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Sample records for active volcanic areas

  1. Volcanic hazard management in dispersed volcanism areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Traditional volcanic hazard methodologies were developed mainly to deal with the big stratovolcanoes. In such type of volcanoes, the hazard map is an important tool for decision-makers not only during a volcanic crisis but also for territorial planning. According to the past and recent eruptions of a volcano, all possible volcanic hazards are modelled and included in the hazard map. Combining the hazard map with the Event Tree the impact area can be zoned and defining the likely eruptive scenarios that will be used during a real volcanic crisis. But in areas of disperse volcanism is very complex to apply the same volcanic hazard methodologies. The event tree do not take into account unknown vents, because the spatial concepts included in it are only related with the distance reached by volcanic hazards. The volcanic hazard simulation is also difficult because the vent scatter modifies the results. The volcanic susceptibility try to solve this problem, calculating the most likely areas to have an eruption, but the differences between low and large values obtained are often very small. In these conditions the traditional hazard map effectiveness could be questioned, making necessary a change in the concept of hazard map. Instead to delimit the potential impact areas, the hazard map should show the expected behaviour of the volcanic activity and how the differences in the landscape and internal geo-structures could condition such behaviour. This approach has been carried out in La Palma (Canary Islands), combining the concept of long-term hazard map with the short-term volcanic scenario to show the expected volcanic activity behaviour. The objective is the decision-makers understand how a volcanic crisis could be and what kind of mitigation measurement and strategy could be used.

  2. Chemical composition of soils in the areas of volcanic ashfalls around active volcanoes in Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharikhina, L. V.; Litvinenko, Yu. S.

    2016-03-01

    The geochemical features of volcanic soils (Andosols) in the northern soil province of Kamchatka are identified. The background regional concentrations ( Cb r ) of most of chemical elements in the studied soils are lower than their average concentrations in soils of the world and in the European volcanic soils. Only Na, Ca, and Mg are present in elevated concentrations in all the studied soils in the north of Kamchatka. Regional background concentrations of elements are exceeded by 1.6 times in the area of active ashfalls of the Tolbachik volcano and by 1.3 times in the area of active ashfalls of the Shiveluch volcano. The concentrations of mobile forms of elements in these areas exceed their regional background concentrations by 2.1 and 2.6 times, respectively.

  3. Time series analysis of thermal variation on Italian volcanic active areas by using IR satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, M.; Buongiorno, M. F.; Pieri, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    To monitoring of active volcanoes the systematic acquisition of medium/high resolution thermal data and the subsequent analysis of time series may improve the capability to detect small surface temperature variation related to changes in volcanic activity level and contribute to the early warning systems. Examples on the processing of long time series based EO data of Mt Etna activity and Phlegraean Fields observation by using remote sensing techniques and at different spatial resolution data (ASTER - 90mt, AVHRR -1km, MODIS-1km, MSG SEVIRI-3km) are showed. The use of TIR sensors with high spatial resolution offers the possibility to obtain detailed information on the areas where there are significant changes, detecting variation in fumaroles fields and summit craters before eruptions. Thanks to ASTER thermal infrared (TIR, 5 bands) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum we have obtained the surface temperature map on the volcano area. For this study we have considered the ASTER's night observations that show well defined episodes of increasing thermal emission of crater thanks to a more uniform background temperature. Two different procedures are shown, both using the TIR high spatial resolution data: for Phlegraean Fields (active but quiescent volcano) the analysis of time series of surface temperature which may improve the capability to detect small surface temperature variation related to changes in volcanic activity level; for Mt. Etna (active volcano) a semi-automatic procedure which extract the summit area radiance values with the goal of detecting variation related to eruptive events. The advantage of direct download of EO data by means INGV antennas even though low spatial resolution offers the possibility of a systematic data processing having a daily updating of information for prompt response and hazard mitigation. At the same time the comparison of surface temperature retrievals at different scale is an important issue for future satellite sensors.

  4. Evidence for Subglacial Volcanic Activity Beneath the area of the Divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    There is an increasing body of aeromagnetic, radar ice-sounding, heat flow, subglacial volcanic earthquakes, several exposed active and subglacial volcanoes and other lines of evidence for volcanic activity associated with the West Antarctic Rift System (WR) since the origin (~25 Ma) of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), which flows through it. Exposed late Cenozoic, alkaline volcanic rocks, 34 Ma to present concentrated in Marie Byrd Land (LeMasurier and Thomson, 1990), but also exposed along the rift shoulder on the Transantarctic Mountains flank of the WR, and >1 million cubic kilometers, of mostly subglacially erupted 'volcanic centers' beneath the WAIS inferred from aeromagnetic data, have been interpreted as evidence of a magmatic plume. About 18 high relief, (~600-2000 m) 'volcanic centers' presently beneath the WAIS surface, probably were erupted subaerially when the WAIS was absent, based on the 5-km orthogonally line spaced Central West Antarctica aerogeophysical survey. All would be above sea level after ice removal and isostatic adjustment. Nine of these high relief peaks are in the general area beneath the divide of the WAIS. This high bed relief topography was first interpreted in the 1980s as the volcanic 'Sinuous Ridge ' based on a widely spaced aeromagnetic -radar ice sounding survey (Jankowski et al,. 1983). A 70-km wide, circular ring of interpreted subglacial volcanic rocks was cited as evidence of a volcanic caldera underlying the ice sheet divide based on the CWA survey (Behrendt et al., 1998). A broad magnetic 'low' surrounding the caldera area possibly is evidence of a shallow Curie isotherm. High heat flow reported from temperature logging (Clow et al., 2012) in the WAISCORE and a thick volcanic ash layer in the core (Dunbar et al., 2012) are consistent with this interpretation. A 2 km-high subaerially erupted volcano (subglacial Mt Thiel, ~78.5 degrees S, 111 degrees W) ~ 100 km north from the WAISCORE could be the source of the ash

  5. Middle Miocene hiatus in volcanic activity in the Great Basin area of the Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, E.H.; Noble, D.C.; Silberman, M.L.

    1970-01-01

    A summary of potassium-argon dates shows that a high level of igneous activity in the Great Basin and adjacent regions during middle Tertiary time (40 to 20 my ago) was followed by a period of relative quiescence in middle Miocene time that lasted for several million years (from 20 to 17 my ago). Volcanism resumed 16 my ago mainly at the margins of the region and has continued to the present. ?? 1970.

  6. Characterization of a deep geothermal reservoir in an active volcanic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehme, M.; Kamah, Y.; Koestono, H.; Zimmermann, G.; Regenspurg, S.; Erbaş, K.; Wiegand, B.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    In this study an integrated methodological approach to characterize a complex deep geothermal reservoir located in an active volcanic setting in Indonesia is presented. The methods applied include hydraulic and hydrogeochemical (incl. isotope tracer) techniques to model groundwater flow, heat transport, and hydro-geochemical properties of the reservoir. 3D geological and hydraulic models of the area were constructed based on deep drill profiles, collected fluid and rock samples, and mapping of geological structures. First results show that the geothermal reservoir is composed of major geological units such as altered andesite, basalt, breccia, and tuff layers. Several tectonic faults crosscut the geological units into individual blocks and reservoirs and influence hydraulic pathways in multiple ways. Hot water and steam are produced by nine wells. Fluids are reinjected into the reservoir through one injection well. Currently, a geothermal plant produces 60 MWe from steam withdrawn. Temperatures of the geothermal system range between 250 and 350 °C (Koestono et al. 2010). Based on the chemical composition of fluids from the production wells (concentration of major ions and physicochemical parameters) at least two different hydro-geochemical reservoirs could be identified. The deep reservoir with a moderate pH of 5 is marked by total silica concentrations up to 350 mg/L and high chloride concentrations of 430 mg/L. For the shallow reservoir, highly acidic conditions with pH values of 2.9 are analysed for water, while steam shows pH values around 4. Furthermore, high chloride (1550 mg/L), total silica (460 mg/L), and sulphate concentrations (1600 mg/L) are characteristic for the shallow reservoir. According to Giggenbach (1988) and Nicholson (1993) the water can be classified into sulphate-rich waters and neutral chloride-waters. Sulphate-rich water is expected to occur near to the heat source while chloride-rich waters discharge near the outflow zone. Surface

  7. Exploration and monitoring geothermal activity using Landsat ETM + images. A case study at Aso volcanic area in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mia, Md. Bodruddoza; Nishijima, Jun; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    Thermal activity monitoring in and around active volcanic areas using remote sensing is an essential part of volcanology nowadays. Three identical approaches were used for thermal activity exploration at Aso volcanic area in Japan using Landsat ETM + images. First, the conventional methods for hydrothermal alteration mapping were applied to find the most active thermal region after exploring geothermal indicator minerals. Second, we found some thermally highly anomalous regions around Nakadake crater using land surface temperature estimation. Then, the Stefan-Boltzmann equation was used for estimating and also monitoring radiative heat flux (RHF) from the most active region of about 8 km2 in and around Nakadake crater in the central part of the Aso volcano. To fulfill the required parameter in the Stefan-Boltzmann equation for radiative heat flux, the NDVI (Normalized differential vegetation index) method was used for spectral emissivity, and the mono-window algorithm was used for land surface temperature of this study area. The NDVI value was used to divide land-cover in the study area into four types: water, bare ground, mixed and vegetated land. The bare land was found within the most active region. Vegetation coverage area showed an inverse relationship with total RHF in this study as health of thermally stressed vegetation supports this relationship. The spatial distribution of spectral emissivity ranged from 0.94 to 0.99 in our study. Land surface temperature was estimated using a mono-window algorithm and was highest LST in 2008 and lowest in 2011. The results of RHF showed that the highest pixel RHF was found to be about 296 W/m2 in 2008. Total RHF was obtained of about 607 MW in 2002 and the lowest was about 354 MW in 2008. The RHF anomaly area was found the highest in 2002 and was lowest in 2011. The highest total heat discharge rate (HDR) obtained about 3918 MW in 2002 and lowest total HDR about 2289 MW in 2008 from this study area. But in the case of

  8. Investigation of active volcanic areas through oceanographic data collected by the NEMO-SN1 multiparametric seafloor observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Bue, Nadia; Sgroi, Tiziana; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Marinaro, Giuditta; Embriaco, Davide; Beranzoli, Laura; Favali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the European Research Infrastructure EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory, www.emso-eu.org), the cabled multidisciplinary seafloor observatory node NEMO-SN1 was deployed in the Western Ionian Sea (Southern Italy) at a depth of 2100 m, about 25 km off-shore Eastern Sicily, close to the Mt. Etna volcano system. The oceanographic payload mounted on this observatory was originally designed to monitor possible variations of the local hydrodynamic playing a crucial role on the redistribution of deep water in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. In particular the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP RDI WorkHorse 600 kHz) was configured with the main aim to record the bottom dynamics, watching few meters of water column above the station (about 30 m). Surprisingly, this sensor offered a spectacular recording of the Mt.Etna pyroclastic activity occurred on 2013 which affected the ESE sector of the volcano. Although the ADCP sensor is commonly used to measure speed and direction of sea currents, it is more often used to monitor concentration suspended matter of controlled areas, such as rivers or coastal marine environments, by the analysis of the acoustic backscatter intensity. This standard condition entails some a-priori knowledge (i.e. suspended sediment concentration, particle size, echo intensity calibration) useful to well configure the sensors before starting its acquisition. However, in the case of Mt. Etna pyroclastic activity, due to the unexpected recording, these information were not available and it was necessary to work in a post-processing mode considering all acquired data. In fact, several different parameters contribute to complete the comprehension of the observed phenomenon: the ADCP acoustic wavelength able to indirectly provide information on the detectable particle size, the intensity of the explosive activity useful to define the starting energy of the volcanic system, the oceanographic local

  9. Prediction and monitoring of volcanic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sudradjat, A.

    1986-07-01

    This paper summarizes the state of the art for predicting and monitoring volcanic activities, and it emphasizes the experience obtained by the Volcanological Survey Indonesia for active volcanoes. The limited available funds, the large number of active volcanoes to monitor, and the high population density of the volcanic area are the main problems encountered. Seven methods of volcano monitoring are applied to the active volcanoes of Indonesia: seismicity, ground deformation, gravity and magnetic studies, self-potential studies, petrochemistry, gas monitoring, and visual observation. Seismic monitoring augmented by gas monitoring has proven to be effective, particularly for predicting individual eruptions at the after-initial phase. However, the success of the prediction depends on the characteristics of each volcano. In general, the initial eruption phase is the most difficult phenomenon to predict. The preparation of hazard maps and the continuous awareness of the volcanic eruption are the most practical ways to mitigate volcanic danger.

  10. Volcanically Active Regions on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Shown here is a portion of one of the highest-resolution images of Io (Latitude: +10 to +60 degrees, Longitude: 180 to 225 degrees) acquired by the Galileo spacecraft, revealing immense lava flows and other volcanic landforms. Several high-temperature volcanic hot spots have been detected in this region by both the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer and the imaging system of Galileo. The temperatures are consistent with active silicate volcanism in lava flows or lava lakes (which reside inside irregular depressions called calderas). The large dark lava flow in the upper left region of the image is more than 400 km long, similar to ancient flood basalts on Earth and mare lavas on the Moon.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the left. The image covers an area 1230 kilometers wide and the smallest features that can be discerned are 2.5 kilometers in size. This image was taken on November 6th, 1996, at a range of 245,719 kilometers by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on the Galileo Spacecraft.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  11. Io. [theories concerning volcanic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A report on the continuing investigation of Io is presented. Gravitational resonance is discussed as the cause of Io's volcanism, and the volcanic activity is explained in terms of sulfur chemistry. Theories concerning the reasons for the two main types of volcanic eruptions on Io are advanced and correlated with geographical features of the satellite. The sulfur and silicate models of the calderas are presented, citing the strengths and weaknesses of each. Problems of the gravitational resonance theory of Io's heat source are then described. Finally, observations of Io planned for the Galileo mission are summarized.

  12. Ambient noise tomography in the Naruko/Onikobe volcanic area, NE Japan: implications for geofluids and seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Jun; Okada, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    To understand the earthquake generation in volcanic areas, it is important to investigate the presence of geofluids in the uppermost crust. We applied ambient noise tomography to the Naruko/Onikobe volcanic area and constructed a detailed 3-D S-wave velocity ( V s) model using continuous records from a dense seismic network and surrounding stations. The low-velocity zones were found beneath Naruko Volcano, Onikobe Caldera, and Mt. Kurikoma. The low-velocity zone beneath Onikobe Caldera may correspond to a magma reservoir, which is also characterized by surrounding S-wave reflectors. The molten magma originates from the upwelling flows in the mantle wedge. We also conducted the relocation of aftershocks of the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake by double-difference tomography based on the obtained velocity model. Beneath Mt. Kurikoma, aftershock distribution delineates one of the unfavorably oriented fault planes of the main shock, which implies that the low-velocity zone around the fault plane is related to the presence of overpressurized fluid.

  13. Helium-3 emission related to volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Wakita, H.; Urabe, A.; Tominaga, T.

    1984-04-13

    The helium-3/helium-4 ratio in bubbling gases from ten hot springs located around Mount Ontake, an active volcano in central Japan, ranges from 1.71 R/sub atm/ (1.71 times the atmospheric ratio of 1.40 x 10/sup -6/) to 6.15 R/sub atm/. The value of the ratio decreases with distance from the central cone of the volcano. Such a tendency may be a characteristic of helium-3 emission in volcanic areas and suggests more primitive helium-3 is carried with fluid flowing through a conduit during volcanic activity. 6 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  14. Global positioning system survey data for active seismic and volcanic areas of eastern Sicily, 1994 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Fagone, Sonia; Giardina, Carmelo; Genovese, Simone; Aiesi, Gianpiero; Calvagna, Francesco; Cantarero, Massimo; Consoli, Orazio; Consoli, Salvatore; Guglielmino, Francesco; Puglisi, Biagio; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    This work presents and describes a 20-year long database of GPS data collected by geodetic surveys over the seismically and volcanically active eastern Sicily, for a total of more than 6300 measurements. Raw data were initially collected from the various archives at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Catania-Osservatorio Etneo and organized in a single repository. Here, quality and completeness checks were performed, while all necessary supplementary information were searched, collected, validated and organized together with the relevant data. Once all data and information collections were completed, raw binary data were converted into the universal ASCII RINEX format; all data are provided in this format with the necessary information for precise processing. In order to make the data archive readily consultable, we developed software allowing the user to easily search and obtain the needed data by simple alphanumeric and geographic queries. PMID:27479914

  15. Early volcanic history of the Rabaul area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Chris O.; Duncan, Robert A.

    2016-04-01

    We conducted an extensive program of 40Ar-39Ar age determinations on a suite of 27 volcanic rock samples from key stratigraphic units at Rabaul, Papua New Guinea in order to improve understanding of the early eruption history of the multiple volcanic systems present in the area. Analyses of whole rock, plagioclase and groundmass separates yielded statistically significant ages for 24 samples. Replicate analyses (groundmass, plagioclase) for 17 of the samples provided concordant ages. The oldest systems in the Rabaul area (>1 Ma to ≈300 ka) are in the south, associated with the caldera-like Varzin Depression, and in the north, at the stratovolcanoes Watom and Tovanumbatir. The earliest known activity of the Rabaul system occurred between about 330 and 200 ka and involved emplacement of lava flows and scoria deposits. Major explosive activity at the Rabaul system commenced at about 200 ka and produced a sequence of dacitic ignimbrites that culminated with the emplacement of the large-volume Malaguna Pyroclastics at about 160 ka. Calderas may have been formed as a consequence of the large volumes of tephra produced during some of these eruptions. Products of the early activity are found in the northern and northeastern walls of Rabaul Caldera and on the northeastern flank of Tovanumbatir. This leads to the conclusion that the source of the early activity at Rabaul probably was located in the northern part of the present caldera complex. A shift in the focus of activity at the Rabaul system took place between about 160 and 125 ka. All of the younger (<125 ka) major pyroclastic formations, including the Karavia Welded Tuff, the Barge Tunnel Ignimbrite and the Latlat Pyroclastics, which make up the bulk of the exposure in the southern and western walls of Rabaul Caldera, were erupted from a source or sources in the south-central part of the complex. The stratovolcanoes Palangiangia and Kabiu, which flank the northeastern part of the complex, had commenced activity by

  16. Volcanic hazards of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1994-12-01

    Potential volcanic hazards are assessed, and hazard zone maps are developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent areas. The basis of the hazards assessment and mapping is the past volcanic history of the INEL region, and the apparent similarity of INEL volcanism with equivalent, well-studied phenomena in other regions of active volcanism, particularly Hawaii and Iceland. The most significant hazards to INEL facilities are associated with basaltic volcanism, chiefly lava flows, which move slowly and mainly threaten property by inundation or burning. Related hazards are volcanic gases and tephra, and ground disturbance associated with the ascent of magma under the volcanic zones. Several volcanic zones are identified in the INEL area. These zones contain most of the volcanic vents and fissures of the region and are inferred to be the most probable sites of future INEL volcanism. Volcanic-recurrence estimates are given for each of the volcanic zones based on geochronology of the lavas, together with the results of field and petrographic investigations concerning the cogenetic relationships of INEL volcanic deposits and associated magma intrusion. Annual probabilities of basaltic volcanism within the INEL volcanic zones range from 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 16,000-year interval between eruptions) for the axial volcanic zone near the southern INEL boundary and the Arco volcanic-rift zone near the western INEL boundary, to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 100,000-year interval between eruptions) for the Howe-East Butte volcanic rift zone, a geologically old and poorly defined feature of the central portion of INEL. Three volcanic hazard zone maps are developed for the INEL area: lava flow hazard zones, a tephra (volcanic ash) and gas hazard zone, and a ground-deformation hazard zone. The maps are useful in land-use planning, site selection, and safety analysis.

  17. A decade's overview of Io's volcanic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Veeder, G. J.; Johnson, T. V.; Blaney, D. L.; Goguen, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past decade some aspects of Io's volcanic activity have changed greatly, while others have essentially remained constant. This contrast has emerged from our study of multi-wavelength, infrared, observations of Io's thermal emission. From 1983 to 1992 we observed the disk integrated flux density of Io from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Our spectral coverage allows us to separate out the emission components due to volcanic thermal anomalies which are warmer than the background emission caused by solar heating. Our temporal coverage allows us to resolve individual eruptions and also to obtain the disk-integrated flux density as a function of longitude (or, equivalently, orbital phase angle). Characteristics that persisted over the decade involve Loki's location and intensity of emission, the leading hemisphere emission, and the average heat flow. The variable aspects of Io over the decade include Loki's hotter area(s) and the outbursts in the leading hemisphere.

  18. Planetary volcanism - A study of volcanic activity in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattermole, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The nature of volcanic activity, theoretical models of its role in planetary evolution, and the evidence for volcanism on the planets and planetary satellites are examined in an introductory overview for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Chapters are devoted to volcanism as a planetary process, the generation and evolution of magmas, magma ascent and eruption, the properties and behavior of volcanic flows, volcanic landforms, the distribution of volcanic rocks in the solar system, and volcanic plains and their development. Consideration is given to lunar volcanism, shield volcanoes and paterae, volcanism on Io, volcanism on icy satellites, and the rheological analysis of volcanic flows.

  19. Active Volcanism on Io: Global Distribution and Variations in Activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes-Gautier, R.; McEwen, A.S.; Smythe, W.B.; Geissler, P.E.; Kamp, L.; Davies, A.G.; Spencer, J.R.; Keszthelyi, L.; Carlson, R.; Leader, F.E.; Mehlman, R.; Soderblom, L.

    1999-01-01

    Io's volcanic activity has been monitored by instruments aboard the Galileo spacecraft since June 28, 1996. We present results from observations by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) for the first 10 orbits of Galileo, correlate them with results from the Solid State Imaging System (SSI) and from groundbased observations, and compare them to what was known about Io's volcanic activity from observations made during the two Voyager flybys in 1979. A total of 61 active volcanic centers have been identified from Voyager, groundbased, and Galileo observations. Of these, 41 are hot spots detected by NIMS and/or SSI. Another 25 locations were identified as possible active volcanic centers, mostly on the basis of observed surface changes. Hot spots are correlated with surface colors, particularly dark and red deposits, and generally anti-correlated with white, SO2-rich areas. Surface features corresponding to the hot spots, mostly calderas or flows, were identified from Galileo and Voyager images. Hot spot temperatures obtained from both NIMS and SSI are consistent with silicate volcanism, which appears to be widespread on Io. Two types of hot spot activity are present: persistent-type activity, lasting from months to years, and sporadic events, which may represent either short-lived activity or low-level activity that occasionally flares up. Sporadic events are not often detected, but may make an important contribution to Io's heat flow and resurfacing. The distribution of active volcanic centers on the surface does not show any clear correlation with latitude, longitude, Voyager-derived global topography, or heat flow patterns predicted by the asthenosphere and deep mantle tidal dissipation models. However, persistent hot spots and active plumes are concentrated toward lower latitudes, and this distribution favors the asthenosphere rather than the deep mantle tidal dissipation model. ?? 1999 Academic Press.

  20. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This color image, acquired during Galileo's ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon (see inset at upper right), erupting over a caldera (volcanic depression) named Pillan Patera after a South American god of thunder, fire and volcanoes. The plume seen by Galileo is 140 kilometers (86 miles) high and was also detected by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Galileo spacecraft will pass almost directly over Pillan Patera in 1999 at a range of only 600 kilometers (373 miles).

    The second plume, seen near the terminator (boundary between day and night), is called Prometheus after the Greek fire god (see inset at lower right). The shadow of the 75-kilometer (45- mile) high airborne plume can be seen extending to the right of the eruption vent. The vent is near the center of the bright and dark rings. Plumes on Io have a blue color, so the plume shadow is reddish. The Prometheus plume can be seen in every Galileo image with the appropriate geometry, as well as every such Voyager image acquired in 1979. It is possible that this plume has been continuously active for more than 18 years. In contrast, a plume has never been seen at Pillan Patera prior to the recent Galileo and Hubble Space Telescope images.

    North is toward the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per picture element. This composite uses images taken with the green, violet and near infrared filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The images were obtained on June 28, 1997, at a range of more than 600,000 kilometers (372,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page

  1. Modeled Aeromagnetic Anomalies, Controlled By Radar Ice Sounding, As Evidence for Subglacial Volcanic Activity in the West Antarctic Rift System (WR) Beneath the Area of the Divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Thwaites and Pine Island ice shelves, buttressing the WAIS, have passed the turning point as they are eaten away by warmer ocean waters (Joghin et al., 2014; Rignot et al., 2014). There is an increasing evidence (aeromagnetic, radar ice-sounding, high heat flow, subglacial volcanic seismicity, and several exposed and subglacial active volcanoes), for volcanic activity in the WR beneath the WAIS, which flows through it. The 5-km, orthogonally line spaced, central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey defined >400 high amplitude volcanic magnetic anomalies correlated with glacial bed topography. Modeled anomalies defined magnetic properties; interpreted volcanic edifices were mostly removed by the moving ice into which they were erupted. Very high apparent susceptibility contrasts (.001->.3 SI) are typical of measured properties from volcanic exposures in the WAIS area. About 90% of the magnetic sources have normal magnetization in the present field direction. Two explanations as to why the anomalies are not approximately 50% negative: (1) Volcanic activity resulting in these anomalies occurred in a predominantly normal field (unlikely). (2) Sources are a combination of induced and remanent magnetization resulting in anomalies of low amplitude (induced cancels remanent) and are not recognized because they are <100 nT (most probable). About 18 high relief, (~600-2000 m) "volcanic centers" beneath the WAIS surface, probably were erupted subaerially when the WAIS was absent; nine of these are in the general area beneath the divide of the WAIS. A 70-km wide, ring of interpreted subglacial volcanic rocks may define a volcanic caldera underlying thedivide (Behrendt et al., 1998). A 2 km-high subaerially erupted volcano (subglacial Mt Thiel, ~78o30'S, 111oW) ~ 100 km north of the WAISCORE, could be the source an ash layer observed in the core. Models by Tulaczyk and Hossainzadeh (2011) indicate >4mm/yr basal melting beneath the WAIS, supportive of high heat flow

  2. The Online GVP/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report: Providing Timely Information About Worldwide Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayberry, G. C.; Guffanti, M. C.; Luhr, J. F.; Venzke, E. A.; Wunderman, R. L.

    2001-12-01

    over 60 volcanoes, with an average of 10 volcanoes discussed each week. Notable volcanic activity during November 2000-November 2001 included an eruption beginning on 6 February at Nyamuragira in the Democratic Republic of the Congo; it issued low-viscosity lava flows that traveled towards inhabited towns, and also produced ash clouds that adversely effected the health of residents and livestock near the volcano. Eruptions at Mayon in the Philippines on 24 June and 25 July caused local authorities to raise the alert to the highest level, close area airports, and evacuate thousands of residents near the volcano. Most recently a large flank eruption at Etna in Italy began on 17 July and gained worldwide attention as extensive lava flows threatened a small town and a tourist complex. While the information found in the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report, ranging from large eruptions to small precursory events, is of interest to the general public, it has also proven to be a valuable resource to volcano observatory staff, universities, researchers, secondary schools, and the aviation community.

  3. Volcanic eruptions and solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    The historical record of large volcanic eruptions from 1500 to 1980 is subjected to detailed time series analysis. In two weak but probably statistically significant periodicities of about 11 and 80 yr, the frequency of volcanic eruptions increases (decreases) slightly around the times of solar minimum (maximum). Time series analysis of the volcanogenic acidities in a deep ice core from Greenland reveals several very long periods ranging from about 80 to about 350 yr which are similar to the very slow solar cycles previously detected in auroral and C-14 records. Solar flares may cause changes in atmospheric circulation patterns that abruptly alter the earth's spin. The resulting jolt probably triggers small earthquakes which affect volcanism.

  4. Active Volcanic Eruptions on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Six views of the volcanic plume named Prometheus, as seen against Io's disk and near the bright limb (edge) of the satellite by the SSI camera on the Galileo spacecraft during its second (G2) orbit of Jupiter. North is to the top of each frame. To the south-southeast of Prometheus is another bright spot that appears to be an active plume erupting from a feature named Culann Patera. Prometheus was active 17 years ago during both Voyager flybys, but no activity was detected by Voyager at Culann. Both of these plumes were seen to glow in the dark in an eclipse image acquired by the imaging camera during Galileo's first (G1) orbit, and hot spots at these locations were detected by Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer.

    The plumes are thought to be driven by heating sulfur dioxide in Io's subsurface into an expanding fluid or 'geyser'. The long-lived nature of these eruptions requires that a substantial supply of sulfur dioxide must be available in Io's subsurface, similar to groundwater. Sulfur dioxide gas condenses into small particles of 'snow' in the expanding plume, and the small particles scatter light and appear bright at short wavelengths. The images shown here were acquired through the shortest-wavelength filter (violet) of the Galileo camera. Prometheus is about 300 km wide and 75 km high and Culann is about 150 km wide and less than 50 km high. The images were acquired on September 4, 1996 at a range of 2,000,000 km (20 km/pixel resolution). Prometheus is named after the Greek fire god and Culann is named after the Celtic smith god.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the

  5. Volcanic risk perception in the Campi Flegrei area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, T.; Barberi, F.; Davis, M. S.; Isaia, R.; Nave, R.

    2013-03-01

    The Campi Flegrei which includes part of the city of Naples, is an active volcanic system; its last eruption occurred in 1538 AD. More recently two significant crises occurred between 1969 and 72 and 1982-84 and were accompanied by ground movements (bradyseism) and seismic activity, forcing people of the town of Pozzuoli to be evacuated. Since 1984 development of a volcanic emergency plan has been underway. In 2000 Civil Protection published a risk map which defined the Red Zone, an area highly at risk from pyroclastic flows, which would need to be evacuated before an eruption. The first study to evaluate the volcanic risk perceptions of the people living within the Campi Flegrei area was completed in spring 2006, resulting in the largest sample ever studied on this topic except for one on Vesuvio area residents by Barberi et al. (2008). A 46 item questionnaire was distributed to 2000 of the approximately 300,000 residents of the Campi Flegrei Red Zone, which includes three towns and four neighborhoods within the city of Naples. A total of 1161 questionnaires were returned, for an overall response rate of 58%. Surveys were distributed to junior high and high school students, as well as to adult members of the general population. Results indicated that unlike issues such as crime, traffic, trash, and unemployment, volcanic hazards are not spontaneously mentioned as a major problem facing their community. However, when asked specific questions about volcanic risks, respondents believe that an eruption is likely and could have serious consequences for themselves and their communities and they are quite worried about the threat. Considering the events of 1969-72 and 1982-84, it was not surprising that respondents indicated earthquakes and ground deformations as more serious threats than eruptive phenomena. Of significant importance is that only 17% of the sample knows about the existence of the Emergency Plan, announced in 2001, and 65% said that they have not received

  6. Amazonian volcanic activity at the Syrtis volcanic province, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, Thomas; Jodlowski, Piotr; Fawdon, Peter; Michael, Greg; Tanaka, Kenneth

    2014-05-01

    The Syrtis Major volcanic province, including the entire Syrtis Major Planum, is located near the Martian highland/lowland transitional zone west of Isidis Planitia. It covers ≡7.4×105 km2 and contains two low-shield volcanic edifices with N-S elongated calderas named Nili and Meroe Paterae. The estimated thickness of erupted material in the province ranges from approximately 0.5 km to 1.0 km with a total volume of about 1.6-3.2×105 km3 [1]. The timing of volcanic activity in the Syrtis Major volcanic province has been suggested to be restricted to the Hesperian Period [1-4]. In the geological map of Greeley and Guest [2], volcanic material of Syrtis Major was assigned an Hesperian age based on the density of observed craters larger than 5 km in diameter. Using the same crater density range, recent studies of Hiesinger et al. [1] and Tanaka et al. [3] and Tanaka et al. [4] assigned an Early Hesperian and Early to Late Hesperian age, respectively, for the entire province. In this study we mapped lava flows, lava channels, and major lava-flow margins and report model ages for lava-flow formation and caldera segments of Nili and Meroe Paterae. The objective of this ongoing survey is to better understand the eruption frequency of this volcanic province. In total, we mapped 67 lava flows, caldera segments, and intra-crater fillings of which 55 were dated. Crater size-frequency distributions (CSFD) were mapped on HRSC and CTX imagery using CraterTools [5]. CSFDs were analyzed and model ages determined in Craterstats [6] using the production and chronology functions of Ivanov [7] and Hartmann and Neukum [8], respectively. A detailed description of the utilization of the crater-counting technique and its limitations with respect to small-scale mapping is given in Platz et al. [9]. Model ages range between 838 Ma (Middle Amazonian) to 3.6 Ga (Late Hesperian). In our survey, a broad age peak occurs between 2 to 2.6 Ga, continuously declining thereafter. We note that

  7. Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash: hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Stettler, L E; Dollberg, D D; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    Volcanic ash samples from four Mount St. Helens' volcanic eruptions were subjected to mineralogical, analytical, and hemolytic studies in order to evaluate their potential for cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity. Plagioclase minerals constituted the major component of the ash with free crystalline silica concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 7.2%. The in vitro hemolytic activity of the volcanic ash was compared to similar concentrations of cytotoxic and inert minerals. The ash was markedly hemolytic, exhibiting an activity similar to chrysotile asbestos, a known fibrogenic agent. The hemolysis of the different ash samples varied with particle size but not with crystalline silica concentration. The results of these studies taken in conjunction with the results of our animal studies indicate a fibrogenic potential of volcanic ash in heavily exposed humans. PMID:6832120

  8. 3D image of Brittle/Ductile transition in active volcanic area and its implication on seismicity: The Campi Flegrei caldera case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, Raffaele; Luca, D'auria; Susi, Pepe; Giuseppe, Solaro; Pietro, Tizzani

    2015-04-01

    The thermo-rheology of the rocks is a crucial aspect to understand the mechanical behavior of the crust in young and tectonically active area. As a consequence, several studies have been performed since last decades in order to understand the role of thermic state in the evolution of volcanic environments. In this context, we analyze the upper crust rheology of the Campi Flegrei active caldera (Southern Italy). Our target is the evaluation of the 3D geometry of the Brittle-Ductile transition beneath the resurgent caldera, by integrating the available geological, geochemical, and geophysical data. We first performed a numerical thermal model by using the a priori geological and geophysical information; than we employ the retrieved isothermal distribution to image the rheological stratification of the shallow crust beneath caldera. In particular, considering both the thermal proprieties and the mechanical heterogeneities of the upper crust, we performed, in a Finite Element environment, a 3D conductive time dependent thermal model through an numerical of solution of the Fourier equation. The dataset consist in temperature measurements recorded in several deep wells. More specifically, the geothermal gradients were measured in seven deep geothermal boreholes, located in three main distinct areas: Mofete, Licola, and San Vito. In addition, we take into account also the heat flow density map at the caldera surface calculated by considering the thermal measurements carried out in 30 shallow water wells. We estimate the isothermal distribution of the crust calibrating two model parameters: the heat production [W], associated to the magma injection episodes in the last 60 kyears within the magma chamber and the heat flow coefficient [W/m2*K] at the external surface. In particular, the optimization procedure has been performed using an exhaustive grid search, to minimize the differences between model and experimental measurements. The achieved results allowed us to

  9. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Newhall, C.G.; Fruchter, J.S.

    1986-03-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace element composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); mudflows (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity.

  10. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-01-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:3946726

  11. Morphostructure analysis of Sapaya ancient volcanic area based lineament data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massinai, Muhammad Altin; Kadir, Fitrah H.; Ismullah, Muh. Fawzy; Aswad, Sabrianto

    2016-05-01

    Morphostructure of Sapaya ancient volcanic have been analysis by using lineament models. In this models, two methods of retrieval data have been used. First, the field survey of the area, second, the satellite images analysis. The morphostructure of Sapaya ancient volcanic contribute to the crater, caldera, and shown an eroded cone morphology. The directions of eruption from Sapaya ancient volcanic have identified in region of Jeneponto and Takalar, which is had east - west and northeast - southwest structure. These eruptions also give contribution to the character of river in Jenelata watershed, by the presence of tuffs, pillow lava, basalt, andesite, diorite, granodiorite, granite, and gabbro, respectively.

  12. Mantle Helium and Carbon Isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon: Evidence for Renewed Volcanic Activity or a Long Term Steady State System?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Soest, M. C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, William C.; Mariner, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    Here we present the helium and carbon isotope results from the initial study of a fluid chemistry-monitoring program started in the summer of 2001 near the South Sister volcano in central Oregon. The Separation Creek area which is several miles due west of the volcano is the locus of strong crustal uplift currently occurring at a rate of 4-5 cm/yr (Wicks, et. al., 2001).Helium [RC/RA = 7.44 and 8.61 RA (RC/R A = (3He/4He)sample-. air corrected/(3He/4He)air))] and carbon (??13C = -11.59 to -9.03??? vs PDB) isotope data and CO2/3He (5 and 9 ?? 109) show that bubbling cold springs in the Separation Creek area near South Sister volcano carry a strong mantle signal, indicating the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. There is no evidence though, to directly relate this signal to the crustal uplift that is currently taking place in the area, which started in 1998. The geothermal system in the area is apparently much longer lived and shows no significant changes in chemistry compared to data from the early 1990s. Hot springs in the area, which are relatively far removed from the volcanic edifice, do not carry a strong mantle signal in helium isotope ratios (2.79 to 5.08 RA), unlike the cold springs, and also do not show any significant changes in helium isotope ratios compared to literature data for the same springs of over two decades ago. The cold springs of the Separation Creek area form a very diffuse but significant low temperature geothermal system, that should, due to its close vicinity to the center of up uplift, be more sensitive to changes in the deeper volcanic plumbing system than the far removed hot springs and therefore require much more study and consideration when dealing with volcano monitoring in the Cascade range or possibly with geothermal exploration in general.

  13. Classifying Volcanic Activity Using an Empirical Decision Making Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junek, W. N.; Jones, W. L.; Woods, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Detection and classification of developing volcanic activity is vital to eruption forecasting. Timely information regarding an impending eruption would aid civil authorities in determining the proper response to a developing crisis. In this presentation, volcanic activity is characterized using an event tree classifier and a suite of empirical statistical models derived through logistic regression. Forecasts are reported in terms of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano alert level system. The algorithm employs multidisciplinary data (e.g., seismic, GPS, InSAR) acquired by various volcano monitoring systems and source modeling information to forecast the likelihood that an eruption, with a volcanic explosivity index (VEI) > 1, will occur within a quantitatively constrained area. Logistic models are constructed from a sparse and geographically diverse dataset assembled from a collection of historic volcanic unrest episodes. Bootstrapping techniques are applied to the training data to allow for the estimation of robust logistic model coefficients. Cross validation produced a series of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves with areas ranging between 0.78-0.81, which indicates the algorithm has good predictive capabilities. The ROC curves also allowed for the determination of a false positive rate and optimum detection for each stage of the algorithm. Forecasts for historic volcanic unrest episodes in North America and Iceland were computed and are consistent with the actual outcome of the events.

  14. Kawah Ijen volcanic activity: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudron, Corentin; Syahbana, Devy Kamil; Lecocq, Thomas; Van Hinsberg, Vincent; McCausland, Wendy; Triantafyllou, Antoine; Camelbeeck, Thierry; Bernard, Alain; Surono

    2015-03-01

    Kawah Ijen is a composite volcano located at the easternmost part of Java island in Indonesia and hosts the largest natural acidic lake in the world. We have gathered all available historical reports on Kawah Ijen's activity since 1770 with the purpose of reviewing the temporal evolution of its activity. Most of these observations and studies have been conducted from a geochemical perspective and in punctuated scientific campaigns. Starting in 1991, the seismic activity and a set of volcanic lake parameters began to be weekly available. We present a database of those measurements that, combined with historical reports, allow us to review each eruption/unrest that occurred during the last two centuries. As of 2010, the volcanic activity is monitored by a new multi-disciplinary network, including digital seismic stations, and lake level and temperature measurements. This detailed monitoring provides an opportunity for better classifying seismic events and forecasting volcanic unrest at Kawah Ijen, but only with the understanding of the characteristics of this volcanic system gained from the historical review presented here.

