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Sample records for active zone molecule

  1. Small molecule inhibitors of the Pyk2 and FAK kinases modulate chemoattractant-induced migration, adhesion and Akt activation in follicular and marginal zone B cells.

    PubMed

    Tse, Kathy W K; Lin, Kevin B L; Dang-Lawson, May; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Aspnes, Gary E; Buckbinder, Leonard; Gold, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    B-lymphocytes produce protective antibodies but also contribute to autoimmunity. In particular, marginal zone (MZ) B cells recognize both microbial components and self-antigens. B cell trafficking is critical for B cell activation and is controlled by chemoattactants such as CXCL13 and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). The related tyrosine kinases focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and proline-rich tyrosine kinase (Pyk2) regulate cell migration and adhesion but their roles in B cells are not fully understood. Using a novel Pyk2-selective inhibitor described herein (PF-719), as well as a FAK-selective inhibitor, we show that both Pyk2 and FAK are important for CXCL13- and S1P-induced migration of B-2 cells and MZ B cells. In contrast, LFA-1-mediated adhesion required only Pyk2 whereas activation of the Akt pro-survival kinase required FAK but not Pyk2. Thus Pyk2 and FAK mediate critical processes in B cells and these inhibitors can be used to further elucidate their functions in B cells. PMID:22507871

  2. Serpentine in active subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Serpentinization is a key phenomenon for understanding the geodynamics of subduction zones in the 10-200 km depth range. Serpentines are a major water carrier, and their rheological properties have a strong influence on deformation partitioning and seismicity at depths. I review experimental investigations that have been conducted on serpentines, with emphasis on the large body of data acquired over the past decade. Determinations of physical properties at the pressure and temperature conditions of subductions allow interpreting geophysical data in active subduction in terms of mineralogy and petrology, and to link the presence of serpentinites with deformation and fluid circulation. The fluid budget can be partially constrained from geophysical data. Elasticity data provide a quantitative basis for mapping serpentinization in the mantle wedge and slab from seismic tomography. Anisotropy suggests the existence of thin serpentinite channels above the plate interface, that account for mechanical decoupling inferred from down-dip limit of the seismogenic zone and heat flow. Strain-rate dependent rheology of antigorite serpentine is consistent with stable deformation of this thin layer or channel over timescales ranging from those of the seismic cycle to those of thermal equilibration and exhumation of high-pressure rocks, and with the geological record of subduction-related deformation. Circulation of serpentinizing fluids depends on the permeability structure, and is imaged by electrical conductivity tomography. It could be controlled by fracturing in the undeformed cold nose of the mantle wedge, and by plastic deformation along the plate interface. Fluid migration mechanisms are similar to those inferred from petrological and geochemical data on exhumed serpentinites. Estimation of the fluid budget associated with serpentine formation will rely on numerical simulations for which coupling of kinetics of hydration and dehydration at scales ranging from grain size up

  3. Rab3-interacting molecules 2α and 2β promote the abundance of voltage-gated CaV1.3 Ca2+ channels at hair cell active zones

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sangyong; Oshima-Takago, Tomoko; Chakrabarti, Rituparna; Wong, Aaron B.; Jing, Zhizi; Yamanbaeva, Gulnara; Picher, Maria Magdalena; Wojcik, Sonja M.; Göttfert, Fabian; Predoehl, Friederike; Michel, Katrin; Hell, Stefan W.; Schoch, Susanne; Strenzke, Nicola; Wichmann, Carolin; Moser, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ influx triggers the fusion of synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic active zone (AZ). Here we demonstrate a role of Ras-related in brain 3 (Rab3)–interacting molecules 2α and β (RIM2α and RIM2β) in clustering voltage-gated CaV1.3 Ca2+ channels at the AZs of sensory inner hair cells (IHCs). We show that IHCs of hearing mice express mainly RIM2α, but also RIM2β and RIM3γ, which all localize to the AZs, as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunohistochemistry, patch-clamp, fluctuation analysis, and confocal Ca2+ imaging demonstrate that AZs of RIM2α-deficient IHCs cluster fewer synaptic CaV1.3 Ca2+ channels, resulting in reduced synaptic Ca2+ influx. Using superresolution microscopy, we found that Ca2+ channels remained clustered in stripes underneath anchored ribbons. Electron tomography of high-pressure frozen synapses revealed a reduced fraction of membrane-tethered vesicles, whereas the total number of membrane-proximal vesicles was unaltered. Membrane capacitance measurements revealed a reduction of exocytosis largely in proportion with the Ca2+ current, whereas the apparent Ca2+ dependence of exocytosis was unchanged. Hair cell-specific deletion of all RIM2 isoforms caused a stronger reduction of Ca2+ influx and exocytosis and significantly impaired the encoding of sound onset in the postsynaptic spiral ganglion neurons. Auditory brainstem responses indicated a mild hearing impairment on hair cell-specific deletion of all RIM2 isoforms or global inactivation of RIM2α. We conclude that RIM2α and RIM2β promote a large complement of synaptic Ca2+ channels at IHC AZs and are required for normal hearing. PMID:26034270

  4. Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra for large molecules through the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. The relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments are used to build the property tensors of the parent molecule to enable the extension of the MIM method for evaluating ROA spectra (MIM-ROA). Two factors were found to be particularly important in yielding accurate results. First, the link-atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, yielding a mathematically rigorous method. Second, the long-range interactions between fragments are taken into account by using a less computationally expensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM-ROA model is calibrated on the enantiomeric pairs of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and ROA intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-ROA method is employed to predict the ROA spectra of d-maltose, α-D-cyclodextrin, and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in excellent agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-ROA model for exploring ROA spectra of large molecules. PMID:26760444

  5. Uranium-mediated activation of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Polly L

    2011-08-28

    Molecular complexes of uranium are capable of activating a range of industrially and economically important small molecules such as CO, CO(2), and N(2); new and often unexpected reactions provide insight into an element that needs to be well-understood if future clean-energy solutions are to involve nuclear power. PMID:21614341

  6. Attachment of second harmonic-active moiety to molecules for detection of molecules at interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Salafsky, Joshua S.; Eisenthal, Kenneth B.

    2005-10-11

    This invention provides methods of detecting molecules at an interface, which comprise labeling the molecules with a second harmonic-active moiety and detecting the labeled molecules at the interface using a surface selective technique. The invention also provides methods for detecting a molecule in a medium and for determining the orientation of a molecular species within a planar surface using a second harmonic-active moiety and a surface selective technique.

  7. Activation of small molecules by phosphorus biradicaloids.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Alexander; Kuzora, Rene; Rosenthal, Uwe; Schulz, Axel; Villinger, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    The reactivity of biradicaloid [P(μ-NTer)]2 was employed to activate small molecules bearing single, double, and triple bonds. Addition of chalcogens (O2 , S8 , Sex and Tex ) led to the formation of dichalcogen-bridged P2 N2 heterocycles, except from the reaction with molecular oxygen, which gave a P2 N2 ring featuring a dicoordinated P(III) and a four-coordinated P(V) center. In formal [2πe+2πe] addition reactions, small unsaturated compounds such as ethylene, acetylene, acetone, acetonitrile, tolane, diphenylcarbodiimide, and bis(trimethylsilyl)sulfurdiimide are readily added to the P2 N2 heterocycle of the biradicaloid [P(μ-NTer)]2 , yielding novel heteroatom cage compounds. The synthesis, reactivity, and bonding of the biradicaloid [P(μ-NTer)]2 were studied in detail as well as the synthesis, properties, and structural features of all addition products. PMID:25266101

  8. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention. PMID:27148040

  9. Molecular Mechanism of Active Zone Organization at Vertebrate Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Organization of presynaptic active zones is essential for development, plasticity, and pathology of the nervous system. Recent studies indicate a trans-synaptic molecular mechanism that organizes the active zones by connecting the pre- and the postsynaptic specialization. The presynaptic component of this trans-synaptic mechanism is comprised of cytosolic active zone proteins bound to the cytosolic domains of voltage-dependent calcium channels (P/Q-, N-, and L-type) on the presynaptic membrane. The postsynaptic component of this mechanism is the synapse organizer (laminin β2) that is expressed by the postsynaptic cell and accumulates specifically on top of the postsynaptic specialization. The pre- and the postsynaptic components interact directly between the extracellular domains of calcium channels and laminin β2 to anchor the presynaptic protein complex in front of the postsynaptic specialization. Hence, the presynaptic calcium channel functions as a scaffolding protein for active zone organization and as an ion-conducting channel for synaptic transmission. In contrast to the requirement of calcium influx for synaptic transmission, the formation of the active zone does not require the calcium influx through the calcium channels. Importantly, the active zones of adult synapses are not stable structures and require maintenance for their integrity. Furthermore, aging or diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system impair the active zones. This review will focus on the molecular mechanisms that organize the presynaptic active zones and summarize recent findings at the neuromuscular junctions and other synapses. PMID:22135013

  10. Microscopy beyond the diffraction limit using actively controlled single molecules

    PubMed Central

    MOERNER, W.E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this short review, the general principles are described for obtaining microscopic images with resolution beyond the optical diffraction limit with single molecules. Although it has been known for several decades that single-molecule emitters can blink or turn on and off, in recent work the addition of on/off control of molecular emission to maintain concentrations at very low levels in each imaging frame combined with sequential imaging of sparse subsets has enabled the reconstruction of images with resolution far below the optical diffraction limit. Single-molecule active control microscopy provides a powerful window into information about nanoscale structures that was previously unavailable. PMID:22582796

  11. Molecules and mechanisms that regulate multipolar migration in the intermediate zone

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Most neurons migrate with an elongated, “bipolar” morphology, extending a long leading process that explores the environment. However, when immature projection neurons enter the intermediate zone (IZ) of the neocortex they become “multipolar”. Multipolar cells extend and retract cytoplasmic processes in different directions and move erratically—sideways, up and down. Multipolar cells extend axons while they are in the lower half of the IZ. Remarkably, the cells then resume radial migration: they reorient their centrosome and Golgi apparatus towards the pia, transform back to bipolar morphology, and commence locomotion along radial glia (RG) fibers. This reorientation implies the existence of directional signals in the IZ that are ignored during the multipolar stage but sensed after axonogenesis. In vivo genetic manipulation has implicated a variety of candidate directional signals, cell surface receptors, and signaling pathways, that may be involved in polarizing multipolar cells and stabilizing a pia-directed leading process for radial migration. Other signals are implicated in starting multipolar migration and triggering axon outgrowth. Here we review the molecules and mechanisms that regulate multipolar migration, and also discuss how multipolar migration affects the orderly arrangement of neurons in layers and columns in the developing neocortex. PMID:25452716

  12. Identification of Biologically Active, HIV TAR RNA-Binding Small Molecules Using Small Molecule Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Identifying small molecules that selectively bind to structured RNA motifs remains an important challenge in developing potent and specific therapeutics. Most strategies to find RNA-binding molecules have identified highly charged compounds or aminoglycosides that commonly have modest selectivity. Here we demonstrate a strategy to screen a large unbiased library of druglike small molecules in a microarray format against an RNA target. This approach has enabled the identification of a novel chemotype that selectively targets the HIV transactivation response (TAR) RNA hairpin in a manner not dependent on cationic charge. Thienopyridine 4 binds to and stabilizes the TAR hairpin with a Kd of 2.4 μM. Structure–activity relationships demonstrate that this compound achieves activity through hydrophobic and aromatic substituents on a heterocyclic core, rather than cationic groups typically required. Selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) analysis was performed on a 365-nucleotide sequence derived from the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of the HIV-1 genome to determine global structural changes in the presence of the molecule. Importantly, the interaction of compound 4 can be mapped to the TAR hairpin without broadly disrupting any other structured elements of the 5′ UTR. Cell-based anti-HIV assays indicated that 4 inhibits HIV-induced cytopathicity in T lymphocytes with an EC50 of 28 μM, while cytotoxicity was not observed at concentrations approaching 1 mM. PMID:24820959

  13. Active zones of mammalian neuromuscular junctions: formation, density, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Presynaptic active zones are synaptic vesicle release sites that playessential roles in the function and pathology of mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The molecular mechanisms of active zone organization utilize presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in NMJs as scaffolding proteins. VDCCs interact extracellularly with the muscle-derived synapse organizer, laminin β2, and interact intracellularly with active zone-specific proteins, such as Bassoon, CAST/Erc2/ELKS2alpha, ELKS, Piccolo, and RIMs. These molecular mechanisms are supported by studies in P/Q- and N-type VDCCs double-knockout mice, and they are consistent with the pathological conditions of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and Pierson syndrome, which are caused by autoantibodies against VDCCs or by a laminin β2 mutation. During normal postnatal maturation, NMJs maintain the density of active zones, while NMJs triple their size. However, active zones become impaired during aging. Propitiously, muscle exercise ameliorates the active zone impairment in aged NMJs, which suggests the potential for therapeutic strategies. PMID:23252894

  14. On the biological activity of drug molecules: Busulfan and nabumetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2010-10-01

    The electronic structures of drug molecules busulfan (BSU) and nabumetone (NAB) have been investigated by HeI and HeII UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and virtual docking studies. Their biological activities are discussed in the framework of their electronic and molecular structures, reactivity and drug-enzyme binding.

  15. Self-assembly of active colloidal molecules with dynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    Catalytically active colloids maintain non-equilibrium conditions in which they produce and deplete chemicals at their surface. While individual colloids that are symmetrically coated do not exhibit dynamical activity, the concentration fields resulting from their chemical activity decay as 1/r and produce gradients that attract or repel other colloids depending on their surface chemistry and ambient variables. This results in a non-equilibrium analogue of ionic systems, but with the remarkable novel feature of action-reaction symmetry breaking. In dilute conditions these active colloids join up to form molecules via generalized ionic bonds. Colloids are found to join up to form self-assembled molecules that could be inert or have spontaneous activity in the form of net translational velocity and spin depending on their symmetry properties and their constituents. As the interactions do not satisfy detailed-balance, it is possible to achieve structures with time dependent functionality. We study a molecule that adopts spontaneous oscillations and another that exhibits a run-and-tumble dynamics similar to bacteria. Our study shows that catalytically active colloids could be used for designing self-assembled structures that posses dynamical functionalities.

  16. Is There any Relationship Between Active Tabriz Fault Zone and Bozkush Fault Zones, NW Iran?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ISIK, V.; Saber, R.; Caglayan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Tectonic plate motions and consequent earthquakes can be actively observed along the northwestern Iran. The Tabriz fault zone (TFZ), also called the North Tabriz fault, active right-lateral strike-slip fault zone with slip rates estimated as ~8 mm/yr, has been vigorously deforming much of northwestern Iran for over the past several million years. Historical earthquakes on the TFZ consist of large magnitude, complimentary rupture length and changed the landscape of regions surrounding the fault zone. The TFZ in the city of Bostanabad is more segmented with several strands and joined by a series of WNW-ESE trending faults, called the Bozkush fault zones. The Bozkush fault zones (BFZ's) (south and north), bounding arch-shaped Bozkush mountains, generates not only hundreds of small earthquakes each year but also has provided significant earthquakes that have been historically documented. The rock units deformed within the BFZ's include Eocene-Oligocene volcanic rocks with intercalation limestone, Oligo-Miocene clastic rocks with intercalation gypsiferous marl and Plio-Quaternary volcano-sedimentary rocks, travertine and alluvium. The North and South Bozkush fault zones are characterized by development of structures typically associated with transpression. These include right-lateral strike-slip faults, thrust faults and foldings. Our field studies indicate that these zones include step to sub-vertical fault surfaces trending NW and NE with slickenlines. Slickensides preserve brittle kinematic indicators (e.g., Riedel shear patterns, slickenside marks) suggesting both dextral displacements and top-to-the-NE/NW and-SE/SW sense of shearing. Besides, mesoscopic and microscopic ductile kinematic indicators (e.g., asymmetric porphyroclasts, C/S fabrics) within Miocene gypsum marl show dextral displacements. Fault rocks along most of these faults consist of incohesive fault breccia and gauge. Adjacent to the fault contact evidence of bedding in Oligo-Miocene and Plio

  17. Biased and unbiased strategies to identify biologically active small molecules.

    PubMed

    Abet, Valentina; Mariani, Angelica; Truscott, Fiona R; Britton, Sébastien; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2014-08-15

    Small molecules are central players in chemical biology studies. They promote the perturbation of cellular processes underlying diseases and enable the identification of biological targets that can be validated for therapeutic intervention. Small molecules have been shown to accurately tune a single function of pluripotent proteins in a reversible manner with exceptional temporal resolution. The identification of molecular probes and drugs remains a worthy challenge that can be addressed by the use of biased and unbiased strategies. Hypothesis-driven methodologies employs a known biological target to synthesize complementary hits while discovery-driven strategies offer the additional means of identifying previously unanticipated biological targets. This review article provides a general overview of recent synthetic frameworks that gave rise to an impressive arsenal of biologically active small molecules with unprecedented cellular mechanisms. PMID:24811300

  18. Mechanism of intersystem crossing of thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Toshinari; Wakikawa, Yusuke; Ikoma, Tadaaki

    2015-04-01

    The spin sublevel dynamics of the excited triplet state in thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) molecules have not been investigated for high-intensity organic light-emitting diode materials. Understanding the mechanism for intersystem crossing (ISC) is thus important for designing novel TADF materials. We report the first study on the ISC dynamics of the lowest excited triplet state from the lowest excited singlet state with charge-transfer (CT) character of TADF molecules with different external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) using time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance methods. Analysis of the observed spin polarization indicates a strong correlation of the EQE with the population rate due to ISC induced by hyperfine coupling with the magnetic nuclei. It is concluded that molecules with high EQE have an extremely small energy gap between the (1)CT and (3)CT states, which allows an additional ISC channel due to the hyperfine interactions. PMID:25774790

  19. Triggered tremors beneath the seismogenic zone of an active fault zone, Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Non-volcanic tremors were induced by the surface waves of the 2012 Sumatra earthquake around the Hinagu fault zone in Kyushu, Japan. We inferred from dense seismic observation data that the hypocenters of these tremors were located beneath the seismogenic zone of the Hinagu fault. Focal mechanisms of the tremors were estimated using S-wave polarization angles. The estimated focal mechanisms show similarities to those of shallow earthquakes in this region. In addition, one of the nodal planes of the focal mechanisms is almost parallel to the strike direction of the Hinagu fault. These observations suggest that the tremors were triggered at the deeper extension of the active fault zone under stress conditions similar to those in the shallower seismogenic region. A low-velocity anomaly beneath the hypocentral area of the tremors might be related to the tremor activity.

  20. Self-assembly of active colloidal molecules with dynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    2015-05-01

    Catalytically active colloids maintain nonequilibrium conditions in which they produce and deplete chemicals and hence effectively act as sources and sinks of molecules. While individual colloids that are symmetrically coated do not exhibit any form of dynamical activity, the concentration fields resulting from their chemical activity decay as 1 /r and produce gradients that attract or repel other colloids depending on their surface chemistry and ambient variables. This results in a nonequilibrium analog of ionic systems, but with the remarkable novel feature of action-reaction symmetry breaking. We study solutions of such chemically active colloids in dilute conditions when they join up to form molecules via generalized ionic bonds and discuss how we can achieve structures with time-dependent functionality. In particular, we study a molecule that adopts a spontaneous oscillatory pattern of conformations and another that exhibits a run-and-tumble dynamics similar to bacteria. Our study shows that catalytically active colloids could be used for designing self-assembled structures that possess dynamical functionalities that are determined by their prescribed three-dimensional structures, a strategy that follows the design principle of proteins.

  1. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by small molecule activators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bing; Sanders, Matthew J.; Carmena, David; Bright, Nicola J.; Haire, Lesley F.; Underwood, Elizabeth; Patel, Bhakti R.; Heath, Richard B.; Walker, Philip A.; Hallen, Stefan; Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Martin, Stephen R.; Carling, David; Gamblin, Steven J.

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a major role in regulating cellular energy balance by sensing and responding to increases in AMP/ADP concentration relative to ATP. Binding of AMP causes allosteric activation of the enzyme and binding of either AMP or ADP promotes and maintains the phosphorylation of threonine 172 within the activation loop of the kinase. AMPK has attracted widespread interest as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes and, more recently, cancer. A number of direct AMPK activators have been reported as having beneficial effects in treating metabolic diseases, but there has been no structural basis for activator binding to AMPK. Here we present the crystal structure of human AMPK in complex with a small molecule activator that binds at a site between the kinase domain and the carbohydrate-binding module, stabilising the interaction between these two components. The nature of the activator-binding pocket suggests the involvement of an additional, as yet unidentified, metabolite in the physiological regulation of AMPK. Importantly, the structure offers new opportunities for the design of small molecule activators of AMPK for treatment of metabolic disorders.

  2. Anti-Ebola Activity of Diazachrysene Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Selaković, Života; Soloveva, Veronica; Gharaibeh, Dima N; Wells, Jay; Šegan, Sandra; Panchal, Rekha G; Šolaja, Bogdan A

    2015-06-12

    Herein we report on a diazachrysene class of small molecules that exhibit potent antiviral activity against the Ebola (EBOV) virus. The antiviral compounds are easily synthesized, and the most active compounds have excellent in vitro activity (0.34-0.70 μM) and are significantly less lipophilic than their predecessors. The three most potent diazachrysene antivirals do not exhibit any toxicity in vivo and protected 70-90% of the mice at 10 mg/kg following EBOV challenge. Together, these studies suggest that diazachrysenes are a promising class of compounds for hit to lead optimization and as potential Ebola therapeutics. PMID:27622742

  3. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation

    PubMed Central

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  4. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation.

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-Awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-04-15

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  5. Single-Molecule Electronic Monitoring of DNA Polymerase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marushchak, Denys O.; Pugliese, Kaitlin M.; Turvey, Mackenzie W.; Choi, Yongki; Gul, O. Tolga; Olsen, Tivoli J.; Rajapakse, Arith J.; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    Single-molecule techniques can reveal new spatial and kinetic details of the conformational changes occurring during enzymatic catalysis. Here, we investigate the activity of DNA polymerases using an electronic single-molecule technique based on carbon nanotube transistors. Single molecules of the Klenow fragment (KF) of polymerase I were conjugated to the transistors and then monitored via fluctuations in electrical conductance. Continuous, long-term monitoring recorded single KF molecules incorporating up to 10,000 new bases into single-stranded DNA templates. The duration of individual incorporation events was invariant across all analog and native nucleotides, indicating that the precise structure of different base pairs has no impact on the timing of incorporation. Despite similar timings, however, the signal magnitudes generated by certain analogs reveal alternate conformational states that do not occur with native nucleotides. The differences induced by these analogs suggest that the electronic technique is sensing KF's O-helix as it tests the stability of nascent base pairs.

  6. Myricetin: A Dietary Molecule with Diverse Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Semwal, Ruchi Badoni; Combrinck, Sandra; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2016-02-01

    Myricetin is a common plant-derived flavonoid and is well recognised for its nutraceuticals value. It is one of the key ingredients of various foods and beverages. The compound exhibits a wide range of activities that include strong anti-oxidant, anticancer, antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory activities. It displays several activities that are related to the central nervous system and numerous studies have suggested that the compound may be beneficial to protect against diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. The use of myricetin as a preserving agent to extend the shelf life of foods containing oils and fats is attributed to the compound's ability to protect lipids against oxidation. A detailed search of existing literature revealed that there is currently no comprehensive review available on this important molecule. Hence, the present work includes the history, synthesis, pharmaceutical applications and toxicity studies of myricetin. This report also highlights structure-activity relationships and mechanisms of action for various biological activities. PMID:26891321

  7. Polarized Raman optical activity of menthol and related molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, L. D.; Hecht, L.; Blyth, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polarized and depolarized Raman optical activity spectra of menthol, menthyl chloride, neomenthol and neothiomenthol from 800 to 1500 cm -1 are reported. Despite axial symmetry in all the bonds, the presence of the heteroatoms O or S seems to induce large deviations from the expected ratio of 2:1 between the polarized and depolarized Raman optical activity intensities, but Cl does not. These deviations might originate in large electric quadrupole contributions induced by excited state interactions involving O or S Rydberg p orbitals and valence orbitals on other parts of the molecule. Such interactions appear to undermine the bond polarizability theory of Raman intensities.

  8. Piccolo Directs Activity Dependent F-Actin Assembly from Presynaptic Active Zones via Daam1

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Dhananjay; Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan; Waites, Clarissa L.; Leal-Ortiz, Sergio A.; Maas, Christoph; Reimer, Richard J.; Garner, Craig C.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of filamentous (F) actin plays essential roles in the assembly of presynaptic boutons, the fusion, mobilization and recycling of synaptic vesicles (SVs), and presynaptic forms of plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the temporal and spatial assembly of presynaptic F-actin remain largely unknown. Similar to other F-actin rich membrane specializations, presynaptic boutons contain a set of molecules that respond to cellular cues and trans-synaptic signals to facilitate activity-dependent assembly of F-actin. The presynaptic active zone (AZ) protein Piccolo has recently been identified as a key regulator of neurotransmitter release during SV cycling. It does so by coordinating the activity-dependent assembly of F-Actin and the dynamics of key plasticity molecules including Synapsin1, Profilin and CaMKII. The multidomain structure of Piccolo, its exquisite association with the AZ, and its ability to interact with a number of actin-associated proteins suggest that Piccolo may function as a platform to coordinate the spatial assembly of F-actin. Here we have identified Daam1, a Formin that functions with Profilin to drive F-actin assembly, as a novel Piccolo binding partner. We also found that within cells Daam1 activation promotes Piccolo binding, an interaction that can spatially direct the polymerization of F-Actin. Moreover, similar to Piccolo and Profilin, Daam1 loss of function impairs presynaptic-F-actin assembly in neurons. These data suggest a model in which Piccolo directs the assembly of presynaptic F-Actin from the AZ by scaffolding key actin regulatory proteins including Daam1. PMID:25897839

  9. Targeting Gli Transcription Activation by Small Molecule Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Clément, Geneviève; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Li, Hui; Mikami, Iwao; Hirata, Tomomi; Yagui-Beltran, Adam; Lui, Natalie; Do, Hanh T.; Cheng, Tiffany; Tseng, Hsin-Hui; Choi, Helen; Fang, Li-Tai; Kim, Il-Jin; Yue, Dongsheng; Wang, Changli; Zheng, Qingfeng; Fujii, Naoaki; Mann, Michael; Jablons, David M.; He, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of Hedgehog signaling at the cell membrane has been associated with anti-cancer activity in preclinical and early clinical studies. Hedgehog signaling involves activation of Gli transcription factors that can also be induced by alternative pathways. In this study we identified an interaction between Gli proteins and a transcription co-activator TAF9, and validated its functional relevance in regulating Gli transactivation. We also describe a novel, synthetic small molecule, FN1-8, that efficiently interferes with Gli/TAF9 interaction and down-regulate Gli/TAF9 dependent transcriptional activity. More importantly, FN1-8 suppresses cancer cell proliferation in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that blocking Gli transactivation, a key control point of multiple oncogenic pathways, may be an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:23686308

  10. Single-Molecule Manipulation Studies of a Mechanically Activated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botello, Eric; Harris, Nolan; Choi, Huiwan; Bergeron, Angela; Dong, Jing-Fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2009-10-01

    Plasma von Willebrand factor (pVWF) is the largest multimeric adhesion ligand found in human blood and must be adhesively activated by exposure to shear stress, like at sites of vascular injury, to initiate blood clotting. Sheared pVWF (sVWF) will undergo a conformational change from a loose tangled coil to elongated strings forming adhesive fibers by binding with other sVWF. VWF's adhesion activity is also related to its length, with the ultra-large form of VWF (ULVWF) being hyper-actively adhesive without exposure to shear stress; it has also been shown to spontaneously form fibers. We used single molecule manipulation techniques with the AFM to stretch pVWF, sVWF and ULVWF and monitor the forces as a function of molecular extension. We showed a similar increase in resistance to unfolding for sVWF and ULVWF when compared to pVWF. This mechanical resistance to forced unfolding is reduced when other molecules known to disrupt their fibril formation are present. Our results show that sVWF and ULVWF domains unfold at higher forces than pVWF, which is consistent with the hypothesis that shear stress induces lateral association that alters adhesion activity of pVWF.

  11. Structural Analysis of Active North Bozgush Fault Zone (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, R.; Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.

    2013-12-01

    NW Iran is one of the seismically active regions between Zagros Thrust Belt at the south and Caucasus at the north. Not only large magnitude historical earthquakes (Ms>7), but also 1987 Bozgush, 1997 Ardebil (Mw 6.1) and 2012 Ahar-Varzagan (Mw 6.4) earthquakes reveal that the region is seismically active. The North Bozgush Fault Zone (NBFZ) in this region has tens of kilometers in length and hundreds of meters in width. The zone has produced some large and destructive earthquakes (1593 M:6.1 and 1883 M:6.2). The NBFZ affects the Cenozoic units and along this zone Eocene units thrusted over Miocene and/or Plio-Quaternary sedimentary units. Together with morphologic features (stream offsets and alluvial fan movements) affecting the young unites reveal that the zone is active. The zone is mainly characterized by strike-slip faults with reverse component and reverse faults. Reverse faults striking N55°-85°E and dip of 40°-50° to the SW while strike-slip faults show right lateral slip with N60°-85°W and N60°-80°E directions. Our structural data analysis in NBFZ indicates that the axis direction of σ2 principal stress is vertical and the stress ratio (R) is 0.12. These results suggest that the tectonic regime along the North Bozgush Fault Zone is transpressive. Obtained other principal stresses (σ1, σ3) results are compatible with stress directions and GPS velocity suggested for NW Iran.

