incubated in the light in medium containing H14CO3- were rapidly separated from the medium by centrifugation through silicone oil into a strongly basic terminating solution. Samples of these inactivated cells were assayed to determine total 14C accumulation, and acid-treated samples were assayed to determine 14C fixation. The rate of transport of inorganic into illuminated cells was faster than the rate of CO2 production in the medium from HCO3- dehydration. This evidence for HCO3- transport in these cells is in agreement with our previous results based upon measurements of photosynthetic O2 evolution. A substantial pool of inorganic carbon was bulit up within the cells presumably as HCO3- before the onset of the maximum rate of photosynthesis. Large accumulation ratios were observed, greater than 1,000 times the external HCO3- concentration. Accumulation did not occur in the dark and was greatly suppressed by the photosynthesis inhibitors 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea and 3-chloro-carbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone. These results indicate that the accumulation of inorganic carbon in these cells involves a light-dependent active transport process. PMID:6773925

  9. Automated calibration of a stream solute transport model: Implications for interpretation of biogeochemical parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, D.T.; Gooseff, M.N.; Bencala, K.E.; Runkel, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    The hydrologic processes of advection, dispersion, and transient storage are the primary physical mechanisms affecting solute transport in streams. The estimation of parameters for a conservative solute transport model is an essential step to characterize transient storage and other physical features that cannot be directly measured, and often is a preliminary step in the study of reactive solutes. Our study used inverse modeling to estimate parameters of the transient storage model OTIS (One dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage). Observations from a tracer injection experiment performed on Uvas Creek, California, USA, are used to illustrate the application of automated solute transport model calibration to conservative and nonconservative stream solute transport. A computer code for universal inverse modeling (UCODE) is used for the calibrations. Results of this procedure are compared with a previous study that used a trial-and-error parameter estimation approach. The results demonstrated 1) importance of the proper estimation of discharge and lateral inflow within the stream system; 2) that although the fit of the observations is not much better when transient storage is invoked, a more randomly distributed set of residuals resulted (suggesting non-systematic error), indicating that transient storage is occurring; 3) that inclusion of transient storage for a reactive solute (Sr2+) provided a better fit to the observations, highlighting the importance of robust model parameterization; and 4) that applying an automated calibration inverse modeling estimation approach resulted in a comprehensive understanding of the model results and the limitation of input data.

  10. Prolonged river water pollution due to variable-density flow and solute transport in the riverbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guangqiu; Tang, Hongwu; Li, Ling; Barry, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    A laboratory experiment and numerical modeling were used to examine effects of density gradients on hyporheic flow and solute transport under the condition of a solute pulse input to a river with regular bed forms. Relatively low-density gradients due to an initial salt pulse concentration of 1.55 kg m-3 applied in the experiment were found to modulate significantly the pore-water flow and solute transport in the riverbed. Such density gradients increased downward flow and solute transport in the riverbed by factors up to 1.6. This resulted in a 12.2% increase in the total salt transfer from the water column to the riverbed over the salt pulse period. As the solute pulse passed, the effect of the density gradients reversed, slowing down the release of the solute back to the river water by a factor of 3.7. Numerical modeling indicated that these density effects intensified as salt concentrations in the water column increased. Simulations further showed that the density gradients might even lead to unstable flow and result in solute fingers in the bed of large bed forms. The slow release of solute from the bed back to the river led to a long tail of solute concentration in the river water. These findings have implications for assessment of impact of pollution events on river systems, in particular, long-term effects on both the river water and riverbed due to the hyporheic exchange.

  11. Information entropy to measure the spatial and temporal complexity of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiyao; Huang, Guanhua; Xiong, Yunwu

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of the spatial structure of porous media, randomness of groundwater recharge and discharge (rainfall, runoff, etc.) has led to groundwater movement complexity, physical and chemical interaction between groundwater and porous media cause solute transport in the medium more complicated. An appropriate method to describe the complexity of features is essential when study on solute transport and conversion in porous media. Information entropy could measure uncertainty and disorder, therefore we attempted to investigate complexity, explore the contact between the information entropy and complexity of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media using information entropy theory. Based on Markov theory, two-dimensional stochastic field of hydraulic conductivity (K) was generated by transition probability. Flow and solute transport model were established under four conditions (instantaneous point source, continuous point source, instantaneous line source and continuous line source). The spatial and temporal complexity of solute transport process was characterized and evaluated using spatial moment and information entropy. Results indicated that the entropy increased as the increase of complexity of solute transport process. For the point source, the one-dimensional entropy of solute concentration increased at first and then decreased along X and Y directions. As time increased, entropy peak value basically unchanged, peak position migrated along the flow direction (X direction) and approximately coincided with the centroid position. With the increase of time, spatial variability and complexity of solute concentration increase, which result in the increases of the second-order spatial moment and the two-dimensional entropy. Information entropy of line source was higher than point source. Solute entropy obtained from continuous input was higher than instantaneous input. Due to the increase of average length of lithoface, media continuity increased, flow and

  12. Addition of simultaneous heat and solute transport and variable fluid viscosity to SEAWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorne, D.; Langevin, C.D.; Sukop, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    SEAWAT is a finite-difference computer code designed to simulate coupled variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. This paper describes a new version of SEAWAT that adds the ability to simultaneously model energy and solute transport. This is necessary for simulating the transport of heat and salinity in coastal aquifers for example. This work extends the equation of state for fluid density to vary as a function of temperature and/or solute concentration. The program has also been modified to represent the effects of variable fluid viscosity as a function of temperature and/or concentration. The viscosity mechanism is verified against an analytical solution, and a test of temperature-dependent viscosity is provided. Finally, the classic Henry-Hilleke problem is solved with the new code. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 Theory Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2005-11-01

    This document presents the mathematical theory implemented in the CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator. The simulator is a three-dimensional finite element model that can be used for evaluating flow and solute mass transport. Although the theory for thermal transport is presented in this guide, it has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. The flow module is capable of simulating both confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentration of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. Mesh construction employs “collapsible”, hexahedral finite elements in a three-dimensional coordinate system. CFEST uses the Galerkin finite element method to convert the partial differential equations to algebraic form. To solve the coupled equations for momentum, solute and heat transport, either Picard or Newton-Raphson iterative schemes are used to treat nonlinearities. An upstream weighted residual finite-element method is used to solve the advective-dispersive transport and energy transfer equations, which circumvents problems of numerical oscillation problems. Matrix solutions of the flow and transport problems are performed using efficient iterative solvers available in ITPACK and PETSc, solvers that are available in the public domain. These solvers are based on the preconditioned conjugate gradient and ORTHOMIN methods for symmetric and a nonsymmetric matrices, respectively.

