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Sample records for active wrist extension

  1. Mirror therapy in a patient with a fractured wrist and no active wrist extension.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, Eric L; Hu, Jeong

    2008-01-01

    We report a patient in whom mirror therapy, training moving both hands while watching the reflection of the present or good hand in a parasaggital mirror - a method used for phantom limb and stroke patients - was extremely useful after a fractured wrist with good passive, but no active, extension. PMID:18335358

  2. In vivo length changes of wrist ligaments at full wrist extension.

    PubMed

    Tan, J; Chen, J; Tang, J B

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the length changes of carpal ligaments when loaded in full extension in vivo. We obtained computed tomography scans of the right wrists in three positions for six volunteers: neutral; 75° extension; and 75° extension with a further 10° of radial deviation. Nine ligaments were measured and analysed with computer modelling. The results showed that the radioscaphocapitate, long radiolunate, and ulnolunate ligaments lengthened the most at full wrist extension, suggesting that they were under greatest load. The radioscapholunate, ulnocapitate, and ulnotriquetral ligaments lengthened further with the addition of wrist radial deviation. At full extension, the dorsal intercarpal ligament inserting on the scaphoid was lengthened. The dorsal radiocarpal and dorsal intercarpal ligaments inserting on the trapezoid were shortened, suggesting reduced loading. In conclusion, a number of volar carpal ligaments lengthened significantly in full wrist extension and the ulnar carpal ligaments were further lengthened at wrist radial deviation. PMID:23571488

  3. Results of wrist extension reconstruction in C5-8 brachial plexus palsy by transferring the pronator quadratus motor branch to the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio; Tacca, Cristiano Paulo

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to report the results of pronator quadratus (PQ) motor branch transfers to the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) motor branch to reconstruct wrist extension in C5-8 root lesions of the brachial plexus. METHODS Twenty-eight patients, averaging 24 years of age, with C5-8 root injuries underwent operations an average of 7 months after their accident. In 19 patients, wrist extension was impossible at baseline, whereas in 9 patients wrist extension was managed by activating thumb and wrist extensors. When these 9 patients grasped an object, their wrist dropped and grasp strength was lost. Wrist extension was reconstructed by transferring the PQ motor to the ECRB motor branch. After surgery, patients were followed for at least 12 months, with final follow-up an average of 22 months after surgery. RESULTS Successful reinnervation of the ECRB was demonstrated in 27 of the 28 patients. In 25 of the patients, wrist extension scored M4, and in 2 it scored M3. CONCLUSIONS In C5-8 root injuries, wrist extension can be predictably reconstructed by transferring the PQ motor branch to reinnervate the ECRB. PMID:26430841

  4. Effects of Taping on Pain, Grip Strength and Wrist Extension Force in Patients with Tennis Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Shamsoddini, Alireza; Hollisaz, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    Background Tennis elbow (TE) is a common musculotendinous degenerative disorder of the extensor origin at the lateral humeral epicondyle. Different modes of treatment are used for management of tennis elbow. Objectives This study investigated the effect of the taping technique (TT) on pain, grip strength and wrist extension force in treatment of tennis elbow. Patients and Methods Thirty patients (16 men /14 women with a mean age of 32.2 years) with tennis elbow of their dominant arm participated in this study. Outcome measures were assessment of pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow, grip strength and wrist extension force before and five to ten minutes after application of elbow tape on the affected and unaffected arms. A Visual Analog Scale was used to assess pain. A dynamometer and a hand-held dynamometer were used for evaluation of grip strength and wrist extension force, respectively. Results Among the variables, significant differences were found in wrist extension forces between effected and unaffected arms (P = 0.02). Changes in grip strength showed statically significant improvements in the affected arm compared to the unaffected arm (P = 0.03). Also, in assessment of pain at the lateral epicondyle, the mean change between affected and unaffected arms was significant, with P = 0.001. Conclusions The taping technique, as applied in this study demonstrates an impressive effect on wrist extension force and grip strength of patients with TE. Elbow taping also reduces pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow in these patients. PMID:24350156

  5. Grip-force modulation in multi-finger prehension during wrist flexion and extension

    PubMed Central

    Ambike, Satyajit S.; Paclet, Florent; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    Extrinsic digit muscles contribute to both fingertip forces and wrist movements (FDP and FPL – flexion, EDC - extension). Hence it is expected that finger forces depend on the wrist movement and position. We investigated the relation between grip force and wrist kinematics to examine whether and how the force: (1) scales with wrist flexion-extension (FE) angle; (2) can be predicted from accelerations induced during FE movement. In one experiment subjects naturally held an instrumented handle using a prismatic grasp and performed very slow FE movements. In another experiment, the same movement was performed cyclically at three prescribed frequencies. In quasistatic conditions, the grip force remained constant over the majority of the wrist range of motion. During the cyclic movements, the grip force changed. The changes were described with a linear regression model that represents the thumb and virtual finger (VF = four fingers combined) normal forces as the sum of the effects of the object’s tangential and radial accelerations and an object-weight-dependent constant term. The model explained 99% of the variability in the data. The independence of the grip force from wrist position agrees with the theory that that the thumb and VF forces are controlled with two neural variables that encode referent coordinates for each digit while accounting for changes in the position dependence of muscle forces, rather than a single neural variable like referent aperture. The results of the cyclical movement study extend the principle of superposition (some complex actions can be decomposed into independently controlled elemental actions) for a motor task involving simultaneous grip force exertion and wrist motion with significant length changes of the grip-force producing muscles. PMID:23625077

  6. Nerve Transfers for the Restoration of Wrist, Finger, and Thumb Extension After High Radial Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Pet, Mitchell A; Lipira, Angelo B; Ko, Jason H

    2016-05-01

    High radial nerve injury is a common pattern of peripheral nerve injury most often associated with orthopedic trauma. Nerve transfers to the wrist and finger extensors, often from the median nerve, offer several advantages when compared to nerve repair or grafting and tendon transfer. In this article, we discuss the forearm anatomy pertinent to performing these nerve transfers and review the literature surrounding nerve transfers for wrist, finger, and thumb extension. A suggested algorithm for management of acute traumatic high radial nerve palsy is offered, and our preferred surgical technique for treatment of high radial nerve palsy is provided. PMID:27094891

  7. Quantitative analysis of wrist electrodermal activity during sleep.

    PubMed

    Sano, Akane; Picard, Rosalind W; Stickgold, Robert

    2014-12-01

    We present the first quantitative characterization of electrodermal activity (EDA) patterns on the wrists of healthy adults during sleep using dry electrodes. We compare the new results on the wrist to the prior findings on palmar or finger EDA by characterizing data measured from 80 nights of sleep consisting of 9 nights of wrist and palm EDA from 9 healthy adults sleeping at home, 56 nights of wrist and palm EDA from one healthy adult sleeping at home, and 15 nights of wrist EDA from 15 healthy adults in a sleep laboratory, with the latter compared to concurrent polysomnography. While high frequency patterns of EDA called "storms" were identified by eye in the 1960s, we systematically compare thresholds for automatically detecting EDA peaks and establish criteria for EDA storms. We found that more than 80% of the EDA peaks occurred in non-REM sleep, specifically during slow-wave sleep (SWS) and non-REM stage 2 sleep (NREM2). Also, EDA amplitude is higher in SWS than in other sleep stages. Longer EDA storms were more likely to occur in the first two quarters of sleep and during SWS and NREM2. We also found from the home studies (65 nights) that EDA levels were higher and the skin conductance peaks were larger and more frequent when measured on the wrist than when measured on the palm. These EDA high frequency peaks and high amplitude were sometimes associated with higher skin temperature, but more work is needed looking at neurological and other EDA elicitors in order to elucidate their complete behavior. PMID:25286449

  8. Grouped spindle and electromyographic responses to abrupt wrist extension movements in man

    PubMed Central

    Hagbarth, K.-E.; Hägglund, J. V.; Wallin, E. U.; Young, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    1. Different techniques were used to generate sudden ramp extension movements of the wrist while the subjects were either relaxed or maintaining a weak voluntary contraction in the wrist flexors. Afferent responses to the displacements were recorded with a tungsten micro-electrode inserted into a fascicle of the median nerve supplying one of the wrist flexor muscles, and e.m.g. responses were recorded with needle electrodes inserted into the same muscle. 2. With the wrist flexors either relaxed or contracting, extensions at 100-200°/sec for 60-70 msec (generated by either an hydraulic motor or a torque motor) produced segmented afferent responses with two to four afferent bursts, separated by intervals of 20-30 msec. The successive neural peaks, occuring during the stretch phase, were correlated to mechanical vibrations sensed by a strain gauge and sometimes also by a wrist goniometer. With the flexor muscles contracting, the successive peaks in the neurogram were followed by similar peaks in the e.m.g, the delay between neural and e.m.g. peaks being 20-25 msec. 3. Small abrupt extension movements of 1-2° lasting only 10-15 msec often produced segmented afferent responses with one neural burst occuring during the stretch phase and another 15-20 msec later, corresponding to a mechanical oscillatory event succeeding the stretch. The oscillation and the second neural burst were not present with small extension movements of smooth onset and halt. With the flexor muscles contracting, stimuli producing one afferent burst produced only one e.m.g. peak, whereas double-peaked afferent discharges produced double-peaked e.m.g. responses, the delay between individual neural e.m.g. peaks being 20-25 msec. 4. Similar segmentation of the neural stretch responses was seen when abrupt displacements were produced by electrically induced muscle twitches, by manual pulls on a spring attached to the hand or by the subject making fast voluntary wrist extensions. This grouping of

  9. Estimating Physical Activity in Youth Using a Wrist Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Crouter, Scott E.; Flynn, Jennifer I.; Bassett, David R.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to develop and validate methods for analyzing wrist accelerometer data in youth. METHODS 181 youth (mean±SD; age, 12.0±1.5 yrs) completed 30-min of supine rest and 8-min each of 2 to 7 structured activities (selected from a list of 25). Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves and regression analyses were used to develop prediction equations for energy expenditure (child-METs; measured activity VO2 divided by measured resting VO2) and cut-points for computing time spent in sedentary behaviors (SB), light (LPA), moderate (MPA), and vigorous (VPA) physical activity. Both vertical axis (VA) and vector magnitude (VM) counts per 5 seconds were used for this purpose. The validation study included 42 youth (age, 12.6±0.8 yrs) who completed approximately 2-hrs of unstructured PA. During all measurements, activity data were collected using an ActiGraph GT3X or GT3X+, positioned on the dominant wrist. Oxygen consumption was measured using a Cosmed K4b2. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare measured vs predicted child-METs (regression only), and time spent in SB, LPA, MPA, and VPA. RESULTS All ROC cut-points were similar for area under the curve (≥0.825), sensitivity (≥0.756), and specificity (≥0.634) and they significantly underestimated LPA and overestimated VPA (P<0.05). The VA and VM regression models were within ±0.21 child-METs of mean measured child-METs and ±2.5 minutes of measured time spent in SB, LPA, MPA, and VPA, respectively (P>0.05). CONCLUSION Compared to measured values, the VA and VM regression models developed on wrist accelerometer data had insignificant mean bias for child-METs and time spent in SB, LPA, MPA, and VPA; however they had large individual errors. PMID:25207928

  10. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  11. 78 FR 36643 - Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900--NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-16. OMB Control Number: 2900-NEW...

  12. 78 FR 36307 - Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-16. OMB Control Number: 2900-NEW...

  13. Estimating Activity and Sedentary Behavior From an Accelerometer on the Hip or Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Mary E.; Haskell, William L.; Albinali, Fahd; Mota, Selene; Nawyn, Jason; Intille, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Previously the National Health and Examination Survey measured physical activity with an accelerometer worn on the hip for seven days, but recently changed the location of the monitor to the wrist. PURPOSE This study compared estimates of physical activity intensity and type with an accelerometer on the hip versus the wrist. METHODS Healthy adults (n=37) wore triaxial accelerometers (Wockets) on the hip and dominant wrist along with a portable metabolic unit to measure energy expenditure during 20 activities. Motion summary counts were created, then receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine sedentary and activity intensity thresholds. Ambulatory activities were separated from other activities using the coefficient of variation (CV) of the counts. Mixed model predictions were used to estimate activity intensity. RESULTS The ROC for determining sedentary behavior had greater sensitivity and specificity (71% and 96%) at the hip than the wrist (53% and 76%), as did the ROC for moderate to vigorous physical activity on the hip (70% and 83%) versus the wrist (30% and 69%). The ROC for the CV associated with ambulation had a larger AUC at the hip compared to the wrist (0.83 and 0.74). The prediction model for activity energy expenditure (AEE) resulted in an average difference of 0.55 (+/− 0.55) METs on the hip and 0.82 (+/− 0.93) METs on the wrist. CONCLUSIONS Methods frequently used for estimating AEE and identifying activity intensity thresholds from an accelerometer on the hip generally do better than similar data from an accelerometer on the wrist. Accurately identifying sedentary behavior from a lack of wrist motion presents significant challenges. PMID:23247702

  14. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... 37.7°C), and recent illness. Other Causes Gout : This occurs when your body produces too much ...

  15. Can Radiocarpal-Spanning Fixation Be Made More Functional by Placing the Wrist in Extension? A Biomechanical Study Under Physiologic Loads.

    PubMed

    Mann, Tobias; Lee, Daniel J; Dahl, Jason; Elfar, John C

    2016-03-01

    We investigate whether applying an internal radiocarpal-spanning plate with the wrist in slight extension affects the biomechanical stability of the construct. An unstable distal radius fracture was simulated in 10 cadaveric specimens and immobilized with a radiocarpal-spanning plate holding the wrist in a neutral position. This construct was then physiologically loaded through the wrist flexor and extensor tendons. The resulting motion at the fracture was captured with a displacement sensor. The plate was then extended using an in situ bending technique, placing the wrist in extension, and the experiment was repeated. No statistically significant difference in the biomechanical stability afforded by the radiocarpal-spanning plate was detected with the wrist in extension compared to that in the traditional neutral position. The radiocarpal-spanning plate fixation was more stable when loaded through the extensor tendons. We conclude that immobilizing a distal radius fracture with an internal radiocarpal-spanning plate that holds the wrist in extension does not compromise biomechanical stability. PMID:26929853

  16. Wrist arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    Wrist surgery; Arthroscopy - wrist; Surgery - wrist - arthroscopy; Surgery - wrist - arthroscopic; Carpal tunnel release ... You will likely receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means you will be asleep and unable ...

  17. Activity recognition using a single accelerometer placed at the wrist or ankle

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Andrea; Intille, Stephen S.; Rosenberger, Mary; Sabatini, Angelo M.; Haskell, William

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Large physical activity surveillance projects such as the UK Biobank and NHANES are using wrist-worn accelerometer-based activity monitors that collect raw data. The goal is to increase wear time by asking subjects to wear the monitors on the wrist instead of the hip, and then to use information in the raw signal to improve activity type and intensity estimation. The purpose of this work is obtaining an algorithm to process wrist and ankle raw data and classify behavior into four broad activity classes: ambulation, cycling, sedentary and other. METHODS Participants (N = 33) wearing accelerometers on the wrist and ankle performed 26 daily activities. The accelerometer data were collected, cleaned, and preprocessed to extract features that characterize 2 s, 4 s, and 12.8 s data windows. Feature vectors encoding information about frequency and intensity of motion extracted from analysis of the raw signal were used with a support vector machine classifier to identify a subject’s activity. Results were compared with categories classified by a human observer. Algorithms were validated using a leave-one-subject-out strategy. The computational complexity of each processing step was also evaluated. RESULTS With 12.8 s windows, the proposed strategy showed high classification accuracies for ankle data (95.0%) that decreased to 84.7% for wrist data. Shorter (4 s) windows only minimally decreased performances of the algorithm on the wrist to 84.2%. CONCLUSIONS A classification algorithm using 13 features shows good classification into the four classes given the complexity of the activities in the original dataset. The algorithm is computationally-efficient and could be implemented in real-time on mobile devices with only 4 s latency. PMID:23604069

  18. Dorsal wrist syndrome repair.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Masataka; Masada, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Eiji

    2004-07-01

    Dorsal wrist pain with or without a palpable dorsal wrist ganglion is a common complaint. Watson developed the concept of the dorsal wrist syndrome (DWS) which is an entity encompassing pre-dynamic rotary subluxation of the scaphoid and the overloaded wrist. We reviewed 20 cases of DWS treated surgically. There were nine males (11 wrists) and nine females (nine wrists). Post-operative follow-up ranged from five to 67 months (mean, 37 months). At operation, we observed SLL tears in eight wrists and dorsal ganglia in 12 cases. Following surgery, 12 cases reported being pain free, five had mild pain, two moderate pain and one case reported severe pain. Post-operative extension/flexion was 73/70 average. Post-operative grip strength was 28 kg average. We believe that excision of the posterior interosseous nerve and the dorsal capsule including the ganglion, if present, provides pain relief in DWS. PMID:15368625

  19. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2–30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  20. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  1. How Accurately Can Your Wrist Device Recognize Daily Activities and Detect Falls?

    PubMed Central

    Gjoreski, Martin; Gjoreski, Hristijan; Luštrek, Mitja; Gams, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    Although wearable accelerometers can successfully recognize activities and detect falls, their adoption in real life is low because users do not want to wear additional devices. A possible solution is an accelerometer inside a wrist device/smartwatch. However, wrist placement might perform poorly in terms of accuracy due to frequent random movements of the hand. In this paper we perform a thorough, large-scale evaluation of methods for activity recognition and fall detection on four datasets. On the first two we showed that the left wrist performs better compared to the dominant right one, and also better compared to the elbow and the chest, but worse compared to the ankle, knee and belt. On the third (Opportunity) dataset, our method outperformed the related work, indicating that our feature-preprocessing creates better input data. And finally, on a real-life unlabeled dataset the recognized activities captured the subject’s daily rhythm and activities. Our fall-detection method detected all of the fast falls and minimized the false positives, achieving 85% accuracy on the first dataset. Because the other datasets did not contain fall events, only false positives were evaluated, resulting in 9 for the second, 1 for the third and 15 for the real-life dataset (57 days data). PMID:27258282

  2. How Accurately Can Your Wrist Device Recognize Daily Activities and Detect Falls?

    PubMed

    Gjoreski, Martin; Gjoreski, Hristijan; Luštrek, Mitja; Gams, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    Although wearable accelerometers can successfully recognize activities and detect falls, their adoption in real life is low because users do not want to wear additional devices. A possible solution is an accelerometer inside a wrist device/smartwatch. However, wrist placement might perform poorly in terms of accuracy due to frequent random movements of the hand. In this paper we perform a thorough, large-scale evaluation of methods for activity recognition and fall detection on four datasets. On the first two we showed that the left wrist performs better compared to the dominant right one, and also better compared to the elbow and the chest, but worse compared to the ankle, knee and belt. On the third (Opportunity) dataset, our method outperformed the related work, indicating that our feature-preprocessing creates better input data. And finally, on a real-life unlabeled dataset the recognized activities captured the subject's daily rhythm and activities. Our fall-detection method detected all of the fast falls and minimized the false positives, achieving 85% accuracy on the first dataset. Because the other datasets did not contain fall events, only false positives were evaluated, resulting in 9 for the second, 1 for the third and 15 for the real-life dataset (57 days data). PMID:27258282

  3. Colles wrist fracture – aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colles wrist fracture is caused by a forceful injury to the wrist. This may occur due to: Car accident Contact sports Falling while skiing, riding a bike, or other activity Falling on an outstretched arm ( ...

  4. Should we think about wrist extensor after flexor tendon repair?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline M; Tanaka, Denise M; Barbosa, Rafael I; Marcolino, Alexandre M; Elui, Valeria MC; Mazzer, Nilton

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the activity of wrist extensor muscle, correlating with wrist motion during gripping after flexor tendon repair. Design: Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Setting: Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Subjects: A total of 11 patients submitted to rehabilitation by early passive motion of the fingers with wrist flexion position were evaluated after 8 weeks of fingers flexor tendon repair and 11 healthy volunteers, all ranging from 20 to 37 years of age. Intervention: Volunteers performed an isometric standardized gripping task. Main measures: We used electrogoniometry to analyze wrist range of motion and surface electromyography, considering 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis. Results: Patients with flexor tendon repair showed co-activation deficit between wrist extensor (extensor carpi radialis) and flexor finger muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis) during gripping in the intermediate phase of rehabilitation, despite some recovering mobility for wrist extension (p ≤ 0.05). A moderate correlation between range of motion and extensor carpi radialis was present only for injured group (r = 0.32). Total active motion score, which represents finger active excursion, was regular or poor in 65% of cases, all with nerve repair associated. Conclusion: Wrist extensors have an important synergist role at handgrip, although some imbalance can be present after flexor tendon repair. These preliminary findings suggest that emphasis could be directed to add synergistic wrist motion in rehabilitation protocols after flexor tendon repair. Future studies with early active rehabilitation are necessary. PMID:26770674

  5. Quantifying forearm muscle activity during wrist and finger movements by means of multi-channel electromyography.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Marco; Celadon, Nicolò; Mastrapasqua, Davide; Paleari, Marco; Margaria, Valentina; Ariano, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1) the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2) the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1) it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2) hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported. PMID:25289669

  6. Quantifying Forearm Muscle Activity during Wrist and Finger Movements by Means of Multi-Channel Electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Gazzoni, Marco; Celadon, Nicolò; Mastrapasqua, Davide; Paleari, Marco; Margaria, Valentina; Ariano, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1) the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2) the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1) it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2) hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported. PMID:25289669

  7. EFFECT OF USING WRIST ORTHOSES ON FOREARM FLEXOR AND EXTENSOR MUSCLE ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Novais Van Petten, Adriana Maria Valladão; Ávila, Antônio Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of using wrist immobilization orthoses made from different materials, on activation of the flexor and extensor musculature of the forearm while performing specific tasks. Methods: Twenty-six adults, with an average age of 26.2 years, underwent the Jebsen-Taylor functional hand test and the grip strength test (Jamar® dynamometer) under three conditions: free hand, wearing a composite orthosis and wearing a thermoplastic orthosis. The tests were carried out using the dominant hand only. During the tests, surface electrodes were attached to the flexor and extensor muscles of the forearm to record the muscle electrical activity. The results obtained under the three conditions were compared and analyzed using the Wilcoxon statistical test. Results: Significant differences in muscle activation were found between using the free hand and using any of the orthoses. There was no significant difference in muscle activation between the two types of orthosis. A decrease in activity of the extensor muscles of the forearm was observed during all the tasks, as well as an increase in activation of the flexor muscles with the use of the orthoses. Conclusion: These results are important for defining whether an orthosis should be prescribed during the rehabilitation process for a wide range of disorders, such as tendinitis of the flexors and extensors of the wrist and fingers, as well as for predicting the length of time for which these devices should be used. PMID:27022523

  8. Comparison of Muscle Activation during Dominant Hand Wrist Flexion when Writing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soohee

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the difference in muscle activation of the dominant upper extremity in right-handed and left-handed persons during writing. [Subjects] There were 36 subjects (16 left- handers/ 20 right- handers), and the study was conducted from 03/01/2012 to 30/3/2012. [Methods] Six electrodes were attached to the FCU (flexor carpi ulnaris), FCR (flexor carpi radialis), ECU (extensor carpi ulnaris), ECR (extensor carpi radialis), and both UT (upper trapezius) muscles. [Results] FCU muscle activation was 16.77±9.12% in left-handers and 10.29±4.13% (%MVIC) in right-handers. FCR muscle activation was 19.09±9.43% in left-handers and 10.64±5.03% in right-handers. In addition, the UT muscle activation on the writing hand side was 11.91±5.79% in left-handers and 1.66±1.19% in right-handers. [Conclusion] As a result of this study, it was discovered that left-handers used more wrist flexion in performance of the writing task with the dominant upper extremity than right-handers, and that the left-handers activated the wrist and shoulder muscles more than the right-handers. These results indicate a potential danger of musculoskeletal disease in left-hander. PMID:24409013

  9. Design of Wrist Gimbal: a forearm and wrist exoskeleton for stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Martinez, John A; Ng, Paul; Lu, Son; Campagna, McKenzie S; Celik, Ozkan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present design, implementation and specifications of the Wrist Gimbal, a three degree-of-freedom (DOF) exoskeleton developed for forearm and wrist rehabilitation. Wrist Gimbal has three active DOF, corresponding to pronation/supination, flexion/extension and adduction/abduction joints. We mainly focused on a robust, safe and practical device design to facilitate clinical implementation, testing and acceptance. Robustness and mechanical rigidity was achieved by implementing two bearing supports for each of the pronation/supination and adduction/abduction axes. Rubber hard stops for each axis, an emergency stop button and software measures ensured safe operation. An arm rest with padding and straps, a handle with adjustable distal distance and height and a large inner volume contribute to ease of use, of patient attachment and to comfort. We present the specifications of Wrist Gimbal in comparison with similar devices in the literature and example data collected from a healthy subject. PMID:24187276

  10. Wrist actigraphy for scratch detection in the presence of confounding activities.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, Johanna; Austin, Daniel; Sack, Robert; Hayes, Tamara L

    2011-01-01

    Scratching is a symptom of many dermatological disorders, especially atopic dermatitis. For the development of anti-itch medications, there is a need for objective measures of scratching. Wrist actigraphy (monitoring wrist and hand movements with micro-accelerometers) is a promising method for assessing scratching; however, currently available technology has a limited capacity to discriminate scratching from other similar movements. In this study, we investigated methods to improve the specificity of actigraphy for scratch detection on movement data collected from subjects using the PAM-RL actigraph. A k-means cluster analysis was used to differentiate scratching from walking and restless sleep, which are potential confounds for nighttime scratching. Features used in the analysis include variance, peak frequency, autocorrelation value at one lag, and number of counts above 0.01 g's. The k-means cluster analysis exhibited a high sensitivity (0.90 ± 0.10) and specificity for walking (0.98 ± 0.05) and restless sleep (0.88 ± 0.06), respectively, demonstrating the separability of these activities. This work indicates that the features described here can be used to develop a classifier that discriminates scratch from other activities. The described method of scratch detection shows promise as an objective method for assessing scratching movements in clinical trials and longitudinal studies of scratch. PMID:22255131

  11. Comparison of Activity Type Classification Accuracy from Accelerometers Worn on the Hip, Wrists, and Thigh in Young, Apparently Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoye, Alexander H. K.; Pivarnik, James M.; Mudd, Lanay M.; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare accuracy of activity type prediction models for accelerometers worn on the hip, wrists, and thigh. Forty-four adults performed sedentary, ambulatory, lifestyle, and exercise activities (14 total, 10 categories) for 3-10 minutes each in a 90-minute semi-structured laboratory protocol. Artificial neural…

  12. Different effects of age, adiposity and physical activity on the risk of ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Miranda E G; Cairns, Benjamin J; Banks, Emily; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K; Beral, Valerie

    2012-06-01

    While increasing age, decreasing body mass index (BMI), and physical inactivity are known to increase hip fracture risk, whether these factors have similar effects on other common fractures is not well established. We used prospectively-collected data from a large cohort to examine the role of these factors on the risk of incident ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women. 1,155,304 postmenopausal participants in the Million Women Study with a mean age of 56.0 (SD 4.8) years, provided information about lifestyle, anthropometric, and reproductive factors at recruitment in 1996-2001. All participants were linked to National Health Service cause-specific hospital records for day-case or overnight admissions. During follow-up for an average of 8.3 years per woman, 6807 women had an incident ankle fracture, 9733 an incident wrist fracture, and 5267 an incident hip fracture. Adjusted absolute and relative risks (RRs) for incident ankle, wrist, and hip fractures were calculated using Cox regression models. Age-specific rates for wrist and hip fractures increased sharply with age, whereas rates for ankle fracture did not. Cumulative absolute risks from ages 50 to 84 years per 100 women were 2.5 (95%CI 2.2-2.8) for ankle fracture, 5.0 (95%CI 4.4-5.5) for wrist fracture, and 6.2 (95%CI 5.5-7.0) for hip fracture. Compared with lean women (BMI<20 kg/m(2)), obese women (BMI≥30 kg/m(2)) had a three-fold increased risk of ankle fracture (RR=3.07; 95%CI 2.53-3.74), but a substantially reduced risk of wrist fracture and especially of hip fracture (RR=0.57; 0.51-0.64 and 0.23; 0.21-0.27, respectively). Physical activity was associated with a reduced risk of hip fracture but was not associated with ankle or wrist fracture risk. Ankle, wrist and hip fractures are extremely common in postmenopausal women, but the associations with age, adiposity, and physical activity differ substantially between the three fracture sites. PMID:22465850

  13. Elbow and wrist joint contact forces during occupational pick and place activities.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, E K; Nicol, A C

    2000-05-01

    A three-dimensional, mathematical model of the elbow and wrist joints, including 15 muscle units, 3 ligaments and 4 joint forces, has been developed. A new strain gauge transducer has been developed to measure functional grip forces. The device measures radial forces divided into six components and forces of up to 250N per segment can be measured with an accuracy of +/-1%. Ten normal volunteers were asked to complete four tasks representing occupational activities, during which time their grip force was monitored. Together with kinematic information from the six-camera Vicon data, the moment effect of these loads at the joints was calculated. These external moments are assumed to be balanced by the internal moments, generated by the muscles, passive soft tissue and bone contact. The effectiveness of the body's internal structures in generating joint moments was assessed by studying the geometry of a simplified model of the structures, where information about the lines of action and moment arms of muscles, tendons and ligaments is contained. The assumption of equilibrium between these external and internal joint moments allows formulation of a set of equations from which muscle and joint forces can be calculated. A two stage, linear optimisation routine minimising the overall muscle stress and the sum of the joint forces has been used to overcome the force-sharing problem. Humero-ulnar forces of up to 1600N, humero-radial forces of up to 800N and wrist joint forces of up to 2800N were found for moderate level activity. The model was validated by comparison with other studies. PMID:10708780

  14. A New Rerouting Technique for the Extensor Pollicis Longus in Palliative Treatment for Wrist and Finger Extension Paralysis Resulting From Radial Nerve and C5C6C7 Root Injury.

    PubMed

    Laravine, Jennifer; Cambon-Binder, Adeline; Belkheyar, Zoubir

    2016-03-01

    Wrist and finger extension paralysis is a consequence of an injury to the radial nerve or the C5C6C7 roots. Despite these 2 different levels of lesions, palliative treatment for this type of paralysis depends on the same tendon transfers. A large majority of the patients are able to compensate for a deficiency of the extension of the wrist and fingers. However, a deficiency in the opening of the first web space, which could be responsible for transfers to the abductor pollicis longus, the extensor pollicis brevis, and the extensor pollicis longus (EPL), frequently exists. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a new EPL rerouting technique outside of Lister's tubercle. Another aim was to verify whether this technique allows a better opening of the thumb-index pinch in this type of paralysis. In the first part, we performed an anatomic study comparing the EPL rerouting technique and the frequently used technique for wrist and finger extension paralyses. In the second part, we present 2 clinical cases in which this new technique will be practiced. Preliminary results during this study favor the EPL rerouting technique. This is a simple and reproducible technique that allows for good opening of the first web space in the treatment of wrist and finger extension paralysis. PMID:26709570

  15. 78 FR 44625 - Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... 17, 2013 (78 FR 36307), inviting the public to comment on a proposed information collection titled ``Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-16.'' On June 18, 2013 (78 FR 36643... corrects that error by withdrawing the FR notice that published on June 18, 2013 (FR Doc 2013-14412)....

  16. Effect of wrist-worn activity monitor feedback on physical activity behavior: A randomized controlled trial in Finnish young men

    PubMed Central

    Jauho, Anna-Maiju; Pyky, Riitta; Ahola, Riikka; Kangas, Maarit; Virtanen, Paula; Korpelainen, Raija; Jämsä, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the use of an activity monitor providing feedback has an effect on physical activity (PA) in young men. A population-based sample of 276 conscription-aged (mean = 17.9, SD = 0.7 years) men participated in a 3-month randomized controlled trial in Oulu in 2012. Participants were randomized to an intervention group (INT, N = 137) and a control group (CON, N = 139). INT received a wrist-worn monitor (Polar Active) showing daily activity, and CON received identical monitors without feedback. Main outcome was the change from baseline in objectively measured weekly time spent in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and sedentary activity (SED), as assessed by generalized estimation equations (GEE). Other lifestyle factors were assessed by a questionnaire at baseline and at 3 months. Weekly physical activity data (≥ 4 days with ≥ 8 h each) were obtained from 72 (53%) and 90 (65%) men in the INT and CON, respectively. Based on GEE, time spent in MVPA increased (p = 0.012) and SED decreased (p = 0.032) in the INT compared with the CON. During the first 7 weeks, the INT spent on average 1 h less sedentary than the CON (t-test, p < 0.05). During the first week, the INT showed 12 minutes more MVPA compared to the CON (t-test, p = 0.034). Based on questionnaire data, the proportion of the most sedentary men decreased in the INT (Wilcoxon test, 28% vs. 10%, p = 0.029), with no change in the CON (20% vs. 19%, p = 0.546). To conclude, a wrist-worn activity monitor providing feedback had a short-term positive effect on PA and SED in young men. Trial registration This is a pilot study for a larger randomized controlled trial registered to the clinical trials register NCT01376986. PMID:26844128

  17. Methods to estimate aspects of physical activity and sedentary behavior from high-frequency wrist accelerometer measurements.

    PubMed

    Staudenmayer, John; He, Shai; Hickey, Amanda; Sasaki, Jeffer; Freedson, Patty

    2015-08-15

    This investigation developed models to estimate aspects of physical activity and sedentary behavior from three-axis high-frequency wrist-worn accelerometer data. The models were developed and tested on 20 participants (n = 10 males, n = 10 females, mean age = 24.1, mean body mass index = 23.9), who wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer on their dominant wrist and an ActiGraph GT3X on the hip while performing a variety of scripted activities. Energy expenditure was concurrently measured by a portable indirect calorimetry system. Those calibration data were then used to develop and assess both machine-learning and simpler models with fewer unknown parameters (linear regression and decision trees) to estimate metabolic equivalent scores (METs) and to classify activity intensity, sedentary time, and locomotion time. The wrist models, applied to 15-s windows, estimated METs [random forest: root mean squared error (rSME) = 1.21 METs, hip: rMSE = 1.67 METs] and activity intensity (random forest: 75% correct, hip: 60% correct) better than a previously developed model that used counts per minute measured at the hip. In a separate set of comparisons, the simpler decision trees classified activity intensity (random forest: 75% correct, tree: 74% correct), sedentary time (random forest: 96% correct, decision tree: 97% correct), and locomotion time (random forest: 99% correct, decision tree: 96% correct) nearly as well or better than the machine-learning approaches. Preliminary investigation of the models' performance on two free-living people suggests that they may work well outside of controlled conditions. PMID:26112238

  18. Universal Dorsal Approach of the Wrist.

    PubMed

    Ciais, Grégoire; Waitzenegger, Thomas; Parot, Catalina; Leclercq, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    The ideal dorsal wrist approach has to provide the best exposure while preserving sensitive dorsal nerve branches, dorsal veins, and skin integrity. Longitudinal incision is mostly used in the wrist surgery. Few anatomic or clinical studies have described transverse dorsal approach following Langer's lines. We present a universal transversal skin incision, the design of which meets the requirements of a dorsal wrist approach. It is adjustable with the radial and ulnar extension and respects Langer's lines, nerves, and veins. We conducted both an anatomic, clinical, and a retrospective study. For the anatomic part, we performed a cadaveric study on the wrist. For the clinical part of the study, we analyzed clinical results for 10 consecutive patients who underwent a universal dorsal wrist approach for various surgical procedures by the same surgeon. For the last part, we reviewed the patients operated during the past 5 years with this approach for different procedures in the wrist. PMID:26197157

  19. Targeted brain activation using an MR-compatible wrist torque measurement device and isometric motor tasks during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Vlaar, Martijn P; Mugge, Winfred; Groot, Paul F C; Sharifi, Sarvi; Bour, Lo J; van der Helm, Frans C T; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Schouten, Alfred C

    2016-07-01

    Dedicated pairs of isometric wrist flexion tasks, with and without visual feedback of the exerted torque, were designed to target activation of the CBL and BG in healthy subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Selective activation of the cerebellum (CBL) and basal ganglia (BG), often implicated in movement disorders such as tremor and dystonia, may help identify pathological changes and expedite diagnosis. A prototyped MR-compatible wrist torque measurement device, free of magnetic and conductive materials, allowed safe execution of tasks during fMRI without causing artifacts. A significant increase of activity in CBL and BG was found in healthy volunteers during a constant torque task with visual feedback compared to a constant torque task without visual feedback. This study shows that specific pairs of motor tasks using MR-compatible equipment at the wrist allow for targeted activation of CBL and BG, paving a new way for research into the pathophysiology of movement disorders. PMID:26968144

  20. Robust heart rate estimation using wrist-based PPG signals in the presence of intense physical activities.

    PubMed

    Chengzhi Zong; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate tracking from a wrist-type photoplethysmogram (PPG) signal during intensive physical activities is a challenge that is attracting more attention thanks to the introduction of wrist-worn wearable computers. Commonly-used motion artifact rejection methods coupled with simple periodicity-based heart rate estimation techniques are incapable of achieving satisfactory heart rate tracking performance during intense activities. In this paper, we propose a two-stage solution. Firstly, we introduce an improved spectral subtraction method to reject the spectral components of motion artifacts. Secondly, instead of using heuristic mechanisms, we formalize the spectral peaks selection process as the shortest path search problem and validate its effectiveness. Analysis on the experimental results based on a published database shows that: (1) Our proposed method outperforms three other comparable methods with regards to heart rate estimation error. (2) The proposed method is a promising candidate for both offline cardiac health analysis and online heart rate tracking in daily life, even during intensive physical motions. PMID:26738168

  1. Number of Days Required to Estimate Habitual Activity Using Wrist-Worn GENEActiv Accelerometer: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Christina B.; Fitzgerald, Anthony P.; Kearney, Patricia M.; Perry, Ivan J.; Rennie, Kirsten L.; Kozarski, Robert; Phillips, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Objective methods like accelerometers are feasible for large studies and may quantify variability in day-to-day physical activity better than self-report. The variability between days suggests that day of the week cannot be ignored in the design and analysis of physical activity studies. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the optimal number of days needed to obtain reliable estimates of weekly habitual physical activity using the wrist-worn GENEActiv accelerometer. Methods Data are from a subsample of the Mitchelstown cohort; 475 (44.6% males; mean aged 59.6±5.5 years) middle-aged Irish adults. Participants wore the wrist GENEActiv accelerometer for 7-consecutive days. Data were collected at 100Hz and summarised into a signal magnitude vector using 60s epochs. Each time interval was categorised according to intensity based on validated cut-offs. Spearman pairwise correlations determined the association between days of the week. Repeated measures ANOVA examined differences in average minutes across days. Intraclass correlations examined the proportion of variability between days, and Spearman-Brown formula estimated intra-class reliability coefficient associated with combinations of 1–7 days. Results Three hundred and ninety-seven adults (59.7±5.5yrs) had valid accelerometer data. Overall, men were most sedentary on weekends while women spent more time in sedentary behaviour on Sunday through Tuesday. Post hoc analysis found sedentary behaviour and light activity levels on Sunday to differ to all other days in the week. Analysis revealed greater than 1 day monitoring is necessary to achieve acceptable reliability. Monitoring frame duration for reliable estimates varied across intensity categories, (sedentary (3 days), light (2 days), moderate (2 days) and vigorous activity (6 days) and MVPA (2 days)). Conclusion These findings provide knowledge into the behavioural variability in weekly activity patterns of middle-aged adults. Since Sunday

  2. The Potential Risk Factors Relevant to Lateral Epicondylitis by Wrist Coupling Posture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Ya; Chieh, Hsiao-Feng; Lin, Chien-Ju; Jou, I-Ming; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Su, Fong-Chin

    2016-01-01

    The use of awkward wrist postures and unskilled techniques might induce lateral epicondylitis. This study thus investigated the effects of wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity on the dynamic performances of the wrist muscles during the coupling posture via a custom-made bi-planar isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty subjects were recruited to perform the isokinetic testing. We measured the muscle strengths and activities for the wrist extensors and flexors during concentric and eccentric contractions at three movement velocities, 30°s-1, 90°s-1, and 180°s-1, combined with three wrist postures, neutral position (NP), radial deviation (RD), and ulnar deviation (UD). The root mean square (RMS) of the electromyographic signal in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC), normalized peak torque of extensors, and ratio of normalized peak torque between wrist extensors and flexors, were all greater in the NP than RD and UD in both contractions. The ratio of RMS between EDC and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) had a significantly greater value in RD than UD during the concentric contraction. The EDC showed significantly higher activity at the fast velocity in both contractions. Nevertheless, a significantly higher RMS of the electromyographic signal between EDC and FDS and the ratio of strength between wrist extensors and flexors were found at slow velocity in both contractions. The wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity of the wrist joint should thus be considered as influential factors which might alter the dynamic performances, and may result in further injury of the elbow joint. PMID:27171198

  3. Trends in Wrist Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Obdeijn, Miryam C.; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.; Mathoulin, Christophe; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Wrist arthroscopy plays a role in both the diagnosis and the treatment of wrist pathology. It has evolved in the last three decades. Questions The present status of wrist arthroscopy was investigated by answering the following questions: -What is its current position in the treatment wrist pathologies according to the literature? -What is its current position according to hand surgeons? Methods Analysis of the number of publications on wrist arthroscopy was performed and compared with the number of publications on other arthroscopy topics to assess the current position of wrist arthroscopy. The members of the EWAS (European Wrist Arthroscopy Society) and the members of eight national hand surgery societies were questioned on wrist arthroscopy in daily practice. Results From 1975 till now, 925 papers on wrist arthroscopy were found. The publications on wrist arthroscopy increased from an average of 8/year (1986) to 26/year (2012). More than half (56.9%) of the respondents of the EWAS perform fewer than 5 wrist arthroscopies per month, and only 7 (10.8%) indicate the performance of more than 10 wrist arthroscopies per month. Seventy-four percent of the orthopedic hand surgeons perform wrist arthroscopy (in 48.5% for therapeutic indications) against 36.8% of plastic surgery hand surgeons (in 23.1% for therapeutic indications). Conclusion Wrist arthroscopy has taken up a place in the armamentarium of the hand surgeon. The place of wrist arthroscopy in daily practice is related to the background of the hand surgeon. PMID:24436823

  4. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age

    PubMed Central

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18–39, 40–64, 65 + years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of −0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of −0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81–1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed. PMID:26449155

  5. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age.