  12. 78 FR 4155 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Foreign Trade Zone and/or Status...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... Foreign Trade Zone and/or Status Designation, and Application for Foreign Trade Zone Activity Permit... Application for Foreign Trade Zone Admission and/or Status Designation, and Application for Foreign Trade Zone... Foreign Trade Zone Admission and/or Status Designation, and Application for Foreign Trade......

  13. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  14. Neurotransmitters couple brain activity to subventricular zone neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Stephanie Z.; Taylor, M. Morgan; Bordey, Angélique

    2011-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs in two privileged microenvironments, the hippocampal subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) along the lateral ventricle. This review focuses on accumulating evidence suggesting that the activity of specific brain regions or bodily states influences SVZ cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Neuromodulators such as dopamine and serotonin have been shown to have long-range effects through neuronal projections into the SVZ. Local GABA and glutamate signaling have demonstrated effects on SVZ proliferation and neurogenesis, but an extra-niche source of these neurotransmitters remains to be explored and options will be discussed. There is also accumulating evidence that diseases and bodily states such as Alzheimer's disease, seizures, sleep, and pregnancy influence SVZ cell proliferation. With such complex behavior and environmentally-driven factors that control subregion-specific activity, it will become necessary to account for overlapping roles of multiple neurotransmitter systems on neurogenesis when developing cell therapies or drug treatments. PMID:21395856

  15. Myricetin: A Dietary Molecule with Diverse Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Semwal, Ruchi Badoni; Combrinck, Sandra; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Myricetin is a common plant-derived flavonoid and is well recognised for its nutraceuticals value. It is one of the key ingredients of various foods and beverages. The compound exhibits a wide range of activities that include strong anti-oxidant, anticancer, antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory activities. It displays several activities that are related to the central nervous system and numerous studies have suggested that the compound may be beneficial to protect against diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The use of myricetin as a preserving agent to extend the shelf life of foods containing oils and fats is attributed to the compound’s ability to protect lipids against oxidation. A detailed search of existing literature revealed that there is currently no comprehensive review available on this important molecule. Hence, the present work includes the history, synthesis, pharmaceutical applications and toxicity studies of myricetin. This report also highlights structure-activity relationships and mechanisms of action for various biological activities. PMID:26891321

  16. The Interfacial Transition Zone in Alkali-Activated Slag Mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Provis, John

    2015-12-01

    The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is known to strongly influence the mechanical and transport properties of mortars and concretes. This paper studies the ITZ between siliceous (quartz) aggregates and alkali activated slag binders in the context of mortar specimens. Backscattered electron images (BSE) generated in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) are used to identify unreacted binder components, reaction products and porosity in the zone surrounding aggregate particles, by composition and density contrast. X-ray mapping is used to exclude the regions corresponding to the aggregates from the BSE image of the ITZ, thus enabling analysis of only the binder phases, which are segmented into binary images by grey level discrimination. A distinct yet dense ITZ region is present in the alkali-activated slag mortars, containing a reduced content of unreacted slag particles compared to the bulk binder. The elemental analysis of this region shows that it contains a (C,N)-A-S-H gel which seems to have a higher content of Na (potentially deposited through desiccation of the pore solution) and a lower content of Ca than the bulk inner and outer products forming in the main binding region. These differences are potentially important in terms of long-term concrete performance, as the absence of a highly porous interfacial transition zone region is expected to provide a positive influence on the mechanical and transport properties of alkali-activated slag concretes.

  17. 78 FR 16701 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Foreign Trade Zone and/or Status...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... Foreign Trade Zone and/or Status Designation, and Application for Foreign Trade Zone Activity Permit... approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Application for Foreign Trade Zone Admission and/or Status Designation, and Application for Foreign Trade Zone Activity Permit (CBP Forms 214,...

  18. Active Microfluidic Devices for Single-Molecule Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2003-03-01

    Microfluidic chips have become an increasingly powerful and versatile tool in the life sciences. Multilayer devices fabricated from soft silicone elastomers in a replication molding technique are especially promising, because they permit flexible integration of active elements such as valves and pumps. In addition, they are fairly easy and inexpensive to produce. In a wide range of applications, microfluidic chips are used in conjunction with optical detection and manipulation techniques. However their widespread use has been hampered due to problems with interconnect stability, optical accessibility, and ability to perform surface chemistry. We have developed a packaging technique that encapsulates the elastomer in an epoxy resin of high optical quality. This stabilizes the interconnects so that a chip can be repeatedly plugged in and out of a socket. Our technique also eliminates the need for a baking step that is conventionally used to attach a glass cover slip to the elastomer surface. This allows us to assemble devices that contain a cover slip coated with proteins, thereby permitting subsequent in situ attachment of DNA molecules to the bottom of the flow channels. We demonstrate the utility of our chips in single-molecule applications involving tethered-particles and optical tweezers. Support: NIH R01 GM065934 & Research Corporation

  19. Linking Plagioclase Zoning Patterns to Active Magma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Nicolaysen, K. P.; Neill, O. K.; Shcherbakov, V.; Plechov, P.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Plagioclase, one of the most common and abundant mineral phases in volcanic products, will vary in composition in response to changes in temperature, pressure, composition of the ambient silicate melt, and melt H2O concentration. Changes in these parameters may cause dissolution or growth of plagioclase crystals, forming characteristic textural and compositional variations (zoning patterns), the complete core-to-rim sequence of which describes events experienced by an individual crystal from its nucleation to the last moments of its growth. Plagioclase crystals in a typical volcanic rock may look drastically dissimilar despite their spatial proximity and the fact that they have erupted together. Although they shared last moments of their growth during magma ascent and eruption, their prior experiences could be very different, as plagioclase crystals often come from different domains of the same magma system. Distinguishing similar zoning patterns, correlating them across the entire population of plagioclase crystals, and linking these patterns to specific perturbations in the magmatic system may provide additional perspective on the variety, extent, and timing of magma processes at active volcanic systems. Examples of magma processes, which may be distinguished based on plagioclase zoning patterns, include (1) cooling due to heat loss, (2) heating and/or pressure build up due to an input of new magmatic material, (3) pressure drop in response to magma system depressurization, and (4) crystal transfer between different magma domains/bodies. This review will include contrasting examples of zoning patters from recent eruptions of Karymsky, Bezymianny, and Tolbachik Volcanoes in Kamchatka, Augustine and Cleveland Volcanoes in Alaska, as well as from the drilling into an active magma body at Krafla, Iceland.

  20. 50 CFR Table 8 to Part 679 - Harvest Zone Codes for Use With Vessel Activity Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Harvest Zone Codes for Use With Vessel... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 8 Table 8 to Part 679—Harvest Zone Codes for Use With Vessel Activity Reports Harvest Zone Description A1 BSAI EEZ off Alaska A2 GOA EEZ off Alaska B State waters...

  1. Manipulating lipid bilayer material properties using biologically active amphipathic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Lampson, M. A.; Greathouse, D. V.; Koeppe, R. E., II; Andersen, O. S.

    2006-07-01

    Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies with properties that can be manipulated/controlled by the adsorption of amphipathic molecules. The resulting changes in bilayer elasticity have been shown to regulate integral membrane protein function. To further understand the amphiphile-induced modulation of bilayer material properties (thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature and elastic moduli), we examined how an enantiomeric pair of viral anti-fusion peptides (AFPs)—Z-Gly-D-Phe and Z-Gly-Phe, where Z denotes a benzyloxycarbonyl group, as well as Z-Phe-Tyr and Z-D-Phe-Phe-Gly—alters the function of enantiomeric pairs of gramicidin channels of different lengths in planar bilayers. For both short and long channels, the channel lifetimes and appearance frequencies increase as linear functions of the aqueous AFP concentration, with no apparent effect on the single-channel conductance. These changes in channel function do not depend on the chirality of the channels or the AFPs. At pH 7.0, the relative changes in channel lifetimes do not vary when the channel length is varied, indicating that these compounds exert their effects primarily by causing a positive-going change in the intrinsic monolayer curvature. At pH 4.0, the AFPs are more potent than at pH 7.0 and have greater effects on the shorter channels, indicating that these compounds now change the bilayer elastic moduli. When AFPs of different anti-fusion potencies are compared, the rank order of the anti-fusion activity and the channel-modifying activity is similar, but the relative changes in anti-fusion potency are larger than the changes in channel-modifying activity. We conclude that gramicidin channels are useful as molecular force transducers to probe the influence of small amphiphiles upon lipid bilayer material properties.

  2. Friction mediated by redox-active supramolecular connector molecules.

    PubMed

    Bozna, B L; Blass, J; Albrecht, M; Hausen, F; Wenz, G; Bennewitz, R

    2015-10-01

    We report on a friction study at the nanometer scale using atomic force microscopy under electrochemical control. Friction arises from the interaction between two surfaces functionalized with cyclodextrin molecules. The interaction is mediated by connector molecules with (ferrocenylmethyl)ammonium end groups forming supramolecular complexes with the cyclodextrin molecules. With ferrocene connector molecules in solution, the friction increases by a factor of up to 12 compared to control experiments without connector molecules. The electrochemical oxidation of ferrocene to ferrocenium causes a decrease in friction owing to the lower stability of ferrocenium-cyclodextrin complex. Upon switching between oxidative and reduction potentials, a change in friction by a factor of 1.2-1.8 is observed. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals fast dissociation and rebinding kinetics and thus an equilibrium regime for the friction experiments. PMID:26367352

  3. Studies Relevent to Catalytic Activation Co & other small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Peter C

    2005-02-22

    Detailed annual and triannual reports describing the progress accomplished during the tenure of this grant were filed with the Program Manager for Catalysis at the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. To avoid unnecessary duplication, the present report will provide a brief overview of the research areas that were sponsored by this grant and list the resulting publications and theses based on this DOE supported research. The scientific personnel participating in (and trained by) this grant's research are also listed. Research carried out under this DOE grant was largely concerned with the mechanisms of the homogeneous catalytic and photocatalytic activation of small molecules such as carbon monoxide, dihydrogen and various hydrocarbons. Much of the more recent effort has focused on the dynamics and mechanisms of reactions relevant to substrate carbonylations by homogeneous organometallic catalysts. A wide range of modern investigative techniques were employed, including quantitative fast reaction methodologies such as time-resolved optical (TRO) and time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy and stopped flow kinetics. Although somewhat diverse, this research falls within the scope of the long-term objective of applying quantitative techniques to elucidate the dynamics and understand the principles of mechanisms relevant to the selective and efficient catalytic conversions of fundamental feedstocks to higher value materials.

  4. Application of Optical Biosensors in Small-Molecule Screening Activities

    PubMed Central

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Carlsson, Johan F.; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The last two decades have seen remarkable progress and improvements in optical biosensor systems such that those are currently seen as an important and value-adding component of modern drug screening activities. In particular the introduction of microplate-based biosensor systems holds the promise to match the required throughput without compromising on data quality thus representing a sought-after complement to traditional fluidic systems. This article aims to highlight the application of the two most prominent optical biosensor technologies, namely surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and optical waveguide grating (OWG), in small-molecule screening and will present, review and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different assay formats on these platforms. A particular focus will be on the specific advantages of the inhibition in solution assay (ISA) format in contrast to traditional direct binding assays (DBA). Furthermore we will discuss different application areas for both fluidic as well as plate-based biosensor systems by considering the individual strength of the platforms. PMID:22666031

  5. The active zone protein CAST regulates synaptic vesicle recycling and quantal size in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shizuka; Hida, Yamato; Ishizaki, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Eiji; Tanaka-Okamoto, Miki; Yamasaki, Miwako; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Fukaya, Masahiro; Kitajima, Isao; Takai, Yoshimi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Manabe, Toshiya

    2016-09-01

    Synaptic efficacy is determined by various factors, including the quantal size, which is dependent on the amount of neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic terminal. It is essential for stable synaptic transmission that the quantal size is kept within a constant range and that synaptic efficacy during and after repetitive synaptic activation is maintained by replenishing release sites with synaptic vesicles. However, the mechanisms for these fundamental properties have still been undetermined. We found that the active zone protein CAST (cytomatrix at the active zone structural protein) played pivotal roles in both presynaptic regulation of quantal size and recycling of endocytosed synaptic vesicles. In the CA1 region of hippocampal slices of the CAST knockout mice, miniature excitatory synaptic responses were increased in size, and synaptic depression after prolonged synaptic activation was larger, which was attributable to selective impairment of synaptic vesicle trafficking via the endosome in the presynaptic terminal likely mediated by Rab6. Therefore, CAST serves as a key molecule that regulates dynamics and neurotransmitter contents of synaptic vesicles in the excitatory presynaptic terminal in the central nervous system. PMID:27422015

  6. Sustainable production of biologically active molecules of marine based origin.

    PubMed

    Murray, Patrick M; Moane, Siobhan; Collins, Catherine; Beletskaya, Tanya; Thomas, Olivier P; Duarte, Alysson W F; Nobre, Fernando S; Owoyemi, Ifeloju O; Pagnocca, Fernando C; Sette, L D; McHugh, Edward; Causse, Eric; Pérez-López, Paula; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, Ma T; Rubiolo, Juan; Leirós, Marta; Botana, Luis M; Pinteus, Susete; Alves, Celso; Horta, André; Pedrosa, Rui; Jeffryes, Clayton; Agathos, Spiros N; Allewaert, Celine; Verween, Annick; Vyverman, Wim; Laptev, Ivan; Sineoky, Sergei; Bisio, Angela; Manconi, Renata; Ledda, Fabio; Marchi, Mario; Pronzato, Roberto; Walsh, Daniel J

    2013-09-25

    The marine environment offers both economic and scientific potential which are relatively untapped from a biotechnological point of view. These environments whilst harsh are ironically fragile and dependent on a harmonious life form balance. Exploitation of natural resources by exhaustive wild harvesting has obvious negative environmental consequences. From a European industry perspective marine organisms are a largely underutilised resource. This is not due to lack of interest but due to a lack of choice the industry faces for cost competitive, sustainable and environmentally conscientious product alternatives. Knowledge of the biotechnological potential of marine organisms together with the development of sustainable systems for their cultivation, processing and utilisation are essential. In 2010, the European Commission recognised this need and funded a collaborative RTD/SME project under the Framework 7-Knowledge Based Bio-Economy (KBBE) Theme 2 Programme 'Sustainable culture of marine microorganisms, algae and/or invertebrates for high value added products'. The scope of that project entitled 'Sustainable Production of Biologically Active Molecules of Marine Based Origin' (BAMMBO) is outlined. Although the Union is a global leader in many technologies, it faces increasing competition from traditional rivals and emerging economies alike and must therefore improve its innovation performance. For this reason innovation is placed at the heart of a European Horizon 2020 Strategy wherein the challenge is to connect economic performance to eco performance. This article provides a synopsis of the research activities of the BAMMBO project as they fit within the wider scope of sustainable environmentally conscientious marine resource exploitation for high-value biomolecules. PMID:23563183

  7. Activating Molecules, Ions, and Solid Particles with Acoustic Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Pflieger, Rachel; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical and physical effects of ultrasound arise not from a direct interaction of molecules with sound waves, but rather from the acoustic cavitation: the nucleation, growth, and implosive collapse of microbubbles in liquids submitted to power ultrasound. The violent implosion of bubbles leads to the formation of chemically reactive species and to the emission of light, named sonoluminescence. In this manuscript, we describe the techniques allowing study of extreme intrabubble conditions and chemical reactivity of acoustic cavitation in solutions. The analysis of sonoluminescence spectra of water sparged with noble gases provides evidence for nonequilibrium plasma formation. The photons and the "hot" particles generated by cavitation bubbles enable to excite the non-volatile species in solutions increasing their chemical reactivity. For example the mechanism of ultrabright sonoluminescence of uranyl ions in acidic solutions varies with uranium concentration: sonophotoluminescence dominates in diluted solutions, and collisional excitation contributes at higher uranium concentration. Secondary sonochemical products may arise from chemically active species that are formed inside the bubble, but then diffuse into the liquid phase and react with solution precursors to form a variety of products. For instance, the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) in pure water provides an innovative synthetic route for monodispersed nanoparticles of metallic platinum without any templates or capping agents. Many studies reveal the advantages of ultrasound to activate the divided solids. In general, the mechanical effects of ultrasound strongly contribute in heterogeneous systems in addition to chemical effects. In particular, the sonolysis of PuO2 powder in pure water yields stable colloids of plutonium due to both effects. PMID:24747272

  8. How to Make an Active Zone: Unexpected Universal Functional Redundancy between RIMs and RIM-BPs.

    PubMed

    Acuna, Claudio; Liu, Xinran; Südhof, Thomas C

    2016-08-17

    RIMs and RIM-binding proteins (RBPs) are evolutionary conserved multidomain proteins of presynaptic active zones that are known to recruit Ca(2+) channels; in addition, RIMs perform well-recognized functions in tethering and priming synaptic vesicles for exocytosis. However, deletions of RIMs or RBPs in mice cause only partial impairments in various active zone functions and have no effect on active zone structure, as visualized by electron micrographs, suggesting that their contribution to active zone functions is limited. Here, we show in synapses of the calyx of Held in vivo and hippocampal neurons in culture that combined, but not individual, deletions of RIMs and RBPs eliminate tethering and priming of synaptic vesicles, deplete presynaptic Ca(2+) channels, and ablate active zone complexes, as analyzed by electron microscopy of chemically fixed synapses. Thus, RBPs perform unexpectedly broad roles at the active zone that together with those of RIMs are essential for all active zone functions. PMID:27537484

  9. Understanding Enzyme Activity Using Single Molecule Tracking (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.-S.; Zeng, Y.; Luo, Y.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M.; Smith S.; Wei, H.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-06-01

    This poster describes single-molecule tracking and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. It discusses whether the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) moves on cellulose, how the CBM binds to cellulose, and the mechanism of cellulosome assembly.

  10. 78 FR 14963 - Foreign-Trade Zone 163-Ponce, Puerto Rico; Authorization of Production Activity; Zimmer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 163--Ponce, Puerto Rico; Authorization of Production Activity; Zimmer Manufacturing BV (Medical Devices); Ponce, Puerto Rico On November 1, 2012, CODEZOL, C.D., grantee of FTZ 163, submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones...

  11. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  12. Nitrogen molecule activation by excited states of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Zamora, M.; Novaro, O.; Ruiz, M.E. )

    1990-04-05

    Ab initio molecular orbital studies that include variational (with a multiconfiguration reference state of 200 states) and perturbational (including over 3 million configurations) configuration interaction calculations were addressed to the interaction of nitrogen molecules with copper. The Cu ground state {sup 2}S and first two excited states {sup 2}P and {sup 2}D were studied as they interact in different geometrical approaches (including side-on and end-on geometries) with ground-state N{sub 2} molecules.

  13. Spatial distribution of microfractures in damage zone along active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, K.; Ueta, K.

    2011-12-01

    For basement faults without overlying quaternary sediments, there are few methods to determine whether the fault is active or not. Recently, we focus on microfracture characteristics of damage zone along active faults as used for the assessment of seismic activity of basement faults. In this study, we examined a newly-found active fault (Sasaki et al., 2011) located to the east of the epicentral area of 1943 Tottori earthquake, southwest Japan. The fault zone consists of the 75 cm thick fault core of the purple-colored clayey fault gouge and the fault breccia with cataclastic foliation, and the surrounding damage zone developed in Cretaceous Kyushozan granite. A subsidiary fault accompanying a fault core of white clayey fault gouge that ranges from 3 to 5 mm thickness is located at about 110 m from the main fault. We collected ten orientated samples 9 m to 180 m from the main fault. The samples were coated with epoxy and then thin sections were cut perpendicular to the fault plane and parallel to a horizontal plane because the slip direction is unknown. Microfracture density data were collected from 40 quartz grains per thin section (per sample). A thin section is marked with a square grid at 3 mm intervals and we picked one grain up in each square of the grid marked on the thin section to reduce operator sampling bias resulting from the selection of quartz grains. Quartz is suitable to estimate the damage that the rock sample has sustained because quartz without cleavage acts as an isotropic medium for fracturing and it is physically and chemically resistant to weathering than other minerals constituting the granite. We counted the number of microfractures that intersected a line which was drawn from the edge of each quartz grain, through the center point, to the other edge of the grain. The linear microfracture density for each sample is calculated to be the total number of microfractures intersecting the lines divided by the total counting line length. Under the

  14. Super-resolution microscopy of the synaptic active zone

    PubMed Central

    Ehmann, Nadine; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Brain function relies on accurate information transfer at chemical synapses. At the presynaptic active zone (AZ) a variety of specialized proteins are assembled to complex architectures, which set the basis for speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Calcium channels are pivotal for the initiation of excitation-secretion coupling and, correspondingly, capture a central position at the AZ. Combining quantitative functional studies with modeling approaches has provided predictions of channel properties, numbers and even positions on the nanometer scale. However, elucidating the nanoscopic organization of the surrounding protein network requires direct ultrastructural access. Without this information, knowledge of molecular synaptic structure-function relationships remains incomplete. Recently, super-resolution microscopy (SRM) techniques have begun to enter the neurosciences. These approaches combine high spatial resolution with the molecular specificity of fluorescence microscopy. Here, we discuss how SRM can be used to obtain information on the organization of AZ proteins. PMID:25688186

  15. Magnetic fields over active tectonic zones in ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopytenko, Yu. A.; Serebrianaya, P.M.; Nikitina, L.V.; Green, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our work is to estimate the electromagnetic effects that can be detected in the submarine zones with hydrothermal activity. It is known that meso-scale flows appear in the regions over underwater volcanoes or hot rocks. Their origin is connected with heat flux and hot jets released from underwater volcanoes or faults in a sea bottom. Values of mean velocities and turbulent velocities in plumes were estimated. Quasiconstant magnetic fields induced by a hot jet and a vortex over a plume top are about 1-40 nT. Variable magnetic fields are about 0.1-1 nT. These magnetic disturbances in the sea medium create an additional natural electromagnetic background that must be considered when making detailed magnetic surveys. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative super-resolution imaging of Bruchpilot distinguishes active zone states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmann, Nadine; van de Linde, Sebastian; Alon, Amit; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Keung, Xi Zhen; Holm, Thorge; Rings, Annika; Diantonio, Aaron; Hallermann, Stefan; Ashery, Uri; Heckmann, Manfred; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J.

    2014-08-01

    The precise molecular architecture of synaptic active zones (AZs) gives rise to different structural and functional AZ states that fundamentally shape chemical neurotransmission. However, elucidating the nanoscopic protein arrangement at AZs is impeded by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. Here we introduce new approaches to quantify endogenous protein organization at single-molecule resolution in situ with super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Focusing on the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), we find that the AZ cytomatrix (CAZ) is composed of units containing ~137 Bruchpilot (Brp) proteins, three quarters of which are organized into about 15 heptameric clusters. We test for a quantitative relationship between CAZ ultrastructure and neurotransmitter release properties by engaging Drosophila mutants and electrophysiology. Our results indicate that the precise nanoscopic organization of Brp distinguishes different physiological AZ states and link functional diversification to a heretofore unrecognized neuronal gradient of the CAZ ultrastructure.

  17. RIM-binding protein, a central part of the active zone, is essential for neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Liu, Karen S Y; Siebert, Matthias; Mertel, Sara; Knoche, Elena; Wegener, Stephanie; Wichmann, Carolin; Matkovic, Tanja; Muhammad, Karzan; Depner, Harald; Mettke, Christoph; Bückers, Johanna; Hell, Stefan W; Müller, Martin; Davis, Graeme W; Schmitz, Dietmar; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2011-12-16

    The molecular machinery mediating the fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at presynaptic active zone (AZ) membranes has been studied in detail, and several essential components have been identified. AZ-associated protein scaffolds are viewed as only modulatory for transmission. We discovered that Drosophila Rab3-interacting molecule (RIM)-binding protein (DRBP) is essential not only for the integrity of the AZ scaffold but also for exocytotic neurotransmitter release. Two-color stimulated emission depletion microscopy showed that DRBP surrounds the central Ca(2+) channel field. In drbp mutants, Ca(2+) channel clustering and Ca(2+) influx were impaired, and synaptic release probability was drastically reduced. Our data identify RBP family proteins as prime effectors of the AZ scaffold that are essential for the coupling of SVs, Ca(2+) channels, and the SV fusion machinery. PMID:22174254

  18. The possibility of a fuzzy zone of semiotic activity.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Masayoshi

    2007-12-01

    In this commentary I tried to further develop the idea of Madureira (Integr Psych Behav Sci, 42(2), 2007), who challenges to clarify the complex sexuality problem of homophobia from the viewpoint of the cultural semiotic activity. Two remarking points were proposed in this commentary article. First, I took notice of the boundary phenomenon constructed between the homophobia and the other. It has a cultural meaning. Concerning with this process, I introduced and examined the concept of tonus that is sensed a subtle changing process of tension in self-other relationship. The second, I discussed about the fuzzy zone of semiotic activity. If one can feel in oneself fuzzy awareness into the source of discomfort affect, it is able to be a creative moment in the tension of fuzzy field (A and non-A) where generates dialogical activity in both vertical and horizontal. Through this discussion, I proposed some remarks for the dissolution on the culturally constructed prejudice of sexuality. PMID:18232094

  19. Investigation of the binding modes between AIE-active molecules and dsDNA by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Ma, Ke; Hu, Ting; Jiang, Bo; Xu, Bin; Tian, Wenjing; Sun, Jing Zhi; Zhang, Wenke

    2015-05-01

    AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active molecules hold promise for the labeling of biomolecules as well as living cells. The study of the binding modes of such molecules to biomolecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, will shed light on a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of molecular interactions and eventually facilitate the design/preparation of new AIE-active bioprobes. Herein, we studied the binding modes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with two types of synthetic AIE-active molecules, namely, tetraphenylethene-derived dicationic compounds (cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy) and anthracene-derived dicationic compounds (DSAI and DSABr-C6) using single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The experimental data indicate that DSAI can strongly intercalate into DNA base pairs, while DSABr-C6 is unable to intercalate into DNA due to the steric hindrance of the alkyl side chains. Cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy can also intercalate into DNA base pairs, but the binding shows strong ionic strength dependence. Multiple binding modes of TPEDPy with dsDNA have been discussed. In addition, the electrostatic interaction enhanced intercalation of cis-TPEDPy with dsDNA has also been revealed.AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active molecules hold promise for the labeling of biomolecules as well as living cells. The study of the binding modes of such molecules to biomolecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, will shed light on a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of molecular interactions and eventually facilitate the design/preparation of new AIE-active bioprobes. Herein, we studied the binding modes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with two types of synthetic AIE-active molecules, namely, tetraphenylethene-derived dicationic compounds (cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy) and anthracene-derived dicationic compounds (DSAI and DSABr-C6) using single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The

  20. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone. (a) Activities Far East's office is located in Yokota, Japan. The boundaries of Activities Far East's...