  14. Role of ABC and Solute Carrier Transporters in the Placental Transport of Lamivudine.

    PubMed

    Ceckova, Martina; Reznicek, Josef; Ptackova, Zuzana; Cerveny, Lukas; Müller, Fabian; Kacerovsky, Marian; Fromm, Martin F; Glazier, Jocelyn D; Staud, Frantisek

    2016-09-01

    Lamivudine is one of the antiretroviral drugs of choice for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) in HIV-positive women. In this study, we investigated the relevance of drug efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (MDR1 [ABCB1]), BCRP (ABCG2), MRP2 (ABCC2), and MATE1 (SLC47A1) for the transmembrane transport and transplacental transfer of lamivudine. We employed in vitro accumulation and transport experiments on MDCK cells overexpressing drug efflux transporters, in situ-perfused rat term placenta, and vesicular uptake in microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles isolated from human term placenta. MATE1 significantly accelerated lamivudine transport in MATE1-expressing MDCK cells, whereas no transporter-driven efflux of lamivudine was observed in MDCK-MDR1, MDCK-MRP2, and MDCK-BCRP monolayers. MATE1-mediated efflux of lamivudine appeared to be a low-affinity process (apparent Km of 4.21 mM and Vmax of 5.18 nmol/mg protein/min in MDCK-MATE1 cells). Consistent with in vitro transport studies, the transplacental clearance of lamivudine was not affected by P-gp, BCRP, or MRP2. However, lamivudine transfer across dually perfused rat placenta and the uptake of lamivudine into human placental MVM vesicles revealed pH dependency, indicating possible involvement of MATE1 in the fetal-to-maternal efflux of the drug. To conclude, placental transport of lamivudine does not seem to be affected by P-gp, MRP2, or BCRP, but a pH-dependent mechanism mediates transport of lamivudine in the fetal-to-maternal direction. We suggest that MATE1 might be, at least partly, responsible for this transport. PMID:27401571

  15. ELVIS: Multi-Electrolyte Aqueous Activity Model for Geothermal Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingerl, F. F.; Wagner, T.; Driesner, T.; Kulik, D. A.; Kosakowski, G.

    2011-12-01

    High temperature, pressure, and fluid salinities render geochemical modeling of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems a demanding task. Accurate prediction of fluid-mineral equilibria strongly depends on the availability of thermodynamic data and activity models. Typically, the Pitzer activity model is applied for geothermal fluids. A drawback of this model is the large number of parameters required to account for temperature and pressure dependencies, which significantly reduces computational efficiency of reactive transport simulations. In addition, most available parameterizations are valid only at vapor-saturated conditions. As an alternative we implemented the EUNIQUAC local composition model [2] that needs substantially fewer fitting parameters. However, the current EUNIQUAC model design does not include provision for high temperature (>150°C) applications and lacks a formulation for pressure dependence. Therefore, its application to geothermal conditions requires a re-formulation and re-fitting of the model. We developed a new tool termed GEMSFIT that allows generic fitting of activity models (for aqueous electrolyte and non-electrolyte solutions) and equations of state implemented in our geochemical equilibrium solver GEM-Selektor (http://gems.web.psi.ch). GEMSFIT combines a PostgreSQL database for storing and managing the datasets of experimental measurements and interaction parameters, the parallelized genetic algorithm toolbox of MATLAB° for the parameter fitting, and an interface to the numerical kernel of GEM-Selektor to access activity models and perform chemical equilibrium calculations. Benchmarking of the partly re-parameterized EUNIQUAC model against Pitzer revealed that the former is less accurate, which can result in incorrect predictions of mineral precipitation/dissolution. Consequently, we modified the EUNIQUAC model and concurrently introduced a pressure dependence to be able to fit experimental data over wide ranges of

  16. Air pollution exposure: An activity pattern approach for active transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew D.; Yiannakoulias, Nikolaos; Kanaroglou, Pavlos S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the calculation of personal air pollution exposure during trips made by active transportation using activity patterns without personal monitors. We calculate exposure as the inhaled dose of particulate matter 2.5 μg or smaller. Two modes of active transportation are compared, and they include cycling and walking. Ambient conditions are calculated by combining mobile and stationary monitoring data in an artificial neural network space-time model. The model uses a land use regression framework and has a prediction accuracy of R2 = 0.78. Exposure is calculated at 10 m or shorter intervals during the trips using inhalation rates associated with both modes. The trips are children's routes between home and school. The average dose during morning cycling trips was 2.17 μg, during morning walking trips was 3.19 μg, during afternoon cycling trips was 2.19 μg and during afternoon walking trips was 3.23 μg. The cycling trip dose was significantly lower than the walking trip dose. The air pollution exposure during walking or cycling trips could not be strongly predicted by either the school or household ambient conditions, either individually or in combination. Multiple linear regression models regressing both the household and school ambient conditions against the dose were only able to account for, at most, six percent of the variance in the exposure. This paper demonstrates that incorporating activity patterns when calculating exposure can improve the estimate of exposure compared to its calculation from ambient conditions.

  17. D4Z - a new renumbering for iterative solution of ground-water flow and solute- transport equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L.; Russell, T.F.; Otto, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    D4 zig-zag (D4Z) is a new renumbering scheme for producing a reduced matrix to be solved by an incomplete LU preconditioned, restarted conjugate-gradient iterative solver. By renumbering alternate diagonals in a zig-zag fashion, a very low sensitivity of convergence rate to renumbering direction is obtained. For two demonstration problems involving groundwater flow and solute transport, iteration counts are related to condition numbers and spectra of the reduced matrices.

  18. Stochastic models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, V.N.; Korotkin, I.A.; Pruess, K.; Goloviznin, V.M.; Sorokovikova, O.S.

    2009-09-15

    A stochastic model of anomalous diffusion was developed in which transport occurs by random motion of Brownian particles, described by distribution functions of random displacements with heavy (power-law) tails. One variant of an effective algorithm for random function generation with a power-law asymptotic and arbitrary factor of asymmetry is proposed that is based on the Gnedenko-Levy limit theorem and makes it possible to reproduce all known Levy {alpha}-stable fractal processes. A two-dimensional stochastic random walk algorithm has been developed that approximates anomalous diffusion with streamline-dependent and space-dependent parameters. The motivation for introducing such a type of dispersion model is the observed fact that tracers in natural aquifers spread at different super-Fickian rates in different directions. For this and other important cases, stochastic random walk models are the only known way to solve the so-called multiscaling fractional order diffusion equation with space-dependent parameters. Some comparisons of model results and field experiments are presented.

  19. Molecular cell biology and physiology of solute transport

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Michael J.; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; Zhang, Li

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review An enormous body of research has been focused on exploring the mechanisms through which epithelial cells establish their characteristic polarity. It is clear that under normal circumstances cell–cell contacts mediated by the calcium-dependent adhesion proteins of the intercellular adhesion junctions are required to initiate complete polarization. Furthermore, formation of the tight, or occluding, junctions that limit paracellular permeability has long been thought to help to establish polarity by preventing the diffusion of membrane proteins between the two plasmalemmal domains. This review will discuss several selected kinases and protein complexes and highlight their relevance to transporting epithelial cell polarization. Recent findings Recent work has shed new light on the roles of junctional complexes in establishing and maintaining epithelial cell polarity. In addition, work from several laboratories, suggests that the formation of these junctions is tied to processes that regulate cellular energy metabolism. Summary Junctional complexes and energy sensing kinases constitute a novel class of machinery whose capacity to generate and modulate epithelial cell polarity is likely to have wide ranging and important physiological ramifications. PMID:18695392

  20. Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Su, G. W.

    1999-10-01

    Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

  1. Solute Transport in Eroded and Rehabilitated Prairie Landforms. 2. Reactive Solute

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information regarding the impact of varying soil, landscape, and climate conditions on the off-site transport of pesticides is critical to the development of improved pesticide management practices. We quantified the rate of S-metolachlor dissipation after fall and spring application in eroded and r...