    PubMed

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2015-11-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18-39, 40-64, 65 +  years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of -0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of -0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81-1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed. PMID:26449155

  6. Wrist Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... runs through your wrist. That tube, called the carpal tunnel, has tendons and a nerve inside. It is ... sports or sewing can cause pain, or even carpal tunnel syndrome. Wrist pain with bruising and swelling can ...

  7. Wrist pulse (image)

    MedlinePlus

    To measure the pulse at the wrist, place the index and middle finger over the underside of the opposite wrist, below the base ... firmly with flat fingers until you feel the pulse in the radial artery.

  8. Application of the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist rehabilitation training

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Wei-Min; Hwang, Yuh-Shyan; Chen, Shih-Ching; Tan, Sun-Yen; Chen, Chih-Chen; Chen, Yu-Luen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The introduction of emerging technologies such as the wireless Blobo bluetooth ball with multimedia features can enhance wrist physical therapy training, making it more fun and enhancing its effects. [Methods] Wrist injuries caused by fatigue at work, improper exercise, and other conditions are very common. Therefore, the reconstruction of wrist joint function is an important issue. The efficacy of a newly developed integrated wrist joint rehabilitation game using a Blobo bluetooth ball with C# software installed was tested in wrist rehabilitation (Flexion, Extension, Ulnar Deviation, Radial Deviation). [Results] Eight subjects with normal wrist function participated in a test of the system’s stability and repeatability. After performing the Blobo bluetooth ball wrist physical therapy training, eight patients with wrist dysfunction experienced approximately 10° improvements in range of motion (ROM) of flexion extension, and ulnar deviation and about 6° ROM improvement in radial deviation. The subjects showed progress in important indicators of wrist function. [Conclusion] This study used the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist physical therapy training and the preliminary results were encouraging. In the future, more diverse wrist or limb rehabilitation games should be developed to meet the needs of physical therapy training. PMID:26957723

  9. Application of the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist rehabilitation training.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wei-Min; Hwang, Yuh-Shyan; Chen, Shih-Ching; Tan, Sun-Yen; Chen, Chih-Chen; Chen, Yu-Luen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The introduction of emerging technologies such as the wireless Blobo bluetooth ball with multimedia features can enhance wrist physical therapy training, making it more fun and enhancing its effects. [Methods] Wrist injuries caused by fatigue at work, improper exercise, and other conditions are very common. Therefore, the reconstruction of wrist joint function is an important issue. The efficacy of a newly developed integrated wrist joint rehabilitation game using a Blobo bluetooth ball with C# software installed was tested in wrist rehabilitation (Flexion, Extension, Ulnar Deviation, Radial Deviation). [Results] Eight subjects with normal wrist function participated in a test of the system's stability and repeatability. After performing the Blobo bluetooth ball wrist physical therapy training, eight patients with wrist dysfunction experienced approximately 10° improvements in range of motion (ROM) of flexion extension, and ulnar deviation and about 6° ROM improvement in radial deviation. The subjects showed progress in important indicators of wrist function. [Conclusion] This study used the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist physical therapy training and the preliminary results were encouraging. In the future, more diverse wrist or limb rehabilitation games should be developed to meet the needs of physical therapy training. PMID:26957723

  10. Activation patterns of mono- and bi-articular arm muscles as a function of force and movement direction of the wrist in humans

    PubMed Central

    van Bolhuis, B M; Gielen, C C A M; van Ingen Schenau, G J

    1998-01-01

    In order to explain the task-dependent activation of muscles, we have investigated the hypothesis that mono- and bi-articular muscles have a different functional role in the control of multijoint movements. According to this hypothesis, bi-articular muscles are activated in a way to control the direction of external force. The mono-articular muscles are thought to be activated to contribute to joint torque mainly during shortening movements.To investigate this hypothesis, surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings were obtained from several mono- and bi-articular arm muscles during voluntary slow movements of the wrist in a horizontal plane against an external force. The direction of force produced at the wrist and the direction of movement of the wrist were varied independently.The results revealed distinct differences between the activation patterns of mono- and bi-articular muscles. The activation of the bi-articular muscles was not affected by movement direction, but appeared to vary exclusively with the direction of force.The mono-articular muscles showed significantly more EMG activity for movements in a specific direction, which equalled the movement direction corresponding to the largest shortening velocity of the muscle. The EMG activity decreased gradually for movements in other directions. This direction-dependent activation appeared to be independent of the direction of the external force. PMID:9490859

  11. Maximal dynamic grip force and wrist torque: the effects of gender, exertion direction, angular velocity, and wrist angle.

    PubMed

    Morse, Jonathan L; Jung, Myung-Chul; Bashford, Gregory R; Hallbeck, M Susan

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of gender, exertion direction, angular velocity and wrist angle on simultaneous grip force and wrist torque under the isokinetic condition. The study used 20 participants (10 males and 10 females) and included 6 angular velocities (15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 degrees /s) and 2 wrist exertion directions (flexion and extension) over the wrist range of motion of 70 degrees flexion to 60 degrees extension in 5 degrees increments. Similar to other studies, males and flexion exertion produced larger forces than females and extension exertion, respectively. However, the largest forces were generated at near extreme flexion of the wrist and the dependent variable of angular velocity was not practically significant. These results can contribute to the evaluation of cumulative trauma syndromes, but there is a need for more research on the dynamic measures of the hand and wrist complex and for standard development for dynamic force measurement. PMID:16442072

  12. Linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel mechanomyographic recordings reveal heterogeneous activation of wrist extensors in presence of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst A; Samani, Afshin

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we applied multi-channel mechanomyographic (MMG) recordings in combination with linear and nonlinear analyses to investigate muscular and musculotendinous effects of high intensity eccentric exercise. Twelve accelerometers arranged in a 3 × 4 matrix over the dominant elbow muscles were used to detect MMG activity in 12 healthy participants. Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced by repetitive high intensity eccentric contractions of the wrist extensor muscles. Average rectified values (ARV) as well as percentage of recurrence (%REC) and percentage of determinism (%DET) extracted from recurrence quantification analysis were computed from data obtained during static-dynamic contractions performed before exercise, immediately after exercise, and in presence of muscle soreness. A linear mixed model was used for the statistical analysis. The ARV, %REC, and %DET maps revealed heterogeneous MMG activity over the wrist extensor muscles before, immediately after, and in presence of muscle soreness (P<0.01). The ARVs were higher while the %REC and %DET were lower in presence of muscle soreness compared with before exercise (P<0.05). The study provides new key information on linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel MMG recordings of the wrist extensor muscles following eccentric exercise that results in muscle soreness. Recurrence quantification analysis can be suggested as a tool for detection of MMG changes in presence of muscle soreness. PMID:25277830

  13. Wrist sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... your wrist starts to feel better, try the ball drill. With your palm up, place a rubber ball in your hand and grab it with your ... and wrist still while you gently squeeze the ball. Squeeze for about 30 seconds, then release. Repeat ...

  14. Assessment of finger forces and wrist torques for functional grasp using new multichannel textile neuroprostheses.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Marc; Gross, Gion-Pitschen; Lang, Martin; Kuhn, Andreas; Keller, Thierry; Morari, Manfred

    2008-08-01

    New multichannel textile neuroprotheses were developed, which comprise multiple sets of transcutaneous electrode arrays and connecting wires embroidered into a fabric layer. The electrode arrays were placed on the forearm above the extrinsic finger flexors and extensors. Activation regions for selective finger flexion and wrist extension were configured by switching a subset of the array elements between cathode, anode, and off states. We present a new isometric measurement system for the assessment of finger forces and wrist torques generated using the new neuroprostheses. Finger forces (from the middle phalanxes) were recorded using five load cells mounted on a "grasp handle" that can be arbitrarily positioned in space. The hand and the grasp handle were rigidly mounted to a 6-degree of freedom load cell, and the forces and torques about the wrist were recorded. A vacuum cushion was used to comfortably fixate the forearm. The position and orientation of the forearm, wrist, fingers, and handle were recorded using a new three-dimensional position measurement system (accuracy <+/-1 mm). The measurement system was integrated into the real-time multichannel transcutaneous electrode environment, which is able to control the spatiotemporal position of multiple activation regions. Using the combined system and textile neuroprosthesis, we were able to optimize the activation regions to produce selective finger and wrist articulation, enabling improved functional grasp. PMID:18782135

  15. Effect of Wrist Posture on Carpal Tunnel Pressure while Typing

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, David M.; Keir, Peter J.; Bach, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    Long weekly hours of keyboard use may lead to or aggravate carpal tunnel syndrome. The effects of typing on fluid pressure in the carpal tunnel, a possible mediator of carpal tunnel syndrome, are unknown. Twenty healthy subjects participated in a laboratory study to investigate the effects of typing at different wrist postures on carpal tunnel pressure of the right hand. Changes in wrist flexion/extension angle (p = 0.01) and radial/ulnar deviation angle (p = 0.03) independently altered carpal tunnel pressure; wrist deviations in extension or radial deviation were associated with an increase in pressure. The activity of typing independently elevated carpal tunnel pressure (p= 0.001) relative to the static hand held in the same posture. This information can guide the design and use of keyboards and workstations in order to minimize carpal tunnel pressure while typing. The findings may also be useful to clinicians and ergonomists in the management of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who use a keyboard. PMID:18383144

  16. Corticomotor excitability changes during mirrored or asynergistic wrist movements.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Charles T; Danna-dos-Santos, Alessander; Peters, Christina; Moore, Marlesa

    2015-03-15

    The current study used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the right primary motor cortex (M1) during bimanual contractions to examine facilitatory and inhibitory influences on the contralateral, target extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR) during changes in the task demands of the ipsilateral (task) ECR. The bimanual contractions were either mirrored (isometric wrist extension bilaterally) or more difficult asynergistic (asymmetric [wrist extension paired with wrist radial deviation]) contractions. TMS-induced motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and cortical silent periods (CSPs) were recorded during the execution of visually guided ramp and hold tasks. It was of interest to determine whether or not asynergistic contractions, representing a more difficult bimanual coordination task, resulted in differing patterns of activation and inhibition than mirrored movements. Asynergistic contractions were found to have differing effects on the target ECR than mirrored contractions. Foremost among these differences were the presence of enhanced inhibitory mechanisms. During asynergistic bimanual contractions the MEPs of the target ECR did not increase to the same degree and cortical silent period durations were longer. Findings indicate that bimanual mirrored and asynergistic contractions result in differing patterns of corticomotor excitability. PMID:25529184

  17. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace.

    PubMed

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  18. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  19. Advances in wrist arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Dukas, Alex; Pensak, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Since its introduction more than three decades ago, wrist arthroscopy has continually evolved. The procedure has a wide list of indications, including diagnostic and management applications. The scope of practice for the wrist arthroscopic surgeon includes management of triangulofibrocartilage complex pathology, evaluation and management of carpal instability, assistance in fracture reduction of the radius and scaphoid, treatment of trapeziometacarpal synovitis and arthritis, distal ulnar and carpal bone excisions, and salvage procedures. In addition, innovations such as new portals and smaller arthroscopes have expanded the applications of wrist arthroscopy. PMID:23118138

  20. Median nerve behavior at different wrist positions among older males

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroki; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The effect of wrist flexion-extension on the median nerve appearance, namely the cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and the longitudinal (D1) and vertical (D2) diameters, was investigated among older adults (N = 34). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at different wrist angles (neutral; and 15°, 30°, and 45° extension and flexion), in both the dominant and nondominant hand. Median nerve behavior were significantly associated with wrist angle changes. The MNCSA at wrist flexion and extension were significantly smaller (P < .001) compared with the neutral position in both the dominant and nondominant hand. The D1 and D2 were significantly reduced at flexion (P < .001) and extension (P < .001), respectively, in both the dominant and nondominant hand. Our results suggest that a larger flexion-extension angle causes higher compression stress on the median nerve, leading to increased deformation of the MNCSA, D1, and D2 among older adults. PMID:25945317

  1. Dexterous Humanoid Robotic Wrist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Nguyen, Vienny (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a torso, a pair of arms, a neck, a head, a wrist joint assembly, and a control system. The arms and the neck movably extend from the torso. Each of the arms includes a lower arm and a hand that is rotatable relative to the lower arm. The wrist joint assembly is operatively defined between the lower arm and the hand. The wrist joint assembly includes a yaw axis and a pitch axis. The pitch axis is disposed in a spaced relationship to the yaw axis such that the axes are generally perpendicular. The pitch axis extends between the yaw axis and the lower arm. The hand is rotatable relative to the lower arm about each of the yaw axis and the pitch axis. The control system is configured for determining a yaw angle and a pitch angle of the wrist joint assembly.

  2. Functional kinematics of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Rainbow, M J; Wolff, A L; Crisco, J J; Wolfe, S W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review past and present concepts concerning functional kinematics of the healthy and injured wrist. To provide a context for students of the wrist, we describe the progression of techniques for measuring carpal kinematics over the past century and discuss how this has influenced today's understanding of functional kinematics. Next, we provide an overview of recent developments and highlight the clinical relevance of these findings. We use these findings and recent evidence that supports the importance of coupled motion in early rehabilitation of radiocarpal injuries to develop the argument that coupled motion during functional activities is a clinically relevant outcome; therefore, clinicians should develop a framework for its dynamic assessment. This should enable a tailored and individualized approach to the treatment of carpal injuries. PMID:26568538

  3. Exploring Extension Involvement in Farm to School Program Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    The study reported here examined Extension professionals' involvement in farm-to-school program activities. Results of an online survey distributed to eight state Extension systems indicate that on average, Extension professionals are involved with one farm to school program activity, with most supporting school or community garden programs.…

  4. Stiffness, not inertial coupling, determines path curvature of wrist motions.

    PubMed

    Charles, Steven K; Hogan, Neville

    2012-02-01

    When humans rotate their wrist in flexion-extension, radial-ulnar deviation, and combinations, the resulting paths (like the path of a laser pointer on a screen) exhibit a distinctive pattern of curvature. In this report we show that the passive stiffness of the wrist is sufficient to account for this pattern. Simulating the dynamics of wrist rotations using a demonstrably realistic model under a variety of conditions, we show that wrist stiffness can explain all characteristics of the observed pattern of curvature. We also provide evidence against other possible causes. We further demonstrate that the phenomenon is robust against variations in human wrist parameters (inertia, damping, and stiffness) and choice of model inputs. Our findings explain two previously observed phenomena: why faster wrist rotations exhibit more curvature and why path curvature rotates with pronation-supination of the forearm. Our results imply that, as in reaching, path straightness is a goal in the planning and control of wrist rotations. This requires humans to predict and compensate for wrist dynamics, but, unlike reaching, nonlinear inertial coupling (e.g., Coriolis acceleration) is insignificant. The dominant term to be compensated is wrist stiffness. PMID:22131378

  5. Ulnar impaction syndrome: Managed by wrist arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jiajie; Xu, Zhijie; Zhao, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of handicraft industry and increase of various such works that need a large amount of repeated wrist ulnar deviation strength, the incidence of ulnar impaction syndrome (UIS) is increasing, but the traditional simple ulnar shortening osteotomy has more complications. This study aimed to explore the early diagnostic criteria of UIS and its wrist arthroscopic treatment experience. Materials and Methods: 9 UIS patients were enrolled in this study. According to magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray and endoscopic features, the diagnostic criteria of UIS were summarized and the individualized treatment schedule was made. If the ulnar positive variance was less than 4 mm, the arthroscopic wafer resection was performed. If the ulnar positive variance was more than 4 mm, the arthroscopic resection of injury and degenerative triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar osteotomy were conducted. Results: In all patients, the wound healed without any complications. All patients returned to normal life and work, with no ulnar wrist pain again. One patient had wrist weakness. There was a significant difference of the wrist activity between the last followup and before operation (P < 0.05). According to the modified wrist function scoring system of Green and O’Brien, there were 6 cases of excellent, 2 cases of good and 1 case of appropriate and the overall excellent and good rate was 92.3%. Conclusion: In the treatment of UIS, the arthroscopy can improve the diagnosis rate, optimize the treatment plan, shorten the treatment cycle, with good treatment results. PMID:27053807

  6. MRI-based modeling for evaluation of in vivo contact mechanics in the human wrist during active light grasp.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Ravi R; Thoomukuntla, Bhaskar; Ateshian, Gerard A; Fischer, Kenneth J

    2007-01-01

    Investigations of in vivo joint mechanics are important for understanding the joint function under functional loading and the mechanisms of pathology. In this study we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based joint contact modeling to evaluate in vivo joint contact mechanics in the human wrist. MRI scans were performed on the wrists of four subjects while they maintained light grasp of a cylinder, and with the same wrist relaxed. 3D models of the radius, scaphoid and lunate, including cartilage surface data, were constructed from the relaxed image data. These models were transformed into the loaded configuration, as determined from the grasp image data, and contact mechanics were evaluated. The resulting contact pressures, areas and forces were then analyzed for each articulation and for each subject. Contact areas were measured directly from grasp MRI images for comparison to the model predictions. The first-ever estimates for in vivo radioscaphoid and radiolunate contact pressure agreed reasonably well with previous cadaveric studies. This investigation also produced novel in vivo scapholunate contact results that were similar to radiolunate data. The specimen-specific contact area comparison generally showed substantial variability between the models and the direct measurements from MRI. On average, the models were within about 10% of the direct MRI measurements for radioscaphoid and scapholunate contact areas, but radiolunate contact areas from the model were only within 55% of the direct measurements. Overall, the results of the study suggest that MRI-based modeling has substantial potential for evaluation of in vivo joint contact mechanics, especially as technology and methodology improve. PMID:17391678

  7. Supinator Extender (SUE): a pneumatically actuated robot for forearm/wrist rehabilitation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Allington, James; Spencer, Steven J; Klein, Julius; Buell, Meghan; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Bobrow, James

    2011-01-01

    The robot described in this paper, SUE (Supinator Extender), adds forearm/wrist rehabilitation functionality to the UCI BONES exoskeleton robot and to the ArmeoSpring rehabilitation device. SUE is a 2-DOF serial chain that can measure and assist forearm supination-pronation and wrist flexion-extension. The large power to weight ratio of pneumatic actuators allows SUE to achieve the forces needed for rehabilitation therapy while remaining lightweight enough to be carried by BONES and ArmeoSpring. Each degree of freedom has a range of 90 degrees, and a nominal torque of 2 ft-lbs. The cylinders are mounted away from the patient's body on the lateral aspect of the arm. This is to prevent the danger of a collision and maximize the workspace of the arm robot. The rotation axis used for supination-pronation is a small bearing just below the subject's wrist. The flexion-extension motion is actuated by a cantilevered pneumatic cylinder, which allows the palm of the hand to remain open. Data are presented that demonstrate the ability of SUE to measure and cancel forearm/wrist passive tone, thereby extending the active range of motion for people with stroke. PMID:22254624

  8. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zukowski, Lisa A; Roper, Jaimie A; Shechtman, Orit; Otzel, Dana M; Hovis, Patty W; Tillman, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury participated. Motion data were captured as participants propelled across a flat surface, completing five trials in a CMW and five trials in the same CMW fitted with the EHDM. Average angular wrist orientations were compared between the two propulsion styles. Use of the EHDM resulted in reduced wrist extension and ulnar deviation. The shift to more neutral wrist orientations observed with EHDM use may reduce median nerve compression. PMID:25856042

  9. Design and Kinematic Evaluation of a Novel Joint-Specific Play Controller: Application for Wrist and Forearm Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Joel B.; Wilcox, Bethany; Costa, Laura; Kerman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background The wrist extensors and flexors are profoundly affected in most children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP) and are the major target of physical therapists' and occupational therapists' efforts to restore useful hand functions. A limitation of any therapeutic or exercise program can be the level of the child's engagement or adherence. The proposed approach capitalizes on the primary learning avenue for children: toy play. Objective This study aimed to develop and evaluate the measurement accuracy of innovative, motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP. Design Design objectives of the play controller included a cost-effective, home-based supplement to physical therapy, the ability to calibrate the controller so that play can be accomplished with any active range of motion, and the capability of logging play activity and wrist motion over week-long periods. Methods Accuracy of the play controller in measuring wrist flexion-extension was evaluated in 6 children who were developing in a typical manner, using optical motion capture of the wrist and forearm as the gold standard. Results The error of the play controller was estimated at approximately 5 degrees in both maximum wrist flexion and extension. Limitations Measurements were taken during a laboratory session, with children without CP, and no toy or computer game was interfaced with the play controller. Therefore, the potential engagement of the proposed approach for therapy remains to be evaluated. Conclusions This study presented the concept, development, and wrist tracking accuracy of an inexpensive approach to extremity therapy that may have a health benefit for children with hemiparesis, and potentially for patients of any age with a wide range of extremity neuromotor impairments. PMID:25573759

  10. Primary Wrist Hemiarthroplasty for Irreparable Distal Radius Fracture in the Independent Elderly.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Guillaume; Burnier, Marion; Marc, Antoine; Izem, Yadar

    2015-08-01

    Background Volar plating for acute distal radius fractures (DRF) in the elderly has been recommended. Some studies have suggested that open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) in this situation results in frequent complications. Our purposes were to provide a definition of irreparable DRF in independent elderly patients and to review the results of a preliminary retrospective series of wrist hemiarthroplasty (WHA) in this patient population. Materials Between 2011 and 2014, 11 consecutive independent elderly patients (12 wrists) with irreparable intra-articular DRF were treated with primary WHA at the acute stage. A resection of the ulnar head was associated in nine wrists. A total of 11 wrists with more than 2 years of follow-up form the basis of this paper. Description of Technique The approach was dorsal longitudinal. An osteotome longitudinally entered the dorsal aspect of the fracture medial to the Lister tubercle. Two thick osteoperiosteal flaps were elevated radially and ulnarly in a fashion similar to opening a book. The distal radius articular surface was excised. The implant was pressed into the radial canal with attention to restoring distal radius length. The two osteoperiosteal flaps were brought back together and sutured so as to close, again like a book, the osseous and soft tissues around the implant. Results At mean follow-up of 30 months, average visual analog scale (VAS) pain was 1/10. Mean QuickDASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand) score was 32, and mean Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) score was 24. Mean forearm rotation arc was 151°. Mean active flexion-extension arc was 60°. Mean active extension was 34°. Mean grip strength was 14 kg (64% of contralateral wrist). Mean Lyon wrist score was 73%. Bone healing around the implants was satisfactory in all but one case. Conclusions Out data suggest that treatment of irreparable DRF in the independent elderly patient with a bone-preserving WHA may be a viable

  11. Primary Wrist Hemiarthroplasty for Irreparable Distal Radius Fracture in the Independent Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, Guillaume; Burnier, Marion; Marc, Antoine; Izem, Yadar

    2015-01-01

    Background Volar plating for acute distal radius fractures (DRF) in the elderly has been recommended. Some studies have suggested that open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) in this situation results in frequent complications. Our purposes were to provide a definition of irreparable DRF in independent elderly patients and to review the results of a preliminary retrospective series of wrist hemiarthroplasty (WHA) in this patient population. Materials Between 2011 and 2014, 11 consecutive independent elderly patients (12 wrists) with irreparable intra-articular DRF were treated with primary WHA at the acute stage. A resection of the ulnar head was associated in nine wrists. A total of 11 wrists with more than 2 years of follow-up form the basis of this paper. Description of Technique The approach was dorsal longitudinal. An osteotome longitudinally entered the dorsal aspect of the fracture medial to the Lister tubercle. Two thick osteoperiosteal flaps were elevated radially and ulnarly in a fashion similar to opening a book. The distal radius articular surface was excised. The implant was pressed into the radial canal with attention to restoring distal radius length. The two osteoperiosteal flaps were brought back together and sutured so as to close, again like a book, the osseous and soft tissues around the implant. Results At mean follow-up of 30 months, average visual analog scale (VAS) pain was 1/10. Mean QuickDASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand) score was 32, and mean Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) score was 24. Mean forearm rotation arc was 151°. Mean active flexion-extension arc was 60°. Mean active extension was 34°. Mean grip strength was 14 kg (64% of contralateral wrist). Mean Lyon wrist score was 73%. Bone healing around the implants was satisfactory in all but one case. Conclusions Out data suggest that treatment of irreparable DRF in the independent elderly patient with a bone-preserving WHA may be a viable

  12. A wrist-mounted arterial pulse interval and movement recording system.

    PubMed

    Sakyou, Fumiteru; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Hahn, Allen W; Caldwell, W Morton

    2003-01-01

    A wrist movement and arterial pulse interval recording system has been developed for continuous data acquisition in studies of activity/rest time ratios, sleep quantity and quality, general activity level, resting heart rate and circadian rhythms. The system employs a wrist-mounted piezoelectric sensor, a low-power 8-bit one-chip microcomputer and a 512 KB EEPROM. The microcomputer detects whether the wrist is moving or inactive; if it is moving, wrist movement is stored into memory. If the wrist is at rest, the arterial pulse interval is continuously detected and stored. After recording, these stored data are downloaded to a desktop computer and analyzed. PMID:12724891

  13. Phoenix Deploying its Wrist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This animated gif shows a series of images taken by Phoenix's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) on Sol 3. It illustrates the actions that Phoenix's Robotic Arm took to deploy its wrist.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Compliant Robot Wrist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George

    1992-01-01

    Compliant element for robot wrist accepts small displacements in one direction only (to first approximation). Three such elements combined to obtain translational compliance along three orthogonal directions, without rotational compliance along any of them. Element is double-blade flexure joint in which two sheets of spring steel attached between opposing blocks, forming rectangle. Blocks moved parallel to each other in one direction only. Sheets act as double cantilever beams deforming in S-shape, keeping blocks parallel.

  15. 75 FR 48921 - Administrative Guidance for Multistate Extension Activities and Integrated Research and Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... with these requirements. Section 105 of AREERA amended the Smith-Lever Act to require that a specified... 204 of AREERA amended the Hatch Act and Smith-Lever Act to require that a specified amount of... Smith- Lever Act funds on multistate extension activities and 25 percent on integrated research...

  16. Using Non-Extension Volunteering as an Experiential Learning Activity for Extension Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Kevin B.; Lockett, Landry L.

    2013-01-01

    Extension professionals can gain much-needed competencies in volunteer administration through experiential learning by participating in volunteer activities. Experiential learning is a means of behavior change that allows the individual learner to reflect on, abstract, and apply their experiences to new situations. This article expands on…

  17. SCRIPT passive orthosis: design and technical evaluation of the wrist and hand orthosis for rehabilitation training at home.

    PubMed

    Ates, Serdar; Lobo-Prat, Joan; Lammertse, Piet; van der Kooij, Herman; Stienen, Arno H A

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a new hand and wrist exoskeleton design, the SCRIPT Passive Orthosis (SPO), for the rehabilitation after stroke is presented. The SPO is a wrist, hand, and finger orthosis that assists individuals after stroke that suffer from impairments caused by spasticity and abnormal synergies. These impairments are characterized in the wrist and hand by excessive involuntary flexion torques that make the hand unable to be used for many activities in daily life. The SPO can passively offset these undesired torques, but it cannot actively generate or control movements. The user needs to use voluntary muscle activation to perform movements and thus needs to have some residual muscle control to successfully use the SPO. The SPO offsets the excessive internal flexion by applying external extension torques to the joints of the wrist and fingers. The SPO physically interacts with the users using the forearm shell, the hand plate and the digit caps from the Saebo Flex, but is otherwise a completely novel design. It applies the external extension torques via passive leaf springs and elastic tension cords. The amount of this support can be adjusted to provide more or less offset force to wrist, finger, or thumb extension, manually. The SPO is equipped with sensors that can give a rough estimate of the joint rotations and applied torques, sufficient to make the orthosis interact with our interactive gaming environment. Integrated inertial and gyroscopic sensors provide limited information on the user's forearm posture. The first home-based patient experiences have already let to several issues being resolved, but have also made it clear that many improvement are still to be made. PMID:24187220

  18. Animation of Phoenix's Wrist Unlatching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This animation shows what happened underneath Phoenix's Robotic Arm wrist on Sol 3. The pin that goes through the loop is what holds the wrist in place. The rotation of the wrist pops the pin free.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization. PMID:26730390

  20. Emerging patterns in wrist osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Oron, Amir; Wollstein, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    The human wrist is a composite joint which incorporates multiple smaller joints. The biomechanics of the wrist are dependent on its bony structure but also on the ligamentous constitution of its joints. This increases the complexity of the joint and reduces our ability to understand its anatomy, mechanics and pathology. Therefore, our understanding and treatment of osteoarthritis in the wrist lags behind that of other joints in the body such as the knee. We discuss some of the recent directions in the comprehension and treatment of wrist osteoarthritis. PMID:25599683

  1. Efficacy of Kinesiology Taping for Recovery from Occupational Wrist Disorders Experienced by a Physical Therapist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this paper was to report the efficacy of kinesiology taping for recovery from wrist pain and limited range of motion (ROM) in a physical therapist with repetitive strain injuries. [Subjects] A 32 year-old male physical therapist developed recurring severe pain in the dominant wrist and limited active ROM with extremely painful supination. [Methods] The kinesiology tape was applied to the lumbricals, musculi interossei dorsales, palmares, the wrist extensor and flexor muscles, and the wrist joint for 3 weeks for an average of 10 h/day. [Results] After application of the kinesiology tape, the Numeric Pain Rating Scale and Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation scores decreased, and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale score increased in comparison with the initial score. [Conclusion] Repeated kinesiology taping of the wrist muscles and joint could be an effective method for recovery from occupational wrist disorders experienced by physical therapists. PMID:25013301

  2. The instability of wrist joint and total wrist replacement.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Xing; Xu, Yong-Qing

    2016-02-01

    Total wrist arthroplasty are not used as widely as total knee and hip replacement. The functional hands are requiring surgeons to design a durable and functional satisfying prosthesis. This article will list the main reasons that cause the failure of the prosthesis. Some remarkable and representative prostheses are listed to show the devolvement of total wrist prosthesis and their individual special innovations to fix the problems. And the second part we will discuss the part that biomechanical elements act in the total wrist replacement (TWA). Summarize and find out what the real problem is and how we can find a way to fix it. PMID:27033274

  3. Wrist ROM and Motion Frequency during Toy and Game Play with a Joint-Specific Controller Specially Designed to Provide Neuromuscular Therapy: A proof of concept study in typically developing children

    PubMed Central

    Crisco, Joseph J.; Schwartz, Joel B.; Wilcox, Bethany; Brideau, Holly; Basseches, Benjamin; Kerman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Upper extremities affected by hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) and other neuromuscular disorders have been demonstrated to benefit from therapy, and the greater the duration of the therapy, the greater the benefit. A great motivator for participating in and extending the duration of therapy with children is play. Our focus is on active motion therapy of the wrist and forearm. In this study we examine the wrist motions associated with playing with two toys and three computer games controlled by a specially-designed play controller. Twenty children (ages 5-11) with no diagnosis of a muscular disorder were recruited. The play controller was fitted to the wrist and forearm of each child and used to measure and log wrist flexion and extension. Play activity and enjoyment were quantified by average wrist range of motion (ROM), motion frequency measures, and a discrete visual scale. We found significant differences in the average wrist ROM and motion frequency among the toys and games, yet there were no differences in the level of enjoyment across all toys and games, which was high. These findings indicate which toys and games may elicit the greater number of goal-directed movements, and lay the foundation for our long-term goal to develop and evaluate innovative motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP. PMID:25935686

  4. Wrist range of motion and motion frequency during toy and game play with a joint-specific controller specially designed to provide neuromuscular therapy: A proof of concept study in typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Crisco, Joseph J; Schwartz, Joel B; Wilcox, Bethany; Brideau, Holly; Basseches, Benjamin; Kerman, Karen

    2015-08-20

    Upper extremities affected by hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) and other neuromuscular disorders have been demonstrated to benefit from therapy, and the greater the duration of the therapy, the greater the benefit. A great motivator for participating in and extending the duration of therapy with children is play. Our focus is on active motion therapy of the wrist and forearm. In this study we examine the wrist motions associated with playing with two toys and three computer games controlled by a specially-designed play controller. Twenty children (ages 5-11) with no diagnosis of a muscular disorder were recruited. The play controller was fitted to the wrist and forearm of each child and used to measure and log wrist flexion and extension. Play activity and enjoyment were quantified by average wrist range of motion (ROM), motion frequency measures, and a discrete visual scale. We found significant differences in the average wrist ROM and motion frequency among the toys and games, yet there were no differences in the level of enjoyment across all toys and games, which was high. These findings indicate which toys and games may elicit the greater number of goal-directed movements, and lay the foundation for our long-term goal to develop and evaluate innovative motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP. PMID:25935686

  5. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  10. Limited wrist arthrodesis versus radial osteotomy for advanced Kienböck's disease--for a fragmented lunate.

    PubMed

    Tatebe, Masahiro; Hirata, Hitoshi; Iwata, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Ryogo

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with advanced Kienböck's disease treated by limited wrist arthrodesis (LWA: n = 10) or radial osteotomy (RO: n = 28) for a fragmented lunate were retrospectively examined after an average of 47.9 and 68.1 months, respectively. Compared with pre-operative values, the active flexion-extension range of motion decreased by about 16.0 degrees in LWA and increased approximately 9.7 degrees in RO and the grip strength improved by approximately 7.5 kg in LWA and 8.0 kg in RO. In both groups, radiographs showed no significant progression of carpal collapse. Although LWA caused some decrease in wrist flexion-extension, both procedures are appropriate for surgical treatment of advanced Kienböck's disease. Most patients experienced a reduction in pain and were able to return to work. PMID:17080522

  11. Wrist display concept demonstration based on 2-in. color AMOLED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Frederick M.; Longo, Sam J.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    2004-09-01

    The wrist watch needs an upgrade. Recent advances in optoelectronics, microelectronics, and communication theory have established a technology base that now make the multimedia Dick Tracy watch attainable during the next decade. As a first step towards stuffing the functionality of an entire personnel computer (PC) and television receiver under a watch face, we have set a goal of providing wrist video capability to warfighters. Commercial sector work on the wrist form factor already includes all the functionality of a personal digital assistant (PDA) and full PC operating system. Our strategy is to leverage these commercial developments. In this paper we describe our use of a 2.2 in. diagonal color active matrix light emitting diode (AMOLED) device as a wrist-mounted display (WMD) to present either full motion video or computer generated graphical image formats.

  12. Kinematics of Hooke universal joint robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, William S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The singularity problem associated with wrist mechanisms commonly found on industrial manipulators can be alleviated by redesigning the wrist so that it functions as a three-axis gimbal system. This paper discussess the kinematics of gimbal robot wrists made of one and two Hooke universal joints. Derivations of the resolved rate motion control equations for the single and double Hooke universal joint wrists are presented using the three-axis gimbal system as a theoretical wrist model.

  13. Scaphoid Fracture of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is very important to maintain full finger motion throughout the recovery period. Your doctor will provide ... may recommend hand therapy to help you regain motion and strength in your wrist. Even with therapy, ...

  14. Ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist.

    PubMed

    Earp, Brandon E; Floyd, W Emerson; Louie, Dexter; Koris, Mark; Protomastro, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Presentation of ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist varies based on differential anatomy and the site or sites of compression. Therefore, an understanding of the anatomy of the Guyon canal is essential for diagnosis in patients presenting with motor and/or sensory deficits in the hand. The etiologies of ulnar nerve compression include soft-tissue tumors; repetitive or acute trauma; the presence of anomalous muscles and fibrous bands; arthritic, synovial, endocrine, and metabolic conditions; and iatrogenic injury. In addition to a thorough history and physical examination, which includes motor, sensory, and vascular assessments, imaging and electrodiagnostic studies facilitate the diagnosis of ulnar nerve lesions at the wrist. Nonsurgical management is appropriate for a distal compression lesion caused by repetitive activity, but surgical decompression is indicated if symptoms persist or worsen over 2 to 4 months. PMID:25344595

  15. Portable device for quantifying parkinsonian wrist rigidity.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, M P

    1994-01-01

    The need for objectivity in the assessment of parkinsonism prompted the development of a portable transducer capable of quantifying muscular rigidity. This paper describes the development and use of a device for measuring wrist rigidity and reports the preliminary findings from 25 normal healthy controls and 29 patients, many of whom were undergoing antiparkinsonian treatment to alleviate rigidity or antipsychotic treatment, which produced parkinsonian rigidity. An objective rigidity score, representing the degree to which motor activity increases muscular stiffness in the wrist, correlates highly with clinical ratings of parkinsonian rigidity and demonstrates 89% specificity and 82% sensitivity. Unlike previous techniques for quantifying rigidity, this transducer offers greater portability and apparent face validity. PMID:7908119

  16. Small Business Innovations (Robotic Wrist)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Under a Langley Research Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. Minneapolis, MN, developed the Omni-Wrist actuator, which has a 25-pound capacity, 180 degrees of pitch/yaw, and 360 degrees of roll. Company literature calls it "the first successful singularity-free high-precision (robotic) wrist." Applications include spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, welding and a variety of nuclear industry, aerospace and military uses.

  17. 75 FR 13568 - MMS Information Collection Activity: 1010-0142, Decommissioning Activities, Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Minerals Management Service MMS Information Collection Activity: 1010-0142, Decommissioning Activities, Extension of a Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION... comments to the Department of the Interior; Minerals Management Service; Attention: Cheryl Blundon;...