  1. Small Molecule Antagonizes Autoinhibition and Activates AMP-activated Protein Kinase in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Tao; Zhang, Zhen-Shan; Gu, Min; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Yu, Li-Fang; Cao, Peng-Rong; Shao, Wei; Su, Ming-Bo; Li, Jing-Ya; Nan, Fa-Jun; Li, Jia

    2008-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) serves as an energy sensor and is considered a promising drug target for treatment of type II diabetes and obesity. A previous report has shown that mammalian AMPK α1 catalytic subunit including autoinhibitory domain was inactive. To test the hypothesis that small molecules can activate AMPK through antagonizing the autoinhibition in α subunits, we screened a chemical library with inactive human α1394 (α1, residues 1-394) and found a novel small-molecule activator, PT1, which dose-dependently activated AMPK α1394, α1335, α2398, and even heterotrimer α1β1γ1. Based on PT1-docked AMPK α1 subunit structure model and different mutations, we found PT1 might interact with Glu-96 and Lys-156 residues near the autoinhibitory domain and directly relieve autoinhibition. Further studies using L6 myotubes showed that the phosphorylation of AMPK and its downstream substrate, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, were dose-dependently and time-dependently increased by PT1 with-out an increase in cellular AMP:ATP ratio. Moreover, in HeLa cells deficient in LKB1, PT1 enhanced AMPK phosphorylation, which can be inhibited by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases inhibitor STO-609 and AMPK inhibitor compound C. PT1 also lowered hepatic lipid content in a dose-dependent manner through AMPK activation in HepG2 cells, and this effect was diminished by compound C. Taken together, these data indicate that this small-molecule activator may directly activate AMPK via antagonizing the autoinhibition in vitro and in cells. This compound highlights the effort to discover novel AMPK activators and can be a useful tool for elucidating the mechanism responsible for conformational change and autoinhibitory regulation of AMPK. PMID:18321858

  2. A comparative phenotypical analysis of rheumatoid nodules and rheumatoid synovium with special reference to adhesion molecules and activation markers

    PubMed Central

    Elewaut, D.; De Keyser, F.; De Wever, N.; Baeten, D.; Van Damme, N.; Verbruggen, G.; Cuvelier, C.; Veys, E.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—(1)To analyse the in situ expression of adhesion molecules in rheumatoid nodules. (2) To compare the endothelial expression of adhesion molecules in synovial tissue and subcutaneous nodules obtained from the same patients. (3) To compare the expression of adhesion molecules and activation markers on T cell lines from nodules and synovium.
METHODS—(1) Immunohistochemical analysis by APAAP technique of E selectin, CD44, ICAM-1, PECAM-1, and VCAM-1 was performed on 10 rheumatoid nodules from seven patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); nodules and synovium were simultaneously analysed from three patients. (2) T cell lines were generated from RA nodules (n=7) and synovium (n=7) by interleukin 2 expansion, and subsequently characterised by flow cytometry for surface expression of αEβ7, α4β7, CD44, L selectin, LFA-1a, PECAM-1, and CD30.
RESULTS—(1) In rheumatoid nodules, the palisading layer strongly stains for ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, but less pronounced for CD44. VCAM-1 staining was usually negative. ICAM-1 is upregulated in the vessels surrounding the central zone of fibrinoid necrosis. The immunohistological picture in different nodules derived from the same patient was similar. (2) The endothelial expression of adhesion molecules is comparable in RA nodules and synovium on an individual level, except for E selectin, which is overexpressed in nodule endothelium. (3) T cell lines from nodules and synovium display similar adhesion molecule profiles. However, the expression of CD30, a T cell activation marker linked with Th2 subsets, is higher in nodules compared with synovium.
CONCLUSION—These data support a recirculation hypothesis of T cells between articular and extra-articular manifestations in RA, although the activation state of the T cells in each of these localisations may differ.

 Keywords: T cells; adhesion molecules; rheumatoid nodules; rheumatoid synovium PMID:9797554

  3. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus

    PubMed Central

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus. PMID:25713700

  4. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus. PMID:25713700

  5. 78 FR 28801 - Foreign-Trade Zone 117-Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 4383, 1-22-2013). The FTZ Board has... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 117--Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International Texas GP, LLC (Shipbuilding), Orange, TX On January 10, 2013, the Foreign Trade Zone of...

  6. 78 FR 4383 - Foreign-Trade Zone 117-Orange, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Signal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 117--Orange, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Signal International Texas GP, LLC (Shipbuilding), Orange, TX The Foreign Trade Zone of Southeast Texas, Inc., grantee of FTZ 117, submitted...

  7. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone. 3.70-20 Section 3.70-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District...

  8. Distributed Anelastic Strain and its Relationship to Compliant Zones Surrounding Active Faults of the Eastern California Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelef, E.; Oskin, M.; Fialko, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Geologic measurements of distributed anelastic strain (DAS) adjacent to active strike slip faults of the Mojave Desert portion of the Eastern California shear zone quantify the magnitude, mechanism, temporal evolution, and relationship of DAS to fault compliant zones imaged via InSAR. Prefaulting markers (mylonitic lineation, dikes, and faults assumed linear prior to dextral faulting) in crystalline rocks next to the Harper Lake fault and Calico fault indicate that DAS accounts for 6 to 23 percent of total displacement and that this displacement scales with fault slip. We conclude that DAS is a significant, active process that is not restricted to the initial fault propagation stage. We find that the width of the zone of DAS is 400-700 m on each side of the faults studied, irrespective of total fault slip. 60 percent of the displacement due to DAS occurs within 100 m of the Calico fault. A similar zone of more intense deformation occurs adjacent to the Harper Lake fault. These 100m- wide-zones are of the same extent but much less intensely deformed compared to the damage zones surrounding the San Andreas fault. Based on these relationships, we hypothesize that damage feedback progressively focuses DAS into a stable, approximately 100-m-wide-zone where its intensity can increase proportionally to fault slip. Disruption of linear markers supports that DAS in crystalline rocks occurs via slip along secondary faults and small-scale block rotation with block sizes decreasing with proximity to faults. The widths of the geologically documented zones of DAS in the Eastern California shear zone are similar to the approximately 1 km width of compliant zones modeled from InSAR observations of surface deformation due to stress changes caused by nearby earthquakes. This correlation suggests a relationship between damage- reduction of shear modulus and displacement via DAS. Paleomagnetic measurements of prefaulting and syntectonically emplaced volcanic rocks in sedimentary

  9. Persistently Active Microbial Molecules Prolong Innate Immune Tolerance In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mingfang; Varley, Alan W.; Munford, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Measures that bolster the resolution phase of infectious diseases may offer new opportunities for improving outcome. Here we show that inactivation of microbial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can be required for animals to recover from the innate immune tolerance that follows exposure to Gram-negative bacteria. When wildtype mice are exposed to small parenteral doses of LPS or Gram-negative bacteria, their macrophages become reprogrammed (tolerant) for a few days before they resume normal function. Mice that are unable to inactivate LPS, in contrast, remain tolerant for several months; during this time they respond sluggishly to Gram-negative bacterial challenge, with high mortality. We show here that prolonged macrophage reprogramming is maintained in vivo by the persistence of stimulatory LPS molecules within the cells' in vivo environment, where naïve cells can acquire LPS via cell-cell contact or from the extracellular fluid. The findings provide strong evidence that inactivation of a stimulatory microbial molecule can be required for animals to regain immune homeostasis following parenteral exposure to bacteria. Measures that disable microbial molecules might enhance resolution of tissue inflammation and help restore innate defenses in individuals recovering from many different infectious diseases. PMID:23675296

  10. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence evidence in non-bonding transition electron donor-acceptor molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marghad, Ikbal; Clochard, M. C.; Ollier, N.; Wade, Travis L.; Aymes-Chodur, C.; Renaud, C.; Zissis, G.

    2015-09-01

    The exhibition of thermally activated delayed fluorescence on triazine derivative by the introduction of a nonbonding part is demonstrated. Two molecules containing triazine core as acceptor and carbazole part as donor has been synthesized and characterized. One of these molecules bears an additional nonbonding part by the means of a phenoxy group. The results indicated that the molecule bearing the nonbonding molecular part (phenoxy) exhibit thermally activated delayed fluorescence while not on molecule free of non-bonding group. The results are supported by, photoluminescence, spectral analysis time-resolved fluorescence and time-dependent density functional estimation

  11. DYNAMICS OF NASCENT AND ACTIVE ZONE ULTRASTRUCTURE AS SYNAPSES ENLARGE DURING LTP IN MATURE HIPPOCAMPUS

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Maria Elizabeth; Bourne, Jennifer N.; Chirillo, Michael A.; Mendenhall, John M.; Kuwajima, Masaaki; Harris, Kristen M.

    2014-01-01

    Nascent zones and active zones are adjacent synaptic regions that share a postsynaptic density, but nascent zones lack the presynaptic vesicles found at active zones. Here dendritic spine synapses were reconstructed through serial section electron microscopy (3DEM) and EM tomography to investigate nascent zone dynamics during long-term potentiation (LTP) in mature rat hippocampus. LTP was induced with theta-burst stimulation and comparisons were made to control stimulation in the same hippocampal slices at 5 minutes, 30 minutes, and 2 hours post-induction and to perfusion-fixed hippocampus in vivo. Nascent zones were present at the edges of ~35% of synapses in perfusion-fixed hippocampus and as many as ~50% of synapses in some hippocampal slice conditions. By 5 minutes, small dense core vesicles known to transport active zone proteins moved into more presynaptic boutons. By 30 minutes, nascent zone area decreased without significant change in synapse area, suggesting that presynaptic vesicles were recruited to pre-existing nascent zones. By 2 hours, both nascent and active zones were enlarged. Immunogold labeling revealed that glutamate receptors can be found in nascent zones; however, average distances from nascent zones to docked presynaptic vesicles ranged from 170±5 nm in perfusion-fixed hippocampus to 251±4 nm at enlarged synapses by 2 hours during LTP. Prior stochastic modeling suggests that falloff in glutamate concentration reduces the probability of glutamate receptor activation from 0.4 at the center of release to 0.1 just 200 nm away. Thus, conversion of nascent zones to functional active zones likely requires the recruitment of presynaptic vesicles during LTP. PMID:25043676

  12. Toll-like receptor stimulation in splenic marginal zone lymphoma can modulate cell signaling, activation and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fonte, Eleonora; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Reverberi, Daniele; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Scarfò, Lydia; Ranghetti, Pamela; Cutrona, Giovanna; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Xochelli, Aliki; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Belessi, Chrysoula; Davis, Zadie; Piris, Miguel A.; Oscier, David; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Muzio, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on splenic marginal zone lymphoma identified distinct mutations in genes belonging to the B-cell receptor and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways, thus pointing to their potential implication in the biology of the disease. However, limited data is available regarding the exact role of TLRs. We aimed at characterizing the expression pattern of TLRs in splenic marginal zone lymphoma cells and their functional impact on the activation, proliferation and viability of malignant cells in vitro. Cells expressed significant levels of TLR1, TLR6, TLR7, TLR8, TLR9 and TLR10 mRNA; TLR2 and TLR4 showed a low, variable pattern of expression among patients whereas TLR3 and TLR5 mRNAs were undetectable; mRNA specific for TLR signaling molecules and adapters was also expressed. At the protein level, TLR1, TLR6, TLR7, TLR9 and TLR10 were detected. Stimulation of TLR1/2, TLR2/6 and TLR9 with their respective ligands triggered the activation of IRAK kinases, MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways, and the induction of CD86 and CD25 activation molecules, although in a heterogeneous manner among different patient samples. TLR-induced activation and cell viability were also inhibited by a specific IRAK1/4 inhibitor, thus strongly supporting the specific role of TLR signaling in these processes. Furthermore, TLR2/6 and TLR9 stimulation also significantly increased cell proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that splenic marginal zone lymphoma cells are equipped with functional TLR and signaling molecules and that the stimulation of TLR1/2, TLR2/6 and TLR9 may play a role in regulating disease pathobiology, likely promoting the expansion of the neoplastic clone. PMID:26294727

  13. Toll-like receptor stimulation in splenic marginal zone lymphoma can modulate cell signaling, activation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Fonte, Eleonora; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Reverberi, Daniele; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Scarfò, Lydia; Ranghetti, Pamela; Cutrona, Giovanna; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Xochelli, Aliki; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Belessi, Chrysoula; Davis, Zadie; Piris, Miguel A; Oscier, David; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Muzio, Marta

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies on splenic marginal zone lymphoma identified distinct mutations in genes belonging to the B-cell receptor and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways, thus pointing to their potential implication in the biology of the disease. However, limited data is available regarding the exact role of TLRs. We aimed at characterizing the expression pattern of TLRs in splenic marginal zone lymphoma cells and their functional impact on the activation, proliferation and viability of malignant cells in vitro. Cells expressed significant levels of TLR1, TLR6, TLR7, TLR8, TLR9 and TLR10 mRNA; TLR2 and TLR4 showed a low, variable pattern of expression among patients whereas TLR3 and TLR5 mRNAs were undetectable; mRNA specific for TLR signaling molecules and adapters was also expressed. At the protein level, TLR1, TLR6, TLR7, TLR9 and TLR10 were detected. Stimulation of TLR1/2, TLR2/6 and TLR9 with their respective ligands triggered the activation of IRAK kinases, MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways, and the induction of CD86 and CD25 activation molecules, although in a heterogeneous manner among different patient samples. TLR-induced activation and cell viability were also inhibited by a specific IRAK1/4 inhibitor, thus strongly supporting the specific role of TLR signaling in these processes. Furthermore, TLR2/6 and TLR9 stimulation also significantly increased cell proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that splenic marginal zone lymphoma cells are equipped with functional TLR and signaling molecules and that the stimulation of TLR1/2, TLR2/6 and TLR9 may play a role in regulating disease pathobiology, likely promoting the expansion of the neoplastic clone. PMID:26294727

  14. Structure and seismic activity of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evain, M.; Galve, A.; Charvis, P.; Laigle, M.; Ruiz Fernandez, M.; Kopp, H.; Hirn, A.; Flueh, E. R.; Thales Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    Several active and passive seismic experiments conducted in 2007 in the framework of the European program "Thales Was Right" and of the French ANR program "Subsismanti" provided a unique set of geophysical data highlighting the deep structure of the central part of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, offshore Dominica and Martinique, and its seismic activity during a period of 8 months. The region is characterized by a relatively low rate of seismicity that is often attributed to the slow (2 cm/yr) subduction of the old, 90 My, Atlantic lithosphere beneath the Caribbean Plate. Based on tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic data, the forearc can clearly be divided into an inner forearc, characterised by a high vertical velocity gradient in the igneous crust, and an outer forearc with lower crustal velocity gradient. The thick, high velocity, inner forearc is possibly the extension at depth of the Mesozoic Caribbean crust outcropping in La Désirade Island. The outer forearc, up to 70 km wide in the northern part of the study area, is getting narrower to the south and disappears offshore Martinique. Based on its seismic velocity structure with velocities higher than 6 km/s the backstop consists, at least partly, of magmatic rocks. The outer forearc is also highly deformed and faulted within the subducting trend of the Tiburon Ridge. With respect to the inner forearc velocity structure the outer forearc basement could either correspond to an accreted oceanic terrane or made of highly fractured rocks. The inner forearc is a dense, poorly deformable crustal block, tilted southward as a whole. It acts as a rigid buttress increasing the strain within both the overriding and subducting plates. This appears clearly in the current local seismicity affecting the subducting and the overriding plates that is located beneath the inner forearc. We detected earthquakes beneath the Caribbean forearc and in the Atlantic oceanic plate as well. The main seismic activity is

  15. Contemporary approaches to studying and mapping of active water exchange zone of ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, C. Ye

    2016-03-01

    The article deals with a zone of ground water active exchange. New principles of the zone study and mapping under the platform hydrogeological condition are discussed. The assessment and distribution techniques are suggested for the active water exchange zone under the condition of hydrogeological parameterization uncertainty. The efficiency and significance of the suggested techniques are proved using the example of ground water in the southwest of Black Sea artesian basin.

  16. Naphthylnitrobutadienes as pharmacologically active molecules: evaluation of the in vivo antitumour activity.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Giovanni; Fenoglio, Carla; Ognio, Emanuela; Aiello, Cinzia; Spinelli, Domenico; Mariggiò, Maria A; Maccagno, Massimo; Morganti, Stefano; Cordazzo, Cinzia; Viale, Maurizio

    2007-12-01

    On the basis of our previous interesting results in vitro on the antiproliferative activity of (1E,3E)-1,4-bis(1-naphthyl)-2,3-dinitro-1,3-butadiene (1-Naph-DNB) we have designed and synthesized the new molecule methyl (2Z,4E)-2-methylsulphanyl-5-(1-naphthyl)-4-nitro-2,4-pentadienoate (1-Naph-NMCB) characterized by the same naphthylnitrobutadiene array but with a different functional group at one end of the diene system. This new molecule showed an in vitro antiproliferative activity more significant than that found for the original 1-Naph-DNB. In order to verify in vivo our in vitro results we have tested the antitumour activity of 1-Naph-DNB and 1-Naph-NMCB in several murine tumour models, namely the myelomonocytic P388 and the Lewis lung carcinoma 3LL in BDF1 mice, the melanoma B16 in C57Bl mice, the fibrosarcoma WEHI 164 in nude mice and, finally, the C51 colon cancer in Balb/c mice. In the case of 1-Naph-NMCB the analysis of the antitumour activity has been preceded by toxicological experiments on CD-1 mice, in order to determine the lethal (LD) and the maximal tolerated (MTD) doses together with the spectrum of histological alterations caused by its iv administration. The results obtained show that the modification of the original structure of 1-Naph-DNB according to the molecular-simplification strategy has led to an asymmetric nitrobutadiene array, i.e. that of 1-Naph-NMCB, endowed with an antitumour activity which is in some cases even better than that showed by the parental compound itself, together with differences in tumour selectivity and negligible histological toxic effects.A promising, versatile route to new, more active and/or safe nitrobutadiene derivatives has thus been positively tested. PMID:17572851

  17. 77 FR 68103 - Foreign-Trade Zone 163-Ponce, PR; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Zimmer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 163--Ponce, PR; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Zimmer Manufacturing BV (Medical Devices); Ponce, PR CODEZOL, C.D., grantee of FTZ 163, submitted a notification of proposed production activity on behalf of Zimmer Manufacturing BV (Zimmer), located in...

  18. High quality, small molecule-activity datasets for kinase research.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajan; Schürer, Stephan C; Muskal, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Kinases regulate cell growth, movement, and death. Deregulated kinase activity is a frequent cause of disease. The therapeutic potential of kinase inhibitors has led to large amounts of published structure activity relationship (SAR) data. Bioactivity databases such as the Kinase Knowledgebase (KKB), WOMBAT, GOSTAR, and ChEMBL provide researchers with quantitative data characterizing the activity of compounds across many biological assays. The KKB, for example, contains over 1.8M kinase structure-activity data points reported in peer-reviewed journals and patents. In the spirit of fostering methods development and validation worldwide, we have extracted and have made available from the KKB 258K structure activity data points and 76K associated unique chemical structures across eight kinase targets. These data are freely available for download within this data note. PMID:27429748

  19. High quality, small molecule-activity datasets for kinase research

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajan; Schürer, Stephan C.; Muskal, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Kinases regulate cell growth, movement, and death. Deregulated kinase activity is a frequent cause of disease. The therapeutic potential of kinase inhibitors has led to large amounts of published structure activity relationship (SAR) data. Bioactivity databases such as the Kinase Knowledgebase (KKB), WOMBAT, GOSTAR, and ChEMBL provide researchers with quantitative data characterizing the activity of compounds across many biological assays. The KKB, for example, contains over 1.8M kinase structure-activity data points reported in peer-reviewed journals and patents. In the spirit of fostering methods development and validation worldwide, we have extracted and have made available from the KKB 258K structure activity data points and 76K associated unique chemical structures across eight kinase targets. These data are freely available for download within this data note. PMID:27429748

  20. Fusion Competent Synaptic Vesicles Persist upon Active Zone Disruption and Loss of Vesicle Docking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan Shan H; Held, Richard G; Wong, Man Yan; Liu, Changliang; Karakhanyan, Aziz; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-08-17

    In a nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle docking and release are restricted to an active zone. The active zone is a protein scaffold that is attached to the presynaptic plasma membrane and opposed to postsynaptic receptors. Here, we generated conditional knockout mice removing the active zone proteins RIM and ELKS, which additionally led to loss of Munc13, Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM-BP, indicating disassembly of the active zone. We observed a near-complete lack of synaptic vesicle docking and a strong reduction in vesicular release probability and the speed of exocytosis, but total vesicle numbers, SNARE protein levels, and postsynaptic densities remained unaffected. Despite loss of the priming proteins Munc13 and RIM and of docked vesicles, a pool of releasable vesicles remained. Thus, the active zone is necessary for synaptic vesicle docking and to enhance release probability, but releasable vesicles can be localized distant from the presynaptic plasma membrane. PMID:27537483

  1. Antimalarial Activity of Small-Molecule Benzothiazole Hydrazones.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Asim A; Saha, Shubhra J; De, Rudranil; Mazumder, Somnath; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Iqbal, Mohd S; Nag, Shiladitya; Adhikari, Susanta; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2016-07-01

    We synthesized a new series of conjugated hydrazones that were found to be active against malaria parasite in vitro, as well as in vivo in a murine model. These hydrazones concentration-dependently chelated free iron and offered antimalarial activity. Upon screening of the synthesized hydrazones, compound 5f was found to be the most active iron chelator, as well as antiplasmodial. Compound 5f also interacted with free heme (KD [equilibrium dissociation constant] = 1.17 ± 0.8 μM), an iron-containing tetrapyrrole released after hemoglobin digestion by the parasite, and inhibited heme polymerization by parasite lysate. Structure-activity relationship studies indicated that a nitrogen- and sulfur-substituted five-membered aromatic ring present within the benzothiazole hydrazones might be responsible for their antimalarial activity. The dose-dependent antimalarial and heme polymerization inhibitory activities of the lead compound 5f were further validated by following [(3)H]hypoxanthine incorporation and hemozoin formation in parasite, respectively. It is worth mentioning that compound 5f exhibited antiplasmodial activity in vitro against a chloroquine/pyrimethamine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum (K1). We also evaluated in vivo antimalarial activity of compound 5f in a murine model where a lethal multiple-drug-resistant strain of Plasmodium yoelii was used to infect Swiss albino mice. Compound 5f significantly suppressed the growth of parasite, and the infected mice experienced longer life spans upon treatment with this compound. During in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays, compound 5f showed minimal alteration in biochemical and hematological parameters compared to control. In conclusion, we identified a new class of hydrazone with therapeutic potential against malaria. PMID:27139466

  2. Atmospheric Aerosols: Cloud Condensation Nucleus Activity of Selected Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenorn, T.; Henning, S.; Hartz, K. H.; Kiss, G.; Pandis, S.; Bilde, M.

    2005-12-01

    Gas/particle partitioning of vapors in the atmosphere plays a major role in both climate through micro meteorology and in the physical and chemical processes of a single particle. This work has focused on the cloud droplet activation of a number of pure and mixed compounds. The means used to investigate these processes have been the University of Copenhagen cloud condensation nucleus counter setup and the Carnegie Mellon University CCNC setup. The importance of correct water activity modeling has been addressed and it has been pointed out that the molecular mass is an important parameter to consider when choosing model compounds for cloud activation models. It was shown that both traditional Kohler theory and Kohler theory modified to account for limited solubility reproduce measurements of soluble compounds well. For less soluble compounds it is necessary to use Kohler theory modified to account for limited solubility. It was also shown that this works for mixtures of compounds containing both inorganic salts and dicarboxylic acids. It has also been shown that particle phase and humidity history is important for activation behavior of particles consisting of two slightly soluble organic substances (succinic and adipic acid) and a soluble salt (NaCl). Model parameters for terpene oxidation product cloud activation have been derived. These are based on two sets of average parameters covering monoterpene oxidation products and sesquiterpene oxidation products. All parameters except the solubility were estimated and an effective solubility was calculated as the fitting parameter. The average solubility of the model compound found for mono terpene oxidation products is similar to those of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate; however the higher molecular weight leads to a slightly higher activation diameter at fixed supersaturation. On a molar basis the monoterpene oxidation products show a 1.5 times higher effective solubility than the sesquiterpene oxidation products.

  3. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of the Hybrid Molecules between Sulfonamides and Active Antimicrobial Pleuromutilin Derivative.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liangzhu; Yang, Dexue; Pan, Zhikun; Lai, Lihong; Liu, Jianhua; Fang, Binghu; Shi, Shuning

    2015-08-01

    A series of novel hybrid molecules between sulfonamides and active antimicrobial 14-o-(3-carboxy-phenylsulfide)-mutilin were synthesized, and their in vitro antibacterial activities were evaluated by the broth microdilution. Results indicated that these compounds displayed potent antimicrobial activities in vitro against various drug-susceptible and drug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococci and streptococci, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and mycoplasma. In particular, sulfapyridine analog (6c) exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria and mycoplasma, including Staphylococcus aureus (MIC = 0.016-0.063 μg/mL), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC = 0.016 μg/mL), Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC = 0.032-0.063 μg/mL), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MIC = 0.004 μg/mL), with respect to other synthesized compounds and reference drugs sulfonamide (MIC = 8-128 μg/mL) and valnemulin (MIC = 0.004-0.5 μg/mL). Furthermore, comparison between MIC values of pleuromutilin-sulfonamide hybrids 6a-f with pleuromutilin parent compound 3 revealed that these modifications at 14 position side chain of the pleuromutilin with benzene sulfonamide could greatly improve the antibacterial activity especially against Gram-positives. PMID:25431015

  4. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  5. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  6. Molecular Machines Regulating the Release Probability of Synaptic Vesicles at the Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Körber, Christoph; Kuner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane of the active zone (AZ) upon arrival of an action potential (AP) at the presynaptic compartment is a tightly regulated probabilistic process crucial for information transfer. The probability of a SV to release its transmitter content in response to an AP, termed release probability (Pr), is highly diverse both at the level of entire synapses and individual SVs at a given synapse. Differences in Pr exist between different types of synapses, between synapses of the same type, synapses originating from the same axon and even between different SV subpopulations within the same presynaptic terminal. The Pr of SVs at the AZ is set by a complex interplay of different presynaptic properties including the availability of release-ready SVs, the location of the SVs relative to the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) at the AZ, the magnitude of calcium influx upon arrival of the AP, the buffering of calcium ions as well as the identity and sensitivity of the calcium sensor. These properties are not only interconnected, but can also be regulated dynamically to match the requirements of activity patterns mediated by the synapse. Here, we review recent advances in identifying molecules and molecular machines taking part in the determination of vesicular Pr at the AZ. PMID:26973506

  7. Molecular Machines Regulating the Release Probability of Synaptic Vesicles at the Active Zone.

    PubMed

    Körber, Christoph; Kuner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane of the active zone (AZ) upon arrival of an action potential (AP) at the presynaptic compartment is a tightly regulated probabilistic process crucial for information transfer. The probability of a SV to release its transmitter content in response to an AP, termed release probability (Pr), is highly diverse both at the level of entire synapses and individual SVs at a given synapse. Differences in Pr exist between different types of synapses, between synapses of the same type, synapses originating from the same axon and even between different SV subpopulations within the same presynaptic terminal. The Pr of SVs at the AZ is set by a complex interplay of different presynaptic properties including the availability of release-ready SVs, the location of the SVs relative to the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) at the AZ, the magnitude of calcium influx upon arrival of the AP, the buffering of calcium ions as well as the identity and sensitivity of the calcium sensor. These properties are not only interconnected, but can also be regulated dynamically to match the requirements of activity patterns mediated by the synapse. Here, we review recent advances in identifying molecules and molecular machines taking part in the determination of vesicular Pr at the AZ. PMID:26973506

  8. Small Molecule Active Site Directed Tools for Studying Human Caspases.

    PubMed

    Poreba, Marcin; Szalek, Aleksandra; Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Rut, Wioletta; Salvesen, Guy S; Drag, Marcin

    2015-11-25

    Caspases are proteases of clan CD and were described for the first time more than two decades ago. They play critical roles in the control of regulated cell death pathways including apoptosis and inflammation. Due to their involvement in the development of various diseases like cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, or autoimmune disorders, caspases have been intensively investigated as potential drug targets, both in academic and industrial laboratories. This review presents a thorough, deep, and systematic assessment of all technologies developed over the years for the investigation of caspase activity and specificity using substrates and inhibitors, as well as activity based probes, which in recent years have attracted considerable interest due to their usefulness in the investigation of biological functions of this family of enzymes. PMID:26551511

  9. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of SETD8 with Cellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SETD8/SET8/Pr-SET7/KMT5A is the sole protein lysine methyltransferase (PKMT) known to monomethylate lysine 20 of histone H4 in vivo. SETD8’s methyltransferase activity has been implicated in many essential cellular processes including DNA replication, DNA damage response, transcription modulation, and cell cycle regulation. Developing SETD8 inhibitors with cellular activity is a key step toward elucidating the diverse roles of SETD8 via convenient pharmacological perturbation. From the hits of a prior high throughput screen (HTS), SPS8I1–3 (NSC663284, BVT948, and ryuvidine) were validated as potent SETD8 inhibitors. These compounds contain different structural motifs and inhibit SETD8 via distinct modes. More importantly, these compounds show cellular activity by suppressing the H4K20me1 mark of SETD8 and recapitulate characteristic S/G2/M-phase cell cycle defects as observed for RNAi-mediated SETD8 knockdown. The commonality of SPS8I1–3 against SETD8, together with their distinct structures and mechanisms for SETD8 inhibition, argues for the collective application of these compounds as SETD8 inhibitors. PMID:25137013

  10. N-substituted 2-isonicotinoylhydrazinecarboxamides--new antimycobacterial active molecules.

    PubMed

    Rychtarčíková, Zuzana; Krátký, Martin; Gazvoda, Martin; Komlóová, Markéta; Polanc, Slovenko; Kočevar, Marijan; Stolaříková, Jiřina; Vinšová, Jarmila

    2014-01-01

    This report presents a new modification of the isoniazid (INH) structure linked with different anilines via a carbonyl group obtained by two synthetic procedures and with N-substituted 5-(pyridine-4-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-amines prepared by their cyclisation. All synthesised derivatives were characterised by IR, NMR, MS and elemental analyses and were evaluated in vitro for their antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, Mycobacterium avium 330/88, Mycobacterium kansasii 235/80 and one clinical isolated strain of M. kansasii 6509/96. 2-Isonicotinoyl-N-(4-octylphenyl)hydrazinecarboxamide displayed an in vitro efficacy comparable to that of INH for M. tuberculosis with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 1-2 μM. Among the halogenated derivatives, the best anti-tuberculosis activity was found for 2-isonicotinoyl-N-(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)hydrazinecarboxamide (MIC=4 μM). In silico modelling on the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase InhA confirmed that longer alkyl substituents are advantageous for the interactions and affinity to InhA. Most of the hydrazinecarboxamides, especially those derived from 4-alkylanilines, exhibited significant activity against INH-resistant nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:24686575

  11. Features of the electronic structure of the active center of an HbS molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, D. Yu.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    Features of the electronic structure of the nonprotein part of the mutant form of the human hemoglobin molecule, HbS, are studied along with the magnetic state of the iron ion that is the "nucleus" of the active center of the molecule. It is found that the mutant form of the HbS molecule differs from a normal hemoglobin molecule by the distortion of the local environment of the iron ion, which changes the energy level splitting by a crystal field. As a result of ab initio calculations, the magnetic transition in the iron atom from the high-spin state to the low-spin state upon the addition of molecular oxygen to hemoglobin molecule is reproduced. It is established for the first time that a change in the crystal and electronic structure of the active center as a result of a mutation can lead to a substantial change in the energy of the bond between the active center of the hemoglobin molecule and an oxygen molecule.