  2. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  3. Automodel solutions for Lévy flight-based transport on a uniform background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    A wide class of non-stationary superdiffusive transport on a uniform background with a power-law decay at large distances of the step-length probability distribution function (PDF) is shown to possess an approximate automodel solution. The solution for the Green’s function is constructed using the scaling laws for the propagation front (relevant-to-superdiffusion average displacement) and asymptotic solutions far beyond and far in advance of the propagation front. These scaling laws are determined essentially by the long-free-path carriers (Lévy flights). The validity of the suggested automodel solution is proved by its comparison with numerical solutions in the one-dimensional (1D) case of the transport equation with a simple long-tailed PDF with various power-law exponents and in the 3D case of the Biberman–Holstein equation of the resonance radiation transfer for various (Doppler, Lorentz, Voigt and Holtsmark) spectral line shapes.

  4. An implicit dispersive transport algorithm for the US Geological Survey MOC3D solute-transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L., Jr.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents an extension to the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model that incorporates an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive transport equation, including source/sink terms. The original MOC3D transport model (Version 1) uses the method of characteristics to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The original MOC3D solution algorithm incorporates particle tracking to represent advective processes and an explicit finite-difference formulation to calculate dispersive fluxes. The new implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for the previous explicit formulation. This allows much larger transport time increments to be used in dispersion-dominated problems. The decoupling of advective and dispersive transport in MOC3D, however, is unchanged. With the implicit extension, the MOC3D model is upgraded to Version 2. A description of the numerical method of the implicit dispersion calculation, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. Version 2 of MOC3D was evaluated for the same set of problems used for verification of Version 1. These test results indicate that the implicit calculation of Version 2 matches the accuracy of Version 1, yet is more efficient than the explicit calculation for transport problems that are characterized by a grid Peclet number less than about 1.0.

  5. Elements of fractal generalization of dual-porosity model for solute transport in unsaturated fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Matveev, L.; Pruess, K.

    2008-09-01

    In this study, new elements were developed to generalize the dual-porosity model for moisture infiltration on and solute transport in unsaturated rocks, taking into account fractal aspects of the percolation process. Random advection was considered as a basic mechanism of solute transport in self-similar fracture systems. In addition to spatial variations in the infiltration velocity field, temporal fluctuations were also taken into account. The rock matrix, a low-permeability component of the heterogeneous geologic medium, acts as a trap for solute particles and moisture. Scaling relations were derived for the moisture infiltration flux, the velocity correlation length, the average velocity of infiltration, and the velocity correlation function. The effect of temporal variations in precipitation intensity on the infiltration processes was analyzed. It showed that the mode of solute transport is determined by the power exponent in the advection velocity correlation function and the dimensionality of the trapping system, both of which may change with time. Therefore, depending on time, various transport regimes may be realized: superdiffusion, subdiffusion, or classical diffusion. The complex structure of breakthrough curves from changes in the transport regimes was also examined. A renormalization of the solute source strength due to characteristic fluctuations of highly disordered media was established.

  6. Solute Transport in Cyclically Deformed Porous Tissue Scaffolds with Controlled Pore Cross-Sectional Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Op Den Buijs, Jorn; Lu, Lichun; Jorgensen, Steven M.; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of pore geometry on the transport rate and depth after repetitive mechanical deformation of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Flexible cubic imaging phantoms with pores in the shape of a circular cylinder, elliptic cylinder, and spheroid were fabricated from a biodegradable polymer blend using a combined 3D printing and injection molding technique. The specimens were immersed in fluid and loaded with a solution of a radiopaque solute. The solute distribution was quantified by recording 20 μm pixel-resolution images in an X-ray microimaging scanner at selected time points after intervals of dynamic straining with a mean strain of 8.6 ± 1.6% at 1.0 Hz. The results show that application of cyclic strain significantly increases the rate and depth of solute transport, as compared to diffusive transport alone, for all pore shapes. In addition, pore shape, pore size, and the orientation of the pore cross-sectional asymmetry with respect to the direction of strain greatly influence solute transport. Thus, pore geometry can be tailored to increase transport rates and depths in cyclically deformed scaffolds, which is of utmost importance when thick, metabolically functional tissues are to be engineered. PMID:19196145

  7. A finite-volume ELLAM for three-dimensional solute-transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, T.F.; Heberton, C.I.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-volume ELLAM method has been developed, tested, and successfully implemented as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) MODFLOW-2000 ground water modeling package. It is included as a solver option for the Ground Water Transport process. The FVELLAM uses space-time finite volumes oriented along the streamlines of the flow field to solve an integral form of the solute-transport equation, thus combining local and global mass conservation with the advantages of Eulerian-Lagrangian characteristic methods. The USGS FVELLAM code simulates solute transport in flowing ground water for a single dissolved solute constituent and represents the processes of advective transport, hydrodynamic dispersion, mixing from fluid sources, retardation, and decay. Implicit time discretization of the dispersive and source/sink terms is combined with a Lagrangian treatment of advection, in which forward tracking moves mass to the new time level, distributing mass among destination cells using approximate indicator functions. This allows the use of large transport time increments (large Courant numbers) with accurate results, even for advection-dominated systems (large Peclet numbers). Four test cases, including comparisons with analytical solutions and benchmarking against other numerical codes, are presented that indicate that the FVELLAM can usually yield excellent results, even if relatively few transport time steps are used, although the quality of the results is problem-dependent.

  8. Reactive solute transport in streams. 1. Development of an equilibrium- based model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Bencala, K.E.; Broshears, R.E.; Chapra, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    An equilibrium-based solute transport model is developed for the simulation of trace metal fate and transport in streams. The model is formed by coupling a solute transport model with a chemical equilibrium submodel based on MINTEQ. The solute transport model considers the physical processes of advection, dispersion, lateral inflow, and transient storage, while the equilibrium submodel considers the speciation and complexation of aqueous species, precipitation/dissolution and sorption. Within the model, reactions in the water column may result in the formation of solid phases (precipitates and sorbed species) that are subject to downstream transport and settling processes. Solid phases on the streambed may also interact with the water column through dissolution and sorption/desorption reactions. Consideration of both mobile (water-borne) and immobile (streambed) solid phases requires a unique set of governing differential equations and solution techniques that are developed herein. The partial differential equations describing physical transport and the algebraic equations describing chemical equilibria are coupled using the sequential iteration approach.

  9. Theory of active transport across frog skin and other bifacial cell systems: a subsidiary of the association-induction hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ling, G N

    1990-09-01

    This review presents the theory of solute transport across frog skin, epithelial cells of the intestine, the kidney tubules, and other similar systems. This theory is a part of a broader theory of the living cell, called the association-induction hypothesis. The central pumping mechanism is the cyclic activity of a sponge-like cytoplasmic protein(s), which alternately sop-up (by adsorption) the solute being transported and squeeze it out again (by desorption) into the cytoplasmic water at a high concentration level. The uptake phase begins with the adsorption of ATP on key cardinal sites of the protein involved; the release phase is triggered by the desorption of ATP through its dephosphorylation during a transitory activation of an ATPase. The theory recognizes the different nature of the two surfaces of the epithelial cells and assigns to each a key role in the active transport. The surface facing the "source solution" has a higher permeability to the solute being transported, while the surface facing the "sink solution" has a low permeability to the solute. This asymmetry in permeability insures that the solute sopped up by the cytoplasmic protein(s) comes primarily from the source solution. Depolarization of the water of the cell surface facing the sink solution (but not that facing the source solution) insures that the solute released into the cytoplasmic water during the squeezing phase leaves the cell only through the opposite surface as that where the solute has entered the cell. PMID:2080435