  15. Sulfide and silicate melt inclusions in the D. João de Castro Volcanic Seamount, a hydrothermally active area on the Terceira Rift, Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. F. A.; Scott, S. D.; Madureira, P.; Rosa, C. J. P.; Lourenço, N.; Conceição, P.; TerRiftic Team

    2012-04-01

    The Azores plateau is a bathymetric high located in the North Atlantic encompassing a triple junction where the American, Eurasia and African plates meet. The Terceira Rift (TR), within the plateau, defines the Eurasia/African plate boundary and corresponds to a 550 Km long, ESE trending line of volcanic islands and seamounts (e.g. D. João de Castro - DJC) alternating with deep basins (e.g. Hirondelle - HIR) [1, 2]. Fresh basalts from the TR, in particular the DJC and HIR areas, were sampled from 2007 to 2009 [EMEPC 2007/2008/2009 cruises]. The team is now studying their melt inclusions [MI] in order to understand processes of magma evolution and mixing as well as the behavior of trace metals and volatiles in the pre-erupted magmas. Petrographic observations indicate that in DJC and HIR, basalts are porphyritic, vesicular, with a microcrystalline groundmass composed mostly of plagioclase laths ± olivine ± clinopyroxene ± skeletal Fe-Ti oxides ± glass. Phenocrysts are subhedral to euhedral with corroded rims. Clinopyroxene (aluminian diopside) is the main phenocryst phase, followed by olivine (Fo83 - DJC; Fo80 - HIR) and minor plagioclase (often as microphenocrysts). Incompatible trace elements in groundmass, glass, and exposed MI in clinopyroxene depict enriched patterns above the OIB field. REE patterns are similar in the groundmass and glass from DJC and HIR. Exposed MI from HIR depicts less enriched REE patterns than the groundmass, whilst DJC MI show similar REE patterns to the groundmass. MI were found in most mineral phases studied. They are distributed randomly (azonal) and appear glassy, partially devitrified or completely opaque with one or more vapor bubbles. Glassy to devitrified MI may show interpenetrating arrays of mineral phases, skeletal Fe-Ti oxides, and included euhedral Cr-spinel. Sulfide globules are common in clinopyroxene-hosted MI and are dispersed within the groundmass. Globules are small, less than 10 μm, and contain distinct mineral

  16. Active Submarine Hotspot Volcanism on the Kerguelen Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, M. F.; Leser, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Heard and McDonald Islands on the Kerguelen Plateau, southern Indian Ocean, are active intraplate hotspot volcanoes. Heard Island is approximately 43 km long, and encompasses an area of approximately 368 square km. It is dominated by Big Ben, a roughly circular volcano with a base diameter of 18-20 km, and a maximum elevation of 2745 m. The McDonald Islands have an area of approximately 2.5 square km. Due to a lack of human habitation and no geoscientific monitoring, and cloud cover precluding satellite remote sensing for geoscientific purposes, the level of volcanic activity of the islands is unknown, but observers on passing ships frequently report eruptions, including molten lava, volcanic plumes, and tephra, and active fumaroles. Bathymetric, seismic reflection, magnetic, and gravity data acquired around Heard and McDonald Islands suggest that submarine magmatism affects a broad region of surrounding Kerguelen Plateau seafloor. In this region, we have identified six distinct fields of sea knolls that we interpret to be volcanic in origin. Individual fields contain from approximately 14 to approximately 140 sea knolls, and are not uniformly distributed around Heard and McDonald Islands. Given that Heard and McDonald Islands are volcanically active, it is likely that at least some of the interpreted submarine volcanoes are active and drive hydrothermal circulation.

  17. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  18. Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?

    SciTech Connect

    van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

    2002-04-30

    Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

  19. Active Volcanism on IO: Global Distribution and Variations in Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes-Gautier, R.; McEwen, A.; Smythe, W.; Geissler, P.; Kamp, L.; Davies, A.; Spencer, J.; Keszthelyi, L.; Carlson, R.; Leader, F.; Mehlman, R.; Soderblom, L.

    1999-01-01

    Io's volcanic activity has been monitored by instruments aboard the Galileo spacecraft since June 28, 1996. We present results from observations by the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIM) for the first ten orbits of Galileo, correlate them with results from the Solid State Imaging System (SSI)and from ground-based observations, and compare them to what was known about Io's volcanic activity from observations made during the two Voyager fly-bys in 1979.

  20. Volcanic risk perception of young people in the urban areas of Vesuvius: Comparisons with other volcanic areas and implications for emergency management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlino, S.; Somma, R.; Mayberry, G. C.

    2008-05-01

    More than 600 000 people are exposed to volcanic risk in the urban areas near the volcano, Vesuvius, and may need to be evacuated if there is renewed volcanic activity. The success of a future evacuation will strongly depend on the level of risk perception and preparedness of the at-risk communities during the current period of quiescence. The volcanic risk perception and preparedness of young people is of particular importance because hazard education programs in schools have been shown to increase the clarity of risk perception and students often share their knowledge with their parents. In order to evaluate young people's risk perception and preparedness for a volcanic crisis, a multiple choice questionnaire was distributed to 400 high-school students in three municipalities located close to the volcano. The overall results suggest that despite a 60-year period of quiescence at Vesuvius, the interviewed students have an accurate perception of the level of volcanic risk. On the other hand, the respondents demonstrate a clear lack of understanding of volcanic processes and their related hazards. Also, the interviewed students show high levels of fear, poor perceived ability to protect themselves from the effects of a future eruption, and insufficient knowledge of the National Emergency Plan for Vesuvian Area (NEPVA). The latter result suggests that in comparison with volcanic crises in other regions, during a future eruption of Vesuvius, there may not be enough time to educate the large number of people living near the volcano about how to appropriately respond. The inadequate risk education and preparedness of respondents implies that a strong effort is needed to improve communication strategies in order to facilitate successful evacuations. Therefore, it is important to take advantage of the present period of quiescence at Vesuvius to improve the accuracy of risk perception of youth in local communities.

  1. Volcanic risk perception of young people in the urban areas of Vesuvius: Comparisons with other volcanic areas and implications for emergency management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlino, S.; Somma, R.; Mayberry, G.C.

    2008-01-01

    More than 600 000 people are exposed to volcanic risk in the urban areas near the volcano, Vesuvius, and may need to be evacuated if there is renewed volcanic activity. The success of a future evacuation will strongly depend on the level of risk perception and preparedness of the at-risk communities during the current period of quiescence. The volcanic risk perception and preparedness of young people is of particular importance because hazard education programs in schools have been shown to increase the clarity of risk perception and students often share their knowledge with their parents. In order to evaluate young people's risk perception and preparedness for a volcanic crisis, a multiple choice questionnaire was distributed to 400 high-school students in three municipalities located close to the volcano. The overall results suggest that despite a 60-year period of quiescence at Vesuvius, the interviewed students have an accurate perception of the level of volcanic risk. On the other hand, the respondents demonstrate a clear lack of understanding of volcanic processes and their related hazards. Also, the interviewed students show high levels of fear, poor perceived ability to protect themselves from the effects of a future eruption, and insufficient knowledge of the National Emergency Plan for Vesuvian Area (NEPVA). The latter result suggests that in comparison with volcanic crises in other regions, during a future eruption of Vesuvius, there may not be enough time to educate the large number of people living near the volcano about how to appropriately respond. The inadequate risk education and preparedness of respondents implies that a strong effort is needed to improve communication strategies in order to facilitate successful evacuations. Therefore, it is important to take advantage of the present period of quiescence at Vesuvius to improve the accuracy of risk perception of youth in local communities. ?? 2008.

  2. Triggering of volcanic activity by large earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avouris, D.; Carn, S. A.; Waite, G. P.

    2011-12-01

    Statistical analysis of temporal relationships between large earthquakes and volcanic eruptions suggests seismic waves may trigger eruptions even over great distances, although the causative mechanism is not well constrained. In this study the relationship between large earthquakes and subtle changes in volcanic activity was investigated in order to gain greater insight into the relationship between dynamic stress and volcanic response. Daily measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), onboard the Aura satellite, provide constraints on volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates as a measure of subtle changes in activity. An SO2 timeseries was produced from OMI data for thirteen persistently active volcanoes. Seismic surface-wave amplitudes were modeled from the source mechanisms of moment magnitude (Mw) ≥7 earthquakes, and peak dynamic stress (PDS) was calculated. The SO2 timeseries for each volcano was used to calculate a baseline threshold for comparison with post-earthquake emission. Delay times for an SO2 response following each earthquake at each volcano were analyzed and compared to a random catalog. The delay time analysis was inconclusive. However, an analysis based on the occurrence of large earthquakes showed a response at most volcanoes. Using the PDS calculations as a filtering criterion for the earthquake catalog, the SO2 mass for each volcano was analyzed in 28-day windows centered on the earthquake origin time. If the average SO2 mass after the earthquake was greater than an arbitrary percentage of pre-earthquake mass, we identified the volcano as having a response to the event. This window analysis provided insight on what type of volcanic activity is more susceptible to triggering by dynamic stress. The volcanoes with lava lakes included in this study, Ambrym, Gaua, Villarrica, and Erta Ale, showed a clear response to dynamic stress while the volcanoes with lava domes, Merapi, Semeru, and Bagana showed no response at all. Perhaps

  3. Frequency Based Volcanic Activity Detection through Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, A. K.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing has proved to offer a useful and relatively inexpensive method for monitoring large areas where field work is logistically unrealistic, and potentially dangerous. Current sensors are able to detect the majority of explosive volcanic activity; those that tend to effect and represent larger scale changes in the volcanic systems, eventually relating to ash producing periods of extended eruptive activity, and effusive activity. As new spaceborne sensors are developed, the ability to detect activity improves so that a system to gauge the frequency of volcanic activity can be used as a useful monitoring tool. Four volcanoes were chosen for development and testing of a method to monitor explosive activity: Stromboli (Italy); Shishaldin and Cleveland (Alaska, USA); and Karymsky (Kamchatka, Russia). Each volcano studied had similar but unique signatures of pre-cursory and eruptive activity. This study has shown that this monitoring tool could be applied to a wide range of volcanoes and still produce useful and robust data. Our method deals specifically with the detection of small scale explosive activity. The method described here could be useful in an operational setting, especially at remote volcanoes that have the potential to impact populations, infrastructure, and the aviation community. A number of important factors will affect the validity of application of this method. They are: (1) the availability of a continuous and continually populated dataset; (2) appropriate and reasonable sensor resolutions; (3) a recorded history of the volcano's previous activity; and, if available, (4) some ground-based monitoring system. We aim to develop the method further to be able to capture and evaluate the frequency of other volcanic processes such as lava flows, phreatomagmatic eruptions and dome growth and collapse. The work shown here has served to illustrate the capability of this method and monitoring tool for use at remote, un-instrumented volcanoes.

  4. Evidence for late tertiary volcanic activity in the northern black hills, South dakota.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, J G

    1977-05-27

    Rhyolitic volcanic rock in the northern Black Hills has a potassium-argon isotopic age of 10.5 +/- 1.5 million years. This is considerably younger than any previously reported igneous activity in this or adjacent areas and indicates that the renewed uplift of the Black Hills, which occurred after the Oligocene epoch, was also accompanied by some volcanism. PMID:17778711

  5. 3d Velocity Tomography of The Kos - Nisyros Volcanic Area - East Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, S.; Ilinski, D.; Makris, J.; Chonia, T.; Stavrakakis, J.

    Since June 2000, active and passive seismic observations have been carried out by IfG, GeoPro GmbH, Hamburg and Institute of Geodynamics, Athens within the frame of the project GEOWARN (Geo-Spacial Warning Systems Nisyros Volcano, Greece: An Emergency Case Study of the Volcanic Area of Nisyros) supported by the European Community. In the active experiment 48 recording seismic units were deployed and recorded more than 7000 shots in 3D array. The Nisyros volcano has been identified as an apophytic intrusion of much larger volcanic structure with a caldera of 35 km diameter, extending between the southern coasts of the islands of Kos and Nisyros. To obtain 3-D velocity structure of the area a tomographic inversion was made using 6800 rays which probed the area with a very high ray density. The method applied and the high accuracy of active tomographic data allowed to resolve the high velocity bodies in the caldera. The complex volcanic structure is identified by high velocity rocks in- truding through the upper crust and penetrating the volcanic cone to depth of approx. 1.0 km to 1.8 km below the surface. Particularly high velocity bodies were identified below the islands of Yali and the central caldera of Nisyros. The high velocity bodies at shallow depth were interpreted as high-density cumulates of solidified magma intru- sion in the caldera. These intrusions explain very high temperature of 300C observed in the lower aquifer in the caldera at 1.5 km depth as confirmed by drilling. The vol- canic edifices of Kos, Yali, Nisyros and Strongily are part of a major volcanic caldera nearly 35 km in diameter. This size of the volcanic caldera explains the large volume of ignimbrites erupted 160 000 years ago. By combining geodetic, geophysical, geo- chemical and geological observations it is intended to correlate magma movements and associated changes of physical and chemical parameters of the recent volcanism.

  6. Volcanic Activities of Hakkoda Volcano after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Miura, S.

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku Earthquake of 11 March 2011 generated large deformation in and around the Japanese islands, and the large crustal deformation raises fear of further disasters including triggered volcanic activities. In this presentation, as an example of such potential triggered volcanic activities, we report the recent seismic activities of Hakkoda volcano, and discuss the relation to the movement of volcanic fluids. Hakkoda volcano is a group of stratovolcanoes at the northern end of Honshu Island, Japan. There are fumaroles and hot springs around the volcano, and phreatic eruptions from Jigoku-numa on the southwestern flank of Odake volcano, which is the highest peak of the volcanic group, were documented in its history. Since just after the occurrence of the Tohokui Earthquake, the seismicity around the volcano became higher, and the migration of hypocenters of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes was observed.In addition to these VT earthquakes, long-period (LP) events started occurring beneath Odake at a depth of about 2-3 km since February, 2013, and subtle crustal deformation caused by deep inflation source was also detected by the GEONET GNSS network around the same time. The spectra of LP events are common between events irrespective of the magnitude of events, and they have several spectral peaks at 6-7 sec, 2-3 sec, 1 sec, and so on. These LP events sometimes occur like a swarm with an interval of several minutes. The characteristics of observed LP events at Hakkoda volcano are similar to those of LP events at other active volcanoes and hydrothermal area in the world, where abundant fluids exist. Our further analysis using far-field Rayleigh radiation pattern observed by NIED Hi-net stations reveals that the source of LP events is most likely to be a nearly vertical tensile crack whose strike is NE-SW direction. The strike is almost perpendicular to the direction of maximum extensional strain estimated from the geodetic analysis, and is almost parallel to

  7. A preliminary evaluation of ERTS-1 images on the volcanic areas of Southern Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassinis, R.; Lechi, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    The test site selected for the investigation covers nearly all the regions of active and quiescent volcanism in southern Italy, i.e. the eastern part of the island of Sicily, the Aeolian Islands and the area of Naples. The three active European volcanoes (Etna, Stromboli and Vesuvius) are included. The investigation is in the frame of a program for the surveillance of active volcanoes by geophysical (including remote sensing thermal methods) and geochemical methods. By the multispectral analysis of ERTS-1 data it is intended to study the spectral behavior of the volcanic materials as well as the major geological lineaments with special reference to those associated with the volcanic region. Secondary objectives are also the determination of the hydrographic network seasonal behavior and the relationship between the vegetation cover and the different type of soils and rocks.

  8. Volcanic Activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milazzo, M. P.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A. G.; McEwen, A. S.

    2004-01-01

    Tvashtar Catena (63 N, 120 W) is one of the most interesting features on Io. This chain of large paterae (caldera-like depressions) has exhibited highly variable volcanic activity in a series of observations. Tvashtar is the type example of a style of volcanism seen only at high latitudes, with short-lived Pele-type plumes and short-lived by intense thermal events. Evidence for a hot spot at Tvashtar was first detected in an eclipse observation in April 1997 (orbit G7) by the Solid State Imager (SSI) on the Galileo Spacecraft. Tvashtar was originally targeted for observation at higher resolution in the close flyby in November 1999 (I25) because of its interesting large-scale topography. There are relatively few but generally larger paterae at high latitudes on Io. I25 images revealed a 25 km long, 1-2 km high lava curtain via a pattern of saturation and bleeding in the CCD image, which requires very high temperatures.

  9. Episodes of fluvial and volcanic activity in Mangala Valles, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keske, Amber L.; Hamilton, Christopher W.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Daubar, Ingrid J.

    2015-01-01

    A new mapping-based study of the 900-km-long Mangala Valles outflow system was motivated by the availability of new high-resolution images and continued debates about the roles of water and lava in outflow channels on Mars. This study uses photogeologic analysis, geomorphic surface mapping, cratering statistics, and relative stratigraphy. Results show that Mangala Valles underwent at least two episodes of fluvial activity and at least three episodes of volcanic activity during the Late Amazonian. The occurrence of scoured bedrock at the base of the mapped stratigraphy, in addition to evidence provided by crater retention ages, suggests that fluvial activity preceded the deposition of two of the volcanic units. Crater counts performed at 30 locations throughout the area have allowed us to construct the following timeline: (1) formation of Noachian Highlands and possible initial flooding event(s) before ∼1 Ga, (2) emplacement of Tharsis lava flows in the valley from ∼700 to 1000 Ma, (3) a megaflooding event at ∼700-800 Ma sourced from Mangala Fossa, (4) valley fill by a sequence of lava flows sourced from Mangala Fossa ∼400-500 Ma, (5) another megaflooding event from ∼400 Ma, (6) a final phase of volcanism sourced from Mangala Fossa ∼300-350 Ma, and (7) emplacement of eolian sedimentary deposits in the northern portion of the valley ∼300 Ma. These results are consistent with alternating episodes of aqueous flooding and volcanism in the valles. This pattern of geologic activity is similar to that of other outflow systems, such as Kasei Valles, suggesting that there is a recurring, and perhaps coupled, nature of these processes on Mars.

  10. Some geochemical features of Caledonian volcanism recorded in sedimentary rocks of the East Baltic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soesoo, Alvar; Kiipli, Tarmo; Kallaste, Toivo

    2013-04-01

    The Caledonian rocks have formed as a result of a multitude of magmatic and tectonic processes. All these major processes have generated a set of volcanic and magmatic products. While products of intrusive magmatism can still be well recognised in Caledonian mountains, some of the volcanic products can be found in a wide area of the Baltica paleocontinent. The best record of the ancient explosive volcanism can be traced in sedimentary sections adjacent to tectonically active areas. The aim of this study is to describe geochemical evolution of the volcanism near the Baltica plate using bulk geochemistry and phenocryst compositions of the Caledonian volcanic ashes stored in the Lower Palaeozoic sections of the Eastern Baltica. The bentonite samples were collected from several drill cores from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Thickness of the ash beds varies mostly between 0.1 and 10 cm, rarely reaching 20-70 cm. Constructed isopach schemes indicate increase of thickness of ash beds towards the northwest and west. Original sanidine composition in ca 400 samples and biotite from 13 ash beds were analysed from grain fraction of bentonites using X-ray diffractometry. Stratigraphical distribution of volcanic ash beds in the East Baltic area can be subdivided into four major intervals separated by intervals with less frequent signs of volcanism. The above intervals show characteristic geochemical signatures. Over 175 thin altered volcanic ash beds have been recognised by authors in the East Baltic sedimentary sections from the Upper Ordovician (ca. 458 Ma) to the Upper Silurian (ca. 421 Ma). There separate ash units may correspond to distinct volcanic eruptions in Caledonides. Volcanic ashes which reached the East Baltic area fall into four time periods (time intervals distinguished by micro-paleontological methods): (1) Sandbian with main sources at the margins of the Avalonian microcontinent; (2) Katian with sources at the margin of the Baltica in Iapetus Palaeo

  11. Radiocarbon ages of lacustrine deposits in volcanic sequences of the Lomas Coloradas area, Socorro Island, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D. ); Farmer, M.C. . Dept. of Geography and Anthropology); Berger, R. . Depts. of Geography and Anthropology and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-01-01

    Extensive eruptions of alkalic basalt from low-elevation fissures and vents on the southern flank of the dormant volcano, Cerro Evermann, accompanied the most recent phase of volcanic activity on Socorro Island, and created the Lomas Coloradas, a broad, gently sloping terrain comprising the southern part of the island. The authors obtained [sup 14]C ages of 4690 [plus minus] 270 Bp (5000-5700 cal Bp) and 5040 [plus minus] 460 Bp (53090-6300 cal Bp) from lacustrine deposits that occur within volcanic sequences of the lower Lonas Coloradas. Apparently, the sediments accumulated within a topographic depression between two scoria cones shortly after they formed. The lacustrine environment was destroyed when the cones were breached by headward erosion of adjacent stream drainages. This was followed by the eruption of a thin basaltic flow from fissures near the base of the northernmost cone. The flow moved downslope for a short distance and into the drainages that presently bound the study area on the east and west. The flow postdates development of the present drainage system and may be very recent. These [sup 14]C data, along with historical accounts of volcanic activity over the last century, including submarine eruptions that occurred a few km west of Socorro in early 1993, underscore the high risk for explosive volcanism in the region and the need for a detailed volcanic hazards plan and seismic monitoring.

  12. Radiocarbon ages of lacustrine deposits in volcanic sequences of the Lomas Coloradas area, Socorro Island, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J D; Farmer, M C; Berger, R

    1993-01-01

    Extensive eruptions of alkalic basalt from low-elevation fissures and vents on the southern flank of the dormant volcano, Cerro Evermann, accompanied the most recent phase of volcanic activity on Socorro Island, and created the Lomas Coloradas, a broad, gently sloping terrain comprising the southern part of the island. We obtained 14C ages of 4690 +/- 270 BP (5000-5700 cal BP) and 5040 +/- 460 BP (5300-6300 cal BP) from lacustrine deposits that occur within volcanic sequences of the lower Lomas Coloradas. Apparently, the sediments accumulated within a topographic depression between two scoria cones shortly after they formed. The lacrustine environment was destroyed when the cones were breached by headward erosion of adjacent stream drainages. This was followed by the eruption of a thin basaltic flow from fissures near the base of the northernmost cone. The flow moved downslope for a short distance and into the drainages that presently bound the study area on the east and west. The flow postdates development of the present drainage system and may be very recent. Our 14C data, along with historical accounts of volcanic activity over the last century, including submarine eruptions that occurred a few km west of Socorro in early 1993, underscore the high risk for explosive volcanism in this region and the need for a detailed volcanic hazards plan and seismic monitoring. PMID:11539414

  13. Radiocarbon ages of lacustrine deposits in volcanic sequences of the Lomas Coloradas area, Socorro Island, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, J. D.; Farmer, M. C.; Berger, R.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive eruptions of alkalic basalt from low-elevation fissures and vents on the southern flank of the dormant volcano, Cerro Evermann, accompanied the most recent phase of volcanic activity on Socorro Island, and created the Lomas Coloradas, a broad, gently sloping terrain comprising the southern part of the island. We obtained 14C ages of 4690 +/- 270 BP (5000-5700 cal BP) and 5040 +/- 460 BP (5300-6300 cal BP) from lacustrine deposits that occur within volcanic sequences of the lower Lomas Coloradas. Apparently, the sediments accumulated within a topographic depression between two scoria cones shortly after they formed. The lacrustine environment was destroyed when the cones were breached by headward erosion of adjacent stream drainages. This was followed by the eruption of a thin basaltic flow from fissures near the base of the northernmost cone. The flow moved downslope for a short distance and into the drainages that presently bound the study area on the east and west. The flow postdates development of the present drainage system and may be very recent. Our 14C data, along with historical accounts of volcanic activity over the last century, including submarine eruptions that occurred a few km west of Socorro in early 1993, underscore the high risk for explosive volcanism in this region and the need for a detailed volcanic hazards plan and seismic monitoring.

  14. Jovian dust streams: A monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kruger, H.; Geissler, P.; Horanyi, M.; Graps, A.L.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Moissl, R.; Johnson, T.V.; Grun, E.

    2003-01-01

    Streams of high speed dust particles originate from Jupiter's moon Io. After release from Io, the particles collect electric charges in the Io plasma torus, gain energy from the co-rotating electric field of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and leave the Jovian system into interplanetary space with escape speeds over 200 km s-1. The Galileo spacecraft has continuously monitored the dust streams during 34 revolutions about Jupiter between 1996 and 2002. The observed dust fluxes exhibit large orbit-to-orbit variability due to systematic and stochastic changes. After removal of the systematic variations, the total dust emission rate of Io has been calculated. It varies between 10-3 and 10 kg s-1, and is typically in the range of 0.1 to 1 kg s-1. We compare the dust emission rate with other markers of volcanic activity on Io like large-area surface changes caused by volcanic deposits and sightings of volcanic plumes. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Aeromagnetic data provide new insights on the volcanism and tectonics of Vulcano Island and offshore areas (southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Ritis, Riccardo; Blanco-Montenegro, Isabel; Ventura, Guido; Chiappini, Massimo

    2005-08-01

    The active Vulcano Island (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea) represents the southernmost portion of a NW-SE elongated volcanic ridge that includes also Lipari and Salina islands. The ridge is affected by a regional, NW-SE to N-S striking fault system. The elaboration and analysis of data from three high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys carried out between 1999 and 2004 on Vulcano and offshore allow us to recognize high intensity magnetic anomalies related to volcanic centers/conduits or shallow intrusions. Previously unreported offshore submarine vents have been also recognized. Some of them may correspond with source areas of outcropping exotic pyroclastics on Vulcano. The spatial analysis of the recognized magnetic anomalies and volcanic structures shows that they are preferably aligned along the strikes of the main regional faults that affect the volcanic ridge. Submarine volcanic conduits revealed by the aeromagnetic survey might represent potential sources for future submarine, effusive or explosive activity.

  16. Integrating Multiple Space Ground Sensors to Track Volcanic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Doubleday, Joshua; Tran, Daniel; Jones, Samuel; Kjartansson, Einar; Thorsteinsson, Hrobjartur; Vogfjord, Kristin; Guomundsson, Magnus; Thordarson, Thor; Mandl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic activity can occur with little or no warning. Increasing numbers of space borne assets can enable coordinated measurements of volcanic events to enhance both scientific study and hazard response. We describe the use of space and ground measurements to target further measurements as part of a worldwide volcano monitoring system. We utilize a number of alert systems including the MODVOLC, GOESVOLC, US Air Force Weather Advisory, and Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) alert systems. Additionally we use in-situ data from ground instrumentation at a number of volcanic sites, including Iceland.

  17. Volcanic activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milazzo, M.P.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A.G.; Turtle, E.P.; Geissler, P.; Klaasen, K.P.; Rathbun, J.A.; McEwen, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    Galileo's Solid State Imager (SSI) observed Tvashtar Catena four times between November 1999 and October 2001, providing a unique look at a distinctive high latitude volcanic complex on Io. The first observation (orbit I25, November 1999) resolved, for the first time, an active extraterrestrial fissure eruption; the brightness temperature was at least 1300 K. The second observation (orbit I27, February 2000) showed a large (??? 500 km 2) region with many, small, hot, regions of active lava. The third observation was taken in conjunction with Cassini imaging in December 2000 and showed a Pele-like, annular plume deposit. The Cassini images revealed an ???400 km high Pele-type plume above Tvashtar Catena. The final Galileo SSI observation of Tvashtar (orbit I32, October 2001), revealed that obvious (to SSI) activity had ceased, although data from Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) indicated that there was still significant thermal emission from the Tvashtar region. In this paper, we primarily analyze the style of eruption during orbit I27 (February 2000). Comparison with a lava flow cooling model indicates that the behavior of the Tvashtar eruption during I27 does not match that of simple advancing lava flows. Instead, it may be an active lava lake or a complex set of lava flows with episodic, overlapping eruptions. The highest reliable color temperature is ???1300 K. Although higher temperatures cannot be ruled out, they do not need to be invoked to fit the observed data. The total power output from the active lavas in February 2000 was at least 1011 W. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. High Resolution Aircraft Scanner Mapping of Geothermal and Volcanic Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Mongillo, M.A.; Cochrane, G.R.; Wood, C.P.; Shibata, Y.

    1995-01-01

    High spectral resolution GEOSCAN Mkll multispectral aircraft scanner imagery has been acquired, at 3-6 m spatial resolutions, over much of the Taupo Volcanic Zone as part of continuing investigations aimed at developing remote sensing techniques for exploring and mapping geothermal and volcanic areas. This study examined the 24-band: visible, near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and thermal-IR (TIR) imagery acquired over Waiotapu geothermal area (3 m spatial resolution) and White Island volcano (6 m resolution). Results show that color composite images composed of visible and NIR wavelengths that correspond to color infrared (CIR) photographic wavelengths can be useful for distinguishing among bare ground, water and vegetation features and, in certain cases, for mapping various vegetation types. However, combinations which include an MIR band ({approx} 2.2 {micro}m) with either visible and NIR bands, or two NIR bands, are the most powerful for mapping vegetation types, water bodies, and bare and hydrothermally altered ground. Combinations incorporating a daytime TIR band with NIR and MIR bands are also valuable for locating anomalously hot features and distinguishing among different types of surface hydrothermal alteration.

  19. Airborne magnetic mapping of volcanic areas - state-of-the-art and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supper, Robert; Paoletti, Valeria; Okuma, Shigeo

    2015-04-01

    Traditionally airborne magnetics surveys in volcanology are used for mapping regional geological features, fault zones and to develop a magnetic model of the volcanic subsurface. Within an Austrian-Italian-Japanese cooperation, several volcanic areas including Mt. Vesuvius, Ischia, Campi Flegreii and Aeolian Islands in Italy and Socorro Island in Mexico were mapped by high-resolution magnetic mapping during the last 15 years. In this paper, general conclusions from this long-term cooperation project on airborne magnetics in volcanic areas will be summarised. Basically the results showed the results from airborne magnetics could be used for three major purposes: 1. Developing a rough model for the magnetisation below the volcano down to several kilometres by applying advanced magnetic inversion algorithms helped to define the possible depth of the current or past magma chamber. Due to the complexity of the subsurface of volcanic areas, inversion of data was much dependent on constraints coming from other geoscientific disciplines. 2. After applying certain steps of reduction (topographic correction, field transformation) and a combination of source selective filtering, important regional structural trends could be derived from the alignment of the residual magnetic anomalies. 3. On the other hand during recent years, research has also focused on repeated measurements of the magnetic field of volcanic areas (differential in respect of time = differential magnetic measurements - DMM) using airborne sensors. Long-term temporal magnetic field variations in active volcanic areas can be caused by a changing size of the magma chamber or a general rise in temperature. This is caused by the fact that magnetization disappears, when a magnetic material is warmed up over a certain temperature (Curie- temperature). In consequence the resulting total magnetic field changes. Therefore, determining areas showing changes in the magnetic field could help to select areas where a

  20. Increased thyroid cancer incidence in a basaltic volcanic area is associated with non-anthropogenic pollution and biocontamination.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Pasqualino; Russo, Marco; Ronchi, Anna; Minoia, Claudio; Cataldo, Daniela; Regalbuto, Concetto; Giordano, Carla; Attard, Marco; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Trimarchi, Francesco; Vigneri, Riccardo

    2016-08-01

    The increased thyroid cancer incidence in volcanic areas suggests an environmental effect of volcanic-originated carcinogens. To address this problem, we evaluated environmental pollution and biocontamination in a volcanic area of Sicily with increased thyroid cancer incidence. Thyroid cancer epidemiology was obtained from the Sicilian Regional Registry for Thyroid Cancer. Twenty-seven trace elements were measured by quadrupole mass spectrometry in the drinking water and lichens (to characterize environmental pollution) and in the urine of residents (to identify biocontamination) in the Mt. Etna volcanic area and in adjacent control areas. Thyroid cancer incidence was 18.5 and 9.6/10(5) inhabitants in the volcanic and the control areas, respectively. The increase was exclusively due to the papillary histotype. Compared with control areas, in the volcanic area many trace elements were increased in both drinking water and lichens, indicating both water and atmospheric pollution. Differences were greater for water. Additionally, in the urine of the residents of the volcanic area, the average levels of many trace elements were significantly increased, with values higher two-fold or more than in residents of the control area: cadmium (×2.1), mercury (×2.6), manganese (×3.0), palladium (×9.0), thallium (×2.0), uranium (×2.0), vanadium (×8.0), and tungsten (×2.4). Urine concentrations were significantly correlated with values in water but not in lichens. Our findings reveal a complex non-anthropogenic biocontamination with many trace elements in residents of an active volcanic area where thyroid cancer incidence is increased. The possible carcinogenic effect of these chemicals on the thyroid and other tissues cannot be excluded and should be investigated. PMID:26438396

  1. Search of CH4 around the mud volcanism areas on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Shohei

    2012-06-01

    We propose the first measurement of CH4 specialized in the mud volcanism areas on Mars. Although the small amount of CH4 in the Martian atmosphere is remarkable because its source is potentially geological (or biological) activity, it is still open question. The high spectral and spatial resolution with high sensitivity and wide spectral coverage of IRCS/Subaru enable us the first mapping of CH4 on the localized mud volcanism areas. In the terrestrial case, mud volcanism vents about 25% of CH4 released from geological sources to the atmosphere. In such locations, CH4 can potentially combine with the infiltrated H2O and generate CH4-hydrate. While in the Martian case, the mud volcanism is expected the mounds in Acidalia Planitia and the Utopia/Isidis pitted cones. However, the releases of CH4 on these locations have not been discovered yet. Since the CH4-hydrate suggests the correlation of CH4 and H2O, high spatial resolution with simultaneous measurements of CH4 and H2O lines are essential. IRCS/Subaru can provide this opportunity. In addition, our observation will override the past one with CSHELL/IRTF in the following aspects, (1) less uncertainty by simultaneous measurement of multiple CH4 lines with wider spectral coverage, and (2) better spatial resolution.

  2. G-EVER Activities and the Next-generation Volcanic Hazard Assessment System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takarada, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Asia-Pacific Region Global Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption Risk Management (G-EVER) is a consortium of Asia-Pacific geohazard research institutes that was established in 2012. G-EVER aims to formulate strategies to reduce the risks of disasters worldwide caused by the occurrence of earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions. G-EVER is working on enhancing collaboration, sharing of resources, and making information on the risks of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions freely available and understandable. The 1st G-EVER International Symposium was held in Tsukuba, Japan in March 11, 2013. The 2nd Symposium is scheduled in Sendai, Tohoku Japan, in Oct. 19-20, 2013. Currently, 4 working groups were proposed in the G-EVER Consortium. The next-generation volcano hazard assessment WG is developing a useful system for volcanic eruption prediction, risk assessment, and evacuation at various eruption stages. The assessment system is based on volcanic eruption history datasets, volcanic eruption database, and numerical simulations. Volcanic eruption histories including precursor phenomena leading to major eruptions of active volcanoes are very important for future prediction of volcanic eruptions. A high quality volcanic eruption database, which contains compilations of eruption dates, volumes, and types, is important for the next-generation volcano hazard assessment system. Proposing international standards on how to estimate the volume of volcanic products is important to make a high quality volcanic eruption database. Spatial distribution database of volcanic products (e.g. tephra and pyroclastic flow distributions), encoded into a GIS based database is necessary for more precise area and volume estimation and risk assessments. The volcanic eruption database is developed based on past eruption results, which only represents a subset of possible future scenarios. Therefore, numerical simulations with controlled parameters are needed for more precise volcanic eruption

  3. Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Model Volcanic Hazard Risk Levels in Areas Surrounding the Copahue Volcano in the Andes Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, A. M.; Weigel, A. M.; Rivas, J.

    2014-12-01

    Copahue is a stratovolcano located along the rim of the Caviahue Caldera near the Chile-Argentina border in the Andes Mountain Range. There are several small towns located in proximity of the volcano with the two largest being Banos Copahue and Caviahue. During its eruptive history, it has produced numerous lava flows, pyroclastic flows, ash deposits, and lahars. This isolated region has steep topography and little vegetation, rendering it poorly monitored. The need to model volcanic hazard risk has been reinforced by recent volcanic activity that intermittently released several ash plumes from December 2012 through May 2013. Exposure to volcanic ash is currently the main threat for the surrounding populations as the volcano becomes more active. The goal of this project was to study Copahue and determine areas that have the highest potential of being affected in the event of an eruption. Remote sensing techniques were used to examine and identify volcanic activity and areas vulnerable to experiencing volcanic hazards including volcanic ash, SO2 gas, lava flow, pyroclastic density currents and lahars. Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI), EO-1 Advanced Land Imager (ALI), Terra Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), ISS ISERV Pathfinder, and Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) products were used to analyze volcanic hazards. These datasets were used to create a historic lava flow map of the Copahue volcano by identifying historic lava flows, tephra, and lahars both visually and spectrally. Additionally, a volcanic risk and hazard map for the surrounding area was created by modeling the possible extent of ash fallout, lahars, lava flow, and pyroclastic density currents (PDC) for future eruptions. These model results were then used to identify areas that should be prioritized for disaster relief and evacuation orders.

  4. The feeder system for the 2014 fissure eruption at Holuhraun, Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland: Geodetic and seismic constraints on subsurface activity in the area north of the Vatnajökull ice cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Stéphanie; Parks, Michelle; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hooper, Andy; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrun; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Spaans, Karsten; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hensch, Martin; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Rafn Heimisson, Elias; Drouin, Vincent; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Pedersen, Rikke; Rut Hjartardóttir, Ásta; Magnússon, Eyjólfur

    2015-04-01

    An intense earthquake swarm began on 16 August 2014 at Bárðarbunga volcano under the Vatnajökull ice cap in Central Iceland. It marked the beginning of an intrusive activity, with a dyke propagating over 45 km northward. Such major magmatic activity has not been observed for the last three decades in Iceland, since the Krafla rifting episode 1975-1984. The dyke propagation stopped 15 days after the onset of the seismic activity, with the dyke distal end in the Holuhraun plain north of the Vatnajökull ice cap. A small 4 hour eruption marked the beginning of extrusive activity. A new fissure eruption opened up on 31 August at the northern dyke tip, with lava fountaining and feeding extensive lava flows. In January 2014 the surface covered by the lava had exceeded 80 km2, and the eruption activity does not show significant decline. We have carried out interferometric analysis of SAR data (InSAR) since the onset of the unrest. X-band satellite images from COSMO-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X satellites were acquired and analyzed to map ground surface deformation associated with the dyke emplacement. Despite most of the dyke propagation occurring under several hundreds meters of ice, the last 10 km were outside the ice cap, allowing better characterisation of the dyke-induced deformation. Here we focus on the deformation in the Holuhraun plain, in order to better understand the link between the surface deformation detected in the vicinity of the dyke by InSAR as well as GPS measurements, and the eruptive activity. The regular SAR acquisitions made over the Holuhraun area since the beginning of the unrest offer a unique opportunity to better understand the evolution of the intrusion feeding the fissure eruption. For that purpose, we focus on the faults and fissures forming the graben borders on the glacier as well as in the Holuhraun plain, initially mapped using high-resolution radar images, acquired by airborne radar. We extract movement along and perpendicular to these

  5. Recent volcanic activity on Venus - Evidence from radiothermal emissivity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Cordula A.; Wood, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Radiothermal emissivity measurements are analyzed in order to study large volcanic constructs on Venus and to correlate details of the reflectivity/emissivity patterns with geological landforms and stratigraphy visible in corresponding SAR images. There appears to be a correlation between locations on Venus where high emissivity at high altitudes and low emissivity at low altitudes are observed. These phenomena are attributed here to relatively recent volcanic activity: the former to summit eruptions that have not had time to weather to the low-emissivity state, the latter to continuing emission of volcanic gases from neighboring small plains volcanoes. The pattern of reflectivity and emissivity on Maat Mons is examined in the light of these findings. It is concluded that Maat Mons has undergone the most recent episode of volcanic activity of all the volcanoes studied here.