  12. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  13. Ozone: A Multifaceted Molecule with Unexpected Therapeutic Activity.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, I; Borrelli, E; Valacchi, G; Travagli, V; Bocci, V

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive outline for understanding and recommending the therapeutic use of ozone in combination with established therapy in diseases characterized by a chronic oxidative stress is currently available. The view of the absolute ozone toxicity is incorrect, because it has been based either on lung or on studies performed in artificial environments that do not correspond to the real antioxidant capacity of body compartments. In fact, ozone exerts either a potent toxic activity or it can stimulate biological responses of vital importance, analogously to gases with prospective therapeutic value such as NO, CO, H2S, H2, as well as O2 itself. Such a crucial difference has increasingly become evident during the last decade. The purpose of this review is to explain the aspects still poorly understood, highlighting the divergent activity of ozone on the various biological districts. It will be clarified that such a dual effect does not depend only upon the final gas concentration, but also on the particular biological system where ozone acts. The real significance of ozone as adjuvant therapeutic treatment concerns severe chronic pathologies among which are cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, multiple sclerosis, and the dry form of age-related macular degeneration. It is time for a full insertion of ozone therapy within pharmaceutical sciences, responding to all the requirements of quality, efficacy and safety, rather than as either an alternative or an esoteric approach. PMID:26687830

  14. Use of Small Fluorescent Molecules to Monitor Channel Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sharon; Stringer, Sarah; Naik, Rajesh; Stone, Morley

    2001-03-01

    The Mechanosensitive channel of Large conductance (MscL) allows bacteria to rapidly adapt to changing environmental conditions such as osmolarity. The MscL channel opens in response to increases in membrane tension, which allows for the efflux of cytoplasmic constituents. Here we describe the cloning and expression of Salmonella typhimurium MscL (St-MscL). Using a fluorescence efflux assay, we demonstrate that efflux through the MscL channel during hypoosmotic shock can be monitored using endogenously produced fluorophores. In addition, we observe that thermal stimulation, i.e., heat shock, can also induce efflux through MscL. We present the first evidence of thermal activation of MscL efflux by heat shocking cells expressing the S. typhimurium protein variant. This finding has significant biosensor implications, especially for investigators exploring the use of channel proteins in biosensor applications. Thermal biosensors are relatively unexplored, but would have considerable commercial and military utility.

  15. Development and Validation of a Model to Predict Aerosol Breathing Zone Concentrations During Common Outdoor Activities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research has been conducted on aerosol emission rates during various activities as well as aerosol transport into the breathing zone under idealized conditions. However, there has been little effort to link the two into a model for predicting a person’s breathing zone concentrat...

  16. 78 FR 68026 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 99-Wilmington, Delaware, Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 99--Wilmington, Delaware, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Noramco, Inc., (Pharmaceutical Intermediate), Wilmington, Delaware The Delaware Economic Development Office, grantee of FTZ...

  17. 77 FR 36997 - Foreign-Trade Zone 7-Mayaguez, PR; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Baxter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 7--Mayaguez, PR; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Baxter Healthcare of Puerto Rico; (Pharmaceutical and Nutritional Intravenous Bags and Administration Sets); Aibonito and Jayuya, PR The...

  18. 77 FR 61381 - Foreign-Trade Zone 7-Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, Authorization of Production Activity, Baxter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 7--Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, Authorization of Production Activity, Baxter Healthcare of Puerto Rico, (Pharmaceutical and Nutritional Intravenous Bags and Administration Sets); Aibonito and Jayuya, Puerto Rico The Puerto Rico Industrial Development Company, grantee...

  19. 77 FR 48127 - Foreign-Trade Zone 20-Suffolk, VA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Usui...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 20--Suffolk, VA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Usui International Corporation, (Diesel Engine Fuel Lines), Chesapeake, VA The Virginia Port Authority, grantee of FTZ 20, submitted a...

  20. 15 CFR 400.49 - Monitoring and reviews of zone operations and activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Monitoring and reviews of zone operations and activity. 400.49 Section 400.49 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) FOREIGN-TRADE ZONES BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE REGULATIONS OF...

  1. 15 CFR 400.49 - Monitoring and reviews of zone operations and activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Monitoring and reviews of zone operations and activity. 400.49 Section 400.49 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) FOREIGN-TRADE ZONES BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE REGULATIONS OF...

  2. 77 FR 74170 - Foreign-Trade Zone 84-Houston, TX; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Mitsubishi...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 84--Houston, TX; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Mitsubishi Caterpillar Forklift America Inc.; (Forklift Trucks); Houston, TX The Port of Houston Authority, grantee of FTZ 84, submitted...

  3. 77 FR 58354 - Foreign-Trade Zone 265-Conroe, TX; Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Bauer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 265--Conroe, TX; Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Bauer Manufacturing Inc. (Pile Drivers and Boring Machinery); Conroe, TX The City of Conroe, Texas, grantee of FTZ 265, submitted a notification...

  4. 77 FR 55182 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, OR, Authorization of Production Activity, Shimadzu USA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ...-52-2012, 77 FR 48127, 8/13/2012). The notification was processed in accordance with the regulations... (77 FR 28353, 5/14/2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the activity is... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 45--Portland, OR, Authorization of Production...

  5. 77 FR 71167 - Foreign-Trade Zone 59-Lincoln, Nebraska, Authorization of Production Activity, Novartis Consumer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... inviting public comment (77 FR 50462, August 21, 2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 59--Lincoln, Nebraska, Authorization of Production Activity, Novartis Consumer Health, Inc. (Pharmaceutical and Related Preparations Production), Lincoln,...

  6. 78 FR 66330 - Foreign-Trade Zone 196-Fort Worth, Texas, Authorization of Production Activity, Flextronics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 196--Fort Worth, Texas, Authorization of Production Activity, Flextronics International USA, Inc. (Mobile Phone Assembly and Kitting), Fort Worth, Texas On June 14, 2013, Flextronics International USA,...

  7. Key Role of Active-Site Water Molecules in Bacteriorhodopsin Proton-Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, A.N.; Baudry, Jerome Y; Suhai, Sandor; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-10-01

    The functional mechanism of the light-driven proton pump protein bacteriorhodopsin depends on the location of water molecules in the active site at various stages of the photocycle and on their roles in the proton-transfer steps. Here, free energy computations indicate that electrostatic interactions favor the presence of a cytoplasmic-side water molecule hydrogen bonding to the retinal Schiff base in the state preceding proton transfer from the retinal Schiff base to Asp85. However, the nonequilibrium nature of the pumping process means that the probability of occupancy of a water molecule in a given site depends both on the free energies of insertion of the water molecule in this and other sites during the preceding photocycle steps and on the kinetic accessibility of these sites on the time scale of the reaction steps. The presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule has a dramatic effect on the mechanism of proton transfer: the proton is channeled on the Thr89 side of the retinal, whereas the transfer on the Asp212 side is hindered. Reaction-path simulations and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule permits a low-energy bacteriorhodopsin conformer in which the water molecule bridges the twisted retinal Schiff base and the proton acceptor Asp85. From this low-energy conformer, proton transfer occurs via a concerted mechanism in which the water molecule participates as an intermediate proton carrier.

  8. Aryl-alkyl-lysines: Membrane-Active Small Molecules Active against Murine Model of Burn Infection.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Chandradhish; Manjunath, Goutham B; Konai, Mohini M; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R; Ravikumar, Raju; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-02-12

    Infections caused by drug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens continue to be significant contributors to human morbidity. The recent advent of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (blaNDM-1) producing pathogens, against which few drugs remain active, has aggravated the problem even further. This paper shows that aryl-alkyl-lysines, membrane-active small molecules, are effective in treating infections caused by Gram-negative pathogens. One of the compounds of the study was effective in killing planktonic cells as well as dispersing biofilms of Gram-negative pathogens. The compound was extremely effective in disrupting preformed biofilms and did not select resistant bacteria in multiple passages. The compound retained activity in different physiological conditions and did not induce any toxic effect in female Balb/c mice until concentrations of 17.5 mg/kg. In a murine model of Acinetobacter baumannii burn infection, the compound was able to bring the bacterial burden down significantly upon topical application for 7 days. PMID:27624962

  9. Small Molecule Activation by Constrained Phosphorus Compounds: Insights from Theory.

    PubMed

    Pal, Amrita; Vanka, Kumar

    2016-01-19

    An exciting new development in main group chemistry has been the use of a constrained, "flat", phosphorus-based complex to mediate in reactions such as the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB), and the activation of the N-H bond in primary amines. Its importance is based on the fact that it shows that main group compounds, when properly designed, can be as effective as transition metal complexes for doing significant chemical transformations. What the current computational study, employing density functional theory (DFT), reveals is that a common, general mechanism exists that accounts for the behavior of the flat phosphorus compound in the different reactions that have been experimentally reported to date. This mechanism, which involves the mediation by a base as a proton transfer agent, is simpler and energetically more favorable than the previous mechanisms that have been proposed for the same reactions in the literature. It is likely that the knowledge gained from the current work about the chemical behavior of this phosphorus compound can be utilized to design new constrained phosphorus-based compounds. PMID:26700074

  10. Earthquake mechanisms and active tectonics of the Hellenic subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Beth; Jackson, James

    2010-05-01

    We use improved focal mechanisms and centroid depth estimates of earthquakes, combined with GPS velocities, to examine the tectonics of the Hellenic subduction zone, and in particular the processes occurring at both ends of the Hellenic Arc. Nubia-Aegean convergence is accommodated by shallowly dipping thrust-faulting along the subduction-zone interface, as well as by steeper splay faults in the overriding material. From a comparison of observed and expected seismic moment release over the last 100 yr, combined with existing knowledge of the longer-term documented historical record, we confirm earlier suggestions that most (80 per cent) of this convergence is accommodated aseismically, that is, that the subduction zone is uncoupled. This conclusion is robust, even allowing for rare very large earthquakes on splay faults, such as that of AD 365, and also allowing for the contribution of small earthquakes. The downgoing Nubian plate deforms by arc-parallel contraction at all depths, from 200 km seaward of Crete to at least 100 km within the subducting slab. Extensional (T) axes of earthquakes are aligned downdip within the descending slab suggesting that, even if the aseismic prolongation of the slab has reached the 670 km mantle discontinuity, it does not transmit stresses to shallower depths. Shallow thrust-faulting earthquakes on the subduction interface show a divergence of slip vectors round the arc, and GPS measurements show that this is accommodated mainly by E-W extension on normal faults in the overriding Aegean material. The eastern end of the subduction zone, south of Rhodes, displays distributed deformation in the overriding material, including a mixture of strike-slip and splay-thrust faulting, and probably involves rotations about a vertical axes. Here slip on the interface itself is by thrust faulting with slip vectors oblique to the arc but parallel to the overall Nubia-Aegean convergence: there is no evidence for slip-partitioning in the traditional

  11. [Differences of activations in visual and associative zones during figurative and verbal activity].

    PubMed

    Nagornova, Zh V; Shemiakina, N V

    2014-04-01

    The study considers correlates of figurative and verbal tasks performance during attention paid to visual stimuli. There are 34 subjects (20 female, mean age 21, 2.5 [SD]) took parts in the study. During subjects performance of the task, there was carried out EEG registration from 19 sites according to 10-20%. Performance of the figurative creative task in comparison with control non-creative task of the same modality was accompanied by activation of occipital and parietal zones of the cerebral cortex (decrease of EEG spectral power in alpha 1 (7.5-9.5 Hz) and alpha2 (10-12.5 Hz) frequency bands was observed) whereas performance of a verbal creative task in the similar test-control comparison was accompanied by decrease of activation in occipital zones (revealed through increase of EEG spectral in alphal and alpha2 frequency bands). As visual stimuli were shown during the whole time of the creative and control tasks fulfilment was made an assumption observed distinction can be connected with redistribution of attention focus at various types of creative activity (figurative or verbal). PMID:25272453

  12. FINAL REPORT. CONTROL OF BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE DEGRADATION ZONES BY VERTICAL HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATIONS IN FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The key objective of this research was to determine the distribution of biologically active contaminant degradation zones in a fractured, subsurface medium with respect to vertical heterogeneities. Our expectation was that
    hydrogeological properties would determine the size, d...

  13. Presynaptic spinophilin tunes neurexin signalling to control active zone architecture and function

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Karzan; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Driller, Jan H; Schreiner, Dietmar; Rey, Ulises; Böhme, Mathias A.; Hollmann, Christina; Ramesh, Niraja; Depner, Harald; Lützkendorf, Janine; Matkovic, Tanja; Götz, Torsten; Bergeron, Dominique D.; Schmoranzer, Jan; Goettfert, Fabian; Holt, Mathew; Wahl, Markus C.; Hell, Stefan W.; Scheiffele, Peter; Walter, Alexander M.; Loll, Bernhard; Sigrist, Stephan J.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and maturation of synapses at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) depend on trans-synaptic neurexin/neuroligin signalling, which is promoted by the scaffolding protein Syd-1 binding to neurexin. Here we report that the scaffold protein spinophilin binds to the C-terminal portion of neurexin and is needed to limit neurexin/neuroligin signalling by acting antagonistic to Syd-1. Loss of presynaptic spinophilin results in the formation of excess, but atypically small active zones. Neuroligin-1/neurexin-1/Syd-1 levels are increased at spinophilin mutant NMJs, and removal of single copies of the neurexin-1, Syd-1 or neuroligin-1 genes suppresses the spinophilin-active zone phenotype. Evoked transmission is strongly reduced at spinophilin terminals, owing to a severely reduced release probability at individual active zones. We conclude that presynaptic spinophilin fine-tunes neurexin/neuroligin signalling to control active zone number and functionality, thereby optimizing them for action potential-induced exocytosis. PMID:26471740

  14. Presynaptic spinophilin tunes neurexin signalling to control active zone architecture and function.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Karzan; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Driller, Jan H; Schreiner, Dietmar; Rey, Ulises; Böhme, Mathias A; Hollmann, Christina; Ramesh, Niraja; Depner, Harald; Lützkendorf, Janine; Matkovic, Tanja; Götz, Torsten; Bergeron, Dominique D; Schmoranzer, Jan; Goettfert, Fabian; Holt, Mathew; Wahl, Markus C; Hell, Stefan W; Scheiffele, Peter; Walter, Alexander M; Loll, Bernhard; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and maturation of synapses at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) depend on trans-synaptic neurexin/neuroligin signalling, which is promoted by the scaffolding protein Syd-1 binding to neurexin. Here we report that the scaffold protein spinophilin binds to the C-terminal portion of neurexin and is needed to limit neurexin/neuroligin signalling by acting antagonistic to Syd-1. Loss of presynaptic spinophilin results in the formation of excess, but atypically small active zones. Neuroligin-1/neurexin-1/Syd-1 levels are increased at spinophilin mutant NMJs, and removal of single copies of the neurexin-1, Syd-1 or neuroligin-1 genes suppresses the spinophilin-active zone phenotype. Evoked transmission is strongly reduced at spinophilin terminals, owing to a severely reduced release probability at individual active zones. We conclude that presynaptic spinophilin fine-tunes neurexin/neuroligin signalling to control active zone number and functionality, thereby optimizing them for action potential-induced exocytosis. PMID:26471740

  15. Group Problem Solving as a Zone of Proximal Development activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Eric

    2006-12-01

    Vygotsky described learning as a process, intertwined with development, which is strongly influenced by social interactions with others that are at differing developmental stages.i These interactions create a Zone of Proximal Development for each member of the interaction. Vygotsky’s notion of social constructivism is not only a theory of learning, but also of development. While teaching introductory physics in an interactive format, I have found manifestations of Vygotsky’s theory in my classroom. The source of evidence is a paired problem solution. A standard mechanics problem was solved by students in two classes as a homework assignment. Students handed in the homework and then solved the same problem in small groups. The solutions to both the group and individual problem were assessed by multiple reviewers. In many cases the group score was the same as the highest individual score in the group, but in some cases, the group score was higher than any individual score. For this poster, I will analyze the individual and group scores and focus on three groups solutions and video that provide evidence of learning through membership in a Zone of Proximal Development. Endnotes i L. Vygotsky -Mind and society: The development of higher mental processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (1978).

  16. Photo-activation of Single Molecule Magnet Behavior in a Manganese-based Complex

    PubMed Central

    Fetoh, Ahmed; Cosquer, Goulven; Morimoto, Masakazu; Irie, Masahiro; El-Gammal, Ola; El-Reash, Gaber Abu; Breedlove, Brian K.; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    A major roadblock to fully realizing molecular electronic devices is the ability to control the properties of each molecule in the device. Herein we report the control of the magnetic properties of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), which can be used in memory devices, by using a photo-isomerizable diarthylenthene ligand. Photo-isomerization of the diarylethene ligand bridging two manganese salen complexes with visible light caused a significant change in the SMM behavior due to opening of the six-membered ring of diarylethene ligand, accompanied by reorganization of the entire molecule. The ring-opening activated the frequency-dependent magnetization of the complex. Our results are a major step towards the realization of molecular memory devices composed of SMMs because the SMM behaviour can be turned on and off simply by irradiating the molecule. PMID:27026506

  17. Photo-activation of Single Molecule Magnet Behavior in a Manganese-based Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetoh, Ahmed; Cosquer, Goulven; Morimoto, Masakazu; Irie, Masahiro; El-Gammal, Ola; El-Reash, Gaber Abu; Breedlove, Brian K.; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    A major roadblock to fully realizing molecular electronic devices is the ability to control the properties of each molecule in the device. Herein we report the control of the magnetic properties of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), which can be used in memory devices, by using a photo-isomerizable diarthylenthene ligand. Photo-isomerization of the diarylethene ligand bridging two manganese salen complexes with visible light caused a significant change in the SMM behavior due to opening of the six-membered ring of diarylethene ligand, accompanied by reorganization of the entire molecule. The ring-opening activated the frequency-dependent magnetization of the complex. Our results are a major step towards the realization of molecular memory devices composed of SMMs because the SMM behaviour can be turned on and off simply by irradiating the molecule.

  18. Photo-activation of Single Molecule Magnet Behavior in a Manganese-based Complex.

    PubMed

    Fetoh, Ahmed; Cosquer, Goulven; Morimoto, Masakazu; Irie, Masahiro; El-Gammal, Ola; El-Reash, Gaber Abu; Breedlove, Brian K; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    A major roadblock to fully realizing molecular electronic devices is the ability to control the properties of each molecule in the device. Herein we report the control of the magnetic properties of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), which can be used in memory devices, by using a photo-isomerizable diarthylenthene ligand. Photo-isomerization of the diarylethene ligand bridging two manganese salen complexes with visible light caused a significant change in the SMM behavior due to opening of the six-membered ring of diarylethene ligand, accompanied by reorganization of the entire molecule. The ring-opening activated the frequency-dependent magnetization of the complex. Our results are a major step towards the realization of molecular memory devices composed of SMMs because the SMM behaviour can be turned on and off simply by irradiating the molecule. PMID:27026506

  19. Implication of crystal water molecules in inhibitor binding at ALR2 active site.

    PubMed

    Hymavati; Kumar, Vivek; Sobhia, M Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Water molecules play a crucial role in mediating the interaction between a ligand and a macromolecule. The solvent environment around such biomolecule controls their structure and plays important role in protein-ligand interactions. An understanding of the nature and role of these water molecules in the active site of a protein could greatly increase the efficiency of rational drug design approaches. We have performed the comparative crystal structure analysis of aldose reductase to understand the role of crystal water in protein-ligand interaction. Molecular dynamics simulation has shown the versatile nature of water molecules in bridge H bonding during interaction. Occupancy and life time of water molecules depend on the type of cocrystallized ligand present in the structure. The information may be useful in rational approach to customize the ligand, and thereby longer occupancy and life time for bridge H-bonding. PMID:22649481

  20. Electro-optical parameters in excited states of some spectrally active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchea, Andreea Celia; Closca, Valentina; Rusu, Cristina Marcela; Morosanu, Cezarina; Dorohoi, Dana Ortansa

    2014-08-01

    The spectral shifts measured in different solvents are expressed as functions of the solvent macroscopic parameters. The value of the correlation coefficient multiplying the functions of electric permittivity was determined by statistical means. The correlation coefficient depends on the electric dipole moment of the spectrally active molecules. The electro-optical parameters in the ground state of the solute molecules can be approximated by molecular modeling. The excited state parameters are usually estimated using the results obtained both by HyperChem Programme and solvatochromic study. The importance of this approximate method is that it offers information about of the excited state of solute molecule for which our measuring possibilities are very restrictive. The information about the excited electronic state is affected by the limits in which the theories of liquid solutions are developed. Our results refer to two molecules of vitamins from B class, namely B3 and B6.

  1. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  2. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  3. Geomorphic Indices in the Assessment of Tectonic Activity in Forearc of the Active Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, K.; Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of GIS techniques and constant advancement of digital elevation models significantly improved the accuracy of extraction of information on active tectonics from landscape features. Numerous attempts were made to quantitatively evaluate recent tectonic activity using GIS and DEMs, and a set of geomorphic indices (GI), however these studies focused mainly on sub-basins or small-scale areal units. In forearc regions where crustal deformation is usually large-scale and do not concentrate only along one specific fault, an assessment of the complete basin is more accurate. We present here the first attempt to implement thirteen GI in the assessment of active tectonics of a forearc region of an active convergent margin using the entire river basins. The GIs were divided into groups: BTAI - basin geomorphic indices (reflecting areal erosion vs. tectonics) and STAI - stream geomorphic indices (reflecting vertical erosion vs. tectonics). We calculated selected indices for 9 large (> 450 km2) drainage basins. Then we categorized the obtained results of each index into three classes of relative tectonic activity: 1 - high, 2 - moderate, and 3 - low. Finally we averaged these classes for each basin to determine the tectonic activity level (TAI). The analysis for the case study area, the Guerrero sector at the Mexican subduction zone, revealed high tectonic activity in this area, particularly in its central and, to a lesser degree, eastern part. This pattern agrees with and is supported by interpretation of satellite images and DEM, and field observations. The results proved that the proposed approach indeed allows identification and recognition of areas witnessing recent tectonic deformation. Moreover, our results indicated that, even though no large earthquake has been recorded in this sector for more than 100 years, the area is highly active and may represent a seismic hazard for the region.

  4. Homeobox NKX2-3 promotes marginal-zone lymphomagenesis by activating B-cell receptor signalling and shaping lymphocyte dynamics.

    PubMed

    Robles, Eloy F; Mena-Varas, Maria; Barrio, Laura; Merino-Cortes, Sara V; Balogh, Péter; Du, Ming-Qing; Akasaka, Takashi; Parker, Anton; Roa, Sergio; Panizo, Carlos; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Siebert, Reiner; Segura, Victor; Agirre, Xabier; Macri-Pellizeri, Laura; Aldaz, Beatriz; Vilas-Zornoza, Amaia; Zhang, Shaowei; Moody, Sarah; Calasanz, Maria Jose; Tousseyn, Thomas; Broccardo, Cyril; Brousset, Pierre; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Fernandez-Luna, Jose Luis; Garcia-Muñoz, Ricardo; Pena, Esther; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Salar, Antonio; Baptista, Maria Joao; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesús Maria; Gonzalez, Marcos; Terol, Maria Jose; Climent, Joan; Ferrandez, Antonio; Sagaert, Xavier; Melnick, Ari M; Prosper, Felipe; Oscier, David G; Carrasco, Yolanda R; Dyer, Martin J S; Martinez-Climent, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    NKX2 homeobox family proteins have a role in cancer development. Here we show that NKX2-3 is overexpressed in tumour cells from a subset of patients with marginal-zone lymphomas, but not with other B-cell malignancies. While Nkx2-3-deficient mice exhibit the absence of marginal-zone B cells, transgenic mice with expression of NKX2-3 in B cells show marginal-zone expansion that leads to the development of tumours, faithfully recapitulating the principal clinical and biological features of human marginal-zone lymphomas. NKX2-3 induces B-cell receptor signalling by phosphorylating Lyn/Syk kinases, which in turn activate multiple integrins (LFA-1, VLA-4), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, MadCAM-1) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. These molecules enhance migration, polarization and homing of B cells to splenic and extranodal tissues, eventually driving malignant transformation through triggering NF-κB and PI3K-AKT pathways. This study implicates oncogenic NKX2-3 in lymphomagenesis, and provides a valid experimental mouse model for studying the biology and therapy of human marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27297662

  5. Homeobox NKX2-3 promotes marginal-zone lymphomagenesis by activating B-cell receptor signalling and shaping lymphocyte dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Eloy F.; Mena-Varas, Maria; Barrio, Laura; Merino-Cortes, Sara V.; Balogh, Péter; Du, Ming-Qing; Akasaka, Takashi; Parker, Anton; Roa, Sergio; Panizo, Carlos; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Siebert, Reiner; Segura, Victor; Agirre, Xabier; Macri-Pellizeri, Laura; Aldaz, Beatriz; Vilas-Zornoza, Amaia; Zhang, Shaowei; Moody, Sarah; Calasanz, Maria Jose; Tousseyn, Thomas; Broccardo, Cyril; Brousset, Pierre; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Fernandez-Luna, Jose Luis; Garcia-Muñoz, Ricardo; Pena, Esther; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Salar, Antonio; Baptista, Maria Joao; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesús Maria; Gonzalez, Marcos; Terol, Maria Jose; Climent, Joan; Ferrandez, Antonio; Sagaert, Xavier; Melnick, Ari M.; Prosper, Felipe; Oscier, David G.; Carrasco, Yolanda R.; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Martinez-Climent, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    NKX2 homeobox family proteins have a role in cancer development. Here we show that NKX2-3 is overexpressed in tumour cells from a subset of patients with marginal-zone lymphomas, but not with other B-cell malignancies. While Nkx2-3-deficient mice exhibit the absence of marginal-zone B cells, transgenic mice with expression of NKX2-3 in B cells show marginal-zone expansion that leads to the development of tumours, faithfully recapitulating the principal clinical and biological features of human marginal-zone lymphomas. NKX2-3 induces B-cell receptor signalling by phosphorylating Lyn/Syk kinases, which in turn activate multiple integrins (LFA-1, VLA-4), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, MadCAM-1) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. These molecules enhance migration, polarization and homing of B cells to splenic and extranodal tissues, eventually driving malignant transformation through triggering NF-κB and PI3K-AKT pathways. This study implicates oncogenic NKX2-3 in lymphomagenesis, and provides a valid experimental mouse model for studying the biology and therapy of human marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27297662

  6. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H Peter

    2015-11-10

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure-function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2-amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme-substrate interactions, enzyme-substrate active complex formation, and protein folding-binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  7. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure–function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2–amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme–substrate interactions, enzyme–substrate active complex formation, and protein folding–binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  8. Information entropy of activation process: Application for low-temperature fluctuations of a myoglobin molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Activation process for unimolecular reaction has been considered by means of radiation theory. The formulae of information entropy of activation have been derived for the Boltzmann-Arrhenius model and the activation process model (APM). The physical meaning of this entropy has been determined. It is a measure of conversion of thermal radiation energy to mechanical energy that moves atoms in a molecule during elementary activation act. It is also a measure of uncertainty of this energy conversion. The uncertainty is due to unevenness of distribution function representing the activation process. It has been shown that Arrhenius dependence is caused by the entropy change. Efficiency comparison of the two models under consideration for low-temperature fluctuations of a myoglobin molecule structure shows that the APM should be favored over the Boltzmann-Arrhenius one.