  10. Analytically-derived sensitivities in one-dimensional models of solute transport in porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knopman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Analytically-derived sensitivities are presented for parameters in one-dimensional models of solute transport in porous media. Sensitivities were derived by direct differentiation of closed form solutions for each of the odel, and by a time integral method for two of the models. Models are based on the advection-dispersion equation and include adsorption and first-order chemical decay. Boundary conditions considered are: a constant step input of solute, constant flux input of solute, and exponentially decaying input of solute at the upstream boundary. A zero flux is assumed at the downstream boundary. Initial conditions include a constant and spatially varying distribution of solute. One model simulates the mixing of solute in an observation well from individual layers in a multilayer aquifer system. Computer programs produce output files compatible with graphics software in which sensitivities are plotted as a function of either time or space. (USGS)

  11. Transport of Solutes in Hyporheic Zones with Temperature-Dependent Reversible Sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, M.; Cardenas, M. B.; Zheng, L.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most important processes impacting the mobility of heavy metals in rivers and their hyporheic zones is reversible sorption to sediment. Reversible sorption has been shown to be a temperature dependent process, however the impact of this variability on heavy metal fate and transport, as well as environmental metal concentrations, has not received much attention. In this study we used zinc as an example heavy metal. Previous studies of the impact of temperature on the sorption of zinc on a goethite substrate show a change in partitioning coefficient and thus retardation factor of 10 to over 60 percent with a temperature change from 10 to 25*C, depending on concentration of dissolved zinc in the water. This relationship was extrapolated to estimate the change in reversible sorption of zinc on silicate sand. This change was then utilized within a finite-element model coupling hyporheic fluid flow in porous media with heat transfer and solute transport with reversible sorption to explore the ways in which variations in surface water temperature over varying timescales can drive changes in both zinc sorption and dissolved zinc fluxes at the bedform scale. These linked processes are of fundamental importance when considering the number of different ways in which surface water temperatures can be varied through both human and non-human activities.

  12. Active urea transport by the skin of Bufo viridis: Amiloride- and phloretin-sensitive transport sites

    SciTech Connect

    Rapoport, J.; Abuful, A.; Chaimovitz, C.; Noeh, Z.; Hays, R.M. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY )

    1988-09-01

    Urea is actively transported inwardly (J{sub i}) across the skin of the green toad Bufo viridis. J{sub i} is markedly enhanced in toads adapted to hypertonic saline. The authors studied urea transport across the skin of Bufo viridis under a variety of experimental conditions, including treatment with amiloride and phloretin, agents that inhibit urea permeability in the bladder of Bufo marinus. Amiloride (10{sup {minus}4} M) significantly inhibited J{sub i} in both adapted and unadapted animals and was unaffected by removal of sodium from the external medium. Phloretin (10{sup {minus}4} M) significantly inhibited J{sub i} in adapted animals by 23-46%; there was also a reduction in J{sub i} in unadapted toads at 10{sup {minus}4} and 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M phloretin. A dose-response study revealed that the concentration of phloretin causing half-maximal inhibition (K{sub {1/2}}) was 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M for adapted animals. J{sub i} was unaffected by the substitution of sucrose for Ringer solution or by ouabain. They conclude (1) the process of adaptation appears to involve an increase in the number of amiloride- and phloretin-inhibitable urea transport sites in the skin, with a possible increase in the affinity of the sites for phloretin; (2) the adapted skin resembles the Bufo marinus urinary bladder with respect to amiloride and phloretin-inhibitable sites; (3) they confirm earlier observations that J{sub i} is independent of sodium transport.

  13. Continuous time random walk analysis of solute transport in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Cortis, Andrea; Cortis, Andrea; Birkholzer, Jens

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this work is to discuss solute transport phenomena in fractured porous media, where the macroscopic transport of contaminants in the highly permeable interconnected fractures can be strongly affected by solute exchange with the porous rock matrix. We are interested in a wide range of rock types, with matrix hydraulic conductivities varying from almost impermeable (e.g., granites) to somewhat permeable (e.g., porous sandstones). In the first case, molecular diffusion is the only transport process causing the transfer of contaminants between the fractures and the matrix blocks. In the second case, additional solute transfer occurs as a result of a combination of advective and dispersive transport mechanisms, with considerable impact on the macroscopic transport behavior. We start our study by conducting numerical tracer experiments employing a discrete (microscopic) representation of fractures and matrix. Using the discrete simulations as a surrogate for the 'correct' transport behavior, we then evaluate the accuracy of macroscopic (continuum) approaches in comparison with the discrete results. However, instead of using dual-continuum models, which are quite often used to account for this type of heterogeneity, we develop a macroscopic model based on the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) framework, which characterizes the interaction between the fractured and porous rock domains by using a probability distribution function of residence times. A parametric study of how CTRW parameters evolve is presented, describing transport as a function of the hydraulic conductivity ratio between fractured and porous domains.

  14. Impact of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kone, T.; Golfier, F.; Orgogozo, L.; Oltéan, C.; Lefèvre, E.; Block, J. C.; Buès, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    In subsurface systems, biofilm may degrade organic or organometallic pollutants contributing to natural attenuation and soil bioremediation techniques. This increase of microbial activity leads to change the hydrodynamic properties of aquifers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media and more specifically on dispersivity. We pursued this goal by (i) monitoring both spatial concentration fields and solute breakthrough curves from conservative tracer experiments in a biofilm-supporting porous medium, (ii) characterizing in situ the changes in biovolume and visualizing the dynamics of the biological material at the mesoscale. A series of experiments was carried out in a flow cell system (60 cm3) with a silica sand (Φ = 50-70 mesh) as solid carrier and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as bacterial strain. Biofilm growth was monitored by image acquisition with a digital camera. The biofilm volume fraction was estimated through tracer experiments with the Blue Dextran macromolecule as in size-exclusion chromatography, leading to a fair picture of the biocolonization within the flow cell. Biofilm growth was achieved in the whole flow cell in 29 days and up to 50% of void space volume was plugged. The influence of biofilm maturation on porous medium transport properties was evaluated from tracer experiments using Brilliant Blue FCF. An experimental correlation was found between effective (i.e., nonbiocolonized) porosity and biofilm-affected dispersivity. Comparison with values given by the theoretical model of Taylor and Jaffé (1990b) yields a fair agreement.

  15. Kinetically influenced terms for solute transport affected by heterogeneous and homogeneous classical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper extends a four-step derivation procedure, previously presented for cases of transport affected by surface reactions, to transport problems involving homogeneous reactions. Derivations for these classes of reactions are used to illustrate the manner in which mathematical differences between reaction classes are reflected in the mathematical derivation procedures required to identify kinetically influenced terms. Simulation results for a case of transport affected by a single solution phase complexation reaction and for a case of transport affected by a precipitation-dissolution reaction are used to demonstrate the nature of departures from equilibrium-controlled transport as well as the use of kinetically influenced terms in determining criteria for the applicability of the local equilibrium assumption. A final derivation for a multireaction problem demonstrates the application of the generalized procedure to a case of transport affected by reactions of several classes. -from Author