  18. Three determinants in ezrin are responsible for cell extension activity.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, M; Roy, C; Montcourrier, P; Sahuquet, A; Mangeat, P

    1997-01-01

    The ERM proteins--ezrin, radixin, and moesin--are key players in membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. In insect cells infected with recombinant baculoviruses, amino acids 1-115 of ezrin were shown to inhibit an actin- and tubulin-dependent cell-extension activity located in ezrin C-terminal domain (ezrin310-586), whereas full-length ezrin1-586 did not induce any morphological change. To refine the mapping of functional domains of ezrin, 30 additional constructs were overexpressed in Sf9 cells, and the resulting effect of each was qualitatively and semiquantitatively compared. The removal of amino acids 13-30 was sufficient to release a cell-extension phenotype. This effect was abrogated if the 21 distal-most C-terminal amino acids were subsequently deleted (ezrin31-565), confirming the existence of a head-to-tail regulation in the whole molecule. Surprisingly, the deletion in full-length ezrin of the same 21 amino acids provided strong cell-extension competence to ezrin1-565, and this property was recovered in N-terminal constructs as short as ezrin1-310. Within ezrin1-310, amino acid sequences 13-30 and 281-310 were important determinants and acted in cooperation to induce cytoskeleton mobilization. In addition, these same residues are part of a new actin-binding site characterized in vitro in ezrin N-terminal domain. Images PMID:9285824

  19. Surgical Treatment of Pediatric Upper Limb Spasticity: The Wrist and Hand.

    PubMed

    Seruya, Mitchel; Dickey, Ryan M; Fakhro, Abdulla

    2016-02-01

    The wrist and hand are essential in the placement of the upper extremity in a functional position for grasp, pinch, and release activities. This depends on the delicate balance between the extrinsic and intrinsic muscles of the wrist and hand. Spasticity alters this equilibrium, limiting the interaction of the upper limb with the environment. Classically, pediatric patients with upper limb spasticity present with a flexed wrist, thumb-in-palm, and flexed finger posture. These contractures are typically secondary to spasticity of the extrinsic flexor muscles of the wrist and hand and intrinsic muscles of the thumb and digits. Tendon release, lengthening, or transfer procedures may help correct the resultant abnormal postures. A total wrist arthrodesis with or without proximal row carpectomy may help address the severely flexed wrist deformity. With proper diagnosis, a well-executed surgical plan, and a consistent hand rehabilitation regimen, successful surgical outcomes can be achieved. PMID:26869861

  20. Damping of the wrist joint during voluntary movement.

    PubMed

    Milner, T E; Cloutier, C

    1998-10-01

    Damping characteristics of the musculoskeletal system were investigated during rapid voluntary wrist flexion movements. Oscillations about the final position were induced by introducing a load with the characteristics of negative damping, which artificially reduced the damping of the wrist. Subjects responded to increases in the negatively damped load by stronger cocontraction of wrist flexor and extensor muscles during the stabilization phase of the movement. However, their ability to counteract the effects of the negatively damped load diminished as the negative damping increased. Consequently, the number and frequency of oscillations increased. The oscillations were accompanied by phase-locked muscle activity superimposed on underlying tonic muscle activation. The wrist stiffness and damping coefficient increased with the increased cocontraction that accompanied more negatively damped loads, although changes in the damping coefficient were less systematic than the stiffness. Analysis of successive half-cycles of the oscillation revealed that the wrist stiffness and damping coefficient increased, despite decreasing muscle activation, as oscillation amplitude and velocity declined. This indicates that the inverse dependence of the damping coefficient on oscillation velocity contributes significantly to damping of joint motion. It is suggested that this property helps to offset a negative contribution to damping from the stretch reflex. PMID:9808304

  1. Current concepts in wrist arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chloros, George D; Wiesler, Ethan R; Poehling, Gary G

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the recent literature on arthroscopic treatment of distal radius fractures (DRFs), triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries, intercarpal ligament injuries, and ganglion cysts, including the use of electrothermal devices. A major advantage of arthroscopy in the treatment of DRFs is the accurate assessment of the status of the articular surfaces and the detection of concomitant injuries. Nonrandomized studies of arthroscopically assisted reduction of DRFs show satisfactory results, but there is only 1 prospective randomized study showing the benefits of arthroscopy compared with open reduction-internal fixation. Wrist arthroscopy plays an important role as part of the treatment for DRFs; however, the treatment for each practitioner and each patient needs to be individualized. Wrist arthroscopy is the gold standard in the diagnosis and treatment of triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries. Type 1A injuries may be successfully treated with debridement, whereas the repair of type 1B, 1C, and 1D injuries gives satisfactory results. For type 2 injuries, the arthroscopic wafer procedure is equally effective as ulnar shortening osteotomy but is associated with fewer complications in the ulnar positive wrist. With interosseous ligament injuries, arthroscopic visualization provides critical diagnostic value. Debridement and pinning in the acute setting of complete ligament tears are promising and proven. In the chronic patient, arthroscopy can guide reconstructive options based on cartilage integrity. The preliminary results of wrist arthroscopy using electrothermal devices are encouraging; however, complications have been reported, and therefore, their use is controversial. In dorsal wrist ganglia, arthroscopy has shown excellent results, a lower rate of recurrence, and no incidence of scapholunate interosseous ligament instability compared with open ganglionectomy. Arthroscopy in the treatment of volar wrist ganglia has yielded

  2. MR Imaging of Wrist Ligaments.

    PubMed

    Ringler, Michael D; Murthy, Naveen S

    2015-08-01

    This article discusses the normal anatomy and pathologic appearances of the intrinsic and extrinsic wrist ligaments using MR Imaging. Technological advances in surface coil design and higher magnetic field strengths have improved radiologists' ability to consistently visualize these small ligaments in their entirety. Wrist ligament anatomy, in the context of proper physiologic function, is emphasized, including common normal variants, and their appearances on MR imaging. The spectrum of disorders, incorporating overlapping appearances of senescent degenerative changes, and destabilizing ligament tears, is outlined. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging to date for various ligament abnormalities is discussed, along with significant limitations. PMID:26216769

  3. Morbidity of hand and wrist Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, P J; Field, J

    2006-01-01

    Pain and disability caused by ganglia of the hand and wrist were assessed using a patient-rated wrist evaluation questionnaire in 75 patients. Dorsal wrist ganglia were the most painful and disabling. However, the majority of ganglia cause little pain or disability. Consequently, referral by General Practitioners should be confined to those with pain, disability or failure of conservative management. PMID:17080521

  4. A National Perspective on the Current Evaluation Activities in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Alexa J.; Israel, Glenn D.; Diehl, David

    2013-01-01

    In order to enhance Extension evaluation efforts it is important to understand current practices. The study reported here researched the evaluation behaviors of county-based Extension professionals. Extension professionals from eight states (n = 1,173) responded to a survey regarding their evaluation data collection, analysis, and reporting…

  5. Prediction of Energy Expenditure from Wrist Accelerometry in People with and without Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Motl, Robert W.; Foley, John T.; Fernhall, Bo

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between energy expenditure and wrist accelerometer output during walking in persons with and without Down syndrome (DS). Energy expenditure in metabolic equivalent units (METs) and activity-count rate were respectively measured with portable spirometry and a uniaxial wrist accelerometer in 17 persons with DS…

  6. Is it Finger or Wrist Dexterity That is Missing in Current Hand Prostheses?

    PubMed

    Montagnani, Federico; Controzzi, Marco; Cipriani, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Building prostheses with dexterous motor function equivalent to that of the human hand is one of the ambitious goals of bioengineers. State of art prostheses lack several degrees of freedom (DoF) and force the individuals to compensate for them by changing the motions of their arms and body. However, such compensatory movements often result in residual limb pain and overuse syndromes. Significant efforts were spent in designing artificial hands with multiple allowed grasps but little work has been done with regards to wrist design, regardless the fact that the wrist contributes significantly to the execution of upper limb motor tasks. We hypothesized that a single DoF hand with wrist flexion/extension allowed function comparable to a highly performant multi DoF hand without wrist flexion/extension. To assess this we compared four emulated architectures of hand-wrist prostheses using the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure and evaluating the extent of compensatory movements with unimpaired subjects wearing ortheses. Our findings show indeed that shifting the dexterity from the hand to the wrist could preserve the ability of transradial amputees in performing common tasks with limited effect on the compensatory movements. Hence, this study invites rehabilitation engineers to focus on novel artificial wrist architectures. PMID:25675462

  7. New advances in wrist arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory I; Munt, Justin; Turner, Perry C

    2008-03-01

    Wrist arthroscopy is a commonly used procedure that has undergone many modifications and improvements since it was first described. The advent of new portals (both dorsal and volar) means that the wrist joint can be viewed from virtually any perspective ("box concept"). Indications for wrist arthroscopy have continued to expand and include diagnostic and reparative procedures and, more recently, reconstructive, soft-tissue, and bony procedures. Arthroscopic grading of Kienböck's disease better describes articular damage compared with plain radiographs and can help guide surgical treatment options. Triangular fibrocartilage complex injury diagnosis, classification, and treatment can be performed arthroscopically, including distal ulna resection (wafer procedure). Assessment of fracture reduction of the distal radius and scaphoid is superior to that obtained with fluoroscopy, with the advantage of being able to look for associated soft-tissue and chondral injuries. Arthroscopic assessment of intercarpal ligament injuries and instability is now considered the gold standard by many authors. Arthroscopy can also aid us in the management of post-traumatic capsular contraction, resection of ganglia, and the relatively rare isolated ulna styloid impaction. Complications of wrist arthroscopy are relatively uncommon. With the ever-expanding list of indications and procedures that can be performed with this technique, it exists as an essential diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the orthopaedic surgeon. PMID:18308189

  8. Neural and Nonneural Contributions to Wrist Rigidity in Parkinson's Disease: An Explorative Study Using the NeuroFlexor

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, H.; Frykberg, G. E.; Gäverth, J.; Lindberg, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The NeuroFlexor is a novel method incorporating a biomechanical model for the measurement of neural and nonneural contributions to resistance induced by passive stretch. In this study, we used the NeuroFlexor method to explore components of passive movement resistance in the wrist and finger muscles in subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. A cross-sectional comparison was performed in twenty-five subjects with PD with clinically identified rigidity and 14 controls. Neural (NC), elastic (EC), and viscous (VC) components of the resistance to passive extension of the wrist were calculated using the NeuroFlexor. Measurements were repeated during a contralateral activation maneuver. Results. PD subjects showed greater total resistance (P < 0.001) and NC (P = 0.002) compared to controls. EC and VC did not differ significantly between groups. Contralateral activation maneuver resulted in increased NC in the PD group but this increase was due to increased resting tension. Total resistance and NC correlated with clinical ratings of rigidity and with bradykinesia. Conclusions. The findings suggest that stretch induced reflex activity, but not nonneural resistance, is the major contributor to rigidity in wrist muscles in PD. The NeuroFlexor is a potentially valuable clinical and research tool for quantification of rigidity. PMID:25685778

  9. Trunk stiffness and dynamics during active extension exertions.

    PubMed

    Moorhouse, Kevin M; Granata, Kevin P

    2005-10-01

    Spinal stability is related to the recruitment and control of active muscle stiffness. Stochastic system identification techniques were used to calculate the effective stiffness and dynamics of the trunk during active trunk extension exertions. Twenty-one healthy adult subjects (10 males, 11 females) wore a harness with a cable attached to a servomotor such that isotonic flexion preloads of 100, 135, and 170 N were applied at the T10 level of the trunk. A pseudorandom stochastic force sequence (bandwidth 0-10 Hz, amplitude +/-30 N) was superimposed on the preload causing small amplitude trunk movements. Nonparametric impulse response functions of trunk dynamics were computed and revealed that the system exhibited underdamped second-order behavior. Second-order trunk dynamics were determined by calculating the best least-squares fit to the IRF. The quality of the model was quantified by comparing estimated and observed displacement variance accounted for (VAF), and quality of the second-order fits was calculated as a percentage and referred to as fit accuracy. Mean VAF and fit accuracy were 87.8 +/- 4.0% and 96.0 +/- 4.3%, respectively, indicating that the model accurately represented active trunk kinematic response. The accuracy of the kinematic representation was not influenced by preload or gender. Mean effective stiffness was 2.78 +/- 0.96 N/mm and increased significantly with preload (p < 0.001), but did not vary with gender (p = 0.425). Mean effective damping was 314 +/- 72 Ns/m and effective trunk mass was 37.0 +/- 9.3 kg. We conclude that stochastic system identification techniques should be used to calculate effective trunk stiffness and dynamics. PMID:16084200

  10. Kinematics of wrist joint flexion in overarm throws made by skilled subjects.

    PubMed

    Debicki, D B; Gribble, P L; Watts, S; Hore, J

    2004-02-01

    Previous studies of multijoint arm movements have shown that the CNS holds arm kinematics constant in different situations by predictively compensating for the effects of interaction torques. We determined whether this was also the case for wrist joint flexion in natural overarm throws performed by skilled subjects in 3D, a situation where large passive torques can occur at the wrist. Specifically, we investigated whether wrist flexion amplitudes are held constant in throws of different speeds. Joint rotations were recorded at 1,000 Hz with the search-coil technique. Contrary to a previous study on constrained 2D throwing, indirect evidence was found that in fast throws passive torques associated with forearm deceleration were exploited to increase wrist flexion velocity. This increase in wrist flexion velocity was associated with constant wrist flexion amplitudes at ball release (mean 27 degrees) for throws of different speeds. Furthermore, final wrist flexion positions after ball release were similar for a particular subject irrespective of the speed of the throw. This was associated in faster throws with increased magnitudes of wrist flexor and wrist extensor EMG activity which damped passive torques associated with forearm angular deceleration. It is concluded that wrist flexion in overarm throws of different speeds is produced by central signals which precisely control net joint torque by both exploiting and damping passive torques during different parts of the throw to keep wrist joint angular position parameters constant. As such the results show that control strategies for natural 3D throwing are different from those for constrained 2D throwing. PMID:14598003

  11. A repeated-measures analysis of the effects of soft tissues on wrist range of motion in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs: Implications for the functional origins of an automatic wrist folding mechanism in Crocodilia.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Joel David; Hutson, Kelda Nadine

    2014-07-01

    A recent study hypothesized that avian-like wrist folding in quadrupedal dinosaurs could have aided their distinctive style of locomotion with semi-pronated and therefore medially facing palms. However, soft tissues that automatically guide avian wrist folding rarely fossilize, and automatic wrist folding of unknown function in extant crocodilians has not been used to test this hypothesis. Therefore, an investigation of the relative contributions of soft tissues to wrist range of motion (ROM) in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs, and the quadrupedal function of crocodilian wrist folding, could inform these questions. Here, we repeatedly measured wrist ROM in degrees through fully fleshed, skinned, minus muscles/tendons, minus ligaments, and skeletonized stages in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis and the ostrich Struthio camelus. The effects of dissection treatment and observer were statistically significant for alligator wrist folding and ostrich wrist flexion, but not ostrich wrist folding. Final skeletonized wrist folding ROM was higher than (ostrich) or equivalent to (alligator) initial fully fleshed ROM, while final ROM was lower than initial ROM for ostrich wrist flexion. These findings suggest that, unlike the hinge/ball and socket-type elbow and shoulder joints in these archosaurs, ROM within gliding/planar diarthrotic joints is more restricted to the extent of articular surfaces. The alligator data indicate that the crocodilian wrist mechanism functions to automatically lock their semi-pronated palms into a rigid column, which supports the hypothesis that this palmar orientation necessitated soft tissue stiffening mechanisms in certain dinosaurs, although ROM-restricted articulations argue against the presence of an extensive automatic mechanism. Anat Rec, 297:1228-1249, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24664936

  12. A Comparative Analysis of Speed Profile Models for Wrist Pointing Movements

    PubMed Central

    Vaisman, Lev; Dipietro, Laura; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Following two decades of design and clinical research on robot-mediated therapy for the shoulder and elbow, therapeutic robotic devices for other joints are being proposed: several research groups including ours have designed robots for the wrist, either to be used as stand-alone devices or in conjunction with shoulder and elbow devices. However, in contrast with robots for the shoulder and elbow which were able to take advantage of descriptive kinematic models developed in neuroscience for the past 30 years, design of wrist robots controllers cannot rely on similar prior art: wrist movement kinematics has been largely unexplored. This study aimed at examining speed profiles of fast, visually evoked, visually guided, target-directed human wrist pointing movements. One thousand three-hundred ninety-eight (1398) trials were recorded from seven unimpaired subjects who performed center-out flexion/extension and abduction/adduction wrist movements and fitted with 19 models previously proposed for describing reaching speed profiles. A nonlinear, least squares optimization procedure extracted parameters’ sets that minimized error between experimental and reconstructed data. Models’ performances were compared based on their ability to reconstruct experimental data. Results suggest that the support-bounded log-normal is the best model for speed profiles of fast, wrist pointing movements. Applications include design of control algorithms for therapeutic wrist robots and quantitative metrics of motor recovery. PMID:23232435

  13. Denervation of the wrist joint.

    PubMed

    Buck-Gramcko, D

    1977-01-01

    A collective review was made of the results of denervation of the wrist joint for painful restrictiorn of motion done in 313 patients and follow-up studies on 195 (average 4.1 years, ranging from 9 months to 14 years). Complete denervation was done in only 30, partial denervation in the others being done after testing with local anesthetic blocks. Sixty-nine of the patients retained a moble wrist without pain or with slight pain with heavy work. No evidence of Charcot-like joints was seen. Poorest results followed when the operation was done for sequelae of intra-articular fracture of the radius, fracture dislocations, unstable ligamentous support, joint surface destruction, or for those required to do heavy manual labor. Arthrodesis was done secondarily in nine patients. PMID:839055

  14. Biased wrist and finger coordination in Parkinsonian patients during performance of graphical tasks.

    PubMed

    Dounskaia, Natalia; Van Gemmert, Arend W A; Leis, Berta C; Stelmach, George E

    2009-10-01

    Handwriting impairments in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been associated with micrographia, i.e. diminished letter size. However, dyscoordination of the wrist and fingers may also contribute to handwriting deterioration in PD. To investigate this hypothesis, right-handed PD patients and controls were tested in performance of three types of cyclic wrist and finger movements: drawing of two lines and a circle. The line drawing was performed with either simultaneous flexion and extension of the wrist and fingers (equivalent pattern resulting in a right-tilted line) or with wrist flexion/extension accompanied with finger extension/flexion (nonequivalent pattern resulting in a left-tilted line). Circle drawing required a specific phase difference between wrist and finger motions. Movements were performed with an inkless pen on a digitizer-tablet at two frequency levels. Consistent deformations of the circle into right-tilted ovals and lower variability in equivalent compared with nonequivalent lines revealed preference to produce right-tilted shapes. This preference became more apparent with increased movement speed and it was amplified in PD patients. Analysis revealed that the circle deformation emerged mainly due to reduction in relative phase, while wrist and finger amplitudes remained unchanged. The results suggest that PD causes deficit characterized by strong tendency to produce certain coordination patterns between wrist and finger motions. This deficit may significantly contribute to handwriting impairments in PD by reducing the dexterity in the production of the variety of shapes of the cursive letters. Furthermore, the deficiency revealed in wrist and finger coordination may represent a more general deficit affecting control of various multi-joint movements in PD. PMID:19410590

  15. Ganglions of the hand and wrist.

    PubMed

    Thornburg, L E

    1999-01-01

    Ganglions of the hand and wrist are common benign lesions. They most frequently arise adjacent to joints and tendons, but may also be intratendinous or intraosseous. Treatment options include observation, aspiration, and surgical excision. Observation is acceptable in most instances. Indications for more aggressive treatment include pain, interference with activity, nerve compression, and imminent ulceration (in the case of some mucous cysts). The recurrence rate after puncture and aspiration is greater than 50% for cysts in most locations, but is less than 30% for cysts in the flexor tendon sheath. Surgical excision is effective, with a recurrence rate of only 5% if care is taken to completely excise the stalk of the cyst along with a small portion of joint capsule. Surgical treatment of occult ganglions is successful with accurate assessment of the source of the pain. Arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglions is still experimental, but early results are encouraging. Ganglion surgery requires a formal operative environment and careful technique in order to minimize injury to adjacent structures and minimize the likelihood of recurrence. PMID:10434077

  16. Effect of Wrist Angle on Median Nerve Appearance at the Proximal Carpal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of wrist angle, sex, and handedness on the changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameters, namely longitudinal diameter (D1) and vertical diameter (D2). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel in both dominant and nondominant hands of men (n = 27) and women (n = 26). A total of seven wrist angles were examined: neutral; 15°, 30°, and 45° extension; and 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Our results indicated sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry of MNCSA, D1 and D2 measurements. MNCSA was significantly reduced when the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions. At flexion positions, D1 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In contrast, at extension positions, D2 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In conclusion, this study showed that MNCSA decreased as the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions in both dominant and nondominant hands of both sexes, whereas deformation of the median nerve differed between wrist flexion and extension. PMID:25658422

  17. Anatomy of the squirrel wrist: bones, ligaments, and muscles.

    PubMed

    Thorington, R W; Darrow, K

    2000-11-01

    Anatomical differences among squirrels are usually most evident in the comparison of flying squirrels and nongliding squirrels. This is true of wrist anatomy, probably reflecting the specializations of flying squirrels for the extension of the wing tip and control of it during gliding. In the proximal row of carpals of most squirrels, the pisiform articulates only with the triquetrum, but in flying squirrels there is also a prominent articulation between the pisiform and the scapholunate, providing a more stable base for the styliform cartilage, which supports the wing tip. In the proximal wrist joint, between these carpals and the radius and ulna, differences in curvature of articular surfaces and in the location of ligaments also correlate with differences in degree and kind of movement occurring at this joint, principally reflecting the extreme dorsal flexion and radial deviation of the wrist in flying squirrels when gliding. The distal wrist joint, between the proximal and distal rows of carpals, also shows most variation among flying squirrels, principally in the articulations of the centrale with the other carpal bones, probably causing the distal row of carpal bones to function more like a single unit in some animals. There is little variation in wrist musculature, suggesting only minor evolutionary modification since the tribal radiation of squirrels, probably in the early Oligocene. Variation in the carpal bones, particularly the articulation of the pisiform with the triquetrum and the scapholunate, suggests a different suprageneric grouping of flying squirrels than previously proposed by McKenna (1962) and Mein (1970). J. Morphol. 246:85-102, 2000. Published 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:11074577

  18. Resonance at the wrist demonstrated by the use of a torque motor: an instrumental analysis of muscle tone in man.

    PubMed Central

    Lakie, M; Walsh, E G; Wright, G W

    1984-01-01

    The resonance of the relaxed wrist for flexion-extension movements in the horizontal plane has been investigated by using rhythmic torques generated by a printed motor. In the normal subject the resonant frequency of the wrist is ca. 2 Hz unless the torque is reduced below a certain critical value when the system is no longer linear and the resonant frequency rises. This critical torque level, and the damping are both less in women than men. The resonant frequency is uninfluenced by surgical anaesthesia. With added bias the increase of resonant frequency at low torques still occurs although the hand is now oscillating about a displaced mean position. It follows that the stiffening implied by this elevation of resonant frequency for small movements is neither the result of pre-stressing of the muscles nor of reflex activity. With velocity feed-back of appropriate polarity the system will oscillate spontaneously at its resonant frequency. If the peak driving torque is progressively reduced the resonant frequency increases abruptly, indicating that the system has stiffened. Perturbations delivered to the wrist may reduce its stiffness. The postural system is thixotropic with a 'memory time' of 1-2 s. The resonant frequency is elevated in voluntary stiffening. PMID:6481624

  19. The anatomy and pathophysiology of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Geoffrey

    2006-04-28

    A basic knowledge of the anatomy and the interrelationships of the structures that make up the joint is a prerequisite for understanding the pathomechanics of the wrist. In the paper, the anatomy (especially including carpal ligaments) and the mechanics of wrist movements, also under load, are described. The features of the common wrist disorders that occur as a result of injury are also explained. PMID:17603435

  20. Immediate effects of different treatments for the wrist joints of subdominant hands, using electromechanical reaction time

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Cui, Yao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of muscle strength training and neuromuscular joint facilitation distal resistance training on wrist joints by using electromechanical reaction time. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 12 healthy young people (24.2 ± 3.1 years, 169.7 ± 6.5 cm, 65.3 ± 12.6 kg). Two kinds of isotonic contraction techniques were applied on the wrist joint: the wrist joint extension muscle strength training and the wrist joint extension pattern of neuromuscular joint facilitation. The electromechanical reaction time, premotor time, and motor time of the left upper limb were measured before and after each intervention session of muscle strength training and neuromuscular joint facilitation. [Results] The neuromuscular joint facilitation group showed significant shortening of the electromechanical reaction time and motor time after the intervention. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the electromechanical reaction time and motor time of the wrist joint can be improved by neuromuscular joint facilitation together with proximal resistance training, which can be used as a new form of exercise for improving the functions of subdominant hand wrist joints.

  1. Kinematic control of robot with degenerate wrist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.; Moore, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Kinematic resolved rate equations allow an operator with visual feedback to dynamically control a robot hand. When the robot wrist is degenerate, the computed joint angle rates exceed operational limits, and unwanted hand movements can result. The generalized matrix inverse solution can also produce unwanted responses. A method is introduced to control the robot hand in the region of the degenerate robot wrist. The method uses a coordinated movement of the first and third joints of the robot wrist to locate the second wrist joint axis for movement of the robot hand in the commanded direction. The method does not entail infinite joint angle rates.

  2. Current treatment of ganglion of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Ho, P C; Griffiths, J; Lo, W N; Yen, C H; Hung, L K

    2001-07-01

    Ganglion of the wrist is one of the the most common lesions of the hand. The cause of pain in an occult dorsal wrist ganglion has been linked to compression of the posterior interosseous nerve at the wrist. A case is presented in this paper and the pathoanatomy discussed. Ultrasound-guided aspiration after hyaluronidase instillation provided a useful alternative to surgery with a high success rate. Arthroscopic decompression for dorsal and palmar wrist ganglia offered the patient the benefit of smaller surgical scars and a high success rate. A description of the surgical techniques, pathoanatomy, and early results of the authors and a review of the literature is presented. PMID:11677666

  3. Wrist rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients by means of adaptive, progressive robot-aided therapy.

    PubMed

    Squeri, V; Masia, L; Giannoni, P; Sandini, G; Morasso, P

    2014-03-01

    Despite distal arm impairment after brain injury is an extremely disabling consequence of neurological damage, most studies on robotic therapy are mainly focused on recovery of proximal upper limb motor functions, routing the major efforts in rehabilitation to shoulder and elbow joints. In the present study we developed a novel therapeutic protocol aimed at restoring wrist functionality in chronic stroke patients. A haptic three DoFs (degrees of freedom) robot has been used to quantify motor impairment and assist wrist and forearm articular movements: flexion/extension (FE), abduction/adduction (AA), pronation/supination (PS). This preliminary study involved nine stroke patients, from a mild to severe level of impairment. Therapy consisted in ten 1-hour sessions over a period of five weeks. The novelty of the approach was the adaptive control scheme which trained wrist movements with slow oscillatory patterns of small amplitude and progressively increasing bias, in order to maximize the recovery of the active range of motion. The primary outcome was a change in the active RoM (range of motion) for each DoF and a change of motor function, as measured by the Fugl-Meyer assessment of arm physical performance after stroke (FMA). The secondary outcome was the score on the Wolf Motor Function Test (WOLF). The FMA score reported a significant improvement (average of 9.33±1.89 points), revealing a reduction of the upper extremity motor impairment over the sessions; moreover, a detailed component analysis of the score hinted at some degree of motor recovery transfer from the distal, trained parts of the arm to the proximal untrained parts. WOLF showed an improvement of 8.31±2.77 points, highlighting an increase in functional capability for the whole arm. The active RoM displayed a remarkable improvement. Moreover, a three-months follow up assessment reported long lasting benefits in both distal and proximal arm functionalities. The experimental results of th- s

  4. Carpal instability of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Caggiano, Nicholas; Matullo, Kristofer S

    2014-01-01

    The scaphoid is stabilized by the scapholunate ligament (directly) and lunotriquetral ligament (indirectly). Disruption of either of these ligaments leads to a pattern of instability that, left untreated, leads to altered mechanics of the wrist and ultimately debilitating arthritis and collapse. Although arthroscopy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of these injuries, plain films and advanced imaging are useful adjuncts. In the acute setting, conservative treatment may be attempted, but recalcitrant cases require surgical stabilization. Salvage procedures are also available for those patients who fail initial stabilization or present with late degeneration. PMID:24267214

  5. Differentiating common causes of radial wrist pain.

    PubMed

    Shuaib, Waqas; Mohiuddin, Zia; Swain, Freddie R; Khosa, Faisal

    2014-09-01

    Radial wrist pain is a common patient complaint with a broad differential. Because treatment and prognosis differ, determining the underlying cause is key. This article reviews a case of intersection syndrome and compares it to other causes of radial wrist pain. PMID:25148441

  6. Ultrasound of wrist and hand masses.

    PubMed

    Guerini, H; Morvan, G; Vuillemin, V; Campagna, R; Thevenin, F; Larousserie, F; Leclercq, C; Le Viet, D; Drapé, J-L

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound is a useful tool to investigate soft tissue masses in the wrist and hand. In most situations ultrasound helps distinguish between a cyst and a tissue mass. This article provides a simple clinical approach to the use of ultrasound imaging for the diagnosis and preoperative assessment of wrist and hand masses. PMID:26625731

  7. Passive resting state and history of antagonist muscle activity shape active extensions in an insect limb.

    PubMed

    Ache, Jan M; Matheson, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Limb movements can be driven by muscle contractions, external forces, or intrinsic passive forces. For lightweight limbs like those of insects or small vertebrates, passive forces can be large enough to overcome the effects of gravity and may even generate limb movements in the absence of active muscle contractions. Understanding the sources and actions of such forces is therefore important in understanding motor control. We describe passive properties of the femur-tibia joint of the locust hind leg. The resting angle is determined primarily by passive properties of the relatively large extensor tibiae muscle and is influenced by the history of activation of the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron. The resting angle is therefore better described as a history-dependent resting state. We selectively stimulated different flexor tibiae motor neurons to generate a range of isometric contractions of the flexor tibiae muscle and then stimulated the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron to elicit active tibial extensions. Residual forces in the flexor muscle have only a small effect on subsequent active extensions, but the effect is larger for distal than for proximal flexor motor neurons and varies with the strength of flexor activation. We conclude that passive properties of a lightweight limb make substantial and complex contributions to the resting state of the limb that must be taken into account in the patterning of neuronal control signals driving its active movements. Low variability in the effects of the passive forces may permit the nervous system to accurately predict their contributions to behavior. PMID:22357791

  8. Current innovations in wrist arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, David J

    2012-09-01

    It has become clear that the stability of the scapholunate joint does not depend wholly on the scapholunate interosseous ligament, but rather on both primary and secondary stabilizers, which form a scapholunate ligament complex. Each case of scapholunate instability is unique and should be treated with tissue-specific repairs, which may partly explain why one procedure cannot successfully restore joint stability in every case. Wrist arthroscopy has a pivotal role in both the assessment and treatment of the scapholunate ligament complex derangements. Tears of the foveal attachment of the triangular fibrocartilaginous complex can be an underdiagnosed cause of distal radioulnar joint instability, because the foveal fibers cannot be visualized using the standard radiocarpal arthroscopy portals. Distal radioulnar joint arthroscopy allows for direct visualization and assessment of these fibers, which in turn has spawned a number of open and arthroscopic repair methods. Wrist arthroscopy has gained wider acceptance as a method to fine-tune articular reduction during open and percutaneous fixation of distal radius fractures, and simplifies intra-articular osteotomies for malunion. It can facilitate percutaneous bone grafting of scaphoid nonunions and has a role in the diagnosis and treatment of associated soft tissue lesions. These and other recent developments will be discussed in the following article. PMID:22916867

  9. The Mechanical Axes of the Wrist Are Oriented Obliquely to the Anatomical Axes

    PubMed Central

    Crisco, Joseph J.; Heard, Wendell M.R.; Rich, Ryan R.; Paller, David J.; Wolfe, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The complex motions of the wrist are described in terms of four anatomical directions that are accomplished through the multiple articulations of the carpus. With minimal tendinous insertions, the carpus is primarily a passive structure. This emphasizes the importance of its mechanical properties, which few studies have examined to date. The purpose of the present study was to determine the mechanical properties of the wrist in twenty-four different directions of wrist motion. Methods: The moment-rotation mechanical behavior of six fresh-frozen cadaver wrists was determined in four directions: flexion, extension, ulnar deviation, and radial deviation. Twenty other directions that were a combination of these anatomical directions were also studied. A custom-designed jig was interfaced with a standard materials testing system to apply unconstrained moments. Moments of ±2 Nm were applied, and the moment-rotation data were recorded and analyzed to determine the neutral zone, range of motion, and stiffness values as well as the orientation of the envelope of these values. Results: The envelope of wrist range-of-motion values was ellipsoidal in shape and was oriented obliquely (p < 0.001) to the direction of pure flexion-extension by a mean (and standard deviation) of 26.6° ± 4.4°. The largest wrist range of motion was a mean of 111.5° ± 10.2°, in the direction of ulnar flexion, 30° from pure flexion. The largest stiffness (mean, 0.4 Nm/deg) was in the direction of radial flexion, while the smallest stiffness (mean, 0.15 Nm/deg) was in the direction of ulnar flexion. Conclusions: The mechanical axes of the wrist are oriented obliquely to the anatomical axes. The primary mechanical direction is one of radial extension and ulnar flexion, a direction along a path of the dart thrower's wrist motion. Clinical Relevance: Understanding the mechanical function of the wrist can aid clinical treatment decisions, arthroplasty, and implant designs. The findings

  10. An Extensible, User- Modifiable Framework for Planning Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshing, Joseph C.; Abramyan, Lucy; Mickelson, Megan C.; Wallick, Michael N.; Kurien, James A.; Crockett, Thomasa M.; Powell, Mark W.; Pyrzak, Guy; Aghevli, Arash

    2013-01-01

    This software provides a development framework that allows planning activities for the Mars Science Laboratory rover to be altered at any time, based on changes of the Activity Dictionary. The Activity Dictionary contains the definition of all activities that can be carried out by a particular asset (robotic or human). These definitions (and combinations of these definitions) are used by mission planners to give a daily plan of what a mission should do. During the development and course of the mission, the Activity Dictionary and actions that are going to be carried out will often be changed. Previously, such changes would require a change to the software and redeployment. Now, the Activity Dictionary authors are able to customize activity definitions, parameters, and resource usage without requiring redeployment. This software provides developers and end users the ability to modify the behavior of automatically generated activities using a script. This allows changes to the software behavior without incurring the burden of redeployment. This software is currently being used for the Mars Science Laboratory, and is in the process of being integrated into the LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) mission, as well as the International Space Station.

  11. Physiological, Sensory, and Functional Measures in a Model of Wrist Muscle Injury and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lindsay; Brant, Aron; Enns, Deborah; Bryden, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of muscle rehabilitation modalities, it is first necessary to develop a model to test measures that would assess physiological, sensory, and functional muscle recovery. This study attempted to develop such a model for wrist injury. Subjects: Healthy male and female adults (n = 25). Methods: Subjects performed wrist muscle damage assessment, soreness, discomfort, difficulty, and functional motor task tests before and 1, 2, and 7 days after eccentric wrist muscle contractions. Wrist-related motor task tests, including the perception of discomfort and difficulty during performance, were also conducted. Results: At 24 hours post–eccentric exercises, wrist extension and flexion force declined (p < 0.05) and soreness (p < 0.05) and circumference (p < 0.05) increased; all returned to normal by 7 days post-exercise. At 24 and 48 hours post-exercise, perception of discomfort and difficulty was elevated during performance of motor tasks (p < 0.05). The completion speed of motor tasks was unaffected at any time post–eccentric exercise (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Loss of wrist muscle force, increased soreness, task discomfort, and difficulty were noted following eccentric exercise. However, subjects appeared able to compensate, such that the speed of completion of motor tasks was not slowed. Longer or more specific motor tasks may be necessary to mimic real work performance decrement and recovery. PMID:20145740

  12. Relative motion between the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon and paratenon in zone V increases with wrist flexion angle.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Keir, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is characterized by non-inflammatory fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT), a paratenon-like structure inside the carpal tunnel. This pathology suggests repetitive and/or excessive shear forces are involved in injury development. We assessed relative motion between the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon and adjacent paratenon in Zone V using colour Doppler imaging as 16 healthy participants completed three long finger movements (metacarpophalangeal joint flexion, proximal and distal interphalangeal joint flexion, full finger flexion) in three wrist postures (30° extension, 0°, 30° flexion). While the type of finger movement did not affect tendon-paratenon relative motion, we found a significant main effect of wrist posture (p < 0.001). Relative displacement between the FDS tendon and paratenon (as a percentage of tendon displacement) increased from 27.2% (95%CI = 24.8-29.5%) in 30° wrist extension to 39.9% (95%CI = 37.3-42.4%) in 30° wrist flexion. Optical motion capture confirmed that wrist posture did not affect metacarpophalangeal joint range of motion (p = 0.265) or proximal interphalangeal joint range of motion (p = 0.582). These results indicate that relative motion increased due to paratenon strain when the wrist was flexed. While our findings agree with previous cadaveric research in wrist flexion, we found that relative displacement decreased in 30° wrist extension (compared to 0°). These results differ from cadaveric research, possibly due to challenges maintaining anatomic fidelity of the viscoelastic paratenon tissue in vitro. Overall, our study suggests a greater susceptibility to shear injury during repetitive finger movements, particularly when the wrist is flexed. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1248-1255, 2016. PMID:26686976

  13. Postural control at the human wrist

    PubMed Central

    Chew, John Z Z; Gandevia, Simon C; Fitzpatrick, Richard C

    2008-01-01

    In our movements and posture, we always act against a physical load. A key property of any load is its elastic stiffness (K), which describes how the force required to hold it must change with position. Here we examine how load stiffness affects the ability to maintain a stable posture at the wrist. Loads having positive (like a spring) and negative stiffness (like an inverted pendulum) were created by varying the position of weights on multiarm rigid pendulum. Subjects (n = 9) held 15 loads (K = ± 0.04, ± 0.01 and 0 N m deg−1 at mean torques of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 N m) still for 60 s. Residual wrist movement (sway) increased with mean torque and increased as stiffness became more negative. Large effects of load stiffness were seen at low frequencies (< 1.5 Hz) but not at higher frequencies that reflect load resonance and reflex activity. Subjects accurately perceived their postural sway while holding the loads but measured psychophysical thresholds showed that load stiffness was not perceived. We conclude that load stiffness, independent of force levels, affects the ability to control a load and that the postural control process relies on perception and volitional tracking rather than more automatic reflex pathways. Despite an awareness of their postural errors, we see no evidence for adaptation of postural control processes to compensate for changes in load properties. This is unlike the adaptation of feedforward control processes that produce targeted volitional movements when load properties are altered. We propose that postural control and movement control are fundamentally different neural processes. PMID:18187473

  14. Life Extension Activities for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walyus, Keith D.; Pepe, Joyce A. K.; Prior, Michael

    2004-01-01

    With the cancellation of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing Mission 4 (SM4), the HST Project will face numerous challenges to keep the Telescope operating during the remainder of the decade. As part of the SM4, the HST Project had planned to install various upgrades to the Telescope including the installation of new batteries and new rate integrating gyros. Without these upgrades, reliability analysis indicates that the spacecraft will lose the capability to conduct science operations later this decade. The HST team will be severely challenged to maximize the Telescope's remaining operational lifetime, while still trying to maximize - its science output and quality. Two of the biggest areas of concern are the age and condition of the batteries and gyros. Together they offer the largest potential extension in Telescope lifetime and present the biggest challenges to the HST team. The six Ni-H batteries on HST are the original batteries from launch. With fourteen years of operational life, these batteries have collectively lasted longer than any other comparable mission. Yet as with all batteries, their capacity has been declining. Engineers are examining various methods to prolong the life of these mission critical batteries, and retard the rate of degradation. This paper will focus on these and other efforts to prolong the life of the HST, thus enabling it to remain a world-class observatory for as long as possible.

  15. Maximum acceptable forces for repetitive ulnar deviation of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Snook, S H; Vaillancourt, D R; Ciriello, V M; Webster, B S

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to quantify maximum acceptable forces for ulnar deviation motions of the wrist at various repetition rates. Subjects grasped a handle with a power grip and moved it through a 1.40 rad (80 degrees) ulnar deviation wrist motion (similar to a knife cutting task). A psychophysical methodology was used in which the subject adjusted the resistance on the handle and the experiment manipulated or controlled all other variables. Two series of experiments were conducted. Thirteen subjects completed the first series, which investigated repetition rates of 15 and 20 motions per minute. Eleven subjects completed the second series, which investigated 15, 20, and 25 motions per minute. Subjects performed for 7 hours per day, 5 days per week, for 4 weeks in the first series and 5 weeks in the second series. The subjects were instructed to work as if they were on an incentive basis, getting paid for the amount of work they performed. Symptoms were recorded by the subjects during the last 5 minutes of each hour. The results are presented and compared with maximum acceptable forces for wrist flexion and extension. PMID:9208467

  16. Wrist Coordination in a Kinematically Redundant Stabilization Task.

    PubMed

    Masia, L; Squeri, V; Burdet, E; Sandini, G; Morasso, P

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how the control of a compliant object is realized by the redundancy of wrist anatomy. Subjects had to balance a one degree-of-freedom inverted pendulum using elastic linkages controlled by wrist flexion/extension (FE) and forearm pronation/supination (PS). Haptic feedback of the interaction forces between the pendulum and the wrist was provided by a robotic interface. By tuning the mechanical properties of the virtual pendulum and the stiffness of the elastic linkages it was possible to study various dynamical regimes of the simulated object. Twenty subjects (divided in two groups) were tested in four days performing the same task but with different presentation order. The stabilization strategy adopted by the subjects was characterized by primarily using the PS DoF when the pendulum was linked to stiff springs and characterized by a relatively fast dynamic response; in contrast, the stabilization task was shared by both DoFs in case of lower spring stiffness and slower dynamics of the virtual object. PMID:26964109

  17. Prospective outcomes of arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglia.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Najafi, Arvin; Zaaferani, Zohre

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the results of arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia. Between November 2002 and September 2007, all patients with dorsal wrist ganglia underwent arthroscopic resection in our institution. Average follow-up was 39.2 months (range, 24-71 months). Fifty-two patients (40 women and 12 men; mean age, 29.8 years) were treated with our operative technique. Symptoms at presentation were unpleasant appearance in 15 patients (28.8 %), pain in 30 (57.6%), and unpleasant appearance and pain in 7 (13.5%). The ganglion cyst site was in front of the midcarpal joint in 41 patients (78.8%), in front of the radiocarpal joint in 6 patients (11.5%), and in front of the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints in 5 patients (9.6%). Our surgical technique resulted in a significant improvement in flexion, extension, and grip strength (P≤.005). In patients with painful ganglia, treatment also had a significant effect. Nine (17.3%) recurrences were observed. Mean time off work was 14 days, but 19 patients returned to work immediately. According to the results of this study, we recommend the use of arthroscopy as the primary treatment method for dorsal wrist ganglion excision. PMID:22385448

  18. [Arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglia].

    PubMed

    Dumontier, C; Chaumeil, G; Chassat, R; Nourissat, G

    2006-11-01

    Incidentally discovered in 1987, arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglia is based on our knowledge of their physiopathology which in turn benefits from the arthroscopic wrist evaluation. Dorsal wrist ganglia arise in the radiocarpal space from the dorsal part of the scapholunate ligament and migrate along the dorsal wrist capsule. According to their position above or under the dorsal intercarpal ligament, their cutaneous projection may vary. The basis of the arthroscopic treatment of wrist ganglia is, as with open surgery, the capsular resection in front of their origin. Arthroscopic resection is made either from dorsal radio-carpal or midcarpal approaches with little morbidity. Scars are unnoticeable, wrist mobility and strength close to normal by three months, which is the delay for dorsal wrist pain, always very limited, to disappear. The recurrence rate is however still debatable. Close to zero in some series, we had almost 20% recurrence rate in our series, with half of patients who reccur after two years follow-up. This variability in the recurrence rate also exists with open techniques. The only prospective and randomized study available to date found no differences between the two techniques, according to the recurrence rate. PMID:17361892

  19. Hand/Wrist Disorders among Sign Language Communicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Susan M.; Kress, Tyler A.; Hart, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A study assessed the frequency of self-reported hand/wrist problems among 184 sign-language communicators. Fifty-nine percent reported experiencing hand/wrist problems, 26 percent reported experiencing hand/wrist problems severe enough to limit their ability to work, and 18 percent reported a medical diagnosis of wrist tendinitis, carpal tunnel…

  20. Arthroscopic findings in patients with painful wrist ganglia.

    PubMed

    Povlsen, B; Peckett, W R

    2001-09-01

    The aetiology of painful dorsal wrist ganglia remains obscure. In a prospective study we investigated the link between a painful dorsal wrist ganglion and wrist joint abnormality with wrist arthroscopy before excision of the ganglion. Of 16 wrists arthroscoped 12 were abnormal, 10 had an abnormal scapholunate joint, and two had abnormal lunatetriquetral joints. We think that painful dorsal wrist ganglia, like popliteal cysts in the knee, are markers of underlying joint abnormalities. Surgeons who treat painful ganglia should be aware of a possible underlying cause so that they can target treatment more accurately, particularly in recurrent cases and those patients with persistent wrist pain after excision of the ganglion. PMID:11680404

  1. Ulnar-sided wrist pain in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Nicholas E; Greenberg, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    The athlete's wrist, especially those using bats, sticks, racquets, or clubs, is subjected to extremely high torque loads during athletic activities. These loads stress the stabilizing elements of the ulnocarpal and distal radioulnar complexes. Lesions of these regions can lead to painful dysfunction and instabilities that negatively impact athletic performance. This article reviews some of the common ulnar-sided maladies focusing on anatomy, biomechanics, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:25455400

  2. Analysis of wrist bone motion before and after SL-ligament resection.

    PubMed

    Eschweiler, Jörg; Stromps, Jan Philipp; Rath, Björn; Pallua, Norbert; Radermacher, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of the three-dimensional motion of wrist joint components in the physiological and injured wrist is of high clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the motion of scaphoid, lunate and triquetrum during physiological wrist motion in flexion and extension, and in radial- and ulnar-deviation, with those motion patterns after complete resection of the scapho-lunate-ligament. Eight fresh frozen cadaver wrists were carefully thawed and prepared for the investigation with an electromagnetic tracking system by implantation of measurement coils with 6 degrees of freedom. Electromagnetic tracking enabled the motion analysis of the scaphoid, lunate, and triquetrum bones with respect to the fixed radius in three planes of passive motion. After scapho-lunate-ligament injury changes in the translational and rotational motion pattern especially of the scaphoid bone occurred in dorsal-volar directions during flexion and extension, radial- and ulnar-deviation, and during rotation around the radio-ulnar- and longitudinal-axis of the wrist. PMID:26402881

  3. Forward and inverse kinematics of double universal joint robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert L., II

    1991-01-01

    A robot wrist consisting of two universal joints can eliminate the wrist singularity problem found on many individual robots. Forward and inverse position and velocity kinematics are presented for such a wrist having three degrees of freedom. Denavit-Hartenberg parameters are derived to find the transforms required for the kinematic equations. The Omni-Wrist, a commercial double universal joint robot wrist, is studied in detail. There are four levels of kinematic parameters identified for this wrist; three forward and three inverse maps are presented for both position and velocity. These equations relate the hand coordinate frame to the wrist base frame. They are sufficient for control of the wrist standing alone. When the wrist is attached to a manipulator arm; the offset between the two universal joints complicates the solution of the overall kinematics problem. All wrist coordinate frame origins are not coincident, which prevents decoupling of position and orientation for manipulator inverse kinematics.