  9. Investigating organic molecules responsible of auxin-like activity of humic acid fraction extracted from vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Barbara; Nunes, Ramom Rachide; Rezende, Maria Olímpia Oliveira; Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-08-15

    This work studied the auxin-like activity of humic acids (HA) obtained from vermicomposts produced using leather wastes plus cattle dung at different maturation stages (fresh, stable and mature). Bioassays were performed by testing HA concentrations in the range of 100-6000mgcarbonL(-1). (13)C CPMAS-NMR and GC-MS instrumental methods were used to assess the effect of biological processes and starting organic mixtures on HA composition. Not all HAs showed IAA-like activity and in general, IAA-like activity increased with the length of the vermicomposting process. The presence of leather wastes was not necessary to produce the auxin-like activity of HA, since HA extracted from a mix of cattle manure and sawdust, where no leather waste was added, showed IAA-like activity as well. CPMAS (13)CNMR revealed that HAs were similar independently of the mix used and that the humification process involved the increasing concentration of pre-existing alkali soluble fractions in the biomass. GC/MS allowed the identification of the molecules involved in IAA-like effects: carboxylic acids and amino acids. The concentration of active molecules, rather than their simple presence in HA, determined the bio-stimulating effect, and a good linear regression between auxin-like activity and active stimulating molecules concentration was found (R(2)=-0.85; p<0.01, n=6). PMID:27100009

  10. Dense small molecule labeling enables activator-dependent STORM by proximity mapping.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Gu, Min; Gunning, Peter W; Russell, Sarah M

    2016-09-01

    Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) enables high-resolution imaging, but multi-channel 3D imaging is problematic because of chromatic aberrations and alignment errors. The use of activator-dependent STORM in which spectrally distinct activators can be coupled with a single reporter can circumvent such issues. However, the standard approach of linking activators and reporters to a single antibody molecule is hampered by low labeling density and the large size of the antibody. We proposed that small molecule labels might enable activator-dependent STORM if the reporter or activator were linked to separate small molecules that bound within 3.5 nm of each other. This would greatly increase the labeling density and therefore improve resolution. We tested various mixtures of phalloidin- or mCling-conjugated fluorophore to demonstrate this feasibility. The specific activation was dependent on the choice of activator, its density, a matching activating laser and its power. In addition to providing an effective means of multi-channel 3D STORM imaging, this method also provides information about the local proximity between labels, potentially enabling super-resolved mapping of the conformation of the labeled structures. PMID:27246003

  11. The Root Apex of Arabidopsis thaliana Consists of Four Distinct Zones of Growth Activities

    PubMed Central

    De Cnodder, Tinne; Le, Jie

    2006-01-01

    In the growing apex of Arabidopsis thaliana primary roots, cells proceed through four distinct phases of cellular activities. These zones and their boundaries can be well defined based on their characteristic cellular activities. The meristematic zone comprises, and is limited to, all cells that undergo mitotic divisions. Detailed in vivo analysis of transgenic lines reveals that, in the Columbia-0 ecotype, the meristem stretches up to 200 µm away from the junction between root and root cap (RCJ). In the transition zone, 200 to about 520 µm away from the RCJ, cells undergo physiological changes as they prepare for their fast elongation. Upon entering the transition zone, they progressively develop a central vacuole, polarize the cytoskeleton and remodel their cell walls. Cells grow slowly during this transition: it takes ten hours to triplicate cell length from 8.5 to about 35 µm in the trichoblast cell files. In the fast elongation zone, which covers the zone from 520 to about 850 µm from the RCJ, cell length quadruplicates to about 140 µm in only two hours. This is accompanied by drastic and specific cell wall alterations. Finally, root hairs fully develop in the growth terminating zone, where root cells undergo a minor elongation to reach their mature lengths. PMID:19517000

  12. 78 FR 75331 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 100-Dayton, Ohio; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; THOR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 100--Dayton, Ohio; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; THOR Industries, Inc. (Commercial Bus Manufacturing); Jackson Center, Ohio The Greater Dayton Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 100, submitted a notification of proposed production activity...

  13. Single-molecule imaging of DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) activity by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Zhang, P.; Wang, Q.; Wu, N.; Zhang, F.; Hu, J.; Fan, C. H.; Li, B.

    2016-03-01

    We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA.We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06544e

  14. Machine learning models identify molecules active against the Ebola virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Freundlich, Joel S; Clark, Alex M; Anantpadma, Manu; Davey, Robert A; Madrid, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The search for small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus (EBOV) has led to several high throughput screens over the past 3 years. These have identified a range of FDA-approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) with anti-EBOV activity in vitro and several of which are also active in a mouse infection model. There are millions of additional commercially-available molecules that could be screened for potential activities as anti-EBOV compounds. One way to prioritize compounds for testing is to generate computational models based on the high throughput screening data and then virtually screen compound libraries. In the current study, we have generated Bayesian machine learning models with viral pseudotype entry assay and the EBOV replication assay data. We have validated the models internally and externally. We have also used these models to computationally score the MicroSource library of drugs to select those likely to be potential inhibitors. Three of the highest scoring molecules that were not in the model training sets, quinacrine, pyronaridine and tilorone, were tested in vitro and had EC 50 values of 350, 420 and 230 nM, respectively. Pyronaridine is a component of a combination therapy for malaria that was recently approved by the European Medicines Agency, which may make it more readily accessible for clinical testing. Like other known antimalarial drugs active against EBOV, it shares the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. Tilorone, is an investigational antiviral agent that has shown a broad array of biological activities including cell growth inhibition in cancer cells, antifibrotic properties, α7 nicotinic receptor agonist activity, radioprotective activity and activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1. Quinacrine is an antimalarial but also has use as an anthelmintic. Our results suggest data sets with less than 1,000 molecules can produce validated machine learning models that can in turn be utilized to identify novel EBOV inhibitors in vitro. PMID:26834994

  15. Machine learning models identify molecules active against the Ebola virus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Freundlich, Joel S.; Clark, Alex M.; Anantpadma, Manu; Davey, Robert A.; Madrid, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The search for small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus (EBOV) has led to several high throughput screens over the past 3 years. These have identified a range of FDA-approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) with anti-EBOV activity in vitro and several of which are also active in a mouse infection model. There are millions of additional commercially-available molecules that could be screened for potential activities as anti-EBOV compounds. One way to prioritize compounds for testing is to generate computational models based on the high throughput screening data and then virtually screen compound libraries. In the current study, we have generated Bayesian machine learning models with viral pseudotype entry assay and the EBOV replication assay data. We have validated the models internally and externally. We have also used these models to computationally score the MicroSource library of drugs to select those likely to be potential inhibitors. Three of the highest scoring molecules that were not in the model training sets, quinacrine, pyronaridine and tilorone, were tested in vitro and had EC 50 values of 350, 420 and 230 nM, respectively. Pyronaridine is a component of a combination therapy for malaria that was recently approved by the European Medicines Agency, which may make it more readily accessible for clinical testing. Like other known antimalarial drugs active against EBOV, it shares the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. Tilorone, is an investigational antiviral agent that has shown a broad array of biological activities including cell growth inhibition in cancer cells, antifibrotic properties, α7 nicotinic receptor agonist activity, radioprotective activity and activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1. Quinacrine is an antimalarial but also has use as an anthelmintic. Our results suggest data sets with less than 1,000 molecules can produce validated machine learning models that can in turn be utilized to identify novel EBOV inhibitors in vitro. PMID:26834994

  16. Lessons from isolable nickel(I) precursor complexes for small molecule activation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenglai; Driess, Matthias

    2012-02-21

    Small-molecule activation by transition metals is essential to numerous organic transformations, both biological and industrial. Creating useful metal-mediated activation systems often depends on stabilizing the metal with uncommon low oxidation states and low coordination numbers. This provides a redox-active metal center with vacant coordination sites well suited for interacting with small molecules. Monovalent nickel species, with their d(9) electronic configuration, are moderately strong one-electron reducing agents that are synthetically attractive if they can be isolated. They represent suitable reagents for closing the knowledge gap in nickel-mediated activation of small molecules. Recently, the first strikingly stable dinuclear β-diketiminate nickel(I) precursor complexes were synthesized, proving to be suitable promoters for small-molecule binding and activation. They have led to many unprecedented nickel complexes bearing activated small molecules in different reduction stages. In this Account, we describe selected achievements in the activation of nitrous oxide (N(2)O), O(2), the heavier chalcogens (S, Se, and Te), and white phosphorus (P(4)) through this β-diketiminatonickel(I) precursor species. We emphasize the reductive activation of O(2), owing to its promise in oxidation processes. The one-electron-reduced O(2) activation product, that is, the corresponding β-diketiminato-supported Ni-O(2) complex, is a genuine superoxonickel(II) complex, representing an important intermediate in the early stages of O(2) activation. It selectively acts as an oxygen-atom transfer agent, hydrogen-atom scavenger, or both towards exogenous organic substrates to yield oxidation products. The one-electron reduction of the superoxonickel(II) moiety was examined by using elemental potassium, β-diketiminatozinc(II) chloride, and β-diketiminatoiron(I) complexes, affording the first heterobimetallic complexes featuring a [NiO(2)M] subunit (M is K, Zn, or Fe). Through

  17. Small Molecule Activators of the Heat Shock Response: Chemical Properties, Molecular Targets, and Therapeutic Promise

    PubMed Central

    West, James D.; Wang, Yanyu; Morano, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    All cells have developed various mechanisms to respond and adapt to a variety of environmental challenges, including stresses that damage cellular proteins. One such response, the heat shock response (HSR), leads to the transcriptional activation of a family of molecular chaperone proteins that promote proper folding or clearance of damaged proteins within the cytosol. In addition to its role in protection against acute insults, the HSR also regulates lifespan and protects against protein misfolding that is associated with degenerative diseases of aging. As a result, identifying pharmacological regulators of the HSR has become an active area of research in recent years. Here, we review progress made in identifying small molecule activators of the HSR, what cellular targets these compounds interact with to drive response activation, and how such molecules may ultimately be employed to delay or reverse protein misfolding events that contribute to a number of diseases. PMID:22799889

  18. Triplet supercurrent due to spin-active zones in a Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Jacob; Sudbø, Asle

    2010-07-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment evidencing triplet superconductivity in a ferromagnetic Josephson junction with a Cu2MnAl -Heusler barrier, we construct a theoretical model accounting for this observation. The key ingredients in our model which generate the triplet supercurrent are spin-active zones, characterized by an effective canted interface magnetic moment. Using a numerical solution of the quasiclassical equations of superconductivity with spin-active boundary conditions, we find qualitatively very good agreement with the experimentally observed supercurrent. Further experimental implications of the spin-active zones are discussed.

  19. Spin state transition in the active center of the hemoglobin molecule: DFT + DMFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, D.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    An ab initio study of electronic and spin configurations of the iron ion in the active center of the human hemoglobin molecule is presented. With a combination of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method and the Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) approach, the spin state transition description in the iron ion during the oxidation process is significantly improved in comparison with previous attempts. It was found that the origin of the iron ion local moment behavior both for the high-spin and for the low-spin states in the hemoglobin molecule is caused by the presence of a mixture of several atomic states with comparable statistical probability.

  20. An RNA molecule copurifies with RNase P activity from Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Doria, M; Carrara, G; Calandra, P; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1991-01-01

    Utilizing a procedure for the purification of RNase P from Xenopus laevis germinal vesicle (GV) extracts, according to which the contamination by a large, cytoplasmic, cylindrical structure (1) is avoided, we demonstrate that the X.laevis enzyme, like the HeLa RNase P, is precipitated by anti-Th antibodies and an RNA molecule (XL RNA), 320 nucleotides long, copurifies with the activity. The sequence of XL RNA is 60% homologous to HeLa H1 RNA, therefore the two molecules seem related. Images PMID:1710353

  1. Calcium-channel number critically influences synaptic strength and plasticity at the active zone

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiansong; He, Liming; Zheng, Hongwei; Xue, Lei; Luo, Fujun; Shin, Wonchul; Sun, Tao; Kuner, Thomas; Yue, David T; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-01-01

    How synaptic-vesicle release is controlled at the basic release structure, the active zone, is poorly understood. By performing cell-attached current and capacitance recordings predominantly at single active zones in rat calyces, we found that single active zones contained 5-218 (mean, 42) calcium channels and 1–10 (mean, 5) readily releasable vesicles (RRVs) and released 0–5 vesicles during a 2-ms depolarization. Large variation in the number of calcium channels caused wide variation in release strength (measured during a 2-ms depolarization) by regulating the RRV release probability (PRRV) and the RRV number. Consequently, an action potential opened ~1–35 (mean, ~7) channels, resulting in different release probabilities at different active zones. As the number of calcium-channels determined PRRV, it critically influenced whether subsequent release would be facilitated or depressed. Regulating calcium channel density at active zones may thus be a major mechanism to yield synapses with different release properties and plasticity. These findings may explain large differences reported at synapses regarding release strength (release of 0, 1 or multiple vesicles), PRRV, short-term plasticity, calcium transients and the requisite calcium-channel number for triggering release. PMID:22683682

  2. Low resistivity and permeability in actively deforming shear zones on the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C.; Lockner, D. A.; Hickman, S.

    2015-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific drill hole near Parkfield, California, crosses the San Andreas Fault at a depth of 2.7 km. Downhole measurements and analysis of core retrieved from Phase 3 drilling reveal two narrow, actively deforming zones of smectite-clay gouge within a roughly 200 m wide fault damage zone of sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones. Here we report electrical resistivity and permeability measurements on core samples from all of these structural units at effective confining pressures up to 120 MPa. Electrical resistivity (~10 Ω-m) and permeability (10-21 to 10-22 m2) in the actively deforming zones were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than the surrounding damage zone material, consistent with broader-scale observations from the downhole resistivity and seismic velocity logs. The higher porosity of the clay gouge, 2 to 8 times greater than that in the damage zone rocks, along with surface conduction were the principal factors contributing to the observed low resistivities. The high percentage of fine-grained clay in the deforming zones also greatly reduced permeability to values low enough to create a barrier to fluid flow across the fault. Together, resistivity and permeability data can be used to assess the hydrogeologic characteristics of the fault, key to understanding fault structure and strength. The low resistivities and strength measurements of the SAFOD core are consistent with observations of low resistivity clays that are often found in the principal slip zones of other active faults making resistivity logs a valuable tool for identifying these zones.

  3. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Purpose of this research program is to obtain experimental information on the different fundamental ways metals bond and activate organic molecules. Our approach has been to directly probe the electronic interactions between metals and molecules through a wide variety of ionization spectroscopies and other techniques, and to investigate the relationships with bonding modes, structures, and chemical behavior. During this period, we have (1) characterized the electronic features of diphosphines and monophosphines in their coordination to metals, (2) carried out theoretical and experimental investigations of the bonding capabilities of C[sub 60] to transition metals, (3) developed techniques for the imaging of single molecules on gold substrates that emphasizes the electronic backbonding from the metal to the molecule, (4) obtained the high resolution photoelectron spectrum of pure C[sub 70] in the gas phase, (5) compared the bonding of [eta][sup 3]- acetylide ligands to the bonding of other small organic molecules with metals, and (6) reported the photoelectron spectra and bonding of [eta][sup 3]-cyclopropenyl groups to metals.

  4. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING

    SciTech Connect

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-03-26

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems.

  5. Protein mutated in paroxysmal dyskinesia interacts with the active zone protein RIM and suppresses synaptic vesicle exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yiguo; Ge, Woo-Ping; Li, Yulong; Hirano, Arisa; Lee, Hsien-Yang; Rohlmann, Astrid; Missler, Markus; Tsien, Richard W.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptáček, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD) is an autosomal dominant episodic movement disorder precipitated by coffee, alcohol, and stress. We previously identified the causative gene but the function of the encoded protein remains unknown. We also generated a PNKD mouse model that revealed dysregulated dopamine signaling in vivo. Here, we show that PNKD interacts with synaptic active zone proteins Rab3-interacting molecule (RIM)1 and RIM2, localizes to synapses, and modulates neurotransmitter release. Overexpressed PNKD protein suppresses release, and mutant PNKD protein is less effective than wild-type at inhibiting exocytosis. In PNKD KO mice, RIM1/2 protein levels are reduced and synaptic strength is impaired. Thus, PNKD is a novel synaptic protein with a regulatory role in neurotransmitter release. PMID:25730884

  6. Structural and Lithologic Characteristics of the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Zone and its Relationship with Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Li, H.; Pei, J.; Li, T.; Huang, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2010-12-01

    the older earthquake, but rather along the edge of the gouge. According to the gouge statistics of the whole fault zone, seismic events have the obvious tendency towards the foot wall, and the thickness of gouge is proportional to the activity of the fault, indicating that the width of fault zone is directly related to the number and evolution history of earthquakes . Repeated earthquakes maybe the main cause for the formation of the Longmenshan Moutains

  7. Aqueous phase adsorption of different sized molecules on activated carbon fibers: Effect of textural properties.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Yogendra N; Bhaduri, Bhaskar; Joshi, Harish C; Srivastava, Anurag; Verma, Nishith

    2016-07-01

    The effect that the textural properties of rayon-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs), such as the BET surface area and pore size distribution (PSD), have on the adsorption of differently sized molecules, namely, brilliant yellow (BY), methyl orange (MO) and phenol (PH), was investigated in the aqueous phase. ACF samples with different BET areas and PSDs were produced by steam-activating carbonized fibers for different activation times (0.25, 0.5, and 1 h). The samples activated for 0.25 h were predominantly microporous, whereas those activated for relatively longer times contained hierarchical micro-mesopores. The adsorption capacities of the ACFs for the adsorbate increased with increasing BET surface area and pore volume, and ranged from 51 to 1306 mg/g depending on the textural properties of the ACFs and adsorbate size. The adsorption capacities of the hierarchical ACF samples followed the order BY > MO > PH. Interestingly, the number of molecules adsorbed by the ACFs followed the reverse order: PH > MO > BY. This anomaly was attributed to the increasing molecular weight of the PH, MO and BY molecules. The equilibrium adsorption data were described using the Langmuir isotherm. This study shows that suitable textural modifications to ACFs are required for the efficient aqueous phase removal of an adsorbate. PMID:27107386

  8. Visualizing repetitive diffusion activity of double-strand RNA binding proteins by single molecule fluorescence assays.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Ran; Wang, Xinlei; Myong, Sua

    2016-08-01

    TRBP, one of double strand RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs), is an essential cofactor of Dicer in the RNA interference pathway. Previously we reported that TRBP exhibits repetitive diffusion activity on double strand (ds)RNA in an ATP independent manner. In the TRBP-Dicer complex, the diffusion mobility of TRBP facilitates Dicer-mediated RNA cleavage. Such repetitive diffusion of dsRBPs on a nucleic acid at the nanometer scale can be appropriately captured by several single molecule detection techniques. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide to four different single molecule fluorescence assays by which the diffusion activity of dsRBPs on dsRNA can be detected. One color assay, termed protein induced fluorescence enhancement enables detection of unlabeled protein binding and diffusion on a singly labeled RNA. Two-color Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in which labeled dsRBPs is applied to labeled RNA, allows for probing the motion of protein along the RNA axis. Three color FRET reports on the diffusion movement of dsRBPs from one to the other end of RNA. The single molecule pull down assay provides an opportunity to collect dsRBPs from mammalian cells and examine the protein-RNA interaction at single molecule platform. PMID:27012177

  9. Optoporation of impermeable molecules and genes for visualization and activation of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Kamal; Batbyal, Subrata; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2015-03-01

    Visualization, activation, and detection of the cell(s) and their electrical activity require delivery of exogenous impermeable molecules and targeted expression of genes encoding labeling proteins, ion-channels and voltage indicators. While genes can be delivered by viral vector to cells, delivery of other impermeable molecules into the cytoplasm of targeted cells requires microinjection by mechanical needle or microelectrodes, which pose significant challenge to the viability of the cells. Further, it will be useful to localize the expression of the targeted molecules not only in specific cell types, but to specific cells in restricted spatial regions. Here, we report use of focused near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser beam to transiently perforate targeted cell membrane to insert genes encoding blue light activatable channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and red-shifted opsin (ReachR). Optoporation of nanomolar concentrations of rhodamine phalloidin (an impermeable dye molecule for staining filamentous actin) into targeted living mammalian cells (both HEK and primary cortical neurons) is also achieved allowing imaging of dynamics and intact morphology of cellular structures without requiring fixation.

  10. Single molecule investigation of the onset and minimum size of the calcium-mediated junction zone in alginate.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Kate A; Aarstad, Olav Andreas; Nakamura, Marcela; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Round, Andrew N

    2016-09-01

    One of the principal roles of alginate, both natively and in commercial applications, is gelation via Ca(2+)-mediated crosslinks between blocks of guluronic acid. In this work, single molecule measurements were carried out between well-characterised series of nearly monodisperse guluronic acid blocks ('oligoGs') using dynamic force spectroscopy. The measurements provide evidence that for interaction times on the order of tens of milliseconds the maximum crosslink strength is achieved by pairs of oligoGs long enough to allow the coordination of 4Ca(2+) ions, with both shorter and longer oligomers forming weaker links. Extending the interaction time from tens to hundreds of milliseconds allows longer oligoGs to achieve much stronger crosslinks but does not change the strength of individual links between shorter oligoGs. These results are considered in light of extant models for the onset of cooperative crosslinking in polyelectrolytes and an anisotropic distribution of oligoGs on interacting surfaces and provide a timescale for the formation and relaxation of alginate gels at the single crosslink level. PMID:27185115

  11. Single molecule microscopy reveals mechanistic insight into RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex assembly and transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Abigail E.; Kugel, Jennifer F.; Goodrich, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a complex process that requires general transcription factors and Pol II to assemble on DNA into preinitiation complexes that can begin RNA synthesis upon binding of NTPs (nucleoside triphosphate). The pathways by which preinitiation complexes form, and how this impacts transcriptional activity are not completely clear. To address these issues, we developed a single molecule system using TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) microscopy and purified human transcription factors, which allows us to visualize transcriptional activity at individual template molecules. We see that stable interactions between polymerase II (Pol II) and a heteroduplex DNA template do not depend on general transcription factors; however, transcriptional activity is highly dependent upon TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF. We also found that subsets of general transcription factors and Pol II can form stable complexes that are precursors for functional transcription complexes upon addition of the remaining factors and DNA. Ultimately we found that Pol II, TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF can form a quaternary complex in the absence of promoter DNA, indicating that a stable network of interactions exists between these proteins independent of promoter DNA. Single molecule studies can be used to learn how different modes of preinitiation complex assembly impact transcriptional activity. PMID:27112574

  12. Force Spectroscopy of Substrate Molecules En Route to the Proteasome's Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Classen, Mirjam; Breuer, Sarah; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Guckenberger, Reinhard; Witt, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    We used an atomic force microscope to study the mechanism underlying the translocation of substrate molecules inside the proteasome. Our specific experimental setup allowed us to measure interaction forces between the 20S proteasome and its substrates. The substrate (β-casein) was covalently bound either via a thiol-Au bond or by a PEG-based binding procedure to the atomic force microscope cantilever tip and offered as bait to proteasomes from Methanosarcina mazei. The proteasomes were immobilized densely in an upright orientation on mica, which made their upper pores accessible for substrates to enter. Besides performing conventional single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments, we developed a three-step procedure that allows the detection of specific proteasome-substrate single-molecule events without tip-sample contact. Using the active 20S wild type and an inactive active-site mutant, as well as two casein mutants bound with opposite termini to the microscope tip, we detected no directional preference of the proteasome-substrate interactions. By comparing the distribution of the measured forces for the proteasome-substrate interactions, were observed that a significant proportion of interaction events occurred at higher forces for the active versus the inactive proteasome. These forces can be attributed to the translocation of substrate en route to the active sites that are harbored deep inside the proteasome. PMID:21244845

  13. Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Çakir, Bilal; Dağliyan, Onur; Dağyildiz, Ezgi; Bariş, İbrahim; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil; Kizilel, Seda; Türkay, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Background Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is an allosteric Zn+2 metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. Conclusion/Significance This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible. PMID:22355395

  14. 78 FR 51707 - Foreign-Trade Zone 59-Lincoln, Nebraska; Authorization of Production Activity; CNH America, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... FTZ Board (15 CFR part 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 59--Lincoln, Nebraska; Authorization of Production Activity..., 2013, the Lincoln-Foreign Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 59, submitted a notification of...

  15. 77 FR 75972 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26 - Atlanta, Georgia Notification of Proposed Production Activity Suzuki Mfg...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26 -- Atlanta, Georgia Notification of Proposed Production Activity Suzuki Mfg. of America Corp. (All-Terrain Vehicles) Rome, Jonesboro and Cartersville, Georgia Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of...

  16. 77 FR 28569 - Foreign-Trade Zone 92-Gulfport, MS Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Gulf Ship, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 92--Gulfport, MS Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Gulf Ship, LLC, (Shipbuilding), Gulfport, MS The Mississippi Coast Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee...

  17. 77 FR 59890 - Foreign-Trade Zone 92-Gulfport, MS; Authorization of Production Activity; Gulf Ship, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (77 FR 28569, 5-15-2012). The FTZ Board has... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 92--Gulfport, MS; Authorization of Production Activity; Gulf Ship, LLC (Shipbuilding); Gulfport, MS On May 10, 2012, the Mississippi Coast Foreign-Trade Zone,...

  18. Nanoscale charge transport in cytochrome c3/DNA network: Comparative studies between redox-active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Harumasa; Che, Dock-Chil; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2015-09-01

    The redox-active molecule of a cytochrome c3/DNA network exhibits nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with a threshold bias voltage at low temperature and zero-bias conductance at room temperature. I-V curves for the cytochrome c3/DNA network are well matched with the Coulomb blockade network model. Comparative studies of the Mn12 cluster, cytochrome c, and cytochrome c3, which have a wide variety of redox potentials, indicate no difference in charge transport, which suggests that the conduction mechanism is not directly related to the redox states. The charge transport mechanism has been discussed in terms of the newly-formed electronic energy states near the Fermi level, induced by the ionic interaction between redox-active molecules with the DNA network.

  19. Investigations of electron helicity in optically active molecules using polarized beams of electrons and positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gidley, D. W.; Rich, A.; Van House, J. C.; Zitzewitz, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    A positronium-formation experiment with a high sensitivity to a possible relation between the helicity of beta particles emitted in nuclear beta decay and the optical asymmetry of biological molecules is presented. The experiment is based on a mechanism in which the electrons in optically active molecules possess a helicity of less than 0.001, too weak to detect in radiolysis experiments, the sign of which depends on the chirality of the isomer. A helicity-dependent asymmetry is sought in the formation of the triplet ground state of positronium when a low-energy beam of polarized positrons of reversible helicity interacts with an optically active substance coating a channel electron multiplier. Asymmetries between positronium decays observed at positive and negative helicities for the same substance can thus be determined with a sensitivity of 0.0001, which represents a factor of 100 improvement over previous positronium experiments.