  16. Ab initio electronic transport model with explicit solution to the linearized Boltzmann transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghaninia, Alireza; Ager, Joel W.; Lo, Cynthia S.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate models of carrier transport are essential for describing the electronic properties of semiconductor materials. To the best of our knowledge, the current models following the framework of the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) either rely heavily on experimental data (i.e., semiempirical), or utilize simplifying assumptions, such as the constant relaxation time approximation (BTE-cRTA). While these models offer valuable physical insights and accurate calculations of transport properties in some cases, they often lack sufficient accuracy—particularly in capturing the correct trends with temperature and carrier concentration. We present here a transport model for calculating low-field electrical drift mobility and Seebeck coefficient of n -type semiconductors, by explicitly considering relevant physical phenomena (i.e., elastic and inelastic scattering mechanisms). We first rewrite expressions for the rates of elastic scattering mechanisms, in terms of ab initio properties, such as the band structure, density of states, and polar optical phonon frequency. We then solve the linear BTE to obtain the perturbation to the electron distribution—resulting from the dominant scattering mechanisms—and use this to calculate the overall mobility and Seebeck coefficient. Therefore, we have developed an ab initio model for calculating mobility and Seebeck coefficient using the Boltzmann transport (aMoBT) equation. Using aMoBT, we accurately calculate electrical transport properties of the compound n -type semiconductors, GaAs and InN, over various ranges of temperature and carrier concentration. aMoBT is fully predictive and provides high accuracy when compared to experimental measurements on both GaAs and InN, and vastly outperforms both semiempirical models and the BTE-cRTA. Therefore, we assert that this approach represents a first step towards a fully ab initio carrier transport model that is valid in all compound semiconductors.

  17. Explicit solutions of the radiative transport equation in the P{sub 3} approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Liemert, André Kienle, Alwin

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Explicit solutions of the monoenergetic radiative transport equation in the P{sub 3} approximation have been derived which can be evaluated with nearly the same computational effort as needed for solving the standard diffusion equation (DE). In detail, the authors considered the important case of a semi-infinite medium which is illuminated by a collimated beam of light. Methods: A combination of the classic spherical harmonics method and the recently developed method of rotated reference frames is used for solving the P{sub 3} equations in closed form. Results: The derived solutions are illustrated and compared to exact solutions of the radiative transport equation obtained via the Monte Carlo (MC) method as well as with other approximated analytical solutions. It is shown that for the considered cases which are relevant for biomedical optics applications, the P{sub 3} approximation is close to the exact solution of the radiative transport equation. Conclusions: The authors derived exact analytical solutions of the P{sub 3} equations under consideration of boundary conditions for defining a semi-infinite medium. The good agreement to Monte Carlo simulations in the investigated domains, for example, in the steady-state and time domains, as well as the short evaluation time needed suggests that the derived equations can replace the often applied solutions of the diffusion equation for the homogeneous semi-infinite medium.

  18. Analytical Solutions of a Fractional Diffusion-advection Equation for Solar Cosmic-Ray Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  19. The Vacuole System Is a Significant Intracellular Pathway for Longitudinal Solute Transport in Basidiomycete Fungi†

    PubMed Central

    Darrah, P. R.; Tlalka, M.; Ashford, A.; Watkinson, S. C.; Fricker, M. D.

    2006-01-01

    Mycelial fungi have a growth form which is unique among multicellular organisms. The data presented here suggest that they have developed a unique solution to internal solute translocation involving a complex, extended vacuole. In all filamentous fungi examined, this extended vacuole forms an interconnected network, dynamically linked by tubules, which has been hypothesized to act as an internal distribution system. We have tested this hypothesis directly by quantifying solute movement within the organelle by photobleaching a fluorescent vacuolar marker. Predictive simulation models were then used to determine the transport characteristics over extended length scales. This modeling showed that the vacuolar organelle forms a functionally important, bidirectional diffusive transport pathway over distances of millimeters to centimeters. Flux through the pathway is regulated by the dynamic tubular connections involving homotypic fusion and fission. There is also a strongly predicted interaction among vacuolar organization, predicted diffusion transport distances, and the architecture of the branching colony margin. PMID:16835455

  20. Analytical solutions of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  1. Using a derivative-free optimization method for multiple solutions of inverse transport problems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-14

    Identifying unknown components of an object that emits radiation is an important problem for national and global security. Radiation signatures measured from an object of interest can be used to infer object parameter values that are not known. This problem is called an inverse transport problem. An inverse transport problem may have multiple solutions and the most widely used approach for its solution is an iterative optimization method. This paper proposes a stochastic derivative-free global optimization algorithm to find multiple solutions of inverse transport problems. The algorithm is an extension of a multilevel single linkage (MLSL) method where a meshmore » adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm is incorporated into the local phase. Furthermore, numerical test cases using uncollided fluxes of discrete gamma-ray lines are presented to show the performance of this new algorithm.« less

  2. Modeling reactive geochemical transport of concentrated aqueous solutions in variably saturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Zheng, Zuoping; Wan, Jiamin

    2004-01-28

    Concentrated aqueous solutions (CAS) have unique thermodynamic and physical properties. Chemical components in CAS are incompletely dissociated, especially those containing divalent or polyvalent ions. The problem is further complicated by the interaction between CAS flow processes and the naturally heterogeneous sediments. As the CAS migrates through the porous media, the composition may be altered subject to fluid-rock interactions. To effectively model reactive transport of CAS, we must take into account ion-interaction. A combination of the Pitzer ion-interaction and the ion-association model would be an appropriate way to deal with multiple-component systems if the Pitzer' parameters and thermodynamic data of dissolved components and the related minerals are available. To quantify the complicated coupling of CAS flow and transport, as well as the involved chemical reactions in natural and engineered systems, we have substantially extended an existing reactive biogeochemical transport code, BIO-CORE{sup 2D}{copyright}, by incorporating a comprehensive Pitzer ion-interaction model. In the present paper, the model, and two test cases against measured data were briefly introduced. Finally we present an application to simulate a laboratory column experiment studying the leakage of the high alkaline waste fluid stored in Hanford (a site of the U.S. Department of Energy, located in Washington State, USA). With the Pitzer ion-interaction ionic activity model, our simulation captures measured pH evolution. The simulation indicates that all the reactions controlling the pH evolution, including cation exchanges, mineral precipitation and dissolution, are coupled.

  3. Analytical Solution for Multi-Species Contaminant Transport Subject to Sequential First-Order Decay Reactions in Finite Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transport equations governing the movement of multiple solutes undergoing sequential first-order decay reactions have relevance in analyzing a variety of subsurface contaminant transport problems. In this study, a one-dimensional analytical solution for multi-species transport is obtained for finite...

  4. Simulation of unsaturated flow and nonreactive solute transport in a heterogeneous soil at the field scale

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, M L

    1993-02-01

    A field-scale, unsaturated flow and solute transport experiment at the Las Cruces trench site in New Mexico was simulated as part of a blind'' modeling exercise to demonstrate the ability or inability of uncalibrated models to predict unsaturated flow and solute transport in spatially variable porous media. Simulations were conducted using a recently developed multiphase flow and transport simulator. Uniform and heterogeneous soil models were tested, and data from a previous experiment at the site were used with an inverse procedure to estimate water retention parameters. A spatial moment analysis was used to provide a quantitative basis for comparing the mean observed and simulated flow and transport behavior. The results of this study suggest that defensible predictions of waste migration and fate at low-level waste sites will ultimately require site-specific data for model calibration.

  5. Nutrition of the intervertebral disc: effect of fluid flow on solute transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, J.P.; Holm, S.; Maroudas, A.; Nachemson, A.