  6. Seismic signature of crustal magma and fluid from deep seismic sounding data across Tengchong volcanic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Z. M.; Zhang, Z. Z.; Wang, C. Y.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-04-01

    The weakened lithosphere around eastern syntax of Tibet plateau has been revealed by the Average Pn and Sn velocities, the 3D upper mantle velocity variations of P wave and S wave, and the iimaging results of magnetotelluric data. Tengchong volcanic area is neighboring to core of eastern syntax and famous for its springs, volcanic-geothermal activities and remarkable seismicity in mainland China. To probe the deep environment for the Tengchong volcanic-geothermal activity a deep seismic sounding (DSS) project was carried out across the this area in 1999. In this paper the seismic signature of crustal magma and fluid is explored from the DSS data with the seismic attribute fusion (SAF) technique, hence four possible positions for magma generation together with some locations for porous and fractured fluid beneath the Tengchong volcanic area were disclosed from the final fusion image of multi seismic attributes. The adopted attributes include the Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs results derived from a new inversion method based on the No-Ray-Tomography technique, and the migrated instantaneous attributes of central frequency, bandwidth and high frequency energy of pressure wave. Moreover, the back-projected ones which are mainly consisted by the attenuation factor Qp , the delay-time of shear wave splitting, and the amplitude ratio between S wave and P wave + S wave were also considered in this fusion process. Our fusion image indicates such a mechanism for the surface springs: a large amount of heat and the fluid released by the crystallization of magma were transmitted upward into the fluid-filled rock, and the fluid upwells along some pipeline since the high pressure in deep, thus the widespread springs of Tengchong volcanic area were developed. Moreover, the fusion image, regional volcanic and geothermal activities, and the seismicity suggest that the main risk of volcanic eruption was concentrated to the south of Tengchong city, especially around the shot point (SP) Tuantian

  7. Modeling Seasonal Thermal Radiance Cycles for Change Detection at Volcanic / Geothermal Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R.; Beuttel, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing observations of thermal features associated with (and often preceding) volcanic activity have been used for decades to detect and monitor volcanism. However, anomalous thermal precursors to volcanic eruptions are usually only recognized retrospectively. One of the reasons for this is that precursor thermal activity is often too subtle in magnitude (spatially, temporally, or in absolute temperature) to be unambiguously detected in time to issue warnings or forecasts. Part of the reason for this is the trade-off between high spatial and high temporal resolution associated with satellite imaging systems. Thus, the goal of this work has been to develop some techniques for using high-temporal-resolution, coarse-spatial-resolution imagery to try to detect subtle thermal anomalies. To identify anomalies, background thermal activity must first be characterized. Every active, or potentially active, volcano has a unique thermal history that provides information about normal background thermal activity due to seasonal or diurnal variations. Understanding these normal variations allows recognition of anomalous activity that may be due to volcanic / hydrothermal processes - ultimately with a lead time that may be sufficient to issue eruption warnings or forecasts. Archived MODIS data, acquired ~daily from 2000 to 2012, were used to investigate seasonal thermal cycles at three volcanic areas with different types of thermal features: Mount St. Helens, which had a dacite dome-building eruption from 2004-2008; Mount Ruapehu, which has a 500-m diameter active summit crater lake; and Yellowstone, which is a large active geothermal system that has hundreds of hot springs and fumarole fields spread out over a very large area. The focus has been on using MODIS 1-km sensor radiance data in the MIR and TIR wavelength regions that are sensitive to thermal emission from features that range in temperature from hundreds of °C, down to tens of °C (below the boiling temperature

  8. Automatic semi-continuous accumulation chamber for diffuse gas emissions monitoring in volcanic and non-volcanic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Matteo; Raco, Brunella; Norelli, Francesco; Virgili, Giorgio; Continanza, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Since various decades the accumulation chamber method is intensively used in monitoring activities of diffuse gas emissions in volcanic areas. Although some improvements have been performed in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility of the detectors, the equipment used for measurement of gas emissions temporal variation usually requires expensive and bulky equipment. The unit described in this work is a low cost, easy to install-and-manage instrument that will make possible the creation of low-cost monitoring networks. The Non-Dispersive Infrared detector used has a concentration range of 0-5% CO2, but the substitution with other detector (range 0-5000 ppm) is possible and very easy. Power supply unit has a 12V, 7Ah battery, which is recharged by a 35W solar panel (equipped with charge regulator). The control unit contains a custom programmed CPU and the remote transmission is assured by a GPRS modem. The chamber is activated by DataLogger unit, using a linear actuator between the closed position (sampling) and closed position (idle). A probe for the measure of soil temperature, soil electrical conductivity, soil volumetric water content, air pressure and air temperature is assembled on the device, which is already arranged for the connection of others external sensors, including an automatic weather station. The automatic station has been tested on the field at Lipari island (Sicily, Italy) during a period of three months, performing CO2 flux measurement (and also weather parameters), each 1 hour. The possibility to measure in semi-continuous mode, and at the same time, the gas fluxes from soil and many external parameters, helps the time series analysis aimed to the identification of gas flux anomalies due to variations in deep system (e.g. onset of volcanic crises) from those triggered by external conditions.

  9. Geomorphic assessment of late Quaternary volcanism in the Yucca Mountain area, southern Nevada: Implications for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.; McFadden, L.D.; Renault, C.E.; Crowe, B.M.

    1991-03-01

    Volcanic hazard studies for high-level radioactive waste isolation in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, require a detailed understanding of Quaternary volcanism to forecast rates of volcanic processes. Recent studies of the Quaternary Cima volcanic fields in southern California have demonstrated that K-Ar dates of volcanic landforms are consistent with their geomorphic and pedologic properties. The systematic change of these properties with time may be used to provide age estimates of undated or questionably dated volcanic features. The reliability of radiometric age determinations of the youngest volcanic center, Lathrop Wells, near the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada has been problematic. In this study, a comparison of morphometric, pedogenic, and stratigraphic data establishes that correlation of geomorphic and soil properties between the Cima volcanic field and the Yucca Mountain area is valid. Comparison of the Lathrop Wells cinder cone to a 15-20 ka cinder cone in California shows that their geomorphic-pedogenic properties are similar and implies that the two cones are of similar age. The authors of ca. 0.27 Ma for the latest volcanic activity at Lathrop Wells, approximately 20 km from the proposed repository, may be in error by as much as an order of magnitude and that the most recent volcanic activity is no older than 20 ka.

  10. Geomorphic assessment of late Quarternary volcanism in the Yucca Mountain area, southern Nevada: Implication for the proposed high-level radiocative waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.; McFadden, L.D.; Renault, C.E.; Crowe, B.M.

    1990-06-01

    Volcanic hazard studies for high-level radioactive waste isolation in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, require a detailed understanding of Quaternary volcanism to forecast rates of volcanic processes. Recent studies of the Quaternary Cima volcanic field in southern California have demonstrated that K-Ar dates of volcanic landforms are consistent with their geomorphic and pedologic properties. The systematic change of these properties with time may be used to provide age estimates of undated or questionably dated volcanic features. The reliability of radiometric age determinations of the youngest volcanic center, Lathrop Wells, near the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada has been problematic. In this study, a comparison of morphometric, pedogenic, and stratigraphic data establishes that correlation of geomorphic and soil properties between the Cima volcanic field and the Yucca Mountain area is valid. Comparison of the Lathrop Wells cinder cone to a 15-20 ka cinder cone in California shows that their geomorphic-pedogenic properties are similar and implies that the two cones are of similar age. We conclude that previous determinations of ca. 0.27 Ma for the latest volcanic activity at Lathrop Wells, approximately 20 km from the proposed repository, may be in error by as much as an order of magnitude and that the most recent volcanic activity is no older than 20ka.

  11. Geomorphic assessment of late Quaternary volcanism in the Yucca Mountain area, southern Nevada: Implications for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, S. G.; McFadden, L. D.; Renault, C. E.; Crowe, B. M.

    1990-06-01

    Volcanic hazard studies for high-level radioactive waste isolation in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, require a detailed understanding of Quaternary volcanism to forecast rates of volcanic processes. Recent studies of the Quaternary Cima volcanic field in southern California have demonstrated that K-Ar dates of volcanic landforms are consistent with their geomorphic and pedologic properties. The systematic change of these properties with time may be used to provide age estimates of undated or questionably dated volcanic features. The reliability off radiometric age determinations of the youngest volcanic center, Lathrop Wells, near the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada has been problematic. In this study, a comparison of morphometric, pedogenic, and stratigraphic data establishes that correlation of geomorphic and soil properties between the Cima volcanic field and the Yucca Mountain area is valid. Comparison of the Lathrop Wells cinder cone to a 15-20 ka cinder cone in California shows that their geomorphic-pedogenic properties are similar and implies that the two cones are of similar age. We conclude that previous determinations of ca. 0.27 Ma for the latest volcanic activity at Lathrop Wells, approximately 20 km from the proposed repository, may be in error by as much as an order of magnitude and that the most recent volcanic activity is no older than 20 ka.

  12. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 2--morphological and mineralogical features.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic emissions were studied at Mount Etna (Italy) by using moss-bags technique. Mosses were exposed around the volcano at different distances from the active vents to evaluate the impact of volcanic emissions in the atmosphere. Morphology and mineralogy of volcanic particulate intercepted by mosses were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Particles emitted during passive degassing activity from the two active vents, Bocca Nuova and North East Crater (BNC and NEC), were identified as silicates, sulfates and halide compounds. In addition to volcanic particles, we found evidences also of geogenic, anthropogenic and marine spray input. The study has shown the robustness of this active biomonitoring technique to collect particles, very useful in active volcanic areas characterized by continuous degassing and often not easily accessible to apply conventional sampling techniques. PMID:25311770

  13. Late Archean mafic volcanism in the Rainy Lake area, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Day, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Late Archean greenstone-granite terrane of the Rainy Lake area of Minnesota contains a bimodal suite of mafic and felsic volcanic and coeval intrusive rocks. New geochemical data show that the mafic rocks occur in three distinct suites: (1) low-Ti olivine- and quartz-tholeiite, (2) high-Ti quartz-tholeiite and basaltic andesite, and (3) calc-alkaline lamprophyric monzodiorite and quartz diorite. The low-Ti tholeiites have only slightly evolved Mg-numbers from 53-63, Ni=125-300 ppm, and MORB-like REE. In contrast, the high-Ti tholeiites are more evolved, with Mg*=26-48, Ni=43-135 ppm, and higher total REE. Compared to the tholeiitic suites, the monzodiorite suite has more primitive Mg-numbers, with Mg*=70-78, Ni<410 ppm, and anomalously high LREE. The two tholeiitic suites cannot be genetically related by simple fractionation from a single parent magma; however, lower degrees of partial melting (<8 percent) of a mantle source (spinel periodotite) with REE=2-4 times chondrites could have produced the high-Ti tholeiites, and higher degrees of melting (20-30 percent) of a similar source could have generated the low-Ti tholeiites. In contrast, the monzodiorite suite must have been generated from either a LREE-rich or (and) a garnet-bearing source (garnet periodotite). The authors conclude that shallow melting (<40-50 km) within the Archean mantle in the Rainy Lake area produced the tholeiitic rocks, and that deep melting (>40-50 km) generated the lamprophyric monzodiorites.

  14. The Physics of a Volcanic System: What is the Actual Role Played by Tectonic Setting in Controlling Volcanic Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canon-Tapia, E.

    2005-12-01

    Modern text-books commonly explain volcanic activity as a direct consequence of plate tectonics, overlooking the different scales characteristic of both types of processes. By acknowledging such differences, however, it is possible to envisage a model of a volcanic system that is based in the same principles of hydrostatics established by Blaise Pascal over 300 yrs ago. Such principles allow us to estimate the local conditions required for the occurrence of volcanism at a given location highlighting the importance of the rock strength and the density difference between melt and its surroundings. This model shows that the minimum thickness of the zone of partial melting in the mantle (or seismically defined Low Velocity Zone) that is required to feed volcanic activity might range from 5 to over 100 km, but also that under certain circumstances a rock strength < 200 MPa may suffice to keep magma trapped at depth whereas in other cases a strength > 600 MPa will not suffice to stop magma ascent resulting in volcanic activity at the surface. Consequently, the model of volcanism developed here explains why is that a given LVZ may lead to volcanic activity in some places whereas a completely identical LVZ may not result in volcanic activity in a different location. Consequently, this model provides a general framework that allows us to better understand the actual role played by tectonic setting in controlling volcanism at a planetary scale.

  15. Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

  16. Ancient Tectonic and Volcanic Activity in the Tharsis Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, S. C.; Kronberg, P.; Hauber, E.; Grott, M.; Steinberger, B.; Torsvik, T. H.; Neukum, G.

    The two topographically dominating volcanic provinces on Mars are the Tharsis and the Elysium regions, situated close to the equator on the dichotomy boundary between the heavily cratered (older) highlands and the northern lowlands (about 100 degrees apart). The regions are characterized by volcanoes whose morphologies are analogous to volcanic landforms on Earth, and the huge volcanoes in the Tharsis region (Olympus Mons and Tharsis Montes) are prime examples resembling many characteristics of Hawaiian shield volcanoes. The main difference between the Martian and terrestrial volcanoes are their size and the length of the flows, possibly due to higher eruption rates, the "stationary" character of the source (no plate tectonics) and the lower gravity. The Tharsis plateau is the topographically most prominent region on Mars, and associated with an areoid high. On Earth, large geoid highs are related to longlived heterogeneities near the core-mantle boundary that are sources for large igneous provinces. The Tharsis' volcanic vent structures were active at least episodically over the past 4 billion years (based on crater count statistics), which indicates long-lived volcanic and magmatic activity. Two major groups of tectonic features are related to the Tharsis bulge: a concentric set of wrinkle ridges indicating compression radial to Tharsis,and several sets of extensional structures that radiate outward from different centers within Tharsis, indicating tension circumferential to Tharsis. No landforms imply ancient plate tectonics. Here, we present surface ages associated with volcanic and tectonic landforms with a special focus on the ancient magma-tectonic environment (see Grott et al. 2006, this volume). We will examine the long-lived volcanism and tectonic surface expressions and discuss whether Mars volcanism could represent deep mantle plumes.

  17. Regional Triggering of Volcanic Activity Following Large Magnitude Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill-Butler, Charley; Blackett, Matthew; Wright, Robert

    2015-04-01

    There are numerous reports of a spatial and temporal link between volcanic activity and high magnitude seismic events. In fact, since 1950, all large magnitude earthquakes have been followed by volcanic eruptions in the following year - 1952 Kamchatka M9.2, 1960 Chile M9.5, 1964 Alaska M9.2, 2004 & 2005 Sumatra-Andaman M9.3 & M8.7 and 2011 Japan M9.0. While at a global scale, 56% of all large earthquakes (M≥8.0) in the 21st century were followed by increases in thermal activity. The most significant change in volcanic activity occurred between December 2004 and April 2005 following the M9.1 December 2004 earthquake after which new eruptions were detected at 10 volcanoes and global volcanic flux doubled over 52 days (Hill-Butler et al. 2014). The ability to determine a volcano's activity or 'response', however, has resulted in a number of disparities with <50% of all volcanoes being monitored by ground-based instruments. The advent of satellite remote sensing for volcanology has, therefore, provided researchers with an opportunity to quantify the timing, magnitude and character of volcanic events. Using data acquired from the MODVOLC algorithm, this research examines a globally comparable database of satellite-derived radiant flux alongside USGS NEIC data to identify changes in volcanic activity following an earthquake, February 2000 - December 2012. Using an estimate of background temperature obtained from the MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) product (Wright et al. 2014), thermal radiance was converted to radiant flux following the method of Kaufman et al. (1998). The resulting heat flux inventory was then compared to all seismic events (M≥6.0) within 1000 km of each volcano to evaluate if changes in volcanic heat flux correlate with regional earthquakes. This presentation will first identify relationships at the temporal and spatial scale, more complex relationships obtained by machine learning algorithms will then be examined to establish favourable

  18. GRID based Thermal Images Processing for volcanic activity monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiagli, S.; Coco, S.; Drago, L.; Laudani, A.,; Lodato, L.; Pollicino, G.; Torrisi, O.

    2009-04-01

    Since 2001, the Catania Section of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) has been running the video stations recording the volcanic activity of Mount Etna, Stromboli and the Fossa Crater of Vulcano island. The video signals of 11 video cameras (seven operating in the visible band and four in infrared) are sent in real time to INGV Control Centre where they are visualized on monitors and archived on a dedicated NAS storage. The video surveillance of the Sicilian volcanoes, situated near to densely populated areas, helps the volcanologists providing the Civil Protection authorities with updates in real time on the on-going volcanic activity. In particular, five video cameras are operating on Mt. Etna and they record the volcano from the south and east sides 24 hours a day. During emergencies, mobile video stations may also be used to better film the most important phases of the activity. Single shots are published on the Catania Section intranet and internet websites. On June 2006 a A 40 thermal camera was installed in Vulcano La Fossa Crater. The location was in the internal and opposite crater flank (S1), 400 m distant from the fumarole field. The first two-year of data on temperature distribution frequency were recorded with this new methodology of acquisition, and automatically elaborated by software at INGV Catania Section. In fact a dedicated software developed in IDL, denominated Volcano Thermo Analysis (VTA), was appositely developed in order to extract a set of important features, able to characterize with a good approssimation the volcanic activity. In particular the program first load and opportunely convert the thermal images, then according to the Region Of Interest (ROI) and the temperature ranges defined by the user provide to automatic spatial and statistic analysis. In addition the VTA is able to analysis all the temporal series of images available in order to achieve the time-event analysis and the dynamic of the volcanic

  19. Explosive Volcanic Activity at Extreme Depths: Evidence from the Charles Darwin Volcanic Field, Cape Verdes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Devey, C. W.; Hansteen, T. H.; Freundt, A.; Kutterolf, S.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions on the deep sea floor have traditionally been assumed to be non-explosive as the high-pressure environment should greatly inhibit steam-driven explosions. Nevertheless, occasional evidence both from (generally slow-) spreading axes and intraplate seamounts has hinted at explosive activity at large water depths. Here we present evidence from a submarine field of volcanic cones and pit craters called Charles Darwin Volcanic Field located at about 3600 m depth on the lower southwestern slope of the Cape Verdean Island of Santo Antão. We examined two of these submarine volcanic edifices (Tambor and Kolá), each featuring a pit crater of 1 km diameter, using photogrammetric reconstructions derived from ROV-based imaging followed by 3D quantification using a novel remote sensing workflow, aided by sampling. The measured and calculated parameters of physical volcanology derived from the 3D model allow us, for the first time, to make quantitative statements about volcanic processes on the deep seafloor similar to those generated from land-based field observations. Tambor cone, which is 2500 m wide and 250 m high, consists of dense, probably monogenetic medium to coarse-grained volcaniclastic and pyroclastic rocks that are highly fragmented, probably as a result of thermal and viscous granulation upon contact with seawater during several consecutive cycles of activity. Tangential joints in the outcrops indicate subsidence of the crater floor after primary emplacement. Kolá crater, which is 1000 m wide and 160 m deep, appears to have been excavated in the surrounding seafloor and shows stepwise sagging features interpreted as ring fractures on the inner flanks. Lithologically, it is made up of a complicated succession of highly fragmented deposits, including spheroidal juvenile lapilli, likely formed by spray granulation. It resembles a maar-type deposit found on land. The eruption apparently entrained blocks of MORB-type gabbroic country rocks with

  20. Multidimensional analysis and probabilistic model of volcanic and seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.

    2009-04-01

    A search for space and time regularities in volcanic and seismic events for the purpose of forecast method development seems to be of current concern, both scientifically and practically. The seismic and volcanic processes take place in the Earth's field of gravity which in turn is closely related to gravitational fields of the Moon, the Sun, and the planets of the Solar System. It is mostly gravity and tidal forces that exercise control over the Earth's configuration and relief. Dynamic gravitational interaction between the Earth and other celestial bodies makes itself evident in tidal phenomena and other effects in the geospheres (including the Earth's crust). Dynamics of the tidal and attractive forces is responsible for periodical changes in gravity force, both in value and direction [Darwin, 1965], in the rate of rotation and orbital speed; that implies related changes in the endogenic activity of the Earth. The Earth's rotation in the alternating gravitational field accounts to a considerable extent for regular pattern of crustal deformations and dislocations; it is among principal factors that control the Earth's form and structure, distribution of oceans and continents and, probably, continental drift [Peive, 1969; Khain, 1973; Kosygin, 1983]. The energy of gravitational interaction is transmitted through the tidal energy to planetary spheres and feeds various processes there, including volcanic and seismic ones. To determine degree, character and special features of tidal force contribution to the volcanic and seismic processes is of primary importance for understanding of genetic and dynamic aspects of volcanism and seismicity. Both volcanic and seismic processes are involved in evolution of celestial bodies; they are operative on the planets of the Earth group and many satellites [Essays…, 1981; Lukashov, 1996]. From this standpoint, studies of those processes are essential with a view to development of scenarios of the Earth's evolution as a celestial

  1. Comparison of airborne and spaceborne TIR data for studying volcanic geothermal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Heasler, H.; Jaworowski, C.; Bergfeld, D.; Evans, W.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping and quantifying the surface expression of geothermal heat flux in volcanic geothermal areas is important for establishing baseline thermal activity to better detect and understand any future changes that may be related to hydrothermal or volcanic processes, or human activities. Volcanic geothermal areas are often too large and inaccessible for only field-based thermal monitoring, so thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing tools are also used. High resolution (sub-meter) airborne TIR imagery can be used for detailed, quantitative analyses of small, subtle geothermal features. Airborne data acquisitions have the advantage of being able to be acquired under ideal conditions (e.g., predawn, cloud-free), but the disadvantage of high costs - thus precluding high-frequency monitoring. Satellite-based TIR data from the Landsat 8 platform are freely available and can be acquired regularly for change detection, but are acquired with coarser spatial resolution (e.g., 100-m pixels), and thus are not as sensitive to subtle thermal characteristics. Two geothermal areas with clear, nighttime TIR data from nearly concurrent (within days) airborne and spaceborne instruments were investigated: Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park, WY; and the Casa Diablo geothermal field, near Mammoth Lakes, CA. At Norris Geyser Basin, the area covered by high-resolution airborne TIR imagery is almost entirely geothermally heated ground, with hundreds of fumaroles, hot springs, and thermal drainages - although some non-geothermal background is exposed. With the coarser resolution Landsat 8 data, there are thermal variations within the smaller area covered by the airborne data, but the entire area appears to be thermally anomalous with respect to the non-geothermal background outside the basin. In the geothermal field around the Casa Diablo geothermal site, there are numerous, small areas of geothermal heating that are clearly distinguishable above the background by the high

  2. Active Volcanism on Io as Seen by Galileo SSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Alfred S.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Geissler, Paul; Simonelli, Damon P.; Carr, Michael H.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; Breneman, H. Herbert; Jones, Todd J.; Kaufman, James M.; Magee, Kari P.; Senske, David A.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Schubert, Gerald

    1998-09-01

    Active volcanism on Io has been monitored during the nominal Galileo satellite tour from mid 1996 through late 1997. The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment was able to observe many manifestations of this active volcanism, including (1) changes in the color and albedo of the surface, (2) active airborne plumes, and (3) glowing vents seen in eclipse. About 30 large-scale (tens of kilometers) surface changes are obvious from comparison of the SSI images to those acquired by Voyager in 1979. These include new pyroclastic deposits of several colors, bright and dark flows, and caldera-floor materials. There have also been significant surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission itself, such as a new 400-km-diameter dark pyroclastic deposit around Pillan Patera. While these surface changes are impressive, the number of large-scale changes observed in the four months between the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 flybys in 1979 suggested that over 17 years the cumulative changes would have been much more impressive. There are two reasons why this was not actually the case. First, it appears that the most widespread plume deposits are ephemeral and seem to disappear within a few years. Second, it appears that a large fraction of the volcanic activity is confined to repeated resurfacing of dark calderas and flow fields that cover only a few percent of Io's surface. The plume monitoring has revealed 10 active plumes, comparable to the 9 plumes observed by Voyager. One of these plumes was visible only in the first orbit and three became active in the later orbits. Only the Prometheus plume has been consistently active and easy to detect. Observations of the Pele plume have been particularly intriguing since it was detected only once by SSI, despite repeated attempts, but has been detected several times by the Hubble Space Telescope at 255 nm. Pele's plume is much taller (460 km) than during Voyager 1 (300 km) and much fainter at visible wavelengths. Prometheus-type plumes (50

  3. Active Volcanism on Io as Seen by Galileo SSI

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Geissler, P.; Simonelli, D.P.; Carr, M.H.; Johnson, T.V.; Klaasen, K.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Senske, D.A.; Belton, M.J.S.; Schubert, G.

    1998-01-01

    Active volcanism on Io has been monitored during the nominal Galileo satellite tour from mid 1996 through late 1997. The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment was able to observe many manifestations of this active volcanism, including (1) changes in the color and albedo of the surface, (2) active airborne plumes, and (3) glowing vents seen in eclipse. About 30 large-scale (tens of kilometers) surface changes are obvious from comparison of the SSI images to those acquired by Voyager in 1979. These include new pyroclastic deposits of several colors, bright and dark flows, and caldera-floor materials. There have also been significant surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission itself, such as a new 400-km-diameter dark pyroclastic deposit around Pillan Patera. While these surface changes are impressive, the number of large-scale changes observed in the four months between the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 flybys in 1979 suggested that over 17 years the cumulative changes would have been much more impressive. There are two reasons why this was not actually the case. First, it appears that the most widespread plume deposits are ephemeral and seem to disappear within a few years. Second, it appears that a large fraction of the volcanic activity is confined to repeated resurfacing of dark calderas and flow fields that cover only a few percent of Io's surface. The plume monitoring has revealed 10 active plumes, comparable to the 9 plumes observed by Voyager. One of these plumes was visible only in the first orbit and three became active in the later orbits. Only the Prometheus plume has been consistently active and easy to detect. Observations of the Pele plume have been particularly intriguing since it was detected only once by SSI, despite repeated attempts, but has been detected several times by the Hubble Space Telescope at 255 nm. Pele's plume is much taller (460 km) than during Voyager 1 (300 km) and much fainter at visible wavelengths. Prometheus-type plumes (50

  4. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Neogene-Quaternary Harrat Al-Madinah intercontinental volcanic field, Saudi Arabia: Implications for duration and migration of volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moufti, M. R.; Moghazi, A. M.; Ali, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar ages, based on incremental heating techniques for groundmass separates of 25 samples, are presented for the Harrat Al-Madinah volcanic field, part of Harrat Rahat in the north western part of the Arabian plate. This area is an active volcanic field characterized by the occurrence of two historical eruptions approximately in 641 and 1256 AD. Field investigations of the main volcanic landforms indicate dominantly monogenetic strombolian eruptions, in addition to local more explosive eruptions. The lavas consist mainly of olivine basalt and hawaiite flows with minor evolved rocks of mugearite, benmoreite, and trachyte that occur mainly as domes, tuff cones and occasionally as lava flows. Previous K/Ar dating shows that the Harrat Al-Madinah lava flows and associated domes comprise seven units spanning an age range of ca. 1.7 Ma-Recent. The new 40Ar/39Ar age determinations confirm, to a great extent, the previously obtained K/Ar ages in the sense that no major systematic biases were found in the general stratigraphy of the different flow units. However, the 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages show that volcanism in this area began in the Neogene (˜10 Ma) and continued to Recent, with the most voluminous eruptions occurring in the Quaternary. Neogene volcanism occurred in at least three pulses around 10, 5 and 2 Ma, whereas Quaternary volcanism produced at least seven units reflecting lava flow emplacement in the time period of 1.90 Ma-Recent. Thus, the whole duration of volcanic activity in the Harrat Al-Madinah (10 Ma-Recent) appears much longer than that previously identified. The longevity of volcanism in the same part of the moving Arabian plate and absence of evidence for uni-directional migration of volcanic activity indicate that there is no fixed plume beneath this region. The NNW-trending distribution of the volcanic vents is parallel to the Red Sea, and suggests their origin is related to periodic extensional episodes along the reactivated Red Sea fault

  5. Mapping Volcanic Gas Emissions in the Mammoth Mountain Area Using AVIRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deJong, Steven M.; Chrien, Thomas G.

    1996-01-01

    The Long Valley Caldera located in the eastern Sierra Nevada (California) shows new signs of volcanic activity. This renewed activity is expressed by gas emissions, hydrothermal activity and frequent earthquakes. Analysis of the gas composition regarding the percentage biogenic carbon and the He-3/He-4 ratio revealed that the gas source is the magma body approximately 7 km beneath the Long Valley Caldera. The gas from the magma body surfaces not only via the fumaroles but also emerges along geological faults. Some of the spots where gas surfaces are marked by dead or stressed trees. Other spots may not yet be identified. It is only recently known, from research at 'Vulcano Island' in southern Italy, that volcanoes release abundant carbon dioxide from their flanks as diffuse soil emanations. Mammoth Mountain seems to behave in a similar manner. The research described in this paper is designed to determine whether AVIRIS (Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) can be used to identify areas of volcanic gas emissions.

  6. The influence of volcanic activity on suspended sediment yield of rivers (Kamchatka, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksina, Ludmila

    2014-05-01

    Kamchatka is specific region of suspended sediment yield formation. This fact is particularly connected with active volcanism in the territory. The influence of volcanism on suspended sediment yield characteristics was studied in various time scales - into-diurnal, seasonal and long-term ones. The study of spatial variability of these characteristics reveals the maximum values characterize river basins in zones of strong impact of volcanic eruptions, especially, rivers draining slopes and flanks of active volcanoes. Into-diurnal fluctuations were studied for rivers in volcanic areas. They are characterized by synchronous changes of water flow and turbidity. It's determined by weak erosion-preventive capacity of friable volcanic deposits and big slopes of channels (2.5 - 6.0 %). The maximum of water flow and turbidity is observed at the period between 12 and 6 pm. The air temperature reaches its maximum by that time, and consequently, the intensity of snow melting is also maximum one. The maximum of turbidity advances diurnal maximum of water flow a little, and it's connected with the features of flood wave moving and consecutive maximums of slopes, turbidity, velocity, water flow, and capacity of stream during flush. Into-diurnal fluctuations are determined by complicated and little-studied processes of mass transfer between stream and channel deposits. These processes are connected with into-diurnal changes of stream capacity and water transfer between channel and underflow. As the result water regime is pulsating. Rivers under the influence of volcanic eruptions transport the main amount of sediments during floods which usually occur in summer-autumn period (in the absence of extreme floods in winter-spring period during volcanic eruptions). Combination of maximum snow supply, significant precipitation in warm part of the year and weak erosion-preventive capacity of friable volcanic deposits on volcanoes slopes is the reason of the most intense erosion in this

  7. Volcanic Hazards Survey in the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Michael; Siebe, Claus; Macias, Jose Luis

    1996-01-01

    We have assembled a digital mosaic of 11 Landsat Thematic images to serve as a mapping base for reconnaissance activities within the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. This will aid us in interpretation and in the evaluation of potential activity of all the volcanic centers there. One result is a volcanic hazards map of the area.

  8. Crustal deformation and volcanism at active plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsson, Halldor

    Most of Earth's volcanoes are located near active tectonic plate boundaries, where the tectonic plates move relative to each other resulting in deformation. Likewise, subsurface magma movement and pressure changes in magmatic systems can cause measurable deformation of the Earth's surface. The study of the shape of Earth and therefore studies of surface deformation is called geodesy. Modern geodetic techniques allow precise measurements (˜1 mm accuracy) of deformation of tectonic and magmatic systems. Because of the spatial correlation between tectonic boundaries and volcanism, the tectonic and volcanic deformation signals can become intertwined. Thus it is often important to study both tectonic and volcanic deformation processes simultaneously, when one is trying to study one of the systems individually. In this thesis, I present research on crustal deformation and magmatic processes at active plate boundaries. The study areas cover divergent and transform plate boundaries in south Iceland and convergent and transform plate boundaries in Central America, specifically Nicaragua and El Salvador. The study is composed of four main chapters: two of the chapters focus on the magma plumbing system of Hekla volcano, Iceland and the plate boundary in south Iceland; one chapter focuses on shallow controls of explosive volcanism at Telica volcano, Nicaragua; and the fourth chapter focuses on co- and post-seismic deformation from a Mw = 7.3 earthquake which occurred offshore El Salvador in 2012. Hekla volcano is located at the intersection of a transform zone and a rift zone in Iceland and thus is affected by a combination of shear and extensional strains, in addition to co-seismic and co-rifting deformation. The inter-eruptive deformation signal from Hekla is subtle, as observed by a decade (2000-2010) of GPS data in south Iceland. A simultaneous inversion of this data for parameters describing the geometry and source characteristics of the magma chamber at Hekla, and

  9. Geology and geochemistry characteristics of the Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (Central Area), Chiapas Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, J. C.; Jaimes-Viera, M. C.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Layer, P. W.; Pompa-Mera, V.; Godinez, M. L.

    2007-04-01

    The Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (CVA), located in the central portion of the State of Chiapas, is a 150 km stretch of volcanoes irregularly aligned in the northwest direction between two great volcanic features: the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the northwest and the Central American Volcanic Arc to the southeast. The CVA is located in a complex zone marking the interaction of the North American, Caribbean and Cocos plates, near the Motagua-Polochic fault system, the boundary between North American and Caribbean plates. The central part of the CVA is composed of an irregular northwest alignment of at least 10 volcanic structures generally lying along NNW-SSE-trending faults splayed from the Motagua-Polochic system. Among the structures there are seven volcanic domes (Huitepec, Amahuitz, La Iglesia, Mispía, La Lanza, Venustiano Carranza and Santotón), one explosion crater (Navenchauc), one collapse structure (Apas), and one dome complex (Tzontehuitz). In the majority of the structures there is a clear resurgence with the formation of several domes in the same structure, with the destruction of previous domes (Navenchauc) or with the formation of new explosion craters or collapse structures (Apas). The volcanic activity in the CVA was mainly effusive accompanied by explosive and phreatomagmatic events and is characterized by volcanic domes accompanied by block-and-ash-flows, ash flows with accretionary lapilli, falls, and pumice flows. The volcanic structures and deposits are calcalkaline in composition with a medium to high content of potassium. CVA volcanic rocks vary from andesite to dacite with SiO 2 between 57 and 66 wt.%, show low concentrations of Ti, P, Nb and Ta, are enriched in Light Rare Earths, depleted in Heavy Rare Earths, and show a small Eu anomaly; all indicative of arc-related volcanism associated with subduction of the Cocos plate under the North American plate, but complicated by the geometry of the plate boundary fault system.

  10. Multidimensional analysis and probabilistic model of volcanic and seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.

    2009-04-01

    A search for space and time regularities in volcanic and seismic events for the purpose of forecast method development seems to be of current concern, both scientifically and practically. The seismic and volcanic processes take place in the Earth's field of gravity which in turn is closely related to gravitational fields of the Moon, the Sun, and the planets of the Solar System. It is mostly gravity and tidal forces that exercise control over the Earth's configuration and relief. Dynamic gravitational interaction between the Earth and other celestial bodies makes itself evident in tidal phenomena and other effects in the geospheres (including the Earth's crust). Dynamics of the tidal and attractive forces is responsible for periodical changes in gravity force, both in value and direction [Darwin, 1965], in the rate of rotation and orbital speed; that implies related changes in the endogenic activity of the Earth. The Earth's rotation in the alternating gravitational field accounts to a considerable extent for regular pattern of crustal deformations and dislocations; it is among principal factors that control the Earth's form and structure, distribution of oceans and continents and, probably, continental drift [Peive, 1969; Khain, 1973; Kosygin, 1983]. The energy of gravitational interaction is transmitted through the tidal energy to planetary spheres and feeds various processes there, including volcanic and seismic ones. To determine degree, character and special features of tidal force contribution to the volcanic and seismic processes is of primary importance for understanding of genetic and dynamic aspects of volcanism and seismicity. Both volcanic and seismic processes are involved in evolution of celestial bodies; they are operative on the planets of the Earth group and many satellites [Essays…, 1981; Lukashov, 1996]. From this standpoint, studies of those processes are essential with a view to development of scenarios of the Earth's evolution as a celestial

  11. Measuring volcanic gases at Taal Volcano Main Crater for monitoring volcanic activity and possible gas hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpa, M.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Reniva, P.; Bariso, E.; Padilla, G.; Melian Rodriguez, G.; Barrancos, J.; Calvo, D.; Nolasco, D.; Padron, E.; Garduque, R.; Villacorte, E.; Fajiculay, E.; Perez, N.; Solidum, R.

    2012-12-01

    Taal is an active volcano located in southwest Luzon, Philippines. It consists of mainly tuff cones which have formed an island at the center of a 30 km wide Taal Caldera. Most historical eruptions, since 1572 on Taal Volcano Island, have been characterized as hydromagmatic eruptions. Taal Main Crater, produced during the 1911 eruption, is the largest crater in the island currently filled by a 1.2 km wide, 85 m deep acidic lake. The latest historical eruption occurred in 1965-1977. Monitoring of CO2 emissions from the Main Crater Lake (MCL) and fumarolic areas within the Main Crater started in 2008 with a collaborative project between ITER and PHIVOLCS. Measurements were done by accumulation chamber method using a Westsystem portable diffuse fluxmeter. Baseline total diffuse CO2 emissions of less than 1000 t/d were established for the MCL from 3 campaign-type surveys between April, 2008 to March, 2010 when seismicity was within background levels. In May, 2010, anomalous seismic activity from the volcano started and the total CO2 emission from the MCL increased to 2716±54 t/d as measured in August, 2010. The CO2 emission from the lake was highest last March, 2011 at 4670±159 t/d when the volcano was still showing signs of unrest. Because CO2 emissions increased significantly (more than 3 times the baseline value) at this time, this activity may be interpreted as magmatic and not purely hydrothermal. Most likely deep magma intrusions occurred but did not progress further to shallower depths and no eruption occurred. No large increase in lake water temperature near the surface (average for the whole lake area) during the period when CO2 was above background, it remained at 30-34°C and a few degrees lower than average ambient temperature. Total CO2 emissions from the MCL have decreased to within baseline values since October, 2011. Concentrations of CO2, SO2 and H2S in air in the fumarolic area within the Main Crater also increased in March, 2011. The measurements

  12. GRAVIMETRIC STUDY OF THE IXTLAN DE LOS HERVORES, GEOTHERMAL AREA, MIDWESTERN MEXICAN VOLCANIC BELT (MVB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, T.; Ortiz, I.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis and interpretation of gravimetric anomalies over the Occidental-Central Mexican Volcanic Belt, sheds new light on the subsurface structure of the Ixtlan de los Hervores, geothermal area. In Mexico, there are several geothermal areas that have been exploited commercially (Cerro Prieto, Los Azufres, Los Humeros, Tres Virgenes fields). However, there are many other known fields that have not been exploited. This is the case in the area of "Ixtlan de los Hervores" in the state of Michoacan. The analyzed region covers a rectangular area, aproximality from 20o N to 20.5° N and 102° W to 102.2°W. In the region there are thick basalt flows. The area is characterized by low and elongated hills formed by volcanic flows and on a smaller scale lacustrian sediments and major normal faults with a NW-SE direction particularly, the Ixtlan-Encinal fault which controls the trace of the Duero River and the Pajacuarán fault. The anomaly map was compared with the surface geology and the anomalies were correlated with major volcanic features, since our main interest was in mapping the subsurface faults and volcanic bodies. Two profiles were selected that cross major anomalies and the geothermal zone of Ixtlan. The Talwani algorithm for 2-D polygonal bodies has been used for calculating the theoretical anomalies. The proposed models adequately explain the main observed geological features. The models are made up of two lithostratigraphic units of volcanic rocks, represented by the Tertiary basalts, which adequately reflect the area's volcanic environment. These basaltic units, corresponding to different volcanic events were cut by the Ixtlan well. Both models reflect the existence of the Ixtlan-Encinal fault, the most important feature in the area which is also responsible for the existence of the geothermal area.

  13. High resolution DEM from Tandem-X interferometry: an accurate tool to characterize volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, Fabien; Kervyn, Francois

    2013-04-01

    Tandem-X mission was launched by the German agency (DLR) in June 2010. It is a new generation high resolution SAR sensor mainly dedicated to topographic applications. For the purpose of our researches focused on the study of the volcano-tectonic activity in the Kivu Rift area, a set of Tandem-X bistatic radar images were used to produce a high resolution InSAR DEM of the Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP). The VVP is part of the Western branch of the African rift, situated at the boundary between D.R. Congo, Rwanda and Uganda. It has two highly active volcanoes, Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira. A first task concerns the quantitative assessment of the vertical accuracy that can be achieved with these new data. The new DEMs are compared to other space borne datasets (SRTM, ASTER) but also to field measurements given by differential GPS. Multi-temporal radar acquisitions allow us to produce several DEM of the same area. This appeared to be very useful in the context of an active volcanic context where new geomorphological features (faults, fissures, volcanic cones and lava flows) appear continuously through time. For example, since the year 2000, time of the SRTM acquisition, we had one eruption at Nyiragongo (2002) and six eruptions at Nyamulagira (2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2010 and 2011) which all induce large changes in the landscape with the emplacement of new lava fields and scoria cones. From our repetitive Tandem-X DEM production, we have a tool to identify and also quantify in term of size and volume all the topographic changes relative to this past volcanic activity. These parameters are high value information to improve the understanding of the Virunga volcanoes; the accurate estimation of erupted volume and knowledge of structural features associated to past eruptions are key parameters to understand the volcanic system, to ameliorate the hazard assessment, and finally contribute to risk mitigation in a densely populated area.

  14. Complex explosive volcanic activity on the Moon within Oppenheimer crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kristen A.; Horgan, Briony H. N.; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Allen, Carlton C.; Hayne, Paul O.; Bell, James F.; Paige, David A.