  20. Tsunamigenic potential of Mediterranean fault systems and active subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petricca, Patrizio; Babeyko, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Since the North East Atlantic and Mediterranean Tsunami Warning System (NEAMTWS) is under development by the European scientific community, it becomes necessary to define guidelines for the characterization of the numerous parameters must be taken into account in a fair assessment of the risk. Definition of possible tectonic sources and evaluation of their potential is one of the principal issues. In this study we systematically evaluate tsunamigenic potential of up-to-now known real fault systems and active subduction interfaces in the NEAMTWS region. The task is accomplished by means of numerical modeling of tsunami generation and propagation. We have simulated all possible uniform-slip ruptures populating fault and subduction interfaces with magnitudes ranging from 6.5 up to expected Mmax. A total of 15810 individual ruptures were processed. For each rupture, a tsunami propagation scenario was computed in linear shallow-water approximation on 1-arc minute bathymetric grid (Gebco_08) implying normal reflection boundary conditions. Maximum wave heights at coastal positions (totally - 23236 points of interest) were recorded for four hours of simulation and then classified according to currently adopted warning level thresholds. The resulting dataset allowed us to classify the sources in terms of their tsunamigenic potential as well as to estimate their minimum tsunamigenic magnitude. Our analysis shows that almost every source in the Mediterranean Sea is capable to produce local tsunami at the advisory level (i.e., wave height > 20 cm) starting from magnitude values of Mw=6.6. In respect to the watch level (wave height > 50 cm), the picture is less homogeneous: crustal sources in south-west Mediterranean as well as East-Hellenic arc need larger magnitudes (around Mw=7.0) to trigger watch levels even at the nearby coasts. In the context of the regional warning (i.e., source-to-coast distance > 100 km) faults also behave more heterogeneously in respect to the minimum

  1. Delivery of Molecules into Human Corneal Endothelial Cells by Carbon Nanoparticles Activated by Femtosecond Laser

    PubMed Central

    Jumelle, Clotilde; Mauclair, Cyril; Houzet, Julien; Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Peoc’h, Michel; Acquart, Sophie; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) form a monolayer at the innermost face of the cornea and are the engine of corneal transparency. Nevertheless, they are a vulnerable population incapable of regeneration in humans, and their diseases are responsible for one third of corneal grafts performed worldwide. Donor corneas are stored in eye banks for security and quality controls, then delivered to surgeons. This period could allow specific interventions to modify the characteristics of CECs in order to increase their proliferative capacity, increase their resistance to apoptosis, or release immunosuppressive molecules. Delivery of molecules specifically into CECs during storage would therefore open up new therapeutic perspectives. For clinical applications, physical methods have a more favorable individual and general benefit/risk ratio than most biological vectors, but are often less efficient. The delivery of molecules into cells by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses is a promising recent technique developed on non-adherent cells. The nanoparticles are partly consummated by the reaction releasing CO and H2 gas bubbles responsible for the shockwave at the origin of cell transient permeation. Our aim was to develop an experimental setting to deliver a small molecule (calcein) into the monolayer of adherent CECs. We confirmed that increased laser fluence and time exposure increased uptake efficiency while keeping cell mortality below 5%. We optimized the area covered by the laser beam by using a motorized stage allowing homogeneous scanning of the cell culture surface using a spiral path. Calcein uptake reached median efficiency of 54.5% (range 50.3–57.3) of CECs with low mortality (0.5%, range (0.55–1.0)). After sorting by flow cytometry, CECs having uptaken calcein remained viable and presented normal morphological characteristics. Delivery of molecules into CECs by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser could prove useful for

  2. Delivery of Molecules into Human Corneal Endothelial Cells by Carbon Nanoparticles Activated by Femtosecond Laser.

    PubMed

    Jumelle, Clotilde; Mauclair, Cyril; Houzet, Julien; Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Peoc'h, Michel; Acquart, Sophie; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) form a monolayer at the innermost face of the cornea and are the engine of corneal transparency. Nevertheless, they are a vulnerable population incapable of regeneration in humans, and their diseases are responsible for one third of corneal grafts performed worldwide. Donor corneas are stored in eye banks for security and quality controls, then delivered to surgeons. This period could allow specific interventions to modify the characteristics of CECs in order to increase their proliferative capacity, increase their resistance to apoptosis, or release immunosuppressive molecules. Delivery of molecules specifically into CECs during storage would therefore open up new therapeutic perspectives. For clinical applications, physical methods have a more favorable individual and general benefit/risk ratio than most biological vectors, but are often less efficient. The delivery of molecules into cells by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses is a promising recent technique developed on non-adherent cells. The nanoparticles are partly consummated by the reaction releasing CO and H2 gas bubbles responsible for the shockwave at the origin of cell transient permeation. Our aim was to develop an experimental setting to deliver a small molecule (calcein) into the monolayer of adherent CECs. We confirmed that increased laser fluence and time exposure increased uptake efficiency while keeping cell mortality below 5%. We optimized the area covered by the laser beam by using a motorized stage allowing homogeneous scanning of the cell culture surface using a spiral path. Calcein uptake reached median efficiency of 54.5% (range 50.3-57.3) of CECs with low mortality (0.5%, range (0.55-1.0)). After sorting by flow cytometry, CECs having uptaken calcein remained viable and presented normal morphological characteristics. Delivery of molecules into CECs by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser could prove useful for future

  3. Structure-property relationship of quinuclidinium surfactants--Towards multifunctional biologically active molecules.

    PubMed

    Skočibušić, Mirjana; Odžak, Renata; Štefanić, Zoran; Križić, Ivana; Krišto, Lucija; Jović, Ozren; Hrenar, Tomica; Primožič, Ines; Jurašin, Darija

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by diverse biological and pharmacological activity of quinuclidine and oxime compounds we have synthesized and characterized novel class of surfactants, 3-hydroxyimino quinuclidinium bromides with different alkyl chains lengths (CnQNOH; n=12, 14 and 16). The incorporation of non conventional hydroxyimino quinuclidinium headgroup and variation in alkyl chain length affects hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of surfactant molecule and thereby physicochemical properties important for its application. Therefore, newly synthesized surfactants were characterized by the combination of different experimental techniques: X-ray analysis, potentiometry, electrical conductivity, surface tension and dynamic light scattering measurements, as well as antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Comprehensive investigation of CnQNOH surfactants enabled insight into structure-property relationship i.e., way in which the arrangement of surfactant molecules in the crystal phase correlates with their solution behavior and biologically activity. The synthesized CnQNOH surfactants exhibited high adsorption efficiency and relatively low critical micelle concentrations. In addition, all investigated compounds showed very potent and promising activity against Gram-positive and clinically relevant Gram-negative bacterial strains compared to conventional antimicrobial agents: tetracycline and gentamicin. The overall results indicate that bicyclic headgroup with oxime moiety, which affects both hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of CnQNOH molecule in addition to enabling hydrogen bonding, has dominant effect on crystal packing and physicochemical properties. The unique structural features of cationic surfactants with hydroxyimino quinuclidine headgroup along with diverse biological activity have made them promising structures in novel drug discovery. Obtained fundamental understanding how combination of different functionalities in a single surfactant molecule affects its physicochemical

  4. Anticancer molecule AS1411 exhibits low nanomolar antiviral activity against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Amrane, Samir; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Andreola, Marie-Line

    2015-11-01

    During clinical trials, a number of fully characterized molecules are dropped along the way because they do not provide enough benefit for the patient. Some of them show limited side effects and might be of great use for other applications. AS1411 is a nucleolin-targeting aptamer that underwent phase II clinical trials as anticancer agent. Here, we show that AS1411 exhibits extremely potent antiviral activity and is therefore an attractive new lead as anti-HIV agent. PMID:26363100

  5. Smart magnetic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to control the release of bio-active molecules.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, Chiara; Lungaro, Lisa; Goranov, Vitaly; Riminucci, Alberto; Piñeiro-Redondo, Yolanda; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, José; Dediu, Valentin

    2014-10-01

    Thermo switchable magnetic hydrogels undoubtedly have a great potential for medical applications since they can behave as smart carriers able to transport bioactive molecules to a chosen part of the body and release them on demand via magneto-thermal activation. We report on the ability to modify the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) on demand from 32 °C to LCST ≥ 37 °C. This was achieved by the absorption of controlled amounts of magnetite nanoparticles on the polymer chains. We show, through the effect on cell viability, that the resulting magnetic PNIPAM is able to trap and to release bio-active molecules, such as cell growth factors. The activities of the released bio molecule are tested on human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture. We demonstrate that the LCST of the magnetic PNIPAM can be reached remotely via inductive heating with an alternating magnetic field. This approach on magnetic PNIPAM clearly supports appealing applications in safe biomedicine. PMID:24477874

  6. Supported gold catalysis: from small molecule activation to green chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; He, Lin; Liu, Yong-Mei; Cao, Yong

    2014-03-18

    With diminishing natural resources, there is an ever-increasing demand for cost-effective and sustainable production of fine and commodity chemicals. For this purpose, there is a need for new catalytic methods that can permit efficient and targeted conversion of fossil and biorenewable feedstocks with lower energy requirements and environmental impact. A significant number of industrial catalytic processes are performed by platinum-group-metal (PGM)-based heterogeneous catalysts capable of activating a range of important small molecules, such as CO, O2, H2, and N2. In contrast, there is a general feeling that gold (Au) cannot act as an efficient catalyst because of its inability to activate most molecules, which is essential to any catalytic processes. As a consequence, researchers have long neglected the potential for use of gold as a catalyst. In recent years, however, chemists have put forth tremendous effort and progress in the use of supported gold catalysts to facilitate a variety of useful synthetic transformations. The seminal discovery by Haruta in 1987 that suitably prepared Au-based catalysts were surprisingly active for CO oxidation even at 200 K initiated rapid development of the field. Since then, researchers have widely employed Au-based catalysts in many types of mild chemical processes, with special focus on selective reactions involving small molecules (for example, CO, H2O, O2, or H2) as a reactant. That gold in the form of tiny nanoparticles (NPs, generally less than 5 nm in diameter) can subtly activate the reactant molecules under mild conditions has been evoked to explain the superior effectiveness of gold compared with conventional PGMs. In this context, Au-based catalysts are gaining great significance in developing new green processes with improved selectivity and energy minimization. In this Account, we describe our efforts toward the development of a range of green and selective processes largely through the appropriate choice of Au

  7. Amplitude analysis of active source seismic data from the grounding zone of Whillans Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, Huw; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Alley, Richard; Christianson, Knut

    2015-04-01

    Amplitude analysis of active source seismic data is often used to estimate acoustic properties and thereby infer the lithology of the substrate beneath glaciers and ice streams. The substrate beneath the ice streams of West Antarctica is of particular interest as here subglacial sediment deformation results in the rapid flow of the overriding ice. At the grounding zone, where the grounded ice sheet transitions to the floating ice shelf, this substrate is thought to stiffen due to tidal compaction resulting in a zone of higher basal shear stress which is manifest in the buckling of the internal layering in the overriding ice. Here we investigate these processes by estimating subglacial properties using active source seismic data acquired across the grounding zone of Whillans Ice Stream. Perhaps uniquely, we are able to test our methodology due to the survey crossing from an ice overlying sediment interface into a known ice overlying water interface. Our analysis indicates that lithological variations within the grounding zone are below the resolution of our methodology with the exception of a body of water trapped by a hydropotential reversal upstream of the grounding zone.

  8. Single-molecule view of basal activity and activation mechanisms of the G protein-coupled receptor β2AR.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Rajan; Liu, Jeffrey J; Pljevaljcic, Goran; White, Kate L; van der Schans, Edwin; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C; Wüthrich, Kurt; Millar, David P

    2015-11-17

    Binding of extracellular ligands to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) initiates transmembrane signaling by inducing conformational changes on the cytoplasmic receptor surface. Knowledge of this process provides a platform for the development of GPCR-targeting drugs. Here, using a site-specific Cy3 fluorescence probe in the human β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), we observed that individual receptor molecules in the native-like environment of phospholipid nanodiscs undergo spontaneous transitions between two distinct conformational states. These states are assigned to inactive and active-like receptor conformations. Individual receptor molecules in the apo form repeatedly sample both conformations, with a bias toward the inactive conformation. Experiments in the presence of drug ligands show that binding of the full agonist formoterol shifts the conformational distribution in favor of the active-like conformation, whereas binding of the inverse agonist ICI-118,551 favors the inactive conformation. Analysis of single-molecule dwell-time distributions for each state reveals that formoterol increases the frequency of activation transitions, while also reducing the frequency of deactivation events. In contrast, the inverse agonist increases the frequency of deactivation transitions. Our observations account for the high level of basal activity of this receptor and provide insights that help to rationalize, on the molecular level, the widely documented variability of the pharmacological efficacies among GPCR-targeting drugs. PMID:26578769

  9. Dynamical Organization of Syntaxin-1A at the Presynaptic Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Alexander; Böhme, Mathias A.; Schöneberg, Johannes; Depner, Harald; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Noé, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle fusion is mediated by SNARE proteins forming in between synaptic vesicle (v-SNARE) and plasma membrane (t-SNARE), one of which is Syntaxin-1A. Although exocytosis mainly occurs at active zones, Syntaxin-1A appears to cover the entire neuronal membrane. By using STED super-resolution light microscopy and image analysis of Drosophila neuro-muscular junctions, we show that Syntaxin-1A clusters are more abundant and have an increased size at active zones. A computational particle-based model of syntaxin cluster formation and dynamics is developed. The model is parametrized to reproduce Syntaxin cluster-size distributions found by STED analysis, and successfully reproduces existing FRAP results. The model shows that the neuronal membrane is adjusted in a way to strike a balance between having most syntaxins stored in large clusters, while still keeping a mobile fraction of syntaxins free or in small clusters that can efficiently search the membrane or be traded between clusters. This balance is subtle and can be shifted toward almost no clustering and almost complete clustering by modifying the syntaxin interaction energy on the order of only 1 kBT. This capability appears to be exploited at active zones. The larger active-zone syntaxin clusters are more stable and provide regions of high docking and fusion capability, whereas the smaller clusters outside may serve as flexible reserve pool or sites of spontaneous ectopic release. PMID:26367029

  10. Reduced endogenous Ca2+ buffering speeds active zone Ca2+ signaling.

    PubMed

    Delvendahl, Igor; Jablonski, Lukasz; Baade, Carolin; Matveev, Victor; Neher, Erwin; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic active zone is triggered by local Ca(2+) signals, which are confined in their spatiotemporal extent by endogenous Ca(2+) buffers. However, it remains elusive how rapid and reliable Ca(2+) signaling can be sustained during repetitive release. Here, we established quantitative two-photon Ca(2+) imaging in cerebellar mossy fiber boutons, which fire at exceptionally high rates. We show that endogenous fixed buffers have a surprisingly low Ca(2+)-binding ratio (∼ 15) and low affinity, whereas mobile buffers have high affinity. Experimentally constrained modeling revealed that the low endogenous buffering promotes fast clearance of Ca(2+) from the active zone during repetitive firing. Measuring Ca(2+) signals at different distances from active zones with ultra-high-resolution confirmed our model predictions. Our results lead to the concept that reduced Ca(2+) buffering enables fast active zone Ca(2+) signaling, suggesting that the strength of endogenous Ca(2+) buffering limits the rate of synchronous synaptic transmission. PMID:26015575

  11. 78 FR 16247 - Foreign-Trade Zone 38-Spartanburg County, South Carolina; Authorization of Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... Federal Register inviting public comment (77 FR 70992-70993, 11-28-2012). The FTZ Board has determined... On November 8, 2012, the South Carolina State Ports Authority, grantee of FTZ 38, submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of...

  12. Dynamical Organization of Syntaxin-1A at the Presynaptic Active Zone.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Alexander; Böhme, Mathias A; Schöneberg, Johannes; Depner, Harald; Sigrist, Stephan J; Noé, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Synaptic vesicle fusion is mediated by SNARE proteins forming in between synaptic vesicle (v-SNARE) and plasma membrane (t-SNARE), one of which is Syntaxin-1A. Although exocytosis mainly occurs at active zones, Syntaxin-1A appears to cover the entire neuronal membrane. By using STED super-resolution light microscopy and image analysis of Drosophila neuro-muscular junctions, we show that Syntaxin-1A clusters are more abundant and have an increased size at active zones. A computational particle-based model of syntaxin cluster formation and dynamics is developed. The model is parametrized to reproduce Syntaxin cluster-size distributions found by STED analysis, and successfully reproduces existing FRAP results. The model shows that the neuronal membrane is adjusted in a way to strike a balance between having most syntaxins stored in large clusters, while still keeping a mobile fraction of syntaxins free or in small clusters that can efficiently search the membrane or be traded between clusters. This balance is subtle and can be shifted toward almost no clustering and almost complete clustering by modifying the syntaxin interaction energy on the order of only 1 kBT. This capability appears to be exploited at active zones. The larger active-zone syntaxin clusters are more stable and provide regions of high docking and fusion capability, whereas the smaller clusters outside may serve as flexible reserve pool or sites of spontaneous ectopic release. PMID:26367029

  13. Microbial respiration and extracellular enzyme activity in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study explores the relationship between sediment chemistry (TC, TN, TP) and microbial respiration (DHA) and extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) across the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) hypoxic zone. TC, TN, and TP were all positively correlated with each other (r=0.19-0.68). DHA was ...

  14. 77 FR 47429 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... concerning the Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones. This request for comment is being made... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities; Petroleum Refineries... CBP is soliciting comments concerning the following information collection: Title:...

  15. RIM Promotes Calcium Channel Accumulation at Active Zones of the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Ethan R.; Valakh, Vera; Wright, Christina M.; Wu, Chunlai; Liu, Zhihua; Zhang, Yong Q.; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Summary Synaptic communication requires the controlled release of synaptic vesicles from presynaptic axon terminals. Release efficacy is regulated by the many proteins that comprise the presynaptic release apparatus, including Ca2+ channels and proteins that influence Ca2+ channel accumulation at release sites. Here we identify Drosophila RIM and demonstrate that it localizes to active zones at the larval neuromuscular junction. In Drosophila RIM mutants, there is a large decrease in evoked synaptic transmission, due to a significant reduction in both the clustering of Ca2+ channels and the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles at active zones. Hence, RIM plays an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating synaptic calcium channel localization and readily releasable pool size. Since RIM has traditionally been studied as an effector of Rab3 function, we investigate whether RIM is involved in the newly identified function of Rab3 in the distribution of presynaptic release machinery components across release sites. Bruchpilot (Brp), an essential component of the active zone cytomatrix T bar, is unaffected by RIM disruption, indicating that Brp localization and distribution across active zones does not require wild type RIM. In addition, larvae containing mutations in both RIM and rab3 have reduced Ca2+ channel levels and a Brp distribution that is very similar to that of the rab3 single mutant, indicating that RIM functions to regulate Ca2+ channel accumulation but is not a Rab3 effector for release machinery distribution across release sites. PMID:23175814

  16. 78 FR 49255 - Foreign-Trade Zone 158-Vicksburg/Jackson, Mississippi; Authorization of Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... (15 CFR part 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 20889, 4-8... Production Activity; Extension of Production Authority; Lane Furniture Industries, Inc. (Upholstered... Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Lane Furniture Industries, Inc., in Belden, Saltillo,...

  17. Reduced endogenous Ca2+ buffering speeds active zone Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Delvendahl, Igor; Jablonski, Lukasz; Baade, Carolin; Matveev, Victor; Neher, Erwin; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic active zone is triggered by local Ca2+ signals, which are confined in their spatiotemporal extent by endogenous Ca2+ buffers. However, it remains elusive how rapid and reliable Ca2+ signaling can be sustained during repetitive release. Here, we established quantitative two-photon Ca2+ imaging in cerebellar mossy fiber boutons, which fire at exceptionally high rates. We show that endogenous fixed buffers have a surprisingly low Ca2+-binding ratio (∼15) and low affinity, whereas mobile buffers have high affinity. Experimentally constrained modeling revealed that the low endogenous buffering promotes fast clearance of Ca2+ from the active zone during repetitive firing. Measuring Ca2+ signals at different distances from active zones with ultra-high-resolution confirmed our model predictions. Our results lead to the concept that reduced Ca2+ buffering enables fast active zone Ca2+ signaling, suggesting that the strength of endogenous Ca2+ buffering limits the rate of synchronous synaptic transmission. PMID:26015575

  18. Early-Late Heterobimetallic Complexes Linked by Phosphinoamide Ligands. Tuning Redox Potentials and Small Molecule Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Christine M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent attention in the chemical community has been focused on the energy efficient and environmentally benign conversion of abundant small molecules (CO2, H2O, etc.) to useful liquid fuels. This project addresses these goals by examining fundamental aspects of catalyst design to ultimately access small molecule activation processes under mild conditions. Specifically, Thomas and coworkers have targetted heterobimetallic complexes that feature metal centers with vastly different electronic properties, dictated both by their respective positions on the periodic table and their coordination environment. Unlike homobimetallic complexes featuring identical or similar metals, the bonds between metals in early/late heterobimetallics are more polarized, with the more electron-rich late metal center donating electron density to the more electron-deficient early metal center. While metal-metal bonds pose an interesting strategy for storing redox equivalents and stabilizing reactive metal fragments, the polar character of metal-metal bonds in heterobimetallic complexes renders these molecules ideally poised to react with small molecule substrates via cleavage of energy-rich single and double bonds. In addition, metal-metal interactions have been shown to dramatically affect redox potentials and promote multielectron redox activity, suggesting that metal-metal interactions may provide a mechanism to tune redox potentials and access substrate reduction/activation at mild overpotentials. This research project has provided a better fundamental understanding of how interactions between transition metals can be used as a strategy to promote and/or control chemical transformations related to the clean production of fuels. While this project focused on the study of homogeneous systems, it is anticipated that the broad conclusions drawn from these investigations will be applicable to heterogeneous catalysis as well, particularly on heterogeneous processes that occur at interfaces in

  19. Facile reversibility by design: tuning small molecule capture and activation by single component frustrated Lewis pairs.

    PubMed

    Mo, Zhenbo; Kolychev, Eugene L; Rit, Arnab; Campos, Jesús; Niu, Haoyu; Aldridge, Simon

    2015-09-30

    A series of single component FLPs has been investigated for small molecule capture, with the finding that through tuning of both the thermodynamics of binding/activation and the degree of preorganization (i.e., ΔS(⧧)) reversibility can be brought about at (or close to) room temperature. Thus, the dimethylxanthene system {(C6H4)2(O)CMe2}(PMes2)(B(C6F5)2): (i) heterolytically cleaves dihydrogen to give an equilibrium mixture of FLP and H2 activation product in solution at room temperature and (ii) reversibly captures nitrous oxide (uptake at room temperature, 1 atm; release at 323 K). PMID:26356306

  20. Ethosomes for the delivery of anti-HSV-1 molecules: preparation, characterization and in vitro activity.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, R; Ravani, L; Zaid, A N; Menegatti, E; Romagnoli, R; Drechsler, M; Esposito, E

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the production, characterization and in vitro activity of ethosomes containing two molecules with antiviral activity, such as acyclovir (ACY) and N1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-pyrazole [3,4d]pyridazin-7(6p-chlorine-phenyl)-one nucleoside (N1CP). Ethosomes were prepared and morphologically characterized by Cryo-TEM. The encapsulation efficiency was 92.3 +/- 2.5% for ACY and 94.2 +/- 2.8% for N1CP. The release of the drug from vesicles, determined by a Franz cell method, indicated that both drugs were released in a controlled manner. In order to possibly guarantee the stability during long-term storage ethosome suspensions was freeze-dried. It was found that the freeze-dried ethosomes' cakes were compact, glassy characterized by low density and quick re-hydration. However, the storage time slightly influences the percentage of drug encapsulation within ethosomes showing a drug leakage after re-hydration around 10%. The antiviral activity against HSV-1 of both drugs was tested by plaque reduction assay in monolayer cultures of Vero cells. Data showed that ethosomes allowed a reduction of the ED50 of N1CP evidencing an increase of its antiviral activity. However, ACY remains more active than N1CP. No differences are appreciable between drug-containing ethosomes before and after freeze-drying. Taken together these results, ethosomal formulation could be possibly proposed as mean for topical administration of anti-herpetic molecules. PMID:21105576

  1. The Small Molecule IMR-1 Inhibits the Notch Transcriptional Activation Complex to Suppress Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Astudillo, Luisana; Da Silva, Thiago G; Wang, Zhiqiang; Han, Xiaoqing; Jin, Ke; VanWye, Jeffrey; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Weaver, Kelly; Oashi, Taiji; Lopes, Pedro E M; Orton, Darren; Neitzel, Leif R; Lee, Ethan; Landgraf, Ralf; Robbins, David J; MacKerell, Alexander D; Capobianco, Anthony J

    2016-06-15

    In many cancers, aberrant Notch activity has been demonstrated to play a role in the initiation and maintenance of the neoplastic phenotype and in cancer stem cells, which may allude to its additional involvement in metastasis and resistance to therapy. Therefore, Notch is an exceedingly attractive therapeutic target in cancer, but the full range of potential targets within the pathway has been underexplored. To date, there are no small-molecule inhibitors that directly target the intracellular Notch pathway or the assembly of the transcriptional activation complex. Here, we describe an in vitro assay that quantitatively measures the assembly of the Notch transcriptional complex on DNA. Integrating this approach with computer-aided drug design, we explored potential ligand-binding sites and screened for compounds that could disrupt the assembly of the Notch transcriptional activation complex. We identified a small-molecule inhibitor, termed Inhibitor of Mastermind Recruitment-1 (IMR-1), that disrupted the recruitment of Mastermind-like 1 to the Notch transcriptional activation complex on chromatin, thereby attenuating Notch target gene transcription. Furthermore, IMR-1 inhibited the growth of Notch-dependent cell lines and significantly abrogated the growth of patient-derived tumor xenografts. Taken together, our findings suggest that a novel class of Notch inhibitors targeting the transcriptional activation complex may represent a new paradigm for Notch-based anticancer therapeutics, warranting further preclinical characterization. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3593-603. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197169

  2. Single-molecule kinetics under force: probing protein folding and enzymatic activity with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley

    2010-03-01

    Weak non-covalent bonds between and within single molecules govern many aspects of biological structure and function (e.g. DNA base-paring, receptor-ligand binding, protein folding, etc.) In living systems, these interactions are often subject to mechanical forces, which can greatly alter their kinetics and activity. My group develops and applies novel single-molecule manipulation techniques to explore and quantify these force-dependent kinetics. Using optical tweezers, we have quantified the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of different proteins, including the cytoskeletal protein spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans's group [1], and the A2 domain of the von Willebrand factor blood clotting protein in collaboration with T. Springer's group [2]. Furthermore, we have studied the kinetics of the ADAMTS13 enzyme acting on a single A2 domain, and have shown that physiolgical forces in the circulation can act as a cofactor for enzymatic cleavage, regulating hemostatic activity [2]. References: 1. E. Evans, K. Halvorsen, K. Kinoshita, and W.P. Wong, Handbook of Single Molecule Biophysics, P. Hinterdorfer, ed., Springer (2009). 2. X. Zhang, K. Halvorsen, C.-Z. Zhang, W.P. Wong, and T.A. Springer, Science 324 (5932), 1330-1334 (2009).

  3. Proteasome activation is a mechanism for pyrazolone small molecules displaying therapeutic potential in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Trippier, Paul C; Zhao, Kevin Tianmeng; Fox, Susan G; Schiefer, Isaac T; Benmohamed, Radhia; Moran, Jason; Kirsch, Donald R; Morimoto, Richard I; Silverman, Richard B

    2014-09-17

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disease. Pyrazolone containing small molecules have shown significant disease attenuating efficacy in cellular and murine models of ALS. Pyrazolone based affinity probes were synthesized to identify high affinity binding partners and ascertain a potential biological mode of action. Probes were confirmed to be neuroprotective in PC12-SOD1(G93A) cells. PC12-SOD1(G93A) cell lysates were used for protein pull-down, affinity purification, and subsequent proteomic analysis using LC-MS/MS. Proteomics identified the 26S proteasome regulatory subunit 4 (PSMC1), 26S proteasome regulatory subunit 6B (PSMC4), and T-complex protein 1 (TCP-1) as putative protein targets. Coincubation with appropriate competitors confirmed the authenticity of the proteomics results. Activation of the proteasome by pyrazolones was demonstrated in the absence of exogenous proteasome inhibitor and by restoration of cellular protein degradation of a fluorogenic proteasome substrate in PC12-SOD1(G93A) cells. Importantly, supplementary studies indicated that these molecules do not induce a heat shock response. We propose that pyrazolones represent a rare class of molecules that enhance proteasomal activation in the absence of a heat shock response and may have therapeutic potential in ALS. PMID:25001311

  4. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  5. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics.

    PubMed

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J; Lu, H Peter

    2015-09-22

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  6. Microgravimetric Analysis Method for Activation-Energy Extraction from Trace-Amount Molecule Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengcheng; Yu, Haitao; Li, Xinxin

    2016-05-01

    Activation-energy (Ea) value for trace-amount adsorption of gas molecules on material is rapidly and inexpensively obtained, for the first time, from a microgravimetric analysis experiment. With the material loaded, a resonant microcantilever is used to record in real time the adsorption process at two temperatures. The kinetic parameter Ea is thereby extracted by solving the Arrhenius equation. As an example, two CO2 capture nanomaterials are examined by the Ea extracting method for evaluation/optimization and, thereby, demonstrating the applicability of the microgravimetric analysis method. The achievement helps to solve the absence in rapid quantitative characterization of sorption kinetics and opens a new route to investigate molecule adsorption processes and materials. PMID:27100734

  7. A HIGH-THROUGHPUT FLUORESCENCE ACTIVATED NANOSCALE SUBCELLULAR SORTER WITH SINGLE-MOLECULE SENSITIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Schiro, Perry G.; Gadd, Jennifer C.; Yen, Gloria S.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent single-cell and single-molecule studies have shown that a variety of subpopulations exist within biological systems, such as synaptic vesicles, that have previously been overlooked in common bulk studies. By isolating and enriching these various subpopulations, detailed analysis with a variety of analytical techniques can be done to further understand the role that various subpopulations play in cellular dynamics and how alterations to these subpopulations affect the overall function of the biological system. Previous sorters lack the sensitivity, sorting speed, and efficiency to isolate synaptic vesicles and other nanoscale systems. This paper describes the development of a fluorescence activated nanoscale subcellular sorter that can sort nearly 10 million objects per hour with single-molecule sensitivity. Utilizing a near-nanoscale channel system, we were able to achieve upwards of 91% recovery of desired objects with a 99.7% purity. PMID:22574902

  8. Plasmonic enhancement of Raman optical activity in molecules near metal nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Ramiro; Lombardini, Richard; Halas, Naomi J; Johnson, Bruce R

    2009-11-26

    Surface-enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA) is investigated theoretically for molecules near a metal nanoshell. For this purpose, induced molecular electric dipole, magnetic dipole, and electric quadrupole moments must all be included. The incident field and the induced multipole fields all scatter from the nanoshell, and the scattered waves can be calculated via extended Mie theory. It is straightforward in this framework to calculate the incident frequency dependence of SEROA intensities, i.e., SEROA excitation profiles. The differential Raman scattering is examined in detail for a simple chiroptical model that provides analytical forms for the relevant dynamical molecular response tensors. This allows a detailed investigation into circumstances that simultaneously provide strong enhancement of differential intensities and remain selective for molecules with chirality. PMID:19639972

  9. Single-Active-Electron Approximation for Describing Molecules in Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Alejandro; Awasthi, Manohar; Vanne, Yulian; Castro, Alberto; Decleva, Piero

    2008-05-01

    A numerical approach that allows for the solution of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation (TDSE) describing molecules exposed to intense short laser pulses was developed. The molecular response to the strong field is described within the single-active electron approximation (SAE). The method is applied to molecular hydrogen and the validity of the SAE is investigated by comparing the ionization and electronic excitation yields to full two-electron solutions of the TDSE. The present results are also used to investigate the validity of approximate SAE methods like the molecular Ammosov-Delone-Krainov and the strong-field approximation. Finally, results for larger molecules like O2, N2, and C2H2 (acetylene) are presented.