    1982-10-01

    Adult dogs were injected intravenously with /sup 35/S-sulphate, and moderately exercised for one to six hours to measure isotope concentrations and profiles throughout the intervertebral discs. The isotope profiles were also observed in control animals that had been under anesthesia between injections and death. In both sets of animals, the profiles were in agreement with those expected for isotope transport by diffusion. This agreement indicates that fluid pumping during movement has an insignificant effect on transport of nutrients into the disc. Small solutes, e.g., O/sub 2/, glucose, and sulphate, are transported into the disc chiefly by diffusion. However, calculations show that because of their low diffusivities, pumping may increase the rate of transport of large solutes into the disc, as it does in articular cartilage.

  6. Lateral subsurface stormflow and solute transport in a forested hillslope: A combined measurement and modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine-Kaulio, Hanne; Backnäs, Soile; Karvonen, Tuomo; Koivusalo, Harri; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2014-10-01

    Preferential flow dominates water movement and solute transport in boreal forest hillslopes. However, only a few model applications to date have accounted for preferential flow at forest sites. Here we present a parallel and coupled simulation of flow and transport processes in the preferential flow domain and soil matrix of a forested hillslope section in Kangaslampi, Finland, using a new, three-dimensional, physically based dual-permeability model. Our aim is to simulate lateral subsurface stormflow and solute transport at the slope during a chloride tracer experiment, and to investigate the role of preferential flow in the tracer transport. The model was able to mimic the observed tracer transport during tracer irrigation, but overestimated the dilution velocity of the tracer plume in the highly conductive soil horizons near the soil surface after changing the irrigation to tracer-free water. According to the model, 140 times more chloride was transported downslope in the preferential flow domain than in the soil matrix during the tracer irrigation. The simulations showed, together with reference simulations with a traditional one pore domain model, that a two pore domain approach was required to simulate the observed flow and transport event. The event was characterized by the transmissivity feedback phenomenon and controlled by preferential flow mechanisms, in particular by lateral by-pass flow. According to our results, accounting for the slow-flow and fast-flow domains of soil, as well as the water and solute exchange between the domains, is essential for a successful simulation of flow and solute transport in preferential flow dominated hillslopes.

  7. Curves to determine the relative importance of advection and dispersion for solute and vapor transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garges, J.A.; Baehr, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of advection and dispersion for both solute and vapor transport can be determined from type curves or concentration, flux, or cumulative flux. The dimensionless form of the type curves provides a means to directly evaluate the importance of mass transport by advection relative to that of mass transport by diffusion and dispersion. Type curves based on an analytical solution to the advection-dispersion equation are plotted in terms of dimensionless time and Peclet number. Flux and cumulative flux type curves provide additional rationale for transport regime determination in addition to the traditional concentration type curves. The extension of type curves to include vapor transport with phase partitioning in the unsaturated zone is a new development. Type curves for negative Peclet numbers also are presented. A negative Peclet number characterizes a problem in which one direction of flow is toward the contamination source, and thereby diffusion and advection can act in opposite directions. Examples are the diffusion of solutes away from the downgradient edge of a pump-and-treat capture zone, the upward diffusion of vapors through the unsaturated zone with recharge, and the diffusion of solutes through a low hydraulic conductivity cutoff wall with an inward advective gradient.

  8. Iterative solution of the multistream electron transport equation. I - Comparison with laboratory beam injection experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, H. S.; Varosi, F.; Mayr, H. G.

    1987-01-01

    The Neumann iteration method presently used for solving the electron transport equation in which energy, attitude, and pitch angle are independent variables is fast, and can compute numerical point-response-function solutions of the electron transport equation. Because both the inelastic cross sections and angular elastic cross sections of the model are empirically based, the solutions obtained represent a test of compatibility between various sets of cross sections and energy deposition measurements. The use of a numerical quadrature based on analytic phase function forms yields accurate phase function integrals at low computational cost.

  9. Evaluation of unsaturated-zone solute-transport models for studies of agricultural chemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, Bernard T.; Bayless, E. Randall; Green, Christopher T.; Garg, Sheena; Voss, Frank D.; Lampe, David C.; Barbash, Jack E.; Capel, Paul D.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Of the models tested, RZWQM, HYDRUS2D, VS2DT, GLEAMS and PRZM had graphical user interfaces. Extensive documentation was available for RZWQM, HYDRUS2D, and VS2DT. RZWQM can explicitly simulate water and solute flux in macropores, and both HYDRUS2D and VS2DT can simulate water and solute flux in two dimensions. The version of RZWQM tested had a maximum simulation depth of 3 meters. The complex models simulate the formation, transport, and fate of degradates of up to three to five compounds including the parent, with the exception of VS2DT, which simulates the transport and fate of a single compound.

  10. Spectroscopic and transport measurements of single molecules in solution using an electrokinetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quan; Moerner, W. E.

    2014-03-01

    In aqueous solution, diffusion generally limits the observation window of a nano-meter sized single molecule to milliseconds and prevents quantitative determination of spectroscopic and transport properties molecule-by-molecule. The anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap is a feedback-based microfluidic device that enables prolonged (multiseconds) observation of single molecules in solution. The amount of information that can be extracted from each molecule in solution is thus boosted by three orders of magnitude. We describe recent advances in extending the ABEL trap to conduct both spectroscopic and transport measurements of single trapped molecules. First, by combining the trap with multi-parameter fluorescence detection, synchronized dynamics in different observables can be visualized in solution. We use single molecules of Atto 633 as an example and show that this popular label switches between different emissive states under common imaging conditions. Next, we show how transport properties of trapped single molecules can be extracted in addition to spectroscopic readouts. Due to their direct sensitivity to molecular size and charge, measured transport coefficients can be used to distinguish different molecular species and trace biomolecular interactions in solution. We demonstrate this new paradigm by monitoring DNA hybridization/melting in real-time.

  11. Analytic solutions of tracer transport in fractured rock associated with precipitation-dissolution reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Spycher, N.; Kennedy, B.

    2011-03-15

    Precipitation-dissolution reactions are important for a number of applications such as isotopic tracer transport in the subsurface. Analytical solutions have been developed for tracer transport in both single-fracture and multiple-fracture systems associated with these reactions under transient and steady-state transport conditions. These solutions also take into account advective transport in fractures and molecular diffusion in the rock matrix. For studying distributions of disturbed tracer concentration (the difference between actual concentration and its equilibrium value), effects of precipitation-dissolution reactions are mathematically equivalent to a 'decay' process with a decay constant proportional to the corresponding bulk reaction rate. This important feature significantly simplifies the derivation procedure by taking advantage of the existence of analytical solutions for tracer transport associated with radioactive decay in fractured rock. It is also useful for interpreting tracer breakthrough curves, because the impact of a decay process is relatively easy to analyze. Several illustrative examples are presented, which show that the results are sensitive to fracture spacing, matrix diffusion coefficient (fracture surface area), and bulk reaction rate (or 'decay' constant), indicating that the relevant flow and transport parameters may be estimated by analyzing tracer signals.

  12. Strategic network design of Java Island fuel supply with production-transportation solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianawati, Fauzia; Farizal, -; Surjandari, Isti; Marzuli, Rully

    2011-10-01

    This study aims to find more efficient supply network, from refineries / imports to fuel terminal, which still uses the Tanker, Tank Trucks or Rail Tank Wagon with an alternative pipeline that are considered more efficient than other transport modes, as well as gaining pipeline transportation network optimization analysis tailored to the capabilities/ capacity of refinery production and capacity of the pipe mode. With the complexity of the number of 3 point sources of supply, 19 destination of terminal, 4 kinds of products and 4 types of transport modes, transport-production model modified by adding multi-modal transport and investment costs of new pipeline. Then coded in Lingo program which adopts Branch & Bound technique and input the processed data in order to obtain an optimal distribution pattern produced the lowest distribution costs. This B&B solution was also compared with SCO solution which is a metaheuristic method. The results of this study lead to the development of new modes of pipeline connections in amount of 4 alternatives, generated from the optimal solution, but still potentially earned savings of about IDR 1 Trillion per year from cost-efficiency of product procurement and transportation costs.