    2016-07-01

    Oppenheimer crater is a floor-fractured crater located within the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon, and exhibits more than a dozen localized pyroclastic deposits associated with the fractures. Localized pyroclastic volcanism on the Moon is thought to form as a result of intermittently explosive Vulcanian eruptions under low effusion rates, in contrast to the higher-effusion rate, Hawaiian-style fire fountaining inferred to form larger regional deposits. We use Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images and Diviner Radiometer mid-infrared data, Chandrayaan-1 orbiter Moon Mineralogy Mapper near-infrared spectra, and Clementine orbiter Ultraviolet/visible camera images to test the hypothesis that the pyroclastic deposits in Oppenheimer crater were emplaced via Vulcanian activity by constraining their composition and mineralogy. Mineralogically, we find that the deposits are variable mixtures of orthopyroxene and minor clinopyroxene sourced from the crater floor, juvenile clinopyroxene, and juvenile iron-rich glass, and that the mineralogy of the pyroclastics varies both across the Oppenheimer deposits as a whole and within individual deposits. We observe similar variability in the inferred iron content of pyroclastic glasses, and note in particular that the northwest deposit, associated with Oppenheimer U crater, contains the most iron-rich volcanic glass thus far identified on the Moon, which could be a useful future resource. We propose that this variability in mineralogy indicates variability in eruption style, and that it cannot be explained by a simple Vulcanian eruption. A Vulcanian eruption should cause significant country rock to be incorporated into the pyroclastic deposit; however, large areas within many of the deposits exhibit spectra consistent with high abundances of juvenile phases and very little floor material. Thus, we propose that at least the most recent portion of these deposits must have erupted via a Strombolian or more continuous fire

  15. Self-sustained vibrations in volcanic areas extracted by Independent Component Analysis: a review and new results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lauro, E.; de Martino, S.; Falanga, M.; Palo, M.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the physical processes associated with volcanic tremor and explosions. A volcano is a complex system where a fluid source interacts with the solid edifice so generating seismic waves in a regime of low turbulence. Although the complex behavior escapes a simple universal description, the phases of activity generate stable (self-sustained) oscillations that can be described as a non-linear dynamical system of low dimensionality. So, the system requires to be investigated with non-linear methods able to individuate, decompose, and extract the main characteristics of the phenomenon. Independent Component Analysis (ICA), an entropy-based technique is a good candidate for this purpose. Here, we review the results of ICA applied to seismic signals acquired in some volcanic areas. We emphasize analogies and differences among the self-oscillations individuated in three cases: Stromboli (Italy), Erebus (Antarctica) and Volcán de Colima (Mexico). The waveforms of the extracted independent components are specific for each volcano, whereas the similarity can be ascribed to a very general common source mechanism involving the interaction between gas/magma flow and solid structures (the volcanic edifice). Indeed, chocking phenomena or inhomogeneities in the volcanic cavity can play the same role in generating self-oscillations as the languid and the reed do in musical instruments. The understanding of these background oscillations is relevant not only for explaining the volcanic source process and to make a forecast into the future, but sheds light on the physics of complex systems developing low turbulence.

  16. California's potential volcanic hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions have occurred infrequently in California during the last few thousand years, the potential danger to life and property from volcanoes in the state is great enough to be of concern, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publication. The 17-page bulletin, Potential Hazards from Future Volcanic Eruptions in California, gives a brief history of volcanic activity in California during the past 100,000 years, descriptions of the types of volcanoes in the state, the types of potentially hazardous volcanic events that could occur, and hazard-zonation maps and tables depicting six areas of the state where volcanic eruptions might occur. The six areas and brief descriptions of their past volcanic history and potential for future volcanic hazards are briefly summarized here.

  17. Active Volcanic and Hydrothermal Processes at NW Rota-1 Submarine Volcano: Mariana Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Baker, E. T.; Butterfield, D. A.; Chadwick, W. W.; de Ronde, C.; Dower, J.; Evans, L.; Hein, J.; Juniper, K.; Lebon, G.; Lupton, J. E.; Merle, S.; Metaxas, A.; Nakamura, K.; Resing, J. E.; Roe, K.; Stern, R.; Tunnicliffe, V.

    2004-12-01

    Dives with the remotely operated vehicle ROPOS in March/April 2004 documented a volcanic eruption at NW Rota-1, a submarine volcano of basaltic composition located at 14\\deg 36.0'N, 144\\deg 46.5'E lying 65 km northwest of Rota Island in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The site was chosen as a dive target because of the of the high concentrations of H2S and alunite in the hydrothermal plume overlying its summit in February 2003. The summit of the volcano is composed of curvilinear volcanic ridge oriented NW-SE bounded by NE-SW trending normal faults. Lavas collected on the upper part of the edifice are primitive to moderately fractionated basalts (Mg# = 51-66). The eruptive activity is occurring within a small crater (Brimstone Pit) located on the upper south flank of the volcano at 550 m, about 30 m below the summit. The crater is approximately 15 m wide and at least 20 meters deep. The ROPOS's cameras observed billowing clouds of sulfur-rich fluid rising out of the crater, punctuated by frequent bursts of several minutes duration that entrained glassy volcanic ejecta up to at least 2 cm in diameter. ROPOS recorded a temperature of 38\\degC within the plume. The volcanic activity had substantial temporal variability on the scale of minutes. ROPOS was sometimes completely enveloped by the plume while on the rim of the crater, and its surfaces were coated with large sulfur droplets. Black glassy fragments were entrained in the plume up to least 50 m above the crater and deposits of this material were on ledges and tops of outcrops up to several hundred meters from Brimstone Pit. The pit crater fluids have an extremely high content of particulate sulfur and extremely acidic, with pH around 2.0. This strongly implicates magmatic degassing of SO2 and disproportionation into elemental S and sulfuric acid. Diffuse venting of clear fluids was also present on the summit of the volcano, with temperatures exceeding 100\\degC in volcaniclastic sands

  18. Groundwater flow in a relatively old oceanic volcanic island: the Betancuria area, Fuerteventura Island, Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Christian; Custodio, Emilio

    2014-10-15

    The island of Fuerteventura is the oldest of the Canary Islands' volcanic archipelago. It is constituted by volcanic submarine and subaerial activity and intrusive Miocene events, with some residual later volcanism and Quaternary volcanic deposits that have favored groundwater recharge. The climate is arid, with an average rainfall that barely attains 60 mm/year in the coast and up to 200 mm/year in the highlands. The aquifer recharge is small but significant; it is brackish due to large airborne atmospheric salinity, between 7 and 15 gm(-2)year(-1) of chloride deposition, and high evapo-concentration in the soil. The average recharge is estimated to be less than about 5 mm/year at low altitude and up to 10 mm/year in the highlands, and up to 20 mm/year associated to recent lava fields. Hydrochemical and water isotopic studies, supported by water table data and well and borehole descriptions, contribute a preliminary conceptual model of groundwater flow and water origin in the Betancuria area, the central area of the island. In general, water from springs and shallow wells tends to be naturally brackish and of recent origin. Deep saline groundwater is found and is explained as remnants of very old marine water trapped in isolated features in the very low permeability intrusive rocks. Preliminary radiocarbon dating indicates that this deep groundwater has an apparent age of less than 5000 years BP but it is the result of mixing recent water recharge with very old deep groundwater. Most of the groundwater flow occurs through the old raised volcanic shield of submarine and subaerial formations and later Miocene subaerial basalts. Groundwater transit time through the unsaturated zone is of a few decades, which allows the consideration of long-term quasi-steady state recharge. Transit times are up to a few centuries through the saturated old volcanics and up to several millennia in the intrusive formations, where isolated pockets of very old water may exist. PMID

  19. 40Ar/39Ar laser fusion and K-Ar ages from Lathrop Wells, Nevada, and Cima, California. The age of the latest volcanic activity in the Yucca Mountain area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, Brent D.; Champion, Duane E.

    1991-01-01

    K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, and from the Cima volcanic field, California, indicate that the recently reported 20-ka age estimate for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center is incorrect. Instead an age of 119??11 to 141??10 ka is indicated for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. This age corrected is concordant with the ages determined by two independent isotopic geochronometric techniques and with the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in the Yucca Mountain region. In addition, paleomagnetic data and radiometric age data indicate only two volcanic events at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center that are probably closely linked in time, not as many as five as recently reported.

  20. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar laser fusion and K-Ar ages from Lathrop Wells, Nevada, and Cima, California: The age of the latest volcanic activity in the Yucca Mountain area

    SciTech Connect

    Turrin, B.D. |; Champion, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    K-Ar and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, and from the Cima volcanic field, California, indicate that the recently reported 20-ka age estimate for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center is incorrect. Instead, an age of 119 {plus_minus} 11 to 141 {plus_minus} 10 ka is indicated for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. This age corrected is concordant with the ages determined by two independent isotopic geochronometric techniques and with the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in the Yucca Mountain region. In addition, paleomagnetic data and radiometric age data indicate only two volcanic events at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center that are probably closely linked in time, not as many as five as recently reported. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Significance of an Active Volcanic Front in the Far Western Aleutian Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Hoernle, K.

    2015-12-01

    Discovery of a volcanic front west of Buldir Volcano, the western-most emergent Aleutian volcano, demonstrates that the surface expression of Aleutian volcanism falls below sea level just west of 175.9° E longitude, but is otherwise continuous from mainland Alaska to Kamchatka. The newly discovered sites of western Aleutian seafloor volcanism are the Ingenstrem Depression, a 60 km-long structural depression just west of Buldir, and an unnamed area 300 km further west, referred to as the Western Cones. These locations fall along a volcanic front that stretches from Buldir to Piip Seamount near the Komandorsky Islands. Western Aleutian seafloor volcanic rocks include large quantities of high-silica andesite and dacite, which define a highly calc-alkaline igneous series and carry trace element signatures that are unmistakably subduction-related. This indicates that subducting oceanic lithosphere is present beneath the westernmost Aleutian arc. The rarity of earthquakes below depths of 200 km indicates that the subducting plate is unusually hot. Some seafloor volcanoes are 6-8 km wide at the base, and so are as large as many emergent Aleutian volcanoes. The seafloor volcanoes are submerged in water depths >3000 m because they sit on oceanic lithosphere of the Bering Sea. The volcanic front is thus displaced to the north of the ridge of arc crust that underlies the western Aleutian Islands. This displacement, which developed since approximately 6 Ma when volcanism was last active on the islands, must be a consequence of oblique convergence in a system where the subducting plate and large blocks of arc crust are both moving primarily in an arc-parallel sense. The result is a hot-slab system where low subduction rates probably limit advection of hot mantle to the subarc, and produce a relatively cool and perhaps stagnant mantle wedge. The oceanic setting and highly oblique subduction geometry also severely limit rates of sediment subduction, so the volcanic rocks, which

  2. Relationship between Jovian Hectometric Attenuation Lanes And Io Volcanic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Within the Galileo plasma wave instrument data a narrow (in frequency) attenuation band is seen in the hectometric (HOM) emission that varies in frequency with system III longitude. This attenuation lane is believed to be the result of near-grazing incidence or coherent scattering of radio emission near the outer edge of the Io torus, i.e., when the ray path is nearly tangent to an L shell containing the Io flux tube. Such a process should, therefore, be enhanced when the Io volcanic activity is increased and the Io flux tube has enhanced density. We have performed a systematic study of the existing Galileo radio emission data in an effort to determine the phenomenology and frequency of occurrence of the attenuation lanes and the association, if any, with published volcanic activity of Io. Our results indicate that the attenuation lanes are present almost all of the time but are enhanced on occasion. The best examples of attenuation lanes occur when Galileo is within approximately 65 R(sub J) of Jupiter and thus are probably more apparent because of the increased signal-to-noise ratio of the radio receivers. The lack of continuous monitoring of Io activity and the lack of known activity on the anti-Earthward side of Io are problematic and make detailed correlation with radio emission very difficult at this time. Nevertheless, if the data are displayed for periods when the spacecraft is within 65 R(sub J) (i.e., for each perijove pass), then the highest-contrast lanes occur on most passes when the Io volcanic activity is also high for that pass. These results support our current understanding of attenuation lane formation and suggest that future efforts can be made to better understand the interaction of HOM emission with the Io flux tube.

  3. The search for active release of volcanic gases on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Alain; Villanueva, Geronimo; Mumma, Michael; Tokunaga, Alan

    2015-11-01

    The study of planetary atmospheres by means of spectroscopy is important for understanding their origin and evolution. The presence of short-lived trace gases in the martian atmosphere would imply recent production, for example, by ongoing geologic activity. On Earth, sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfur monoxide (SO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are the main sulfur-bearing gases released during volcanic outgassing. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS), also released from some volcanoes on Earth (e.g., Erebus and Nyiragongo), could be formed by reactions involving SO2 or H2S inside magma chambers. We carried out the first ground-based, semi-simultaneous, multi-band and multi-species search for such gases above the Tharsis and Syrtis volcanic regions on Mars. The submillimeter search extended between 23 November 2011 and 13 May 2012 which corresponded to Mars’ mid Northern Spring and early Northern Summer seasons (Ls = 34-110°). The strong submillimeter rotational transitions of SO2, SO and H2S were targeted using the high-resolution heterodyne receiver (aka Barney) on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We reached sensitivities sufficient to detect a volcanic release on Mars that is 4% of the SO2 released continuously from Kilauea volcano in Hawaii, or 5% that of the Masaya volcano in Nicaragua. The infrared search covered OCS in its combination band (ν2+ν3) at 3.42 μm at two successive Mars years, during Mars’ late Northern Spring and mid Northern Summer seasons, spanning Ls= 43º and Ls= 147º. The targeted volcanic districts were observed during the two intervals, 14 Dec. 2011 to 6 Jan. 2012 in the first year, and 30 May 2014 to 16 June 2014 in the second year, using the high resolution infrared spectrometer (CSHELL) on NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility (NASA/IRTF). We will present our results and discuss their implications for current volcanic outgassing activity on the red planet. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program under NASA

  4. Bromo volcano area as human-environment system: interaction of volcanic eruption, local knowledge, risk perception and adaptation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachri, Syamsul; Stötter, Johann; Sartohadi, Junun

    2013-04-01

    People in the Bromo area (located within Tengger Caldera) have learn to live with the threat of volcanic hazard since this volcano is categorized as an active volcano in Indonesia. During 2010, the eruption intensity increased yielding heavy ash fall and glowing rock fragments. A significant risk is also presented by mass movement which reaches areas up to 25 km from the crater. As a result of the 2010 eruption, 12 houses were destroyed, 25 houses collapsed and there were severe also effects on agriculture and the livestock sector. This paper focuses on understanding the interaction of Bromo volcanic eruption processes and their social responses. The specific aims are to 1) identify the 2010 eruption of Bromo 2) examine the human-volcano relationship within Bromo area in general, and 3) investigate the local knowledge related to hazard, risk perception and their adaptation strategies in specific. In-depth interviews with 33 informants from four districts nearest to the crater included local people and authorities were carried out. The survey focused on farmers, key persons (dukun), students and teachers in order to understand how people respond to Bromo eruption. The results show that the eruption in 2010 was unusual as it took continued for nine months, the longest period in Bromo history. The type of eruption was phreatomagmatic producing material dominated by ash to fine sand. This kind of sediment typically belongs to Tengger mountain eruptions which had produced vast explosions in the past. Furthermore, two years after the eruption, the interviewed people explained that local knowledge and their experiences with volcanic activity do not influence their risk perception. Dealing with this eruption, people in the Bromo area applied 'lumbung desa' (traditional saving systems) and mutual aid activity for surviving the volcanic eruption. Keywords: Human-environment system, local knowledge, risk perception, adaptation strategies, Bromo Volcano Indonesia

  5. High-resolution 900 year volcanic and climatic record from the Vostok area, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, E. Y.; Khodzher, T. V.; Golobokova, L. P.; Onischuk, N. A.; Lipenkov, V. Y.; Ekaykin, A. A.; Shibaev, Y. A.; Osipova, O. P.

    2014-05-01

    Ion chromatography measurements of 1730 snow and firn samples obtained from three short cores and one pit in the Vostok station area, East Antarctica, allowed for the production of the combined volcanic record of the last 900 years (AD 1093-2010). The resolution of the record is 2-3 samples per accumulation year. In total, 24 volcanic events have been identified, including seven well-known low-latitude eruptions (Pinatubo 1991, Agung 1963, Krakatoa 1883, Tambora 1815, Huanaputina 1600, Kuwae 1452, El Chichon 1259) found in most of the polar ice cores. In comparison with three other East Antarctic volcanic records (South Pole, Plateau Remote and Dome C), the Vostok record contains more events within the last 900 years. The differences between the records may be explained by local glaciological conditions, volcanic detection methodology, and, probably, differences in atmospheric circulation patterns. The strongest volcanic signal (both in sulfate concentration and flux) was attributed to the AD 1452 Kuwae eruption, similar to the Plateau Remote and Talos Dome records. The average snow accumulation rate calculated between volcanic stratigraphic horizons for the period AD 1260-2010 is 20.9 mm H2O. Positive (+13%) anomalies of snow accumulation were found for AD 1661-1815 and AD 1992-2010, and negative (-12%) for AD 1260-1601. We hypothesized that the changes in snow accumulation are associated with regional peculiarities in atmospheric transport.

  6. Distribution of recent volcanism and the morphology of seamounts and ridges in the GLIMPSE study area: Implications for the lithospheric cracking hypothesis for the origin of intraplate, non-hot spot volcanic chains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forsyth, D.W.; Harmon, N.; Scheirer, D.S.; Duncan, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Lithospheric cracking by remotely applied stresses or thermoelastic stresses has been suggested to be the mechanism responsible for the formation of intraplate volcanic ridges in the Pacific that clearly do not form above fixed hot spots. As part of the Gravity Lineations Intraplate Melting Petrology and Seismic Expedition (GLIMPSE) project designed to investigate the origin of these features, we have mapped two volcanic chains that are actively forming to the west of the East Pacific Rise using multibeam echo sounding and side-scan sonar. Side-scan sonar reveals the distribution of rough seafloor corresponding to recent, unsedimented lava flows. In the Hotu Matua volcanic complex, recent flows and volcanic edifices are distributed over a region 450 km long and up to 65 km wide, with an apparent, irregular age progression from older flows in the west to younger in the east. The 550-km-long Southern Cross Seamount/Sojourn Ridge/Brown Ridge chain appears to have been recently active only at its eastern end near the East Pacific Rise. A third region of recent flows is found 120 km north of Southern Cross Seamount in seafloor approximately 9 Myr old. No indication of lithospheric extension in the form of faulting or graben formation paralleling the trend of the volcanic chains is found in the vicinity of recent flows or anywhere else in the study area. Thermoelastic cracking could be a factor in the formation of a few small, very narrow volcanic ridges, but most of the volcanic activity is broadly distributed in wide swaths with no indication of formation along narrow cracks. The Sojourn and Brown chains appear to begin as distributed zones of small seamounts that later develop into segmented ridges, perhaps under the influence of membrane stresses from self-loading. We suggest that the linear volcanic chains are created by moving melting anomalies in the asthenosphere and that lithospheric cracking plays at most a secondary role. Copyright 2006 by the American

  7. Multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity and epithermal mineralization in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and their relations to magmatic activity, volcanism and regional extension

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Jackson, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic rocks of middle Miocene age and underlying pre-Mesozoic sedimentary rocks host widely distributed zones of hydrothermal alteration and epithermal precious metal, fluorite and mercury deposits within and peripheral to major volcanic and intrusive centers of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF) in southern Nevada, near the southwestern margin of the Great Basin of the western United States. Radiometric ages indicate that episodes of hydrothermal activity mainly coincided with and closely followed major magmatic pulses during the development of the field and together spanned more than 4.5 m.y. Rocks of the SWNVF consist largely of rhyolitic ash-flow sheets and intercalated silicic lava domes, flows and near-vent pyroclastic deposits erupted between 15.2 and 10 Ma from vent areas in the vicinity of the Timber Mountain calderas, and between about 9.5 and 7 Ma from the outlying Black Mountain and Stonewall Mountain centers. Three magmatic stages can be recognized: the main magmatic stage, Mountain magmatic stage (11.7 to 10.0 Ma), and the late magmatic stage (9.4 to 7.5 Ma).

  8. Thyroid cancer incidence in relation to volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Arnbjoernsson, E.A.; Arnbjoernsson, A.O.; Olafsson, A.

    1986-01-01

    Environmental or genetic factors are sought to explain the high incidence of thyroid cancer in Iceland. At present, it is impossible to cite any environmental factor, particularly one related to the volcanic activity in the country, which could explain the high incidence of thyroid cancer in Iceland. However, the thyroid gland in Icelanders is very small due to the high intake of iodine from seafood. It is, therefore, easier for physicians to find thyroid tumors. Furthermore, genetic factors are very likely to be of great importance in the small, isolated island of Iceland.

  9. Structural control on geothermal circulation in the Tocomar geothermal volcanic area (Puna plateau, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Guido

    2016-04-01

    The reconstruction of the stratigraphical-structural framework and the hydrogeology of geothermal areas is fundamental for understanding the relationships between cap rocks, reservoir and circulation of geothermal fluids and for planning the exploitation of the field. The Tocomar geothermal volcanic area (Puna plateau, Central Andes, NW Argentina) has a high geothermal potential. It is crossed by the active NW-SE trans-Andean tectonic lineament known as the Calama-Olacapato-Toro (COT) fault system, which favours a high secondary permeability testified by the presence of numerous thermal springs. This study presents new stratigraphic, structural, volcanological, geochemical and hydrogeological data on the geothermal field. Our data suggest that the main geothermal reservoir is located within or below the Pre-Palaeozoic-Ordovician basement units, characterised by unevenly distributed secondary permeability. The reservoir is recharged by infiltration in the ridges above 4500 m a.s.l., where basement rocks are in outcrop. Below 4500 m a.s.l., the reservoir is covered by the low permeable Miocene-Quaternary units that allow a poor circulation of shallow groundwater. Geothermal fluids upwell in areas with more intense fracturing, especially where main regional structures, particularly NW-SE COT-parallel lineaments, intersect with secondary structures, such as at the Tocomar field.

  10. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  11. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  12. Nitrate contamination of groundwater in two areas of the Cameroon Volcanic Line (Banana Plain and Mount Cameroon area)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ako, Andrew Ako; Eyong, Gloria Eneke Takem; Shimada, Jun; Koike, Katsuaki; Hosono, Takahiro; Ichiyanagi, Kimpei; Richard, Akoachere; Tandia, Beatrice Ketchemen; Nkeng, George Elambo; Roger, Ntankouo Njila

    2014-06-01

    Water containing high concentrations of nitrate is unfit for human consumption and, if discharging to freshwater or marine habitats, can contribute to algal blooms and eutrophication. The level of nitrate contamination in groundwater of two densely populated, agro-industrial areas of the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) (Banana Plain and Mount Cameroon area) was evaluated. A total of 100 samples from boreholes, open wells and springs (67 from the Banana Plain; 33 from springs only, in the Mount Cameroon area) were collected in April 2009 and January 2010 and analyzed for chemical constituents, including nitrates. The average groundwater nitrate concentrations for the studied areas are: 17.28 mg/l for the Banana Plain and 2.90 mg/l for the Mount Cameroon area. Overall, groundwaters are relatively free from excessive nitrate contamination, with nitrate concentrations in only 6 % of groundwater resources in the Banana Plain exceeding the maximum admissible concentration for drinking water (50 mg/l). Sources of NO3 - in groundwater of this region may be mainly anthropogenic (N-fertilizers, sewerage, animal waste, organic manure, pit latrines, etc.). Multivariate statistical analyses of the hydrochemical data revealed that three factors were responsible for the groundwater chemistry (especially, degree of nitrate contamination): (1) a geogenic factor; (2) nitrate contamination factor; (3) ionic enrichment factor. The impact of anthropogenic activities, especially groundwater nitrate contamination, is more accentuated in the Banana Plain than in the Mount Cameroon area. This study also demonstrates the usefulness of multivariate statistical analysis in groundwater study as a supplementary tool for interpretation of complex hydrochemical data sets.

  13. Galileo SSI Observations of Volcanic Activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milazzo, M. P.; Keszthely, L. P.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A. G.; Turtle, E. P.; Geissler, P.; Klaasen, K. P.; McEwen, A. S.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: We report on the analysis of the Galileo SSI's observations of the volcanic activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io as discussed by Milazzo et al. Galileo's Solid State Imager (SSI) observed Tvashtar Catena (63 deg N, 120 deg W) four times between November 1999 and October 2001, providing a unique look at the distinctive high latitude volcanism on Io. The November 1999 observation spatially resolved, for the first time, an active extraterrestrial fissure eruption. The brightness temperature of the lavas at the November 1999 fissure eruption was 1300 K. The second observation (orbit I27, February 2000) showed a large (approx. 500 sq km) region with many, small spots of hot, active lava. The third observation was taken in conjunction with a Cassini observation in December 2000 and showed a Pele-like plume deposition ring, while the Cassini images revealed a 400 km high Pele-type plume above the Catena. The final Galileo SSI observation of Tvashtar was acquired in October 2001, and all obvious (to SSI) activity had ceased, although data from Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) indicated that there was still significant thermal emission from the Tvashtar region. We have concentrated on analyzing the style of eruption during orbit I27 (February 2000). Comparison with a lava flow cooling model indicates that the behavior of the Tvashtar eruption during I27 does not match that of "simple" advancing lava flows. Instead, it may be an active lava lake or a complex set of lava flows with episodic, overlapping (in time and space) eruptions.

  14. Nondestructive neutron activation analysis of volcanic samples: Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Zoller, W.H.; Finnegan, D.L.; Crowe, B.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of volcanic emissions have been collected between and during eruptions of both Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes during the last three years. Airborne particles have been collected on Teflon filters and acidic gases on base-impregnated cellulose filters. Chemically neutral gas-phase species are collected on charcoal-coated cellulose filters. The primary analytical technique used is nondestructive neutron activation analysis, which has been used to determine the quantities of up to 35 elements on the different filters. The use of neutron activation analysis makes it possible to analyze for a wide range of elements in the different matrices used for the collection and to learn about the distribution between particles and gas phases for each of the elements.

  15. Possible volcanic structures near Olympia Undae, North circumpolar area of Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Bayton, M.; Tréguier, E.; Herraiz, M.; Martin, P.; Schmidt, F.; Witasse, O.

    2011-10-01

    The work presented here is a study of structures encountered in the area bordering the Olympia Undae dune sea (Fig. 1). Various structures have been observed in this area, such as cones and domes [6] (whose origin may be volcanic), impact craters, etc. These structures are particularly difficult to characterize because of their relatively small size and the occasional occurrence of a sediment cover. This study is mainly based on data from Mars Express (HRSC imagery) and Mars Global Surveyor (MOLA altimetry data).

  16. Temporal relations of volcanism and hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Goff, F. )

    1989-11-01

    Two hydrothermal alteration events (8.07 Ma, one sample; 6.51-5.60 Ma, six samples) related to the waning stages of late Miocene volcanism ({ge} 13 to {le} 5.8 Ma) are recognized at the Cochiti district (southeast Jemez Mountains). Most of the K/Ar dates (0.83 {plus minus} 0.11-0.66 {plus minus} 0.21 Ma, four samples) in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A at Sulfur Springs, Valles caldera, indicate post-Valles caldera hydrothermal alteration. A sample from acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole was too young to be dated by the K/Ar method and is possibly associated with current hot-spring activity and the youngest pulses of volcanism. Oxygen-isotope data from illite/smectite clays in the Cochiti district are zonally distributed and range from {minus}2.15{per thousand} to {plus}7.97{per thousand} (SMOW), depending upon temperature, extent of rock-fluid interaction, and composition. The samples from VC-2A get lighter with depth ({minus}0.20{per thousand} to {plus}1.62{per thousand}). The K/Ar and oxygen-isotope data provide strong evidence that the epithermal quartz-vein-hosted gold-silver mineralization at Cochiti and the sub-ore grade molybdenite at VC-2A were deposited in the late Miocene (5.99-5.60 Ma) and mid-Quaternary ({approximately}0.66 Ma), respectively, by hydrothermal fluids composed primarily of meteoric water.

  17. Bimodal Silurian and Lower Devonian volcanic rock assemblages in the Machias-Eastport area, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gates, Olcott; Moench, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Exposed in the Machias-Eastport area of southeastern Maine is the thickest (at least 8,000 m), best exposed, best dated, and most nearly complete succession of Silurian and Lower Devonian volcanic strata in the coastal volcanic belt, remnants of which crop out along the coasts of southern New Brunswick, Canada, and southeastern New England in the United States. The volcanics were erupted through the 600-700-million-year-old Avalonian sialic basement. To test the possibility that this volcanic belt was a magmatic arc above a subduction zone prior to presumed Acadian continental collision, samples representing the entire section in the Machias-Eastport area of Maine were chemically analyzed. Three strongly bimodal assemblages of volcanic rocks and associated intrusives are recognized, herein called the Silurian, older Devonian, and younger Devonian assemblages. The Silurian assemblage contains typically nonporphyritic high-alumina tholeiitic basalts, basaltic andesites, and diabase of continental characterand calc-alkalic rhyolites, silicic dacites, and one known dike of andesite. These rocks are associated with fossiliferous, predominantly marine strata of the Quoddy, Dennys, and Edmunds Formations, and the Leighton Formation of the Pembroke Group (the stratigraphic rank of both is revised herein for the Machias-Eastport area), all of Silurian age. The shallow marine Hersey Formation (stratigraphic rank also revised herein) of the Pembroke Group, of latest Silurian age (and possibly earliest Devonian, as suggested by an ostracode fauna), contains no known volcanics; and it evidently was deposited during a volcanic hiatus that immediately preceded emergence of the coastal volcanic belt and the eruption of the older Devonian assemblage. The older Devonian assemblage, in the lagoonal to subaerial Lower Devonian Eastport Formation, contains tholeiitic basalts and basaltic andesites, typically with abundant plagioclase phenocrysts and typically richer in iron and

  18. Extensive and Diverse Submarine Volcanism and Hydrothermal Activity in the NE Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Merle, S. G.; Lupton, J. E.; Resing, J.; Baker, E. T.; Lilley, M. D.; Arculus, R. J.; Crowhurst, P. V.

    2009-12-01

    The northeast Lau basin, the NE “corner” of the Tonga subduction zone, has an unusual concentration of young submarine volcanism and hydrothermal activity. The area is bounded on the west by overlapping spreading centers opening at rates up to 120 mm/yr, on the north by the E-W trending Tonga trench and on the east by the Tofua arc front. From the south, the Fonualei rift spreading center (FRSC) overlaps with the southern rift of The Mangatolo triple junction spreading center (MTJSC). The northern arm of the MTJSC overlaps with the northeast Lau spreading center (NELSC). Surveys of the area with an EM300 sonar system in November 2008 show high backscatter over the 10-20 km wide neovolcanic zones of the FRSC, MTJSC and NELSC. High backscatter is also associated with: (1) a 10-km diameter, hydrothermally active, volcanic caldera/cone (Volcano “O”) lying between the NELSC and the northern Tofua arc front; (2) a rift zone extending north from volcano “O” and intersecting the NELSC near the Tonga trench; and (3) a series of volcanoes constructed along SW-NE trending crustal tears in the northernmost backarc near the east-west portion of the Tonga Trench. Two eruptions were detected in November 2008 during hydrothermal plume surveys of the area. Subsequent dives with the remotely operated vehicle Jason 2 in May 2009 revealed that the southern NELSC eruption was a short-lived, primarily effusive eruption. The second eruption was detected on the summit of the largest SW-NE trending volcano (West Mata) and was ongoing when Jason 2 arrived on site more than 6 months later. It was producing both pillow lavas and abundant volcaniclastic debris streams that have a characteristic appearance on the sonar backscatter map. There is also an unusual series of lava flows emanating from ridges and scarps between Volcano “O” and West Mata. These flows contain drained-out lava ponds up to 2 km in diameter. The apparent high level of volcanic activity in the NE Lau basin

  19. The Cenozoic volcanism in the Kivu rift: Assessment of the tectonic setting, geochemistry, and geochronology of the volcanic activity in the South-Kivu and Virunga regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouclet, A.; Bellon, H.; Bram, K.

    2016-09-01

    The Kivu rift is part of the western branch of the East African Rift system. From Lake Tanganyika to Lake Albert, the Kivu rift is set in a succession of Precambrian zones of weakness trending NW-SE, NNE-SSW and NE-SW. At the NW to NNE turn of the rift direction in the Lake Kivu area, the inherited faults are crosscut by newly born N-S fractures which developed during the late Cenozoic rifting and controlled the volcanic activity. From Lake Kivu to Lake Edward, the N-S faults show a right-lateral en echelon pattern. Development of tension gashes in the Virunga area indicates a clockwise rotation of the constraint linked to dextral oblique motion of crustal blocks. The extensional direction was W-E in the Mio-Pliocene and ENE-WSW in the Pleistocene to present time. The volcanic rocks are assigned to three groups: (1) tholeiites and sodic alkali basalts in the South-Kivu, (2) sodic basalts and nephelinites in the northern Lake Kivu and western Virunga, and (3) potassic basanites and potassic nephelinites in the Virunga area. South-Kivu magmas were generated by melting of spinel + garnet lherzolite from two sources: an enriched lithospheric source and a less enriched mixed lithospheric and asthenospheric source. The latter source was implied in the genesis of the tholeiitic lavas at the beginning of the South-Kivu tectono-volcanic activity, in relationships with asthenosphere upwelling. The ensuing outpouring of alkaline basaltic lavas from the lithospheric source attests for the abortion of the asthenospheric contribution and a change of the rifting process. The sodic nephelinites of the northern Lake Kivu originated from low partial melting of garnet peridotite of the sub-continental mantle due to pressure release during swell initiation. The Virunga potassic magmas resulted from the melting of garnet peridotite with an increasing degree of melting from nephelinite to basanite. They originated from a lithospheric source enriched in both K and Rb, suggesting the

  20. Probabilistic constraints from existing and future radar imaging on volcanic activity on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-11-01

    We explore the quantitative limits that may be placed on Venus' present-day volcanic activity by radar imaging of surface landforms. The apparent nondetection of new lava flows in the areas observed twice by Magellan suggests that there is a ~60% chance that the eruption rate is ~1 km3/yr or less, using the eruption history and area/volume flow geometry of terrestrial volcanoes (Etna, Mauna Loa and Merapi) as a guide. However, if the detection probability of an individual flow is low (e.g. ~10%) due to poor resolution or quality and unmodeled viewing geometry effects, the constraint (<10 km3/yr) is not useful. Imaging at Magellan resolution or better of only ~10% of the surface area of Venus on a new mission (30 years after Magellan) would yield better than 99% chance of detecting a new lava flow, even if the volcanic activity is at the low end of predictions (~0.01 km3/yr) and is expressed through a single volcano with a stochastic eruption history. Closer re-examination of Magellan data may be worthwhile, both to search for new features, and to establish formal (location-dependent) limits on activity against which data from future missions can be tested. While Magellan-future and future-future comparisons should offer much lower detection thresholds for erupted volumes, a probabilistic approach will be required to properly understand the implications.

  1. Chronology of late Pleistocene and Holocene volcanics, Long Valley and Mono Basin geothermal areas, eastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    mono magma chamber suggests that rhyolite magma may have been emplaced in the shallow crust as recently as 32,000 to 40,000 yrs ago. Calculations by Lachenbruch et al. (1976, Jour. Geophys. Research, v. 81, p. 769-784) that a thermal disturbance at this age would have propagated upward by solid conduction only 4 km and offer an explanation for the lack of a heat-flow anomaly and surface indications of hydrothermal activity over the Mono magma chamber and its associated ring-fracture system. This report also contains new information on the age and chemistry of volcanics on the Mono Lake island, the Inyo domes, and tephras within the Long Valley Caldera. A newly discovered rhyolite tuff ring of late Quaternary age in the Toowa volcanic field of the southern Sierra Nevada is briefly described for it represents a new area that should be examined for potential as a geothermal area.

  2. Estimating different eruptive style volcanic areas of Mars from NASA Martian Meteorites Compendium data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Nicola; Verrino, Miriam

    2016-04-01

    The geomorphological characteristics of the Martian surface suggest that both effusive and explosive eruptive behaviour occurred. We investigated whether data about magma viscosity could be extrapolated from Mars SNCs (Shergotty, Nakhla, and Chassigny classes) meteorites, by using available geochemical and petrographic data from the NASA Martian Meteorites Compendium. Viscosity was used to characterize how eruptive style could change in different volcanic regions of planet Mars. Data about composition and crystallinity of 41 SNCs meteorites were used and classified, avoiding meteorites with poor/incomplete database. We assumed Mars as a one-plate planet, fO2 = QFM, and H2O wt% = 0 for each sample. Collected data from the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS TES) identified the source regions for almost all the studied SNCs meteorites. As input for thermodynamic simulations we first needed to find the depth and pressure of the magmatic source for each meteorite sample through available Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). Data about average surface temperatures was used to establish whether a magmatic source is shallow or deep. Successively, we found the magma source depth (and pressure) by using the relationship with the heights of the volcanic edifice. The subsolidus equilibration temperatures found through petrologic softwares were used to calculate viscosity. Results indicate a crystallization temperature in a range from 1,120°C to 843°C, follow by a variation in viscosity from 101,43 to 105,97 Pa s. Viscosity seems to be higher in Tharsis, Elysium, Amazonis, and Syrtis Major regions than the remnant areas. According to past experimental studies about magma viscosity, we classified the eruptive style into effusive (101-103,5 Pa s), intermediate (103,5-104,5 Pa s), and explosive (104,5-106 Pa s). The Hellas Basin, Argyre Basin, Ganges Chasma, Eos Chasma, and Nili Fossae regions show an eruptive behaviour between effusive and intermediate

  3. High resolution 900 yr volcanic and climatic record from the Vostok area, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, E. Yu.; Khodzher, T. V.; Golobokova, L. P.; Onischuk, N. A.; Lipenkov, V. Ya.; Ekaykin, A. A.; Osipova, O. P.

    2013-05-01

    Detailed volcanic record of the last 900 yr (1093-2010 AD) has been received using high resolution (2-3 samples per accumulation year) sulfate measurements in four snow/firn cores from the Vostok station area, East Antarctica. Totally, 33 volcanic events have been identified in the record, including well-known low latitude eruption signals found in many polar ice cores (e.g., Pinatubo 1991, Agung 1963, Krakatoa 1883, Tambora 1815, Huanaputina 1600, Kuwae 1452), however in comparison with other Antarctic sites the record has more events covering the last 900 yr. The strongest volcanic signals occurred during mid-13th, mid-15th and 18th centuries. The largest volcanic signal of Vostok (both in sulfate concentration and flux) is the 1452 AD Kuwae eruption. Average snow accumulation rate calculated for the period 1093-2010 AD is 21.3 ± 2.3 mm H2O. Accumulation record demonstrates a slight positive trend, however sharply increased accumulation rate during the periods from 1600 to 1815 AD (by 11% from long-term mean) and from 1963 to 2010 AD (by 15%) are typical features of the site. Na+ record shows strong decadal-scale variability probably connected with coupled changes in atmospheric transport patterns over Antarctica (meridional circulation change) and local glaciology. The obtained high resolution climatic records suggest a high sensitivity of the Vostok location to environmental changes in Southern Hemisphere.

  4. Lake-floor sediment texture and composition of a hydrothermally-active, volcanic lake, Lake Rotomahana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittari, A.; Muir, S. L.; Hendy, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Young volcanic lakes undergo a transition from rapid, post-eruptive accumulation of volcaniclastic sediment to slower pelagic settling under stable lake conditions, and may also be influenced by sublacustrine hydrothermal systems. Lake Rotomahana is a young (129 year-old), hydrothermally-active, volcanic lake formed after the 1886 Tarawera eruption, and provides a unique insight into the early evolution of volcanic lake systems. Lake-bottom sediment cores, 20-46 cm in length, were taken along a transect across the lake and characterised with respect to stratigraphy, facies characteristics (i.e., grain size, componentry) and pore water silica concentrations. The sediments generally comprise two widespread facies: (i) a lower facies of light grey to grey, very fine lacustrine silt derived from the unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits that mantled the catchment area immediately after the eruption, which were rapidly reworked and redeposited into the lake basin; and (ii) an upper facies of dark, fine-sandy diatomaceous silt, that settled from the pelagic zone of the physically stable lake. Adjacent to sublacustrine hydrothermal vents, the upper dark facies is absent, and the upper part of the light grey to grey silt is replaced by a third localised facies comprised of hydrothermally altered pale yellow to yellowish brown, laminated silt with surface iron-rich encrustations. Microspheres, which are thought to be composed of amorphous silica, although some may be halloysite, have precipitated from pore water onto sediment grains, and are associated with a decrease in pore water silicon concentration. Lake Rotomahana is an example of a recently-stabilised volcanic lake, with respect to sedimentation, that shows signs of early sediment silicification in the presence of hydrothermal activity.