  10. Small-molecule probes elucidate global enzyme activity in a proteomic context

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Seok; Yoo, Young-Hwa; Yoon, Chang No

    2014-01-01

    The recent dramatic improvements in high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) have revolutionized the speed and scope of proteomic studies. Conventional MS-based proteomics methodologies allow global protein profiling based on expression levels. Although these techniques are promising, there are numerous biological activities yet to be unveiled, such as the dynamic regulation of enzyme activity. Chemical proteomics is an emerging field that extends these types proteomic profiling. In particular, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) utilizes small-molecule probes to monitor enzyme activity directly in living intact subjects. In this mini-review, we summarize the unique roles of smallmolecule probes in proteomics studies and highlight some recent examples in which this principle has been applied. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(3): 149-157] PMID:24499666

  11. Antithrombotic and antiplatelet activities of small-molecule alkaloids from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonhwa; Lee, JungIn; Kulkarni, Roshan; Kim, Mi-Ae; Hwang, Jae Sam; Na, MinKyun; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to discover small-molecule anticoagulants from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans (SSM). A new acylated polyamine (1) and a new sulfated quinoline alkaloid (2) were isolated from SSM. Treatment with the new alkaloids 1, 2, and indole acetic acid 4 prolonged the activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time and inhibited the activity and production of thrombin and activated factor X. Furthermore, compounds 1, 2, and 4 inhibited thrombin-catalyzed fibrin polymerization and platelet aggregation. In accordance with these potential in vitro antiplatelet activities, compounds 1, 2, and 4 showed enhanced antithrombotic effects in an in vivo pulmonary embolism and arterial thrombosis model. Compounds 1, 2, and 4 also elicited anticoagulant effects in mice. Collectively, this study may serve as the groundwork for commercializing SSM or compounds 1, 2, and 4 as functional food components for the prevention and treatment of pathogenic conditions and serve as new scaffolds for the development of anticoagulants. PMID:26905699

  12. Bruchpilot and Synaptotagmin collaborate to drive rapid glutamate release and active zone differentiation.

    PubMed

    Paul, Mila M; Pauli, Martin; Ehmann, Nadine; Hallermann, Stefan; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J; Heckmann, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The active zone (AZ) protein Bruchpilot (Brp) is essential for rapid glutamate release at Drosophila melanogaster neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Quantal time course and measurements of action potential-waveform suggest that presynaptic fusion mechanisms are altered in brp null mutants (brp(69) ). This could account for their increased evoked excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) delay and rise time (by about 1 ms). To test the mechanism of release protraction at brp(69) AZs, we performed knock-down of Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt) via RNAi (syt(KD) ) in wildtype (wt), brp(69) and rab3 null mutants (rab3(rup) ), where Brp is concentrated at a small number of AZs. At wt and rab3(rup) synapses, syt(KD) lowered EPSC amplitude while increasing rise time and delay, consistent with the role of Syt as a release sensor. In contrast, syt(KD) did not alter EPSC amplitude at brp(69) synapses, but shortened delay and rise time. In fact, following syt(KD) , these kinetic properties were strikingly similar in wt and brp(69) , which supports the notion that Syt protracts release at brp(69) synapses. To gain insight into this surprising role of Syt at brp(69) AZs, we analyzed the structural and functional differentiation of synaptic boutons at the NMJ. At 'tonic' type Ib motor neurons, distal boutons contain more AZs, more Brp proteins per AZ and show elevated and accelerated glutamate release compared to proximal boutons. The functional differentiation between proximal and distal boutons is Brp-dependent and reduced after syt(KD) . Notably, syt(KD) boutons are smaller, contain fewer Brp positive AZs and these are of similar number in proximal and distal boutons. In addition, super-resolution imaging via dSTORM revealed that syt(KD) increases the number and alters the spatial distribution of Brp molecules at AZs, while the gradient of Brp proteins per AZ is diminished. In summary, these data demonstrate that normal structural and functional differentiation of Drosophila AZs requires

  13. Structural Basis for Selective Small Molecule Kinase Inhibition of Activated c-Met

    SciTech Connect

    Rickert, Keith W.; Patel, Sangita B.; Allison, Timothy J.; Byrne, Noel J.; Darke, Paul L.; Ford, Rachael E.; Guerin, David J.; Hall, Dawn L.; Kornienko, Maria; Lu, Jun; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Reid, John C.; Shipman, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Elizabeth F.; Wilson, Kevin J.; Young, Jonathon R.; Soisson, Stephen M.; Lumb, Kevin J.

    2012-03-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met is implicated in oncogenesis and is the target for several small molecule and biologic agents in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Binding of the hepatocyte growth factor to the cell surface receptor of c-Met induces activation via autophosphorylation of the kinase domain. Here we describe the structural basis of c-Met activation upon autophosphorylation and the selective small molecule inhibiton of autophosphorylated c-Met. MK-2461 is a potent c-Met inhibitor that is selective for the phosphorylated state of the enzyme. Compound 1 is an MK-2461 analog with a 20-fold enthalpy-driven preference for the autophosphorylated over unphosphorylated c-Met kinase domain. The crystal structure of the unbound kinase domain phosphorylated at Tyr-1234 and Tyr-1235 shows that activation loop phosphorylation leads to the ejection and disorder of the activation loop and rearrangement of helix {alpha}C and the G loop to generate a viable active site. Helix {alpha}C adopts a orientation different from that seen in activation loop mutants. The crystal structure of the complex formed by the autophosphorylated c-Met kinase domain and compound 1 reveals a significant induced fit conformational change of the G loop and ordering of the activation loop, explaining the selectivity of compound 1 for the autophosphorylated state. The results highlight the role of structural plasticity within the kinase domain in imparting the specificity of ligand binding and provide the framework for structure-guided design of activated c-Met inhibitors.

  14. Molecular mimicry of substrate oxygen atoms by water molecules in the beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, G; Palau, J

    2001-08-01

    Soybean beta-amylase (EC 3.2.1.2) has been crystallized both free and complexed with a variety of ligands. Four water molecules in the free-enzyme catalytic cleft form a multihydrogen-bond network with eight strategic residues involved in enzyme-ligand hydrogen bonds. We show here that the positions of these four water molecules are coincident with the positions of four potential oxygen atoms of the ligands within the complex. Some of these waters are displaced from the active site when the ligands bind to the enzyme. How many are displaced depends on the shape of the ligand. This means that when one of the four positions is not occupied by a ligand oxygen atom, the corresponding water remains. We studied the functional/structural role of these four waters and conclude that their presence means that the conformation of the eight side chains is fixed in all situations (free or complexed enzyme) and preserved from unwanted or forbidden conformational changes that could hamper the catalytic mechanism. The water structure at the active pocket of beta-amylase is therefore essential for providing the ligand recognition process with plasticity. It does not affect the protein active-site geometry and preserves the overall hydrogen-bonding network, irrespective of which ligand is bound to the enzyme. We also investigated whether other enzymes showed a similar role for water. Finally, we discuss the potential use of these results for predicting whether water molecules can mimic ligand atoms in the active center. PMID:11468361

  15. Antifungal activities of Ocimum sanctum essential oil and its lead molecules.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Ahmad, Aijaz; Manzoor, Nikhat; Khan, Luqman A

    2010-02-01

    Aqueous extracts and oils of five Indian medicinal plants, traditionally used for their antimicrobial activities, were evaluated against two of the most prevalent Candida species causing candidiasis, C. albicans and C. tropicalis. Of these plant materials, three showed varying degrees of antifungal activity against both species. Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum Linn.) essential oil (TEO) was found to be the most effective, followed by Peppermint essential oil, and Aloe vera aqueous leaf extract. The product with the lowest MIC was further studied along with its lead molecules to explore the possible mechanism of action of the most active constituents. Eugenol, methyl eugenol, linalool, and 1, 8-cineole, along with TEO were then evaluated at the same. The pattern and extent of inhibition was studied using growth and WST1 cytotoxicity assays. Proton pumps are important for growth and metabolism of Candida species and so H+ extrusion studies were performed to explore the possible mechanism of the test compounds. Linalool was the most active constituent of TEO, whereas inhibition of H+ extrusion appeared to be a synergistic function of the lead molecules. PMID:20334156

  16. Small-molecule activation of SERCA2a SUMOylation for the treatment of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Changwon; Lee, Ahyoung; Jeong, Dongtak; Oh, Jae Gyun; Gorski, Przemek A.; Fish, Kenneth; Sanchez, Roberto; DeVita, Robert J.; Christensen, Geir; Dahl, Russell; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    Decreased activity and expression of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA2a), a critical pump regulating calcium cycling in cardiomyocyte, are hallmarks of heart failure. We have previously described a role for the small ubiquitin-like modifier type 1 (SUMO-1) as a regulator of SERCA2a and have shown that gene transfer of SUMO-1 in rodents and large animal models of heart failure restores cardiac function. Here, we identify and characterize a small molecule, N106, which increases SUMOylation of SERCA2a. This compound directly activates the SUMO-activating enzyme, E1 ligase, and triggers intrinsic SUMOylation of SERCA2a. We identify a pocket on SUMO E1 likely to be responsible for N106's effect. N106 treatment increases contractile properties of cultured rat cardiomyocytes and significantly improves ventricular function in mice with heart failure. This first-in-class small-molecule activator targeting SERCA2a SUMOylation may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of heart failure. PMID:26068603

  17. Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family Receptor Homologs in New World Monkey Cytomegaloviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Carmona, Natàlia; Farré, Domènec; Martínez-Vicente, Pablo; Terhorst, Cox; Engel, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Throughout evolution, large DNA viruses have been usurping genes from their hosts to equip themselves with proteins that restrain host immune defenses. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family (SLAMF) receptors are involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity, which occurs upon engagement with their ligands via homotypic or heterotypic interactions. Here we report a total of seven SLAMF genes encoded by the genomes of two cytomegalovirus (CMV) species, squirrel monkey CMV (SMCMV) and owl monkey CMV (OMCMV), that infect New World monkeys. Our results indicate that host genes were captured by retrotranscription at different stages of the CMV-host coevolution. The most recent acquisition led to S1 in SMCMV. S1 is a SLAMF6 homolog with an amino acid sequence identity of 97% to SLAMF6 in its ligand-binding N-terminal Ig domain. We demonstrate that S1 is a cell surface glycoprotein capable of binding to host SLAMF6. Furthermore, the OMCMV genome encodes A33, an LY9 (SLAMF3) homolog, and A43, a CD48 (SLAMF2) homolog, two soluble glycoproteins which recognize their respective cellular counterreceptors and thus are likely to be viral SLAMF decoy receptors. In addition, distinct copies of further divergent CD48 homologs were found to be encoded by both CMV genomes. Remarkably, all these molecules display a number of unique features, including cytoplasmic tails lacking characteristic SLAMF signaling motifs. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel immune evasion mechanism in which incorporation of host SLAMF receptors that retain their ligand-binding properties enables viruses to interfere with SLAMF functions and to supply themselves with convenient structural molds for expanding their immunomodulatory repertoires. IMPORTANCE The way in which viruses shape their genomes under the continual selective pressure exerted by the host immune system is central for their survival. Here, we report that New World monkey cytomegaloviruses

  18. Hydrogen Gas Emissions from Active Faults and Identification of Flow Pathway in a Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, T.; Niwa, M.; Kurosawa, H.; Shimada, K.

    2010-12-01

    It has been observed that hydrogen gas emissions from the subsurface along active faults exceed atmospheric concentrations (e.g. Sugisaki et. al., 1983). Experimental studies have shown that hydrogen gas is generated in a radical reaction of water with fractured silicate minerals due to rock fracturing caused by fault movement (e.g. Kita et al., 1982). Based on such research, we are studying an investigation method for an assessment of fault activity using hydrogen gas emissions from fracture zones. To start, we have devised portable equipment for rapid and simple in situ measurement of hydrogen gas emissions (Shimada et al., 2008). The key component of this equipment is a commercially available and compact hydrogen gas sensor with an integral data logger operable at atmospheric pressure. In the field, we have drilled shallow boreholes into incohesive fault rocks to depths ranging from 15 to 45 cm using a hand-operated drill with a 9mm drill-bit. Then, we have measured the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from active faults such as: the western part of the Atotsugawa fault zone, the Atera fault zone and the Neodani fault in central Japan; the Yamasaki fault zone in southwest Japan; and the Yamagata fault zone in northeast Japan. In addition, we have investigated the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from other major geological features such as tectonic lines: the Butsuzo Tectonic Line in the eastern Kii Peninsula and the Atokura Nappe in the Northeastern Kanto Mountains. As a result of the investigations, hydrogen gas concentration in emissions from the active faults was measured to be in the approximate range from 6,000 ppm to 26,000 ppm in two to three hours after drilling. A tendency for high concentrations of hydrogen gas in active faults was recognized, in contrast with low concentrations in emissions from tectonic lines that were observed to be in the range from 730 ppm to 2,000 ppm. It is inferred that the hydrogen gas migrates to ground

  19. Discovery of Diverse Small Molecule Chemotypes with Cell-Based PKD1 Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Mustata Wilson, Gabriela; Close, David; Leimgruber, Stephanie; Tandon, Manuj; Reed, Robyn B.; Shun, Tong Ying; Wang, Q. Jane; Wipf, Peter; Lazo, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) is a novel family of serine/threonine kinases regulated by diacylglycerol, which is involved in multiple cellular processes and various pathological conditions. The limited number of cell-active, selective inhibitors has historically restricted biochemical and pharmacological studies of PKD. We now markedly expand the PKD1 inhibitory chemotype inventory with eleven additional novel small molecule PKD1 inhibitors derived from our high throughput screening campaigns. The in vitro IC50s for these eleven compounds ranged in potency from 0.4 to 6.1 µM with all of the evaluated compounds being competitive with ATP. Three of the inhibitors (CID 1893668, (1Z)-1-(3-ethyl-5-methoxy-1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylidene)propan-2-one; CID 2011756, 5-(3-chlorophenyl)-N-[4-(morpholin-4-ylmethyl)phenyl]furan-2-carboxamide; CID 5389142, (6Z)-6-[4-(3-aminopropylamino)-6-methyl-1H-pyrimidin-2-ylidene]cyclohexa-2,4-dien-1-one) inhibited phorbol ester-induced endogenous PKD1 activation in LNCaP prostate cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The specificity of these compounds for PKD1 inhibitory activity was supported by kinase assay counter screens as well as by bioinformatics searches. Moreover, computational analyses of these novel cell-active PKD1 inhibitors indicated that they were structurally distinct from the previously described cell-active PKD1 inhibitors while computational docking of the new cell-active compounds in a highly conserved ATP-binding cleft suggests opportunities for structural modification. In summary, we have discovered novel PKD1 inhibitors with in vitro and cell-based inhibitory activity, thus successfully expanding the structural diversity of small molecule inhibitors available for this important pharmacological target. PMID:21998636

  20. 34 CFR 299.3 - What priority may the Secretary establish for activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? For any ESEA discretionary grant program, the Secretary may establish a priority, as authorized by 34 CFR 75.105(b), for projects that will— (a) Use a... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? 299.3 Section 299.3 Education Regulations of...

  1. 34 CFR 299.3 - What priority may the Secretary establish for activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? For any ESEA discretionary grant program, the Secretary may establish a priority, as authorized by 34 CFR 75.105(b), for projects that will— (a) Use a... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? 299.3 Section 299.3 Education Regulations of...

  2. 34 CFR 299.3 - What priority may the Secretary establish for activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? For any ESEA discretionary grant program, the Secretary may establish a priority, as authorized by 34 CFR 75.105(b), for projects that will— (a) Use a... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? 299.3 Section 299.3 Education Regulations of...

  3. 34 CFR 299.3 - What priority may the Secretary establish for activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? For any ESEA discretionary grant program, the Secretary may establish a priority, as authorized by 34 CFR 75.105(b), for projects that will— (a) Use a... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? 299.3 Section 299.3 Education Regulations of...

  4. 34 CFR 299.3 - What priority may the Secretary establish for activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? For any ESEA discretionary grant program, the Secretary may establish a priority, as authorized by 34 CFR 75.105(b), for projects that will— (a) Use a... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? 299.3 Section 299.3 Education Regulations of...

  5. 77 FR 52680 - Foreign-Trade Zone 242-Boundary County, ID, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, AREVA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 242--Boundary County, ID, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, AREVA Enrichment Services, LLC, (Gas Centrifuge Production Equipment), Bonneville County, ID Boundary County, grantee of FTZ 242, submitted a notification of proposed production activity on behalf...

  6. 77 FR 39209 - Foreign-Trade Zone 74-Baltimore, MD, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, J.D. Neuhaus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 74--Baltimore, MD, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, J.D. Neuhaus LP (Overhead Lifting Equipment Production) Sparks, MD The Baltimore Development Corporation, grantee of FTZ 74, submitted a notification of proposed production activity on behalf of...

  7. 77 FR 28353 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, OR, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Shimadzu USA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 45--Portland, OR, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Shimadzu USA Manufacturing, Inc. (Chromatograph and Mass Spectrometer Production), Canby, OR The Port of Portland, grantee of FTZ 45, submitted a notification of proposed production activity on...

  8. Influence of the water molecules near surface of viral protein on virus activation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelenko, S. O.; Salnikov, A. S.; Rak, S. V.; Goncharova, E. P.; Ryzhikov, A. B.

    2009-06-01

    The infection of a cell with influenza virus comprises the stages of receptor binding to the cell membrane, endocytosis of virus particle, and fusion of the virus envelope and cell endosome membrane, which is determined by the conformational changes in hemagglutinin, a virus envelope protein, caused by pH decrease within the endosome. The pH value that induces conformation rearrangements of hemagglutinin molecule considerably varies for different influenza virus strains, first and foremost, due to the differences in amino acid structure of the corresponding proteins. The main goal of this study was to construct a model making it possible to assess the critical pH value characterizing the fusogenic activity of influenza virus hemagglutinin from the data on hemagglutinin structure and experimental verification of this model. Under this model, we assume that when the electrostatic force between interacting hemagglutinin molecules in the virus envelop exceeds a certain value, the hemagglutinin HA1 subunits are arranged so that they form a cavity sufficient for penetration of water molecules. This event leads to an irreversible hydration of the inner fragments of hemagglutinin molecule in a trimer and to the completion of conformational changes. The geometry of electrostatic field in hemagglutinin trimer was calculated taking into account the polarization effects near the interface of two dielectrics, aqueous medium and protein macromolecule. The critical pH values for the conformational changes in hemagglutinin were measured by the erythrocyte hemolysis induced by influenza virus particles when decreasing pH. The critical pH value conditionally separating the pH range into the regions with and without the conformational changes was calculated for several influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2 strains based on the data on the amino acid structure of the corresponding hemagglutinin molecules. Comparison of the theoretical and experimental values of critical pH values for

  9. Syntenin-1 and Ezrin Proteins Link Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule to the Actin Cytoskeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Tudor, Cicerone; te Riet, Joost; Eich, Christina; Harkes, Rolf; Smisdom, Nick; Bouhuijzen Wenger, Jessica; Ameloot, Marcel; Holt, Matthew; Kanger, Johannes S.; Figdor, Carl G.; Cambi, Alessandra; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is a type I transmembrane protein member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules. Involved in important pathophysiological processes such as the immune response, cancer metastasis, and neuronal development, ALCAM undergoes both homotypic interactions with other ALCAM molecules and heterotypic interactions with the surface receptor CD6 expressed at the T cell surface. Despite biochemical and biophysical evidence of a dynamic association between ALCAM and the actin cytoskeleton, no detailed information is available about how this association occurs at the molecular level. Here, we exploit a combination of complementary microscopy techniques, including FRET detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and single-cell force spectroscopy, and we demonstrate the existence of a preformed ligand-independent supramolecular complex where ALCAM stably interacts with actin by binding to syntenin-1 and ezrin. Interaction with the ligand CD6 further enhances these multiple interactions. Altogether, our results propose a novel biophysical framework to understand the stabilizing role of the ALCAM supramolecular complex engaged to CD6 during dendritic cell-T cell interactions and provide novel information on the molecular players involved in the formation and signaling of the immunological synapse at the dendritic cell side. PMID:24662291

  10. Vascular activation of adhesion molecule mRNA and cell surface expression by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, M; Douwes, K; Peter, R; Degitz, K

    1998-01-10

    During cutaneous inflammatory reactions the recruitment of circulating leukocytes into the tissue critically depends on the regulated expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Various proinflammatory stimuli upregulate endothelial CAMs, including cytokines and UV irradiation. We have investigated the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) on endothelial CAM expression. Organ cultures of normal human skin as well as cultured human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) were exposed to IR. Expression of three major endothelial CAMs was studied in skin organ cultures by immunohistochemistry and in cell culture by Northern blot analysis and flow cytometry. In skin organ cultures vascular immunoreactivity for ICAM-1, E-selectin, and VCAM-1 was strongly induced 24 h after exposure to 5 or 10 Gy of IR, while immunoreactivity for CD31/PECAM-1, a constitutively expressed endothelial cell adhesion molecule, remained unchanged. In cultured HDMEC IR upregulated ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin mRNAs and cell surface expression in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Cellular morphology and viability remained unaltered by IR up to 24 h postirradiation. This study characterizes microvascular activation of adhesion molecule expression in response to ionizing radiation in a clinically relevant IR dose range. The findings also underscore the ability of endothelial cells to integrate environmental electromagnetic stimuli. PMID:9457067

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Activity of a Novel Antifungal Small Molecule against Candida Infections

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Kwok Yong; Wang, Yu; Yang, Dan; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2014-01-01

    Candida is the most common fungal pathogen of humans worldwide and has become a major clinical problem because of the growing number of immunocompromised patients, who are susceptible to infection. Moreover, the number of available antifungals is limited, and antifungal-resistant Candida strains are emerging. New and effective antifungals are therefore urgently needed. Here, we discovered a small molecule with activity against Candida spp. both in vitro and in vivo. We screened a library of 50,240 small molecules for inhibitors of yeast-to-hypha transition, a major virulence attribute of Candida albicans. This screening identified 20 active compounds. Further examination of the in vitro antifungal and anti-biofilm properties of these compounds, using a range of Candida spp., led to the discovery of SM21, a highly potent antifungal molecule (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.2 – 1.6 µg/ml). In vitro, SM21 was toxic to fungi but not to various human cell lines or bacterial species and was active against Candida isolates that are resistant to existing antifungal agents. Moreover, SM21 was relatively more effective against biofilms of Candida spp. than the current antifungal agents. In vivo, SM21 prevented the death of mice in a systemic candidiasis model and was also more effective than the common antifungal nystatin at reducing the extent of tongue lesions in a mouse model of oral candidiasis. Propidium iodide uptake assay showed that SM21 affected the integrity of the cell membrane. Taken together, our results indicate that SM21 has the potential to be developed as a novel antifungal agent for clinical use. PMID:24465737

  12. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya; Nan, Fa-Jun; Li, Jia

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. PMID:24055643

  13. Novel small molecules targeting ciliary transport of Smoothened and oncogenic Hedgehog pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bomi; Messias, Ana C.; Schorpp, Kenji; Geerlof, Arie; Schneider, Günter; Saur, Dieter; Hadian, Kamyar; Sattler, Michael; Wanker, Erich E.; Hasenöder, Stefan; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Smoothened (Smo) to the primary cilium (PC) is a potential target to inhibit oncogenic Hh pathway activation in a large number of tumors. One drawback is the appearance of Smo mutations that resist drug treatment, which is a common reason for cancer treatment failure. Here, we undertook a high content screen with compounds in preclinical or clinical development and identified ten small molecules that prevent constitutive active mutant SmoM2 transport into PC for subsequent Hh pathway activation. Eight of the ten small molecules act through direct interference with the G protein-coupled receptor associated sorting protein 2 (Gprasp2)-SmoM2 ciliary targeting complex, whereas one antagonist of ionotropic receptors prevents intracellular trafficking of Smo to the PC. Together, these findings identify several compounds with the potential to treat drug-resistant SmoM2-driven cancer forms, but also reveal off-target effects of established drugs in the clinics. PMID:26931153

  14. Novel Small Molecule Activators of the Trk Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Obianyo, Obiamaka; Ye, Keqiang

    2012-01-01

    The Tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors are a subset of the receptor tyrosine kinase family with an important functionality in the regulation of neurotrophic signaling in the peripheral and central nervous system. As the receptors are able to mediate neuronal survival by associating with their respective neurotrophin ligands, many studies have focused on the therapeutic potential of generating small-molecule mimetic compounds that elicit agonistic effects similar to those of the natural protein ligands. To this end, various structure-based studies have led to the generation of bivalent peptide-based agonists and antibodies that selectively initiate Trk receptor signaling; however, these compounds do not possess the ideal characteristics of a potential drug. Additionally, the reliance of structure-based data to generate the compound libraries, limits the potential identification of novel chemical structures with desirable activity. Therefore, subsequent investigations utilized a cell-based apoptotic screen to facilitate the analysis of large, diverse chemical libraries of small molecules and quickly identify compounds with Trk-dependent antiapoptotic activity. Herein, we describe the Trk agonists that have been identified by this screening methodology and summarize their in vitro and in vivo neurotrophic activity as well as their efficacy in various neurological disease models, implicating their future utility as therapeutic compounds. PMID:22982231

  15. Single Molecule Characterization of UV-Activated Antibodies on Gold by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Funari, R; Della Ventura, B; Altucci, C; Offenhäusser, A; Mayer, D; Velotta, R

    2016-08-16

    The interaction between proteins and solid surfaces can influence their conformation and therefore also their activity and affinity. These interactions are highly specific for the respective combination of proteins and solids. Consequently, it is desirable to investigate the conformation of proteins on technical surfaces, ideally at single molecule level, and to correlate the results with their activity. This is in particular true for biosensors where the conformation-dependent target affinity of an immobilized receptor determines the sensitivity of the sensor. Here, we investigate for the first time the immobilization and orientation of antibodies (Abs) photoactivated by a photonic immobilization technique (PIT), which has previously demonstrated to enhance binding capabilities of antibody receptors. The photoactivated immunoglobulins are immobilized on ultrasmooth template stripped gold films and investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the level of individual molecules. The observed protein orientations are compared with results of nonactivated antibodies adsorbed on similar gold films and mica reference samples. We find that the behavior of Abs is similar for mica and gold when the protein are not treated (physisorption), whereas smaller contact area and larger heights are measured when Abs are treated (PIT). This is explained by assuming that the activated antibodies tend to be more upright compared with nonirradiated ones, thereby providing a better exposure of the binding sites. This finding matches the observed enhancement of Abs binding efficiency when PIT is used to functionalize gold surface of QCM-based biosensors. PMID:27444884

  16. Activation of the p53 pathway by small-molecule-induced MDM2 and MDMX dimerization.

    PubMed

    Graves, Bradford; Thompson, Thelma; Xia, Mingxuan; Janson, Cheryl; Lukacs, Christine; Deo, Dayanand; Di Lello, Paola; Fry, David; Garvie, Colin; Huang, Kuo-Sen; Gao, Lin; Tovar, Christian; Lovey, Allen; Wanner, Jutta; Vassilev, Lyubomir T

    2012-07-17

    Activation of p53 tumor suppressor by antagonizing its negative regulator murine double minute (MDM)2 has been considered an attractive strategy for cancer therapy and several classes of p53-MDM2 binding inhibitors have been developed. However, these compounds do not inhibit the p53-MDMX interaction, and their effectiveness can be compromised in tumors overexpressing MDMX. Here, we identify small molecules that potently block p53 binding with both MDM2 and MDMX by inhibitor-driven homo- and/or heterodimerization of MDM2 and MDMX proteins. Structural studies revealed that the inhibitors bind into and occlude the p53 pockets of MDM2 and MDMX by inducing the formation of dimeric protein complexes kept together by a dimeric small-molecule core. This mode of action effectively stabilized p53 and activated p53 signaling in cancer cells, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Dual MDM2/MDMX antagonists restored p53 apoptotic activity in the presence of high levels of MDMX and may offer a more effective therapeutic modality for MDMX-overexpressing cancers. PMID:22745160

  17. Probe molecule studies: Active species in alcohol synthesis. Final report, July 1993--July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Blackmond, D.G.; Wender, I.; Oukaci, R.; Wang, Jian

    1994-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the role(s) of cobalt and copper in constructing the active sites for the formation of higher alcohols from CO/H{sub 2} over the Co-Cu based catalysts by using different reduction treatments and applying selected characterization tools such as TPR, TPD, XRD and XPS as well as to generate mechanistic information on the reaction pathway(s) and key intermediate(s) of higher alcohol synthesis from CO/H{sub 2} over Co-Cu/ZnO catalysts by the approach of in-situ addition of a probe molecule (nitromethane).