  13. Transporting Radioactive Waste: An Engineering Activity. Grades 5-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAZWRAP, The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program.

    This brochure contains an engineering activity for upper elementary, middle school, and high school students that examines the transportation of radioactive waste. The activity is designed to inform students about the existence of radioactive waste and its transportation to disposal sites. Students experiment with methods to contain the waste and…

  14. Solutions and reductions for radiative energy transport in laser-heated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Broadbridge, P.; Ivanova, N. M.

    2015-01-15

    A full symmetry classification is given for models of energy transport in radiant plasma when the mass density is spatially variable and the diffusivity is nonlinear. A systematic search for conservation laws also leads to some potential symmetries and to an integrable nonlinear model. Classical point symmetries, potential symmetries, and nonclassical symmetries are used to effect variable reductions and exact solutions. The simplest time-dependent solution is shown to be stable and relevant to a closed system.

  15. Anomalous solute transport in saturated porous media: Relating transport model parameters to electrical and nuclear magnetic resonance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; France, Samantha; Osterman, Gordon; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Singha, Kamini

    2015-02-01

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe commonly observed non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models such as the dual-domain mass-transfer (DDMT) model. DDMT model parameters are commonly calibrated via curve fitting, providing little insight into the relation between effective parameters and physical properties of the medium. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can provide insight into the geometry and connectedness of pore spaces related to transport model parameters. Here, we consider proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), direct-current (DC) resistivity, and complex conductivity (CC) measurements for this purpose, and assess these methods using glass beads as a control and two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material that demonstrates non-Fickian transport due to intragranular porosity. We estimate DDMT parameters via calibration of a transport model to column-scale solute tracer tests, and compare NMR, DC resistivity, CC results, which reveal that grain size alone does not control transport properties and measured geophysical parameters; rather, volume and arrangement of the pore space play important roles. NMR cannot provide estimates of more-mobile and less-mobile pore volumes in the absence of tracer tests because these estimates depend critically on the selection of a material-dependent and flow-dependent cutoff time. Increased electrical connectedness from DC resistivity measurements are associated with greater mobile pore space determined from transport model calibration. CC was hypothesized to be related to length scales of mass transfer, but the CC response is unrelated to DDMT.

  16. Transport solutions of the Lamé equations and shock elastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeyeva, L. A.; Kaishybaeva, G. K.

    2016-07-01

    The Lamé system describing the dynamics of an isotropic elastic medium affected by a steady transport load moving at subsonic, transonic, or supersonic speed is considered. Its fundamental and generalized solutions in a moving frame of reference tied to the transport load are analyzed. Shock waves arising in the medium at supersonic speeds are studied. Conditions on the jump in the stress, displacement rate, and energy across the shock front are obtained using distribution theory. Numerical results concerning the dynamics of an elastic medium influenced by concentrated transport loads moving at sub-, tran- and supersonic speeds are presented.

  17. Osmosis and solute-solvent drag: fluid transport and fluid exchange in animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Hammel, H T; Schlegel, Whitney M

    2005-01-01

    , (3) the return of interstitial fluid to the vasa recta, (4) return of aqueous humor to the episcleral veins, and (5) flow of phloem from source to sink in higher plants and many more examples of fluid transport and fluid exchange in animal and plant physiology. When a membrane is permeable to water only and when it separates differing aqueous solutions, the flow of water is from the solution with the lower osmotic pressure to the solution with the higher osmotic pressure. PMID:15976460

  18. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model

    PubMed Central

    Vaquer, Sergi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Rabadán, Arnau; González, Albert; Fenollosa, Felip; de la Torre, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay ® (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary) was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG) transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP) during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology opens new and

  19. Modeling variably saturated subsurface solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and MT3DMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morway, Eric D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Langevin, Christian D.; Bailey, Ryan T.; Healy, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    The MT3DMS groundwater solute transport model was modified to simulate solute transport in the unsaturated zone by incorporating the unsaturated-zone flow (UZF1) package developed for MODFLOW. The modified MT3DMS code uses a volume-averaged approach in which Lagrangian-based UZF1 fluid fluxes and storage changes are mapped onto a fixed grid. Referred to as UZF-MT3DMS, the linked model was tested against published benchmarks solved analytically as well as against other published codes, most frequently the U.S. Geological Survey's Variably-Saturated Two-Dimensional Flow and Transport Model. Results from a suite of test cases demonstrate that the modified code accurately simulates solute advection, dispersion, and reaction in the unsaturated zone. Two- and three-dimensional simulations also were investigated to ensure unsaturated-saturated zone interaction was simulated correctly. Because the UZF1 solution is analytical, large-scale flow and transport investigations can be performed free from the computational and data burdens required by numerical solutions to Richards' equation. Results demonstrate that significant simulation runtime savings can be achieved with UZF-MT3DMS, an important development when hundreds or thousands of model runs are required during parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. Three-dimensional variably saturated flow and transport simulations revealed UZF-MT3DMS to have runtimes that are less than one tenth of the time required by models that rely on Richards' equation. Given its accuracy and efficiency, and the wide-spread use of both MODFLOW and MT3DMS, the added capability of unsaturated-zone transport in this familiar modeling framework stands to benefit a broad user-ship.

  20. Modeling variably saturated subsurface solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and MT3DMS.

    PubMed

    Morway, Eric D; Niswonger, Richard G; Langevin, Christian D; Bailey, Ryan T; Healy, Richard W

    2013-03-01

    The MT3DMS groundwater solute transport model was modified to simulate solute transport in the unsaturated zone by incorporating the unsaturated-zone flow (UZF1) package developed for MODFLOW. The modified MT3DMS code uses a volume-averaged approach in which Lagrangian-based UZF1 fluid fluxes and storage changes are mapped onto a fixed grid. Referred to as UZF-MT3DMS, the linked model was tested against published benchmarks solved analytically as well as against other published codes, most frequently the U.S. Geological Survey's Variably-Saturated Two-Dimensional Flow and Transport Model. Results from a suite of test cases demonstrate that the modified code accurately simulates solute advection, dispersion, and reaction in the unsaturated zone. Two- and three-dimensional simulations also were investigated to ensure unsaturated-saturated zone interaction was simulated correctly. Because the UZF1 solution is analytical, large-scale flow and transport investigations can be performed free from the computational and data burdens required by numerical solutions to Richards' equation. Results demonstrate that significant simulation runtime savings can be achieved with UZF-MT3DMS, an important development when hundreds or thousands of model runs are required during parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. Three-dimensional variably saturated flow and transport simulations revealed UZF-MT3DMS to have runtimes that are less than one tenth of the time required by models that rely on Richards' equation. Given its accuracy and efficiency, and the wide-spread use of both MODFLOW and MT3DMS, the added capability of unsaturated-zone transport in this familiar modeling framework stands to benefit a broad user-ship. PMID:22834908

  1. Influence of karst evolution on solute transport evaluated by process-based numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubinger, Bernhard; Birk, Steffen