  5. Volcanostratigraphy, petrography and petrochemistry of Late Cretaceous volcanic rocks from the Görele area (Giresun, NE Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguz, Simge; Aydin, Faruk; Baser, Rasim

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we have reported for lithological, petrographical and geochemical features of late Cretaceous volcanic rocks from the Çanakçı and the Karabörk areas in the south-eastern part of Görele (Giresun, NE Turkey) in order to investigate their origin and magmatic evolution. Based on the previous ages and recent volcano-stratigraphic studies, the late Cretaceous time in the study area is characterized by an intensive volcanic activity that occurred in two different periods. The first period of the late Cretaceous volcanism (Cenomanian-Santonian; 100-85 My), conformably overlain by Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous massive carbonates (Berdiga Formation), is represented by bimodal units consisting of mainly mafic rock series (basaltic-andesitic lavas and hyaloclastites, dikes and sills) in the lower part (Çatak Formation), and felsic rock series (dacitic lavas and hyaloclastites, crystal- and pyrite-bearing tuffs) in the upper part (Kızılkaya Formation). The second period of the late Cretaceous volcanism (Santonian-Late Campanian; 85-75 Ma) is also represented by bimodal character and again begins with mafic rock suites (basaltic-basaltic andesitic lavas and hyaloclastites) in the lower part (Çağlayan Formation), and grades upward into felsic rock suites (biotite-bearing rhyolitic lavas, ignimbrites and hyaloclastites) through the upper part (Tirebolu Formation). These bimodal units are intercalated with volcanic conglomerates-sandstones, claystones, marl and red pelagic limestones throughout the volcanic sequence, and the felsic rock series have a special important due to hosting of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits in the region. All volcano-sedimentary units are covered by Tonya Formation (Late Campanian-Paleocene) containing calciturbidites, biomicrites and clayey limestones. The mafic rocks in the two volcanic periods generally include basalt, basaltic andesite and minor andesite, whereas felsic volcanics of the first period mainly consists of

  6. The Geysers-Clear Lake area, California: thermal waters, mineralization, volcanism, and geothermal potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Burns, M.G.; Goff, F.E.; Peters, E.K.; Thompson, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Manifestations of a major thermal anomaly in the Geysers-Clear Lake area of northern California include the late Pliocene to Holocene Clear Lake Volcanics, The Geysers geothermal field, abundant thermal springs, and epithermal mercury and gold mineralization. The epithermal mineralization and thermal springs typically occur along high-angle faults within the broad San Andreas transform fault system that forms the western boundary of the North American plate in this area. The young volcanic rocks overlie Mesozoic marine rocks of the Great Valley sequence which have been thrust above the coeval Franciscan Complex and penecontemporaneously dropped back down along low-angle detachment faults. Geothermal power production has peaked at The Geysers and pressure declines indicate significant depletion of the fluid resource. It is proposed that recently discovered, isotopically shifted steam in the northwest Geysers area indicates the presence not of deep connate water but rather of boiled-down, boron-rich Franciscan evolved meteoric water. This water is likely to be present in limited quantities and will not provide a significant hot water resource for geothermal power production at The Geysers field or from the main Clear Lake volcanic field. -from Authors

  7. Reflection seismic imaging in the volcanic area of the geothermal field Wayang Windu, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, Ulrich; Wiyono, Wiyono; Pramono, Bambang; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2014-05-01

    Reflection seismic exploration in volcanic areas is still a scientific challenge and requires major efforts to develop imaging workflows capable of an economic utilization, e.g., for geothermal exploration. The SESaR (Seismic Exploration and Safety Risk study for decentral geothermal plants in Indonesia) project therefore tackles still not well resolved issues concerning wave propagation or energy absorption in areas covered by pyroclastic sediments using both active P-wave and S-wave seismics. Site-specific exploration procedures were tested in different tectonic and lithological regimes to compare imaging conditions. Based on the results of a small-scale, active seismic pre-site survey in the area of the Wayang Windu geothermal field in November 2012, an additional medium-scale active seismic experiment using P-waves was carried out in August 2013. The latter experiment was designed to investigate local changes of seismic subsurface response, to expand the knowledge about capabilities of the vibroseis method for seismic surveying in regions covered by pyroclastic material, and to achieve higher depth penetration. Thus, for the first time in the Wayang Windu geothermal area, a powerful, hydraulically driven seismic mini-vibrator device of 27 kN peak force (LIAG's mini-vibrator MHV2.7) was used as seismic source instead of the weaker hammer blow applied in former field surveys. Aiming at acquiring parameter test and production data southeast of the Wayang Windu geothermal power plant, a 48-channel GEODE recording instrument of the Badan Geologi was used in a high-resolution configuration, with receiver group intervals of 5 m and source intervals of 10 m. Thereby, the LIAG field crew, Star Energy, GFZ Potsdam, and ITB Bandung acquired a nearly 600 m long profile. In general, we observe the successful applicability of the vibroseis method for such a difficult seismic acquisition environment. Taking into account the local conditions at Wayang Windu, the method is

  8. Explosive volcanic activity on Venus: The roles of volatile contribution, degassing, and external environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airey, M. W.; Mather, T. A.; Pyle, D. M.; Glaze, L. S.; Ghail, R. C.; Wilson, C. F.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the conditions that will promote explosive volcanic activity on Venus. Conduit processes were simulated using a steady-state, isothermal, homogeneous flow model in tandem with a degassing model. The response of exit pressure, exit velocity, and degree of volatile exsolution was explored over a range of volatile concentrations (H2O and CO2), magma temperatures, vent altitudes, and conduit geometries relevant to the Venusian environment. We find that the addition of CO2 to an H2O-driven eruption increases the final pressure, velocity, and volume fraction gas. Increasing vent elevation leads to a greater degree of magma fragmentation, due to the decrease in the final pressure at the vent, resulting in a greater likelihood of explosive activity. Increasing the magmatic temperature generates higher final pressures, greater velocities, and lower final volume fraction gas values with a correspondingly lower chance of explosive volcanism. Cross-sectionally smaller, and/or deeper, conduits were more conducive to explosive activity. Model runs show that for an explosive eruption to occur at Scathach Fluctus, at Venus' mean planetary radius (MPR), 4.5% H2O or 3% H2O with 3% CO2 (from a 25 m radius conduit) would be required to initiate fragmentation; at Ma'at Mons (~9 km above MPR) only ~2% H2O is required. A buoyant plume model was used to investigate plume behaviour. It was found that it was not possible to achieve a buoyant column from a 25 m radius conduit at Scathach Fluctus, but a buoyant column reaching up to ~20 km above the vent could be generated at Ma'at Mons with an H2O concentration of 4.7% (at 1300 K) or a mixed volatile concentration of 3% H2O with 3% CO2 (at 1200 K). We also estimate the flux of volcanic gases to the lower atmosphere of Venus, should explosive volcanism occur. Model results suggest explosive activity at Scathach Fluctus would result in an H2O flux of ~107 kg s-1. Were Scathach Fluctus emplaced in a single event, our model

  9. Relationship between normal faulting and volcanic activity in the Taranaki backarc basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giba, M.; Walsh, J. J.; Nicol, A.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanoes and normal faults are, by definition, both present within volcanic rifts. Despite this association the causal relationships between volcanism and normal faulting can be unclear and are poorly understood. One of the principal challenges for investigations of the links between faulting and volcanic activity, is the definition of the detailed temporal relationships between these two processes. The northern Taranaki Basin, which benefits from excellent seismic (2D and 3D) and drillhole coverage, provides the basis for a detailed study of volcanism and faulting over the last ca 15 Myr. Most of the basin is characterised by sedimentation rates which exceed fault displacement rates, a condition which permits displacement backstripping of these syn-sedimentary growth faults. The timing of a suite of mostly andesitic submarine volcanoes has been constrained by interdigitation of the volcanic cones with basinal sedimentary rocks. Eleven dated horizons within the ca 15 Myr and younger stratigraphy together with mapping provide a means of examining the temporal and spatial links between fault and volcanic activity within the basin. The northern Taranaki Basin has a multiphase deformation history, with extension during the Late Cretaceous to Mid Eocene (ca 80-45 Ma), followed by contraction in the Late Eocene to Early Miocene (ca 40-18 Ma) and then by Mid Miocene to recent back arc extension (ca 15-0 Ma). The youngest phase of extensional faulting initiated in the north and west of the basin and migrated to the southeast where present activity is focused. Volcanic activity also commenced in the north during the Mid Miocene and migrated towards the south and east. Volcanism and backarc extension are driven by subduction of the Pacific plate along the Hikurangi margin. The southward and eastward migration of both faulting and volcanic activity is attributed to the steepening and rotation of the subducting slab beneath the Taranaki Basin. Despite the common origin of

  10. A new model for the development of the active Afar volcanic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pik, Raphaël; Stab, Martin; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Leroy, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic passive margins, that represent more than the three quarters of continental margins worldwide, are privileged witnesses of the lithospheric extension processes thatform new oceanic basins. They are characterized by voluminous amounts of underplated, intruded and extruded magmas, under the form of massive lavas prisms (seaward-dipping reflectors, or SDR) during the course of thinning and stretching of the lithosphere, that eventually form the ocean-continent transition. The origin and mechanisms of formation of these objects are still largely debated today. We have focussed our attention in the last few years on the Afar volcanic province which represents an active analogue of such volcanic margins. We explored the structural and temporal relationships that exist between the development of the major thinning and stretching structures and the magmatic production in Central Afar. Conjugate precise fieldwork analysis along with lavas geochronology allowed us to revisit the timing and style of the rift formation, since the early syn-rift period of time in the W-Afar marginal area to present days. Extension is primarily accommodated over a wide area at the surface since the very initial periods of extension (~ 25 Ma) following the emplacement of Oligocene CFBs. We propose in our reconstruction of central Afar margin history that extension has been associated with important volumes of underplated mafic material that compensate crustal thinning. This has been facilitated by major crustal-scale detachments that help localize the thinning and underplating at depth. In line with this 'magmatic wide-rift' mode of extension, we demonstrate that episodic extension steps alternate with more protracted magmatic phases. The production of syn-rift massive flood basalts (~ 4 Ma) occurs after early thinning of both the crust and the lithosphere, which suggests that SDR formation, is controlled by previous tectonic event. We determined how the melting regime evolved in

  11. Geology, geochronology, and paleogeography of the southern Sonoma volcanic field and adjacent areas, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Clahan, K.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Allen, J.R.; Deino, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping in the northern San Francisco Bay region (California, USA) supported by radiometric dating and tephrochronologic correlations, provides insights into the framework geology, stratigraphy, tectonic evolution, and geologic history of this part of the San Andreas transform plate boundary. There are 25 new and existing radiometric dates that define three temporally distinct volcanic packages along the north margin of San Pablo Bay, i.e., the Burdell Mountain Volcanics (11.1 Ma), the Tolay Volcanics (ca. 10-8 Ma), and the Sonoma Volcanics (ca. 8-2.5 Ma). The Burdell Mountain and the Tolay Volcanics are allochthonous, having been displaced from the Quien Sabe Volcanics and the Berkeley Hills Volcanics, respectively. Two samples from a core of the Tolay Volcanics taken from the Murphy #1 well in the Petaluma oilfield yielded ages of 8.99 ?? 0.06 and 9.13 ?? 0.06 Ma, demonstrating that volcanic rocks exposed along Tolay Creek near Sears Point previously thought to be a separate unit, the Donnell Ranch volcanics, are part of the Tolay Volcanics. Other new dates reported herein show that volcanic rocks in the Meacham Hill area and extending southwest to the Burdell Mountain fault are also part of the Tolay Volcanics. In the Sonoma volcanic field, strongly bimodal volcanic sequences are intercalated with sediments. In the Mayacmas Mountains a belt of eruptive centers youngs to the north. The youngest of these volcanic centers at Sugarloaf Ridge, which lithologically, chemically, and temporally matches the Napa Valley eruptive center, was apparently displaced 30 km to the northwest by movement along the Carneros and West Napa faults. The older parts of the Sonoma Volcanics have been displaced at least 28 km along the RodgersCreek fault since ca. 7 Ma. The Petaluma Formation also youngs to the north along the Rodgers Creek-Hayward fault and the Bennett Valley fault. The Petaluma basin formed as part of the Contra Costa basin in the Late Miocene and was

  12. Modelling Gravimetric Fluctuations due to Hydrological Processes in Active Volcanic Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmings, B.; Gottsmann, J.; Whitaker, F.

    2014-12-01

    Both static and dynamic gravimetric surveys are widely used to monitor magmatic processes in active volcanic settings. However, attributing residual gravimetric signals solely to magma movement can result in misdiagnosis of a volcano's pre-eruptive state and incorrect assessment of hazard. The relative contribution of magmatic and aqueous fluids to integrated gravimetric and geodetic data has become an important topic for debate, particularly in restless caldera systems. Groundwater migration driven by volcanically-induced pressure changes, and groundwater mass fluctuations associated with seasonal and inter-annual variations in recharge may also contribute to measured gravity changes. Here we use numerical models to explore potential gravimetric signals associated with fundamental hydrological processes, focusing on variations in recharge and hydrogeological properties. TOUGH2 simulations demonstrate the significance of groundwater storage within a thick unsaturated zone (up to 100 m). Changes are dominantly in response to inter-annual recharge variations and can produce measurable absolute gravity variations of several 10s of μgal. Vadose zone storage and the rate of response to recharge changes depend on the hydrological properties. Porosity, relative and absolute permeability and capillary pressure conditions all affect the amplitude and frequency of modelled gravity time series. Spatial variations in hydrologic properties and importantly, hydrological recharge, can significantly affect the phase and amplitude of recorded gravity signals. Our models demonstrate the potential for an appreciable hydrological component within gravimetric measurements on volcanic islands. Characterisation of hydrological processes within a survey area may be necessary to robustly interpret gravity signals in settings with significant recharge fluctuations, a thick vadose zone and spatially variable hydrological properties. Such modelling enables further exploration of feedbacks

  13. Hydrothermal reservoir beneath Taal Volcano (Philippines): Implications to volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, T.; Alanis, P. B.; Yamaya, Y.; Takeuchi, A.; Bornas, M. V.; Cordon, J. M.; Puertollano, J.; Clarito, C. J.; Hashimoto, T.; Mogi, T.; Sasai, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Taal Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Philippines. The first recorded eruption was in 1573. Since then it has erupted 33 times resulting in thousands of casualties and large damages to property. In 1995, it was declared as one of the 15 Decade Volcanoes. Beginning in the early 1990s it has experienced several phases of abnormal activity, including seismic swarms, episodes of ground deformation, ground fissuring and hydrothermal activities, which continues up to the present. However, it has been noted that past historical eruptions of Taal Volcano may be divided into 2 distinct cycles, depending on the location of the eruption center, either at Main Crater or at the flanks. Between 1572-1645, eruptions occurred at the Main Crater, in 1707 to 1731, they occurred at the flanks. In 1749, eruptions moved back to the Main Crater until 1911. During the 1965 and until the end of the 1977 eruptions, eruptive activity once again shifted to the flanks. As part of the PHIVOLCS-JICA-SATREPS Project magnetotelluric and audio-magnetotelluric surveys were conducted on Volcano Island in March 2011 and March 2012. Two-dimensional (2-D) inversion and 3-D forward modeling reveals a prominent and large zone of relatively high resistivity between 1 to 4 kilometers beneath the volcano almost directly beneath the Main Crater, surrounded by zones of relatively low resistivity. This anomalous zone of high resistivity is hypothesized to be a large hydrothermal reservoir filled with volcanic fluids. The presence of this large hydrothermal reservoir could be related to past activities of Taal Volcano. In particular we believe that the catastrophic explosion described during the 1911 eruption was the result of the hydrothermal reservoir collapsing. During the cycle of Main Crater eruptions, this hydrothermal reservoir is depleted, while during a cycle of flank eruptions this reservoir is replenished with hydrothermal fluids.

  14. Gish Bar Patera, Io: Geology and Volcanic Activity, 1996-2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jason; Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly; McEwen, Alfred; Keszthelyi, Laszlo

    2003-01-01

    Since the two Voyagers passed by Jupiter in 1979, it has been known that volcanic activity is ubiquitous on the surface of Io. With over 400 volcanic centers, Io is even more volcanically active than the earth with massive flood basalt-style eruptions and komatitite lavas a common occurrence. Additionally, some volcanoes appear to be giant lava lakes, with violent activity churning the crust of the lake for periods of 20 years or more. Finally, sulfur is believed to play a large role in Io's volcanism, be it as a primary lava or as a secondary product of large, high-temperature eruptions. By studying one volcano in particular, Gish Bar Patera, one can observe many of these characteristics in one volcanic center.

  15. Analysis of radar images of the active volcanic zone at Krafla, Iceland: The effects of look azimuth biasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Williams, R. S., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The geomorphic expression of Mid-Ocean-Ridge (MOR) volcanism in a subaerial setting occurs uniquely on Earth in Iceland, and the most recent MOR eruptive activity has been concentrated in the Northeastern Volcanic Zone in an area known as Krafla. Within the Krafla region are many of the key morphologic elements of MOR-related basaltic volcanism, as well as volcanic explosion craters, subglacial lava shields, tectonic fissure swarms known as gjar, and basaltic-andesite flows with well developed ogives (pressure-ridges). The objective was to quantify the degree to which the basic volcanic and structural features can be mapped from directional SAR imagery as a function of the look azimuth. To accomplish this, the current expression of volcanic and tectonic constructs was independently mapped within the Krafla region on the E, W, and N-looking SAR images, as well as from SPOT Panchromatic imagery acquired in 1987. The initial observations of the E, W, and N images indicates that fresh a'a lava surfaces are extremely radar bright (rough at 3 cm to meter scales) independent of look direction; this suggests that these flows do not have strong flow direction related structures at meter and cm scales, which is consistent with typical Icelandic a'a lava surfaces in general. The basic impression from a preliminary analysis of the effects of look azimuth biasing on interpretation of the geology of an active MOR volcanic zone is that up to 30 percent of the diagnostic features can be missed at any given look direction, but that having two orthogonal look direction images is probably sufficient to prevent gross misinterpretation.

  16. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  17. Io's Diverse Styles of Volcanic Activity: Results from Galileo NIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L. W.; Doute, S.; Carlson, R.; McEwen, A.; Geissler, P.

    2001-01-01

    Observations by Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer were used to map the thermal structure of several of Io's hot spots, revealing different styles of volcanism Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract..

  18. Spatial distribution of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation in active volcanic islands - II: Deception Island images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, Janire; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; García-Yeguas, Araceli; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Posadas, Antonio M.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we present regional maps of the inverse intrinsic quality factor (Qi-1), the inverse scattering quality factor (Qs-1) and total inverse quality factor (Qt-1) for the volcanic environment of Deception Island (Antarctica). Our attenuation study is based on diffusion approximation, which permits us to obtain the attenuation coefficients for every single couple source-receiver separately. The data set used in this research is derived from an active seismic experiment using more than 5200 offshore shots (air guns) recorded at 32 onshore seismic stations and four ocean bottom seismometers. To arrive at a regional distribution of these values, we used a new mapping technique based on a Gaussian space probability function. This approach led us to create `2-D probabilistic maps' of values of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation. The 2-D tomographic images confirm the existence of a high attenuation body below an inner bay of Deception Island. This structure, previously observed in 2-D and 3-D velocity tomography of the region, is associated with a massive magma reservoir. Magnetotelluric studies reach a similar interpretation of this strong anomaly. Additionally, we observed areas with lower attenuation effects that bear correlation with consolidated structures described in other studies and associated with the crystalline basement of the area. Our calculations of the transport mean-free path and absorption length for intrinsic attenuation gave respective values of ≈ 950 m and 5 km, which are lower than the values obtained in tectonic regions or volcanic areas such as Tenerife Island. However, as observed in other volcanic regions, our results indicate that scattering effects dominate strongly over the intrinsic attenuation.

  19. Characterization and interpretation of volcanic activity at Redoubt, Bezymianny and Karymsky volcanoes through direct and remote measurements of volcanic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Taryn M.

    Surface measurements of volcanic emissions can provide critical insight into subsurface processes at active volcanoes such as the influx or ascent of magma, changes in conduit permeability, and relative eruption size. In this dissertation I employ direct and remote measurements of volcanic emissions to characterize activity and elucidate subsurface processes at three active volcanoes around the North Pacific. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, produced elevated SO2 emissions that were detected by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite sensor for over three months. This provided a rare opportunity to characterize Redoubt's daily SO2 emissions and to validate the OMI measurements. Order of magnitude variations in daily SO2 mass were observed, with over half of the cumulative SO2 emissions released during the explosive phase of the eruption. Correlations among OMI daily SO2 mass, tephra mass and acoustic energies during the explosive phase suggest that OMI data may be used to infer eruption size and explosivity. From 2007 through 2010 direct and remote measurements of volcanic gas composition and flux were measured at Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. During this period Bezymianny underwent five explosive eruptions. Estimates of passive and eruptive SO2 emissions suggest that the majority of SO2 is released passively. Order of magnitude variations in total volatile flux observed throughout the study period were attributed to changes in the depth of gas exsolution and separation from the melt at the time of sample collection. These findings suggest that exsolved gas composition may be used to detect magma ascent prior to eruption at Bezymianny Volcano. Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, is a dynamic volcano which exhibited four end-member activity types during field campaigns in 2011 and 2012, including: discrete ash explosions, pulsatory degassing, gas jetting, and explosive eruption. These activity types were characterized quantitatively

  20. Microbial life in volcanic/geothermal areas: how soil geochemistry shapes microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; D'Alessandro, Walter; Franzetti, Andrea; Parello, Francesco; Tagliavia, Marcello; Quatrini, Paola

    2015-04-01

    Extreme environments, such as volcanic/geothermal areas, are sites of complex interactions between geosphere and biosphere. Although biotic and abiotic components are strictly related, they were separately studied for long time. Nowadays, innovative and interdisciplinary approaches are available to explore microbial life thriving in these environments. Pantelleria island (Italy) hosts a high enthalpy geothermal system characterized by high CH4 and low H2S fluxes. Two selected sites, FAV1 and FAV2, located at Favara Grande, the main exhalative area of the island, show similar physical conditions with a surface temperature close to 60° C and a soil gas composition enriched in CH4, H2 and CO2. FAV1 soil is characterized by harsher conditions (pH 3.4 and 12% of H2O content); conversely, milder conditions were recorded at site FAV2 (pH 5.8 and 4% of H2O content). High methanotrophic activity (59.2 nmol g-1 h-1) and wide diversity of methanotrophic bacteria were preliminary detected at FAV2, while no activity was detected at FAV1(1). Our aim was to investigate how the soil microbial communities of these two close geothermal sites at Pantelleria island respond to different geochemical conditions. Bacterial and Archaeal communities of the sites were investigated by MiSeq Illumina sequencing of hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. More than 33,000 reads were obtained for Bacteria and Archaea from soil samples of the two sites. At FAV1 99% of the bacterial sequences were assigned to four main phyla (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi). FAV2 sequences were distributed in the same phyla with the exception of Chloroflexi that was represented below 1%. Results indicate a high abundance of thermo-acidophilic chemolithotrophs in site FAV1 dominated by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (25%), Nitrosococcus halophilus (10%), Alicyclobacillus spp. (7%) and the rare species Ktedonobacter racemifer (11%). The bacterial community at FAV2 soil is dominated by

  1. 1996 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    During 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity, anomalous seismicity, or suspected volcanic activity at 10 of the approximately 40 active volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. As part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also disseminated information about eruptions and other volcanic unrest at six volcanic centers on the Kamchatka Peninsula and in the Kurile Islands, Russia.

  2. SO2 on Venus: IUE, HST and ground-based measurements, and the active volcanism connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Na, C. Y.; Barker, E. S.; Stern, S. A.; Esposito, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Magellan images have shown that the volcanic features are widespread over the surface of Venus. The question of whether there is active volcanism is important for understanding both the atmospheric and the geological processes on Venus. The thick cloud cover of Venus precludes any direct observation of active volcanoes even if they exist. The only means of monitoring the active volcanism on Venus at present seems to be remote sensing from Earth. Continuous monitoring of SO2 is important to establish the long term trend of SO2 abundance and to understand the physical mechanism responsible for the change.

  3. Spatial Characteristics of Geothermal Spring Temperatures and Discharge Rates in the Tatun Volcanic Area, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, C. S.; Liu, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    The Tatun volcanic area is the only potential volcanic geothermal region in the Taiwan island, and abundant in hot spring resources owing to stream water mixing with fumarolic gases. According to the Meinzer's classification, spring temperatures and discharge rates are the most important properties for characterizing spring classifications. This study attempted to spatially characterize spring temperatures and discharge rates in the Tatun volcanic area, Taiwanusing indicator kriging (IK). First, data on spring temperatures and discharge rates, which were collected from surveyed data of the Taipei City Government, were divided into high, moderate and low categories according to spring classification criteria, and the various categories were regarded as estimation thresholds. Then, IK was adopted to model occurrence probabilities of specified temperatures and discharge rates in springs, and to determine their classifications based on estimated probabilities. Finally, nine combinations were obtained from the classifications of temperatures and discharge rates in springs. Moreover, the combinations and features of spring water were spatially quantified according to seven sub-zones of spring utilization. A suitable and sustainable development strategy of the spring area was proposed in each sub-zone based on probability-based combinations and features of spring water.The research results reveal that the probability-based classifications using IK provide an excellent insight in exploring the uncertainty of spatial features in springs, and can provide Taiwanese government administrators with detailed information on sustainable spring utilization and conservation in the overexploited spring tourism areas. The sub-zones BT (Beitou), RXY (Rd. Xingyi), ZSL (Zhongshanlou) and LSK (Lengshuikeng) with high or moderate discharge rates are suitable to supply spring water for tourism hotels.Local natural hot springs should be planned in the sub-zones DBT (Dingbeitou), ZSL, XYK

  4. Catastrophic volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  5. Petrology and petrogenesis of the Eocene Volcanic rocks in Yildizeli area (Sivas), Central Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğa Topbay, C.; Karacık, Zekiye; Genç, S. Can; Göçmengil, Gönenç

    2015-04-01

    Yıldızeli region to the south of İzmir Ankara Erzincan suture zone is situated on the large Sivas Tertiary sedimentary basin. After the northern branch of the Neotethyan Ocean was northerly consumed beneath the Sakarya Continent, a continent - continent collision occurred between the Anatolide- Tauride platform and Pontides and followed a severe intermediate magmatism during the Late Cretaceous- Tertiary period. This created an east-west trending volcanic belt along the whole Pontide range. In the previous studies different models are suggested for the Eocene volcanic succession such as post-collisional, delamination and slab-breakoff models as well as the arc model for its westernmost parts. We will present our field and geochemical data obtained from the Yıldızeli and its surroundings for its petrogenesis, and will discuss the tectonic model(s) on the basis of their geochemical/petrological aspects. Cenozoic volcanic sequences of Yıldızeli region which is the main subject of this study, overlie Pre-Mesozoic crustal meta-sedimentary group of Kırşehir Massif, Ophiolitic mélange and Cretaceous- Paleocene? flysch-like sequences. In the northern part of Yıldızeli region, north vergent thrust fault trending E-W seperates the ophiolitic mélange complex from the Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene and Tertiary formations. Volcano-sedimentary units, Eocene in age, of the Yıldızeli (Sivas-Turkey) which are intercalated with sedimentary deposits related to the collision of Anatolide-Tauride and a simultaneous volcanic activity (i.e. the Yıldızeli volcanics), exposed throughout a wide zone along E-W orientation. Yıldızeli volcanics consist of basalts, basaltic-andesites and andesitic lavas intercalated flow breccias and epiclastic, pyroclastic deposits. Basaltic andesite lavas contain Ca-rich plagioclase + clinopyroxene ± olivine with minor amounts of opaque minerals in a matrix comprised of microlites and glass; andesitic lavas are generally contain Ca

  6. Rapid response of a hydrologic system to volcanic activity: Masaya volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, S.C.P.; Connor, C.B.; Sanford, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrologic systems change in response to volcanic activity, and in turn may be sensitive indicators of volcanic activity. Here we investigate the coupled nature of magmatic and hydrologic systems using continuous multichannel time series of soil temperature collected on the flanks of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, one of the most active volcanoes in Central America. The soil temperatures were measured in a low-temperature fumarole field located 3.5 km down the flanks of the volcano. Analysis of these time series reveals that they respond extremely rapidly, on a time scale of minutes, to changes in volcanic activity also manifested at the summit vent. These rapid temperature changes are caused by increased flow of water vapor through flank fumaroles during volcanism. The soil temperature response, ~5 °C, is repetitive and complex, with as many as 13 pulses during a single volcanic episode. Analysis of the frequency spectrum of these temperature time series shows that these anomalies are characterized by broad frequency content during volcanic activity. They are thus easily distinguished from seasonal trends, diurnal variations, or individual rainfall events, which triggered rapid transient increases in temperature during 5% of events. We suggest that the mechanism responsible for the distinctive temperature signals is rapid change in pore pressure in response to magmatism, a response that can be enhanced by meteoric water infiltration. Monitoring of distal fumaroles can therefore provide insight into coupled volcanic-hydrologic-meteorologic systems, and has potential as an inexpensive monitoring tool.

  7. Compilation of modal analyses of volcanic rocks from the Nevada Test Site area, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Page, W.R.

    1990-10-01

    Volcanic rock samples collected from the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, between 1960 and 1985 were analyzed by thin section to obtain petrographic mode data. In order to provide rapid accessibility to the entire database, all data from the cards were entered into a computerized database. This computer format will enable workers involved in stratigraphic studies in the Nevada Test Site area and other locations in southern Nevada to perform independent analyses of the data. The data were compiled from the mode cards into two separate computer files. The first file consists of data collected from core samples taken from drill holes in the Yucca Mountain area. The second group of samples were collected from measured sections and surface mapping traverses in the Nevada Test Site area. Each data file is composed of computer printouts of tables with mode data from thin section point counts, comments on additional data, and location data. Tremendous care was taken in transferring the data from the cards to computer, in order to preserve the original information and interpretations provided by the analyzer. In addition to the data files above, a file is included that consists of Nevada Test Site petrographic data published in other US Geological Survey and Los Alamos National Laboratory reports. These data are presented to supply the user with an essentially complete modal database of samples from the volcanic stratigraphic section in the Nevada Test Site area. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  8. [Micro-area characteristics of laminated chert in the volcanic rocks of Xionger Group of Ruyang area and its geological significances].

    PubMed

    Luo, An; Li, Hong-zhong; Zhao, Ming-zhen; Yang, Zhi-jun; Liang, Jin; He, Jun-guo

    2014-12-01

    sedimentation contributed to the bands (or lamellars) with minerals of much smaller grain size, which therefore resulted in diversities from the other bands (or lamellars). According to this, the repeated bands (or lamellars) denoted the volcanic activities were cyclic during the formation of the chert. What's more, the carbonate vein came from the precipitation of subsequent hydrothermal fluids in the fracture of the chert, which contributed to the changes (e. g. rising in crystallinity degree of silica and formation of micro-structure of new silicate) near the interface between chert and the carbonate vein. Although there were many impurity minerals with complex genesis, the relatively lower content of silica in the chert of Xionger Group was due to the volcanic mineral mainly. Since there were impurity minerals of volcanic genesis in relatively large amount, the content of silica in the chert of Xionger Group was hence relatively low. In this study, the Raman analysis was witnessed to be an effective way in the researches on the chert, and could open out the type of mineral, micro-structure and degrees of crystallinity (or order). These characteristics were well kept in the micro-area, and played significant roles to reflect and understand the formation mechanism and subsequent evolution of the chert. PMID:25881434

  9. Sensitivity of two biomarkers for biomonitoring exposure to fluoride in children and women: A study in a volcanic area.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Diana Paula Silva; Garcia, Patrícia Ventura; Amaral, Leslie; Ferreira, Teresa; Cury, Jaime A; Vieira, Waldomiro; Rodrigues, Armindo Dos Santos

    2016-07-01

    The natural enrichment of water with fluoride is related to natural sources such as volcanic activity, with it being documented that fluorosis, an endemic and widespread disease in volcanic areas, is associated to the ingestion of high levels of fluoride through water. Thus, in this study, we aimed to define the fluoride concentration in drinking waters of volcanic origin and compare the sensitivity of urine and nail clippings as biomarkers for fluoride exposure in adults and children. Samples of drinking water from four villages in São Miguel Island (Azores) were used and the fluoride concentration was determined, as well the fluoride content in urine and toenails clippings from 66 children and 63 adults from these villages. A validated diet questionnaire, assessing sources of fluoride, was recorded for each participant. The fluoride determination in urine and nail clipping samples was made using a fluoride-specific electrode. A positive correlation was found between the fluoride daily intake and fluoride content in children urine (rs = 0.475; p < 0.001) and in their nail clippings (rs = 0.475; p < 0.001), while in adult women, the fluoride daily intake correlated positively with fluoride content nail clippings (rs = 0.495, p < 0.001). This reveals that nail clippings are more reliable as biomarkers of chronic exposure to fluoride than urine for populations of different ages (children vs. adults). Furthermore, nail clippings are more suitable than urine fluoride levels to assess long term exposure to fluoride in areas where the exposure to fluoride in drinking water is considered within, or slightly above, the recommended legal values. PMID:27155929

  10. Active Volcanism Late in Martian History - Evidence from Crater Counts in the Tharsis Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, J. A.; Berman, D. C.; Hartmann, W. K.; Bottke, W. F.; Kesthelyi, L. P.

    2001-11-01

    The current hypothesis of young Martian volcanism is based on several lines of evidence including analyses of Martian meteorites, photogeologic examination of the planet's surface and detailed crater count studies of high resolution images from MGS/MOC. In addition, some possible signs of recent liquid water on Mars may be evidence of active volcanism as a heat source. Early crater count studies were questioned on the basis of two major uncertainties: very small sampling of counts on young flows, and poor absolute surface age estimates on Mars. Our attack on these uncertainties includes both improving the detailed crater count statistics on the large Martian shield volcanoes and their surrounding lava plains, and refining the absolute ages of counted units using new estimates of the crater production rate on Mars. We have obtained counts on Olympus Mons, Pavonis Mons and Arsia Mons. We have targeted areas both on the slopes and inter-volcanic plains, and have begun examining the caldera regions. Our initial examination of the counts of caldera floors indicates terrains with statistically significant age differences, suggesting for some volcanoes sustained episodes of caldera collapse or resurfacing. Our slope and inter-volcanic plains data when plotted with the latest calibrated isochrons yield some very young ages, 10 My or younger for some small flows. The estimated uncertainty in the age data is about a factor of two. Our preliminary conclusions therefore appear to support the hypothesis of very recent volcanism on Mars. However, it is clear that a critical issue regarding crater counting on high resolution MOC images is the necessity of avoiding the ubiquitous dust on the Martian surface. TES data have shown that dust mantles exist over much of the Tharsis region, and it is critical that the ages of the terrains counted do not appear artificially young due to dust cover of some of the craters. We have begun a systematic review of counted MOC images and

  11. Mantle xenoliths from Marosticano area (Northern Italy): a comparison with Veneto Volcanic Province lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brombin, Valentina; Bonadiman, Costanza; Coltorti, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The Tertiary Magmatic Province of Veneto, known as Veneto Volcanic Province (VVP), in the North-East of Italy, represents the most important volcanic distric of Adria Plate. It is composed by five volcanic bodies: Val d'Adige, Marosticano, Mts. Lessini, Berici Hills and Euganean Hills. Most of the volcanic products are relatively undifferentiated lavas and range in composition from nephelinites to tholeiites. Often VVP nephelinites and basanites carry mantle xenoliths (mainly harzburgites and lherzolite). This study reports petrological comparison between Marosticano xenoliths (new outcrop) and xenoliths from the Lessinean and Val d'Adige areas already studied by many Authors (Siena & Coltorti 1989; Beccaluva et al., 2001, Gasperini et al., 2006). Mineral major elements analyses show that the Marosticano lherzolites and harzburgites reflect "more restitic" composition than the mantle domain beneath the other VVP districts (Lessini Mts. and Val d'Adige). In fact, olivine and pyroxene of Marosticano xenoliths have the highest mg# values of the entire district (Marosticano→90-93; literature→86-92). At comparable mg# (45-85 wt%) Marosticano spinels tend to be higher in Cr2O3 (23-44 wt%) contents with respect to the other VVP sp (7-25 wt%). It is worth noting that, Ni contents of Marosticano olivines in both harzburgites and lherzolites are higher (2650-3620 ppm) than those of the Lessinean xenoliths (1500- 3450 ppm), and similar to that of Val d'Adige lherzolites (3000-3500 ppm), approaching the contents of Archean cratonic mantle (Kelemen, 1998). In turn, Lessinean olivines properly fall in the Ni-mg# Phanerozoic field. At fixed pressure of 15 kbar, the equilibration temperature of Marosticano xenoliths are similar (Brey & Köhler: 920-1120°C) to those of Lessini (O'Neill & Wall: 990-1110°C; Beccaluva et al., 2007), but higher than those of Val d'Adige (Wells: 909-956°C; Gasperini et al., 2006). Finally, Marosticano mantle fragment show similar relatively high

  12. Observed multivariable signals of late 20th and early 21st century volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santer, Benjamin D.; Solomon, Susan; Bonfils, Céline; Zelinka, Mark D.; Painter, Jeffrey F.; Beltran, Francisco; Fyfe, John C.; Johannesson, Gardar; Mears, Carl; Ridley, David A.; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Wentz, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    The relatively muted warming of the surface and lower troposphere since 1998 has attracted considerable attention. One contributory factor to this "warming hiatus" is an increase in volcanically induced cooling over the early 21st century. Here we identify the signals of late 20th and early 21st century volcanic activity in multiple observed climate variables. Volcanic signals are statistically discernible in spatial averages of tropical and near-global SST, tropospheric temperature, net clear-sky short-wave radiation, and atmospheric water vapor. Signals of late 20th and early 21st century volcanic eruptions are also detectable in near-global averages of rainfall. In tropical average rainfall, however, only a Pinatubo-caused drying signal is identifiable. Successful volcanic signal detection is critically dependent on removal of variability induced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation.

  13. Temporal monitoring of Bardarbunga volcanic activity with TanDEM-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, C.; Minet, C.; Fritz, T.; Eineder, M.; Erten, E.

    2015-12-01

    On August 29, 2014, a volcanic activity started in the lava field of Holuhraun, at the north east of the Bardarbunga caldera in Iceland. The activity was declared finished on February 27, 2015, thus lasting for about 6 months. During these months the magma chamber below the caldera slowly emptied, causing the rare event of caldera collapse. In this scenario, TanDEM-X remote sensing data is of particular interest. By producing high-resolution and accurate elevation models of the caldera, it is possible to evaluate volume losses and topographical changes useful to increase the knowledge about the volcanic activity dynamics. 5 TanDEM-X InSAR acquisitions have been commanded between August 01, 2014 and November 08, 2014. 2 acquisitions have been commanded before the eruption and 3 acquisitions afterwards. To fully cover the volcanic activity, also the lava flow area at the north-west of the caldera has been monitored and a couple of acquisitions have been employed to reveal the subglacial graben structure and the lava path. In this context, the expected elevation accuracy is studied on two levels. Absolute height accuracy is analyzed by inspecting the signal propagation at X-band in the imaged medium. Relative height accuracy is analyzed by investigating the InSAR system parameters and the local geomorphology. It is shown how the system is very well accurate with mean height errors below the meter. Moreover, neither InSAR processing issues, e.g. phase unwrapping errors, nor complex DEM calibration aspects are problems to tackle. Caldera is imaged in its entirety and new cauldron formations and, in general, the complete restructuring of the glacial volcanic system is well represented. An impressive caldera volume loss of about 1 billion cubic meters is measured in about two months. The dyke propagation from the Bardarbunga cauldron to the Holuhraun lava field is also revealed and a graben structure with a width of up to 1 km and a sinking of a few meters is derived

  14. The origin of muddy sand sediments associated with mud volcanism in the Horonobe area of northern Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Kazuya; Tokiwa, Tetsuya; Murakami, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    The origin of muddy sand and gas in muddy sand sediments in the Horonobe area of northern Hokkaido, Japan, was investigated by analyzing the mineralogical and chemical compositions of the sediments and the chemical/isotopic compositions of the gas. X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that chemically, the muddy sand is derived from a mixing of components from the Hakobuchi and overlying formations, and that the characteristic mineral of the muddy sand is heulandite, which, in the study area, has been detected only in the Hakobuchi Formation. These results suggest that the sediments ascended from depths of at least 2200-2400 m. The δ13CCH4 values and the methane/(ethane + propane) ratios of the gas indicate that the primary origin of the methane is by thermogenic decomposition of coal-bearing beds in the Haboro or Hakobuchi formations, or further deep sources. This study provides new data on processes of onshore mud volcanism in Japan, and contributes to an understanding of processes of subsurface mass transport in regions of mud-volcanic activity.