  4. Qualifying CT for wrist arthroplasty: extending techniques for total hip arthroplasty to total wrist arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, Yvonne; Olivecrona, Henrik; Olivecrona, Lotta; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Zeleznik, Michael P.; Sollerman, Christer

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous work to detect migration of total wrist arthroplasty non-invasively, and with greater accuracy. Two human cadaverous arms, each with a cemented total wrist implant, were used in this study. In one of the arms, 1 mm tantalum balls were implanted, six in the carpal bones and five in the radius. Five CT scans of each arm were acquired, changing the position of the arm each time to mimic different positions patients might take on repeated examinations. Registration of CT volume data sets was performed using an extensively validated, 3D semi-automatic volume fusion tool in which co-homologous point pairs (landmarks) are chosen on each volume to be registered. Three sets of ten cases each were obtained by placing landmarks on 1) bone only (using only arm one), 2) tantalum implants only, and 3) bone and tantalum implants (both using only arm two). The accuracy of the match was assessed visually in 2D and 3D, and numerically by calculating the distance difference between the actual position of the transformed landmarks and their ideal position (i.e., the reference landmark positions). All cases were matched visually within one width of cortical bone and numerically within one half CT voxel (0.32 mm, p = 0.05). This method matched only the bone/arm and not the prosthetic component per se, thus making it possible to detect prosthetic movement and wear. This method was clinically used for one patient with pain. Loosening of the carpal prosthetic component was accurately detected and this was confirmed at surgery.

  5. The proto-type wrist joint assembly TACPAW (Triple Axis Common Pivot Arm Wrist), phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kersten, L.

    1978-01-01

    A wrist joint assembly is described for use with a mechanical manipulator arm for finely positioning an end-effector carried by the wrist joint on the terminal end of the manipulator arm. The wrist joint assembly is pivotable about a first axis to produce a yaw motion, a second axis to produce a pitch motion, and a third axis to produce a roll motion. The performance of the wrist configuration is indicative of the capability to produce the 15 ft lb torque in either one of the three motions and the smoothness of operation is notable.

  6. Evaluation of effects of different treatments for the wrist joints of subdominant hands using joint proprioception and writing time

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Hu, Yue; Rongming, Xia; Li, Zhou; Xiaojiao, Fu; Gu, Rui; Cui, Yao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine immediate effects of strength training and NJF distal resistance training in wrist joints by using writing time and evaluation of proprioception using the JPE test. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 12 young healthy people (24.2 ± 3.1 y, 169.7 ± 6.5 cm, 65.3 ± 12.6 kg). Two isotonic contraction techniques were applied on the wrist joint: wrist joint extension muscle strength training (MST) and the wrist joint extension pattern of NJF. The uppercase English alphabet writing time and joint position errors of the left upper limb were measured before and after one intervention session of MST and NJF. [Results] The decrease in errors in wrist extension angle repetition and the writing time represented the improvement resulting from NJF. [Conclusion] This result suggests that the subdominant hands wrist joint proprioception and writing function can be improved by NJF together with proximal resistance training. PMID:27313380

  7. Evaluation of effects of different treatments for the wrist joints of subdominant hands using joint proprioception and writing time.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Hu, Yue; Rongming, Xia; Li, Zhou; Xiaojiao, Fu; Gu, Rui; Cui, Yao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine immediate effects of strength training and NJF distal resistance training in wrist joints by using writing time and evaluation of proprioception using the JPE test. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 12 young healthy people (24.2 ± 3.1 y, 169.7 ± 6.5 cm, 65.3 ± 12.6 kg). Two isotonic contraction techniques were applied on the wrist joint: wrist joint extension muscle strength training (MST) and the wrist joint extension pattern of NJF. The uppercase English alphabet writing time and joint position errors of the left upper limb were measured before and after one intervention session of MST and NJF. [Results] The decrease in errors in wrist extension angle repetition and the writing time represented the improvement resulting from NJF. [Conclusion] This result suggests that the subdominant hands wrist joint proprioception and writing function can be improved by NJF together with proximal resistance training. PMID:27313380

  8. 77 FR 14829 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of a Currently Approved Collection; Comments...

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  12. Wrist arthroscopy: principles and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Bozentka, D J; Osterman, A L

    2001-01-01

    With the development of better and smaller equipment, arthroscopy of the wrist offers the same benefits achievable with arthroscopy of the knee, shoulder, or elbow - not only diagnostic information but also a therapeutic option. Standardized techniques of performing wrist arthroscopy have been developed to evaluate the treat various wrist disorders, such as lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, intra-articular distal radius fractures, and scaphoid fractures. Arthroscopy is now performed in the treatment of dorsal-wrist ganglion cysts and interosseous ligament disruptions, as well as for bone incisions, such as radial styloidectomy, distal ulnar excision (wafer procedure), and proximal-row carpectomy. Compared with other techniques, arthroscopic procedures, such as repair of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, demonstrate better results and improved localization of the injury with a low complication rate. In addition, arthroscopic procedures involve lesssurgical dissection, less postoperative pain, a shorter recovery time, and an earlier return to work for the patient. PMID:11421577

  13. Tendinopathies of the Hand and Wrist.

    PubMed

    Adams, Julie E; Habbu, Rohan

    2015-12-01

    Tendinopathies involving the hand and wrist are common. Many are diagnosed easily, and in many cases, the management is straightforward, provided the pathology and principles are understood. Common conditions involving the tendons of the hand and wrist include trigger finger, tenosynovitis of the first through sixth dorsal extensor compartments, and flexor carpi radialis tendonitis. Management strategies include nonsurgical treatments, such as splinting, injection, or therapy, and surgical techniques such as tendon release. PMID:26510626

  14. Ligamentous Hyperlaxity and Dorsal Wrist Ganglions

    PubMed Central

    McKeon, Kathleen E.; London, Daniel A.; Osei, Daniel A.; Gelberman, Richard H.; Goldfarb, Charles A.; Boyer, Martin I.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine if symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions are associated with generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity. Methods Ninety-six patients (61 females) presenting to hand surgeons for a symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions were prospectively enrolled in this case-control investigation. Beighton scores were calculated to quantify generalized ligamentous laxity in each patient, and a scaphoid shift test (scapholunate capsuloligamentous laxity evaluation) was performed. A positive scaphoid shift test was defined by both pain and a palpable clunk. Ninety-six individuals without ganglions were then enrolled to form an age and sex frequency-matched control cohort. The control group was similarly assessed for Beighton score and scaphoid shift test. Binary logistic regression was performed to assess the association of ganglions with generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity (Beighton score ≥4) while accounting for effects of age and sex. Results Patients with symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions demonstrated significantly increased rates of generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity. Among those with ganglions, 27 of 96 (28%) patients exhibited generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity, compared to 12 of the 96 (13%) age and sex-matched individuals in the control group. Patients with symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions were also significantly more likely to demonstrate localized scapholunate hyperlaxity with a positive scaphoid shift test (25% positive scaphoid shift test with ganglions vs 1% in controls). In logistic modeling, patients with dorsal wrist ganglions had 2.9 (95% CI 1.3-6.2) times greater odds of generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity compared to patients without a dorsal wrist ganglion after accounting for patient age and sex. Discussion Symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions were associated with both generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity and a positive scaphoid shift test. Although an association between wrist ganglions and ligamentous hyperlaxity does not prove causation, the

  15. Ganglions of the hand and wrist.

    PubMed

    Young, L; Bartell, T; Logan, S E

    1988-06-01

    The ganglion is the most common soft tissue tumor of the hand and wrist, originating from the joint capsule or tendon sheath. Accurate diagnosis and proper treatment of these entities require a thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the wrist and hand as well as of the ganglion itself. Definitive therapy is based on total surgical removal of the cyst and its connections to the joint or tendon sheath. PMID:3287641

  16. A biomechanical model of the wrist joint for patient-specific model guided surgical therapy: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Eschweiler, Jörg; Stromps, Jan-Philipp; Fischer, Maximilian; Schick, Fabian; Rath, Björn; Pallua, Norbert; Radermacher, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced musculoskeletal biomechanical model of the wrist joint is presented in this article. The computational model is based on the multi-body simulation software AnyBody. Multi body dynamic musculoskeletal models capable of predicting muscle forces and joint contact pressures simultaneously would be valuable for studying clinical issues related to wrist joint degeneration and restoration. In this study, the simulation model of the wrist joint was used for investigating deeper the biomechanical function of the wrist joint. In representative physiological scenarios, the joint behavior and muscle forces were computed. Furthermore, the load transmission of the proximal wrist joint was investigated. The model was able to calculate the parameters of interest that are not easily obtainable experimentally, such as muscle forces and proximal wrist joint forces. In the case of muscle force investigation, the computational model was able to accurately predict the computational outcome for flexion and extension motion. In the case of force distribution of the proximal wrist joint, the model was able to predict accurately the computational outcome for an axial load of 140 N. The presented model and approach of using a multi-body simulation model are anticipated to have value as a predictive clinical tool including effect of injuries or anatomical variations and initial outcome of surgical procedures for patient-specific planning and custom implant design. Therefore, patient-specific multi-body simulation models are potentially valuable tools for surgeons in pre- and intraoperative planning of implant placement and orientation. PMID:26994118

  17. Prophylactic Effects of Sauna on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness of the Wrist Extensors

    PubMed Central

    Khamwong, Peanchai; Paungmali, Aatit; Pirunsan, Ubon; Joseph, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-intensity of exercise or unaccustomed eccentric exercise can cause the phenomenon of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD) which usually results in cramps, muscle strain, impaired muscle function and delayed-onset muscle soreness. Objectives: This study investigated the prophylactic effects of sauna towards the symptoms associated with muscle damage from eccentric exercises of wrist extensor muscle group. Patients and Methods: A total of twenty-eight subjects (mean age 20.9 years old, SD = 1.6) were randomly divided into the sauna group (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14). In the sauna group, subjects received sauna before eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor. The eccentric exercises were conducted on the non-dominant arm by using an isokinetic dynamometer. Pain Intensity (PI), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) and passive range of motion of wrist flexion (PF-ROM) and extension (PE-ROM) were measured as pain variables. Grip Strength (GS) and Wrist Extension Strength (WES) were measured as variables of wrist extensor muscle function. All the measurements were performed at baseline, immediately after and from 1st to 8th days after the exercise-induced muscle damage. Results: The sauna group significantly demonstrated a lower deficit in ROM (passive flexion and passive extension), GS and WES following exercise than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Sauna application prior to the exercise-induced muscle damage demonstrated effectiveness in reduction of sensory impairment (PF-ROM and PE-ROM) and improvement of muscle functions (GS, and WES) in wrist extensor muscle group. PMID:26446307

  18. MR and CT arthrography of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Cerezal, Luis; de Dios Berná-Mestre, Juan; Canga, Ana; Llopis, Eva; Rolon, Alejandro; Martín-Oliva, Xavier; del Piñal, Francisco

    2012-02-01

    The study of the wrist represents a major diagnostic challenge because of its complex anatomy and the small size of individual structures. Recent advances in imaging techniques have increased our diagnostic capabilities. However, 3T magnets, multichannel specific wrist coils, and new MRI sequences have not restricted the indications of arthrographic imaging techniques (CT arthrography and MR arthrography). Distension of the different wrist compartments at CT arthrography and MR arthrography significantly improves the diagnostic accuracy for triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) complex injuries and carpal instability. Dedicated multichannel wrist coils are essential for an adequate study of the wrist, but the placement of these coils and the positioning of the wrist are also important for proper diagnosis. The development of dynamic multislice CT studies allows a diagnostic approach that combines dynamic information and the accurate assessment of ligaments and the TFC complex. New advances in arthroscopy have changed the anatomical description of the TFC with a functional division in the proximal and distal TFC complex, and they have allowed a better characterization of lesions of the TFC complex with subclassification of Palmer 1B and 1D lesions and description of new lesions not included in the Palmer classification, such as capsular injuries. PMID:22447235

  19. 75 FR 42816 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Notice of Request for Extension of Currently Approved...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Agency Information Collection Activities; Extension of a Currently Approved Collection: Semi-Annual Progress Report... sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking and to foster partnerships...

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  8. Arthroscopic Resection Arthroplasty of the Radial Column for SLAC Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Tyson K.; Walden, Anna L.; Wilt, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symptomatic advanced scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are typically treated with extensive open procedures, including but not limited to scaphoidectomy plus four-corner fusion (4CF) and proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Although a minimally invasive arthroscopic option would be desirable, no convincing reports exist in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new surgical technique and outcomes on 14 patients who underwent arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column (ARARC) for arthroscopic stage II through stage IIIB SLAC wrists and to describe an arthroscopic staging classification of the radiocarpal joint for patients with SLAC wrist. Patients and Methods Data were collected prospectively on 17 patients presenting with radiographic stage I through III SLAC wrist who underwent ARARC in lieu of scaphoidectomy and 4CF or PRC. Fourteen patients (12 men and 2 women) subject to 1-year follow-up were included. The average age was 57 years (range 41 to 78). The mean follow-up was 24 months (range 12 to 61). Arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column is described for varying stages of arthritic changes of the radioscaphoid joint. Midcarpal resection was not performed. Results The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 66 preoperatively and 28 at final follow-up. The mean satisfaction (0 = not satisfied, 5 = completely satisfied) at final follow-up was 4.5 (range 3 to 5). The pain level (on 0–10 scale) improved from 6.6 to 1.3. The total arc of motion changed from 124° preoperatively to 142° postoperatively following an ARARC. Grip was 16 kg preoperatively and 18 kg postoperatively. Radiographic stages typically underestimated arthroscopic staging. Although four of our patients appeared to be radiographic stage I, all were found to have arthritis involving some or all of the radioscaphoid articulation at the time of arthroscopy. Clinical Relevance

  9. Neuroplasticity of imagined wrist actions after spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Franck; Guillot, Aymeric; Mateo, Sébastien; Daligault, Sébastien; Delpuech, Claude; Rode, Gilles; Collet, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI - i.e., the mental representation of an action without physically executing it) stimulates brain motor networks and promotes motor learning after spinal cord injury (SCI). An interesting issue is whether the brain networks controlling MI are being reorganized with reference to spared motor functions. In this pilot study, we tested using magnetoencephalography (MEG) whether changes in cortical recruitment during MI were related to the motor changes elicited by rehabilitation. Over a 1-year period of inclusion, C6 SCI participants (n = 4) met stringent criteria for inclusion in a rehabilitation program focused on the tenodesis prehension (i.e., a compensatory prehension enabling seizing of objects in spite of hand and forearm muscles paralysis). After an extended baseline period of 5 weeks including repeated MEG and chronometric assessments of motor performance, MI training was embedded to the classical course of physiotherapy for five additional weeks. Posttest MEG and motor performance data were collected. A group of matched healthy control participants underwent a similar procedure. The MI intervention resulted in changes in the variability of the wrist extensions, i.e., a key movement of the tenodesis grasp (p < .05). Interestingly, the extent of cortical recruitment, quantified by the number of MEG activation sources recorded within Brodmann areas 1-8 during MI of the wrist extension, significantly predicted actual movement variability changes across sessions (p < .001). However, no such relationship was present for movement times. Repeated measurements afforded a reliable statistical power (range .70-.97). This pilot study does not provide straightforward evidence of MI efficacy, which would require a randomized controlled trial. Nonetheless, the data showed that the relationship between action and imagery of spared actions may be preserved after SCI. PMID:25300960

  10. Automatic Segmentation of Wrist Bones in CT Using a Statistical Wrist Shape + Pose Model.

    PubMed

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Rasoulian, Abtin; Seitel, Alexander; Darras, Kathryn; Wilson, David; John, Paul St; Pichora, David; Mousavi, Parvin; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2016-08-01

    Segmentation of the wrist bones in CT images has been frequently used in different clinical applications including arthritis evaluation, bone age assessment and image-guided interventions. The major challenges include non-uniformity and spongy textures of the bone tissue as well as narrow inter-bone spaces. In this work, we propose an automatic wrist bone segmentation technique for CT images based on a statistical model that captures the shape and pose variations of the wrist joint across 60 example wrists at nine different wrist positions. To establish the correspondences across the training shapes at neutral positions, the wrist bone surfaces are jointly aligned using a group-wise registration framework based on a Gaussian Mixture Model. Principal component analysis is then used to determine the major modes of shape variations. The variations in poses not only across the population but also across different wrist positions are incorporated in two pose models. An intra-subject pose model is developed by utilizing the similarity transforms at all wrist positions across the population. Further, an inter-subject pose model is used to model the pose variations across different wrist positions. For segmentation of the wrist bones in CT images, the developed model is registered to the edge point cloud extracted from the CT volume through an expectation maximization based probabilistic approach. Residual registration errors are corrected by application of a non-rigid registration technique. We validate the proposed segmentation method by registering the wrist model to a total of 66 unseen CT volumes of average voxel size of 0.38 mm. We report a mean surface distance error of 0.33 mm and a mean Jaccard index of 0.86. PMID:26890640

  11. Parkinsonism reduces coordination of fingers, wrist, and arm in fine motor control.

    PubMed

    Teulings, H L; Contreras-Vidal, J L; Stelmach, G E; Adler, C H

    1997-07-01

    This experiment investigates movement coordination in Parkinson's disease (PD) subjects. Seventeen PD patients and 12 elderly control subjects performed several handwriting-like tasks on a digitizing writing tablet resting on top of a table in front of the subject. The writing patterns, in increasing order of coordination complexity, were repetitive back-and-forth movements in various orientations, circles and loops in clockwise and counterclockwise directions, and a complex writing pattern. The patterns were analyzed in terms of jerk normalized for duration and size per stroke. In the PD subjects, back-and-forth strokes, involving coordination of fingers and wrist, showed larger normalized jerk than strokes performed using either the wrist or the fingers alone. In the PD patients, wrist flexion (plus radial deviation) showed greater normalized jerk in comparison to wrist extension (plus ulnar deviation). The elderly control subjects showed no such effects as a function of coordination complexity. For both PD and elderly control subjects, looping patterns consisting of circles with a left-to-right forearm movement, did not show a systematic increase of normalized jerk. The same handwriting patterns were then simulated using a biologically inspired neural network model of the basal ganglia thalamocortical relations for a control and a mild PD subject. The network simulation was consistent with the observed experimental results, providing additional support that a reduced capability to coordinate wrist and finger movements may be caused by suboptimal functioning of the basal ganglia in PD. The results suggest that in PD patients fine motor control problems may be caused by a reduced capability to coordinate the fingers and wrist and by reduced control of wrist flexion. PMID:9225749

  12. Prognosis of wrist ganglion operations.

    PubMed

    Gündeş, H; Cirpici, Y; Sarlak, A; Müezzinoglu, S

    2000-10-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the results of treatment of 40 wrist ganglia operated under local anesthesia over four years. The mean follow-up period was 27 months (range 6-48 months). There were 24 dorsal and 16 volar ganglia. The mean complication rate was 56% for volar ganglia, 12.5% for dorsal ganglia, and the difference was significant (p < 0.05). The recurrence rates were 31.2% and 8.3%, respectively (mean 17.5%). There was evidence of nerve damage to the superficial branch of the radial nerve in one patient (dorsal cyst) and to the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve in two patients (volar cysts). The mean nerve injury rate was 7.5%. In two patients with volar ganglia, the palmar superficial branch of the radial artery was lace-rated and had to be ligated. The significantly higher complication rate after excision of volar ganglia in contrast to dorsal ones might indicate that the former should be approached more carefully in contrast to dorsal ones and preferably by a senior surgeon. PMID:11103488

  13. Arthroscopic resection of wrist ganglia.

    PubMed

    Mathoulin, C; Hoyos, A; Pelaez, J

    2004-12-01

    The arthroscopic resection of synovial cysts of the wrist is a simple technique which is comfortable for the patient. We report on a series of 96 patients with dorsal synovial cysts (75 women, 21 men). All patients had undergone preliminary treatment which had been unsuccessful. We operated on 32 patients with a volar cyst (27 women, five men). All the patients were operated on as outpatients under local regional anaesthesia. For the dorsal cysts, after having precisely located the cyst, it is then resected after having inserted a shaver directly through the wall of the cyst starting with the capsule. For the volar cysts the arthroscope was inserted through a 3-4 portal and the shaver was inserted through a 1-2 radiocarpal portal. In all cases, there was no immobilisation and a range of motion was started the same day. For the dorsal cysts, our average follow-up was 34 months (range 12-46 months). There were no complications. We had four recurrences. For the palmar cysts, our average follow-up was 26 months (range 12-39 months). There have been no recurrences to date. PMID:15810100

  14. Evaluation of wrist and forearm motion in college-aged baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Solomito, Matthew J; Garibay, Erin J; Woods, Jessica R; Ounpuu, Sylvia; Nissen, Carl W

    2014-11-01

    Current pitching literature focuses primarily on the elbow and glenohumeral joints. This has led to a paucity of information regarding the forearm and wrist, and the limited data available are inconsistent. Therefore, this article seeks to provide a comprehensive description of the kinematics and kinetics of the wrist and forearm for the fastball, curveball, slider/cutter, and change-up for college-level baseball pitchers. Thirty-six collegiate pitchers were evaluated using motion analysis techniques. Results indicated that pitching the curveball generated the greatest forearm supination (16 ± 13°) compared with the other three pitch types (p < 0.05). The curveball and slider/cutter were pitched with less wrist extension and greater ulnar deviation compared with the fastball and change-up. The curveball was found to produce the greatest ulnar moment (7.3 ± 2.2 Nm) and was significantly different from the moments noted when pitching the fastball and change-up (5.1 ± 1.9 and 4.9 ± 1.9 Nm, respectively; p < 0.05). These results indicate that it may be possible to objectively determine pitch type from kinematic data of the wrist and forearm. It may also be possible that coaches may be able to identify abnormal pitching mechanics from more proximal segments by understanding the motion of the wrist. PMID:25203486

  15. The effect of wrist surgery on the kinematic consistency of joint axis reconstruction in a static posture.

    PubMed

    Kraszewski, Andrew P; Osei, Daniel A; Garg, Rohit; Jang, Eugene; Hillstrom, Howard J; Lenhoff, Mark W; Wolfe, Scott W

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional analysis of wrist motion is a growing focus in orthopedic research, however, our understanding of its validity (accuracy and reliability) remains limited. Nine human cadavers were tested to estimate wrist joint axes alignment in a postural static pose. The objective was to investigate a rater's ability to reliably align three skin- tracked wrist joint coordinate system (WJCS) definitions across baseline and reconstructive wrist states (intact, mid-carpal arthrodesis, and proximal-row carpectomy). Two WJCSs (legacy, anatomic) were based on palpated bony landmarks and the third (functional) was based on both landmarks and passive flexion-extension motion. A coordinate frame based on the anatomic definition was tracked with bone pins and served as a reference. Each WJCS was tested in each wrist state and in three forearm position (45° pronation, neutral, 45° supination). The angular offset about each axis of the WJCS frames were calculated with respect to the reference in flexion-extension, radial-ulnar deviation, and pronation-supination for every iteration. Reliability and root mean square deviation values were analyzed across wrist states. Our data suggest that no WJCS is uniformly more reliable than another. The functional WJCS definition was most consistent across intact and post-operative states for pronation-supination offset, but this was dependent on rater interpretation. It still however offers the practical benefit of requiring fewer landmarks. PMID:25940572

  16. Neural and electromyographic correlates of wrist posture control.

    PubMed

    Suminski, Aaron J; Rao, Stephen M; Mosier, Kristine M; Scheidt, Robert A

    2007-02-01

    In identical experiments in and out of a MR scanner, we recorded functional magnetic resonance imaging and electromyographic correlates of wrist stabilization against constant and time-varying mechanical perturbations. Positioning errors were greatest while stabilizing random torques. Wrist muscle activity lagged changes in joint angular velocity at latencies suggesting trans-cortical reflex action. Drift in stabilized hand positions gave rise to frequent, accurately directed, corrective movements, suggesting that the brain maintains separate representations of desired wrist angle for feedback control of posture and the generation of discrete corrections. Two patterns of neural activity were evident in the blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) time series obtained during stabilization. A cerebello-thalamo-cortical network showed significant activity whenever position errors were present. Here, changes in activation correlated with moment-by-moment changes in position errors (not force), implicating this network in the feedback control of hand position. A second network, showing elevated activity during stabilization whether errors were present or not, included prefrontal cortex, rostral dorsal premotor and supplementary motor area cortices, and inferior aspects of parietal cortex. BOLD activation in some of these regions correlated with positioning errors integrated over a longer time-frame consistent with optimization of feedback performance via adjustment of the behavioral goal (feedback setpoint) and the planning and execution of internally generated motor actions. The finding that nonoverlapping networks demonstrate differential sensitivity to kinematic performance errors over different time scales supports the hypothesis that in stabilizing the hand, the brain recruits distinct neural systems for feedback control of limb position and for evaluation/adjustment of controller parameters in response to persistent errors. PMID:17135464

  17. WGEF activates Rho in the Wnt–PCP pathway and controls convergent extension in Xenopus gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Zhao, Hui; Dawid, Igor B

    2008-01-01

    The Wnt–PCP (planar cell polarity, PCP) pathway regulates cell polarity and convergent extension movements during axis formation in vertebrates by activation of Rho and Rac, leading to the re-organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Rho and Rac activation require guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs), but the identity of the GEF involved in Wnt–PCP-mediated convergent extension is unknown. Here we report the identification of the weak-similarity GEF (WGEF) gene by a microarray-based screen for notochord enriched genes, and show that WGEF is involved in Wnt-regulated convergent extension. Overexpression of WGEF activated RhoA and rescued the suppression of convergent extension by dominant-negative Wnt-11, whereas depletion of WGEF led to suppression of convergent extension that could be rescued by RhoA or Rho-associated kinase activation. WGEF protein preferentially localized at the plasma membrane, and Frizzled-7 induced colocalization of Dishevelled and WGEF. WGEF protein can bind to Dishevelled and Daam-1, and deletion of the Dishevelled-binding domain generates a hyperactive from of WGEF. These results indicate that WGEF is a component of the Wnt–PCP pathway that connects Dishevelled to Rho activation. PMID:18256687

  18. WGEF activates Rho in the Wnt-PCP pathway and controls convergent extension in Xenopus gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Zhao, Hui; Dawid, Igor B

    2008-02-20

    The Wnt-PCP (planar cell polarity, PCP) pathway regulates cell polarity and convergent extension movements during axis formation in vertebrates by activation of Rho and Rac, leading to the re-organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Rho and Rac activation require guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs), but the identity of the GEF involved in Wnt-PCP-mediated convergent extension is unknown. Here we report the identification of the weak-similarity GEF (WGEF) gene by a microarray-based screen for notochord enriched genes, and show that WGEF is involved in Wnt-regulated convergent extension. Overexpression of WGEF activated RhoA and rescued the suppression of convergent extension by dominant-negative Wnt-11, whereas depletion of WGEF led to suppression of convergent extension that could be rescued by RhoA or Rho-associated kinase activation. WGEF protein preferentially localized at the plasma membrane, and Frizzled-7 induced colocalization of Dishevelled and WGEF. WGEF protein can bind to Dishevelled and Daam-1, and deletion of the Dishevelled-binding domain generates a hyperactive from of WGEF. These results indicate that WGEF is a component of the Wnt-PCP pathway that connects Dishevelled to Rho activation. PMID:18256687

  19. Use of wrist albedo neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    We are developing a wrist dosimeter that can be used to measure the exposure at the wrist to x-rays, gamma rays, beta-particles, thermal neutrons and fast neutrons. It consists of a modified Hankins Type albedo neutron dosimeter and also contains three pieces of CR-39 plastic. ABS plastic in the form of an elongated hemisphere provides the beta and low energy x-ray shielding necessary to meet the requirement of depth dose measurements at 1 cm. The dosimeter has a beta window located in the side of the hemisphere oriented towards an object being held in the hands. A TLD 600 is positioned under the 1 cm thick ABS plastic and is used to measure the thermal neutron dose. At present we are using Velcro straps to hold the dosimeter on the inside of the wrist. 9 figures.

  20. MR imaging of the painful wrist.

    PubMed

    Oneson, S R; Scales, L M; Erickson, S J; Timins, M E

    1996-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an effective method for helping determine the cause of wrist pain by demonstrating a broad spectrum of abnormalities, including those of bone, cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. MR imaging is useful in the detection, characterization, and staging of osseous injury and disease, although computed tomography provides superior detail in the depiction of bone. MR imaging may demonstrate irregular cartilage loss in noninflammatory arthropathies such as osteoarthritis, and its superior soft-tissue contrast makes it the method of choice for evaluating the synovial processes. Although arthrography remains the standard of reference in the detection of perforations of the principal intrinsic ligaments of the wrist, three-dimensional MR imaging has shown promise in depicting the small interosseous ligaments. Tendinitis, tenosynovitis, ganglia, and anatomic variants can be diagnosed and accurately assessed with MR imaging. Radiologists need to be aware of the full spectrum of wrist abnormalities and the characteristic MR imaging findings that accompany them. PMID:8888387

  1. Ultrasonography of the hand, wrist, and elbow.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Marko; Fullerton, Brad

    2010-08-01

    High-frequency diagnostic ultrasonography of the hand, wrist and elbow has significant potential to improve the quality of diagnosis and care provided by neuromuscular and musculoskeletal specialists. In patients referred for weakness, pain and numbness of the hand, wrist or elbow, diagnostic ultrasonography can be an adjunct to electrodiagnosis and help in identifying ruptured tendons and treating conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome or trigger finger. Use of a small high-frequency (>10-15 MHz) transducer, an instrument with a blunt pointed tip to enhance sonopalpation and a model of the hand, wrist and elbow is advised to enhance visualization of small anatomical structures and complex bony contours. A range of conditions, including tendon and ligament ruptures, trigger finger, de Quervain tenosynovitis, intersection syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, and osteoarthritis, is described along with detailed ultrasonography-guided injection techniques for carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger. PMID:20797547

  2. [Arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia].

    PubMed

    Borisch, N

    2014-10-01

    In arthroscopic wrist surgery, the resection of dorsal wrist ganglia has become a well accepted practice. As advantages for the minimally invasive procedure the low complication rate and low postoperative morbidity, less postoperative pain and faster recovery over open techniques are discussed. The possibility to assess accompanying joint pathology is considered as another advantage. The importance of identifying a so-called ganglion cyst stalk seems to have been overstated. Regarding the technique, the main discussion points are the size and localisation of the capsular window and the necessity of additional midcarpal arthroscopy. The possibility and results of treatment of recurrent ganglion cysts are still controversial. Our own experience and that of some authors are positive. Hardly mentioned in the literature is the treatment of occult dorsal wrist ganglia and its results, which is considered as very successful by the authors. PMID:25290273

  3. 3D Dynamic Analysis of the Wrist.

    PubMed

    Sandow, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    With advances in imaging and computing technology the greater capacity to diagnose, plan and deliver care to patients with hand and wrist disorder is being realised. Work in our laboratory, has been able to identify certain specific rules that control wrist motion, and is a step on the pathway to creating a unified theory of carpal mechanics which will incorporate a kinetic biomechanical model. This will allow more precise anatomically based as well as quantitative diagnoses, but also an ability to test a proposed intervention in a "what if" scenario. PMID:26387995

  4. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-06-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rate. We reviewed the current literature available on dorsal wrist ganglion. PMID:25983472

  5. [Ganglion cysts of the hand and wrist].

    PubMed

    Sarig, Oren; Hass, Avraham; Oron, Amir

    2013-10-01

    Ganglion cysts are considered the most common tumor of the wrist and hand. They are most common between the second and fourth decades of life. The most common anatomical location is the dorsal wrist. This article includes a general review of these cysts including symptoms, pathology and methods of diagnosis, as well as a review of these cysts in specific anatomic locations. The article also includes an updated review of the literature comparing open surgery vs. arthroscopic treatment. The authors believe that arthroscopic surgery of ganglion cysts will gain an important role in the treatment of these cysts. PMID:24450035

  6. Dorsal wrist mass: the carpal boss.

    PubMed

    Boggess, Blake; Berkoff, David

    2011-01-01

    The carpal boss is an osseous overgrowth that is occasionally mistaken for a ganglion cyst. This report highlights the case a 36-year-old patient who was originally diagnosed by his primary care physician with a ganglion cyst and was sent to an orthopaedist for aspiration. Upon further evaluation with a plain radiograph, the dorsal wrist mass was found to be a carpal boss. The patient was treated with rest and a wrist brace, and was informed that a corticosteroid injection or surgical excision would be necessary if conservative treatment failed. The patient was asymptomatic on follow-up and invasive procedures were not necessary. PMID:22707539

  7. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rate. We reviewed the current literature available on dorsal wrist ganglion. PMID:25983472

  8. Randomised controlled study of postinjection immobilisation after intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment for wrist synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Weitoft, T; Ronnblom, L

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether better treatment results might also be achieved by a similar postinjection regimen for the wrist, which is non-weightbearing. Methods: 117 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and wrist synovitis were treated with intra-articular glucocorticoid injections. The patients were randomly allocated to 48 hour postinjection immobilisation in elastic wrist orthoses (n=58) or to normal postinjection activity (n=59). The primary end point was relapse of synovitis. In addition, joint circumference, pain, function, range of movement, and grip strength were followed up during six months. Results: 24 relapses occurred in the orthoses group and 14 in the active group (p=0.056). The secondary measure showed no statistically significant differences between the groups. Conclusion: The use of elastic wrist orthoses as a postinjection regimen does not improve the outcome of intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment for wrist synovitis. Results achieved in studies on knees should not be generalised to other joints, and postinjection recommendations should differ depending on the joint treated. PMID:12972485

  9. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  14. Development and performance of a new prosthesis system using ultrasonic sensor for wrist movements: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The design and performance of a new development prosthesis system known as biomechatronics wrist prosthesis is presented in this paper. The prosthesis system was implemented by replacing the Bowden tension cable of body powered prosthesis system using two ultrasonic sensors, two servo motors and microcontroller inside the prosthesis hand for transradial user. Methods The system components and hand prototypes involve the anthropometry, CAD design and prototyping, biomechatronics engineering together with the prosthetics. The modeler construction of the system develop allows the ultrasonic sensors that are placed on the shoulder to generate the wrist movement of the prosthesis. The kinematics of wrist movement, which are the pronation/supination and flexion/extension were tested using the motion analysis and general motion of human hand were compared. The study also evaluated the require degree of detection for the input of the ultrasonic sensor to generate the wrist movements. Results The values collected by the vicon motion analysis for biomechatronics prosthesis system were reliable to do the common tasks in daily life. The degree of the head needed to bend to give the full input wave was about 45° - 55° of rotation or about 14 cm – 16 cm. The biomechatronics wrist prosthesis gave higher degree of rotation to do the daily tasks but did not achieve the maximum degree of rotation. Conclusion The new development of using sensor and actuator in generating the wrist movements will be interesting for used list in medicine, robotics technology, rehabilitations, prosthetics and orthotics. PMID:24755242

  15. Perturbation amplitude affects linearly estimated neuromechanical wrist joint properties.

    PubMed

    Klomp, Asbjorn; de Groot, Jurriaan H; de Vlugt, Erwin; Meskers, Carel G M; Arendzen, J Hans; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2014-04-01

    System identification techniques have been used to separate intrinsic muscular and reflexive contributions to joint impedance, which is an essential step in the proper choice of patient specific treatment. These techniques are, however, only well developed for linear systems. Assuming linearity prescribes the neuromuscular system to be perturbed only around predefined operating points. In this study, we test the validity of a commonly used linear model by analyzing the effects of flexion-extension displacement amplitude (2(°), 4(°), and 8(°)) on damping, stiffness, and reflex gain of the wrist joint, at different background torque levels (0, 1, and 2 N · m). With displacement amplitude, intrinsic damping increased, while intrinsic stiffness and reflex gains decreased. These changes were dependent on the level of wrist torque. The dependency of the neuromuscular system properties on even small variations in angular displacement is evident and has to be accounted for when comparing different studies and clinical interpretations using linear identification techniques. Knowledge of the behavior of the neuromuscular system around operating points is an essential step toward the development of nonlinear models that allow for discrimination between patients and controls in a larger range of loading conditions. PMID:24216632

  16. An Exoskeleton Robot for Human Forearm and Wrist Motion Assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranathunga Arachchilage Ruwan Chandra Gopura; Kiguchi, Kazuo

    The exoskeleton robot is worn by the human operator as an orthotic device. Its joints and links correspond to those of the human body. The same system operated in different modes can be used for different fundamental applications; a human-amplifier, haptic interface, rehabilitation device and assistive device sharing a portion of the external load with the operator. We have been developing exoskeleton robots for assisting the motion of physically weak individuals such as elderly or slightly disabled in daily life. In this paper, we propose a three degree of freedom (3DOF) exoskeleton robot (W-EXOS) for the forearm pronation/ supination motion, wrist flexion/extension motion and ulnar/radial deviation. The paper describes the wrist anatomy toward the development of the exoskeleton robot, the hardware design of the exoskeleton robot and EMG-based control method. The skin surface electromyographic (EMG) signals of muscles in forearm of the exoskeletons' user and the hand force/forearm torque are used as input information for the controller. By applying the skin surface EMG signals as main input signals to the controller, automatic control of the robot can be realized without manipulating any other equipment. Fuzzy control method has been applied to realize the natural and flexible motion assist. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the proposed exoskeleton robot and its control method.

  17. 77 FR 21104 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-694, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  7. 7 CFR 3400.22 - Merit review for education and extension activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Merit review for education and extension activities. 3400.22 Section 3400.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM Peer and Merit Review Arranged by...

  8. 7 CFR 3400.22 - Merit review for education and extension activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Merit review for education and extension activities. 3400.22 Section 3400.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM Peer and Merit Review Arranged by...

  9. 7 CFR 3400.22 - Merit review for education and extension activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Merit review for education and extension activities. 3400.22 Section 3400.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM Peer and Merit Review Arranged by...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  15. Pacific Northwest USDA-ARS Jointed Goatgrass Research and Extension Activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS weed scientists have conducted research and extension activities on six research projects funded by the National Jointed Goatgrass Research Program (NJGGRP). This poster reviews the objectives and major research findings from these federally funded projects. Most of these projects wer...

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  1. 32 CFR 767.8 - Requests for amendments or extensions of active permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requests for amendments or extensions of active permits. 767.8 Section 767.8 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES APPLICATION GUIDELINES FOR ARCHEOLOGICAL RESEARCH PERMITS ON SHIP AND AIRCRAFT WRECKS...

  2. 32 CFR 767.8 - Requests for amendments or extensions of active permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requests for amendments or extensions of active permits. 767.8 Section 767.8 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES APPLICATION GUIDELINES FOR ARCHEOLOGICAL RESEARCH PERMITS ON SHIP AND AIRCRAFT WRECKS...

  3. 32 CFR 767.8 - Requests for amendments or extensions of active permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requests for amendments or extensions of active permits. 767.8 Section 767.8 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES APPLICATION GUIDELINES FOR ARCHEOLOGICAL RESEARCH PERMITS ON SHIP AND AIRCRAFT WRECKS...

  4. 32 CFR 767.8 - Requests for amendments or extensions of active permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requests for amendments or extensions of active permits. 767.8 Section 767.8 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES APPLICATION GUIDELINES FOR ARCHEOLOGICAL RESEARCH PERMITS ON SHIP AND AIRCRAFT WRECKS...

  5. 32 CFR 767.8 - Requests for amendments or extensions of active permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requests for amendments or extensions of active permits. 767.8 Section 767.8 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES APPLICATION GUIDELINES FOR ARCHEOLOGICAL RESEARCH PERMITS ON SHIP AND AIRCRAFT WRECKS...

  6. 75 FR 10298 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-929; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-929; Extension of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 30 Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review; Form I-929,...

  7. 76 FR 10387 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-929; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-929; Extension of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review; Form I- 929,...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

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  9. 78 FR 14402 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Extension of a Currently Approved Collection: Driver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... December 29, 2010 (75 FR 82133). Public Participation: The Federal eRulemaking Portal is available 24 hours... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Extension of a... Reduction Act of 1995, FMCSA announces its plan to submit the Information Collection Request (ICR)...

  10. 76 FR 41282 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-363, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-363, Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 30-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review: Form I-...