    2010-05-01

    Karst waters are of major interest in water resources management. Because of their inherent properties karst systems show great vulnerability with regard to contaminants. Karst systems include highly permeable solution conduit networks formed by chemical aggressive water embedded in a fissured matrix. Small initial voids are widened and thus act as preferential passages, where flow is rapid and often turbulent. Water discharging at karst spring originates from different pathways with different residence times. Contaminant transport through conduit pathways is very rapid, whereas flow through the fissured porous matrix is much slower. Thus, on the one hand, pollutants may be rapidly transported and reach high concentrations at the karst spring shortly after their release; on the other hand, the existence of slow flow components may cause the pollution to last for long times. In this work, solute transport properties of karst aquifers are investigated using generic conduit networks of hydraulically connected proto-conduits with initially log-normally distributed apertures in the millimetre range and below. Conduit evolution is modelled by coupling flow, transport, and dissolution processes, whereby single conduits are widened up to the metre range. Thus, different stages of karst evolution can be distinguished. The resulting flow systems provide the basis for modelling advective-dispersive transport of non-reactive solutes through the network of more or less widened (proto-)conduits. The general transport characteristics in karst systems as well as the influence of heterogeneities and structures on solute transport are illustrated for cases of direct injection into the conduit systems at different evolutionary stages. The resulting breakthrough curves typically show several distinct, chronologically shifted peaks with long tailings, which appears to be similar to data from field tracer experiments.

  2. The inhibitory effects of camptothecin (CPT) and its derivatives on the substrate uptakes mediated by human solute carrier transporters (SLCs).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Chan, Ting; Zhu, Ling; Yan, Xiufeng; Cao, Zhisong; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Fanfan

    2016-09-01

    1. Camptothecin (CPT) and its derivatives are potent candidate compounds in treating cancers. However, their clinical applications are largely restricted by severe toxicities. 2. The solute carrier transporters (SLCs), particularly the organic anion transporting polypeptides and organic anion/cation transporters (OATs/OCTs) are widely expressed in human key organs and responsible for the cellular influx of many substances including endogenous substrates and many clinically important drugs. Drug-drug interactions through SLCs often result in unsatisfied therapeutic outcomes and/or unexpected toxicities. 3. This study investigated the inhibitory effects of CPT and its eight derivatives on the cellular uptake of specific substrates mediated by the essential SLCs in over-expressing Human embryonic kidney 293 cells. 4. Our data revealed that CPT, 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT), 10-methoxycamptothecin (MCPT) and 9-nitrocamptothecin (9NC) significantly inhibit the uptake activity of OAT3. 9NC also inhibited the substrate transport mediated by OAT1. The substrate uptakes of OAT1, OCTN1 and OCTN2 were significantly decreased in the presence of CZ112, while CPT-11 potently down-regulated the transport activity of OCT1 and OCT3. 5. In summary, our study demonstrated that CPT and its eight derivatives selectively inhibit the substrate uptakes mediated by the essential SLCs. This information contributes to understanding the localized toxicity of CPTs and provides novel molecular targets for the therapeutic optimization of CPTs in the future. PMID:26744836

  3. Testing and benchmarking of a three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, P.N.; Andersen, P.F.; Faust, C.R.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1988-12-31

    A three-dimensional finite-difference model was developed to simulate groundwater flow and solute transport. The model is intended for application to a variety of groundwater resource and solute migration evaluations, including several complex sites at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Because the model, FTWORK, is relatively new, there is a need to provide confidence in the model results. Methodologies that test models include comparisons with analytical solutions, comparisons with empirical data, and checking that conservation properties hold. Another level of testing is the comparison of one code against another. This paper describes the testing and benchmarking procedure used to verify the validate FTWORK.

  4. Solutions to bi-Maxwellian transport equations for the polar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demars, H. G.; Schunk, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    In this study, polar wind solutions are obtained for a broad range of O(+) density, H(+) drift velocity, electron temperature and H(+) temperature boundary conditions. The bi-Maxwellian-based 16-moment set of transport equations is used, since this set is expected to be superior to Maxwellian-based equations in describing large temperature anisotropies and heat flows. The present solutions corroborate earlier results when similar boundary conditions are used. Also, for previously unexplored combinations of boundary conditions, the present solutions are often qualitatively different from any obtained before.

  5. Modeling Activity: Ions to Hydrophobics in Crowded Biological Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettitt, Montgomery

    2006-03-01

    Nonideal solutions play a role in many aspects of chemistry. As concentrations increase, concentration itself becomes a less useful quantity to understand equilibria. Industrial and medicinal chemistry often fail due to the difference between concentration and activity. An understanding of the impact of the crowded conditions in the cytoplasm on its biomolecules is of clear importance to biochemical, medical and pharmaceutical science. Work on the use of small biochemical compounds to crowd protein solutions indicates that a quantitative description of their non-ideal behavior is possible and straightforward. Here, we will show what the structural origin of this non-ideal solution behavior is from expression derived from a semi grand ensemble approach. We discuss the consequences of these findings regarding protein folding stability and solvation in crowded solutions through a structural analysis of the m-value or the change in free energy difference of a macromolecule in solution with respect to the concentration of a third component.

  6. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1in L929 fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Stephen M.; Kerk, Samuel A.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuipers, David P.; Praamsma, Riemer C.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. PMID:24333987

  7. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1 in L929 fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Gunnink, Stephen M; Kerk, Samuel A; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Alabi, Ola D; Kuipers, David P; Praamsma, Riemer C; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2014-04-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. PMID:24333987

  8. CTSPAC: MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR COUPLED TRANSPORT OF WATER, SOLUTES, AND HEAT IN THE SOIL-PLANT-ATMOSPHERE CONTINUUM. VOLUME 1. MATHEMATICAL THEORY AND TRANSPORT CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical structure of the model consists of the coupling of a model for the transport through soils to a model for transport through plants. The coupled model describes uptake of water and solutes by plants from the soil solution. The rate of uptake is a function of the e...

  9. Solute transport in eroded and rehabilitated prairie landforms. 2. Reactive solute.

    PubMed

    Papiernik, Sharon K; Koskinen, William C; Yates, Scott R

    2009-08-26

    The impact of varying soil, landscape, and climate conditions on the off-site transport of pesticides must be determined to develop improved pesticide management practices. This study quantified the rate of S-metolachlor dissipation after fall and spring application in eroded and rehabilitated landforms in which topsoil was moved from the lower slope to the upper slope. Fall-applied metolachlor provided no control of annual grasses because approximately 80% was removed from the root zone during the winter and early spring, presumably by leaching and runoff. S-Metolachlor dissipated in the spring with a DT(50) of 24-29 days. These results suggest that fall-applied metolachlor may not provide economic weed control and presents an increased risk of water contamination. Although landscape position and bulk soil movement within the landform had a large impact on soil properties, no significant differences in metolachlor dissipation between different landscape positions and between eroded and rehabilitated landforms were observed. PMID:19653695

  10. Heat transport in active harmonic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Mei C.; Ellis, Fred M.; Kottos, Tsampikos; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Geisel, Theo; Prosen, Tomaz

    2011-08-15

    We show that a harmonic lattice model with amplifying and attenuating elements, when coupled to two thermal baths, exhibits unique heat transport properties. Some of these novel features include anomalous nonequilibrium steady-state heat currents, negative differential thermal conductance, as well as nonreciprocal heat transport. We find that when these elements are arranged in a PT-symmetric manner, the domain of existence of the nonequilibrium steady state is maximized. We propose an electronic experimental setup based on resistive-inductive-capacitive (RLC) transmission lines, where our predictions can be tested.