  15. Temporal changes in thermal waters related to volcanic activity of Tokachidake Volcano, Japan: implications for forecasting future eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ryo; Shibata, Tomo; Murayama, Yasuji; Ogino, Tagiru; Okazaki, Noritoshi

    2015-01-01

    In order to detect changes in volcanic activity of Tokachidake Volcano, Japan, we have continuously monitored thermal waters discharging at the western to southwestern flank of the volcano since 1986. The steam-heated waters in the Nukkakushi crater discharged with boiling temperature until 2002. Thermal waters at the Tokachidake spa area have similar compositions to fumarolic gas emitted from the summit craters, indicating that the waters formed by absorption of volcanic gas into shallow aquifers. Thermal waters at the Fukiage spa area were derived from the same aquifer as the Tokachidake spa area until early 1986. However, after that time, NaCl-type thermal water entered the Fukiage spa area during the increase in volcanic activity associated with the 1988-1989 eruption, thus leading to a clear increase in Cl concentrations and temperature. After the eruption, the supply of the NaCl-type thermal water was halted, and the Cl concentrations of the thermal waters decreased. In contrast, SO4 concentrations gradually increased in the Fukiage spa area after 1989, and the temperature has been maintained. These observations indicate that SO4-rich thermal water with a relatively high temperature entered the system instead of the NaCl-type thermal water. As was the case for the 1988-1989 eruption, the Cl concentrations at the Fukiage spa area increased in 2012 during an increase in volcanic activity, implying that the supply of the NaCl-type thermal water had resumed. However, the chemical changes in the thermal waters since 2012 are small compared with those before the 1988-1989 eruption, with oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions remaining nearly the same as those of meteoric waters.

  16. The Effect of Recent Volcanic Activity on the Seismic Structure of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, M. E.; Aleqabi, G. I.; Pratt, M. J.; Shore, P.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Rambolamanana, G.; Andriampenomanana Ny Ony, F. S. T.; Tsiriandrimanana, R.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic structure of Madagascar is determined using ambient-noise and two-plane-wave earthquake surface waves analyses. A deep low-velocity anomaly is seen in regions of recent volcanic activity in the central and northern regions of the island. The primary data used are from the 2011-2013 MACOMO (Madagascar, the Comoros, and Mozambique) broadband seismic array from the PASSCAL program of IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology), funded by the NSF. Additional data came from the RHUM-RUM project (led by G. Barruol and K. Sigloch), the Madagascar Seismic Profile (led by F. Tilmann), and the GSN. For the ambient-noise study, Rayleigh wave green's functions for all interstation paths are extracted from the broadband seismic data recorded from August 2011 until October 2013. Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity dispersion curves are extracted in the 8 - 50 s period range, identifying shallow crustal structure. For deeper structure, the two-plane-wave method is used on teleseismic earthquake data to obtain surface wave phase velocities in the 20 - 182 s period range. In the inversion, a finite-frequency kernel is used for each period, and a 1-D shear velocity structure is determined at each location. A three-dimensional S-wave velocity model of the crust and upper mantle is obtained from assembling the 1-D models. Preliminary results show a good correlation between the Rayleigh wave velocities and the geology of Madagascar, which includes areas of ancient Archaean craton. The slowest seismic velocities are associated with known volcanic regions in both the central and northern regions, which have experienced volcanic activity within the past million years.

  17. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  18. GEOFIM: A WebGIS application for integrated geophysical modeling in active volcanic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currenti, Gilda; Napoli, Rosalba; Sicali, Antonino; Greco, Filippo; Negro, Ciro Del

    2014-09-01

    We present GEOFIM (GEOphysical Forward/Inverse Modeling), a WebGIS application for integrated interpretation of multiparametric geophysical observations. It has been developed to jointly interpret scalar and vector magnetic data, gravity data, as well as geodetic data, from GPS, tiltmeter, strainmeter and InSAR observations, recorded in active volcanic areas. GEOFIM gathers a library of analytical solutions, which provides an estimate of the geophysical signals due to perturbations in the thermal and stress state of the volcano. The integrated geophysical modeling can be performed by a simple trial and errors forward modeling or by an inversion procedure based on NSGA-II algorithm. The software capability was tested on the multiparametric data set recorded during the 2008-2009 Etna flank eruption onset. The results encourage to exploit this approach to develop a near-real-time warning system for a quantitative model-based assessment of geophysical observations in areas where different parameters are routinely monitored.

  19. Use of High Temporal Resolution Thermal Imagery of Karymsky's Volcanic Plume to Constrain Volcanic Activity and Elucidate Vent Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, T. M.; Dehn, J.; Belousov, A.; Fee, D.; Buurman, H.; Grapenthin, R.; Ushakov, S.

    2011-12-01

    Analysis of high temporal resolution thermal imagery of the volcanic plume from Karymsky volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, was performed to characterize the activity and elucidate vent processes observed during a field campaign from 21 through 26 July 2008. Observed emission styles ranged from explosive eruptions, gas jetting, gas puffing, passive degassing, to absent degassing. These styles can be broadly categorized according to the thermal data. Specifically, we interpret: (1) apparent temperatures in excess of 120°C to indicate eruption of juvenile material; (2) exponential trends between maximum apparent temperature and radiation above background values to indicate degassing or explosive eruptions; (3) flat and/or flat-exponential hybrid trends between maximum apparent temperature and radiation to indicate absent degassing and/or gas puffing, or a transition between degassing and absent degassing; and (4) strong periodicity identified by inspection or through power spectral density analysis of timeseries data to indicate gas puffing. Based on our thermal observations we propose that these styles of volcanic emissions are primarily controlled by shallow vent processes, with the range of emission styles reflecting a continuum between open and closed vent activity. Specifically, we propose that (1) periods of absent degassing indicate vent sealing; (2) periods of gas puffing indicate cyclic behavior between partial vent sealing and vent fracturing; and (3) passive degassing, gas jetting, and continuous eruption all indicate open vent conditions. We suggest that secondary influences by magma recharge and gas exsolution processes may contribute to variations in degassing style under open vent conditions. These results suggest that trends in thermal timeseries data, such as maximum apparent temperature and radiation, can be used to quantitatively characterize volcanic activity and may help constrain vent processes at active volcanoes.

  20. Results From NICLAKES Survey of Active Faulting Beneath Lake Nicaragua, Central American Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, J.; Mann, P.; McIntosh, K.; Wulf, S.; Dull, R.; Perez, P.; Strauch, W.

    2006-12-01

    In May of 2006 we used a chartered ferry boat to collect 520 km of seismic data, 886 km of 3.5 kHz subbottom profiler data, and 35 cores from Lake Nicaragua. The lake covers an area of 7700 km2 within the active Central American volcanic arc, forms the largest lake in Central America, ranks as the twentieth largest freshwater lake in the world, and has never been previously surveyed or cored in a systematic manner. Two large stratovolcanoes occupy the central part of the lake: Concepcion is presently active, Maderas was last active less than 2000 years ago. Four zones of active faulting and doming of the lake floor were mapped with seismic and 3.5 kHz subbottom profiling. Two of the zones consist of 3-5-km-wide, 20-30-km-long asymmetric rift structures that trend towards the inactive cone of Maderas Volcano in a radial manner. The northeastern rift forms a 20-27-m deep depression on the lake bottom that is controlled by a north-dipping normal fault. The southwestern rift forms a 25-35-m deep depression controlled by a northeast-dipping normal fault. Both depressions contain mound-like features inferred to be hydrothermal deposits. Two zones of active faulting are associated with the active Concepcion stratovolcano. A 600-m-wide and 6-km-long fault bounded horst block extends westward beneath the lake from a promontory on the west side of the volcano. Like the two radial rift features of Maderas, the horst points roughly towards the active caldera of Concepcion. A second north-south zone of active faulting, which also forms a high, extends off the north coast of Concepcion and corresponds to a localized zone of folding and faulting mapped by previous workers and inferred by them to have formed by gravitational spreading of the flank of the volcano. The close spatial relation of these faults to the two volcanic cones in the lake suggests that the mechanism for faulting is a result of either crustal movements related to magma intrusion or gravitational sliding and is

  1. Evaluation of approximations in modeling the thermal history of a volcanic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giberti, G.; Sartoris, G.

    1989-02-01

    The thermal history of a relatively young volcanic area, characterized by a shallow magmatic reservoir and the occurrence of a major eruption accompanied by caldera collapse, is simulated numerically. Geometry, geology and volcanic history of the system are chosen having in mind the Campi Flegrei volcanic area, Southern Italy. The 3D axially symmetric model adopted is nonhomogeneous, with variable geometry and thermal properties depending on temperature. Heat transfer is treated using the conduction equations. Convection in the magma - undoubtedly vigorous in the early stages of the cooling process - is taken into account by a temperature-averaging procedure. Moderate convection in the permeable rocks overlying the reservoir is simulated by using effective thermal parameters. The mathematical problem is solved by a finite-difference method. This model is then adopted as "reality" and its results are compared with those obtained with other models, referred to as "approximations" in which some features of the conventional reality have been neglected. It is found that the temperature field of a static model (in which the eruption of about 110 km 3 of magma, caldera collapse and the related physical changes are neglected) is in good agreement with "reality" 30,000 years after the eruption. The assumption of magma and surrounding rocks having the same constant thermal properties yields poor results (errors of 100-150°K at shallow depth on the axis of symmetry). If homogeneity is assumed only for the host rocks, while the magma is assigned "real" properties, the temperature field above the reservoir is affected by quite similar errors. The temperature field is quite well approximated by solving the "reality" in a vertical plane through the axis of symmetry (errors <20°K and 40°K in the central part of the caldera for t=120,000 years and t=250,000 years, respectively, after the emplacement of the magmatic body). The solution of "reality" in just one dimension yields

  2. Regimes of Volcanic Activity at Mt. Etna in 2007-2009 inferred from Unsupervised Pattern Recognition on Volcanic Tremor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsaperla, S. M.; Behncke, B.; Langer, H. K.; Messina, A.; Spampinato, S.

    2009-12-01

    Mt Etna is a well monitored basaltic volcano for which high-quality, multidisciplinary data set are continuously available for around-the-clock surveillance. Particularly, volcano-seismic data sets cover decades long local recordings, temporally encompassing different styles of eruptive activity, from Strombolian eruptions to lava fountains and lava flows. Intense earthquakes swarms have often heralded effusive activity. However, from the seismic point of view, volcanic tremor has proved to be one of the most reliable indicators of impending eruptive activity. Indeed, changes in the volcano feeder show up in the signature of tremor, its spectral characteristics and source location. Some of us (Langer and Messina) have recently developed a new software for the classification of volcanic tremor data, combining Self Organizing Maps (also known as Kohonen Maps) along with Cluster and Fuzzy Analysis. This software allows us to analyse the background seismic radiation at permanent broadband stations located at various distance from the summit craters to identify transitions from pre-eruptive to eruptive activity. Throughout the analysis of the data flow, the software provides an unsupervised classification of the spectral characteristics (i.e., amplitude and frequency content) of the signal. The information embedded in the spectrum is interpreted to assign a specific state of the volcano. An application of this new software is proposed here on the eruptive events at Etna of 2007-2009, which consisted of 7 episodes of lava fountaining, periodic Strombolian activity at the summit craters, followed by lava emissions on the upper east flank of the volcano, with start on 13 May 2008 and end on 6 July 2009. In the study period the source of volcanic tremor was always shallow (less than 3 km) and within the volcano edifice. The upraise of magma to the surface was fast and associated with changes of volcanic tremor features, which covered time windows of variable duration from

  3. Influence of explosive volcanic events on the activation versus de-activation of a modern turbidite system: the example of the Dohrn canyon-fan in the continental slope of the Campania volcanic district (Naples Bay, Italy - Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, M.; Budillon, F.; Pappone, G.; Insinga, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between volcanic activity, volcano-clastic yield and activation/deactivation of a turbidite system can be evaluated along the continental margin of Campania region (Tyrrhenian Sea - Italy), an active volcanic area, where three wide canyon-fans occur at short distances one to another. Actually, the Dohrn, Magnaghi and Cuma canyons cut the continental slope and shelf off Ischia and Procida volcanic islands and off the Campania Plain where Phlegraean Field and Mt. Vesuvius active vents are located. This research, partly supported by the Italian Flagship Project Ritmare, is based on single-channel, high-resolution seismic profiles (Sparker-One 16 kJ, 0.5 s twtt), swath-bathymetry and litho- and tephra-stratigraphy of gravity cores. We focused on the stratigraphic constraint of paleo-thalweg features and channel/levees deposits in seismics, debris flow, turbidites and hemipelagites in cores, to learn more on the activation/deactivation stages of the canyon Dohrn, in the frame of relative eustatic sea level variations over the Middle Pleistocene-Holocene time span.Preliminary outcomes suggest that even major volcanic events occurred in the last 300 ky, such as ignimbrite eruptions or large fallouts, have caused the infilling of the canyon head and the cover of pre-existing seabed morphology. As a consequence, the temporary deactivation of the turbidite system has occurred, despite the volcano-clastic overload in the coastal environment. Phases of renewed activities of the thalweg are observed to be in step with falling stages of sea level, which have driven the re-incision of canyon valleys through continuous volcano-clastic debris and turbidites down-flows. Since Holocene, the quiescence of the Dohrn Canyon has been documented, despite the intense volcano-tectonic activity in the area.

  4. Disruptive event analysis: Volcanism and igneous intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, B. M.

    1980-08-01

    An evaluation was made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions were considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity were the geometry of the magma repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Simplified probability calculations were attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

  5. Potential and limitations of risk scenario tools in volcanic areas through an example at Mount Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehl, P.; Quinet, C.; Le Cozannet, G.; Kouokam, E.; Thierry, P.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an integrated approach to conduct a scenario-based volcanic risk assessment on a variety of exposed assets, such as residential buildings, cultivated areas, network infrastructures or individual strategic buildings. The focus is put on the simulation of scenarios, based on deterministic adverse event input, which are applied to the case study of an effusive eruption on the Mount Cameroon volcano, resulting in the damage estimation of the assets located in the area. The work is based on the recent advances in the field of seismic risk. A software for systemic risk scenario analysis developed within the FP7 project SYNER-G has been adapted to address the issue of volcanic risk. Most significant improvements include the addition of vulnerability models adapted to each kind of exposed element and the possibility to quantify the successive potential damages inflicted by a sequence of adverse events (e.g. lava flows, tephra fall, etc.). The use of an object-oriented architecture gives the opportunity to model and compute the physical damage of very disparate types of infrastructures under the same framework. Finally, while the risk scenario approach is limited to the assessment of the physical impact of adverse events, a specific focus on strategic infrastructures and a dialogue with stakeholders helps in evaluating the potential wider indirect consequences of an eruption.

  6. Determination of ancient volcanic eruption center based on gravity methods (3D) in Gunungkidul area Yogyakarta, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoso, Agus; Sismanto, Setiawan, Ary; Pramumijoyo, Subagyo

    2016-05-01

    Ancient eruption centers can be determined by detecting the position of the ancient volcanic material, it is important to understand the elements of ancient volcanic material by studying the area geologically and prove the existence of an ancient volcanic eruption centers using geophysics gravity method. The measuring instrument is Lacoste & Romberg gravimeter type 1115, the number of data are 900 points. The area 60×40 kilometers, the modeling 3D software is reaching depth of 15 km at the south of the island of Java subduction zone. It is suported by geological data in the field that are found as the following: 1. Pyroclastic Fall which is a product of volcanic eruptions, and lapilli tuff with felsic mineral. 2. Pyroclastic flow with Breccia, tuffaceous sandstone and tuff breccia. 3. Hot springs near Parangwedang Parangtritis. 4. Igneous rock with scoria structure in Parang Kusumo, structured amigdaloida which is the result of the eruption of lava/volcanic eruptions, and Pillow lava in the shows the flowing lava into the sea. Base on gravity anomaly shows that there are strong correlationship between those geological data to the gravity anomaly. The gravblox modeling (3D) shows the position of ancient of volcanic eruption in this area clearly.

  7. Geochemistry of arsenic and other trace elements in a volcanic aquifer system of Kumamoto Area, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Shahadat; Hosono, Takahiro; Shimada, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Total arsenic (As), As(III) species, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), methane (CH4), sulfur isotope ratios of sulfate (δ34SSO4), major ions and trace elements were measured in groundwater collected from boreholes and wells along the flow lines of western margins of Kumamoto basin, at central part of Kyushu island in southern Japan. Kumamoto city is considered as the largest groundwater city in Japan. 100% people of this city depends on groundwater for their drinking purpose. In this study, we used trace elements data and δ34SSO4 values to better understand the processes that are likely controlling mobilization of As in this area. Arsenic concentrations ranges from 1 to 60.6 μg/L. High concentrations were found in both shallow and deep aquifers. The aquifers are composed of Quaternary volcanic (pyroclastic) flow deposits. In both aquifers, groundwaters evolve along the down flow gradient from oxidizing conditions of recharge area to the reducing conditions of stagnant area of Kumamoto plain. 40% samples from the Kumamoto plain area excced the maximum permissible limit of Japan drinking water quality standard (10 μg/L). In the reducing groundwater, As(III) constitutes typically more, however; 50% samples dominated with As(III) and 50% samples dominated with As(V) species. High As concentrations occur in anaerobic stagnant groundwaters from this plain area with high dissolved Fe, Mn, moderately dissolved HCO3, PO4, DOC and with very low concentrations of NO3 and SO4 suggesting the reducing condition of subsurface aquifer. Moderately positive correlation between As and dissolved Fe, Mn and strong negative correlation between As(III)/As(V) ratio and V, Cr and U reflect the dependence of As concentration on the reductive process. The wide range of δ34SSO4 values (6.8 to 36.1‰) indicate that sulfur is undergoing redox cycling. Highly enriched values suggesting the process was probably mediated by microbial activity. It also be noted from positive values of sulfur

  8. Volcanic activity in the Acambay Graben: a < 25 Ka subplinian eruption from the Temascalcingo volcano and implications for volcanic hazard.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Aguirre Díaz, Gerardo; Sunyé Puchol, Ivan; Bartolini, Stefania; Geyer, Adelina

    2016-04-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) contains a large number of stratovolcanoes, some well-known, as Popocatepetl, Iztaccihuatl, Nevado de Toluca, or Colima and many others of more modest dimensions that are not well known but constitute the majority in the TMVB. Such volcanoes are, for example, Tequila, San Juan, Sangangüey, Cerro Culiacán, Cerro Grande, El Zamorano, La Joya, Palo Huerfano, Jocotitlán, Altamirano and Temascalcingo, among many others. The Temascalcingo volcano (TV) is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) at the eastern part of the Acambay Graben (northwest portion of Estado de México). The TV is composed mainly by dacitic, porphyritic lavas, block and ash deposits and subordinate pumice fall deposits and ignimbrites (Roldán-Quintana et al., 2011). The volcanic structure includes a summit caldera that has a rectangular shape, 2.5×3.5 km, with the largest side oriented E-W, parallel to major normal faults affecting the edifice. The San Mateo Pumice eruption is one of the greatest paroxysmal episodes of this volcano with pumice deposits mainly exposed at the scarp of the Acambay-Tixmadeje fault and at the northern and northeastern flanks of TV. It overlies a paleosol dated at 25 Ka. A NE-trending dispersion was obtained from field data covering an area of at least 80 km2. These deposits overlie older lava flows and mud flows and are discontinuously covered and eroded by younger reworked deposits of Temascalcingo volcano. This event represents a highly explosive phase that generated a relatively thick and widespread pumice fallout deposit that may occur again in future eruptions. A similar eruption today would have a significantly impact in the region, overall due to the fact that there has been no systematic assessment of the volcanic hazard in any of the studies that have been conducted so far in the area. So, this is a pending and urgent subject that must be tackled without delay. Financed by

  9. Explosively activated egress area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Bailey, J. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A lightweight, add on structure which employs linear shaped pyrotechnic charges to smoothly cut an airframe along an egress area periphery is provided. It compromises reaction surfaces attached to the exterior surface of the airframe's skin and is designed to restrict the skin deflection. That portion of the airframe within the egress area periphery is jettisoned. Retention surfaces and sealing walls are attached to the interior surface of the airframe's skin and are designed to shield the interior of the aircraft during detonation of the pyrotechnic charges.

  10. Acute health effects associated with exposure to volcanic air pollution (vog) from increased activity at Kilauea Volcano in 2008.

    PubMed

    Longo, Bernadette M; Yang, Wei; Green, Joshua B; Crosby, Frederick L; Crosby, Vickie L

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, the Kilauea Volcano on the island of Hawai'i increased eruption activity and emissions of sulfurous volcanic air pollution called vog. The purpose of this study was to promptly assess for a relative increase in cases of medically diagnosed acute illnesses in an exposed Hawaiian community. Using a within-clinic retrospective cohort design, comparisons were made for visits of acute illnesses during the 14 wk prior to the increased volcanic emissions (low exposure) to 14 wk of high vog exposure when ambient sulfur dioxide was threefold higher and averaged 75 parts per billion volume per day. Logistic regression analysis estimated effect measures between the low- and high-exposure cohorts for age, gender, race, and smoking status. There were statistically significant positive associations between high vog exposure and visits for medically diagnosed cough, headache, acute pharyngitis, and acute airway problems. More than a sixfold increase in odds was estimated for visits with acute airway problems, primarily experienced by young Pacific Islanders. These findings suggest that the elevated volcanic emissions in 2008 were associated with increased morbidity of acute illnesses in age and racial subgroups of the general Hawaiian population. Continued investigation is crucial to fully assess the health impact of this natural source of sulfurous air pollution. Culturally appropriate primary- and secondary-level health prevention initiatives are recommended for populations in Hawai'i and volcanically active areas worldwide. PMID:20818536

  11. Characterization of volcanic activity using observations of infrasound, volcanic emissions, and thermal imagery at Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, T.; Fee, D.; Prata, F.

    2012-04-01

    Karymsky Volcano is one of the most active and dynamic volcanoes in Kamchatka, with activity ranging from vigorous degassing, frequent ash emissions, and apparent vent sealing, all punctuated by daily to weekly explosive magmatic eruptions. Recent studies have highlighted the strengths in using complementary infrasound measurements and remote volcanic emission measurements to characterize volcanic activity, with the potential to discriminate emission-type, approximate ash-cloud height, and estimate SO2 emission mass. Here we use coincident measurements of infrasound, SO2, ash, and thermal radiation collected over a ten day period at Karymsky Volcano in August 2011 to characterize the observed activity and elucidate vent processes. The ultimate goal of this project is to enable different types of volcanic activity to be identified using only infrasound data, which would significantly improve our ability to continuously monitor remote volcanoes. Four types of activity were observed. Type 1 activity is characterized by discrete ash emissions occurring every 1 - 5 minutes that either jet or roil out of the vent, by plumes from 500 - 1500 m (above vent) altitudes, and by impulsive infrasonic onsets. Type 2 activity is characterized by periodic pulses of gas emission, little or no ash, low altitude (100 - 200 m) plumes, and strong audible jetting or roaring. Type 3 activity is characterized by sustained emissions of ash and gas, with multiple pulses lasting from ~1 - 3 minutes, and by plumes from 300 - 1500 m. Type 4 activity is characterized by periods of relatively long duration (~30 minutes to >1 hour) quiescence, no visible plume and weak SO2 emissions at or near the detection limit, followed by an explosive, magmatic eruption, producing ash-rich plumes to >2000 m, and centimeter to meter (or greater) sized pyroclastic bombs that roll down the flanks of the edifice. Eruption onset is accompanied by high-amplitude infrasound and occasionally visible shock

  12. Recurrence rates of volcanism in basaltic volcanic fields: An example from the Springerville volcanic field, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Condit, C.D.; Connor, C.B.

    1996-10-01

    A spatio-temporal near-neighbor model is used to identify and map variations in the recurrence rate of volcanism in the Springerville volcanic field, Arizona, a large field on the Colorado Plateau boundary. Detailed mapping of individual lava flows and their associated vents, together with radiometric and paleomagnetic dating, demonstrates that 366 volcanic events have formed the Springerville volcanic field. A near-neighbor spatio-temporal recurrence-rate model using seven near-neighbor volcanoes and a 0.5 m.y. time window reveals that (1) areas of waxing and waning magmatism in the Springerville volcanic field are much more localized and (2) volcanic activity within these areas is much more intense than implied by field-wide temporal trends. Because volcanic activity is spatially and temporally clustered, forecasting subsequent activity is more successful if the spatio-temporal recurrence-rate model is used, rather than the average recurrence rates. This success indicates that spatio-temporal recurrence-rate models are useful tools for the quantification of long-term volcanic hazards in basaltic volcanic fields. 61 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  14. Volcanic features of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. Temporal and Spatial Strain Distribution Derived from GNSS Network in Volcanic Area, the Case Study of Piton De La Fournaise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, A.; Got, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Basaltic volcanoes are amongst the largest volcanic edifices on Earth. These huge volcanoes exhibit large deformation areas such as rift zones, and strong ground displacements with more or less mobile flanks, which respond to long-lasting stress field conditions (gravitational stress, magmatic processes and/or regional tectonics...). Piton de la Fournaise (La Réunion, Indian ocean) is one of the most active basaltic volcano in the world and displays all of these features. We study the dynamics and the origin of Piton de la Fournaise deformation through the observation of temporal and spatial strain distribution. With the densification of the volcano observatory permanent GNSS network in 2009 and thanks to their high sampling rates, for the first time we have calculated strain maps derived from GNSS displacements on this volcano. We present temporal and spatial distribution of strain on Piton de la Fournaise, on the whole edifice from the summit to the coastline, during both eruptive and rest periods. Main deformation allows us to distinguish four main sectors displaying distinct behaviors in response to volcanic and rest activities: (1) the summit, (2) the terminal cone, (3) the base of the cone, and (4) the eastern flank. Principal strains are maximal on the terminal cone -with an antagonist pattern between the summit and the slope of the terminal cone where the strains are one order of magnitude lower than on the summit-, while decay rates of compressive strain is observed in the eastern flank up to the coastline. Even if the strains are low in the eastern flank, we evidence compressive strain there, whereas the coastline appears to be more stable. The eastern flank sliding damps with the distance, suggesting stress accumulates in the slopes of the Grandes Pentes/Grand Brûlé areas. This evaluation provides new insights for the assessment of potential hazards associated with edifice instabilities, and especially the generation of future flank destabilizations

  16. Exploring for Volcanic and Hydrothermal Activity Above Off-axis Melt Lenses near the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, A. J.; Torres, M. A.; Nealson, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Two Alvin dives (AL 4771 and 4774) transected the seafloor directly above the two largest Off-Axis Melt Lenses (O-AML) east of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) axis at 9 39'N and 9 54'N. In 2008, a 3D high-resolution seismic reflection survey (MGL-0812) discovered O-AMLs 3-7 km from the EPR at 2-3 km below the seafloor. Several other O-AML in the crust have been subsequently detected in several locations up to 20 km from the spreading axis at fast and intermediate spreading ridges; understanding their impacts is increasingly important. During the dives, no currently active hydrothermal venting or fresh lava was seen, suggesting that these features do not constantly power off-axis geological activity. However, the seafloor appears much younger at small volcanic seamounts in the 9 39'N than at the 9 54'N site. At 9 39'N, we used Alvin to explore the off-axis volcanic mound complex, reaching the summit of the three largest mounds. Although no evidence for on-going hydrothermal or volcanic activity was detected, the seafloor wore a thin sediment layer of ~10cm and thin Mn-coatings on 9 rock samples, suggesting volcanism more recently than would be expected based on the spreading-rate age of the crust. At 9 54'N, the Alvin trackline started south of a prominent abyssal hill, which has an unusual D-shape over 1 km wide in the center, crossed the abyssal hill, visited two local hummocks on top, and then attempted to find volcanic activity on the near slope of EPR axis by going as far west was possible during the dive. Heavy sediment everywhere on the abyssal hill, to the depth of push cores (~30 cm) and probably much deeper in many areas and 4 rock samples from the abyssal hill were quite weathered with little glass intact, suggest that this site is unaffected by the underlying O-AML. Upslope toward the EPR west of the abyssal hill, 4 rocks collected appear somewhat younger, and sediment became thinner. In addition, 3 CTD tow-yos over each O-AML found no evidence of active

  17. Exploring for Volcanic and Hydrothermal Activity Above Off-axis Melt Lenses near the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Lee, A. J.; Rubin, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Two Alvin dives (AL 4771 and 4774) transected the seafloor directly above the two largest Off-Axis Melt Lenses (O-AML) east of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) axis at 9 39'N and 9 54'N. In 2008, a 3D high-resolution seismic reflection survey (MGL-0812) discovered O-AMLs 3-7 km from the EPR at 2-3 km below the seafloor. Several other O-AML in the crust have been subsequently detected in several locations up to 20 km from the spreading axis at fast and intermediate spreading ridges; understanding their impacts is increasingly important. During the dives, no currently active hydrothermal venting or fresh lava was seen, suggesting that these features do not constantly power off-axis geological activity. However, the seafloor appears much younger at small volcanic seamounts in the 9 39'N than at the 9 54'N site. At 9 39'N, we used Alvin to explore the off-axis volcanic mound complex, reaching the summit of the three largest mounds. Although no evidence for on-going hydrothermal or volcanic activity was detected, the seafloor wore a thin sediment layer of ~10cm and thin Mn-coatings on 9 rock samples, suggesting volcanism more recently than would be expected based on the spreading-rate age of the crust. At 9 54'N, the Alvin trackline started south of a prominent abyssal hill, which has an unusual D-shape over 1 km wide in the center, crossed the abyssal hill, visited two local hummocks on top, and then attempted to find volcanic activity on the near slope of EPR axis by going as far west was possible during the dive. Heavy sediment everywhere on the abyssal hill, to the depth of push cores (~30 cm) and probably much deeper in many areas and 4 rock samples from the abyssal hill were quite weathered with little glass intact, suggest that this site is unaffected by the underlying O-AML. Upslope toward the EPR west of the abyssal hill, 4 rocks collected appear somewhat younger, and sediment became thinner. In addition, 3 CTD tow-yos over each O-AML found no evidence of active

  18. Lake-level rise in the late Pleistocene and active subaquatic volcanism since the Holocene in Lake Kivu, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Kelly Ann; Smets, Benoît; De Batist, Marc; Hilbe, Michael; Schmid, Martin; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2014-09-01

    The history of Lake Kivu is strongly linked to the activity of the Virunga volcanoes. Subaerial and subaquatic volcanoes, in addition to lake-level changes, shape the subaquatic morphologic and structural features in Lake Kivu's Main Basin. Previous studies revealed that volcanic eruptions blocked the former outlet of the lake to the north in the late Pleistocene, leading to a substantial rise in the lake level and subsequently the present-day thermohaline stratification. Additional studies have speculated that volcanic and seismic activities threaten to trigger a catastrophic release of the large amount of gases dissolved in the lake. The current study presents a bathymetric mapping and seismic profiling survey that covers the volcanically active area of the Main Basin at a resolution that is unprecedented for Lake Kivu. New geomorphologic features identified on the lake floor can accurately describe related lake-floor processes for the first time. The late Pleistocene lowstand is observed at 425 m depth, and volcanic cones, tuff rings, and lava flows observed above this level indicate both subaerial and subaquatic volcanic activities during the Holocene. The geomorphologic analysis yields new implications on the geologic processes that have shaped Lake Kivu's basin, and the presence of young volcanic features can be linked to the possibility of a lake overturn.

  19. Seafloor doming driven by degassing processes unveils sprouting volcanism in coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Stella; Vallefuoco, Mattia; Tassi, Franco; Vaselli, Orlando; Giannini, Luciano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Caliro, Stefano; Sacchi, Marco; Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Ventura, Guido

    2016-03-01

    We report evidences of active seabed doming and gas discharge few kilometers offshore from the Naples harbor (Italy). Pockmarks, mounds, and craters characterize the seabed. These morphologies represent the top of shallow crustal structures including pagodas, faults and folds affecting the present-day seabed. They record upraise, pressurization, and release of He and CO2 from mantle melts and decarbonation reactions of crustal rocks. These gases are likely similar to those that feed the hydrothermal systems of the Ischia, Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius active volcanoes, suggesting the occurrence of a mantle source variously mixed to crustal fluids beneath the Gulf of Naples. The seafloor swelling and breaching by gas upraising and pressurization processes require overpressures in the order of 2-3 MPa. Seabed doming, faulting, and gas discharge are manifestations of non-volcanic unrests potentially preluding submarine eruptions and/or hydrothermal explosions.

  20. Seafloor doming driven by degassing processes unveils sprouting volcanism in coastal areas

    PubMed Central

    Passaro, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Stella; Vallefuoco, Mattia; Tassi, Franco; Vaselli, Orlando; Giannini, Luciano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Caliro, Stefano; Sacchi, Marco; Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Ventura, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We report evidences of active seabed doming and gas discharge few kilometers offshore from the Naples harbor (Italy). Pockmarks, mounds, and craters characterize the seabed. These morphologies represent the top of shallow crustal structures including pagodas, faults and folds affecting the present-day seabed. They record upraise, pressurization, and release of He and CO2 from mantle melts and decarbonation reactions of crustal rocks. These gases are likely similar to those that feed the hydrothermal systems of the Ischia, Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius active volcanoes, suggesting the occurrence of a mantle source variously mixed to crustal fluids beneath the Gulf of Naples. The seafloor swelling and breaching by gas upraising and pressurization processes require overpressures in the order of 2–3 MPa. Seabed doming, faulting, and gas discharge are manifestations of non-volcanic unrests potentially preluding submarine eruptions and/or hydrothermal explosions. PMID:26925957

  1. Seafloor doming driven by degassing processes unveils sprouting volcanism in coastal areas.

    PubMed

    Passaro, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Stella; Vallefuoco, Mattia; Tassi, Franco; Vaselli, Orlando; Giannini, Luciano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Caliro, Stefano; Sacchi, Marco; Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Ventura, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We report evidences of active seabed doming and gas discharge few kilometers offshore from the Naples harbor (Italy). Pockmarks, mounds, and craters characterize the seabed. These morphologies represent the top of shallow crustal structures including pagodas, faults and folds affecting the present-day seabed. They record upraise, pressurization, and release of He and CO2 from mantle melts and decarbonation reactions of crustal rocks. These gases are likely similar to those that feed the hydrothermal systems of the Ischia, Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius active volcanoes, suggesting the occurrence of a mantle source variously mixed to crustal fluids beneath the Gulf of Naples. The seafloor swelling and breaching by gas upraising and pressurization processes require overpressures in the order of 2-3 MPa. Seabed doming, faulting, and gas discharge are manifestations of non-volcanic unrests potentially preluding submarine eruptions and/or hydrothermal explosions. PMID:26925957

  2. Autonomous Sensorweb Operations for Integrated Space, In-Situ Monitoring of Volcanic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve A.; Doubleday, Joshua; Kedar, Sharon; Davies, Ashley G.; Lahusen, Richard; Song, Wenzhan; Shirazi, Behrooz; Mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    We have deployed and demonstrated operations of an integrated space in-situ sensorweb for monitoring volcanic activity. This sensorweb includes a network of ground sensors deployed to the Mount Saint Helens volcano as well as the Earth Observing One spacecraft. The ground operations and space operations are interlinked in that ground-based intelligent event detections can cause the space segment to acquire additional data via observation requests and space-based data acquisitions (thermal imagery) can trigger reconfigurations of the ground network to allocate increased bandwidth to areas of the network best situated to observe the activity. The space-based operations are enabled by an automated mission planning and tasking capability which utilizes several Opengeospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensorweb Enablement (SWE) standards which enable acquiring data, alerts, and tasking using web services. The ground-based segment also supports similar protocols to enable seamless tasking and data delivery. The space-based segment also supports onboard development of data products (thermal summary images indicating areas of activity, quicklook context images, and thermal activity alerts). These onboard developed products have reduced data volume (compared to the complete images) which enables them to be transmitted to the ground more rapidly in engineering channels.

  3. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.

    1980-08-01

    An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

  4. Geochemical modeling of groundwater evolution in a volcanic aquifer system of Kumamoto area, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, S.; Hosono, T.; Ide, K.; Shimada, J.

    2013-12-01

    Inverse geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) was used to identify the evolution of groundwater in a volcanic aquifer system of Kumamoto area (103 Km2) in southern Japan. The modeling was based on flow paths proposed by different researcher using different techniques, and detailed chemical analysis of groundwater along the flow paths. Potential phases were constrained using general trends in hydrochemical data of groundwater, mineralogical data, and saturation indices data of minerals in groundwater. Hydrochemical data from a total of 180 spring, river and well water samples were used to evaluate water quality and to determine processes that control groundwater chemistry. The samples from the area were classified as recharge zone water (Ca-HCO3 and Ca-SO4 type), lateral flow to discharge zone water (Ca-HCO3 and Na-HCO3 type) and stagnant zone water (Na-Cl type). The inverse geochemical modeling demonstrated that relatively few phases are required to derive water chemistry in the area. The downstream changes in groundwater chemistry could be largely explained by the weathering of plagioclase to kaolinite, with possible contributions from weathering of biotite and pyroxene. In a broad sense, the reactions responsible for the hydrochemical evolution in the area fall into three categories (1) silicate weathering reactions (2) precipitation of amorphous silica and clay minerals and (3) Cation exchange reactions of Ca2+ to Na+.

  5. Assessing the volcanic hazard for Rome: 40Ar/39Ar and In-SAR constraints on the most recent eruptive activity and present-day uplift at Colli Albani Volcanic District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, F.; Gaeta, M.; Giaccio, B.; Jicha, B. R.; Palladino, D. M.; Polcari, M.; Sottili, G.; Taddeucci, J.; Florindo, F.; Stramondo, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar data which allow us to refine the recurrence time for the most recent eruptive activity occurred at Colli Albani Volcanic District (CAVD) and constrain its geographic area. Time elapsed since the last eruption (36 kyr) overruns the recurrence time (31 kyr) in the last 100 kyr. New interferometric synthetic aperture radar data, covering the years 1993-2010, reveal ongoing inflation with maximum uplift rates (>2 mm/yr) in the area hosting the most recent (<200 ka) vents, suggesting that the observed uplift might be caused by magma injection within the youngest plumbing system. Finally, we frame the present deformation within the structural pattern of the area of Rome, characterized by 50 m of regional uplift since 200 ka and by geologic evidence for a recent (<2000 years) switch of the local stress-field, highlighting that the precursors of a new phase of volcanic activity are likely occurring at the CAVD.

  6. Mid-Miocene Silicic Volcanism of the Three Fingers - Mahogany Mountain Area, SE Oregon - Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, P.; Streck, M. J.; Ferns, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earlier work identified two adjacent caldera systems, the Mahogany Mountain and Three Fingers calderas as the centerpiece of voluminous rhyolitic volcanism on the eastern margin of the Oregon-Idaho graben during the mid-Miocene. Silicic volcanism of Three Fingers-Mahogany Mtn. area is part of the Lake Owyhee volcanic field, Oregon and belongs to widespread rhyolites associated with the Columbia River Basalt province. Here we revisit field evidence and establish relationships between intra-caldera units of Three Fingers and Mahogany Mtn. calderas, and their outflow facies, the tuffs of Spring Creek and Leslie Gulch. In addition, we assess the distribution of entrained mafic clasts and their often anomalously high, nearly ore-grade concentrations of rare earth elements (REE). Previous mapping identified two groups of intra-caldera rhyolite units: 1) intra-caldera tuffs of Spring Creek and Leslie Gulch and 2) younger rhyolite lavas (Trp) within Three Fingers Caldera and cross-cutting rhyolite dikes within the core of Mahogany Mtn. Caldera. Our mapping determines that devitrified Trp of Three Fingers area is equivalent to surrounding often glassy, pumiceous to dense or brecciated rhyolite flows mapped before as intra-caldera tuff of Spring Creek, and all are compositionally indistinguishable from cross-cutting dikes within Mahogany Mtn. Reinterpreted rhyolites of Three Fingers Caldera lack vitroclastic textures and are geochemically distinct from outflow tuff of Spring Creek which in turn can be distinguished from the tuff of Leslie Gulch. Outflow tuff of Spring Creek is Fe-rich, low silica rhyolite (~74 wt.% SiO2, 3 wt.% FeO, ~1600 ppm Ba) as compared to less Fe rich, high-silica rhyolite (~77 wt.% SiO2, 2 wt.% FeO, ~200 ppm Ba) of intra-caldera units. Outflow tuff of Leslie Gulch is also high-silica rhyolite but Ba rich (~1500 ppm). We interpret the investigated Three Fingers area as a rhyolite dome field, erupting subsequent to caldera collapse. There, abundant post

  7. U.S. Geological Survey's Alert Notification System for Volcanic Activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, Cynthia A.; Guffanti, Marianne C.