  11. Design of a torque-controlled manipulator to analyse the admittance of the wrist joint.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Alfred C; de Vlugt, Erwin; van Hilten, J J Bob; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2006-06-30

    This paper describes the design of a torque-controlled manipulator to identify the dynamics of the wrist joint. With torque disturbances, the subject can actively control the joint angle, giving a natural task. The application of a hybrid haptic controller guarantees linearity over a large bandwidth and adjustable virtual dynamics. The haptic controller has a bandwidth of 50 Hz, meaning that the virtual dynamics are realistically felt at up to 50 Hz. To let the subject 'feel' the torque, disturbances as well as possible the apparent, or virtual, dynamics of the device must be small. The minimal apparent inertia of the device is 1.6 g m(2), which is of the same order as for a normal wrist, and the minimal damping and stiffness are negligible. To judge the accuracy of the manipulator, loads of known physical properties were attached and their parameters were quantified. The parameters of the loads were estimated with a maximum error of 5%. As the eigenfrequency of a (co)-contracted human wrist is approximately 15 Hz, the 50-Hz bandwidth of the haptic device is sufficient to measure all relevant dynamics of the human wrist. With this device, the dynamics of the human wrist joint can be measured under varying virtual dynamics, as well as the effect of neurological dysfunction on human motor control, for example. PMID:16434105

  12. Kinematic analysis of wrist motion during simulated colonoscopy in first-year gastroenterology fellows

    PubMed Central

    Ratuapli, Shiva K; Ruff, Kevin C; Ramirez, Francisco C; Wu, Qing; Mohankumar, Deepika; Santello, Marco; Fleischer, David E

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastroenterology trainees acquire skill and proficiency in performing colonoscopies at different rates. The cause for heterogeneous competency among the trainees is unclear. Kinematic analysis of the wrist joint while performing colonoscopy can objectively assess the variation in wrist motion. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that the time spent by the trainees in extreme ranges of wrist motion will decrease as the trainees advance through the fellowship year. Subjects and methods: Five first-year gastroenterology fellows were prospectively studied at four intervals while performing simulated colonoscopies. The setting was an endoscopy simulation laboratory at a tertiary care center. Kinematic assessment of wrist motion was done using a magnetic position/orientation tracker held in place by a custom-made arm sleeve and hand glove. The main outcome measure was time spent performing each of four ranges of wrist motion (mid, center, extreme, and out) for each wrist degree of freedom (pronation/supination, flexion/extension, and adduction/abduction). Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the time spent for wrist movements across the three degrees of freedom throughout the study period. However, fellows spent significantly less time in extreme range (1.47 ± 0.34 min vs. 2.44 ± 0.34 min, P = 0.004) and center range (1.02 ± 0.34 min vs 1.9 ± 0.34 min, P = 0.01) at the end of the study compared to the baseline evaluation. The study was limited by the small number of subjects and performance of colonoscopies on a simulator rather than live patients. Conclusions: Gastroenterology trainees alter the time spent at the extreme range of wrist motion as they advance through training. Endoscopy training during the first 10 months of fellowship may have beneficial effects on learning ergonomically correct motion patterns. PMID:26716123

  13. In Vivo Triquetrum-Hamate Kinematics Through a Simulated Hammering Task Wrist Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Robin N.; Rainbow, Michael J.; Akelman, Edward; Crisco, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The shape and kinematics of the triquetrum-hamate joint have been the subject of continued research, as its articulation provides wrist stability and motion. The purpose of this study was to measure the in vivo articulation of the triquetrum-hamate joint as the wrist moves along an important functional wrist motion, the dart thrower's path. Methods: The right wrist of six male and six female volunteers (average age [and standard deviation], 24.8 ± 3.8 years) were imaged with computed tomography in five positions along a simulated hammering task. Three-dimensional kinematics of the third metacarpal, triquetrum, hamate, and radius were analyzed with use of the rotation axis and the path of contact areas. Results: As the wrist ulnar-flexed with respect to the radius, the triquetrum translated 3.7 ± 1.7 mm distally on the hamate. Approximately midway through this distal course, when the triquetrum appeared to engage the distal ridge of the hamate, the triquetrum began translating volarly. Total volar translation was 2.6 ± 1.1 mm. As the wrist ulnar-flexed, there was also a decrease in the distance and variability in the location of the triquetrum-hamate rotation axis from the hamate centroid: it decreased from 11.7 ± 4.1 mm to 3.3 ± 1.4 mm (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Our findings support the concept that the triquetrum rotates on the convex ellipsoid surface of the hamate and that the helicoidal description of the triquetrum's motion on the hamate may be an oversimplification. Clinical Relevance: Our results suggest that the triquetrum-hamate joint is less constrained in radial extension than it is in ulnar flexion. The concave distal ridge of the hamate may guide the triquetrum toward the hook of the hamate until it is fully engaged, which could block further ulnar deviation of the wrist. This may provide carpal stability while also serving as a rationale for triquetrum excision to increase the range of motion of the wrist. PMID:22717837

  14. Assessing adult leisure activities: an extension of a self-report activity questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Jopp, Daniela S; Hertzog, Christopher

    2010-03-01

    Everyday leisure activities in adulthood and old age have been investigated with respect to constructs such as successful aging, an engaged lifestyle, and prevention of age-related cognitive decline. They also relate to mental health and have clinical value, as they can inform diagnosis and interventions. In the present study, the authors enhanced the content validity of the Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire by adding items on physical and social activities and validated a shortened version of the questionnaire. The proposed leisure activity model included 11 activity categories: 3 types of social activities (i.e., activities with close social partners, group-centered public activity, religious activities), physical activities, developmental activities, experiential activities, crafts, game playing, TV watching, travel, and technology use. Confirmatory factor analyses validated the proposed factor structure in 2 independent samples. A higher order model with a general activity factor fitted the activity factor correlations with relatively little loss of fit. Convergent and discriminant validity for the activity scales were supported by patterns of their correlations with education, health, depression, cognition, and personality. In sum, the scores derived from of the augmented Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire demonstrate good reliability, and validity evidence supports their use as measures of leisure activities in young, middle-aged, and older individuals. PMID:20230157

  15. Assessing Adult Leisure Activities: An Extension of a Self-Report Activity Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Jopp, Daniela; Hertzog, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Everyday leisure activities in adulthood and old age have been investigated with respect to constructs such as successful aging, an engaged lifestyle, and prevention of age-related cognitive decline. They also relate to mental health and have clinical value as they can inform diagnosis and interventions. In the present study, we enhanced the content validity of the Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire by adding items on physical and social activities, and validated a shortened version of the questionnaire. Our proposed leisure activity model included 11 activity categories: three types of social activities (i.e., activities with close social partners, group-centered public activity, religious activities), physical, developmental, and experiential activities, crafts, game playing, TV watching, travel, and technology use. Confirmatory factor analyses validated the proposed factor structure in two independent samples. A higher-order model with a general activity factor fitted the activity factor correlations with relatively little loss of fit. Convergent and discriminant validity for the activity scales were supported by patterns of their correlations with education, health, depression, cognition, and personality. In sum, the scores derived from of the augmented VLS activity questionnaire demonstrate good reliability, and validity evidence supports their use as measure of leisure activities in young, middle-aged, and older individuals. PMID:20230157

  16. Clinical manual assessment of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Porretto-Loehrke, Ann; Schuh, Cassandra; Szekeres, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Although hand therapists often evaluate patients with wrist pain, novice and experienced clinicians alike would benefit from a systematic assessment to efficiently identify the source of dysfunction and initiate an appropriate treatment plan. This article proposes a systematic approach for clinical evaluation of the wrist by describing the basic clinical examination (BCE) process and interpreting the findings in terms of common pathology. The BCE will enable the hand therapist to identify conditions that are contraindicated for conservative care and require further physician intervention, determine a working diagnosis for most musculoskeletal problems, and determine the appropriate extra tests to confirm the working diagnosis and/or rule out differential diagnoses. By combining findings from the patient's history, BCE, and special testing, hand therapists can efficiently determine the underlying pathology and provide appropriate treatment that can optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:27112270

  17. PERSISTENT WRIST PAIN IN A MATURE GOLFER

    PubMed Central

    Hazle, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Clients presenting with ulnar-sided wrist pain can provide diagnostic and management challenges for physical therapists. Symptoms in this region may originate from multiple structures. Integration of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging results is often required for optimal decision-making and patient management. To obtain the most informative imaging results, practitioners need an understanding of injury patterns and their detection by various imaging modalities. This case describes a mature golfer who presented with persistent ulnar-sided wrist pain and was eventually determined to have a fracture of the hook of the hamate accompanied by neighboring soft tissue involvement also contributing to his symptom complex. His history and the diagnostic process are detailed along with a brief discussion of his subsequent management post-operatively. Level of Evidence: 5 (Single Case Report) PMID:22893862

  18. Analysis And Display Of Human Wrist Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Steven W.; Erdman, Arthur G.

    1983-07-01

    The three-dimensional kinematic analysis of the wrist is a complex problem. A method utilizing high speed stereocinematography has been developed to accurately measure the motion of the bones in the wrist. Both relative and absolute motions can be obtained using this system. The system has been shown to accurately locate a point to +/- 0.003 inch. The three-dimensional motion characteristics of the capitate in radial ulnar deviation were analyzed using this system, and the results are presented. A computer graphics program, developed by the authors, is used to display the motion characteristics of the carpal bones. In this program, the bone surface, defined using a special stereopointer and bicubic surface fitting algorithms, is displayed along with the kinematic data.

  19. The prevalence, variety and impact of wrist problems in elite professional golfers on the European Tour

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Roger; O'Connor, Phil; Campbell, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Golf is a popular sport played by an estimated 57 million people. Previous studies on wrist injuries in elite golfers have been of simple design and have demonstrated such injuries to be frequent, although no studies report the incidence, variety, severity or impact on the activity of wrist injuries in detail. This prospective cross-sectional study assesses these factors in a cohort of elite professional golfers. Methods European Tour golfers eligible to compete at the 2009 BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth were studied. Study design involved the completion of a structured questionnaire supplemented by interview and examination when required, with performance statistics provided by the European Tour. The severity of injury was assessed by the number of missed tournaments and the amount of time of missed practice. Results 128 of 153 eligible golfers, (84%) completed the study with 38 golfers (30%) reporting 43 problems. The majority of injuries (67%) occurred in the leading wrist at the most common location, the ulnar side of the wrist (35%). 87% of all ulnar-sided and 100% of radial-sided problems were in the leading wrist. Conclusions There were clear side differences reported by the players with the lead wrist demonstrating much higher injury rates in all areas. The most significant injury, in terms of absence from competition, was extensor carpi ulnaris tendon subluxation. Specific injuries are explained in relation to the biomechanics of the golf swing. Most structural injuries have a specific treatment and rehabilitation plan, which can involve significant periods of time away from the sport, while the management of many of the more minor problems is through alterations in technique or practice regimes, aiming to keep a golfer playing during recovery. PMID:24014125

  20. Ultrasonography for Hand and Wrist Conditions.

    PubMed

    Starr, Harlan M; Sedgley, Matthew D; Means, Kenneth R; Murphy, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasonography facilitates dynamic, real-time evaluation of bones, joints, tendons, nerves, and vessels, making it an ideal imaging modality for hand and wrist conditions. Ultrasonography can depict masses and fluid collections, help locate radiolucent foreign bodies, characterize traumatic or overuse tendon or ligament pathology, and help evaluate compressive peripheral neuropathy and microvascular blood flow. Additionally, this modality improves the accuracy of therapeutic intra-articular or peritendinous injections and facilitates aspiration of fluid collections, such as ganglia. PMID:27355280

  1. High-energy injuries of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Obert, L; Loisel, F; Jardin, E; Gasse, N; Lepage, D

    2016-02-01

    High-energy injuries to the wrist gather complex fractures of the distal radius, radiocarpal dislocations, perilunate dislocations, and other intracarpal dislocations. Depending on the energy of the injury and the position of the wrist at the time of impact, the patient, often a young male with a high functional demand, presents one of these injuries associating fracture(s) and ligament injury. The trauma is often bilateral, with proximal lesions (elbow) very often associated with contusion or compression of the median nerve. Diagnosis is confirmed by wrist X-rays, which are sufficient to determine treatment for radiocarpal and perilunate dislocations. In cases of distal radius fractures or other intracarpal dislocations, a preoperative CT is necessary. Reduction of the dislocation and relief of neurovascular compression are performed immediately. The final treatment of each lesion (bone fixation, ligament repair) can be undertaken simultaneously or delayed, depending on the patient and the lesions. Cartilage lesions, resulting from the high-energy injury, can be estimated using arthroscopy but cannot be repaired and determine the prognosis. The surgeon's objective is to restore joint congruence, which does not prevent stiffness, the main complication of these rare injuries, which the surgeon must know how to recognize and treat. PMID:26782706

  2. New concept for total wrist replacement.

    PubMed

    Reigstad, Astor; Reigstad, Ole; Grimsgaard, Christian; Røkkum, Magne

    2011-06-01

    Wrist prostheses have never achieved the sort of clinical outcomes found with those of hips and knees. We have developed a novel uncemented modular wrist prosthesis with screw fixation, metal-on-metal coupling, and ball-and-socket articulation. Eight patients admitted for wrist arthrodesis to treat primary or secondary osteoarthritis (not rheumatoid) were operated on. The prosthesis reduced the amount of bone removed and spared the distal radioulnar joint. After 7 to 9 years we found that the fixed centre of the ball-and-socket articulation provided good stability and mobility, and relief of pain and grip strength were satisfactory. We saw no luxations, metacarpal fractures or cut-outs, or mechanical failures of the implants. Two distal screws loosened (revised with new distal screws), and one early inflammation and one late infection occurred (revised to arthrodesis). We propose modifications to the implant with reduction in the diameter of the screws and the height of the threads, and rounding of the distal tip. The technique should include release of the third carpometacarpal joint, alignment of the capitate and the third metacarpal, and arthrodesis of the joint with bone chips. PMID:21682612

  3. A cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator using a novel torque-field controller for human motion training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weihai; Cui, Xiang; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-06-01

    Rehabilitation technologies have great potentials in assisted motion training for stroke patients. Considering that wrist motion plays an important role in arm dexterous manipulation of activities of daily living, this paper focuses on developing a cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator (CDWRR) for motion training or assistance to subjects with motor disabilities. The CDWRR utilizes the wrist skeletal joints and arm segments as the supporting structure and takes advantage of cable-driven parallel design to build the system, which brings the properties of flexibility, low-cost, and low-weight. The controller of the CDWRR is designed typically based on a virtual torque-field, which is to plan "assist-as-needed" torques for the spherical motion of wrist responding to the orientation deviation in wrist motion training. The torque-field controller can be customized to different levels of rehabilitation training requirements by tuning the field parameters. Additionally, a rapidly convergent parameter self-identification algorithm is developed to obtain the uncertain parameters automatically for the floating wearable structure of the CDWRR. Finally, experiments on a healthy subject are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the controller and the feasibility of the CDWRR on wrist motion training or assistance.

  4. A cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator using a novel torque-field controller for human motion training.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weihai; Cui, Xiang; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-06-01

    Rehabilitation technologies have great potentials in assisted motion training for stroke patients. Considering that wrist motion plays an important role in arm dexterous manipulation of activities of daily living, this paper focuses on developing a cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator (CDWRR) for motion training or assistance to subjects with motor disabilities. The CDWRR utilizes the wrist skeletal joints and arm segments as the supporting structure and takes advantage of cable-driven parallel design to build the system, which brings the properties of flexibility, low-cost, and low-weight. The controller of the CDWRR is designed typically based on a virtual torque-field, which is to plan "assist-as-needed" torques for the spherical motion of wrist responding to the orientation deviation in wrist motion training. The torque-field controller can be customized to different levels of rehabilitation training requirements by tuning the field parameters. Additionally, a rapidly convergent parameter self-identification algorithm is developed to obtain the uncertain parameters automatically for the floating wearable structure of the CDWRR. Finally, experiments on a healthy subject are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the controller and the feasibility of the CDWRR on wrist motion training or assistance. PMID:26133875

  5. A new myohaptic instrument to assess wrist motion dynamically.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; Van Den Braber, Niels; Grimaldi, Giuliana; Lammertse, Piet

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiological assessment of joint properties and voluntary motion in neurological patients remains a challenge. This is typically the case in cerebellar patients, who exhibit dysmetric movements due to the dysfunction of cerebellar circuitry. Several tools have been developed, but so far most of these tools have remained confined to laboratories, with a lack of standardization. We report on a new device which combines the use of electromyographic (EMG) sensors with haptic technology for the dynamic investigation of wrist properties. The instrument is composed of a drivetrain, a haptic controller and a signal acquisition unit. Angular accuracy is 0.00611 rad, nominal torque is 6 N·m, maximal rotation velocity is 34.907 rad/sec, with a range of motion of -1.0472 to +1.0472 rad. The inertia of the motor and handgrip is 0.004 kg·m2. This is the first standardized myohaptic instrument allowing the dynamic characterization of wrist properties, including under the condition of artificial damping. We show that cerebellar patients are unable to adapt EMG activities when faced with an increase in damping while performing fast reversal movements. The instrument allows the extraction of an electrophysiological signature of a cerebellar deficit. PMID:22319293

  6. Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist)

    MedlinePlus

    ... choice depends on many factors, such as the nature of the fracture, your age and activity level, ... causing the cast to loosen. Depending on the nature of the fracture, your doctor may closely monitor ...

  7. Wrist ultrasound examination – scanning technique and ultrasound anatomy. Part 1: Dorsal wrist

    PubMed Central

    Łasecki, Mateusz; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the musculoskeletal system is superior to other imaging methods in many aspects, such as multidimensional character of imaging, possibility of dynamic evaluation and precise assessment of soft tissues. Moreover, it is a safe and relatively inexpensive method, broadly available and well-tolerated by patients. A correctly conducted ultrasound examination of the wrist delivers detailed information concerning the condition of tendons, muscles, ligaments, nerves and vessels. However, the knowledge of anatomy is crucial to establish a correct ultrasound diagnosis, also in wrist assessment. An ultrasound examination of the wrist is one of the most common US examinations conducted in patients with rheumatological diseases. Ultrasonographic signs depend on the advancement of the disease. The examination is equally frequently conducted in patients with pain or swelling of the wrist due to non-rheumatological causes. The aim of this publication was to present ultrasound images and anatomic schemes corresponding to them. The correct scanning technique of the dorsal part of the wrist was discussed and some practical tips, thanks to which highly diagnostic images can be obtained, were presented. The following anatomical structures should be visualized in an ultrasound examination of the dorsal wrist: distal radio-ulnar joint, radiocarpal joint, midcarpal joint, carpometacarpal joints, dorsal radiocarpal ligament, compartments of extensor tendons, radial artery, cephalic vein, two small branches of the radial nerve: superficial and deep, as well as certain midcarpal ligaments, particularly the scapholunate ligament and lunotriquetral ligament. The paper was distinguished in 2014 as the “poster of the month” (poster number C-1896) during the poster session of the European Congress of Radiology in Vienna. PMID:26675810

  8. Wrist ultrasound examination - scanning technique and ultrasound anatomy. Part 1: Dorsal wrist.

    PubMed

    Olchowy, Cyprian; Łasecki, Mateusz; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the musculoskeletal system is superior to other imaging methods in many aspects, such as multidimensional character of imaging, possibility of dynamic evaluation and precise assessment of soft tissues. Moreover, it is a safe and relatively inexpensive method, broadly available and well-tolerated by patients. A correctly conducted ultrasound examination of the wrist delivers detailed information concerning the condition of tendons, muscles, ligaments, nerves and vessels. However, the knowledge of anatomy is crucial to establish a correct ultrasound diagnosis, also in wrist assessment. An ultrasound examination of the wrist is one of the most common US examinations conducted in patients with rheumatological diseases. Ultrasonographic signs depend on the advancement of the disease. The examination is equally frequently conducted in patients with pain or swelling of the wrist due to non-rheumatological causes. The aim of this publication was to present ultrasound images and anatomic schemes corresponding to them. The correct scanning technique of the dorsal part of the wrist was discussed and some practical tips, thanks to which highly diagnostic images can be obtained, were presented. The following anatomical structures should be visualized in an ultrasound examination of the dorsal wrist: distal radio-ulnar joint, radiocarpal joint, midcarpal joint, carpometacarpal joints, dorsal radiocarpal ligament, compartments of extensor tendons, radial artery, cephalic vein, two small branches of the radial nerve: superficial and deep, as well as certain midcarpal ligaments, particularly the scapholunate ligament and lunotriquetral ligament. The paper was distinguished in 2014 as the "poster of the month" (poster number C-1896) during the poster session of the European Congress of Radiology in Vienna. PMID:26675810

  9. The "Conflicted Dying": The Active Search for Life Extension in Advanced Cancer Through Biomedical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Shan; Peter, Elizabeth; Gastaldo, Denise; Howell, Doris

    2016-03-01

    Using a poststructural perspective, we examine the subjectivities that are produced when advanced cancer patients seek life extension through biomedical treatments. Seven case studies were developed that included 20 interviews with patients, family, nurses, and physicians recruited from a tertiary hospital in Canada, 30 documents, and 5 hours of participant observation. We identify seven types of subjectivity: (a) the Desperate Subject, (b) the Cancer Expert Subject, (c) the Proactive Subject, (d) the Productive Subject, (e) the Mistrusting Subject, (f) the Model Patient Subject, and (g) the Suffering Subject. We characterize the "conflicted dying," a contemporary figure who holds multiple perspectives about seeking curative treatment despite the acknowledgment of death. Using active strategies to gain access to treatment, this figure resists traditional arrangements of power/knowledge established by health care providers. We suggest that the search for life extension is a process of shaping the self to fit certain aesthetical traits associated with surviving cancer. PMID:25711844

  10. Results of a unicentric series of 15 wrist prosthesis implantations at a 5.2 year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chevrollier, Jérémie; Strugarek-Lecoanet, Clotilde; Dap, François; Dautel, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Our retrospective study aimed to evaluate functional and radiological results of a unicentric series of 17 total wrist prostheses implanted between 2001 and 2011. Nine women and seven men, mean age 59, underwent wrist joint arthroplasty, bilateral in one case. Universal Total Wrist and Remotion prostheses were used and followed-up at a mean of 5.2 years (1.1-10). Fifteen patients were reviewed. Four patients had postoperative complications, three of whom required arthrodesis. The rest obtained satisfactory pain relief. Grip strength nevertheless decreased compared to the contralateral side and mobility was reduced: flexion/extension=33°, ulnar/radial deviation=20°. The Quick DASH score was 29% and PRWE, 26%. Radiological assessment revealed carpal implant loosening in eight patients. Our series confirms the discordance generally observed between patients' subjective satisfaction and mediocre clinical and radiological results over the medium term. PMID:26984652

  11. Non-extensivity and complexity in the earthquake activity at the West Corinth rift (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michas, Georgios; Vallianatos, Filippos; Sammonds, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Earthquakes exhibit complex phenomenology that is revealed from the fractal structure in space, time and magnitude. For that reason other tools rather than the simple Poissonian statistics seem more appropriate to describe the statistical properties of the phenomenon. Here we use Non-Extensive Statistical Physics [NESP] to investigate the inter-event time distribution of the earthquake activity at the west Corinth rift (central Greece). This area is one of the most seismotectonically active areas in Europe, with an important continental N-S extension and high seismicity rates. NESP concept refers to the non-additive Tsallis entropy Sq that includes Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy as a particular case. This concept has been successfully used for the analysis of a variety of complex dynamic systems including earthquakes, where fractality and long-range interactions are important. The analysis indicates that the cumulative inter-event time distribution can be successfully described with NESP, implying the complexity that characterizes the temporal occurrences of earthquakes. Further on, we use the Tsallis entropy (Sq) and the Fischer Information Measure (FIM) to investigate the complexity that characterizes the inter-event time distribution through different time windows along the evolution of the seismic activity at the West Corinth rift. The results of this analysis reveal a different level of organization and clusterization of the seismic activity in time. Acknowledgments. GM wish to acknowledge the partial support of the Greek State Scholarships Foundation (IKY).

  12. Effects of wrist tendon vibration on arm tracking in people poststroke.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Megan O; Scheidt, Robert A; Schmit, Brian D

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of wrist tendon vibration on a multijoint elbow/shoulder tracking task. We hypothesized that tendon vibration applied at the wrist musculature would improve upper arm tracking performance in chronic stroke survivors through increased, Ia-afferent feedback to the central nervous system (CNS). To test this hypothesis, 10 chronic stroke and 5 neurologically intact subjects grasped the handle of a planar robot as they tracked a target through a horizontal figure-8 pattern. A total of 36 trials were completed by each subject. During the middle trials, 70-Hz tendon vibration was applied at the wrist flexor tendons. Position, velocity, and electromyography data were evaluated to compare the quality of arm movements before, during, and after trials with concurrent vibration. Despite tracking a target that moved at a constant velocity, hand trajectories appeared to be segmented, displaying alternating intervals of acceleration and deceleration. Segments were identifiable in tangential velocity data as single-peaked, bell-shaped speed pulses. When tendon vibration was applied at the wrist musculature, stroke subjects experienced improved tracking performance in that hand path lengths and peak speed variability decreased, whereas movement smoothness increased. These performance improvements were accompanied by decreases in the muscle activity during movement. Possible mechanisms behind improved movement control in response to tendon vibration may include improved sensorimotor integration or improved cortical modulation of spinal reflex activity. PMID:21697444

  13. Distinct Thalamo-Cortical Controls for Shoulder, Elbow, and Wrist during Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Beloozerova, Irina N.; Stout, Erik E.; Sirota, Mikhail G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent data from this laboratory on differential controls for the shoulder, elbow, and wrist exerted by the thalamo-cortical network during locomotion is presented, based on experiments involving chronically instrumented cats walking on a flat surface and along a horizontal ladder. The activity of the following three groups of neurons is characterized: (1) neurons of the motor cortex that project to the pyramidal tract (PTNs), (2) neurons of the ventrolateral thalamus (VL), many identified as projecting to the motor cortex (thalamo-cortical neurons, TCs), and (3) neurons of the reticular nucleus of thalamus (RE), which inhibit TCs. Neurons were grouped according to their receptive field into shoulder-, elbow-, and wrist/paw-related categories. During simple locomotion, shoulder-related PTNs were most active in the late stance and early swing, and on the ladder, often increased activity and stride-related modulation while reducing discharge duration. Elbow-related PTNs were most active during late swing/early stance and typically remained similar on the ladder. Wrist-related PTNs were most active during swing, and on the ladder often decreased activity and increased modulation while reducing discharge duration. In the VL, shoulder-related neurons were more active during the transition from swing-to-stance. Elbow-related cells tended to be more active during the transition from stance-to-swing and on the ladder often decreased their activity and increased modulation. Wrist-related neurons were more active throughout the stance phase. In the RE, shoulder-related cells had low discharge rates and depths of modulation and long periods of activity distributed evenly across the cycle. In sharp contrast, wrist/paw-related cells discharged synchronously during the end of stance and swing with short periods of high activity, high modulation, and frequent sleep-type bursting. We conclude that thalamo-cortical network processes information related to different segments of the

  14. Ezrin NH2-terminal domain inhibits the cell extension activity of the COOH-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Overexpression in insect cells of the full coding sequence of the human membrane cytoskeletal linker ezrin (1-586) was compared with that of a NH2-terminal domain (ezrin 1-233) and that of a COOH-terminal domain (ezrin 310-586). Ezrin (1-586), as well as ezrin (1-233) enhanced cell adhesion of infected Sf9 cells without inducing gross morphological changes in the cell structure. Ezrin (310-586) enhanced cell adhesion and elicited membrane spreading followed by microspike and lamellipodia extensions by mobilization of Sf9 cell actin. Moreover some microspikes elongated into thin processes, up to 200 microns in length, resembling neurite outgrowths by a mechanism requiring microtubule assembly. Kinetics of videomicroscopic and drug-interference studies demonstrated that mobilization of actin was required for tubulin assembly to proceed. A similar phenotype was observed in CHO cells when a comparable ezrin domain was transiently overexpressed. The shortest domain promoting cell extension was localized between residues 373-586. Removal of residues 566-586, involved in in vitro actin binding (Turunen, O., T. Wahlstrom, and A. Vaheri. 1994. J. Cell Biol. 126:1445- 1453), suppressed the extension activity. Coexpression of ezrin (1-233) with ezrin (310-586) in the same insect cells blocked the constitutive activity of ezrin COOH-terminal domain. The inhibitory activity was mapped within ezrin 115 first NH2-terminal residues. We conclude that ezrin has properties to promote cell adhesion, and that ezrin NH2- terminal domain negatively regulates membrane spreading and elongation properties of ezrin COOH-terminal domain. PMID:7896873

  15. Extensive training leads to temporal and spatial shifts of cortical activity underlying visual category selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kietzmann, Tim C; Ehinger, Benedikt V; Porada, Danja; Engel, Andreas K; König, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The human visual system is able to distinguish naturally occurring categories with exceptional speed and accuracy. At the same time, it exhibits substantial plasticity, permitting the seamless and fast learning of entirely novel categories. Here we investigate the interplay of these two processes by asking how category selectivity emerges and develops from initial to extended category learning. For this purpose, we combine a rapid event-related MEG adaptation paradigm, an extension of fMRI adaptation to high temporal resolution, a novel spatiotemporal analysis approach to separate adaptation effects from other effect origins, and source localization. The results demonstrate a spatiotemporal shift of cortical activity underlying category selectivity: after initial category acquisition, the onset of category selectivity was observed starting at 275ms together with stronger activity in prefrontal cortex. Following extensive training over 22 sessions, adding up to more than 16.600 trials, the earliest category effects occurred at a markedly shorter latency of 113ms and were accompanied by stronger occipitotemporal activity. Our results suggest that the brain balances plasticity and efficiency by relying on different mechanisms to recognize new and re-occurring categories. PMID:27063060

  16. Assessing Adult Leisure Activities: An Extension of a Self-Report Activity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jopp, Daniela S.; Hertzog, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Everyday leisure activities in adulthood and old age have been investigated with respect to constructs such as successful aging, an engaged lifestyle, and prevention of age-related cognitive decline. They also relate to mental health and have clinical value, as they can inform diagnosis and interventions. In the present study, the authors enhanced…

  17. 75 FR 54363 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activity: 1010-0142, Decommissioning Activities, Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... 22, 2010, we published a Federal Register notice (75 FR 13568) announcing that we would submit this... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement BOEMRE Information Collection Activity... and Budget (OMB) Review; Comment Request AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation...

  18. Results and complications in dorsal and volar wrist Ganglia arthroscopic resection.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, L; Canal, A; Pelaez, J; Fanfani, F; Catalano, F

    2006-01-01

    The authors present the procedure and results of five years of arthroscopic treatment of wrist radiocarpal and midcarpal ganglia. Thirty cases of dorsal ganglia and seventeen cases of volar ganglia were operated on arthroscopically. The technique was easy to perform in all the radiocarpal ganglia, not easy in midcarpal dorsal ganglia and very difficult in midcarpal volar ganglia. The results were recorded with a mean follow-up of 15 months. Twenty-seven cases of dorsal ganglia and twelve cases of volar ganglia had excellent results with active motion recovery, no complications, absence of scars and no recurrence. Two cases had a recurrence. There were four complications: a case of injury of a radial artery branch, a case of extensive haematoma, and two cases of neuropraxia. In three cases the procedure was converted into open surgery: they had a longer time of healing and a residual scar. The arthroscopic resection has been in our experience effective and safe for the treatment of all radiocarpal ganglia. Good results have been obtained also in the treatment of dorsal midcarpal ganglia. Concerning the uncommon cases of volar midcarpal (STT) ganglia, an open approach seems still indicated. PMID:17080524

  19. Avoiding unplanned resections of wrist sarcomas: an algorithm for evaluating dorsal wrist masses.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Samuel N; Alamanda, Vignesh K; Weikert, Douglas R; Holt, Ginger E

    2013-09-01

    Ganglion cysts, soft-tissue masses that commonly occur about the wrist, are often excised without imaging or biopsy. In this article, we report a series of incompletely excised soft-tissue sarcomas about the wrist and offer an algorithm for their evaluation. We describe a series of 4 consecutive patients who each presented after incomplete resection of a soft-tissue sarcoma mistakenly diagnosed as a ganglion cyst. We also retrospectively review the cases of 7 patients with incompletely excised sarcomas of the wrist. Three of the 4 patients with sarcomas mistaken for ganglion cysts did not have prior magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 3 of the 4 did not have an attempted aspiration, and all 4 did not have transillumination. Common atypical characteristics included ulna-based lesions (3/4), symptoms for less than 6 months (3/4), and no appreciable fluctuation in size (3/4). Functional outcomes for all patients were poor because of multiple surgical procedures, re-excisions requiring flaps, and need for additional adjuvant therapies. Dorsal wrist masses with atypical characteristics should be approached with caution. Transillumination and aspiration are 2 accessible, cost-efficient methods for evaluating these masses. If either test is abnormal, an MRI should be performed. PMID:24078963

  20. Extensive sugar modification improves triple helix forming oligonucleotide activity in vitro but reduces activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Rowshon; Majumdar, Alokes; Thazhathveetil, Arun Kalliat; Liu, Su-Ting; Liu, Ji-Lan; Puri, Nitin; Cuenoud, Bernard; Sasaki, Shigeki; Miller, Paul S; Seidman, Michael M

    2007-09-01

    We are developing triple helix forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) for gene targeting. Previously, we synthesized bioactive TFOs containing 2'-O-methylribose (2'-OMe) and 2'-O-aminoethylribose (2'-AE) residues. Active TFOs contained four contiguous 2'-AE residues and formed triplexes with high thermal stability and rapid association kinetics. In an effort to further improve bioactivity, we synthesized three series of TFOs containing the 2'-AE patch and additional ribose modifications distributed throughout the remainder of the oligonucleotide. These were either additional 2'-AE residues, the conformationally locked BNA/LNA ribose with a 2'-O,4'-C-methylene bridge, or the 2'-O,4'-C-ethylene analogue (ENA). The additionally modified TFOs formed triplexes with greater thermal stability than the reference TFO, and some had improved association kinetics. However, the most active TFOs in the biochemical and biophysical assays were the least active in the bioassay. We measured the thermal stability of triplexes formed by the TFOs in each series on duplex targets containing a change in sequence at a single position. The Tm value of the variant sequence triplexes increased as the number of all additional modifications increased. A simple explanation for the failure of the improved TFOs in the bioassay was that the increased affinity for nonspecific targets lowered the effective nuclear concentration. Enhancement of TFO bioactivity will require chemical modifications that improve interaction with the specific targets while retaining selectivity against mismatched sequences. PMID:17691818

  1. Surgical exposures of the wrist and hand.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Louis W; Zlotolow, Dan A; Purcelli Lafer, Marissa; Weidner, Zachary; Barron, O Alton

    2012-01-01

    The neurovascular anatomy of the carpus and hand is complex. Therefore, precise exposures are required to avoid iatrogenic injury. In general, dorsal exposures are more forgiving than volar exposures because major neurovascular structures lie on the volar aspect of the hand and fingers; however, volar, ulnar, and radial approaches to the carpal bones are also commonly used. Exposure of the metacarpals and phalanges is relatively straightforward by comparison. Exposure of the carpus and hand is also complicated by the dense and often superficial innervation network. Therefore, a thorough knowledge of the pertinent anatomy is required for safe surgical approaches to the wrist and hand. PMID:22207518

  2. A closer look at hand and wrist complaints.

    PubMed

    Zychowicz, Michael E

    2013-03-10

    Hand or wrist pain is a common complaint in primary care. This pain can be very disabling and can significantly impair a person's quality of life. With the appropriate clinical knowledge and skills, nurse practitioners can effectively evaluate, diagnose, and treat many of the common hand and wrist complaints seen in primary care. PMID:23416341

  3. Wrist Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Wrist Injuries and Disorders URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Wrist Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  4. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one’s thermal environment. PMID:27023538

  5. Iodide and albumin kinetics in normal canine wrists and knees

    SciTech Connect

    Simkin, P.A.; Benedict, R.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The clearance rates of free iodide and of radioiodinated serum albumin were measured in the knee and wrist joints of 9 normal adult dogs. Iodide clearance from the knee was 3 times greater than that from the wrist. In contrast, radioiodinated serum albumin clearance from the knee was only slightly greater than that from the wrist. Interpreted as respective indices of effective synovial plasma flow and lymphatic drainage, these values indicate that the filtration fraction is normally greater in microvessels of the wrist than in those of the knee. These findings complement the results of companion studies of Starling forces that indicate a higher pressure microvascular bed in the wrist than in the knee.

  6. Arthroscopic Resection of Wrist Ganglion Arising from the Lunotriquetral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Michael C. K.; Ho, Pak-cheong; Tse, W. L.; Wong, Clara W. Y.

    2013-01-01

    The dorsal wrist ganglion is the most common wrist mass, and previous studies have shown that it arises from the scapholunate interval in the vast majority of cases. Treatment has traditionally been open excision, and more recently arthroscopic resection has been established as an effective and less invasive treatment method. However, application of this technique to ganglia in atypical locations has not been reported, where open excision is the usual practice. This report describes two cases of atypical dorsal wrist ganglia that arose from the lunotriquetral (LT) joint, demonstrated by arthroscopic visualization and wrist arthrogram in one of them. Arthroscopic resection was performed, and the application of this technique to a dorsal wrist ganglion with an atypical origin and location is described. PMID:24436842

  7. Recognizing upper limb movements with wrist worn inertial sensors using k-means clustering classification.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dwaipayan; Cranny, Andy; Gupta, Nayaab; Maharatna, Koushik; Achner, Josy; Klemke, Jasmin; Jöbges, Michael; Ortmann, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a methodology for recognizing three fundamental movements of the human forearm (extension, flexion and rotation) using pattern recognition applied to the data from a single wrist-worn, inertial sensor. We propose that this technique could be used as a clinical tool to assess rehabilitation progress in neurodegenerative pathologies such as stroke or cerebral palsy by tracking the number of times a patient performs specific arm movements (e.g. prescribed exercises) with their paretic arm throughout the day. We demonstrate this with healthy subjects and stroke patients in a simple proof of concept study in which these arm movements are detected during an archetypal activity of daily-living (ADL) - 'making-a-cup-of-tea'. Data is collected from a tri-axial accelerometer and a tri-axial gyroscope located proximal to the wrist. In a training phase, movements are initially performed in a controlled environment which are represented by a ranked set of 30 time-domain features. Using a sequential forward selection technique, for each set of feature combinations three clusters are formed using k-means clustering followed by 10 runs of 10-fold cross validation on the training data to determine the best feature combinations. For the testing phase, movements performed during the ADL are associated with each cluster label using a minimum distance classifier in a multi-dimensional feature space, comprised of the best ranked features, using Euclidean or Mahalanobis distance as the metric. Experiments were performed with four healthy subjects and four stroke survivors and our results show that the proposed methodology can detect the three movements performed during the ADL with an overall average accuracy of 88% using the accelerometer data and 83% using the gyroscope data across all healthy subjects and arm movement types. The average accuracy across all stroke survivors was 70% using accelerometer data and 66% using gyroscope data. We also use a Linear

  8. Exploring the Gap for Effective Extension of Professional Active Life in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Will; Afsarmanesh, Hamideh; Msanjila, Simon S.; Playfoot, Jim

    Extending Professional Active Life (ePAL [2]) of elder people in Europe is affected by a number of factors in the market and society, which have the potential to either positively and negatively influence it. Current practices indicate that the European society, while started to act on this subject, is still slow to recognize the rationale behind and importance of fully supporting the extension of active professional life of seniors. Similarly, the capacity of the service sector to fully support the involvement of seniors in economical activities is at present limited, given the huge number of these seniors in different countries who need to be mobilized. This paper seeks to highlight the identified gaps related to effective mechanisms by which Europe can support its willing senior professionals to remain active. The study on gap identification addresses relevant technological, social, and organizational factors and external influences which have the potential to impact successful future life of elderly population. It also presents the methodology that is applied in our study to identify and analyze the gaps between the current practices in this area, the so-called baseline [2], and the desired future for this area as inspired in the ePAL vision [1] addressed in other research.

  9. Nuclear Energy Gradients for Internally Contracted Complete Active Space Second-Order Perturbation Theory: Multistate Extensions.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Shiozaki, Toru

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of the theory and computer program for analytical nuclear energy gradients for (extended) multistate complete active space perturbation theory (CASPT2) with full internal contraction. The vertical shifts are also considered in this work. This is an extension of the fully internally contracted CASPT2 nuclear gradient program recently developed for a state-specific variant by us [MacLeod and Shiozaki, J. Chem. Phys. 2015, 142, 051103]; in this extension, the so-called λ equation is solved to account for the variation of the multistate CASPT2 energies with respect to the change in the amplitudes obtained in the preceding state-specific CASPT2 calculations, and the Z vector equations are modified accordingly. The program is parallelized using the MPI3 remote memory access protocol that allows us to perform efficient one-sided communication. The optimized geometries of the ground and excited states of a copper corrole and benzophenone are presented as numerical examples. The code is publicly available under the GNU General Public License. PMID:27388038

  10. Persistent Posttraumatic Wrist Pain - Tuberculosis Infection Should be in the Differential Diagnosis. A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Shardul Madhav; Patel, Bhavik Nandubhai; Shah, Pratik Dineshbhai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: It is uncommon for hand surgeons to diagnose and treat persistent post-traumatic radius fracture on the lines of tuberculosis infection even in developing countries especially when the clinical picture resembles more of a complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Although it works for many patients, some conditions that affect the wrist don’t fall in this category and worsen with this treatment practice. We present a patient who had an extra articular distal radius fracture treated initially with percutaneous pinning and was treated as CRPS for the next ten months by local physician. He was eventually diagnosed with advanced tuberculosis of the wrist and a total wrist arthrodesis was performed. Only one such case was ever reported in literature. Case Report: A 50-year-old male, came to our institute with the history of pain and fullness in the wrist since one year. One year ago he had developed an extra articular fracture of the distal radius which was initially treated with percutaneous pinning and a below elbow cast for six weeks. On removal of the cast one pin was found loose and the other removed eventually after two more weeks of immobilization. Patient continued to have pain with fullness around the wrist which was treated at local place with anti inflammatory agents and ice application. Patient had complaint of other constitutional symptoms. Initially patient had full range of motion which gradually decreased. X-ray showed characteristic signs suggesting of extensive tuberculosis of distal radius which was operated with wrist arthrodesis. Per operatively, fine rice granular granulation tissue was found, histopathological examination of which confirmed the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Conclusion: Though rare, every case of distal radius fracture complaining of chronic pain and signs suggestive of CRPS should have tuberculosis as one of the differential diagnosis, even if patient does not present any signs of tuberculosis or any primary focus is not

  11. C-Terminal extension of a plant cysteine protease modulates proteolytic activity through a partial inhibitory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sruti; Choudhury, Debi; Dattagupta, Jiban K; Biswas, Sampa

    2011-09-01

    The amino acid sequence of ervatamin-C, a thermostable cysteine protease from a tropical plant, revealed an additional 24-amino-acid extension at its C-terminus (CT). The role of this extension peptide in zymogen activation, catalytic activity, folding and stability of the protease is reported. For this study, we expressed two recombinant forms of the protease in Escherichia coli, one retaining the CT-extension and the other with it truncated. The enzyme with the extension shows autocatalytic zymogen activation at a higher pH of 8.0, whereas deletion of the extension results in a more active form of the enzyme. This CT-extension was not found to be cleaved during autocatalysis or by limited proteolysis by different external proteases. Molecular modeling and simulation studies revealed that the CT-extension blocks some of the substrate-binding unprimed subsites including the specificity-determining subsite (S2) of the enzyme and thereby partially occludes accessibility of the substrates to the active site, which also corroborates the experimental observations. The CT-extension in the model structure shows tight packing with the catalytic domain of the enzyme, mediated by strong hydrophobic and H-bond interactions, thus restricting accessibility of its cleavage sites to the protease itself or to the external proteases. Kinetic stability analyses (T(50) and t(1/2) ) and refolding experiments show similar thermal stability and refolding efficiency for both forms. These data suggest that the CT-extension has an inhibitory role in the proteolytic activity of ervatamin-C but does not have a major role either in stabilizing the enzyme or in its folding mechanism. PMID:21707922

  12. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. PMID:25902402

  13. Extension of polyphenolics by CWPO-C peroxidase mutant containing radical-robust surface active site.

    PubMed

    Pham, L T Mai; Kim, S Jin; Ahn, U Suk; Choi, J Weon; Song, B Keun; Kim, Y Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Expressed as insoluble forms in Escherichia coli, native cationic cell wall peroxidase (CWPO-C) from the poplar tree and mutant variants were successfully reactivated via refolding experiments and used to elucidate the previously presumed existence of an electron transfer (ET) pathway in the CWPO-C structure. Their catalytic properties were fully characterized through various analyses including steady-state kinetic, direct oxidation of lignin macromolecules and their respective stabilities during the polymerization reactions. The analysis results proved that the 74th residue on the CWPO-C surface plays an important role in catalyzing the macromolecules via supposed ET mechanism. By comparing the residual activities of wild-type CWPO-C and mutant 74W CWPO-C after 3 min, mutation of tyrosine 74 residue to tryptophan increased the radical resistance of peroxidase up to ten times dramatically while maintaining its capability to oxidize lignin macromolecules. Furthermore, extension of poly(catechin) as well as lignin macromolecules with CWPO-C Y74W mutant clearly showed that this radical-resistant peroxidase mutant can increase the molecular weight of various kinds of polyphenolics by using surface-located active site. The anti-oxidation activity of the synthesized poly(catechin) was confirmed by xanthine oxidase assay. The elucidation of a uniquely catalytic mechanism in CWPO-C may improve the applicability of the peroxidase/H2O2 catalyst to green polymer chemistry. PMID:24122664

  14. 76 FR 43654 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit for Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Preliminary Rescission in Part: Certain Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China, 75 FR 23978... International Trade Administration Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension of... the antidumping duty administrative review on certain activated carbon from the People's Republic...