    2006-01-01

    The United States and its territories have about 170 volcanoes that have been active during the past 10,000 years, and most could erupt again in the future. In the past 500 years, 80 U.S. volcanoes have erupted one or more times. About 50 of these recently active volcanoes are monitored, although not all to the same degree. Through its five volcano observatories, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) issues information and warnings to the public about volcanic activity. For clarity of warnings during volcanic crises, the USGS has now standardized the alert-notification system used at its observatories.

  8. Sulfur dioxide - Episodic injection shows evidence for active Venus volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Pioneer Venus ultraviolet spectra from the first 5 years of operation show a decline (by more than a factor of 10) in sulfur dioxide abundance at the cloud tops and in the amount of submicron haze above the clouds. At the time of the Pioneer Venus encounter, the values for both parameters greatly exceeded earlier upper limits. However, Venus had a similar appearance in the late 1950's, implying the episodic injection of sulfur dioxide possibly caused by episodic volcanism. The amount of haze in the Venus middle atmosphere is about ten times that found in earth's stratosphere after the most recent major volcanic eruptions, and the thermal energy required for this injection on Venus is greater by about an order of magnitude than the largest of these recent earth eruptions and about as large as the Krakatoa eruption of 1883. The episodic behavior of sulfur dioxide implies that steady-state models of the chemistry and dynamics of cloud-top regions may be of limited use.

  9. InSAR imaging of volcanic deformation over cloud-prone areas - Aleutian islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter-tosubcentimeter precision and spatial resolution of tens-of meters over a relatively large region. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, INSAR is an important technique for measuring ground-surface deformation of volcanoes over cloud-prone and rainy regions such as the Aleutian Islands, where only less than 5 percent of optical imagery is usable due to inclement weather conditions. The spatial distribution of surface deformation data, derived from INSAR images, enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic processes. This paper reviews the basics of INSAR for volcanic deformation mapping and the INSAR studies of ten Aleutian volcanoes associated with both eruptive and noneruptive activity. These studies demonstrate that all-weather INSAR imaging can improve our understanding of how the Aleutian volcanoes work and enhance our capability to predict future eruptions and associated hazards.

  10. Detection of aeromagnetic anomaly change associated with volcanic activity: An application of the generalized mis-tie control method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Tadashi; Utsugi, Mitsuru; Okuma, Shigeo; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2009-12-01

    Repeat aeromagnetic surveys may assist in mapping and monitoring long-term changes associated with volcanic activity. However, when dealing with repeat aeromagnetic survey data, the problem of how to extract the real change of magnetic anomalies from a limited set of observations arises, i.e. the problem of spatial aliasing. Recent development of the generalized mis-tie control method for aeromagnetic surveys flown at variable elevations enables us to statistically extract the errors from ambiguous noise sources. This technique can be applied to overcome the spatial alias effect when detecting magnetic anomaly changes between aeromagnetic surveys flown at different times. We successfully apply this technique to Asama Volcano, one of the active volcanoes in Japan, which erupted in 2004. Following the volcanic activity in 2005, we conducted a helicopter-borne aeromagnetic survey, which we compare here to the result from a previous survey flown in 1992. To discuss small changes in magnetic anomalies induced by volcanic activity, it is essential to estimate the accuracy of the reference and the repeat aeromagnetic measurements and the probable errors induced by data processing. In our case, the positioning inaccuracy of the 1992 reference survey was the most serious factor affecting the estimation of the magnetic anomaly change because GPS was still in an early stage at that time. However, our analysis revealed that the magnetic anomaly change over the Asama Volcano area from 1992 to 2005 exceeded the estimated error at three locations, one of which is interpreted as a loss of magnetization induced by volcanic activity. In this study, we suffered from the problem of positioning inaccuracy in the 1992 survey data, and it was important to evaluate its effect when deriving the magnetic anomaly change.

  11. Magma injection beneath the urban area of Naples: a new mechanism for the 2012-2013 volcanic unrest at Campi Flegrei caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, Luca; Pepe, Susi; Castaldo, Raffaele; Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, Giovanni; Ricciolino, Patrizia; Tizzani, Pietro; Casu, Francesco; Lanari, Riccardo; Manzo, Mariarosaria; Martini, Marcello; Sansosti, Eugenio; Zinno, Ivana

    2015-08-01

    We found the first evidence, in the last 30 years, of a renewed magmatic activity at Campi Flegrei caldera from January 2012 to June 2013. The ground deformation, observed through satellite interferometry and GPS measurements, have been interpreted as the effect of the intrusion at shallow depth (3090 ± 138 m) of 0.0042 ± 0.0002 km3 of magma within a sill. This interrupts about 28 years of dominant hydrothermal activity and occurs in the context of an unrest phase which began in 2005 and within a more general ground uplift that goes on since 1950. This discovery has implications on the evaluation of the volcanic risk and in the volcanic surveillance of this densely populated area.

  12. Magma injection beneath the urban area of Naples: a new mechanism for the 2012-2013 volcanic unrest at Campi Flegrei caldera.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, Luca; Pepe, Susi; Castaldo, Raffaele; Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, Giovanni; Ricciolino, Patrizia; Tizzani, Pietro; Casu, Francesco; Lanari, Riccardo; Manzo, Mariarosaria; Martini, Marcello; Sansosti, Eugenio; Zinno, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    We found the first evidence, in the last 30 years, of a renewed magmatic activity at Campi Flegrei caldera from January 2012 to June 2013. The ground deformation, observed through satellite interferometry and GPS measurements, have been interpreted as the effect of the intrusion at shallow depth (3090 ± 138 m) of 0.0042 ± 0.0002 km(3) of magma within a sill. This interrupts about 28 years of dominant hydrothermal activity and occurs in the context of an unrest phase which began in 2005 and within a more general ground uplift that goes on since 1950. This discovery has implications on the evaluation of the volcanic risk and in the volcanic surveillance of this densely populated area. PMID:26279090

  13. Magma injection beneath the urban area of Naples: a new mechanism for the 2012–2013 volcanic unrest at Campi Flegrei caldera

    PubMed Central

    D’Auria, Luca; Pepe, Susi; Castaldo, Raffaele; Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, Giovanni; Ricciolino, Patrizia; Tizzani, Pietro; Casu, Francesco; Lanari, Riccardo; Manzo, Mariarosaria; Martini, Marcello; Sansosti, Eugenio; Zinno, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    We found the first evidence, in the last 30 years, of a renewed magmatic activity at Campi Flegrei caldera from January 2012 to June 2013. The ground deformation, observed through satellite interferometry and GPS measurements, have been interpreted as the effect of the intrusion at shallow depth (3090 ± 138 m) of 0.0042 ± 0.0002 km3 of magma within a sill. This interrupts about 28 years of dominant hydrothermal activity and occurs in the context of an unrest phase which began in 2005 and within a more general ground uplift that goes on since 1950. This discovery has implications on the evaluation of the volcanic risk and in the volcanic surveillance of this densely populated area. PMID:26279090

  14. Unraveling the lipolytic activity of thermophilic bacteria isolated from a volcanic environment.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulou, Panagiota M; Savvides, Alexander L; Karagouni, Amalia D; Hatzinikolaou, Dimitris G

    2013-01-01

    In a bioprospecting effort towards novel thermostable lipases, we assessed the lipolytic profile of 101 bacterial strains isolated from the volcanic area of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece. Screening of lipase activity was performed both in agar plates and liquid cultures using olive oil as carbon source. Significant differences were observed between the two screening methods with no clear correlation between them. While the percentage of lipase producing strains identified in agar plates was only 17%, lipolytic activity in liquid culture supernatants was detected for 74% of them. Nine strains exhibiting elevated extracellular lipase activities were selected for lipase production and biochemical characterization. The majority of lipase producers revealed high phylogenetic similarity with Geobacillus species and related genera, whilst one of them was identified as Aneurinibacillus sp. Lipase biosynthesis strongly depended on the carbon source that supplemented the culture medium. Olive oil induced lipase production in all strains, but maximum enzyme yields for some of the strains were also obtained with Tween-80, mineral oil, and glycerol. Partially purified lipases revealed optimal activity at 70-80°C and pH 8-9. Extensive thermal stability studies revealed marked thermostability for the majority of the lipases as well as a two-step thermal deactivation pattern. PMID:23738330

  15. Volcanism in Eastern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauthen, Clay; Coombs, Cassandra R.

    1996-01-01

    In 1891, the Virunga Mountains of Eastern Zaire were first acknowledged as volcanoes, and since then, the Virunga Mountain chain has demonstrated its potentially violent volcanic nature. The Virunga Mountains lie across the Eastern African Rift in an E-W direction located north of Lake Kivu. Mt. Nyamuragira and Mt. Nyiragongo present the most hazard of the eight mountains making up Virunga volcanic field, with the most recent activity during the 1970-90's. In 1977, after almost eighty years of moderate activity and periods of quiescence, Mt. Nyamuragira became highly active with lava flows that extruded from fissures on flanks circumscribing the volcano. The flows destroyed vast areas of vegetation and Zairian National Park areas, but no casualties were reported. Mt. Nyiragongo exhibited the same type volcanic activity, in association with regional tectonics that effected Mt. Nyamuragira, with variations of lava lake levels, lava fountains, and lava flows that resided in Lake Kivu. Mt. Nyiragongo, recently named a Decade volcano, presents both a direct and an indirect hazard to the inhabitants and properties located near the volcano. The Virunga volcanoes pose four major threats: volcanic eruptions, lava flows, toxic gas emission (CH4 and CO2), and earthquakes. Thus, the volcanoes of the Eastern African volcanic field emanate harm to the surrounding area by the forecast of volcanic eruptions. During the JSC Summer Fellowship program, we will acquire and collate remote sensing, photographic (Space Shuttle images), topographic and field data. In addition, maps of the extent and morphology(ies) of the features will be constructed using digital image information. The database generated will serve to create a Geographic Information System for easy access of information of the Eastem African volcanic field. The analysis of volcanism in Eastern Africa will permit a comparison for those areas from which we have field data. Results from this summer's work will permit

  16. Volcanic activity and satellite-detected thermal anomalies at Central American volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator); Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A large nuee ardente eruption occurred at Santiaguito volcano, within the test area on 16 September 1973. Through a system of local observers, the eruption has been described, reported to the international scientific community, extent of affected area mapped, and the new ash sampled. A more extensive report on this event will be prepared. The eruption is an excellent example of the kind of volcanic situation in which satellite thermal imagery might be useful. The Santiaguito dome is a complex mass with a whole series of historically active vents. It's location makes access difficult, yet its activity is of great concern to large agricultural populations who live downslope. Santiaguito has produced a number of large eruptions with little apparent warning. In the earlier ground survey large thermal anomalies were identified at Santiaguito. There is no way of knowing whether satellite monitoring could have detected changes in thermal anomaly patterns related to this recent event, but the position of thermal anomalies on Santiaguito and any changes in their character would be relevant information.

  17. Morpho-structural evolution of a volcanic island developed inside an active oceanic rift: S. Miguel Island (Terceira Rift, Azores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibrant, A. L. R.; Hildenbrand, A.; Marques, F. O.; Weiss, B.; Boulesteix, T.; Hübscher, C.; Lüdmann, T.; Costa, A. C. G.; Catalão, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of volcanic islands is generally marked by fast construction phases alternating with destruction by a variety of mass-wasting processes. More specifically, volcanic islands located in areas of intense regional deformation can be particularly prone to gravitational destabilisation. The island of S. Miguel (Azores) has developed during the last 1 Myr inside the active Terceira Rift, a major tectonic structure materializing the present boundary between the Eurasian and Nubian lithospheric plates. In this work, we depict the evolution of the island, based on high-resolution DEM data, stratigraphic and structural analyses, high-precision K-Ar dating on separated mineral phases, and offshore data (bathymetry and seismic profiles). The new results indicate that: (1) the oldest volcanic complex (Nordeste), composing the easternmost part of the island, was dominantly active between ca. 850 and 750 ka, and was subsequently affected by a major south-directed flank collapse. (2) Between at least 500 ka and 250 ka, the landslide depression was massively filled by a thick lava succession erupted from volcanic cones and domes distributed along the main E-W collapse scar. (3) Since 250 kyr, the western part of this succession (Furnas area) was affected by multiple vertical collapses; associated plinian eruptions produced large pyroclastic deposits, here dated at ca. 60 ka and less than 25 ka. (4) During the same period, the eastern part of the landslide scar was enlarged by retrogressive erosion, producing the large Povoação valley, which was gradually filled by sediments and young volcanic products. (5) The Fogo volcano, in the middle of S. Miguel, is here dated between ca. 270 and 17 ka, and was affected by, at least, one southwards flank collapse. (6) The Sete Cidades volcano, in the western end of the island, is here dated between ca. 91 and 13 ka, and experienced mutliple caldera collapses; a landslide to the North is also suspected from the presence of a

  18. Neogene to Quaternary basalts of the Jabal Eghei (Nuqay) area (south Libya): Two distinct volcanic events or continuous volcanism with gradual shift in magma composition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radivojević, Maša; Toljić, Marinko; Turki, Salah M.; Bojić, Zoran; Šarić, Kristina; Cvetković, Vladica

    2015-02-01

    This study reports and discusses a set of new K/Ar age and new petrochemical data on basalts of the Jabal Eghei (Nuqay) area (south Libya). This area is part of a > 1000 km long NNW-SSE Libyan volcanic field that stretches from the Mediterranean coastal near Tripoli to the Tibesti massif in Chad. Whole rock K/Ar ages, stratigraphy, volcanology and rock petrochemistry indicate that the Jabal Eghei developed during two volcanic events. The first occurred from the Middle Miocene to the Pliocene (K/Ar ages from ~ 16 to ~ 5 Ma) when large volumes of low aspect ratio lava flows of transitional basalts formed. The second event happened in Pliocene-mid-Pleistocene time (4-≤ 1 Ma) and it gave rise to basanite spatter to scoria pyroclastic cones and subordinate lava flow facies. The transitional basalts are less primitive and less enriched in incompatible trace elements than the basanites. Petrochemical characteristics reveal that the transitional basalts underwent weak to moderate olivine-dominated fractionation and that crustal assimilation had negligible effects. REE geochemical modeling shows that primary magmas of both transitional basalts and basanites formed by melting of a similar garnet-bearing, primitive mantle-like source with degree of melting of 3-5% and ≤ 1%, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the transitional basalts show systematic compositional changes in time because progressively younger rocks are petrochemically more similar to basanites. We argue that our data definitely prove that the age pattern along the entire Libyan volcanic field is much more complex than it was thought before.

  19. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 1--major and trace element composition.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W; Bellomo, S; Brusca, L; Martin, R S; Saiano, F; Parello, F

    2015-01-01

    Active biomonitoring using moss-bags was applied to an active volcanic environment for the first time. Bioaccumulation originating from atmospheric deposition was evaluated by exposing mixtures of washed and air-dried mosses (Sphagnum species) at 24 sites on Mt. Etna volcano (Italy). Concentrations of major and a large suite of trace elements were analysed by inductively coupled mass and optical spectrometry (ICP-MS and ICP-OES) after total acid digestion. Of the 49 elements analysed those which closely reflect summit volcanic emissions were S, Tl, Bi, Se, Cd, As, Cu, B, Na, Fe, Al. Enrichment factors and cluster analysis allowed clear distinction between volcanogenic, geogenic and anthropogenic inputs that affect the local atmospheric deposition. This study demonstrates that active biomonitoring with moss-bags is a suitable and robust technique for implementing inexpensive monitoring in scarcely accessible and harsh volcanic environments, giving time-averaged quantitative results of the local exposure to volcanic emissions. This task is especially important in the study area because the summit area of Mt. Etna is visited by nearly one hundred thousand tourists each year who are exposed to potentially harmful volcanic emissions. PMID:25262949

  20. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  1. Okataina Volcanic Centre, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: A review of volcanism and synchronous pluton development in an active, dominantly silicic caldera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. W.; Deering, C. D.; Burt, R. M.; Sewell, S.; Shane, P. A. R.; Matthews, N. E.

    2014-01-01

    The Okataina Volcanic Centre (OVC) is one of eight caldera systems, which form the central part of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. During its ~ 625 kyr volcanic history, which perhaps equates to ~ 750 kyr of magmatic history, the OVC has experienced two definite periods of caldera collapse (Matahina, ~ 322 ka, and Rotoiti, for which dates of 61 and 45 ka have recently been published), one probable collapse (Utu, ~ 557 ka) and one possible collapse (Kawerau, ~ 33 ka). Each collapse accompanied voluminous ignimbrite eruptions. Rhyolite dome extrusion and explosive tephra eruptions have occurred throughout the history of OVC.

  2. Monitoring Io volcanic activity using the Keck AO system: 2-5μm sunlit and eclipse observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, F.; de Pater, I.; Le Mignant, D.; Roe, H. G.; Fusco, T.; Graham, J. R.; Prange, R.; Macintosh, B.

    2002-12-01

    Galileo provided us with spectacular images of the volcanically active Io moon over the last 7 years, but we understand little about the physical processes occurring on this moon. Groundbased monitoring programs help characterize the long time evolution of Io's volcanic activity, such as the frequency, spatial distribution and temperature of hot spots and outbursts. Our group started a monitoring program of Io's volcanic activity using the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) system and its recently installed near-infrared camera NIRC2. Here we report groundbased observations of Io conducted in December 2001 (UT), at 0.05" resolution (120-140 km on Io) in K', i.e., ~4 times better than HST and than global Galileo NIMS images. Our 1-5 micron data enable us to determine the temperature of individual hot spots, a key parameter for geophysical/volcanic flow models. We will present: i) Io in reflected sunlight in K', L', and M bands. We used Io itself as reference source for the wavefront sensor of the AO system. Our L and M-band images show both reflected sunlight and thermal emission from volcanic hot spots. The contrast of images is enhanced using the MISTRAL deconvolution algorithme. The 12 images taken on 10 days provides a complete survey of Io surface during one full rotation. 26 active hot spots were detected on the entire surface in L band (3.8μm), approximatively three times more in M band (4.7μm). One active hot spot is seen in K band (2.2μm) in the Pele area. A study of individual hot spot (temperature, emission area, nature) will be presented. ii) Io in eclipse. While Io is in Jupiter's shadow, it is invisible to the wavefront sensor, but its hot spots are easily visible in the near-infrared. We imaged Io during the 18 Dec. 2001 eclipse using Ganymede (30" from Io, moving relative to Io at ~0.5"/min) as a reference source. A dozen of faint hot spots are detected at both K' and L', allowing temperature estimates for each of them. Keck Science team is composed of

  3. Geologic Investigations Spurred by Analog Testing at the 7504 Cone-SP Mountain Area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.

    2015-01-01

    The SP Mountain area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, AZ, has been used as an analog mission development site for NASA since 1998. This area consists of basaltic cinder cones, lava flows and maar craters that have been active since mid-Miocene, with the youngest events occurring within the last 10,000 years. The area has been used because its geologic and topographic resemblance to lunar and Martian terrains provides an ideal venue for testing hardware and science operations practices that might be employed on planetary surfaces, as well as training astronauts in field geology. Analog operations have often led to insights that spurred new scientific investigations. Most recently, an investigation of the 7504 cone was initiated due to perceptions that Apollo-style traverse plans executed during the Desert RATS 2010 mission had characterized the area incorrectly, leading to concerns that the Apollo traverse planning process was scientifically flawed. This investigation revealed a complex history of fissure eruptions of lava and cinders, cinder cone development, a cone-fill-and-spill episode, extensive rheomorphic lava flow initiation and emplacement, and cone sector collapse that led to a final lava flow. This history was not discernible on pre-RATS mission photogeology, although independent analysis of RATS 2010 data and samples develped a "75% complete solution" that validated the pre-RATS mission planning and Apollo traverse planning and execution. The study also pointed out that the development of scientific knowledge with time in a given field area is not linear, but may follow a functional form that rises steeply in the early period of an investigation but flattens out in the later period, asymptotically approaching a theoretical "complete knowledge" point that probably cannot be achieved. This implies that future human missions must be prepared to shift geographic areas of investigation regularly if significant science returns are to be forthcoming.

  4. Geologic Investigations Spurred by Analog Testing at the 7504 Cone-Sp Mountain Area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Needham, D. H.; Evans, C. A.; Skinner, J. A.; Feng, W.

    2015-12-01

    The SP Mountain area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, AZ, has been used as an analog mission development site for NASA since 1998. This area consists of basaltic cinder cones, lava flows and maar craters that have been active since mid-Miocene, with the youngest events occurring within the last 10,000 years. The area has been used because its geologic and topographic resemblance to lunar and Martian terrains provides an ideal venue for testing hardware and science operations practices that might be employed on planetary surfaces, as well as training astronauts in field geology. Analog operations have often led to insights that spurred new scientific investigations. Most recently, an investigation of the 7504 cone was initiated due to perceptions that Apollo-style traverse plans executed during the Desert RATS 2010 mission had characterized the area incorrectly, leading to concerns that the Apollo traverse planning process was scientifically flawed. This investigation revealed a complex history of fissure eruptions of lava and cinders, cinder cone development, a cone-fill-and-spill episode, extensive rheomorphic lava flow initiation and emplacement, and cone sector collapse that led to a final lava flow. This history was not discernible on pre-RATS mission photogeology, although independent analysis of RATS 2010 data and samples develped a "75% complete solution" that validated the pre-RATS mission planning and Apollo traverse planning and execution. The study also pointed out that the development of scientific knowledge with time in a given field area is not linear, but may follow a functional form that rises steeply in the early period of an investigation but flattens out in the later period, asymptotically approaching a theoretical "complete knowledge" point that probably cannot be achieved. This implies that future human missions must be prepared to shift geographic areas of investigation regularly if significant science returns are to be forthcoming.

  5. Possible Recent Volcanic Activity on the East Pacific Rise at 9° 32'N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, T.; Edwards, M. H.; Johnson, P.; Fornari, D. J.; Perfit, M.; Schouten, H.; Tivey, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    In 2001, the DSL-120A near-bottom mapping system was used to survey a 31.4 km by 6.8 km corridor of the East Pacific Rise crest between 9° 25'N and 9° 57'N. The mapping system included a 120 kHz sidescan and interferometric bathymetry sonar that was used to produce 2 meter-resolution sidescan images of the corridor. The sidescan data depict three scarps located approximately 3 km west of the ridge axis that are interpreted to have been volcanically overprinted between 9° 31'N and 9° 32'N on the basis of sharply lineated features that are interrupted along-strike. In transcripts, video, and 35 mm film footage of the same region collected during Alvin Dive 2490 in 1992, these same scarps are documented as two inward-facing and one outward-facing vertical walls that are 17-18 m high. Co-registration of the DSL-120A and Alvin 2490 datasets shows a strong correlation between other features that are depicted in both the acoustic and photographic data, but the appearance of the scarps changes markedly between 1992 and 2001. In the DSL-120A sidescan data, amorphous-shaped regions of relatively high backscatter characterize the area where the scarps are thought to be volcanically overprinted. In some cases, these reflective patches appear to pond at the base of faults or to spill over the faults. To verify whether the morphology changes between 1992 and 2001 reflect recent volcanic activity on the flank of the ridge axis, we have located SeaMARC-II data for the same region collected in 1987. A cursory examination of the much lower-resolution SeaMARC-II sidescan images vaguely shows the presence of similarly-shaped reflective scarps in the approximate location of the new flow. We are presently reprocessing the SeaMARC-II data to improve the data resolution, making a map from the DSL-120A bathymetry data, and searching for additional datasets that may confirm the existence of a new off-axis flow. The results of our efforts will be reported in December.

  6. Volcanic signature of Basin and Range extension on the shrinking Cascade arc, Klamath Falls-Keno area, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, George R.; Hladky, Frank R.; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Murray, Robert B.; Wiley, Thomas J.

    2013-08-01

    geologic mapping of the Klamath Falls-Keno area revealed the complex relationship between subduction, crustal extension, and magmatic composition of the southern Oregon Cascade volcanic arc. Volcanism in the study area at ~7-4 Ma consisted of calc-alkaline basaltic andesite and andesite lava flowing over a relatively flat landscape. Local angular unconformities are evidence that Basin and Range extension began at by at least ~4 Ma and continues today with fault blocks tilting at a long-term rate of ~2°/Ma to 3°/Ma. Minimum NW-SE extension is ~1.5 km over ~28 km (~5%). High-alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) or low-K, low-Ti transitional high-alumina olivine tholeiite (LKLT) erupted within and adjacent to the back edge of the calc-alkaline arc as the edge receded westward at a rate of ~10 km/Ma at 2.7-0.45 Ma. The volcanic front migrated east much slower than the back arc migrated west: ~0 km/Ma for 6-0.4 Ma calc-alkaline rocks; ~0.7 km/Ma, if ~6 Ma HAOT-LKLT is included; and ~1 km/Ma, if highly differentiated 17-30 Ma volcanic rocks of the early Western Cascades are included. Declining convergence probably decreased asthenospheric corner flow, decreasing width of calc-alkaline and HAOT-LKLT volcanism and the associated heat flow anomaly, the margins of which focused on Basin and Range extension and leakage of HAOT-LKLT magma to the surface. This declining corner flow combined with steepening slab dip shifted the back arc west. Compensation of extension by volcanic intrusion and extrusion allowed growth of imposing range-front fault scarps only behind the trailing edge of the shrinking arc.

  7. Quantifying Heat Flow from a Restless Caldera: Shallow Measurement from a Vapor Dominated Area of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, R.; Harris, R. N.; Hurwitz, S.; Fulton, P. M.; Davis, M. G.; Werner, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    Any attempt to characterize the vigor of magmatic activity and forecast future volcanism in Yellowstone caldera requires knowledge regarding the thermal state of its magmatic system, one of the largest and most focused heat sources on Earth. Current knowledge of heat transport between magma and the ground surface is limited. Advective heat transport from the caldera has been quantified by measuring chloride flux from the major rivers draining the caldera, based on the assumptions of the chloride inventory method (Fournier, JVGR1979). We have quantified the total (conductive, advective, and evaporative) heat flux from one of the most active thermal areas in Yellowstone caldera, the Obsidian Pool thermal area (OPTA) which includes 0.1 km2 of thermal ground within the Mud Volcano thermal area. The OPTA is characterized by vapor dominated conditions. Rising steam and other gases (mainly CO2) fill open fractures beneath a low-permeability cap consisting of clay minerals (Bargar and Muffler, 1982). Conduction-dominated heat transfer through the clay cap is associated with a high temperature gradient. We made at least 4 soil-temperature measurements at 0-1 m depth at 251 locations in the OPTA and measured soil thermal conductivity in the laboratory. Evaporative heat from several thermal pools was quantified based on pool temperatures and meteorological data. Our preliminary analysis indicates that surface heat loss from OPTA is dominantly conductive. Extrapolation of the OPTA results to approximately 35 km2 of vapor-dominated area in Yellowstone caldera and surroundings would yield a total heat flow that constitutes a major fraction of the total heat power from Yellowstone’s magmatic system.

  8. Structural control on geothermal circulation in the Cerro Tuzgle-Tocomar geothermal volcanic area (Puna plateau, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Guido; Pinton, Annamaria; Cianfarra, Paola; Baez, Walter; Chiodi, Agostina; Viramonte, José; Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of the stratigraphical-structural framework and the hydrogeology of geothermal areas is fundamental for understanding the relationships between cap rocks, reservoir and circulation of geothermal fluids and for planning the exploitation of the field. The Cerro Tuzgle-Tocomar geothermal volcanic area (Puna plateau, Central Andes, NW Argentina) has a high geothermal potential. It is crossed by the active NW-SE trans-Andean tectonic lineament known as the Calama-Olacapato-Toro (COT) fault system, which favours a high secondary permeability testified by the presence of numerous springs. This study presents new stratigraphic and hydrogeological data on the geothermal field, together with the analysis from remote sensed image analysis of morphostructural evidences associated with the structural framework and active tectonics. Our data suggest that the main geothermal reservoir is located within or below the Pre-Palaeozoic-Ordovician basement units, characterised by unevenly distributed secondary permeability. The reservoir is recharged by infiltration in the ridges above 4500 m a.s.l., where basement rocks are in outcrop. Below 4500 m a.s.l., the reservoir is covered by the low permeable Miocene-Quaternary units that allow a poor circulation of shallow groundwater. Geothermal fluids upwell in areas with more intense fracturing, especially where main regional structures, particularly NW-SE COT-parallel lineaments, intersect with secondary structures, such as at the Tocomar field. Away from the main tectonic features, such as at the Cerro Tuzgle field, the less developed network of faults and fractures allows only a moderate upwelling of geothermal fluids and a mixing between hot and shallow cold waters. The integration of field-based and remote-sensing analyses at the Cerro Tuzgle-Tocomar area proved to be effective in approaching the prospection of remote geothermal fields, and in defining the conceptual model for geothermal circulation.

  9. Sacks-Evertson Borehole Strainmeters: New Designs, Volcanic Activity and Slow Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, A. T.; Sacks, S.

    2008-12-01

    The quality of borehole strain data depends on a variety of factors, perhaps the most important being the character of rock in the immediate vicinity of the instrument. In tectonically active areas it is often difficult to find sites that provide suitable geometry for studying the activity and also have strong competent rock with few or no fractures. We have tested new designs, for both dilatometers and 3 component Sacks-Evertson hydraulic strainmeters, and have found that, in sites we would previously have rejected because of rock quality, we now obtain reliable data. The approach depends on two factors: the sensing components of the instruments have always been ~3m in length so that they integrate over that vertical interval of rock and additionally we can now have a weak inclusion so that we minimize the mechanical impedance contrast between rock and cement plus instrument. Our current three component design is radically different from the modified Sakata-type used previously. Numerical modeling of the design shows that the response to strain change is essentially perfect; compared with earlier designs this gives better shear response and avoids strain concentrations in the rock wall. This design also provides good data from a site with very low rock quality. Data recorded in Taiwan from the 'weak' single component system have been critically important in allowing us to identify and model slow earthquakes triggered by typhoons. During a 5 year interval we have observed 20 slow earthquakes (durations of hours to days), 11 of which are coincident with typhoons (30 during that time span). This part of Taiwan (south east) experiences extremely high deformation rates but has a paucity of large earthquakes. Our data and modeling indicate that the stressed region is segmented by slow relief of stress, reducing the likelihood of seismic failure over extended fault lengths. Borehole strain recordings of volcanic activity in Montserrat and in Iceland have been critical in

  10. Fluxes of deep CO 2 in the volcanic areas of central-southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambardella, Barbara; Cardellini, Carlo; Chiodini, Giovanni; Frondini, Francesco; Marini, Luigi; Ottonello, Giulio; Vetuschi Zuccolini, Marino

    2004-08-01

    Both the shallow (organic-derived) and deep (mantellic-magmatic-metamorphic) fluxes of CO 2 [ ΦCO 2, mass time -1] and specific fluxes of CO 2 [ ϕCO 2 mass time -1 surface -1] dissolving in the shallow groundwaters of the volcanic areas of Amiata, Vulsini-Vico-Sabatini, Albani, Roccamonfina, Vesuvio, Vulture, and Etna were evaluated by partitioning the composed population of total dissolved inorganic carbon in two individual populations and subsequent subtraction of local background population. The flux of deep CO 2 released from the geothermal fields of Piancastagnaio (Amiata), Torre Alfina, Latera, Marta, Bracciano south, Cesano, and Mofete and from the Overall Northern Latium Hydrothermal Reservoir were also evaluated by means of the total surface heat flux and the enthalpy and CO 2 molality of the single liquid phase circulating in each geothermal reservoir. These data suggest that the ϕCO 2 released to the atmosphere varies from 9.5×10 6 to 3.0×10 6 mol year -1 km -2, over the geothermal fields of Bracciano south and Cesano, respectively, and that a total ΦCO 2 of 3.8×10 8 mol year -1 is cumulatively released from the geothermal fields of Torre Alfina, Latera and Cesano extending over an area of only 66 km 2. In addition, a flux of ˜2.2×10 11 to 3.8×10 11 mol year -1 of gaseous CO 2 entering the atmosphere is obtained for the entire anomalous area of central Italy, extending from the Tyrrhenian coastline to the Apennine chain (45,000 km 2). Thus terrestrial CO 2 emission in central-southern Italy appears to be a significant carbon source.

  11. Paterae on Io: Volcanic Activity Observed by Galileo's NIMS and SSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, Rosaly; Kamp, Lucas; Smythe, W. D.; Carlson, R.; Radebaugh, Jani; Gregg, Tracy K.

    2003-01-01

    Paterae are the most ubiquitous volcanic construct on Io s surface. Paterae are irregular craters, or complex craters with scalloped edges, interpreted as calderas or pit craters. Data from Galileo has shown that the activity of Ionian paterae is often confined to its interior and that generally lava flows are not seen spilling out over the edges. We use observations from Galileo s Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) to study the thermal emission from several Ionian paterae and compare them with images in visible wavelengths obtained by Galileo s Solid State Imaging System (SSI). Galileo s close fly-bys of Io from 1999 to 2001 have allowed NIMS to image the paterae at high spatial resolution (1-30 km pixel). At these scales, several of these features reveal greater thermal emission around the edges, which can be explained as the crust of a lava lake breaking up against the paterae walls. Comparisons with imaging data show that lower albedo areas (which are indicative of young lavas) coincide with higher thermal emission areas on NIMS data. Other paterae, however, show thermal emission and features in the visible that are more consistent with lava flows over a solid patera floor. Identifying eruption styles on Io is important for constraining eruption and interior models on Io.

  12. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  13. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009-2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes. PMID:27079264

  14. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes. PMID:27079264

  15. Numerical evidence enabling reconciliation gravity and height changes in volcanic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currenti, Gilda

    2014-04-01

    Gravity and height changes, reflecting magma accumulation in subsurface chambers, are evaluated using finite element models in order to resolve controversial relationships observed in some volcanic areas. When significant gravity changes occur without any significant deformation, or vice versa, it is often difficult, if not impossible, to explain the observations using the popular Mogi model. Here, we explore whether these discrepancies can be explained by magma compressibility and source geometry effects. Compression of resident magma and expansion of the chamber wall act concurrently to accommodate newly added magma. Gravity-height ratios are found to mainly depend on: (i) geometry of the sources, which control the volume expansion of the chamber, (ii) magma compressibility, which affects the contraction of the magma resident in the chamber, and (iii) depth of the sources. Our numerical results show that, when magma compressibility and non-spherical sources are taken into account, significant gravity variations can, indeed, be successfully reconciled with negligible height changes. This may be the case at Etna volcano, where gravity changes (about 40 μGal) without any significant deformation (below 5 cm) were observed during the 1994-1995 inflation period. The numerical results point to the accumulation of a 1.4 × 1010 kg mass into an elongated source simulating a shallow storage region supplying the summit craters.

  16. Mineral chemistry of lava flows from Linga area of the Eastern Deccan Volcanic Province, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Sohini; Ray, Jyotisankar; Koeberl, Christian; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Banerjee, Mousumi

    2012-02-01

    Several basaltic lava flows have been identified in the study area in and around Linga, in the Eastern Deccan Volcanic Province (EDVP) on the basis of distinctly developed structural zones defined by primary volcanic structures such as columnar joints and vesicles. These basaltic lava flows are spatially distributed in four different sectors, viz., (i) Bargona-Gadarwara (BG) sector (ii) Shikarpur-Linga (SL) sector (iii) Arjunvari-Survir Hill (AS) sector and (iv) Kukrachiman-Morand Hill (KM) sector. A three-tier classification scheme has been adopted for the characterization and classification of individual lava flows. Each lava flow consists of a Lower Colonnade Zone (LCZ) overlain by the Entablature Zone (EZ) and Upper Colonnade Zone (UCZ). The LCZ and UCZ grade into a distinct/indistinct Lower Vesicular Zone (LVZ) and Upper Vesicular Zone (UVZ), respectively. The LCZ and UCZ of the flows are characterized by columnar joints while the EZ is marked by multi-directional hackly jointing. The geometry of different joint patterns corresponds to different styles of cooling during solidification of lava flows. Detailed petrographic studies of the investigated lava flows reveal inequigranular phenocrystal basalts characterized by development of phenocrystal phases including plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine, whereas groundmass composition is marked by tiny plagioclase, clinopyroxene, opaque mineral and glass. Electron microprobe analyses indicate that the olivine has a wide range ˜Fo22 to Fo66 revealing a wide spectrum of compositional variation. Pyroxene compositions are distinctly designated as Quad pyroxenes. Phenocrystal pyroxenes are mostly diopsidic, while the groundmass pyroxenes mainly correspond to augite with a minor pigeonite component. Pyroxene phenocrysts are characterized by a prominent Ti-enrichment. Phenocrystal plagioclase grains are calcic (An52.7-An72.9), whereas groundmass plagioclase are relatively sodic (An39.2-An61.6). Groundmass opaque

  17. WebGIS as boundary tools between scientific geoinformation and disaster risk reduction action in volcanic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Cozannet, G.; Bagni, M.; Thierry, P.; Aragno, C.; Kouokam, E.

    2014-06-01

    As the amount of spatial data is growing, there is increased interest in developing tools to explore, visualize and interpret them, with the final aim of informing decision making efficiently. Within the European MIAVITA project, we examined this issue in the case of volcanic areas, where existing geospatial databases are particularly complex due to the number of threats to be considered, including volcanic (e.g. lava flows, ash fall) and non-volcanic hazards, such as landslides or tsunamis. We involved a group of hazard and risk analysts and managers, civil security officers, GIS analysts and system developers to design a Web-based geographical information system (WebGIS). We tested the system at the Mount Cameroon volcano, taking advantage of a complex hazard and risk geographical database. This study enabled identifying key requirements for such tools in volcanic areas, such as the need to manage user privileges differently according to their profile and the status of the volcano. This work also highlights that, in addition to the development of large geoinformation clearinghouses, there is a need for site-specific information systems focused on working procedures of users, in order to fill the last gap between data producers and users.

  18. Deconvolving the process-origin of sediments on volcanic mountains and implications for paleoclimatic reconstruction: Mt Ruapehu area, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Martin; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Glaciation on the central North Island of New Zealand is limited to the volcanoes of Tongariro National Park, including Mt Ruapehu, the largest and most active andesitic stratovolcano on the North Island. At 2797 m asl, Mt Ruapehu represents the only peak in the North Island to currently intercept the permanent snowline, with small cirque glaciers descending to an altitude of ~2300 m. During the last glacial maximum (LGM), small ice-caps existed on Mt Ruapehu and the Tongariro Massif (15 km to the NNE of Ruapehu), with a series of small (<10 km-long) valley glaciers radiating out from domes centered on the summit areas to altitudes of ~1200 m. Holocene glacier advances have left smaller deposits inboard of some of the LGM moraines. However, understanding of moraine deposition and reconstructing former glacier extent is limited by: (1) the fragmentary nature of glacier moraines in this high precipitation environment; and (2) the broad range of possible process-origins for unconsolidated debris ridges on active volcanoes. Here, we describe the clast roundness, clast shape and textural characteristics associated with active and former glaciers on Mt Ruaephu and the Tongariro Massif, in order to assist in classifying the process-origin of sediments on glaciated volcanic mountains. Supraglacial inputs include rockfall, tephra, and avalanche material delivered to the surface of glaciers. Basal debris, where observed at the terminus of active cirque glaciers, consists mainly of incorporated fluvial material. Following deposition, reworking is mainly by proglacial streams, debris flows and lahars. Within the vicinity of glaciers, the dominant facies appear to be: (i) bouldery gravel with angular clasts on steep slopes surrounding glaciers, (ii) silty-sandy boulder gravel, with mainly subangular clasts, forming lateral moraines, (iii) boulder/cobble gravel with mainly subrounded clasts and associated laminated sediments representing fluvially-reworked material; and (iv

  19. New 40Ar/39Ar isotopic dates from Miocene volcanic rocks in the Lake Mead area and southern Las Vegas Range, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, S.S.; Duebendorfer, E.M.; Deibert, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar dates on volcanic rocks interlayered with synextensional Miocene sedimentary rocks in the western Lake Mead area and southern end of the Las Vegas Range provide tight constraints on magmatism, basin formation, and extensional deformation in the Basin and Range province of southern Nevada. Vertical axis rotations associated with movement along the Las Vegas Valley shear zone occurred after 15.67??0.10 Ma (2??), based on a 40Ar/39Ar date from a tuff in the Gass Peak formation in the southern Las Vegas Range. Basaltic magmatism in the western Lake Mead area began as early as 13.28??0.09 Ma, based on a date from a basalt flow in the Lovell Wash Member of the Horse Spring Formation. Isotopic dating of a basalt from the volcanic rocks of Callville Mesa indicates that these rocks are as old as 11.41??0.14 Ma, suggesting that volcanic activity began shortly after formation of the Boulder basin, the extensional basin in which the informally named red sandstone unit was deposited. The red sandstone unit is at least as old as 11.70??0.08 Ma and contains megabreccia deposits younger than 12.93??0.10 Ma. This results shows that formation of the Boulder basin was associated with development of topographic relief that was probably generated by movement along the Saddle Island low-angle normal fault. Stratal tilting associated with extension occurred both prior to and after 11.5 Ma.

  20. GeoNetGIS: a Geodetic Network Geographical Information System to manage GPS networks in seismic and volcanic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofoletti, P.; Esposito, A.; Anzidei, M.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents the methodologies and issues involved in the use of GIS techniques to manage geodetic information derived from networks in seismic and volcanic areas. Organization and manipulation of different geodetical, geological and seismic database, give us a new challenge in interpretation of information that has several dimensions, including spatial and temporal variations, also the flexibility and brand range of tools available in GeoNetGIS, make it an attractive platform for earthquake risk assessment. During the last decade the use of geodetic networks based on the Global Positioning System, devoted to geophysical applications, especially for crustal deformation monitoring in seismic and volcanic areas, increased dramatically. The large amount of data provided by these networks, combined with different and independent observations, such as epicentre distribution of recent and historical earthquakes, geological and structural data, photo interpretation of aerial and satellite images, can aid for the detection and parameterization of seismogenic sources. In particular we applied our geodetic oriented GIS to a new GPS network recently set up and surveyed in the Central Apennine region: the CA-GeoNet. GeoNetGIS is designed to analyze in three and four dimensions GPS sources and to improve crustal deformation analysis and interpretation related with tectonic structures and seismicity. It manages many database (DBMS) consisting of different classes, such as Geodesy, Topography, Seismicity, Geology, Geography and Raster Images, administrated according to Thematic Layers. GeoNetGIS represents a powerful research tool allowing to join the analysis of all data layers to integrate the different data base which aid for the identification of the activity of known faults or structures and suggesting the new evidences of active tectonics. A new approach to data integration given by GeoNetGIS capabilities, allow us to create and deliver a wide range of maps, digital

  1. Thermography of volcanic areas on Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island : Mapping surface properties and possible detection of convective air flow within volcanic debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, R.; Baratoux, D.; Rabinowicz, M.; Saracco, G.; Bachelery, P.; Staudacher, T.; Fontaine, F.

    2007-12-01

    We report on the detection of air convection in a couple of quasi circular cavities forming the 300 years old volcanically inactive cone of Formica Leo (Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island) [1]. Infrared thermal images of the cone have been acquired in 2006 from a hand held camera at regular time interval during a complete diurnal cycle. During night and dawn, the data display hot rims and cold centers. Both the conductivity contrasts of the highly porous soils filling the cavities and their 30° slopes are unable to explain the systematic rim to center temperature drop. Accordingly, this signal could be attributed to an air convection dipping inside the highly porous material at the center of each cavity, then flowing upslope along the base of the soil layer, before exiting it along the rims. Anemometrical and electrical data acquired in 2007 allow for the first time the direct detection of this air flow on the field: dipping gas velocities are measured at the center of the cone and self-potentials anomalies [2] generated by the humid air flow in the porous medium are detected. To quantify this process, we present 2D/3D numerical models of air convection in a sloped volcanic soil with a surface temperature evolving between day and night and taking into account electrical phenomena created by the air flow. At this present stage, this work constitutes a first step to investigate the deep structure of the active caldera of Bory-Dolomieu. The detection of the air flow at the surface could be of paramount importance for the understanding of volcanic hazards of the Reunion volcano. [1] Antoine et. al, submitted to G-Cubed [2] Darnet, PhD, Université Louis Pasteur (2003)

  2. The Volcanic Ash Strategic Initiative Team (VAST) - operational testing activities and exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wotawa, Gerhard; Arnold, Delia; Eckhardt, Sabine; Kristiansen, Nina; Maurer, Christian; Prata, Fred; Stohl, Andreas; Zehner, Claus

    2013-04-01

    The project VAST performs its activities within an ESA (European Space Agency) initiative to enhance the use of Earth Observation (EO) data in volcanic ash monitoring and forecasting. The VAST project aims at further exploring the suitability of EO data for such activities and to improve volcanic ash atmospheric transport forecasting services through exercises and demonstration activities in operational environments. Previous to the in-house deployment of the demonstration service, several exercises on operations and communication exchange are needed and first results are presented here. These exercises include technical in-house settings and conceptual planning of the operations with procedure development, volcanic eruptions drills that trigger the acquiring of data and dispersion/forecasting calculations with preliminary estimates of source terms and finally, an international exercise that provides a test case volcanic event to evaluate response times and the usefulness of the different products obtained. Products also include ensemble dispersion forecasts, on one hand multi-input ensembles utilizing the ECMWF EPS system, and on the other hand multi-model ensembles based on different dispersion models driven with different input data. As part of the work, socio-economic aspects need to be taken into account as well. This includes also the identification of best practices on how results can be presented to the stakeholders, including national authorities and policy makers, and the general public.

  3. Chemistry of ash-leachates: a reliable monitoring tool for volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienta, M. A.; De la Cruz-Reyna, S.; Soler, A.; Ceniceros, N.; Cruz, O.; Aguayo, A.

    2012-04-01

    Real-time volcanic hazard assessment requires the integrated interpretation of data obtained with different monitoring methods, particularly when people may be at risk. One of the methods rendering earliest precursory variations reflecting the internal state of a volcano is the geochemical analysis of gases, ground or lake waters related to volcanic systems, and volcanic ash. At Popocatépetl volcano, Central México, chemical fluctuations of the soluble cover of volcanic ash particles has proved to reflect diverse characteristics of the eruption types. Chloride, sulfate and fluoride concentrations of ash leachates have been consistently measured within the current eruptive episode beginning in December 1994. Particularly, main anions presented diverse relative concentrations in periods of dome extrusions, contrasting with hydrothermal activity or quiescence. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that higher proportions of fluoride in the leachates corresponded to new dome emplacements and relatively higher sulfate concentrations to hydrothermal ashes, although these results may be ambiguous at times. However, different sulfur isotopic ratios were measured in sulfate from ashes erupted during periods dominated by hydrothermal activity to those emitted during dome emplacement. Additionally, ascent of fresh magma was reflected on high fluoride concentrations jointly with low 34S-SO4 isotopic values. It is thus recommended to maintain persistent analyses of ash-leachates from on-going eruptions as a monitoring tool at active volcanoes.

  4. Exploratory Data Analysis Using a Dedicated Visualization App: Looking for Patterns in Volcanic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Manen, S. M.; Chen, S.

    2015-12-01

    Here we present an App designed to visualize and identify patterns in volcanic activity during the last ten years. It visualizes VEI (volcanic explosivity index) levels, population size, frequency of activity, and geographic region, and is designed to address the issue of oversampling of data. Often times, it is difficult to access a large set of data that can be scattered at first glance and hard to digest without visual aid. This App serves as a model that solves this issue and can be applied to other data. To enable users to quickly assess the large data set it breaks down the apparently chaotic abundance of information into categories and graphic indicators: color is used to indicate the VEI level, size for population size within 5 km of a volcano, line thickness for frequency of activity, and a grid to pinpoint a volcano's latitude. The categories and layers within them can be turned on and off by the user, enabling them to scroll through and compare different layers of data. By visualising the data this way, patterns began to emerge. For example, certain geographic regions had more explosive eruptions than others. Another good example was that low frequency larger impact volcanic eruptions occurred more irregularly than smaller impact volcanic eruptions, which had a more stable frequencies. Although these findings are not unexpected, the easy to navigate App does showcase the potential of data visualization for the rapid appraisal of complex and abundant multi-dimensional geoscience data.

  5. Late Cenozoic volcanism in the Lassen area, southernmost Cascade Range, California

    SciTech Connect

    Clynne, M.A.; Muffler, L.J.P.; Dalrymple, G.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Volcanism in the southernmost Cascade Range can be characterized on two scales. Regional volcanism is predominantly basaltic to andesitic, and hundreds of coalescing volcanoes of small volume (10[sup [minus]3] to 10[sup 1] km[sup 3]) with short lifetimes have built a broad platform. Superimposed on the regional volcanism are a few long-lived ([approximately]10[sup 6] years) much larger (>10 [sup 2] km[sup 3]) volcanic centers. Each of these larger centers consists of a basaltic-andesite to andesite composite cone and flanking silicic domes and flows. The evolution of these volcanic centers conforms to a generalized three-stage model during which a conspicuous edifice is constructed. Stages 1 and 2 comprise a dominantly andesitic composite cone; Stage 3 marks a change to dominantly silicic volcanism and is accompanied by development of a hydrothermal system in the permeable core of the andesitic composite cone. Subsequent fluvial and glacial erosion produces a caldera-like depression with a topographically high resistant rim of Stage 2 lavas surrounding the deeply eroded, hydrothermally altered core of the composite cone. Two types of basalt are recognized in the southernmost Cascades; medium-K calc-alkaline (CAB) and low-K olivine tholeiite (LKOT). CAB exhibits considerable geochemical diversity and is the parent magma for the volcanic-center lavas and the majority of the evolved regional lavas. LKOT is chemically homogeneous, and outcrops sporadically in association with extensional tectonics of the Basin and Range Province, and is related to Pleistocene encroachment of Basin-and-Range tectonics on the subduction-related volcanism of the Cascade Range.

  6. Prediction of ground motion parameters for the volcanic area of Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tusa, Giuseppina; Langer, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) have been derived for peak ground acceleration (PGA), velocity (PGV), and 5 % damped spectral acceleration (PSA) at frequencies between 0.1 and 10 Hz for the volcanic area of Mt. Etna. The dataset consists of 91 earthquakes with epicentral distances between 0.5 and 100 km. Given the specific characteristics of the area, we divided our data set into two groups: shallow events (SE, focal depth <5 km), and deep events (DE, focal depth >5 km). The range of magnitude covered by the SE and the DE is 3.0 ≤ M L ≤ 4.3 and 3.0 ≤ M L ≤ 4.8, respectively. Signals of DE typically have more high frequencies than those of SE. These differences are clearly reflected in the empirical GMPEs of the two event groups. Empirical GMPEs were estimated considering several functional forms: Sabetta and Pugliese (Bull Seism Soc Am 77:1491-1513, 1987) (SP87), Ambraseys et al. (Earth Eng Struct Dyn 25:371-400, 1996) (AMB96), and Boore and Atkinson (Earth Spectra 24:99-138, 2008) (BA2008). From ANOVA, we learn that most of the errors in our GMPEs can be attributed to unmodeled site effects, whereas errors related to event parameters are limited. For DE, BA2008 outperforms the simpler models SP87 or AMB96. For SE, the simple SP87 is preferable considering the Bayesian Information Criterion since it proves more stable with respect to confidence and gives very similar or even lower prediction errors during cross-validation than the BA2008 model. We compared our results to relationships derived for Italy (ITA10, Bindi et al. Bull Earth Eng 99:2471-2488, 2011). For SE, the main differences are observed for distances greater than about 5 km for both horizontal and vertical PGAs. Conversely, for DE the ITA10 heavily overestimates the peak ground parameters for short distances.

  7. The STRATegy COLUMN for Precollege Science Teachers: Volcanic Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Ellen Pletcher

    1995-01-01

    Describes resources for information and activities involving volcanoes. Includes an activity that helps students become familiar with the principal types of volcanoes and explores how the viscosity of magma affects the way a volcano erupts. (MKR)

  8. Long-term risk in a recently active volcanic system: Evaluation of doses and indoor radiological risk in the quaternary Vulsini Volcanic District (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioni, B.; Cinelli, G.; Mostacci, D.; Tositti, L.

    2012-12-01

    Volcanic rocks in the Vulsini Volcanic District (Central Italy) contain high concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K due to subduction-related metasomatic enrichment of incompatible elements in the mantle source coupled with magma differentiation within the upper crust. Due to their favorable mechanical properties they have been extensively used for construction since the Etruscan age. In the old buildings of the Bolsena village, one of the most populated ancient village in the area, the major source of indoor radioactivity is 222Rn, a radioactive noble gas descendant of 238U. Direct 222Rn indoor measurements have detected extremely high values in the old center due to the combined effect of building materials, radon fluxes from the volcanic basement and low air exchange rates. In these cases the evaluated risk of developing lung cancer within a 75 year lifetime reaches up to 40% for ever smokers. Simulations of "standard rooms" built with different tuffs and lavas collected from the Vulsini Volcanic District have also provided estimations of the effective doses and lifetime risk for radiogenic cancer. Other than by the method adopted for calculation, the total evaluated risk for each volcanic rock depends on different parameters, such as: radionuclide content, radon emanation power, occupancy factor and air exchange rate. Occupancy factor and air exchange rate appear as the only controlling parameters able to mitigate the indoor radiological risk.

  9. Planetary Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonenko, I.; Head, J. W.; Pieters, C. W.

    1998-01-01

    The final report consists of 10 journal articles concerning Planetary Volcanism. The articles discuss the following topics: (1) lunar stratigraphy; (2) cryptomare thickness measurements; (3) spherical harmonic spectra; (4) late stage activity of volcanoes on Venus; (5) stresses and calderas on Mars; (6) magma reservoir failure; (7) lunar mare basalt volcanism; (8) impact and volcanic glasses in the 79001/2 Core; (9) geology of the lunar regional dark mantle deposits; and (10) factors controlling the depths and sizes of magma reservoirs in Martian volcanoes.

  10. Evidence of recent deep magmatic activity at Cerro Bravo-Cerro Machín volcanic complex, central Colombia. Implications for future volcanic activity at Nevado del Ruiz, Cerro Machín and other volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, John Makario

    2016-09-01

    In the last nine years (2007-2015), the Cerro Bravo-Cerro Machín volcanic complex (CBCMVC), located in central Colombia, has experienced many changes in volcanic activity. In particular at Nevado del Ruiz volcano (NRV), Cerro Machin volcano (CMV) and Cerro Bravo (CBV) volcano. The recent activity of NRV, as well as increasing seismic activity at other volcanic centers of the CBCMVC, were preceded by notable changes in various geophysical and geochemical parameters, that suggests renewed magmatic activity is occurring at the volcanic complex. The onset of this activity started with seismicity located west of the volcanic complex, followed by seismicity at CBV and CMV. Later in 2010, strong seismicity was observed at NRV, with two small eruptions in 2012. After that, seismicity has been observed intermittently at other volcanic centers such as Santa Isabel, Cerro España, Paramillo de Santa Rosa, Quindío and Tolima volcanoes, which persists until today. Local deformation was observed from 2007 at NRV, followed by possible regional deformation at various volcanic centers between 2011 and 2013. In 2008, an increase in CO2 and Radon in soil was observed at CBV, followed by a change in helium isotopes at CMV between 2009 and 2011. Moreover, SO2 showed an increase from 2010 at NRV, with values remaining high until the present. These observations suggest that renewed magmatic activity is currently occurring at CBCMVC. NRV shows changes in its activity that may be related to this new magmatic activity. NRV is currently exhibiting the most activity of any volcano in the CBCMVC, which may be due to it being the only open volcanic system at this time. This suggests that over the coming years, there is a high probability of new unrest or an increase in volcanic activity of other volcanoes of the CBCMVC.

  11. Results from NICLAKES Survey of Active Faulting Beneath Lake Managua,Central American Volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, K.; Funk, J.; Mann, P.; Perez, P.; Strauch, W.

    2006-12-01

    Lake Managua covers an area of 1,035 km2 of the Central American volcanic arc and is enclosed by three major stratovolcanoes: Momotombo to the northwest was last active in AD 1905, Apoyeque in the center on the Chiltepe Peninsula was last active ca. 4600 years BP, and Masaya to the southeast was last active in AD 2003. A much smaller volcano in the lake (Momotombito) is thought to have been active <4500 yrs B.P. In May of 2006, we used a chartered barge to collect 330 km of 3.5 kHz profiler data along with coincident 274 km of sidescan sonar and 27 km of seismic reflection data. These data identify three zones of faulting on the lake floor: 1) A zone of north-northeast-striking faults in the shallow (2.5-7.5 m deep) eastern part of the lake that extends from the capital city of Managua, which was severely damaged by shallow, left-lateral strike-slip displacements on two of these faults in 1931 (M 5.6) and 1972 (M 6.2): these faults exhibit a horst and graben character and include possible offsets on drowned river valleys 2) a semicircular rift zone that is 1 km wide and can be traced over a distance of 30 km in the central part of the lake; the rift structure defines the deepest parts of the lake ranging from 12 to 18 m deep and is concentric about the Apoyeque stratocone/Chiltepe Peninsula; and 3) a zone of fault scarps defining the northwestern lake shore that may correlate to the northwestern extension of the Mateare fault zone, a major scarp-forming fault that separates the Managua lowlands from the highlands south and west of the city. Following previous workers, we interpret the northeast- trending group of faults in the eastern part of the lake as part of a 15-km-long discontinuity where the trend of the volcanic arc is offset in a right-lateral sense. The semi-circular pattern of the rift zone that is centered on Chiltepe Peninsula appears to have formed as a distal effect of either magma intrusion or withdrawal from beneath this volcanic complex. The

  12. International Collaboration on Building Local Technical Capacities for Monitoring Volcanic Activity at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Chigna, G.; Morales, H.; Waite, G. P.; Oommen, T.; Lechner, H. N.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a frequently active and potentially dangerous volcano situated in the Guatemalan volcanic arc. It is also a National Park and a major touristic attraction, constituting an important economic resource for local municipality and the nearby communities. Recent eruptions have caused fatalities and extensive damage to nearby communities, highlighting the need for risk management and loss reduction from the volcanic activity. Volcanic monitoring at Pacaya is done by the Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), instrumentally through one short period seismic station, and visually by the Parque Nacional Volcan de Pacaya y Laguna de Calderas (PNVPLC) personnel. We carry out a project to increase the local technical capacities for monitoring volcanic activity at Pacaya. Funding for the project comes from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists through the Geoscientists Without Borders program. Three seismic and continuous GPS stations will be installed at locations within 5 km from the main vent at Pacaya, and one webcam will aid in the visual monitoring tasks. Local educational and outreach components of the project include technical workshops on data monitoring use, and short thesis projects with the San Carlos University in Guatemala. A small permanent exhibit at the PNVPLC museum or visitor center, focusing on the volcano's history, hazards and resources, will also be established as part of the project. The strategy to involve a diverse group of local collaborators in Guatemala aims to increase the chances for long term sustainability of the project, and relies not only on transferring technology but also the "know-how" to make that technology useful. Although not a primary research project, it builds on a relationship of years of joint research projects at Pacaya between the participants, and could be a model of how to increase the broader impacts of such long term collaboration partnerships.

  13. Active spreading processes at ultraslow mid-ocean ridges: The 1999-2001 seismo-volcanic episode at 85°E Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlindwein, Vera; Riedel, Carsten; Korger, Edith; Läderach, Christine

    2010-05-01

    The rate of magma and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges is thought to decrease with decreasing spreading rate. At ultraslow spreading rates below 10-20 mm/y full rate, heat loss by conduction greatly reduces melt production with less melt produced at increasingly greater depths. Gakkel Ridge, the actively spreading mid-ocean ridge in the Arctic Ocean, opens at rates of 14 mm/y in the west decreasing to less than 6 mm/y at its eastern termination and demonstrates that magma production is not only a function of spreading rate. Whereas amagmatic spreading takes place at rates of about 12-10 mm/y, focussed melt production occurs at even lower spreading rates in long-lived discrete volcanic centres. One such centre is the 85°E volcanic complex at eastern Gakkel ridge where in 1999 a teleseismically recorded earthquake swarm consisting of more than 250 earthquakes over 9 months signalled the onset of an active spreading episode. The earthquake swarm is believed to be associated with volcanic activity although no concurrent lava effusion was found. We analysed the teleseismic earthquake swarm together with visual observation and microseismic data recorded at this site in 2001 and 2007 and noted the following characteristics which may be indicative for volcanic spreading events at the still poorly explored ultraslow spreading ridges: - unusual duration: The 1999 earthquake swarm lasted over 9 months rather than a few weeks as observed on faster spreading ridges. In addition, in 2001 seismoacoustic sounds which we interpret as gas discharge in Strombolian eruptions and a giant event plume maintained over more than one year indicate waxing and waning volcanic activity since 1999. - unusual strength: The earthquake swarm was detected at teleseismic distances of more than 1000 km and included 11 events with a magnitude >5. No other confirmed mid-ocean ridge eruption released a comparable seismic moment. Rather than focussing in a narrow area or showing pronounced

  14. Magmatic activity beneath the quiescent Three Sisters volcanic center, central Oregon Cascade Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicks, Charles W., Jr.; Dzurisin, Daniel; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Lu, Zhong; Iverson, Justin

    2002-01-01

    Images from satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) reveal uplift of a broad ???10 km by 20 km area in the Three Sisters volcanic center of the central Oregon Cascade Range, ???130 km south of Mt. St. Helens. The last eruption in the volcanic center occurred ???1500 years ago. Multiple satellite images from 1992 through 2000 indicate that most if not all of ???100 mm of observed uplift occurred between September 1998 and October 2000. Geochemical (water chemistry) anomalies, first noted during 1990, coincide with the area of uplift and suggest the existence of a crustal magma reservoir prior to the uplift. We interpret the uplift as inflation caused by an ongoing episode of magma intrusion at a depth of ???6.5 km.

  15. Monitoring and behavior of unsaturated volcanic pyroclastic in the Metropolitan Area of San Salvador, El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Chávez, José Alexander; Landaverde, José; Landaverde, Reynaldo López; Tejnecký, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Field monitoring and laboratory results are presented for an unsaturated volcanic pyroclastic. The pyroclastic belongs to the latest plinian eruption of the Ilopango Caldera in the Metropolitan Area of San Salvador, and is constantly affected by intense erosion, collapse, slab failure, sand/silt/debris flowslide and debris avalanche during the rainy season or earthquakes. Being the flowslides more common but with smaller volume. During the research, preliminary results of rain threshold were obtained of flowslides, this was recorded with the TMS3 (a moisture sensor device using time domain transmission) installed in some slopes. TMS3 has been used before in biology, ecology and soil sciences, and for the first time was used for engineering geology in this research. This device uses electromagnetic waves to obtain moisture content of the soil and a calibration curve is necessary. With the behavior observed during this project is possible to conclude that not only climatic factors as rain quantity, temperature and evaporation are important into landslide susceptibility but also information of suction-moisture content, seepage, topography, weathering, ground deformation, vibrations, cracks, vegetation/roots and the presence of crust covering the surface are necessary to research in each site. Results of the field monitoring indicates that the presence of biological soil crusts a complex mosaic of soil, green algae, lichens, mosses, micro-fungi, cyanobacteria and other bacteria covering the slopes surface can protect somehow the steep slopes reducing the runoff process and mass wasting processes. The results obtained during the assessment will help explaining the mass wasting problems occurring in some pyroclastic soils and its possible use in mitigation works and early warning system. PMID:27186500

  16. Monitoring active volcanoes and mitigating volcanic hazards: the case for including simple approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoiber, Richard E.; Williams, Stanley N.

    1990-07-01

    Simple approaches to problems brought about eruptions and their ensuing hazardous effects should be advocated and used by volcanologists while awaiting more sophisticated remedies. The expedients we advocate have all or many of the following attributes: only locally available materials are required; no extensive training of operators or installation is necessary; they are affordable and do not require foreign aid or exports; they are often labor intensive and are sustainable without outside assistance. Where appropriate, the involvement of local residents is advocated. Examples of simple expedients which can be used in forecasting or mitigating the effects of crises emphasize the relative ease and the less elaborate requirements with which simple approaches can be activated. Emphasis is on visual observations often by untrained observers, simple meteorogical measurements, observations of water level in lakes, temperature and chemistry of springs and fumaroles, new springs and collapse areas and observations of volcanic plumes. Simple methods are suggested which can be applied to mitigating damage from mudflows, nuées ardentes, tephra falls and gas discharge. A review in hindsight at Ruiz includes the use of both chemical indicators and simple mudflow alarms. Simple expedients are sufficiently effective that any expert volcanologist called to aid in a crisis must include them in the package of advice offered. Simple approaches are a critical and logical complement to highly technical solutions to hazardous situations.

  17. Geochemistry and geochronology of granitoids in the Kibi-Asamankese area of the Kibi-Winneba volcanic belt, southern Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anum, Solomon; Sakyi, Patrick Asamoah; Su, Ben-Xun; Nude, Prosper M.; Nyame, Frank; Asiedu, Daniel; Kwayisi, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    In Ghana the West African Craton is represented by Birimian and Tarkwaian rocks with extensive granitoid bodies. Granitoids from Asamankese area of the Kibi-Winneba volcanic belt, southern Ghana were analysed for major and trace element contents and found to be characterised by highly-fractionated REE, enrichments, in LILE, and depletion in Nb, Ta and Sr. The LILE enrichment relative to strong Nb-Ta depression, indicates that these granitoids were emplaced in an active margin. Based on field relations, geochemical composition and geochronological data, the granitoids from the Kibi-Asamankese area can be divided into three types, namely; the Eburnean biotite granodiorite (2133-2127 Ma) and hornblende granodiorite (2147 Ma), and the Pre-Eburnean gneissic biotite granite (2193 Ma). The geochemical data of the studied rocks plot in the tholeiitic field, whereas on the A/CNK-A/NK diagram, they generally fall within the metaluminous field, with A/CNK values between 0.69 and 0.88. U-Pb dating of zircons in the granitoids yielded ages ranging from 2193 to 2127 Ma, which are among the oldest ages obtained from the granitoid plutons in Ghana. Such high-precision geochronological data indicate that magmatism occurred over a time-span of about 70 Ma. This provides further evidence that the period 2.1-2.2 Ga was one of the important stages of Birimian magmatism that led to the generation of the granitoids. From the above-mentioned ages, it is possible to link the geological activities to crustal processes and establish the cyclic geotectonic evolution in the West African Craton over time as part of an arc-back-arc basin system.

  18. Factors limiting microbial activity in volcanic tuff at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T.L.; Kovacik, W.P.; Taylor, J.

    1996-09-01

    Samples of tuff aseptically collected from 10 locations in the Exploratory Shaft Facility at the site of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site were analyzed for microbiological populations, activities, and factors limiting microbial activity. Radiotracer assays ({sup 14}C-labeled organic substrate mineralization), direct microscopic counts, and plate counts were used. Radiolabeled substrates were glucose, acetate, and glutamate. Radiotracer experiments were carried out with and without moisture and inorganic nutrient amendments to determine factors limiting to microbial activities. Nearly all samples showed the presence of microorganisms with the potential to mineralize organic substrates. Addition of inorganic nutrients stimulated activities in a small number of samples. The presence of viable microbial communities within the tuff has implications for transport of contaminants.

  19. Eighteen years of geochemical monitoring at the oceanic active volcanic island of El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio-Ramos, María; Alonso, Mar; Sharp, Emerson; Woods, Hannah; Barrancos, José; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    We report herein the latest results of a diffuse CO2 efflux survey at El Hierro volcanic system carried out during the summer period of 2015 to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area a during post-eruptive period. El Hierro Island (278 km2) is the youngest and the SW-most of the Canary Islands. On July 16, 2011, a seismic-volcanic crisis started with the occurrence of more than 11,900 seismic events and significant deformation along the island. On October 10, 2011, the dominant character of seismicity changed dramatically from discrete earthquakes to continuous tremor, a clear indication that magma was rapidly approaching the surface immediately before the onset of the eruption, October 12. Eruption was declared over on 5 March, 2012. In order to monitor the volcanic activity of El Hierro Island, from 1998 to 2015 diffuse CO2 emission studies have been performed at El Hierro volcanic system in a yearly basis (˜600 observation sites) according to the accumulation chamber method. Spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. To quantify the total CO2 emission from the studied area, 100 simulations for each survey have been performed. During the eruption period, soil CO2 efflux values range from non-detectable (˜0.5 g m‑2 d‑1) up to 457 g m‑2 d‑1, reaching in November 27, 2011, the maximum CO2 output estimated value of all time series, 2,398 t d‑1, just before the episodes of maximum degassing observed as vigorous bubbling at the sea surface and an increment in the amplitude of the tremor signal. During the 2015 survey, soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 41 g m‑2 d‑1. The spatial distribution of diffuse CO2 emission values seemed to be controlled by the main volcano structural features of the island. The total diffuse CO2 output released to atmosphere was estimated at 575 ± 24 t d‑1, value slightly higher that the background CO2 emission estimated at 422 t

  20. Compilation of Disruptions to Airports by Volcanic Activity (Version 1.0, 1944-2006)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, Marianne; Mayberry, Gari C.; Casadevall, Thomas J.; Wunderman, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. To more fully characterize the nature and scope of volcanic hazards to airports, we collected data on incidents of airports throughout the world that have been affected by volcanic activity, beginning in 1944 with the first documented instance of damage to modern aircraft and facilities in Naples, Italy, and extending through 2006. Information was gleaned from various sources, including news outlets, volcanological reports (particularly the Smithsonian Institution's Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network), and previous publications on the topic. This report presents the full compilation of the data collected. For each incident, information about the affected airport and the volcanic source has been compiled as a record in a Microsoft Access database. The database is incomplete in so far as incidents may not have not been reported or documented, but it does present a good sample from diverse parts of the world. Not included are en-route diversions to avoid airborne ash clouds at cruise altitudes. The database has been converted to a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. To make the PDF version of table 1 in this open-file report resemble the spreadsheet, order the PDF pages as 12, 17, 22; 13, 18, 23; 14, 19, 24; 15, 20, 25; and 16, 21, 26. Analysis of the database reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were impacted on 171 occasions from 1944 through 2006 by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. The number of affected airports (101) probably is better constrained than the number of incidents (171) because recurring disruptions at a given airport may have been lumped together or not reported by news agencies, whereas the initial disruption likely is noticed and reported and thus the airport correctly counted.

  1. Volcanic Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    volcanism on humankind in the North Pacific, where Holocene time saw many caldera-forming eruptions in an area of comparatively intense human activity.

  2. Volcanic ash layers in blue ice fields (Beardmore Glacier Area, Antarctica): Iridium enrichments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeberl, Christian

    1988-01-01

    Dust bands on blue ice fields in Antarctica have been studied and have been identified to originate from two main sources: bedrock debris scraped up from the ground by the glacial movement (these bands are found predominantly at fractures and shear zones in the ice near moraines), and volcanic debris deposited on and incorporated in the ice by large-scale eruptions of Antarctic (or sub-Antractic) volcanoes. Ice core studies have revealed that most of the dust layers in the ice cores are volcanic (tephra) deposits which may be related to some specific volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have to be related to some specific volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have to be relatively recent (a few thousand years old) since ice cores usually incorporate younger ice. In contrast, dust bands on bare blue ice fields are much older, up to a few hundred thousand years, which may be inferred from the rather high terrestrial age of meteorites found on the ice and from dating the ice using the uranium series method. Also for the volcanic ash layers found on blue ice fields correlations between some specific volcanoes (late Cenozoic) and the volcanic debris have been inferred, mainly using chemical arguments. During a recent field expedition samples of several dust bands found on blue ice fields at the Lewis Cliff Ice Tongue were taken. These dust band samples were divided for age determination using the uranium series method, and chemical investigations to determine the source and origin of the dust bands. The investigations have shown that most of the dust bands found at the Ice Tongue are of volcanic origin and, for chemical and petrological reasons, may be correlated with Cenozoic volcanoes in the Melbourne volcanic province, Northern Victoria Land, which is at least 1500 km away. Major and trace element data have been obtained and have been used for identification and correlation purposes. Recently, some additional trace elements were determined in some of the dust band

  3. Geological and 40Ar/39Ar age constraints on late-stage Deccan rhyolitic volcanism, inter-volcanic sedimentation, and the Panvel flexure from the Dongri area, Mumbai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Pande, Kanchan

    2014-04-01

    Post-K-Pg Boundary Deccan magmatism is well known from the Mumbai area in the Panvel flexure zone. Represented by the Salsette Subgroup, it shows characters atypical of much of the Deccan Traps, including rhyolite lavas and tuffs, mafic tuffs and breccias, spilitic pillow basalts, and "intertrappean" sedimentary or volcanosedimentary deposits, with mafic intrusions as well as trachyte intrusions containing basaltic enclaves. The intertrappean deposits have been interpreted as formed in shallow marine or lagoonal environments in small fault-bounded basins due to syn-volcanic subsidence. We report a previously unknown sedimentary deposit underlying the Dongri rhyolite flow from the upper part of the Salsette Subgroup, with a westerly tectonic dip due to the Panvel flexure. We have obtained concordant 40Ar/39Ar ages of 62.6 ± 0.6 Ma (2σ) and 62.9 ± 0.2 Ma (2σ) for samples taken from two separate outcrops of this rhyolite. The results are significant in showing that (i) Danian inter-volcanic sedimentary deposits formed throughout Mumbai, (ii) the rock units are consistent with the stratigraphy postulated earlier for Mumbai, (iii) shale fragments known in some Dongri tuffs were likely derived from the sedimentary deposit under the Dongri rhyolite, (iv) the total duration of extrusive and intrusive Deccan magmatism was at least 8-9 million years, and (v) Panvel flexure formed, or continued to form, after 63 Ma, possibly even 62 Ma, and could not have formed by 65-64 Ma as concluded in a recent study.

  4. Electrical activity during the 2006 Mount St. Augustine volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Ronald J.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William; Edens, H. E.; Aulich, G. D.; McNutt, S.R.; Tytgat, Guy; Clark, E.

    2007-01-01

    By using a combination of radio frequency time-of-arrival and interferometer measurements, we observed a sequence of lightning and electrical activity during one of Mount St. Augustine's eruptions. The observations indicate that the electrical activity had two modes or phases. First, there was an explosive phase in which the ejecta from the explosion appeared to be highly charged upon exiting the volcano, resulting in numerous apparently disorganized discharges and some simple lightning. The net charge exiting the volcano appears to have been positive. The second phase, which followed the most energetic explosion, produced conventional-type discharges that occurred within plume. Although the plume cloud was undoubtedly charged as a result of the explosion itself, the fact that the lightning onset was delayed and continued after and well downwind of the eruption indicates that in situ charging of some kind was occurring, presumably similar in some respects to that which occurs in normal thunderstorms.

  5. Electrical activity during the 2006 Mount St. Augustine volcanic eruptions.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R J; Krehbiel, P R; Rison, W; Edens, H E; Aulich, G D; Winn, W P; McNutt, S R; Tytgat, G; Clark, E

    2007-02-23

    By using a combination of radio frequency time-of-arrival and interferometer measurements, we observed a sequence of lightning and electrical activity during one of Mount St. Augustine's eruptions. The observations indicate that the electrical activity had two modes or phases. First, there was an explosive phase in which the ejecta from the explosion appeared to be highly charged upon exiting the volcano, resulting in numerous apparently disorganized discharges and some simple lightning. The net charge exiting the volcano appears to have been positive. The second phase, which followed the most energetic explosion, produced conventional-type discharges that occurred within plume. Although the plume cloud was undoubtedly charged as a result of the explosion itself, the fact that the lightning onset was delayed and continued after and well downwind of the eruption indicates that in situ charging of some kind was occurring, presumably similar in some respects to that which occurs in normal thunderstorms. PMID:17322054

  6. Explosive activity associated with the growth of volcanic domes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhall, C.G.; Melson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Domes offer unique opportunities to measure or infer the characteristics of magmas that, at domes and elsewhere, control explosive activity. A review of explosive activity associated with historical dome growth shows that: 1. (1) explosive activity has occurred in close association with nearly all historical dome growth; 2. (2) whole-rock SiO2 content, a crude but widely reported indicator of magma viscosity, shows no systematic relationship to the timing and character of explosions; 3. (3) the average rate of dome growth, a crude indicator of the rate of supply of magma and volatiles to the near-surface enviornment, shows no systematic relationship to the timing or character of explosions; and 4. (4) new studies at Arenal and Mount St. Helens suggest that water content is the dominant control on explosions from water-rich magmas, whereas the crystal content and composition of the interstitial melt (and hence magma viscosity) are equally or more important controls on explosions from water-poor magmas. New efforts should be made to improve current, rather limited techniques for monitoring pre-eruption volatile content and magma viscosity, and thus the explosive potential of magmas. ?? 1983.

  7. Complex explosive volcanic activity on the Moon within Oppenheimer crater, Icarus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, Kristen A; Horgan, Briony H N; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Allen, Carlton C.; Hayne, Paul O; Bell, James F III; Paige, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Oppenheimer Crater is a floor-fractured crater located within the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon, and exhibits more than a dozen localized pyroclastic deposits associated with the fractures. Localized pyroclastic volcanism on the Moon is thought to form as a result of intermittently explosive Vulcanian eruptions under low effusion rates, in contrast to the higher-effusion rate, Hawaiian-style fire fountaining inferred to form larger regional deposits. We use Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images and Diviner Radiometer mid-infrared data, Chandrayaan-1 orbiter Moon Mineralogy Mapper near-infrared spectra, and Clementine orbiter Ultraviolet/Visible camera images to test the hypothesis that the pyroclastic deposits in Oppenheimer crater were emplaced via Vulcanian activity by constraining their composition and mineralogy. Mineralogically, we find that the deposits are variable mixtures of orthopyroxene and minor clinopyroxene sourced from the crater floor, juvenile clinopyroxene, and juvenile iron-rich glass, and that the mineralogy of the pyroclastics varies both across the Oppenheimer deposits as a whole and within individual deposits. We observe similar variability in the inferred iron content of pyroclastic glasses, and note in particular that the northwest deposit, associated with Oppenheimer U crater, contains the most iron-rich volcanic glass thus far identified on the Moon, which could be a useful future resource. We propose that this variability in mineralogy indicates variability in eruption style, and that it cannot be explained by a simple Vulcanian eruption. A Vulcanian eruption should cause significant country rock to be incorporated into the pyroclastic deposit; however, large areas within many of the deposits exhibit spectra consistent with high abundances of juvenile phases and very little floor material. Thus, we propose that at least the most recent portion of these deposits must have erupted via a Strombolian or more continuous fire

  8. A reassessment of the volcanic history of western South Pole-Aitken Basin based on geologic mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Chuang, F. C.; Berman, D. C.; Mest, S. C.

    2013-09-01

    Geologic mapping of west South Pole-Aitken (SPA) indicates a larger area covered by volcanic deposits; and a greater diversity in mode of emplacement of volcanic deposits than reported in previous work. Understanding the nature and stratigraphy of lunar volcanic activity will ultimately provide constraints on models of lunar volcanic generation and evolution.

  9. Hawaiian oral tradition describes 400 years of volcanic activity at Kīlauea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Culturally significant oral tradition involving Pele, the Hawaiian volcano deity, and her youngest sister Hi'iaka may involve the two largest volcanic events to have taken place in Hawai'i since human settlement: the roughly 60-year-long ‘Ailā’au eruption during the 15th century and the following development of Kīlauea's caldera. In 1823, Rev. William Ellis and three others became the first Europeans to visit Kīlauea's summit and were told stories about Kīlauea's activity that are consistent with the Pele–Hi'iaka account and extend the oral tradition through the 18th century. Recent geologic studies confirm the essence of the oral traditions and illustrate the potential value of examining other Hawaiian chants and stories for more information about past volcanic activity in Hawai‘i.

  10. Quantifying unsteadiness and dynamics of pulsatory volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, L.; Pioli, L.; Bonadonna, C.; Connor, C. B.; Andronico, D.; Harris, A. J. L.; Ripepe, M.

    2016-06-01

    Pulsatory eruptions are marked by a sequence of explosions which can be separated by time intervals ranging from a few seconds to several hours. The quantification of the periodicities associated with these eruptions is essential not only for the comprehension of the mechanisms controlling explosivity, but also for classification purposes. We focus on the dynamics of pulsatory activity and quantify unsteadiness based on the distribution of the repose time intervals between single explosive events in relation to magma properties and eruptive styles. A broad range of pulsatory eruption styles are considered, including Strombolian, violent Strombolian and Vulcanian explosions. We find a general relationship between the median of the observed repose times in eruptive sequences and the viscosity of magma given by η ≈ 100 ṡtmedian. This relationship applies to the complete range of magma viscosities considered in our study (102 to 109 Pa s) regardless of the eruption length, eruptive style and associated plume heights, suggesting that viscosity is the main magma property controlling eruption periodicity. Furthermore, the analysis of the explosive sequences in terms of failure time through statistical survival analysis provides further information: dynamics of pulsatory activity can be successfully described in terms of frequency and regularity of the explosions, quantified based on the log-logistic distribution. A linear relationship is identified between the log-logistic parameters, μ and s. This relationship is useful for quantifying differences among eruptive styles from very frequent and regular mafic events (Strombolian activity) to more sporadic and irregular Vulcanian explosions in silicic systems. The time scale controlled by the parameter μ, as a function of the median of the distribution, can be therefore correlated with the viscosity of magmas; while the complexity of the erupting system, including magma rise rate, degassing and fragmentation efficiency