  15. 75 FR 39916 - Certain Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit for Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... International Trade Administration A-570-904 Certain Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China... initiation of the antidumping duty administrative review on certain activated carbon from the People's... Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limits for Preliminary Results...

  16. 75 FR 61126 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit for Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension of... the antidumping duty administrative review on certain activated carbon from the People's Republic of... results of this review. See Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Notice...

  17. Defective DNA repair increases susceptibility to senescence through extension of Chk1-mediated G2 checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    Johmura, Yoshikazu; Yamashita, Emiri; Shimada, Midori; Nakanishi, Keiko; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility to senescence caused by defective DNA repair is a major hallmark of progeroid syndrome patients, but molecular mechanisms of how defective DNA repair predisposes to senescence are largely unknown. We demonstrate here that suppression of DNA repair pathways extends the duration of Chk1-dependent G2 checkpoint activation and sensitizes cells to senescence through enhancement of mitosis skipping. Extension of G2 checkpoint activation by introduction of the TopBP1 activation domain and the nondegradable mutant of Claspin sensitizes cells to senescence. In contrast, a shortening of G2 checkpoint activation by expression of SIRT6 or depletion of OTUB2 reduces susceptibility to senescence. Fibroblasts from progeroid syndromes tested shows a correlation between an extension of G2 checkpoint activation and an increase in the susceptibility to senescence. These results suggest that extension of G2 checkpoint activation caused by defective DNA repair is critical for senescence predisposition in progeroid syndrome patients. PMID:27507734

  18. Defective DNA repair increases susceptibility to senescence through extension of Chk1-mediated G2 checkpoint activation.

    PubMed

    Johmura, Yoshikazu; Yamashita, Emiri; Shimada, Midori; Nakanishi, Keiko; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility to senescence caused by defective DNA repair is a major hallmark of progeroid syndrome patients, but molecular mechanisms of how defective DNA repair predisposes to senescence are largely unknown. We demonstrate here that suppression of DNA repair pathways extends the duration of Chk1-dependent G2 checkpoint activation and sensitizes cells to senescence through enhancement of mitosis skipping. Extension of G2 checkpoint activation by introduction of the TopBP1 activation domain and the nondegradable mutant of Claspin sensitizes cells to senescence. In contrast, a shortening of G2 checkpoint activation by expression of SIRT6 or depletion of OTUB2 reduces susceptibility to senescence. Fibroblasts from progeroid syndromes tested shows a correlation between an extension of G2 checkpoint activation and an increase in the susceptibility to senescence. These results suggest that extension of G2 checkpoint activation caused by defective DNA repair is critical for senescence predisposition in progeroid syndrome patients. PMID:27507734

  19. Effect of imperceptible vibratory noise applied to wrist skin on fingertip touch evoked potentials – an EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Na Jin; Lakshminarayanan, Kishor; Bonilha, Leonardo; Lauer, Abigail W; Schmit, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    Random vibration applied to skin can change the sense of touch. Specifically, low amplitude white-noise vibration can improve fingertip touch perception. In fact, fingertip touch sensation can improve even when imperceptible random vibration is applied to other remote upper extremity areas such as wrist, dorsum of the hand, or forearm. As such, vibration can be used to manipulate sensory feedback and improve dexterity, particularly during neurological rehabilitation. Nonetheless, the neurological bases for remote vibration enhanced sensory feedback are yet poorly understood. This study examined how imperceptible random vibration applied to the wrist changes cortical activity for fingertip sensation. We measured somatosensory evoked potentials to assess peak-to-peak response to light touch of the index fingertip with applied wrist vibration versus without. We observed increased peak-to-peak somatosensory evoked potentials with wrist vibration, especially with increased amplitude of the later component for the somatosensory, motor, and premotor cortex with wrist vibration. These findings corroborate an enhanced cortical-level sensory response motivated by vibration. It is possible that the cortical modulation observed here is the result of the establishment of transient networks for improved perception. PMID:26603457

  20. Ultrasound Color Doppler Image Segmentation and Feature Extraction in MCP and Wrist Region in Evaluation of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Snekhalatha, U; Muthubhairavi, V; Anburajan, M; Gupta, Neelkanth

    2016-09-01

    The present study focuses on automatically to segment the blood flow pattern of color Doppler ultrasound in hand region of rheumatoid arthritis patients and to correlate the extracted the statistical features and color Doppler parameters with standard parameters. Thirty patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and their total of 300 joints of both the hands, i.e., 240 MCP and 60 wrists were examined in this study. Ultrasound color Doppler of both the hands of all the patients was obtained. Automated segmentation of color Doppler image was performed using color enhancement scaling based segmentation algorithm. The region of interest is fixed in the MCP joints and wrist of the hand. Features were extracted from the defined ROI of the segmented output image. The color fraction was measured using Mimics software. The standard parameters such as HAQ score, DAS 28 score, and ESR was obtained for all the patients. The color fraction tends to be increased in wrist and MCP3 joints which indicate the increased blood flow pattern and color Doppler activity as part of inflammation in hand joints of RA. The ESR correlated significantly with the feature extracted parameters such as mean, standard deviation and entropy in MCP3, MCP4 joint and the wrist region. The developed automated color image segmentation algorithm provides a quantitative analysis for diagnosis and assessment of RA. The correlation study between the color Doppler parameters with the standard parameters provides moral significance in quantitative analysis of RA in MCP3 joint and the wrist region. PMID:27449351

  1. Prediction of the Wrist Joint Position During a Postural Tremor Using Neural Oscillators and an Adaptive Controller

    PubMed Central

    Kobravi, Hamid Reza; Ali, Sara Hemmati; Vatandoust, Masood; Marvi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the joint angle position, especially during tremor bursts, can be useful for detecting, tracking, and forecasting tremors. Thus, this research proposes a new model for predicting the wrist joint position during rhythmic bursts and inter-burst intervals. Since a tremor is an approximately rhythmic and roughly sinusoidal movement, neural oscillators have been selected to underlie the proposed model. Two neural oscillators were adopted. Electromyogram (EMG) signals were recorded from the extensor carpi radialis and flexor carpi radialis muscles concurrent with the joint angle signals of a stroke subject in an arm constant-posture. The output frequency of each oscillator was equal to the frequency corresponding to the maximum value of power spectrum related to the rhythmic wrist joint angle signals which had been recorded during a postural tremor. The phase shift between the outputs of the two oscillators was equal to the phase shift between the muscle activation of the wrist flexor and extensor muscles. The difference between the two oscillators’ output signals was considered the main pattern. Along with a proportional compensator, an adaptive neural controller has adjusted the amplitude of the main pattern in such a way so as to minimize the wrist joint prediction error during a stroke patient's tremor burst and a healthy subject's generated artificial tremor. In regard to the range of wrist joint movement during the observed rhythmic motions, a calculated prediction error is deemed acceptable. PMID:27186540

  2. [Radiometric assessment of wrist angle values, linear parameters of the forearm and wrist ratios].

    PubMed

    Baczkowski, Bogusław; Mechlińska-Baczkowska, Janina; Lorczyński, Adam

    2006-01-01

    With the device of our own invention suitable for static X-ray examination of the wrist 12 radiographic parameters were evaluated. 100 radiograms regarded normal were analyzed, obtained as a comparative in unilateral wrist trauma patients group. Age of the patients ranged from 18 to 60 years. No comparative studies in regard to sex were performed. Obtained data were statistically analyzed. Subsequent values of the radiometric parameters were obtained: scaphoid-lunate angle (SL) 48.61 degrees, radio-lunate angle (RL): -0.83 degrees, palmar inclination of the distal radius metaphysis (RI): 25.96. The most significant linear parameters measured: ulnar length 0.18 mm, ulnar transposition (UT): 0.339 mm. PMID:17131729

  3. Theoretical three-and four-axis gimbal robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.; Houck, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    In high-performance flight simulations, a four-axis gimbal system allows all possible rotations with acceptable gimbal angle rates while it avoids the so-callled 'gimbal lock' that occurs when gimbal rotational axes are colinear. In this paper, pertinent equations (including quaternions) are assembled for a hypothetical robot wrist, functionally equivalent to this four-axis gimbal system, and also for a true three-axis gimbal robot wrist. These equations are used to simulate the rotation of a robot hand by the robot wrist in response to operator rotational velocity commands to the robot hand. Near gimbal lock (wrist singularity), excessive rotational rates occur. Scaling the rates, which is necessary for the three-gimbal robot wrist to prevent rate limiting, introduces an undesirable time delay in the robot hand rotation with respect to the commanded rotation. However, the merit of the four-gimbal robot wrist is that the fourth gimbal angle keeps the robot wrist away from the singularity so that the robot hand moves exactly as commanded. It appears that in a 'worst-type' maneuver of the robot hand, the fourth gimbal angle can be defined so that none of the gimbal angle rates exceed about twice the commanded rates.

  4. Active shallow extension in central and eastern Betic Cordillera from CGPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Zaldivar, J.; Gil, A. J.; Sanz de Galdeano, C.; Lacy, M. C.; García-Armenteros, J. A.; Ruano, P.; Ruiz, A. M.; Martínez-Martos, M.; Alfaro, P.

    2015-11-01

    The Betic Cordillera is an Alpine belt formed in the western Mediterranean by the westward displacement of the Alboran Domain in between the Eurasian and African convergent plates. New CGPS data from the central and eastern Betic Cordillera and its foreland-obtained mainly from the Topo-Iberia project-allowed us to precisely determine the rate of tectonic deformation. Most of the displacements of the central and eastern Betics are westward, with a variable southwestward component, in relation to the Eurasian stable plate. While in the Iberian foreland the displacements are extremely low, some deformation related to low compressional deformation occurs in the easternmost foreland basin and eastern Betic Cordillera. The displacement increases substantially southwards and westwards in relation to present-day extensional deformation. Major active discontinuities correspond to the NW-SE normal fault zones, which dip westwards; they are located in Almeria-Tabernas; Balanegra, and western Sierra de Gador; whereas the Padul fault zone located west of Sierra Nevada extends northwards to the Granada Basin. NW-SE extensional faults are also observed to the north, in the Baza Basin. Moreover, the activity of dextral faults along the Sorbas-Tabernas-Alpujarras-Guajares band, generally considered as a transfer fault zone, is evidenced by the displacement data. These results come to demonstrate the low activity or inactivity of the large northern E-W oriented folds of the central and eastern Internal Zone, such as the Sierra de Los Filabres antiform. They also point to the possible residual activity of the northern part of the NE-SW Sierra Nevada antiform, where the maximum relief of the Cordillera is found. Altogether, our data support a heterogeneous present-day westward extension that affects the upper crust of the Betic Cordillera and increases towards the thinned continental crust of the Alboran Sea and towards the west, which is compatible with roll-back subduction along

  5. [Arthroscopy-assisted management of wrist fractures].

    PubMed

    Deiler, S; Häberle, S; Quentmeier, P; Biberthaler, P; Ahrens, P

    2013-04-01

    Distal radius fractures are the most common fractures in humans and early surgical intervention with modern plating systems is becoming increasingly more established to avoid secondary dislocation. Even fractures with slight dislocations are adequately stabilized and the affinity for surgical intervention and plating procedures is applied to secure these simple fractures. In this aspect the surgical indications are significantly dependent on X-ray examination results. Further diagnostics with respect to ligamentous and soft tissue injury are the exception although the impact energy which creates osseus fractures is sufficient by far to destroy functional soft tissue, cartilage and ligaments. The ongoing development of wrist arthroscopy enables new possibilities especially concerning concomitant articular involvement of distal radius fractures. Arthroscopy-assisted reduction and stabilization as well as minimally invasive soft tissue repair and loose body removal seem to be adequate methods to improve the surgical treatment of distal radius fractures. PMID:23515646

  6. Southeast Papuan crustal tectonics: Imaging extension and buoyancy of an active rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abers, G. A.; Eilon, Z.; Gaherty, J. B.; Jin, G.; Kim, YH.; Obrebski, M.; Dieck, C.

    2016-02-01

    Southeast Papua hosts the world's youngest ultra-high-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks. These rocks are found in an extensional setting in metamorphic core complexes. Competing theories of extensional shear zones or diapiric upwelling have been suggested as driving their exhumation. To test these theories, we analyze the CDPAPUA temporary array of 31 land and 8 seafloor broadband seismographs. Seismicity shows that deformation is being actively accommodated on the core complex bounding faults, offset by transfer structures in a manner consistent with overall north-south extension rather than radial deformation. Rayleigh wave dispersion curves are jointly inverted with receiver functions for crustal velocity structure. They show crustal thinning beneath the core complexes of 30-50% and very low shear velocities at all depths beneath the core complexes. On the rift flanks velocities resemble those of normal continents and increase steadily with depth. There is no evidence for velocity inversions that would indicate that a major density inversion exists to drive crustal diapirs. Also, low-density melt seems minor within the crust. Together with the extension patterns apparent in seismicity, these data favor an extensional origin for the core complexes and limit the role of diapirism as a secondary exhumation mechanism, although deeper mantle diapirs may be undetected. A small number of intermediate-depth earthquakes, up to 120 km deep, are identified for the first time just northeast of the D'Entrecasteaux Islands. They occur at depths similar to those recorded by UHP rocks and similar temperatures, indicating that the modern seismicity occurs at the setting that generates UHP metamorphism.

  7. Pairing broadband noise with cortical stimulation induces extensive suppression of ascending sensory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovitz, Craig D.; Hogan, Patrick S.; Wesen, Kyle A.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The corticofugal system can alter coding along the ascending sensory pathway. Within the auditory system, electrical stimulation of the auditory cortex (AC) paired with a pure tone can cause egocentric shifts in the tuning of auditory neurons, making them more sensitive to the pure tone frequency. Since tinnitus has been linked with hyperactivity across auditory neurons, we sought to develop a new neuromodulation approach that could suppress a wide range of neurons rather than enhance specific frequency-tuned neurons. Approach. We performed experiments in the guinea pig to assess the effects of cortical stimulation paired with broadband noise (PN-Stim) on ascending auditory activity within the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (CNIC), a widely studied region for AC stimulation paradigms. Main results. All eight stimulated AC subregions induced extensive suppression of activity across the CNIC that was not possible with noise stimulation alone. This suppression built up over time and remained after the PN-Stim paradigm. Significance. We propose that the corticofugal system is designed to decrease the brain’s input gain to irrelevant stimuli and PN-Stim is able to artificially amplify this effect to suppress neural firing across the auditory system. The PN-Stim concept may have potential for treating tinnitus and other neurological disorders.

  8. Pairing broadband noise with cortical stimulation induces extensive suppression of ascending sensory activity

    PubMed Central

    Markovitz, Craig D.; Hogan, Patrick S.; Wesen, Kyle A.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The corticofugal system can alter coding along the ascending sensory pathway. Within the auditory system, electrical stimulation of the auditory cortex (AC) paired with a pure tone can cause egocentric shifts in the tuning of auditory neurons, making them more sensitive to the pure tone frequency. Since tinnitus has been linked with hyperactivity across auditory neurons, we sought to develop a new neuromodulation approach that could suppress a wide range of neurons rather than enhance specific frequency-tuned neurons. Approach We performed experiments in the guinea pig to assess the effects of cortical stimulation paired with broadband noise (PN-Stim) on ascending auditory activity within the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (CNIC), a widely studied region for AC stimulation paradigms. Main results All eight stimulated AC regions induced extensive suppression of activity across the CNIC that was not possible with noise stimulation alone. This suppression built up over time and remained after the PN-Stim paradigm. Significance We propose that the corticofugal system is designed to decrease the brain’s input gain to irrelevant stimuli and PN-Stim is able to artificially amplify this effect to suppress neural firing across the auditory system. The PN-Stim concept may have potential for treating tinnitus and other neurological disorders. PMID:25686163

  9. Analysis of viscoelastic properties of wrist joint for quantification of parkinsonian rigidity.

    PubMed

    Park, Byung Kyu; Kwon, Yuri; Kim, Ji-Won; Lee, Jae-Ho; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Koh, Seong-Beom; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Hong, Junghwa

    2011-04-01

    This study aims to analyze viscoelastic properties of the wrist in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in comparison with the clinical score of severity. Forty-five patients with PD and 12 healthy volunteers participated in this study. Severity of rigidity at the wrist was rated by a neurologist just before the experiment. Wrist joint torque resistive to the imposed movement was measured. Three different models, (identical in structure, only different in the number of parameters for extension and flexion phases) were used in identification of viscoelastic properties: 1) one damping constant and one spring constant throughout all phases, 2) two damping constants for each phase and one spring constant throughout all phases, and 3) two damping constants and two spring constants for each phase. Normalized work and impulse suggested in the literature were also calculated. Spring constants of different models and phases showed comparable correlation with rigidity score ( r=0.68-0.73). In terms of the correlation of damping constant with clinical rigidity score, model 1 ( r = 0.90) was better than models 2 and 3 ( r=0.59 - 0.71). These results suggest that the clinical rigidity score is better represented by the mean viscosity during both flexion and extension. In models with two dampers (model 2 and 3), the damping constant was greater during extension than flexion in patients , in contrast that there was no phase difference in normal subjects. This suggests that in contrast with normal subjects, phase-dependent viscosity may be an inherent feature of PD. Although work and impulse were correlated with clinical rigidity score ( r = 0.11 - 0.84), they could not represent the phase-dependent rigidity inherent in PD. In conclusion, the viscosity of model 1 would be appropriate for quantification of clinical ratings of rigidity and that of model 2 for distinction of PD and also for investigation of phase-dependent characteristics in parkinsonian rigidity. PMID:21075739

  10. Extensive hydrothermal activity in the NE Lau basin revealed by ROV dives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Resing, J. A.; Tebo, B.; Baker, E. T.; Butterfield, D. A.; Chadwick, B.; Davis, R.; de Ronde, C. E. J.; Lilley, M. D.; Lupton, J. E.; Merle, S. G.; Rubin, K. H.; Shank, T. M.; Walker, S. L.; Arculus, R. J.; Bobbitt, A. M.; Buck, N. J.; Caratori Tontini, F.; Crowhurst, P. V.; Mitchell, E.; Olson, E. J.; Ratmeyer, V.; Richards, S.; Roe, K. K.; Kenner-Chavis, P.; Martinez-Lyons, A.; Sheehan, C.; Brian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Dives with the QUEST 4000 ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) in September 2012 discovered nine hydrothermal sites in the arc and rear-arc region of the NE Lau Basin in 1150 m to 2630 m depth. These sites, originally detected by water column and seafloor surveys conducted in 2008-2011, include: (1) a paired sulfur-rich/black smoker field on the summit of a tectonically deformed magmatic arc volcano (Niua), (2) fracture-controlled black smoker venting on several small en echelon seamounts (north Matas) that lie between the magmatic arc and the backarc spreading center and (3) a magmatic degassing site on the summit of a dacite cone within a large (~12 km diameter) caldera volcano (Niuatahi). Dives at West Mata Seamount, which was undergoing strombolian volcanic activity and effusive rift-zone eruptions from 2008 to 2010, revealed a dormant volcanic phase in September 2012, with continued low-temperature diffuse venting. The high-temperature venting is likely driven by magmatic heat indicative of underlying partial melt zones and/or melt pockets distributed through the region. The occurrence of the youngest known boninite eruptions on the Mata volcanoes is consistent with subduction fluid flux melting extending into the rear-arc zone. Extension related to the transition from subduction to strike-slip motion of the northern Tonga Arc over the active Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator (STEP) fault probably contributes to the enhanced volcanism/hydrothermal activity in the NE Lau Basin. Chemosynthetic ecosystems at these sites range from mostly motile, lower diversity ecosystems at the eruptive/magmatically-degassing sites to higher diversity ecosystems with less mobile faunal components at the black-smoker systems. The wide range of fluid chemistry, water depth and geologic settings of the hydrothermal systems in this area provides an intriguing template to study the interaction of hydrothermal fluid chemistry, chemosynthetic habitats and their geologic underpinning

  11. Extension joints: a tool to infer the active stress field orientation (case study from southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Guidi, Giorgio; Caputo, Riccardo; Scudero, Salvatore; Perdicaro, Vincenzo

    2013-04-01

    An intense tectonic activity in eastern Sicily and southern Calabria is well documented by the differential uplift of Late Quaternary coastlines and by the record of the strong historical earthquakes. The extensional belt that crosses this area is dominated by a well established WNW-ESE-oriented extensional direction. However, this area is largely lacking of any structural analysis able to define the tectonics at a more local scale. In the attempt to fill this gap of knowledge, we carried out a systematic analysis of extension joint sets. In fact, the systematic field collection of these extensional features, coupled with an appropriate inversion technique, allows to determine the characteristic of the causative tectonic stress field. Joints are defined as outcrop-scale mechanical discontinuities showing no evidence of shear motion and being originated as purely extensional fractures. Such tectonic features are one of the most common deformational structures in every tectonic environment and particularly abundant in the study area. A particular arrangement of joints, called "fracture grid-lock system", and defined as an orthogonal joint system where mutual abutting and crosscutting relationships characterize two geologically coeval joint sets, allow to infer the direction and the magnitude of the tectonic stress field. We performed the analyses of joints only on Pleistocene deposits of Eastern Sicily and Southern Calabria. Moreover we investigated only calcarenite sediments and cemented deposits, avoiding claysh and loose matrix-supported clastic sediments where the deformation is generally accomodated in a distributed way through the relative motion between the single particles. In the selection of the sites, we also took into account the possibility to clearly observe the geometric relationships among the joints. For this reason we chose curvilinear road cuts or cliffs, wide coastal erosional surfaces and quarries. The numerical inversions show a similar stress

  12. Simulation of tremor on 3-dimentional musculoskeletal model of wrist joint and experimental verification?

    PubMed

    Yao, Peng; Zhang, Dingguo; Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A musculoskeletal model that allows to simulate the tremor of wrist joint with three degrees of freedom (DoFs) is developed. The model includes five muscles, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor carpi radialis longus, extensor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis and flexor carpi ulnaris. Simulation of tremor generation based on the 3-DoF model is performed. The tremor disorder can be generated in two directions: flexion-extension and radia-ulnar deviation. Accordingly, experiment is conducted on healthy subjects to verify the feasibility of artificial tremor generation via functional electrical stimulation (FES). Simulation results have shown qualitative agreement with the experimental results. PMID:23367007

  13. Traction radiographs in the diagnosis of chronic wrist pain.

    PubMed

    Fortems, Y; Mawhinney, I; Lawrence, T; Stanley, J K

    1994-06-01

    A sensitive non-invasive diagnostic test for intrinsic ligament rupture in patients with chronic wrist pain has still to be found. Differential displacement of the scaphoid, lunate and triquetrum can in some instances be seen during arthroscopy of acute wrist injuries and also on overdistraction of distal radial fractures with an external fixator. We performed a prospective study on 20 patients with chronic wrist pain using 2 kg and 5 kg traction radiographs without and with the addition of an ischaemic block, to assess differential displacement as a diagnostic criterion for intrinsic ligament rupture. Arthroscopy was used as arbiter of diagnosis. The sensitivity ranged from 14% to 57% and the specificity ranged from 53.7% to 100% according to the amount of traction and ischaemic block. In view of these poor results we conclude the stretch test has no additional value in the preoperative assessment of chronic wrist pain. PMID:8077822

  14. Pseudotumoral form of soft-tissue tuberculosis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Benzarti, Sofien; Msek, Hichem; Boussen, Monia; Khorbi, Adel

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in developing countries. Hand and wrist is a rare localization for extra-pulmonary tuberculosis, a pseudotumoral form of soft tissue tuberculosis of the wrist is exceptional. We report the case of a 45-year-old male presenting with a painful swelling of the dorsal aspect of the right wrist evolving for six months. Clinical study was evoking a ganglion cyst of the wrist. Intraoperatively a pseudotumoral mass with rice bodies was found, suggesting tuberculous tenosynovitis. The histopathological study revealed caseating giant cell granulomas with epithelioid cells. Cultures on Löwenstein-Jensen medium detected Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Synovectomy with removal of all the rice bodies followed by anti-tuberculous chemotherapy provided uneventful recovery. PMID:26927998

  15. Longitudinal observation of pediatric hand and wrist ganglia.

    PubMed

    Wang, A A; Hutchinson, D T

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the behavior of ganglia of the hand and wrist in young children treated without surgery. Fourteen consecutive children, less than 10 years of age, who presented with cysts of the hand and wrist were followed up by a single surgeon. The average age of the patient at the time of diagnosis was 38 months (range, 2 months to 9 years 3 months). The masses included 7 retinacular cysts, 5 volar wrist ganglia, and 2 dorsal wrist ganglia. These cysts had been present for an average of 3.3 months (range, 1-12 months) before medical advice was sought. None of the cysts were painful. Follow-up averaged 33 months (range, 9-112 months), with 79% of all cysts spontaneously resolving, the majority within a year. We believe that a child presenting with a benign hand lesion characteristic of a ganglion cyst should initially be treated by observation. PMID:11466631

  16. Extensive Reading in the EFL Classroom: Benefits of a Face-to-Face Collaboration Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchhoff, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Extensive reading is an approach to language education that has shown great promise for foreign language learners to acquire language; however, implementation reveals difficulty in maintaining student motivation to read over long periods of time. This study investigates students' experience of face-to-face talk about books in an extensive reading…

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  20. Capitolunate Arthrodesis for Treatment of Scaphoid Nonunion Advanced Collapse (SNAC) Wrist Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Galal

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate results of capitolunate arthrodesis for the treatment of post traumatic degenerative SNAC wrist disorders. A capitolunate arthrodesis was performed on 12 patients, three women and nine men, of 44 years in average (28-66 years). Ten patients were manual workers; dominant side was involved in seven cases with no history of previous operation. Fixation of the arthrodesis was performed with headless compression screws. Patients were reviewed at 37.4 months of average follow up (range; 12-47 months). Mayo score equal to 82.8 points. Radiolunate and capitolunate angles were decreased of 6 and 8° respectively at the final follow up radiograph compared to preoperative values. The Ten manual worker patients were able to return to their previous professional activities and the other two patients were retired but they resume their sports and recreational activities. With the advent of headless compression screws the capitolunate arthrodesis gained a higher union rate, short operative time and short rehabilitation period. In the present study the capitolunate arthrodesis allowed restoring a stable functional wrist in the 12 patients reviewed. It is a satisfactory therapeutic alternative to four corners fusion for SNAC wrist with osteoarthritis. PMID:26078508

  1. Antitubercular activity of disulfiram, an antialcoholism drug, against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Horita, Yasuhiro; Takii, Takemasa; Yagi, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Kenji; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Inagaki, Emi; Kremer, Laurent; Sato, Yasuo; Kuroishi, Ryuji; Lee, Yoosa; Makino, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Hajime; Hasegawa, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2012-08-01

    The antimycobacterial activities of disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) clinical isolates were evaluated in vitro. Both DSF and DDC exhibited potent antitubercular activities against 42 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, including MDR/XDR-TB strains. Moreover, DSF showed remarkable bactericidal activity ex vivo and in vivo. Therefore, DSF might be a drug repurposed for the treatment of MDR/XDR-TB. PMID:22615274

  2. Antitubercular Activity of Disulfiram, an Antialcoholism Drug, against Multidrug- and Extensively Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Kenji; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Inagaki, Emi; Kremer, Laurent; Sato, Yasuo; Kuroishi, Ryuji; Lee, YooSa; Makino, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Hajime; Hasegawa, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2012-01-01

    The antimycobacterial activities of disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) clinical isolates were evaluated in vitro. Both DSF and DDC exhibited potent antitubercular activities against 42 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, including MDR/XDR-TB strains. Moreover, DSF showed remarkable bactericidal activity ex vivo and in vivo. Therefore, DSF might be a drug repurposed for the treatment of MDR/XDR-TB. PMID:22615274

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  5. Impairment of Gradual Muscle Adjustment during Wrist Circumduction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Toxopeus, Carolien M.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Valsan, Gopal; Conway, Bernard A.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    Purposeful movements are attained by gradually adjusted activity of opposite muscles, or synergists. This requires a motor system that adequately modulates initiation and inhibition of movement and selectively activates the appropriate muscles. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) initiation and inhibition of movements are impaired which may manifest itself in e.g. difficulty to start and stop walking. At single-joint level, impaired movement initiation is further accompanied by insufficient inhibition of antagonist muscle activity. As the motor symptoms in PD primarily result from cerebral dysfunction, quantitative investigation of gradually adjusted muscle activity during execution of purposeful movement is a first step to gain more insight in the link between impaired modulation of initiation and inhibition at the levels of (i) cerebrally coded task performance and (ii) final execution by the musculoskeletal system. To that end, the present study investigated changes in gradual adjustment of muscle synergists using a manipulandum that enabled standardized smooth movement by continuous wrist circumduction. Differences between PD patients (N = 15, off-medication) and healthy subjects (N = 16) concerning the relation between muscle activity and movement performance in these groups were assessed using kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) recordings. The variability in the extent to which a particular muscle was active during wrist circumduction – defined as muscle activity differentiation - was quantified by EMG. We demonstrated that more differentiated muscle activity indeed correlated positively with improved movement performance, i.e. higher movement speed and increased smoothness of movement. Additionally, patients employed a less differentiated muscle activity pattern than healthy subjects. These specific changes during wrist circumduction imply that patients have a decreased ability to gradually adjust muscles causing a decline in movement

  6. A New Total Wrist Fusion Locking Plate for Patients with Small Hands or with Failed Partial Wrist Fusion: Preliminary Experience

    PubMed Central

    del Pino, Juan González

    2014-01-01

    The author has designed a custom-made titanium plate for total wrist fusion for small-handed persons or patients with failed partial wrist fusions. From May 2011 to April 2013, this plate was used on 13 wrists, 5 of them with a minimum follow-up of 1 year. This implant is downsized compared with the standard wrist fusion plate: lower in profile, shorter in length, and narrower than the standard one. It is fixed to the radius by means of 2.7-mm screws and to the capitate and third metacarpal with 2.4-mm screws. In the curved plate all the screws are locked to the plate with a predetermined coaxial angle. The plate has a curvature to fit the dorsum of the carpus; it is 10° dorsally extended and has undercuts on the contact areas at the radius and third metacarpal dorsal surface. The indication for this implant is a short-statured patient for whom the standard plate is too large and bulky; a failed partial wrist fusion or proximal row carpectomy, for which a shorter plate is needed because only one articulation should be fused (midcarpal or radiocapitate joint); or both. The five wrists (two primary fusions and three failed radioscapholunate [RSL] fusions) healed between 11 and 14 weeks. No plate loosening was observed, and none of the patients felt painful prominence to the distal end of the plate on the dorsum of the hand. PMID:24872923

  7. Periprosthetic Osteolysis after Total Wrist Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boeckstyns, Michel E. H.; Herzberg, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Background and Literature Review Periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO) after second- or third-generation total wrist arthroplasty (TWA), with or without evident loosening of the implant components, has previously been reported in the literature, but rarely in a systematic way. Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence, location, and natural history of PPO following a TWA and to determine whether this was associated with prosthetic loosening. Patients and Methods We analyzed 44 consecutive cases in which a RE-MOTION TWA (Small Bone Innovations Inc., Morrisville, PA, USA) had been done. Results We found significant periprosthetic radiolucency (more than 2 mm in width) at the radial component side in 16 of the cases and at the carpal component side in 7. It developed gradually juxta-articularly around the prosthetic components regardless of the primary diagnosis, and seemed to stabilize in most patients after 1–3 years. In a small percentage of the patients, the periprosthetic area of bone resorption was markedly larger. In general, radiolucency was not related to evident loosening of the implant components, and only five carpal components and one radial had subsided or tilted. Conclusion Periprosthetic loosening is frequent following a TWA. In our series it was not necessarily associated with implant loosening and seemed to stabilize within 3 years. Close and continued observation is, however, recommended. Level of Evidence Therapeutic IV PMID:25032076

  8. Wrist actigraphic measures of sleep in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Rose, L. R.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To determine whether wrist actigraphy is useful as a tool for space-based sleep research. Specifically, to determine whether bedtimes and waketimes can be identified from the actigraphic record, and whether actigraphic measures of sleep in space are related to polysomnographic (PSG) ones. DESIGN AND SETTING: Actigraphy, sleep diary, and Polysomnographic (PSG) measures of sleep were obtained from four subjects in two 72h measurement blocks occurring 2d and 12d into a 17d Space Shuttle mission in orbiting the earth in microgravity. PATIENTS: Four healthy male astronauts aged 38y - 47y. INTERVENTIONS: NA. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Sleep onset and offset at "night" could be quite clearly identified from the actigraphic record and were better estimated by actigraph than by diary. There was a high correlation between actigraphic and PSG estimates of sleep duration (r = 0.96) and sleep efficiency (r = 0.88), and a similarity in the mean estimates obtained. On a minute-by-minute basis, there was a good correlation between sleep stage and actigraphic movement counts, with a higher level of counts per minute recorded in epochs with lighter PSG sleep stages. There was also a high correlation (r = 0.90) between minutes of stage 0 (wake) occurring between bedtime and wake time, and number of non-zero actigraph epochs during the same interval. CONCLUSIONS: Actigraphy worked well in space both as a way of detecting bedtimes and waketimes, and as an indicant of sleep restlessness.

  9. Detection of clinically manifest and silent synovitis in the hands and wrists by fluorescence optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kisten, Yogan; Györi, Noémi; af Klint, Erik; Rezaei, Hamed; Levitsky, Adrian; Karlsson, Anna; van Vollenhoven, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The correct identification of synovitis is critical for achieving optimal therapy results. Fluorescence optical imaging (FOI) is a novel modality based on the use of an intravenous fluorophore, which enables fluorescent imaging of the hands and wrists with increased focal optical signal intensities in areas of high perfusion and/or capillary leakage. The study objective was to determine the diagnostic utility of FOI in detecting apparent and clinically non-apparent active synovitis. Methods Bilateral hand and wrist joints (n=872) of 26 patients with inflammatory arthritis assessed by standard clinical examination, musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) and FOI were studied. Synovitis was defined as tender and swollen joints on clinical examination, presence of synovial thickening and intra-articular Doppler signals on MSUS, and abnormal focal optical signal intensities on FOI, respectively. Subclinical synovitis was defined as being clinically non-apparent, but positively inflamed on MSUS. Results Depending on the standard used to define inflammation, FOI ranged from 73–83% sensitive and 83–95% specific for detecting manifest synovitis. For detecting clinically silent synovitis, the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of FOI were 80%, 96%, 77% and 97%, respectively. Conclusions The high degree of agreement between MSUS and FOI suggest its use in clinical practice, especially when MSUS is not available, in order to identify synovitis earlier and with greater confidence. FOI may be particularly useful in identifying patients with clinically non-apparent joint inflammation of the hands and/or wrists. PMID:26535142

  10. Interpretations of Wrist/Grip Operations From SEMG Signals at Different Locations on Arm.

    PubMed

    Ryait, H S; Arora, A S; Agarwal, R

    2010-04-01

    Surface electromyogram (SEMG) is a common method of measurement of muscle activity. It is noninvasive and is measured with minimal risk to the subject. The analysis of SEMG signal depends on a number of factors, such as amplitude as well as time- and frequency-domain properties. In the present investigation, the study of SEMG signals at different below elbow muscles for four operations of the hand wrist/grip-like opening (op)/closing (cl)/down (d)/up (u) was carried out. Myoelectric signals were extracted by using a single-channel SEMG amplifier consisting of a differential amplifier, noninverting amplifier, and interface module. Matlab softscope was used to acquire the SEMG signal from the hardware. After acquiring the data from six selected locations, interpretations were made for the estimation of parameters of the SEMG using the Matlab-filter algorithm and the fast Fourier transform technique. An interpretation of wrist/grip operations using principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out. PCA was used to identify the best SEMG signal capturing system out of two-channel, three-channel, and four-channel systems. Two acupressure points (on wrist) were also selected for the analysis with other points on the arm. SEMG signal's study at different locations, including pressure points, will be a very helpful tool for the researchers in understanding the behavior of SEMG for the development of the prosthetic hand. PMID:23853317

  11. 75 FR 18545 - MMS Information Collection Activity: 1010-0067, Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations, Extension...

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    ... Minerals Management Service MMS Information Collection Activity: 1010-0067, Oil and Gas Well- Completion Operations, Extension of a Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior... submit to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. The information...

  12. Read Alouds and Beyond: The Effects of Read Aloud Extension Activities on Vocabulary in Head Start Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Rebecca; Crandell, Jennifer DiBara; Carlis, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted in 26 Head Start classrooms with 264 children to compare the effect of a read aloud plus extension activities intervention over a control group to the effect of a read aloud only intervention over a control group on preschool children's vocabulary. Children were assessed before and after the intervention on target vocabulary…

  13. Phantom hand and wrist movements in upper limb amputees are slow but naturally controlled movements.

    PubMed

    De Graaf, J B; Jarrassé, N; Nicol, C; Touillet, A; Coyle, T; Maynard, L; Martinet, N; Paysant, J

    2016-01-15

    After limb amputation, patients often wake up with a vivid perception of the presence of the missing limb, called "phantom limb". Phantom limbs have mostly been studied with respect to pain sensation. But patients can experience many other phantom sensations, including voluntary movements. The goal of the present study was to quantify phantom movement kinematics and relate these to intact limb kinematics and to the time elapsed since amputation. Six upper arm and two forearm amputees with various delays since amputation (6months to 32years) performed phantom finger, hand and wrist movements at self-chosen comfortable velocities. The kinematics of the phantom movements was indirectly obtained via the intact limb that synchronously mimicked the phantom limb movements, using a Cyberglove® for measuring finger movements and an inertial measurement unit for wrist movements. Results show that the execution of phantom movements is perceived as "natural" but effortful. The types of phantom movements that can be performed are variable between the patients but they could all perform thumb flexion/extension and global hand opening/closure. Finger extension movements appeared to be 24% faster than finger flexion movements. Neither the number of types of phantom movements that can be executed nor the kinematic characteristics were related to the elapsed time since amputation, highlighting the persistence of post-amputation neural adaptation. We hypothesize that the perceived slowness of phantom movements is related to altered proprioceptive feedback that cannot be recalibrated by lack of visual feedback during phantom movement execution. PMID:26556065

  14. Active oblique extension in the central Apennines (Italy): evidence from the Fucino region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardi, Luigi; Gaudemer, Yves; Tapponnier, Paul; Boccaletti, Mario

    1999-11-01

    The Fucino Basin is a flat Quaternary depression within the central Apennines. It is surrounded by active normal faults with small oblique-slip components. Surface faulting was observed along the east side of the basin during the Ms=7.0 Avezzano earthquake of 1915. In order to understand the kinematics of recent strain better and to assess the seismic hazard of this region, we carried out a detailed geomorphic and structural study of the faults around the basin. Fault scarp heights were accurately measured with total station profiles, and vertical slip rates were estimated assuming slope offsets to post-date the end of periglacial abrasion (14+/-4 kyr BP). To the north, the most prominent fault, the Magnola fault, appears to have an average postglacial throw rate of 0.7+/-0.3 mm yr-1 and, together with the Velino fault, to be capable of generating earthquakes of maximum magnitudes of 6.9-7.3 with recurrence intervals of 1000-3000 yr. East of the basin, the Serrone, Parasano and Ventrino faults form a right-stepping horsetail of the Giovenco fault. Current vertical slip rates on the three former faults appear to be between 0.5 and 1.4, 0.5 and 1.0, and 0.3 and 1.1 mm yr-1, respectively. Infrequent maximum-magnitude earthquakes on them may also exceed 7, particularly in the case of coupled rupture, with loosely constrained recurrence intervals (up to several thousand years). The right-lateral slip components implied by the most recent slickensides and by geomorphic offsets on the NW-SE-trending normal faults of the area suggest that the blocks they bound rotate counterclockwise, consistent with oblique left slip on the NNW-SSE-trending Giovenco and Ovindoli faults to the east. Sinistral shear parallel to the latter faults, the maximum relief across the Magnola fault, and the postglacial slope offsets measured suggest that the extension rate across the central Apennines might be of the order of 6+/-3 mm yr-1 in a N20 deg+/-10 degE direction, more northerly than

  15. Solar powered wrist worn acquisition system for continuous photoplethysmogram monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dieffenderfer, James P; Beppler, Eric; Novak, Tristan; Whitmire, Eric; Jayakumar, Rochana; Randall, Clive; Qu, Weiguo; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Bozkurt, Alper

    2014-01-01

    We present a solar-powered, wireless, wrist-worn platform for continuous monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters during the activities of daily life. In this study, we demonstrate the capability to produce photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals using this platform. To adhere to a low power budget for solar-powering, a 574 nm green light source is used where the PPG from the radial artery would be obtained with minimal signal conditioning. The system incorporates two monocrystalline solar cells to charge the onboard 20 mAh lithium polymer battery. Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is used to tether the device to a smartphone that makes the phone an access point to a dedicated server for long term continuous storage of data. Two power management schemes have been proposed depending on the availability of solar energy. In low light situations, if the battery is low, the device obtains a 5-second PPG waveform every minute to consume an average power of 0.57 mW. In scenarios where the battery is at a sustainable voltage, the device is set to enter its normal 30 Hz acquisition mode, consuming around 13.7 mW. We also present our efforts towards improving the charge storage capacity of our on-board super-capacitor. PMID:25570657

  16. The Manumeter: A non-obtrusive wearable device for monitoring spontaneous use of the wrist and fingers

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Justin B.; Friedman, Nizan; Bachman, Mark; Reinkensmeyer, David J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and pilot testing of a novel device for unobtrusive monitoring of wrist and hand movement through a sensorized watch and a magnetic ring system called the manumeter. The device senses the magnetic field of the ring through two triaxial magnetometers and records the data to onboard memory which can be analyzed later by connecting the watch unit to a computer. Wrist and finger joint angles are estimated using a radial basis function network. We compared joint angle estimates collected using the manumeter to direct measurements taken using a passive exoskeleton and found that after a 60 minute trial, 95% of the radial/ulnar deviation, wrist flexion/extension and finger flexion/extension estimates were within 2.4, 5.8, and 4.7 degrees of their actual values respectively. The device measured angular distance traveled for these three joints within 10.4%, 4.5%, and 14.3 % of their actual values. The manumeter has potential to improve monitoring of real world use of the hand after stroke and in other applications. PMID:24187216

  17. 78 FR 26618 - Collection of Information; Proposed Extension of Approval; Comment Request-Follow-Up Activities...

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    ...As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA) (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35), the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC or Commission) requests comments on a proposed extension of approval of a collection of information from persons who have been involved in or have witnessed incidents associated with consumer products. The Commission will consider all comments received in response to......

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  15. Particularities of hand and wrist complex injuries in polytrauma management.

    PubMed

    Ciclamini, Davide; Panero, Bernardino; Titolo, Paolo; Tos, Pierluigi; Battiston, Bruno

    2014-02-01

    Hand and wrist lesions are relatively common in polytraumatised patients. These subjects sustain a wide range of potential life-threatening conditions and hand and wrist injuries incurred are often not diagnosed or are insufficiently treated. Closed lesions are the most frequently missed diagnosis, but even severe open lesions may be incorrectly treated. Most of these hand and wrist injuries can have a strong negative impact on long-term quality of life, particularly when treatment of these injuries is poor or delayed. Orthopaedic and hand surgeons should be vigilant in their assessment and treatment of patients with multiple injuries and a global approach, based on the advanced trauma life support (ATLS)-protocol, must be applied. The very common association of head, chest, abdomen, bone and soft-tissue lesions in the polytraumatised patient requires a multidisciplinary team approach from the beginning. The energy of trauma in these patients often causes complex injuries to the wrist and hand; these require correct treatment in terms of both timing and techniques. It is not possible to create a practical, useful guideline with a "one lesion-one solution" approach, because every case is different; therefore, this paper describes a spectrum of indications and techniques that may be useful in managing hand and wrist injuries, particularly in polytraumatised patients. PMID:24119831

  16. Synovial osteochondromatosis of the wrist joint: A case report

    PubMed Central

    GU, HOUYUN; LI, WEI; DAI, MIN; ZHANG, BIN; LIU, HUCHENG; DING, YI

    2016-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is a rare condition in which multiple cartilaginous nodules proliferate within the synovial membranes of joints, tendon sheaths or bursae. In general, a complete synovectomy is an effective method to treat this disease. Commonly involved joints are the knee, glenohumeral joint, elbow, hip and ankle, although any articulation may be affected. However, synovial osteochondromatosis occurs rarely in the wrist, and there have been a lack of reports of this occurrence in the literature. The current study presents a case of synovial osteochondromatosis in a 33-year-old man, who was admitted in 2014 with the symptom of swelling of the left wrist joint for 2 years. The swelling had become increasingly painful over the previous 2 months. Physical examination revealed local tenderness and a soft pliable mass, with no involvement of the skin and with moderate pain. X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the left wrist revealed a lump at the volar radial side of the left wrist joint without any bone erosion. The lesion was subsequently excised. Histological examination resulted in a diagnosis of osteochondromatosis, which was not considered prior to the surgery. The present case was reported with the aim of analyzing the clinical, imaging characteristic and therapeutic modalities of synovial osteochondromatosis of the wrist. While there was no evidence of recurrence for the subsequent 4 months of post-operative follow-up in the present case, the long-term efficacy of surgical excision requires extended observation. PMID:26998083

  17. Vascularized Bone Grafts from the Dorsal Wrist for the Treatment of Kienböck Disease.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Makoto; Omokawa, Shohei; Kira, Tsutomu; Kawamura, Kenji; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The objective of this article is to evaluate functional and radiological outcomes of vascularized bone grafts for stage 2 and 3 Kienböck disease. The outcomes of three different donor sites via dorsal approach of the wrist were compared. Pearls and pitfalls in surgical technique were discussed. Methods There were 28 patients who underwent vascularized bone grafts, including the extensor fourth and fifth compartmental artery graft of distal radius in 8 patients, the first and second supraretinacular intercompartmental artery graft of distal radius in 12 patients, and the second dorsal metacarpal neck graft in 8 patients. Average age was 32 years, and radiological grading according to Lichtman classification was stage 2 in 8 patients, stage 3A in 10 patients, and stage 3B in 10 patients. Temporary pinning fixing the midcarpal joint was conducted for 10 weeks postoperatively. Results Follow-up periods averaged 70 months. Pain reduced in 27 patients, and visual analog scale for pain of pre- and postoperative level averaged 59 and 18. Range of wrist flexion and extension motion improved from 87 to 117 degrees, and average grip strength improved from 21 kg preoperatively to 33 kg postoperatively. Carpal height ratio had almost no change from 0.52 to 0.53. Fragmentation of necrotic bone healed in 7 of the 14 cases. Comparative analyses of functional and radiological outcomes between three donor sites found no significant difference. Conclusion Three different vascularized bone grafts from the dorsal wrist and hand area demonstrated favorable and comparable functional outcomes. It was technically important to elevate vascular bundle with surrounding retinaculum or fascia, to include sufficient periosteum, and to insert the vascularized bone as the cortex aligned longitudinally. PMID:27104073

  18. A Wrist for Needle-Sized Surgical Robots

    PubMed Central

    York, Peter A.; Swaney, Philip J.; Gilbert, Hunter B.; Webster, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The needle-sized surgical tools used in arthroscopy, otolaryngology, and other surgical fields could become even more valuable to surgeons if endowed with the ability to navigate around sharp corners to manipulate or visualize tissue. We present a needle-sized wrist design that grants this ability. It can be easily interfaced with manual tools or concentric tube robots and is straightforward and inexpensive to manufacture. The wrist consists of a nitinol tube with several asymmetric cutouts, actuated by a tendon. Perhaps counter-intuitively, within this seemingly simple design concept, design optimization is challenging due to the number of parameters available and nonlinearities in material properties. In this paper, we examine a subset of possible geometries and derive kinematic and static models. Experimental results with a 1.16 mm diameter prototype validate the models. Lastly, we provide a discussion summarizing the lessons learned in our early experience designing and fabricating wrists of this type. PMID:26405562

  19. Therapeutic Approach of Wrist Ganglion Using Electroacupuncture: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Lee, Sung Hoon; Jung, A Young; Nam, Doo Hyoun; Cheon, Ji Hwan

    2014-01-01

    A ganglion cyst is a relatively common benign tumor on the wrist. Conservative and surgical approaches have been used for its treatment. Various conservative treatment methods have been suggested such as reassurance, aspiration, sclerosant injection, and direct compression. But, there is no acceptable treatment of choice yet because each suggested method has a relatively high recurrence rate. We want to report two cases in which the size of the wrist ganglion was decreased by using electroacupuncture. One patient presented with a chronic ganglion for six years and the other patient presented with a recently occurred acute ganglion. We applied electroacupuncture for 20 minutes once a week for eight weeks to both of them. Afterwards, the size of the wrist ganglion diminished in the follow-up sonography and the accompanying pain was also relieved. Herein we report both cases along with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:25024969

  20. 78 FR 68905 - Agency Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB... Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Rennie, Enterprise Records... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Wrist Conditions Disability...

  1. Mosaic Activating Mutations in GNA11 and GNAQ Are Associated with Phakomatosis Pigmentovascularis and Extensive Dermal Melanocytosis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anna C; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan; Al-Olabi, Lara; St-Onge, Judith; Atherton, David J; Aubert, Hélène; Bagazgoitia, Lorea; Barbarot, Sébastien; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Chiaverini, Christine; Chong, W Kling; Duffourd, Yannis; Glover, Mary; Groesser, Leopold; Hadj-Rabia, Smail; Hamm, Henning; Happle, Rudolf; Mushtaq, Imran; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Waelchli, Regula; Wobser, Marion; Vabres, Pierre; Patton, E Elizabeth; Kinsler, Veronica A

    2016-04-01

    Common birthmarks can be an indicator of underlying genetic disease but are often overlooked. Mongolian blue spots (dermal melanocytosis) are usually localized and transient, but they can be extensive, permanent, and associated with extracutaneous abnormalities. Co-occurrence with vascular birthmarks defines a subtype of phakomatosis pigmentovascularis, a group of syndromes associated with neurovascular, ophthalmological, overgrowth, and malignant complications. Here, we discover that extensive dermal melanocytosis and phakomatosis pigmentovascularis are associated with activating mutations in GNA11 and GNAQ, genes that encode Gα subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins. The mutations were detected at very low levels in affected tissues but were undetectable in the blood, indicating that these conditions are postzygotic mosaic disorders. In vitro expression of mutant GNA11(R183C) and GNA11(Q209L) in human cell lines demonstrated activation of the downstream p38 MAPK signaling pathway and the p38, JNK, and ERK pathways, respectively. Transgenic mosaic zebrafish models expressing mutant GNA11(R183C) under promoter mitfa developed extensive dermal melanocytosis recapitulating the human phenotype. Phakomatosis pigmentovascularis and extensive dermal melanocytosis are therefore diagnoses in the group of mosaic heterotrimeric G-protein disorders, joining McCune-Albright and Sturge-Weber syndromes. These findings will allow accurate clinical and molecular diagnosis of this subset of common birthmarks, thereby identifying infants at risk for serious complications, and provide novel therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26778290

  2. Mosaic Activating Mutations in GNA11 and GNAQ Are Associated with Phakomatosis Pigmentovascularis and Extensive Dermal Melanocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anna C.; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; O’Shaughnessy, Ryan; Al-Olabi, Lara; St.-Onge, Judith; Atherton, David J.; Aubert, Hélène; Bagazgoitia, Lorea; Barbarot, Sébastien; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Chiaverini, Christine; Chong, W. Kling; Duffourd, Yannis; Glover, Mary; Groesser, Leopold; Hadj-Rabia, Smail; Hamm, Henning; Happle, Rudolf; Mushtaq, Imran; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Waelchli, Regula; Wobser, Marion; Vabres, Pierre; Patton, E. Elizabeth; Kinsler, Veronica A.

    2016-01-01

    Common birthmarks can be an indicator of underlying genetic disease but are often overlooked. Mongolian blue spots (dermal melanocytosis) are usually localized and transient, but they can be extensive, permanent, and associated with extracutaneous abnormalities. Co-occurrence with vascular birthmarks defines a subtype of phakomatosis pigmentovascularis, a group of syndromes associated with neurovascular, ophthalmological, overgrowth, and malignant complications. Here, we discover that extensive dermal melanocytosis and phakomatosis pigmentovascularis are associated with activating mutations in GNA11 and GNAQ, genes that encode Gα subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins. The mutations were detected at very low levels in affected tissues but were undetectable in the blood, indicating that these conditions are postzygotic mosaic disorders. In vitro expression of mutant GNA11R183C and GNA11Q209L in human cell lines demonstrated activation of the downstream p38 MAPK signaling pathway and the p38, JNK, and ERK pathways, respectively. Transgenic mosaic zebrafish models expressing mutant GNA11R183C under promoter mitfa developed extensive dermal melanocytosis recapitulating the human phenotype. Phakomatosis pigmentovascularis and extensive dermal melanocytosis are therefore diagnoses in the group of mosaic heterotrimeric G-protein disorders, joining McCune-Albright and Sturge-Weber syndromes. These findings will allow accurate clinical and molecular diagnosis of this subset of common birthmarks, thereby identifying infants at risk for serious complications, and provide novel therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26778290

  3. Revision Wrist Arthroscopy after Failed Primary Arthroscopic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eugene; Danoff, Jonathan R.; Rajfer, Rebecca A.; Rosenwasser, Melvin P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The etiologies and outcomes of cases of failed therapeutic wrist arthroscopy have not been well-described to date. Purpose The purposes of this study were to identify common preventable patterns of failure in wrist arthroscopy and to report outcomes of a series of revision arthroscopy cases. Patients and Methods Retrospective review of 237 wrist arthroscopies revealed 21 patients with a prior arthroscopy for the same symptoms, of which 16 were assessed by questionnaires and physical exam for this study. Results Six of sixteen patients (38%) had unrecognized dynamic ulnar impaction after débridement of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears, which resolved with arthroscopic wafer resection. Five (31%) had persistent distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability after initial treatment of TFCC tears, requiring arthroscopic repair at revision. Four (25%) experienced diffuse dorsal wrist pain initially diagnosed as TFCC tears, but dynamic scapholunate ligament injuries were found and addressed with radiofrequency (RF) shrinkage at reoperation. Two (13%) required further resection of the radial styloid, after initial débridement was insufficient to correct radioscaphoid impingement. At a mean of 4.8 years after repeat arthroscopy (range, 1.5–13.4 years), this cohort had significant improvements in pain and satisfaction with outcomes after revision arthroscopy. Conclusions The most common indications for repeat wrist arthroscopy were ligamentous instability (of the DRUJ or scapholunate ligament) and osteoarthritis (from dynamic ulnar impaction or radioscaphoid impingement). Although revision wrist arthroscopy may yield acceptable outcomes, careful assessment of stability and cartilage wear at index procedure is crucial. Level of Evidence: Level IV Therapeutic. PMID:24533243

  4. The Cooperative Extension System's Use of USDA's Online Food and Physical Activity Tracker-Supertracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hongu, Nobuko; Martinez, Cathy L.; Billias, Natalia N.; Wyatt, Melissa A.; Turner, Rachel J.; Manore, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition professionals within the Cooperative Extension system use the USDA's interactive online tool SuperTracker, which is designed to help individuals track diet and physical activity (PA) to apply healthy eating patterns and improve PA. An investigation of all 50 states' Extension websites and interviews of Extension educators…

  5. Anthropometric characteristics of wrists joint surfaces depending on lunate types.

    PubMed

    Dyankova, S

    2007-10-01

    It is well known that the lunate presents with two main types: lunate type I has one facet of its distal surface only for capitates, whereas lunate type II has two facets of the same surface for capitate and for hamate. Our previous anthropometric studies showed that the lunate type II wrists are of greater size than the lunate type I wrists. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the lunate types and the presence or absence of hamato-lunate joint correlate with anthropometric characteristics of the joint surfaces of other wrists. Sixteen sets of macerated wrists with the lunate type I and 21 with the lunate type II were studied. Two-thousand-four-hundred-and-forty-eight anthropometric measurements were done (for 68 anthropometric indicators) and 864 anthropometric indices were calculated (for 24 anthropometric indices) separately for the wrist joint surfaces. The absolute value of the anthropometric indicators of the joint surfaces of the separated wrists were greater in the wrists with the lunate type II, except for the indicators "Greatest length of the dorsal joint surface of pisiform", "Width of the proximal joint surface, measured in the middle" and "Greatest width of the proximal joint surface" for the trapezoid and "Greatest height of the ulnar joint surface" for the capitate. The enlargement of the joint surfaces for the scaphoid was mainly in proximo-distal direction. The enlargement for the triquetrum and pisiform was mainly in radio-ulnar direction. The enlargement for trapezium, trapezoid and capitate was mainly in dorso-volar direction (except for the ulnar joint surface of capitate). The enlargement for hamate was mainly in radio-ulnar and dorso-volar directions (except for the joint surfaces for capitate and triquetrum). The calculated indices illustrate the quantitative proportions of the variations mentioned above. The anthropometric differences are a good reason to make a clear distinction between both types of wrist joint

  6. Total wrist arthrodesis using bowed crossed K-wires.

    PubMed

    Minami, A; Kato, H; Iwasaki, N

    1999-08-01

    A method of total wrist arthrodesis using a combination of autogenous iliac crest bone graft and "bowed" crossed Kirschner wires is described. The method of bowing the K-wires results in a compressive force on the iliac bone graft. This technique resulted in bony union of 22 wrists in 20 patients. The mean time to union was 12 weeks (range, 8-14 weeks). There were no major postoperative complications. The advantages of this technique are its simplicity, versatility, and reliability which mean that special internal fixation devices are not needed. PMID:10473146

  7. 77 FR 28369 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC-576); Comment Request; Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... facilities as a result of a hurricane, earthquake, or other natural disaster, or terrorist activity, (2... interested in receiving automatic notification of activity in this docket or in viewing/downloading comments... disaster or terrorist activity, that creates the potential for serious delivery problems on the...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3790 Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3790 Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3790 Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is...

  11. Transverse Movement of the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel during Wrist and Finger Motion in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanno, Mitsuhiko; Sawaizumi, Takuya; Kodera, Norie; Tomori, Yuji; Takai, Shinro

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy of the upper extremity. Repetitive wrist and finger motion has been suggested as a major factor of pathogenesis of CTS. However, little is known about the pathomechanics of CTS. We aimed to evaluate the movement of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel during wrist and finger motions using transverse ultrasound in 21 patients with CTS (5 men and 16 women with mean age 69.0 years). We examined quantitatively the median nerve location as a coordinate within the carpal tunnel at varied wrist positions with all fingers full extension and flexion respectively in the affected and unaffected sides. We thus found that at all wrist positions during finger motion, the median nerve moved significantly more ulnopalmarly in the affected side compared to the unaffected side (p < 0.05). Especially, at the wrist palmar-flexion position as a provocative test, the nerve moved significantly (p < 0.05) the most ulnopalmarly among all wrist positions in the affected side. The nerve was the most strongly compressed against the transverse carpal ligament by the flexor tendons. Additionally, the displacement amount of the nerve in the dorsal-palmar direction was significantly smaller in the affected side than in the unaffected side. These findings indicate that such a pattern of nerve movement has the potential to distinguish affected from unaffected individuals. This ultrasound information could be useful in better understanding of the pathomechanics of CTS, and in further improvement of diagnosis and treatment for CTS. PMID:26133190

  12. Longitudinal, Lateral and Transverse Axes of Forearm Muscles Influence the Crosstalk in the Mechanomyographic Signals during Isometric Wrist Postures

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Anamul; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahmad, R. Badlishah; Sundaraj, Sebastian; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Ali, Md. Asraf

    2014-01-01

    Problem Statement In mechanomyography (MMG), crosstalk refers to the contamination of the signal from the muscle of interest by the signal from another muscle or muscle group that is in close proximity. Purpose The aim of the present study was two-fold: i) to quantify the level of crosstalk in the mechanomyographic (MMG) signals from the longitudinal (Lo), lateral (La) and transverse (Tr) axes of the extensor digitorum (ED), extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscles during isometric wrist flexion (WF) and extension (WE), radial (RD) and ulnar (UD) deviations; and ii) to analyze whether the three-directional MMG signals influence the level of crosstalk between the muscle groups during these wrist postures. Methods Twenty, healthy right-handed men (mean ± SD: age = 26.7±3.83 y; height = 174.47±6.3 cm; mass = 72.79±14.36 kg) participated in this study. During each wrist posture, the MMG signals propagated through the axes of the muscles were detected using three separate tri-axial accelerometers. The x-axis, y-axis, and z-axis of the sensor were placed in the Lo, La, and Tr directions with respect to muscle fibers. The peak cross-correlations were used to quantify the proportion of crosstalk between the different muscle groups. Results The average level of crosstalk in the MMG signals generated by the muscle groups ranged from: 34.28–69.69% for the Lo axis, 27.32–52.55% for the La axis and 11.38–25.55% for the Tr axis for all participants and their wrist postures. The Tr axes between the muscle groups showed significantly smaller crosstalk values for all wrist postures [F (2, 38) = 14–63, p<0.05, η2 = 0.416–0.769]. Significance The results may be applied in the field of human movement research, especially for the examination of muscle mechanics during various types of the wrist postures. PMID:25090008

  13. Functional Modulation of Corticospinal Excitability with Adaptation of Wrist Movements to Novel Dynamical Environments

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Masaya

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation of reaching movements to a novel dynamic environment is associated with changes in neuronal activity in the primary motor cortex (M1), suggesting that M1 neurons are part of the internal model. Here, we investigated whether such changes in neuronal activity, resulting from motor adaptation, were also accompanied by changes in human corticospinal excitability, which reflects M1 activity at a macroscopic level. Participants moved a cursor on a display using the right wrist joint from the starting position toward one of eight equally spaced peripheral targets. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were elicited from the wrist muscles by transcranial magnetic stimulation delivered over the left M1 before and after adaptation to a clockwise velocity-dependent force field. We found that the MEP elicited even during the preparatory period exhibited a directional tuning property, and that the preferred direction shifted clockwise after adaptation to the force field. In a subsequent experiment, participants simultaneously adapted an identical wrist movement to two opposing force fields, each of which was associated with unimanual or bimanual contexts, and the MEP during the preparatory period was flexibly modulated, depending on the context. In contrast, such modulation of the MEP was not observed when participants tried to adapt to two opposing force fields that were each associated with a target color. These results suggest that the internal model formed in the M1 is retrieved flexibly even during the preparatory period, and that the MEP could be a very useful probe for evaluating the formation and retrieval of motor memory. PMID:25209281

  14. Towards Modeling a Collaborative Environment for Extension of Professional Active Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsarmanesh, Hamideh; Camarinha-Matos, Luis

    Progress on computer networks is offering new conditions for individuals to remain active after their retirement. Furthermore, the scarcity of human resources and the increasing percentage of elder professionals in Europe have catalyzed the formation of a new type of collaborative community referred to as community of active senior professionals (CASP). These new networks aim to support retired professionals with their participation in socio-economic activities and thus remaining professionally active. As such, identification of their specificities as well as developing a descriptive model of CASPs is challenging. This paper characterizes the CASP environments and performs a first attempt towards identifying and modeling their constituent elements.

  15. The Scholarly Activity Predictor Model among Counseling Psychology Doctoral Students: A Modification and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to help understand scholarly activity better among counseling psychology doctoral students. Two new variables were added to the previously created predictor model of scholarly activity: advisory working alliance and research competence. Three path analytic models were designed in the current study: (1) a…

  16. Systematic changes in the perceived posture of the wrist and elbow during formation of a phantom hand and arm.

    PubMed

    Inui, Nobuyuki; Masumoto, Junya; Ueda, Yuki; Ide, Kazuhiro

    2012-05-01

    Our previous study showed that a fully flexed or extended hand became perceived as an extended or flexed 'phantom' hand as ischemic anesthesia progressed (Inui et al. in J Physiol 589:5775-5784, 2011). Here, we examined what happened if the hand was held in the midposition before and during the anesthesia. Twenty healthy participants reported the perceived postures of their right wrist and elbow during an ischemic block of the right upper arm using the left hand and arm. If the actual arm and hand were fully extended, then the perceived position of the elbow and wrist moved toward flexion. Conversely, if they were fully flexed, then the perceived position of the joints moved toward extension. However, when the hand was held in the midposition before and during the anesthesia, the position of the wrist was perceived to be in the same position. Hence, the fully flexed or extended position of a limb was essential for systematic changes in the perceived posture of the limb during the anesthesia. Because the start of these changes occurred as somatosensory inputs were declining, the changes depended on the fading inputs from strongly stretched muscle and skin during the anesthesia. PMID:22367400

  17. A Case Report of Primary Extranodal Non-hodgkin Lymphoma First Presentation as a Soft Tissue Swelling Around the Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Sopu, Alexandra; Green, Connor; McHugh, Gavin; Quinlan, John

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Primary musculoskeletal extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare presentation and account for 5% of all primary extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Treatment uses a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy with good prognosis in unifocal manifestation. We report an unusual case of primary musculoskeletal extranodal lymphoma presenting as a soft tissue swelling around the wrist. Case Report: A 75 year old lady was referred to the Orthopaedic Outpatients Department with a painless, slowly growing mass on the dorsum of the right wrist. Clinical examination revealed a 6 X 9 cm round painless mass on the dorsum of the distal radius adherent to both the underlying structures and skin. MRI of the wrist showed a large mass causing extensive osteolysis of the distal radius and extending proximally with abnormal replacement of the marrow. The patient was brought to theatre for biopsy and subsequent histopathological examination confirmed a B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The patient was referred to the Haematology Service for further treatment and follow-up. She received chemotherapy and radiotherapy with satisfactory results. Conclusion: Lymphoma presenting as a soft tissue mass is relatively uncommon and can easily be confused with a wide variety of inflammatory conditions, more common neoplasias as well as infectious diseases (tuberculosis). Though rare, extranodal lymphoma should be regularly included in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions. PMID:27299029

  18. Arthroscopic Reduction and Stabilization of Chronic Perilunate Wrist Dislocations.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N

    2016-04-01

    An acute perilunate wrist injury that is unreduced for more than 6 weeks results in severe disability, and even open reduction with stabilization through wide dorsal and volar approaches is technically challenging. This report describes an arthroscopic technique for reduction and percutaneous wire stabilization of a chronic perilunate wrist dislocations. The technique involves initial radiocarpal and midcarpal access through the 6R and 3-4 portals, and these portals are used for synovectomy and debridement of capsular flap tears. The midcarpal joint is accessed initially through the radiocarpal joint, and additional midcarpal portals are used for sequential perilunate adhesiolysis before carpal mobilization and reduction. A percutaneous wire drilled into the lunate is used as a joystick to manipulate the lunate into its anatomic alignment along the carpal bones, and percutaneous transcarpal wire fixation is performed to stabilize the carpus. Arthroscopic and fluoroscopic guidance is used to optimize anatomic reduction and to confirm stability. The wrist is immobilized for 6 weeks; the percutaneous wires are removed thereafter, and the wrist is mobilized. Overall, the arthroscopic technique provides a safe and reproducible method for treatment of this complex chronic injury. PMID:27354948

  19. Muscle recruitment variations during wrist flexion exercise: MR evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleckenstein, J. L.; Watumull, D.; Bertocci, L. A.; Nurenberg, P.; Peshock, R. M.; Payne, J. A.; Haller, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many exercise protocols used in physiological studies assume homogeneous and diffuse muscle recruitment. To test this assumption during a "standard" wrist flexion protocol, variations in muscle recruitment were assessed using MRI in eight healthy subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Variations were assessed by comparing the right to the left forearms and the effect of slight (15 degrees) pronation or supination at the wrist. RESULTS: Postexercise imaging showed focal regions of increased signal intensity (SI), indicating relatively strong recruitment, most often in entire muscles, although occasionally only in subvolumes of muscles. In 15 of 26 studies, flexor carpi radialis (FCR) showed more SI than flexor carpi ulnaris, while in 11 studies SI in these muscles increased equivalently. Relatively greater FCR recruitment was seen during pronation and/or use of the nondominant side. Palmaris longus, a wrist flexor, did not appear recruited in 4 of 11 forearms in which it was present. A portion of the superficial finger flexor became hyperintense in 89% of studies, while recruitment of the deep finger flexor was seen only in 43%. CONCLUSION: Inter- and intraindividual variations in forearm muscle recruitment should be anticipated in physiological studies of standard wrist flexion exercise protocols.

  20. Selection of wrist posture in conditions of motor ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Wood, Daniel K; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2011-02-01

    In our everyday motor interactions with objects, we often encounter situations where the features of an object are determinate (i.e., not perceptually ambiguous), but the mapping between those features and appropriate movement patterns is indeterminate, resulting in a lack of any clear preference for one posture over another. We call this indeterminacy in stimulus-response mapping 'motor ambiguity'. Here, we use a grasping task to investigate the decision mechanisms that mediate the basic behavior of selecting one wrist posture over another in conditions of motor ambiguity. Using one of two possible wrist postures, participants grasped a dowel that was presented at various orientations. At most orientations, there was a clear preference for one wrist posture over the other. Within a small range of orientations, however, participants were variable in their posture selection due to the fact that the dowel was ambiguous with respect to the hand posture it afforded. We observed longer reaction times (RT) during 'ambiguous' trials than during the 'unambiguous' trials. In two subsequent experiments, we explored the effects of foreknowledge and trial history on the selection of wrist posture. We found that foreknowledge led to shorter RT unless the previous trial involved selecting a posture in the ambiguous region, in which case foreknowledge gave no RT advantage. These results are discussed within the context of existing models of sensorimotor decision making. PMID:21152907

  1. Late rupture of extensor pollicis longus after wrist arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fortems, Y; Mawhinney, I; Lawrence, T; Trial, I A; Stanley, J K

    1995-06-01

    The first cases of impending rupture of the extensor pollicis longus after wrist arthroscopy are reported and the etiology is compared with extensor pollicis longus ruptures after nondisplaced or minimally displaced Colles fractures. Both cases were treated with extensor indices proprius to extensor pollicis longus transfer with good clinical results. PMID:7632309

  2. Cartilaginous and ligamentous degeneration of the wrist. Anatomic study.

    PubMed

    Fortems, Y; de Smet, L; Fabry, G

    1994-01-01

    The growing precision of diagnostic techniques (MRI, arthrography, arthroscopy) and the consequent increase of the diagnosis of cartilaginous and ligamentous lesions of the wrist led us to undertake a detailed anatomical study of the carpus and to extend this study to the search for correlations between these lesions and the radio-ulnar index. Fifty one cadaveric wrists were dissected from an elderly population (mean age of 76 years). Cartilaginous lesions were found in two-thirds of radioulnar joints of the wrist with a marked predominance for the lunate bone (43%). The triangular cartilage of the fibrocartilaginous complex (TFCC) was perforated in 23 wrists (46%). We established a correlation between the radio-ulnar index and perforations of the TFCC (p < 0.05), as well as the thickness of this structure (p < 0.05). The relationship between age and rupture of intrinsic ligaments (p < 0.05), and the radio-ulnar index (p < 0.05) and age was also established. We present our figures, discuss the clinical implications, and draw the following conclusions from this study. 1) The carpus is a complex joint which is subject to age-related degeneration. 2) The large number of cartilaginous lesions observed in this study must be taken into account in the interpretation of MRI and the "over" precise results of arthroscopy. PMID:7531478

  3. Arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia and treatment of recurrences.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, R; Badia, A; Alfarano, M; Orbay, J; Indriago, I; Mustapha, B

    2000-02-01

    From 1995 to 1998, 30 patients with dorsal wrist ganglia and four with recurrent dorsal ganglia underwent arthroscopic resection. At a mean follow-up of 16 months, no complications were seen, but minimal pain persisted in three patients. Two recurrences were seen after arthroscopic resection of primary ganglia. PMID:10763721

  4. Arthroscopic diagnosis and treatment of dorsal wrist ganglion.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, S; Toh, S; Miura, H; Arai, K; Irie, T

    2001-12-01

    Thirty-seven patients with dorsal wrist ganglia underwent arthroscopic resection. The mean follow-up was 20 months, and no complications were encountered. The ganglia were classified into three types according to their arthroscopic appearance. This classification helps to determine the amount of dorsal capsular resection required. PMID:11884110

  5. Management of the spastic wrist and hand in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Leafblad, Nels D; Van Heest, Ann E

    2015-05-01

    Research from the last 5 years on the pathophysiology and treatment of upper extremity sequelae of cerebral palsy (CP) is presented. The development of new treatments of CP-affected limbs, utilizing the brain's inherent neuroplasticity, remains an area of promising and active research. Functional magnetic resonance imaging scans have evaluated the role of neuroplasticity in adapting to the initial central nervous system insult. Children with CP appear to have greater recruitment of the ipsilateral brain for motor and sensory functions of the affected upper limb. Studies have also shown that constraint-induced movement therapy results in localized increase in gray matter volume of the sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the affected arm targeted during rehabilitation. Recent therapy interventions have emphasized the role of home therapy programs, the transient effects of splinting, and the promise of constraint-induced movement therapy and bimanual hand training. The use of motion laboratory analysis to characterize the movement pattern disturbances in children with CP continues to expand. Classification systems for CP upper limb continue to expand and improve their reliability, including use of the House Classification, the Manual Ability Classification System, and the Shriner's Hospital Upper Extremity Evaluation. Surgical outcomes have greater patients' satisfaction when they address functional limitations, also in addition to aesthetics, which may improve patients' self-esteem. Surgical techniques for elbow, wrist, fingers, and thumb continue to be refined. Research into each of these areas continues to expand our understanding of the nervous system insults that cause CP, how they may be modified, and how hand surgeons can continue to serve patients by improving their upper limb function and aesthetics. PMID:25841769

  6. 76 FR 72210 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Information Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities.... Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), is submitting the following information collection request for... United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security, and sent...

  7. 77 FR 66862 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities.... Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will submit the following information collection request for review... Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security, and sent via electronic mail...

  8. 75 FR 53322 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), will submit the following... United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security, and sent...

  9. 75 FR 24721 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), has submitted the following...), Joseph M. Gerhart, Chief, Records Management Branch, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 500...

  10. 77 FR 33478 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities.... 1653- 0019). The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), is... should be addressed to OMB Desk Officer, for United States Immigration and Customs...

  11. 77 FR 77069 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC-730); Comment Request; Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    .../2006), published: 71 FR 43294. Actual transmission investment for the most recent calendar year, and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC-730); Comment...

  12. 76 FR 57081 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments... directed to Mr. Gregory E. Scarbro, Unit Chief, Federal Bureau of Investigation, CJIS Division, Module E-3..., Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Justice. (4) Affected public who will......

  13. 77 FR 56863 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments Requested Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments.../collection: Federal Bureau of Investigation Bioterrorism Preparedness Act: Entity/Individual Information. (3... collection: Forms FD-961; Criminal Justice Information Services Division, Federal Bureau of......

  14. 77 FR 56861 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments Requested Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments.../collection: Federal Bureau of Investigation Bioterrorism Preparedness Act: Entity/Individual Information. (3... collection: Forms FD-961; Criminal Justice Information Services Division, Federal Bureau of......

  15. 77 FR 41801 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments..., Federal Bureau of Investigation, Criminal Justice Information Services Division, (CJIS), Module E-3, 1000.... (2) The title of the form/collection: Federal Bureau of Investigation Bioterrorism......

  16. 78 FR 63247 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments... October 31 ACTION: 30-day Notice. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Criminal Justice...-711; Criminal Justice Information Services Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation,......

  17. 76 FR 72977 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments..., Federal Bureau of Investigation, Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS), will be submitting... directed to Mr. Gregory E. Scarbro, Unit Chief, Federal Bureau of Investigation, CJIS......

  18. 78 FR 48720 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested; Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments... October 31 ACTION: 60-Day notice. The Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Criminal..., Federal Bureau of Investigation, Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division,......

  19. 77 FR 4833 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested: Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments..., Federal Bureau of Investigation, Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) will be submitting... directed to Mr. Gregory E. Scarbro, Unit Chief, Federal Bureau of Investigation, CJIS......

  20. 77 FR 56862 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments.../collection: Federal Bureau of Investigation Bioterrorism Preparedness Act: Entity/Individual Information. (3... collection: Forms FD-961; Criminal Justice Information Services Division, Federal Bureau of......

  1. 78 FR 48719 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested; Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments... Enforcement ACTION: 60-Day notice. The Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Criminal..., Federal Bureau of Investigation, Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division,......

  2. 78 FR 63247 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments... Enforcement ACTION: 30-day Notice. The Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Criminal... collection: Form 1-725; Criminal Justice Information Services Division, Federal Bureau of......

  3. 77 FR 76015 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC-607); Comment Request; Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... (EPAct 2005) modified FERC's role in order to better coordinate the activities of the separate agencies with varying responsibilities over proposed natural gas projects. Section 313 of EPAct 2005 \\1\\...

  4. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John Je; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. PMID:27115346

  5. The Effect of Amorphization Conditions on the Measured Activation of Source Drain Extension Implants

    SciTech Connect

    England, Jonathan; Kontos, Alexander; Renau, Anthony; Gwilliam, Russell; Smith, Andrew; Knights, Andrew; Jain, Amitabh

    2008-11-03

    Un-patterned wafers were processed using low-dose Indium or medium-dose Germanium pre-amorphization implants (PAI) followed by p-type dopant implants of BF{sub 2} or carborane (CBH). The wafers were then annealed by RTA (spike), laser anneal (LSA) or combination of LSA and spike. Active dopant distributions calculated from SIMS and sheet resistance measurements compared favorably with those determined by differential Hall, which is a challenging technique for shallow profiles. The trends in B diffusion behavior and activation are discussed in relation to the different implant damage budgets, damage evolution during the anneals and presence of fluorine. In particular, for low thermal budget LSA only anneals, CBH implants appear to give higher activation than BF{sub 2} due to the absence of fluorine.

  6. 77 FR 31033 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-589, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... published in the Federal Register on March 19, 2012, at 77 FR 16047, allowing for a 60-day public comment... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-589... Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting...

  7. 75 FR 65022 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-698, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    .... The information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on June 23, 2010, at 75 FR... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-698... Resident; OMB Control No. 1615-0035. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and...

  8. 77 FR 34398 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ..., 2012, at 77 FR 18255, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS did not receive any comments... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565... Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting the following information collection request to the Office...

  9. 77 FR 3485 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-129F, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... Federal Register on October 28, 2011, at 76 FR 66944, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-129F... Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting the following...

  10. 77 FR 27474 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-687; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-687...-687. The Department Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has...-687; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will be asked...

  11. 77 FR 3484 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-914, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... Federal Register on October 28, 2011, at 76 FR 66944, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-914... Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting the following...

  12. 77 FR 16047 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-589; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-589.... 1615-0067. The Department Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be...: Form I-589; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will be asked...

  13. 76 FR 31971 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-212; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... on March 16, 2011, at 76 FR 14419, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS received no... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-212.... Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting the following information collection...

  14. 75 FR 65022 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-751, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... collection was previously published in the Federal Register on June 30, 2010, at 75 FR 37821, allowing for a... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-751.... 1615- 0038. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)...

  15. 77 FR 34053 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-590, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... published in the Federal Register on March 12, 2012, at 77 FR 14535, allowing for a 60-day public comment... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-590... of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting...

  16. 77 FR 27473 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-924; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-924... Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitted... sponsoring the collection: Form I-924; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. (4) Affected public...

  17. 77 FR 3486 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-539, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... previously published in the Federal Register on October 28, 2011, at 76 FR 66946, allowing for a 60-day... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-539... Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting...

  18. 75 FR 52539 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-777, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on June 9, 2010, at 75 FR 32799... asked or required to respond, as well as a brief abstract: Primary: Individuals or Households. Form I... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form...

  19. 76 FR 11805 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-134, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... published in the Federal Register on December 14, 2010, at 75 FR 77891, allowing for a 60-day public comment... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-134... Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting...

  20. 77 FR 42322 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will submit the following information..., Chief, Records Management, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 500 12th Street SW., Stop...

  1. 75 FR 71451 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-470, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on August 18, 2010, at 75 FR 51096... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-470... Control No. 1615-0056. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration...

  2. 77 FR 11148 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...-0026. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will submit... Homeland Security (DHS), John Ramsay, Program (Forms) Manager, U.S. Immigration and Customs...

  3. 76 FR 79204 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities.... ] The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will submit the... Security (DHS), John Ramsay, Program Manager, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 500 12th Street...

  4. 75 FR 24720 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities.... Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), has submitted the following information collection request for... Management Branch, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 500 12th Street, SW., Room 3138, Washington,...

  5. 78 FR 23577 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... Information Collection for Review; File No. I- 352, Immigration Bond; OMB Control No. 1653-0022. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will submit the...

  6. 75 FR 24721 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities.... The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), will be... Homeland Security (DHS), Joseph M. Gerhart, Chief, Records Management Branch, U.S. Immigration and...

  7. 77 FR 37063 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...-0026). The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will submit... Homeland Security (DHS), John Ramsay, Program (Forms) Manager, U.S. Immigration and Customs...

  8. 76 FR 66944 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-129F; Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... SECURITY Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-129F.... The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will be submitting the... Department of Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form I-129F, U.S. Citizenship and...

  9. 75 FR 12249 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-134, Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... the Federal Register on November 12, 2009, at 74 FR 58302 allowing for a 60-day public comment period... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-134... Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has submitted the...

  10. 75 FR 16158 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...-0026. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), has... should be addressed to OMB Desk Officer, for U. S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department...

  11. 75 FR 65500 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-360, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on June 30, 2010, at 75 FR 37820... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-360... Control No. 1615-0020. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration...

  12. 75 FR 2881 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...-0026. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), has... of Homeland Security (DHS), Joseph M. Gerhart, Chief, Records Management Branch, U.S. Immigration...

  13. 78 FR 44141 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Affidavit of Support, Form I-134; Extension, Without...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Affidavit of.... SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS... accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including...

  14. The Improvement of Thinking Skills in Young Children Using Computer Activities: A Replication and Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riding, R. J.; Powell, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Replicates and extends Riding and Powells' study of four-year-olds' problem-solving abilities using computer activities. Achieves similar results, namely significantly greater improvement between the pretest and posttest scores for the treatment group. Suggests that computers could aid worthwhile improvement in young children's thinking…

  15. 75 FR 51096 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400... Collection Under Review; Form N- 400, Application for Naturalization; OMB Control No. 1615-0052. The... 60 day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-400. Should USCIS decide...

  16. 75 FR 13776 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-300; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-300... Collection Under Review; Form N- 300, Application to File Declaration of Intention; OMB Control No. 1615-0078... this 60-day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-300. Should USCIS decide...

  17. 75 FR 51094 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600... Collection under Review; Form N- 600, Application for Certificate of Citizenship; OMB Control No. 1615- 0057..., 2010. During this 60 day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-600....

  18. 75 FR 70278 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 600, Application for Certificate of Citizenship; OMB Control No..., and the applicable component of the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form...

  19. 76 FR 69275 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 400, Application for Naturalization; OMB Control No. 1615-0052... the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form N-400. U.S. Citizenship...

  20. 75 FR 70277 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 400, Application for Naturalization; OMB Control No. 1615-0052... applicable component of the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form N-400;...

  1. 75 FR 21013 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644... Collection Under Review; Form N- 644, Application for Posthumous Citizenship; OMB Control No. 1615-0059. The..., USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-644. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-644...

  2. 76 FR 21913 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644... Collection Under Review: Form N- 644, Application for Posthumous Citizenship; OMB Control No. 1615-0059. The..., USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-644. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-644...

  3. 76 FR 27078 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-426, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-426... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 426, Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service; OMB... until July 11, 2011. During this 60-day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form...

  4. 75 FR 41216 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 644, Application for Posthumous Citizenship; OMB Control No. 1615... N-644; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will be asked...

  5. 77 FR 24507 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-25, Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-25... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 25, Request for Verification of Naturalization. The Department of... component of the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form N-25. U.S. Citizenship...

  6. 75 FR 5098 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565... information collection under review: Form N- 565, Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship... Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form N-565; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

  7. 75 FR 80835 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565... Collection Under Review; Form N- 565, Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document; OMB... N-565. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-565 we will advise the public when we publish the...

  8. 76 FR 39415 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 644, Application for Posthumous Citizenship; OMB Control No. 1615... Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form N-644; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

  9. 75 FR 51095 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-336; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-336... Collection under Review; Form N- 336, Request for Hearing on a Decision in Naturalization Proceedings Under... the Form N-336. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-336 we will advise the public when we publish...

  10. 77 FR 18255 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565... collection under review; Form N- 565, Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document; OMB... until May 29, 2012. During this 60 day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form...

  11. 75 FR 70277 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-336, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-336... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 336, Request for Hearing on a Decision in Naturalization... collection: Form N-336; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will...

  12. 75 FR 51096 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-470; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-470... Collection Under Review; Form N- 470, Application To Preserve Residence for Naturalization; OMB Control No... until October 18, 2010. During this 60-day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form...

  13. 75 FR 32801 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-865; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-865... Collection Under Review: Form I- 865, Sponsor's Notice of Change of Address; OMB Control Number 1615- 0076. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has...

  14. 78 FR 45919 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 80); Comment Request; Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... the Federal Register (78 FR 28820, 5/16/2013) requesting public comments. FERC received no comments on... Energy Regulatory Commission Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 80); Comment Request... the requirements of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 44 U.S.C. 3507(a)(1)(D), the Federal...

  15. 76 FR 65740 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Employment Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... soliciting comments, of the following collection of information on August 10, 2011, 76 FR 49503. The... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., aircraft piracy, and terrorist activities. Number of Respondents: 1,337. Estimated Annual Burden Hours:...

  16. 76 FR 28444 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-884, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-884... information collection under review: Form G- 884, Request for the Return of Original Documents; OMB Control No... July 18, 2011. During this 60-day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form...

  17. 75 FR 23785 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639... Collection Under Review; Form G- 639, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Request; OMB Control No. 1615- 0102... this 60 day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form G-639. Should USCIS decide...

  18. 76 FR 11807 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-646, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... December 15, 2010, at 75 FR 78263, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS did not receive any... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-646... Information Collection Under Review: Form G- 646, Sworn Statement of Refugee Applying for Admission to...

  19. 76 FR 11806 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-1145, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on December 14, 2010, at 75 FR 77890... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-1145... Information Collection Under Review: Form G- 1145, E-Notification of Application/Petition Acceptance;...

  20. 76 FR 48874 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-884, Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... the Federal Register on March 17, 2011, at 76 FR 28444, allowing for a 60- day public comment period... SECURITY Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-884... Collection Under Review: Form G- 884, Request for the Return of Original Document(s). The Department...

  1. 75 FR 5097 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-646, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... 74 FR 58037, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS did not receive any comments for this... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-646... Information Collection Under Review: Form G- 646, Sworn Statement of Refugee Applying for Admission to...

  2. 77 FR 33760 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-646, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... collection was previously published in the Federal Register on March 9, 2012, at 77 FR 14407, allowing for a... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-646... Information Collection Under Review: Form G- 646, Sworn Statement of Refugee Applying for Admission to...

  3. 75 FR 47822 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... collection was previously published in the Federal Register on May 4, 2010, at 75 FR 23785, allowing for a 60... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639... Information Collection Under Review: Form G- 639, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Request; OMB Control...

  4. 76 FR 24908 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639... Collection Under Review; Form G- 639, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Request; OMB Control No. 1615- 0102.... During this 60 day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form G-639. Should USCIS...

  5. 77 FR 38307 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition, Extension, Without...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Refugee/Asylee... Information Collection Under Review: Form I- 730, Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition; OMB Control No. 1615-0037.... (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition. (3) Agency form number, if...

  6. Effect of Behavioral Activation Treatment on Chronic Fibromyalgia Pain: Replication and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Talley, Chris; Buermann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A multiple-baseline-across two behavior sets and positions (reclined, upright) was used to experimentally examine the effect of Behavioral Activation Treatment for Pain (BAT-P) on pain-related behavior of a 44-year-old woman with a 22-year history of fibromyalgia (FM). BAT-P, based on the matching law, is comprised of Behavioral Relaxation…

  7. 76 FR 71607 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments.... Gregory E. Scarbro, Unit Chief, Federal Bureau of Investigation, CJIS Division, Module E-3, 1000 Custer... collection: Form Number 1-725; Sponsor: Criminal Justice Information Services Division, Federal Bureau......

  8. 77 FR 70746 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC-592); Comment Request; Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... Provider; and Marketing Affiliates of Interstate Pipelines. DATES: Comments on the collection of... Marketing Affiliates of Interstate Pipelines. OMB Control No.: 1 902-0157. Type of Request: Three-year... the pipeline's transportation, sales, and storage activities for its marketing affiliate to...

  9. 76 FR 11807 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... 75 FR 80835, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS did not receive any comments for this... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565... Document; OMB Control No. 1615-0091. * * * * * The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship...

  10. 75 FR 51094 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-363, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    .... The information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on June 23, 2010, at 75 FR... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-363... Amerasian; OMB Control No. 1615-0022. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and...

  11. 76 FR 21912 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-363; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-363... Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting the following information... the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form I-363, U.S. Citizenship...

  12. 75 FR 35822 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-363; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-363... Control No. 1615-0022. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services... Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form I-363; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

  13. Comprehensive program and plan for federal energy education, extension, and information activities: Fiscal Year 1981. Fifth report to congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The activities conducted solely in Fiscal Year (FY) 1981 in the areas of Federal energy education, extension service, and information dissemination are reported. The broad purpose of the FY 1981 activities addressed has been to inform governmental and private sectors about the methods and technologies to conserve energy and to utilize renewable energy sources. With the increase in awareness on the part of energy users and decisionmakers, as well as additional information sources available from the private sector, the emphasis of the various Federal energy information activities is being focused on reporting results of Federal programs. The course of activities related to conservation and renewable energy information has been one of consolidation, both in terms of programmatic substance and methods. The practical impetus has been the redirection of Federal progrms and related budgetary revisions for FY 1981 and FY 1982. Further, products conveying information on conservation and renewable energy technologies have been examined extensively, pursuant to the Administration's directive in April 1981 on elimination of wasteful spending on periodicals, audiovisuals and similar materials. Efforts in coordination of conservation and renewable energy information activities of the Department of Energy (DOE) as well as other Federal agencies have adjusted to timetables for review and redirection of programs initially planned for FY 1981. Mechanisms to coordinate existing Federal energy information activities employed in previous fiscal years were continued in FY 1981 to the extent applicable under current Administration policy and the above-noted circumstances of redirection. Coordinating actions requiring convening of groups were held in abeyance pending resolution of programmatic issues.

  14. Musculoskeletal integration at the wrist underlies the modular development of limb tendons.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alice H; Riordan, Timothy J; Pryce, Brian; Weibel, Jennifer L; Watson, Spencer S; Long, Fanxin; Lefebvre, Veronique; Harfe, Brian D; Stadler, H Scott; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Tufa, Sara F; Keene, Douglas R; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2015-07-15

    The long tendons of the limb extend from muscles that reside in the zeugopod (arm/leg) to their skeletal insertions in the autopod (paw). How these connections are established along the length of the limb remains unknown. Here, we show that mouse limb tendons are formed in modular units that combine to form a functional contiguous structure; in muscle-less limbs, tendons develop in the autopod but do not extend into the zeugopod, and in the absence of limb cartilage the zeugopod segments of tendons develop despite the absence of tendons in the autopod. Analyses of cell lineage and proliferation indicate that distinct mechanisms govern the growth of autopod and zeugopod tendon segments. To elucidate the integration of these autopod and zeugopod developmental programs, we re-examined early tendon development. At E12.5, muscles extend across the full length of a very short zeugopod and connect through short anlagen of tendon progenitors at the presumptive wrist to their respective autopod tendon segment, thereby initiating musculoskeletal integration. Zeugopod tendon segments are subsequently generated by proximal elongation of the wrist tendon anlagen, in parallel with skeletal growth, underscoring the dependence of zeugopod tendon development on muscles for tendon anchoring. Moreover, a subset of extensor tendons initially form as fused structures due to initial attachment of their respective wrist tendon anlage to multiple muscles. Subsequent individuation of these tendons depends on muscle activity. These results establish an integrated model for limb tendon development that provides a framework for future analyses of tendon and musculoskeletal phenotypes. PMID:26062940

  15. Musculoskeletal integration at the wrist underlies the modular development of limb tendons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alice H.; Riordan, Timothy J.; Pryce, Brian; Weibel, Jennifer L.; Watson, Spencer S.; Long, Fanxin; Lefebvre, Veronique; Harfe, Brian D.; Stadler, H. Scott; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Tufa, Sara F.; Keene, Douglas R.; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    The long tendons of the limb extend from muscles that reside in the zeugopod (arm/leg) to their skeletal insertions in the autopod (paw). How these connections are established along the length of the limb remains unknown. Here, we show that mouse limb tendons are formed in modular units that combine to form a functional contiguous structure; in muscle-less limbs, tendons develop in the autopod but do not extend into the zeugopod, and in the absence of limb cartilage the zeugopod segments of tendons develop despite the absence of tendons in the autopod. Analyses of cell lineage and proliferation indicate that distinct mechanisms govern the growth of autopod and zeugopod tendon segments. To elucidate the integration of these autopod and zeugopod developmental programs, we re-examined early tendon development. At E12.5, muscles extend across the full length of a very short zeugopod and connect through short anlagen of tendon progenitors at the presumptive wrist to their respective autopod tendon segment, thereby initiating musculoskeletal integration. Zeugopod tendon segments are subsequently generated by proximal elongation of the wrist tendon anlagen, in parallel with skeletal growth, underscoring the dependence of zeugopod tendon development on muscles for tendon anchoring. Moreover, a subset of extensor tendons initially form as fused structures due to initial attachment of their respective wrist tendon anlage to multiple muscles. Subsequent individuation of these tendons depends on muscle activity. These results establish an integrated model for limb tendon development that provides a framework for future analyses of tendon and musculoskeletal phenotypes. PMID:26062940

  16. Neural Adaptations Associated with Interlimb Transfer in a Ballistic Wrist Flexion Task

    PubMed Central

    Ruddy, Kathy L.; Rudolf, Anne K.; Kalkman, Barbara; King, Maedbh; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Carroll, Timothy J.; Carson, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Cross education is the process whereby training of one limb gives rise to increases in the subsequent performance of its opposite counterpart. The execution of many unilateral tasks is associated with increased excitability of corticospinal projections from primary motor cortex (M1) to the opposite limb. It has been proposed that these effects are causally related. Our aim was to establish whether changes in corticospinal excitability (CSE) arising from prior training of the opposite limb determine levels of interlimb transfer. We used three vision conditions shown previously to modulate the excitability of corticospinal projections to the inactive (right) limb during wrist flexion movements performed by the training (left) limb. These were: (1) mirrored visual feedback of the training limb; (2) no visual feedback of either limb; and (3) visual feedback of the inactive limb. Training comprised 300 discrete, ballistic wrist flexion movements executed as rapidly as possible. Performance of the right limb on the same task was assessed prior to, at the mid point of, and following left limb training. There was no evidence that variations in the excitability of corticospinal projections (assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)) to the inactive limb were associated with, or predictive of, the extent of interlimb transfer that was expressed. There were however associations between alterations in muscle activation dynamics observed for the untrained limb, and the degree of positive transfer that arose from training of the opposite limb. The results suggest that the acute adaptations that mediate the bilateral performance gains realized through unilateral practice of this ballistic wrist flexion task are mediated by neural elements other than those within M1 that are recruited at rest by single-pulse TMS. PMID:27199722

  17. Extensive and Diverse Submarine Volcanism and Hydrothermal Activity in the NE Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Merle, S. G.; Lupton, J. E.; Resing, J.; Baker, E. T.; Lilley, M. D.; Arculus, R. J.; Crowhurst, P. V.

    2009-12-01

    The northeast Lau basin, the NE “corner” of the Tonga subduction zone, has an unusual concentration of young submarine volcanism and hydrothermal activity. The area is bounded on the west by overlapping spreading centers opening at rates up to 120 mm/yr, on the north by the E-W trending Tonga trench and on the east by the Tofua arc front. From the south, the Fonualei rift spreading center (FRSC) overlaps with the southern rift of The Mangatolo triple junction spreading center (MTJSC). The northern arm of the MTJSC overlaps with the northeast Lau spreading center (NELSC). Surveys of the area with an EM300 sonar system in November 2008 show high backscatter over the 10-20 km wide neovolcanic zones of the FRSC, MTJSC and NELSC. High backscatter is also associated with: (1) a 10-km diameter, hydrothermally active, volcanic caldera/cone (Volcano “O”) lying between the NELSC and the northern Tofua arc front; (2) a rift zone extending north from volcano “O” and intersecting the NELSC near the Tonga trench; and (3) a series of volcanoes constructed along SW-NE trending crustal tears in the northernmost backarc near the east-west portion of the Tonga Trench. Two eruptions were detected in November 2008 during hydrothermal plume surveys of the area. Subsequent dives with the remotely operated vehicle Jason 2 in May 2009 revealed that the southern NELSC eruption was a short-lived, primarily effusive eruption. The second eruption was detected on the summit of the largest SW-NE trending volcano (West Mata) and was ongoing when Jason 2 arrived on site more than 6 months later. It was producing both pillow lavas and abundant volcaniclastic debris streams that have a characteristic appearance on the sonar backscatter map. There is also an unusual series of lava flows emanating from ridges and scarps between Volcano “O” and West Mata. These flows contain drained-out lava ponds up to 2 km in diameter. The apparent high level of volcanic activity in the NE Lau basin

  18. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John JE; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14530.001 PMID:27115346

  19. Feature-specific imaging: Extensions to adaptive object recognition and active illumination based scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baheti, Pawan K.

    Computational imaging (CI) systems are hybrid imagers in which the optical and post-processing sub-systems are jointly optimized to maximize the task-specific performance. In this dissertation we consider a form of CI system that measures the linear projections (i.e., features) of the scene optically, and it is commonly referred to as feature-specific imaging (FSI). Most of the previous work on FSI has been concerned with image reconstruction. Previous FSI techniques have also been non-adaptive and restricted to the use of ambient illumination. We consider two novel extensions of the FSI system in this work. We first present an adaptive feature-specific imaging (AFSI) system and consider its application to a face-recognition task. The proposed system makes use of previous measurements to adapt the projection basis at each step. We present both statistical and information-theoretic adaptation mechanisms for the AFSI system. The sequential hypothesis testing framework is used to determine the number of measurements required for achieving a specified misclassification probability. We demonstrate that AFSI system requires significantly fewer measurements than static-FSI (SFSI) and conventional imaging at low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We also show a trade-off, in terms of average detection time, between measurement SNR and adaptation advantage. Experimental results validating the AFSI system are presented. Next we present a FSI system based on the use of structured light. Feature measurements are obtained by projecting spatially structured illumination onto an object and collecting all of the reflected light onto a single photodetector. We refer to this system as feature-specific structured imaging (FSSI). Principal component features are used to define the illumination patterns. The optimal LMMSE operator is used to generate object estimates from the measurements. We demonstrate that this new imaging approach reduces imager complexity and provides improved image

  20. Relationship Between Wrist Motion and Capitolunate Reduction in Four-Corner Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lamas Gomez, Claudia; Proubasta Renart, Ignacio; Llusa Perez, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The authors retrospectively studied 36 patients with degenerative changes associated with scaphoid nonunion and scapholunate advanced collapse treated with circular plate fixation and bone graft. The goals of the study were to review the incidence of dorsal impingement, nonunion of arthrodesis, loose hardware, broken screws, and limitation in wrist motion associated with correct or incorrect surgical capitolunate reduction. Surgical indications were scapholunate advanced collapse (3 patients), scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (32 patients), and sequelae of irreducible perilunate dislocation (1 patient). All of the patients were men, with a mean age of 48 years (range, 35-68 years). Average follow-up was 56 months (range, 12-108 months). Functional outcomes evaluated were pain with the visual analog scale, range of motion, grip strength, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score, satisfaction, and time to union. Mean visual analog scale score was 7 (range, 5-9) preoperatively and 1 (range, 0-2) postoperatively. Average wrist range of motion was 42° in extension, 36° in flexion, 15° in ulnar deviation, and 12° in radial deviation. Mean grip strength was 34 kg preoperatively, 50 kg postoperatively, and 56 kg contralaterally. Thirty-five of the 36 patients achieved union at 6 months. Degenerative changes at the radiolunate articulation were present in 1 patient 62 months after surgery, but he was asymptomatic. Mean capitolunate angle was 38º preoperatively and 9º postoperatively. Poor correlation was found between the measured capitate-lunate angle and subsequent flexion and extension (r=0.32 and r=0.17, respectively) using the Pearson correlation coefficient. The authors noted 1 or 2 broken screws in 3 cases (8.3%) and hardware dorsal impingement in the plate in 6 cases (16.6%). Mean DASH score was 24 of 100. Overall patient satisfaction was 70%. PMID:26558669

  1. Extensive Post-translational Modification of Active and Inactivated Forms of Endogenous p53*

    PubMed Central

    DeHart, Caroline J.; Chahal, Jasdave S.; Flint, S. J.; Perlman, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein accumulates to very high concentrations in normal human fibroblasts infected by adenovirus type 5 mutants that cannot direct assembly of the viral E1B 55-kDa protein-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets p53 for degradation. Despite high concentrations of nuclear p53, the p53 transcriptional program is not induced in these infected cells. We exploited this system to examine select post-translational modifications (PTMs) present on a transcriptionally inert population of endogenous human p53, as well as on p53 activated in response to etoposide treatment of normal human fibroblasts. These forms of p53 were purified from whole cell lysates by means of immunoaffinity chromatography and SDS-PAGE, and peptides derived from them were subjected to nano-ultra-high-performance LC-MS and MS/MS analyses on a high-resolution accurate-mass MS platform (data available via ProteomeXchange, PXD000464). We identified an unexpectedly large number of PTMs, comprising phosphorylation of Ser and Thr residues, methylation of Arg residues, and acetylation, ubiquitinylation, and methylation of Lys residues—for example, some 150 previously undescribed modifications of p53 isolated from infected cells. These modifications were distributed across all functional domains of both forms of the endogenous human p53 protein, as well as those of an orthologous population of p53 isolated from COS-1 cells. Despite the differences in activity, including greater in vitro sequence-specific DNA binding activity exhibited by p53 isolated from etoposide-treated cells, few differences were observed in the location, nature, or relative frequencies of PTMs on the two populations of human p53. Indeed, the wealth of PTMs that we have identified is consistent with a far greater degree of complex, combinatorial regulation of p53 by PTM than previously anticipated. PMID:24056736

  2. Small Molecule APY606 Displays Extensive Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer via Impairing Ras-MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Na; Liu, Zuojia; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been found with abnormal expression or mutation in Ras proteins. Oncogenic Ras activation exploits their extensive signaling reach to affect multiple cellular processes, in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling exerts important roles in tumorigenesis. Therapies targeted Ras are thus of major benefit for pancreatic cancer. Although small molecule APY606 has been successfully picked out by virtual drug screening based on Ras target receptor, its in-depth mechanism remains to be elucidated. We herein assessed the antitumor activity of APY606 against human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 and SW1990 cell lines and explored the effect of Ras-MAPK and apoptosis-related signaling pathway on the activity of APY606. APY606 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cancer cell viability. Additionally, APY606 exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced not only by reduction in tumor cell invasion, migration and mitochondrial membrane potential but also by alteration in several apoptotic indexes. Furthermore, APY606 treatment directly inhibited Ras-GTP and the downstream activation of MAPK, which resulted in the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, leading to the up-regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-related proteins (Bax, cytosolic Cytochrome c and Caspase 3) and of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and Cyclin A, E. These data suggest that impairing Ras-MAPK signaling is a novel mechanism of action for APY606 during therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27223122

  3. Small Molecule APY606 Displays Extensive Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer via Impairing Ras-MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Na; Liu, Zuojia; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been found with abnormal expression or mutation in Ras proteins. Oncogenic Ras activation exploits their extensive signaling reach to affect multiple cellular processes, in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling exerts important roles in tumorigenesis. Therapies targeted Ras are thus of major benefit for pancreatic cancer. Although small molecule APY606 has been successfully picked out by virtual drug screening based on Ras target receptor, its in-depth mechanism remains to be elucidated. We herein assessed the antitumor activity of APY606 against human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 and SW1990 cell lines and explored the effect of Ras-MAPK and apoptosis-related signaling pathway on the activity of APY606. APY606 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cancer cell viability. Additionally, APY606 exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced not only by reduction in tumor cell invasion, migration and mitochondrial membrane potential but also by alteration in several apoptotic indexes. Furthermore, APY606 treatment directly inhibited Ras-GTP and the downstream activation of MAPK, which resulted in the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, leading to the up-regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-related proteins (Bax, cytosolic Cytochrome c and Caspase 3) and of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and Cyclin A, E. These data suggest that impairing Ras-MAPK signaling is a novel mechanism of action for APY606 during therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27223122

  4. Partition of voluntary command to antagonist muscles during cyclic flexion-extension of the hand.

    PubMed

    Esposti, Roberto; Cavallari, Paolo; Baldissera, Fausto

    2005-05-01

    Activity distribution between wrist movers during rhythmic flexion-extension of the wrist has been analysed in three different mechanical conditions. Wrist angular position and surface EMG from Extensor Carpi Radialis (ECR) and Flexor Carpi Radialis (FCR) were recorded. In the first condition (hand prone, flexion-extension in a vertical parasagittal plane) the hand passive equilibrium position was approximately 50 degrees in flexion. During hand oscillations FCR and ECR were alternatively recruited to move the hand symmetrically away from the equilibrium and de-recruited to allow conservative forces to restore the equilibrium. Switching between antagonists occurred at the centre of the oscillation (equilibrium crossing). In the second condition (hand semi-prone, flexion-extension in a horizontal transversal plane) the hand equilibrium was attained over an angle of about 26 degrees . When the hand was oscillated symmetrically around this equilibrium range, each muscle was recruited when the hand entered the equilibrium range and switching between antagonists therefore occurred in advance of the oscillation centre. Both vertical and horizontal oscillations were also performed all externally to the equilibrium position or range: in these cases only one muscle was recruited over the entire cycle, the EMG burst starting at the onset of the related movement. In the third condition (hand semi-prone, flexion-extension in a horizontal transversal plane) a frictional load added to the platform pivot expanded the equilibrium range to encompass the entire hand oscillation. Now concentric muscle contraction was needed throughout each phase of the movement and switching between antagonists occurred at the movement reversal, i.e. ~90 degrees in advance of the oscillation centre. The above descriptions held for oscillation frequencies from 0.2 Hz to 3.0 Hz, once the frequency-dependent effects of viscosity and inertia were accounted for. In all the three conditions, contractile

  5. NASA Common Research Model Test Envelope Extension With Active Sting Damping at NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Melissa B.; Balakrishna, S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Common Research Model (CRM) high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnel testing program was established to generate an experimental database for applied Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation studies. During transonic wind tunnel tests, the CRM encounters large sting vibrations when the angle of attack approaches the second pitching moment break, which can sometimes become divergent. CRM transonic test data analysis suggests that sting divergent oscillations are related to negative net sting damping episodes associated with flow separation instability. The National Transonic Facility (NTF) has been addressing remedies to extend polar testing up to and beyond the second pitching moment break point of the test articles using an active piezoceramic damper system for both ambient and cryogenic temperatures. This paper reviews CRM test results to gain understanding of sting dynamics with a simple model describing the mechanics of a sting-model system and presents the performance of the damper under cryogenic conditions.

  6. Restoring ADL function after wrist surgery in children with cerebral palsy: a novel Bilateral robot system design.

    PubMed

    Holley, D; Theriault, A; Kamara, S; Anewenter, V; Hughes, D; Johnson, M J

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral palsy is a leading cause of disability in children and reducing its effects on arm function will improve quality of life. Our goal is to train children with CP after wrist tendon transfer surgery using a robotic therapy system consisting of two robot arms and wrist robots. The therapeutic goal is to determine if the robot training combined with surgery intervention improved functional outcomes significantly more than surgery alone. To accomplish this long-term goal we have developed a Bilateral ADL Exercise Robot, BiADLER aimed at training children with CP in reach to grasp coordination on ADLs. Specifically, the robot will provide active training using an assist-as-needed. This paper presents the design concepts. PMID:24187280

  7. The contribution of motor commands to position sense differs between elbow and wrist

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Lee D; Proske, Uwe; Allen, Trevor J; Gandevia, Simon C

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that centrally generated motor commands contribute to the perception of position and movement at the wrist, but not at the elbow. Because the wrist and elbow experiments used different methods, this study was designed to resolve the discrepancy. Two methods were used to test both the elbow and wrist (20 subjects each). For the wrist, subjects sat with their right arm strapped to a device that restricted movement to the wrist. Before each test, voluntary contraction of wrist flexor or extensor muscles controlled for muscle spindle thixotropy. After relaxation, the wrist was moved to a test angle. Position was indicated either with a pointer, or by matching with the contralateral wrist, under two conditions: when the reference wrist was relaxed or when its muscles were contracted isometrically (30% maximum). The elbow experiment used the same design to measure position sense in the passive elbow and with elbow muscles contracting (30% maximum). At the wrist when using a pointer, muscle contraction altered significantly the perceived wrist angle in the direction of contraction by 7 deg [3 deg, 12 deg] (mean [95% confidence interval]) with a flexor contraction and 8 deg [4 deg, 12 deg] with an extensor contraction. Similarly, in the wrist matching task, there was a change of 13 deg [9 deg, 16 deg] with a flexor contraction and 4 deg [1 deg, 8 deg] with an extensor contraction. In contrast, contraction of elbow flexors or extensors did not alter significantly the perceived position of the elbow, compared with rest. The contribution of central commands to position sense differs between the elbow and the wrist. PMID:24099798

  8. Evidence of parasexual activity in "asexual amoebae" Cochliopodium spp. (Amoebozoa): extensive cellular and nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Tekle, Yonas I; Anderson, O Roger; Lecky, Ariel F

    2014-09-01

    The majority of microbial eukaryotes have long been considered asexual, though new evidence indicates sex, or sexual-like (parasexual) behaviors that deviate from the usual union of two gametes, among other variant aspects. Over a dozen amoebozoans are implicated to have sexual stages. However, the exact mechanism by which sex occurs in these lineages remains elusive. This is mainly due to the diverse quality and cryptic nature of their life cycle. In this study we present evidence of some previously unreported aspects of the life cycle of an amoeba, Cochliopodium, that undergoes unusual intraspecific interactions using light microscopy and immunocytochemistry. Similar to other amoebozoans, Cochliopodium, is considered asexual with no published reports of sex or parasexuality. We also investigated environmental conditions that govern the observed intraspecific interactions. Both light microscopic and immunocytochemistry evidence demonstrates Cochliopodium undergoes cellular fusion (plasmogamy) and nuclear fusion (karyogamy). Large plasmodia eventually undergo karyogamy and contain large fused, polyploid, nuclei. These are observed to fragment, subsequently, by karyotomy (nuclear fission) and cytoplasmic fission to yield uninucleated amoebae. This process could lead to a non-meiotic, parasexual exchange of chromosomes in Cochliopodium. These findings strongly suggest that Cochliopodium is involved in parasexual activity and should no longer be considered strictly asexual. PMID:25168314

  9. Within- and between-session reliability of the maximal voluntary knee extension torque and activation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihong; Hopkins, J Ty

    2013-01-01

    A ratio between the torque generated by maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and exogenous electrical stimulus, central activation ratio (CAR), has been widely used to assess quadriceps function. To date, no data exist regarding between-session reliability of this measurement. Thirteen neurologically sound volunteers underwent three testing sessions (three trials per session) with 48 hours between-session. Subjects performed MVICs of the quadriceps with the knee locked at 90° flexion and the hip at 85°. Once the MVIC reached a plateau, an electrical stimulation from superimposed burst technique (SIB: 125 V with peak output current 450 mA) was manually delivered and transmitted directly to the quadriceps via stimulating electrodes. CAR was calculated by using the following equation: CAR = MVIC torque/MVIC + SIB torque. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated within- (ICC((2,1))) and between-session (ICC((2,k))) for MVIC torques and CAR values. Our data show that quadriceps MVIC and CAR are very reliable both within- (ICC((2,1)) = 0.99 for MVIC; 0.94 for CAR) and between-measurement sessions (ICC((2,k)) = 0.92 for MVIC; 0.86 for CAR) in healthy young adults. For clinical research, more data of the patients with pathological conditions are required to ensure reproducibility of calculation of CAR. PMID:23009562

  10. 1st place, PREMUS 1 best paper competition: workplace and individual factors in wrist tendinosis among blue-collar workers – the San Francisco study

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Carisa; Eisen, Ellen A; Goldberg, Robert; Krause, Niklas; Rempel, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective Workplace studies have linked hand/wrist tendinosis to forceful and repetitive hand exertions, but the associations are not consistent. We report findings from a prospective study of right wrist tendinosis among blue-collar workers. Methods Workers (N=413) at four industries were followed for 28 months with questionnaires and physical examinations every 4 months to identify incident cases of right wrist tendinosis. Exposure assessment of force and repetition were based on field measurements and video analysis to determine repetition rate and the percent time (% time) in heavy pinch (>1 kg-force) or power grip (>4 kg-force). All exposure variables were measured at the level of the individual and task. For workers responsible for >1 task, a time-weighted average exposure was calculated based on task hours per week. A proportional hazards model was used to assess the relationship between exposures and incidence of wrist tendinosis. Results During the 481 person-years of follow-up, there were 26 incident cases of right wrist tendinosis [incidence rate (IR) 5.40 cases per 100 person-years]. Adjusting for age, gender, and repetition, wrist tendinosis was associated with % time spent in heavy pinch [hazard ratio (HR) 5.01, 95% CI 1.27–19.79]. Composite exposure measure American Conference of Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Value (ACGIH-TLV) for hand activity level (HR 3.95, 95% CI 1.52–10.26) was also associated with the outcome for the medium-exposure group using video-based total repetition rate. Conclusions The workplace factors predicting wrist tendinosis were time-weighted average values of % time spent in heavy pinch and the ACGIH-TLV for Hand Activity Level. The % time spent in power grip was not a significant predictor, nor were any measures of repetition. An exposure–response relationship was observed for the % time spent in heavy pinch. These findings may improve programs for preventing occupational wrist tendinosis. PMID:21298225

  11. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Atsuya; Souza, Felipe; Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. PMID:20012039

  12. Modulation of human motoneuron activity by a mental arithmetic task.

    PubMed

    Bensoussan, Laurent; Duclos, Yann; Rossi-Durand, Christiane

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the performance of a mental task affects motoneuron activity. To this end, the tonic discharge pattern of wrist extensor motor units was analyzed in healthy subjects while they were required to maintain a steady wrist extension force and to concurrently perform a mental arithmetic (MA) task. A shortening of the mean inter-spike interval (ISI) and a decrease in ISI variability occurred when MA task was superimposed to the motor task. Aloud and silent MA affected equally the rate and variability of motoneuron discharge. Increases in surface EMG activity and force level were consistent with the modulation of the motor unit discharge rate. Trial-by-trial analysis of the characteristics of motor unit firing revealed that performing MA increases activation of wrist extensor SMU. It is suggested that increase in muscle spindle afferent activity, resulting from fusimotor drive activation by MA, may have contributed to the increase in synaptic inputs to motoneurons during the mental task performance, likely together with enhancement in the descending drive. The finding that a mental task affects motoneuron activity could have consequences in assessment of motor disabilities and in rehabilitation in motor pathologies. PMID:23159444

  13. WRIST ARTHRODESIS WITH MINIMAL FIXATION PRESERVING THE CARPOMETACARPAL JOINTS

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, Arlindo Gomes; Pádua Gonçalves, Rodolfo Fonseca; Freitas, Afrânio Donato; Chaves, Antonio Barbosa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Wrist arthrodesis is a surgical procedure that should always be considered in cases of pathological conditions in which anatomical and functional structures are altered. In general, the results are very satisfactory, particularly for pain relief, and in the majority of cases, there is considerable functional improvement. Various techniques have been described, with different methods of internal fixation, most of which include the carpometacarpal joints in the fusion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results from wrist arthrodesis using a technique that is simpler, more biological, less expensive, and does not involve the carpometacarpal joints. Methods: Fifteen patients with wrist arthrodesis were evaluated (six with sequelae from trauma, four with rheumatoid arthritis, three with Kienbock grade IV, one with Preiser and one with panarthrosis). The technique consisted of using an iliac bone plate and internal fixation with Kirschner wires, avoiding the carpometacarpal joints. Results: The evaluation was based on consolidation time (93% in seven weeks); movements of the fingers and pronosupination; pinch and grasp strength; functional evaluation through the DASH, pain and patient satisfaction questionnaires. In general, the results were similar to those of other, more aggressive techniques, and the non-inclusion of the carpometacarpal joints did not affect the final result. Conclusion: Wrist arthrodesis with fixation using Kirschner wires and an iliac bone plate, preserving the carpometacarpal joints, gives good or excellent results that are not inferior to those of other techniques that have been described. However, it presents major advantages over other methods: it is less aggressive and cheaper, and does not have the inconvenience and complications associated with the use of plates and screws. PMID:27022522

  14. Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy for Ulnar-Sided Wrist Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tatebe, Masahiro; Nishizuka, Takanobu; Hirata, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Ryogo

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of ulnar shortening osteotomy is literally to shorten the ulna. It can tighten the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), ulnocarpal ligaments, and interosseous membrane. Nowadays, this method is used to treat ulnar-sided wrist pain, for which we have also started to use a treatment algorithm. The purpose of this study was to review the long-term and clinical results based on our algorithm. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with ulnocarpal impaction syndrome after a minimum follow-up of 5 years (Group A) and then retrospectively evaluated 66 patients with recalcitrant ulnar wrist pain treated based on our algorithm (Group B). Description of Technique Ulnocarpal abutment was confirmed arthroscopically. The distal ulna was approached through a longitudinal incision between the extensor carpi ulnaris and flexor carpi ulnaris. We performed a transverse resection of the ulna fixed with a small locking compression plate. The contralateral side served as the reference for the length of shortening (mean, 2.4 mm; range, 1–5 mm). Disappearance of ulnar abutment was then confirmed again arthroscopically. Results (Group A) Most patients showed good long-term clinical results. About half of the patients showed a bony spur at the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ), but the clinical results did not significantly correlate with presence of bony spurs. Radiological parameters wre not related to the presence of bony spurs. (Group B) Twenty-four of the 66 patients investigated prospectively underwent an ulnar shortening osteotomy, with all showing good clinical results at 18 months postoperatively. Conclusions Ulnar shortening osteotomy can change the load of the ulnar side of the wrist and appears useful for ulnar-sided wrist pain in the presence of ulnar impaction. Level of evidence IV PMID:25077045

  15. Volar wrist ganglion excision through the flexor carpi radialis sheath.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Gregory A; DaSilva, Manuel F; Akelman, Edward

    2012-09-01

    Volar wrist ganglions are much less frequent than their dorsal counterparts but provide much more surgical trepidation due to their proximity to the radial artery. With the majority arising from the radiocarpal joint, we have found that entering the flexor carpi radialis sheath and accessing the ganglion through the floor of the sheath allows for a relatively safe excision of these benign hand tumors. PMID:22913995

  16. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  17. Deep conservation of wrist and digit enhancers in fish.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Andrew R; Schneider, Igor; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Tena, Juan J; Gomez-Marin, Carlos; Chandran, Mayuri; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Braasch, Ingo; Postlethwait, John H; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Shubin, Neil H

    2015-01-20

    There is no obvious morphological counterpart of the autopod (wrist/ankle and digits) in living fishes. Comparative molecular data may provide insight into understanding both the homology of elements and the evolutionary developmental mechanisms behind the fin to limb transition. In mouse limbs the autopod is built by a "late" phase of Hoxd and Hoxa gene expression, orchestrated by a set of enhancers located at the 5' end of each cluster. Despite a detailed mechanistic understanding of mouse limb development, interpretation of Hox expression patterns and their regulation in fish has spawned multiple hypotheses as to the origin and function of "autopod" enhancers throughout evolution. Using phylogenetic footprinting, epigenetic profiling, and transgenic reporters, we have identified and functionally characterized hoxD and hoxA enhancers in the genomes of zebrafish and the spotted gar, Lepisosteus oculatus, a fish lacking the whole genome duplication of teleosts. Gar and zebrafish "autopod" enhancers drive expression in the distal portion of developing zebrafish pectoral fins, and respond to the same functional cues as their murine orthologs. Moreover, gar enhancers drive reporter gene expression in both the wrist and digits of mouse embryos in patterns that are nearly indistinguishable from their murine counterparts. These functional genomic data support the hypothesis that the distal radials of bony fish are homologous to the wrist and/or digits of tetrapods. PMID:25535365

  18. Deep conservation of wrist and digit enhancers in fish

    PubMed Central

    Gehrke, Andrew R.; Schneider, Igor; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Tena, Juan J.; Gomez-Marin, Carlos; Chandran, Mayuri; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Braasch, Ingo; Postlethwait, John H.; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Shubin, Neil H.

    2015-01-01

    There is no obvious morphological counterpart of the autopod (wrist/ankle and digits) in living fishes. Comparative molecular data may provide insight into understanding both the homology of elements and the evolutionary developmental mechanisms behind the fin to limb transition. In mouse limbs the autopod is built by a “late” phase of Hoxd and Hoxa gene expression, orchestrated by a set of enhancers located at the 5′ end of each cluster. Despite a detailed mechanistic understanding of mouse limb development, interpretation of Hox expression patterns and their regulation in fish has spawned multiple hypotheses as to the origin and function of “autopod” enhancers throughout evolution. Using phylogenetic footprinting, epigenetic profiling, and transgenic reporters, we have identified and functionally characterized hoxD and hoxA enhancers in the genomes of zebrafish and the spotted gar, Lepisosteus oculatus, a fish lacking the whole genome duplication of teleosts. Gar and zebrafish “autopod” enhancers drive expression in the distal portion of developing zebrafish pectoral fins, and respond to the same functional cues as their murine orthologs. Moreover, gar enhancers drive reporter gene expression in both the wrist and digits of mouse embryos in patterns that are nearly indistinguishable from their murine counterparts. These functional genomic data support the hypothesis that the distal radials of bony fish are homologous to the wrist and/or digits of tetrapods. PMID:25535365

  19. Neuroarthropathy of the Wrist in Paraplegia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shem, Kazuko L

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: Neuroarthropathy, also known as Charcot joint, is most commonly seen in the spine and other weight-bearing joints in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). It is rarely seen in the joints of the upper extremities because the pathophysiology of the neuroarthropathy is thought to be significant repetitive trauma such as with weight bearing in an insensate joint. Methods: Case report of neuroarthropathy in the wrist of a 46-year-old man with a 30-year history of T4 paraplegia caused by ependymoma. Results: The patient recently developed a nonpainful swelling in the left wrist, which had decreased sensation since the time of his initial SCI. Radiological evaluation showed marked degenerative changes consistent with neuroarthropathy. A magnetic resonance image of the spine showed spinal cord atrophy at the cervicothoracic junction. Conclusions: This case shows an unusual presentation of a neuroarthropathy in a wrist in an individual with functional paraplegia. Because the treatment options for neuroarthropathy in the upper extremity in individuals with SCI are limited, early diagnosis is crucial to implement conservative management before significant destruction of the joint occurs. PMID:17044396

  20. The management of wrist injuries: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Elias, Marc; Folgar, Miguel Angel Vidal

    2006-11-01

    Wrist injury is common and may significantly impair the overall function of the upper extremity unless properly managed. Fractures of the distal radius are particularly common among the aging population, accounting for nearly 1/6 of all fractures, often as a result of increased longevity with the subsequent underlying osteoporosis. New diagnostic tools, including wrist arthroscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, or computed tomography, are increasingly available in developed countries allowing accurate recognition and more effective resolution of lesions which would be otherwise missed using conventional methods. First world treatment standards, however, can scarcely be introduced in developing countries owing to, among other factors, different prevalence of problems, and the lack of resource to implement most modern technologies. If any program needs to be introduced that meets the demands of wrist injury management in the third world, aside from a better regionalisation of trauma care, it should emphasise adequate training of professionals in the use of more cost effective techniques of fracture reduction and stabilisation, applicable everywhere, with the minimum possible morbidity. PMID:17049527