  18. Mechanically activated switching of Si-based single-molecule junction as imaged with three-dimensional dynamic probe.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Miki; Yoshida, Shoji; Katayama, Tomoki; Taninaka, Atsushi; Mera, Yutaka; Okada, Susumu; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and extracting the full functions of single-molecule characteristics are key factors in the development of future device technologies, as well as in basic research on molecular electronics. Here we report a new methodology for realizing a three-dimensional (3D) dynamic probe of single-molecule conductance, which enables the elaborate 3D analysis of the conformational effect on molecular electronics, by the formation of a Si/single molecule/Si structure using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The formation of robust covalent bonds between a molecule and Si electrodes, together with STM-related techniques, enables the stable and repeated control of the conformational modulation of the molecule. By 3D imaging of the conformational effect on a 1,4-diethynylbenzene molecule, a binary change in conductance with hysteresis is observed for the first time, which is considered to originate from a mechanically activated conformational change. PMID:26439280

  19. Mechanically activated switching of Si-based single-molecule junction as imaged with three-dimensional dynamic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Miki; Yoshida, Shoji; Katayama, Tomoki; Taninaka, Atsushi; Mera, Yutaka; Okada, Susumu; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2015-10-01

    Understanding and extracting the full functions of single-molecule characteristics are key factors in the development of future device technologies, as well as in basic research on molecular electronics. Here we report a new methodology for realizing a three-dimensional (3D) dynamic probe of single-molecule conductance, which enables the elaborate 3D analysis of the conformational effect on molecular electronics, by the formation of a Si/single molecule/Si structure using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The formation of robust covalent bonds between a molecule and Si electrodes, together with STM-related techniques, enables the stable and repeated control of the conformational modulation of the molecule. By 3D imaging of the conformational effect on a 1,4-diethynylbenzene molecule, a binary change in conductance with hysteresis is observed for the first time, which is considered to originate from a mechanically activated conformational change.

  20. Single molecule analysis reveals reversible and irreversible steps during spliceosome activation

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, Aaron A; Rodgers, Margaret L; Friedman, Larry J; Gelles, Jeff; Moore, Melissa J

    2016-01-01

    The spliceosome is a complex machine composed of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and accessory proteins that excises introns from pre-mRNAs. After assembly the spliceosome is activated for catalysis by rearrangement of subunits to form an active site. How this rearrangement is coordinated is not well-understood. During activation, U4 must be released to allow U6 conformational change, while Prp19 complex (NTC) recruitment is essential for stabilizing the active site. We used multi-wavelength colocalization single molecule spectroscopy to directly observe the key events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae spliceosome activation. Following binding of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP, the spliceosome either reverses assembly by discarding tri-snRNP or proceeds to activation by irreversible U4 loss. The major pathway for NTC recruitment occurs after U4 release. ATP stimulates both the competing U4 release and tri-snRNP discard processes. The data reveal the activation mechanism and show that overall splicing efficiency may be maintained through repeated rounds of disassembly and tri-snRNP reassociation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14166.001 PMID:27244240

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L V; Szele, Francis G

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V.; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L. V.; Szele, Francis G.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  3. Accumulation of Exogenous Activated TGF-β in the Superficial Zone of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Albro, Michael B.; Nims, Robert J.; Cigan, Alexander D.; Yeroushalmi, Kevin J.; Alliston, Tamara; Hung, Clark T.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2013-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that mechanical shearing of synovial fluid (SF), induced during joint motion, rapidly activates latent transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). This discovery raised the possibility of a physiological process consisting of latent TGF-β supply to SF, activation via shearing, and transport of TGF-β into the cartilage matrix. Therefore, the two primary objectives of this investigation were to characterize the secretion rate of latent TGF-β into SF, and the transport of active TGF-β across the articular surface and into the cartilage layer. Experiments on tissue explants demonstrate that high levels of latent TGF-β1 are secreted from both the synovium and all three articular cartilage zones (superficial, middle, and deep), suggesting that these tissues are capable of continuously replenishing latent TGF-β to SF. Furthermore, upon exposure of cartilage to active TGF-β1, the peptide accumulates in the superficial zone (SZ) due to the presence of an overwhelming concentration of nonspecific TGF-β binding sites in the extracellular matrix. Although this response leads to high levels of active TGF-β in the SZ, the active peptide is unable to penetrate deeper into the middle and deep zones of cartilage. These results provide strong evidence for a sequential physiologic mechanism through which SZ chondrocytes gain access to active TGF-β: the synovium and articular cartilage secrete latent TGF-β into the SF and, upon activation, TGF-β transports back into the cartilage layer, binding exclusively to the SZ. PMID:23601326

  4. Regulation of cellular signals from nutritional molecules: a specific role for phytochemicals, beyond antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Virgili, Fabio; Marino, Maria

    2008-11-01

    Phytochemicals (PhC) are a ubiquitous class of plant secondary metabolites. A "recommended" human diet should warrant a high proportion of energy from fruits and vegetables, therefore providing, among other factors, a huge intake of PhC, in general considered "health promoting" by virtue of their antioxidant activity and positive modulation, either directly or indirectly, of the cellular and tissue redox balance. Diet acts through multiple pathways and the association between the consumption of specific food items and the risk of degenerative diseases is extremely complex. Recent literature suggests that molecules having a chemical structure compatible with a putative antioxidant capacity can actually "perform" activities and roles independent of such capacity, interacting with cellular functions at different levels, such as affecting enzyme activities, binding to membrane or nuclear receptors as either an elective ligand or a ligand mimic. Inductive or signaling effects may occur at concentrations much lower than that required for effective antioxidant activity. Therefore, the "antioxidant hypothesis" is to be considered in some cases an intellectual "shortcut" possibly biasing the real understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of various classes of food items. In the past few years, many exciting new indications elucidating the mechanisms of polyphenols have been published. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms by which specific molecules of nutritional interest, and in particular polyphenols, play a role in cellular response and in preventing pathologies. In particular, their direct interaction with nuclear receptors and their ability to modulate the activity of key enzymes involved in cell signaling and antioxidant responses are presented and discussed. PMID:18762244

  5. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease.

    PubMed

    Flores, Alyssa M; Casey, Scott D; Felix, Christian M; Phuan, Puay W; Verkman, A S; Levin, Marc H

    2016-05-01

    Dry eye disorders, including Sjögren's syndrome, constitute a common problem in the aging population, with limited effective therapeutic options available. The cAMP-activated Cl(-) channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a major prosecretory channel at the ocular surface. We investigated whether compounds that target CFTR can correct the abnormal tear film in dry eye. Small-molecule activators of human wild-type CFTR identified by high-throughput screening were evaluated in cell culture and in vivo assays, to select compounds that stimulate Cl(-)-driven fluid secretion across the ocular surface in mice. An aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine, CFTRact-K089, fully activated CFTR in cell cultures with EC50 ∼250 nM and produced an ∼8.5 mV hyperpolarization in ocular surface potential difference. When delivered topically, CFTRact-K089 doubled basal tear volume for 4 h and had no effect in CF mice. CFTRact-K089 showed sustained tear film bioavailability without detectable systemic absorption. In a mouse model of aqueous-deficient dry eye produced by lacrimal ablation, topical administration of 0.1 nmol CFTRact-K089 3 times daily restored tear volume to basal levels, preventing corneal epithelial disruption when initiated at the time of surgery and reversing it when started after development of dry eye. Our results support the potential utility of CFTR-targeted activators as a novel prosecretory treatment for dry eye.-Flores, A. M., Casey, S. D., Felix, C. M., Phuan, P. W., Verkman, A. S., Levin, M. H. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease. PMID:26842854

  6. Vascular and angiogenic activities of CORM-401, an oxidant-sensitive CO-releasing molecule.

    PubMed

    Fayad-Kobeissi, Sarah; Ratovonantenaina, Johary; Dabiré, Hubert; Wilson, Jayne Louise; Rodriguez, Anne Marie; Berdeaux, Alain; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Mann, Brian E; Motterlini, Roberto; Foresti, Roberta

    2016-02-15

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is generated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and displays important signaling, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities, indicating that pharmacological agents mimicking its action may have therapeutic benefit. This study examined the biochemical and pharmacological properties of CORM-401, a recently described CO-releasing molecule containing manganese as a metal center. We used in vitro approaches, ex-vivo rat aortic rings and the EA.hy926 endothelial cell line in culture to address how CORM-401 releases CO and whether the compound modulates vascular tone and pro-angiogenic activities, respectively. We found that CORM-401 released up to three CO/mole of compound depending on the concentration of the acceptor myoglobin. Oxidants such as H2O2, tert-butyl hydroperoxide or hypochlorous acid increased the CO liberated by CORM-401. CORM-401 also relaxed pre-contracted aortic rings and vasorelaxation was enhanced in combination with H2O2. Consistent with the release of multiple CO molecules, CORM-401-induced vasodilation was three times higher than that elicited by CORM-A1, which exhibits a similar half-life to CORM-401 but liberates only one CO/mole of compound. Furthermore, endothelial cells exposed to CORM-401 accumulated CO intracellularly, accelerated migration in vitro and increased VEGF and IL-8 levels. Studies using pharmacological inhibitors revealed HO-1 and p38 MAP kinase as two independent and parallel mechanisms involved in stimulating migration. We conclude that the ability of CORM-401 to release multiple CO, its sensitivity to oxidants which increase CO release, and its vascular and pro-angiogenic properties highlight new advances in the design of CO-releasing molecules that can be tailored for the treatment of inflammatory and oxidative stress-mediated pathologies. PMID:26721585

  7. High efficiency pure blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules having 10H-phenoxaborin and acridan units.

    PubMed

    Numata, Masaki; Yasuda, Takuma; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-06-11

    Highly efficient blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules having 10H-phenoxaborin and acridan units were reported. Pure blue emission peaking at around 450 nm with a high external electroluminescence quantum efficiency of around 20% was demonstrated. PMID:25959457

  8. Conserved Active Site Residues Limit Inhibition of a Copper-Containing Nitrite By Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tocheva, E.I.; Eltis, L.D.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-05-26

    The interaction of copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 ( AfNiR) with each of five small molecules was studied using crystallography and steady-state kinetics. Structural studies revealed that each small molecule interacted with the oxidized catalytic type 2 copper of AfNiR. Three small molecules (formate, acetate and nitrate) mimic the substrate by having at least two oxygen atoms for bidentate coordination to the type 2 copper atom. These three anions bound to the copper ion in the same asymmetric, bidentate manner as nitrite. Consistent with their weak inhibition of the enzyme ( K i >50 mM), the Cu-O distances in these AfNiR-inhibitor complexes were approximately 0.15 A longer than that observed in the AfNiR-nitrite complex. The binding mode of each inhibitor is determined in part by steric interactions with the side chain of active site residue Ile257. Moreover, the side chain of Asp98, a conserved residue that hydrogen bonds to type 2 copper-bound nitrite and nitric oxide, was either disordered or pointed away from the inhibitors. Acetate and formate inhibited AfNiR in a mixed fashion, consistent with the occurrence of second acetate binding site in the AfNiR-acetate complex that occludes access to the type 2 copper. A fourth small molecule, nitrous oxide, bound to the oxidized metal in a side-on fashion reminiscent of nitric oxide to the reduced copper. Nevertheless, nitrous oxide bound at a farther distance from the metal. The fifth small molecule, azide, inhibited the reduction of nitrite by AfNiR most strongly ( K ic = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mM). This ligand bound to the type 2 copper center end-on with a Cu-N c distance of approximately 2 A, and was the only inhibitor to form a hydrogen bond with Asp98. Overall, the data substantiate the roles of Asp98 and Ile257 in discriminating substrate from other small anions.

  9. Arrayed lipid bilayer chambers allow single-molecule analysis of membrane transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Soga, Naoki; Fujita, Daishi; Tabata, Kazuhito V.; Yamauchi, Lisa; Hyeon Kim, Soo; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Suga, Hiroaki; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Nano- to micron-size reaction chamber arrays (femtolitre chamber arrays) have facilitated the development of sensitive and quantitative biological assays, such as single-molecule enzymatic assays, digital PCR and digital ELISA. However, the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays is limited to reactions that occur in aqueous solutions. Here we report an arrayed lipid bilayer chamber system (ALBiC) that contains sub-million femtolitre chambers, each sealed with a stable 4-μm-diameter lipid bilayer membrane. When reconstituted with a limiting amount of the membrane transporter proteins α-hemolysin or F0F1-ATP synthase, the chambers within the ALBiC exhibit stochastic and quantized transporting activities. This demonstrates that the single-molecule analysis of passive and active membrane transport is achievable with the ALBiC system. This new platform broadens the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays and paves the way for novel applications aimed at furthering our mechanistic understanding of membrane proteins’ function. PMID:25058452

  10. Single-molecule imaging at high fluorophore concentrations by local activation of dye.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Hylkje J; Schulte, Aartje C; Spenkelink, Lisanne M; McGrath, William J; Morrone, Seamus R; Sohn, Jungsan; Mangel, Walter F; Robinson, Andrew; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2015-02-17

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for observing biomolecular interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. Detecting fluorescent signals from individual labeled proteins above high levels of background fluorescence remains challenging, however. For this reason, the concentrations of labeled proteins in in vitro assays are often kept low compared to their in vivo concentrations. Here, we present a new fluorescence imaging technique by which single fluorescent molecules can be observed in real time at high, physiologically relevant concentrations. The technique requires a protein and its macromolecular substrate to be labeled each with a different fluorophore. Making use of short-distance energy-transfer mechanisms, only the fluorescence from those proteins that bind to their substrate is activated. This approach is demonstrated by labeling a DNA substrate with an intercalating stain, exciting the stain, and using energy transfer from the stain to activate the fluorescence of only those labeled DNA-binding proteins bound to the DNA. Such an experimental design allowed us to observe the sequence-independent interaction of Cy5-labeled interferon-inducible protein 16 with DNA and the sliding via one-dimensional diffusion of Cy5-labeled adenovirus protease on DNA in the presence of a background of hundreds of nanomolar Cy5 fluorophore. PMID:25692599

  11. Design of a Small-Molecule Entry Inhibitor with Activity against Primary Measles Virus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plemper, Richard K.; Doyle, Joshua; Sun, Aiming; Prussia, Andrew; Cheng, Li-Ting; Rota, Paul A.; Liotta, Dennis C.; Snyder, James P.; Compans, Richard W.

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of measles virus (MV) infection has been significantly reduced in many nations through extensive vaccination; however, the virus still causes significant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Measles outbreaks also occur in some developed countries that have failed to maintain high vaccine coverage rates. While vaccination is essential in preventing the spread of measles, case management would greatly benefit from the use of therapeutic agents to lower morbidity. Thus, the development of new therapeutic strategies is desirable. We previously reported the generation of a panel of small-molecule MV entry inhibitors. Here we show that our initial lead compound, although providing proof of concept for our approach, has a short half-life (<16 h) under physiological conditions. In order to combine potent antiviral activity with increased compound stability, a targeted library of candidate molecules designed on the structural basis of the first lead has been synthesized and tested against MV. We have identified an improved lead with low toxicity and high stability (half-life ≫ 16 h) that prevents viral entry and hence infection. This compound shows high MV specificity and strong activity (50% inhibitory concentration = 0.6 to 3.0 μM, depending on the MV genotype) against a panel of wild-type MV strains representative of viruses that are currently endemic in the field. PMID:16127050

  12. Tungsten polyoxometalate molecules as active nodes for dynamic carrier exchange in hybrid molecular/semiconductor capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Balliou, A.; Douvas, A. M.; Normand, P.; Argitis, P.; Glezos, N.; Tsikritzis, D.; Kennou, S.

    2014-10-14

    In this work we study the utilization of molecular transition metal oxides known as polyoxometalates (POMs), in particular the Keggin structure anions of the formula PW₁₂O₄₀³⁻, as active nodes for potential switching and/or fast writing memory applications. The active molecules are being integrated in hybrid Metal-Insulator/POM molecules-Semiconductor capacitors, which serve as prototypes allowing investigation of critical performance characteristics towards the design of more sophisticated devices. The charging ability as well as the electronic structure of the molecular layer is probed by means of electrical characterization, namely, capacitance-voltage and current-voltage measurements, as well as transient capacitance measurements, C (t), under step voltage polarization. It is argued that the transient current peaks observed are manifestations of dynamic carrier exchange between the gate electrode and specific molecular levels, while the transient C (t) curves under conditions of molecular charging can supply information for the rate of change of the charge that is being trapped and de-trapped within the molecular layer. Structural characterization via surface and cross sectional scanning electron microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, UV and Fourier-transform IR spectroscopies, UPS, and XPS contribute to the extraction of accurate electronic structure characteristics and open the path for the design of new devices with on-demand tuning of their interfacial properties via the controlled preparation of the POM layer.

  13. Single-molecule imaging at high fluorophore concentrations by local activation of dye

    SciTech Connect

    Geertsema, Hylkje J.; Mangel, Walter F.; Schulte, Aartje C.; Spenkelink, Lisanne M.; McGrath, William J.; Morrone, Seamus R.; Sohn, Jungsan; Robinson, Andrew; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2015-02-17

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is a powerful approach to observe biomolecular interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. Detecting fluorescent signals from individual, labeled proteins above high levels of background fluorescence remains challenging, however. For this reason, the concentrations of labeled proteins in in vitro assays are often kept low compared to their in vivo concentrations. Here, we present a new fluorescence imaging technique by which single fluorescent molecules can be observed in real time at high, physiologically relevant concentrations. The technique requires a protein and its macromolecular substrate to be labeled each with a different fluorophore. Then, making use of short-distance energy-transfer mechanisms, the fluorescence from only those proteins bound to their substrate are selectively activated. This approach is demonstrated by labeling a DNA substrate with an intercalating stain, exciting the stain, and using energy transfer from the stain to activate the fluorescence of only those labeled DNA-binding proteins bound to the DNA. Such an experimental design allowed us to observe the sequence-independent interaction of Cy5-labeled interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) with DNA and the sliding via one-dimensional diffusion of Cy5-labeled adenovirus protease (pVIc-AVP) on DNA in the presence of a background of hundreds of nM Cy5 fluorophore.

  14. Single-molecule imaging at high fluorophore concentrations by local activation of dye

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geertsema, Hylkje J.; Mangel, Walter F.; Schulte, Aartje C.; Spenkelink, Lisanne M.; McGrath, William J.; Morrone, Seamus R.; Sohn, Jungsan; Robinson, Andrew; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2015-02-17

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is a powerful approach to observe biomolecular interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. Detecting fluorescent signals from individual, labeled proteins above high levels of background fluorescence remains challenging, however. For this reason, the concentrations of labeled proteins in in vitro assays are often kept low compared to their in vivo concentrations. Here, we present a new fluorescence imaging technique by which single fluorescent molecules can be observed in real time at high, physiologically relevant concentrations. The technique requires a protein and its macromolecular substrate to be labeled each with a different fluorophore. Then, making use ofmore » short-distance energy-transfer mechanisms, the fluorescence from only those proteins bound to their substrate are selectively activated. This approach is demonstrated by labeling a DNA substrate with an intercalating stain, exciting the stain, and using energy transfer from the stain to activate the fluorescence of only those labeled DNA-binding proteins bound to the DNA. Such an experimental design allowed us to observe the sequence-independent interaction of Cy5-labeled interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) with DNA and the sliding via one-dimensional diffusion of Cy5-labeled adenovirus protease (pVIc-AVP) on DNA in the presence of a background of hundreds of nM Cy5 fluorophore.« less

  15. Single-Molecule Imaging at High Fluorophore Concentrations by Local Activation of Dye

    PubMed Central

    Geertsema, Hylkje J.; Schulte, Aartje C.; Spenkelink, Lisanne M.; McGrath, William J.; Morrone, Seamus R.; Sohn, Jungsan; Mangel, Walter F.; Robinson, Andrew; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for observing biomolecular interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. Detecting fluorescent signals from individual labeled proteins above high levels of background fluorescence remains challenging, however. For this reason, the concentrations of labeled proteins in in vitro assays are often kept low compared to their in vivo concentrations. Here, we present a new fluorescence imaging technique by which single fluorescent molecules can be observed in real time at high, physiologically relevant concentrations. The technique requires a protein and its macromolecular substrate to be labeled each with a different fluorophore. Making use of short-distance energy-transfer mechanisms, only the fluorescence from those proteins that bind to their substrate is activated. This approach is demonstrated by labeling a DNA substrate with an intercalating stain, exciting the stain, and using energy transfer from the stain to activate the fluorescence of only those labeled DNA-binding proteins bound to the DNA. Such an experimental design allowed us to observe the sequence-independent interaction of Cy5-labeled interferon-inducible protein 16 with DNA and the sliding via one-dimensional diffusion of Cy5-labeled adenovirus protease on DNA in the presence of a background of hundreds of nanomolar Cy5 fluorophore. PMID:25692599

  16. Small-Molecule Inhibition and Activation-Loop Trans-Phosphorylation of the IGF1 Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,J.; Li, W.; Craddock, B.; Foreman, K.; Mulvihill, M.; Ji, Q.; Miller, W.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that has a critical role in mitogenic signalling during embryogenesis and an antiapoptotic role in the survival and progression of many human tumours. Here, we present the crystal structure of the tyrosine kinase domain of IGF1R (IGF1RK), in its unphosphorylated state, in complex with a novel compound, cis-3-[3-(4-methyl-piperazin-l-yl)-cyclobutyl]-1-(2-phenyl-quinolin-7-yl)-imidazo[1, 5-a]pyrazin-8-ylamine (PQIP), which we show is a potent inhibitor of both the unphosphorylated (basal) and phosphorylated (activated) states of the kinase. PQIP interacts with residues in the ATP-binding pocket and in the activation loop, which confers specificity for IGF1RK and the highly related insulin receptor (IR) kinase. In this crystal structure, the IGF1RK active site is occupied by Tyr1135 from the activation loop of an symmetry (two-fold)-related molecule. This dimeric arrangement affords, for the first time, a visualization of the initial trans-phosphorylation event in the activation loop of an RTK, and provides a molecular rationale for a naturally occurring mutation in the activation loop of the IR that causes type II diabetes mellitus.

  17. Discovery of Novel Small Molecule Activators of β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Verkaar, Folkert; van der Stelt, Mario; Blankesteijn, W. Matthijs; van der Doelen, Antoon A.; Zaman, Guido J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a major role in embryonic development and adult stem cell maintenance. Reduced activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway underlies neurodegenerative disorders and aberrations in bone formation. Screening of a small molecule compound library with a β-galactosidase fragment complementation assay measuring β-catenin nuclear entry revealed bona fide activators of β-catenin signaling. The compounds stabilized cytoplasmic β-catenin and activated β–catenin-dependent reporter gene activity. Although the mechanism through which the compounds activate β-catenin signaling has yet to be determined, several key regulators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, including glycogen synthase kinase 3 and Frizzled receptors, were excluded as the molecular target. The compounds displayed remarkable selectivity, as they only induced β-catenin signaling in a human osteosarcoma U2OS cell line and not in a variety of other cell lines examined. Our data indicate that differences in cellular Wnt/β-catenin signaling machinery can be exploited to identify cell type-specific activators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:21559429

  18. Single DNA molecule stretching measures the activity of chemicals that target the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Cruceanu, Margareta; Stephen, Andrew G.; Beuning, Penny J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Fisher, Robert J.; Williams, Mark C.

    2006-01-01

    We develop a biophysical method for investigating chemical compounds that target the nucleic acid chaperone activity of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). We used an optical tweezers instrument to stretch single λ-DNA molecules through the helix-to-coil transition in the presence of NCp7 and various chemical compounds. The change in the helix-coil transition width induced by wild-type NCp7 and its zinc finger variants correlates with in vitro nucleic acid chaperone activity measurements and in vivo assays. The compound-NC interaction measured here reduces NCp7’s capability to alter the transition width. Purified compounds from the NCI Diversity set, 119889, 119911, and 119913 reduce the chaperone activity of 5 nM NC in aqueous solution at 10 nM, 25 nM, and 100 nM concentration, respectively. Similarly, gallein reduced the activity of 4 nM NC at 100 nM concentration. Further analysis allows us to dissect the impact of each compound on both sequence-specific and non-sequence-specific DNA binding of NC, two of the main components of NC’s nucleic acid chaperone activity. These results suggest that DNA stretching experiments can be used to screen chemical compounds targeting NC proteins, and to further explore the mechanisms by which these compounds interact with NC and alter its nucleic acid chaperone activity. PMID:17034752

  19. Small molecule activators of pre-mRNA 3′ cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Kevin; Khleborodova, Asya; Pan, Jingyi; Ryan, Xiaozhou P.

    2009-01-01

    3′ Cleavage and polyadenylation are obligatory steps in the biogenesis of most mammalian pre-mRNAs. In vitro reconstitution of the 3′ cleavage reaction from human cleavage factors requires high concentrations of creatine phosphate (CP), though how CP activates cleavage is not known. Previously, we proposed that CP might work by competitively inhibiting a cleavage-suppressing serine/threonine (S/T) phosphatase. Here we show that fluoride/EDTA, a general S/T phosphatase inhibitor, activates in vitro cleavage in place of CP. Subsequent testing of inhibitors specific for different S/T phosphatases showed that inhibitors of the PPM family of S/T phosphatases, which includes PP2C, but not the PPP family, which includes PP1, PP2A, and PP2B, activated 3′ cleavage in vitro. In particular, NCI 83633, an inhibitor of PP2C, activated extensive 3′ cleavage at a concentration 50-fold below that required by fluoride or CP. The testing of structural analogs led to the identification of a more potent compound that activated 3′ cleavage at 200 μM. While testing CP analogs to understand the origin of its cleavage activation effect, we found phosphocholine to be a more effective activator than CP. The minimal structural determinants of 3′ cleavage activation by phosphocholine were identified. Our results describe a much improved small molecule activator of in vitro pre-mRNA cleavage, identify the molecular determinants of cleavage activation by phosphoamines such as phosphocholine, and suggest that a PPM family phosphatase is involved in the negative regulation of mammalian pre-mRNA 3′ cleavage. PMID:19155323

  20. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya Nan, Fa-Jun Li, Jia

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. - Highlights: • C24 activates AMPK through antagonizing autoinhibition within α subunit. • C24 activates AMPK in hepatocytes and decreases glucose output via AMPK. • C24 exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice. • C24 represents a novel therapeutic for treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  1. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  2. Accelerating the Discovery of Biologically Active Small Molecules Using a High-Throughput Yeast Halo Assay#

    PubMed Central

    Gassner, Nadine C.; Tamble, Craig M.; Bock, Jonathan E.; Cotton, Naomi; White, Kimberly N.; Tenney, Karen; St. Onge, Robert P.; Proctor, Michael J.; Giaever, Guri; Davis, Ronald W.; Crews, Phillip; Holman, Theodore R.; Lokey, R. Scott

    2008-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a powerful model system for the study of basic eukaryotic cell biology, has been used increasingly as a screening tool for the identification of bioactive small molecules. We have developed a novel yeast toxicity screen that is easily automated and compatible with high-throughput screening robotics. The new screen is quantitative and allows inhibitory potencies to be determined, since the diffusion of the sample provides a concentration gradient and a corresponding toxicity halo. The efficacy of this new screen was illustrated by testing materials including 3,104 compounds from the NCI libraries, 167 marine sponge crude extracts, and 149 crude marine-derived fungal extracts. There were 46 active compounds among the NCI set. One very active extract was selected for bioactivity-guided fractionation resulting in the identification of crambescidin 800 as a potent antifungal agent. PMID:17291044

  3. Preparation and performance of chitosan encapsulated activated charcoal (ACCB) adsorbents for small molecules.

    PubMed

    Chandy, T; Sharma, C P

    1993-01-01

    A technique is described to encapsulate activated charcoal for haemoperfusion to be used in an artificial liver support. Activated charcoal was encapsulated within chitosan matrix (ACCB) in different concentrations, and was used as the supports for perfusion of a mixture of solutes, having molecular weight ranges from 60 to 69,000; under a flow rate of 8 ml/min. It seems the ACCB may be a good adsorbent system for the removal of toxic uric acid, creatinine, bilirubin, etc., from solutions; while larger molecules such as albumin are adsorbed less. The encapsulated charcoal did not leach out from the matrix during perfusion, and the system may be useful for detoxification of blood. The haemolytic potential of ACCB has been compatible with polystyrene control tubes. However, further studies are needed to determine their behaviour under clinical conditions. PMID:8263676

  4. Size-dependent catalytic activity and dynamics of gold nanoparticles at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaochun; Xu, Weilin; Liu, Guokun; Panda, Debashis; Chen, Peng

    2010-01-13

    Nanoparticles are important catalysts for petroleum processing, energy conversion, and pollutant removal. As compared to their bulk counterparts, their often superior or new catalytic properties result from their nanometer size, which gives them increased surface-to-volume ratios and chemical potentials. The size of nanoparticles is thus pivotal for their catalytic properties. Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to study the size-dependent catalytic activity and dynamics of spherical Au-nanoparticles under ambient solution conditions. By monitoring the catalysis of individual Au-nanoparticles of three different sizes in real time with single-turnover resolution, we observe clear size-dependent activities in both the catalytic product formation reaction and the product dissociation reaction. Within a model of classical thermodynamics, these size-dependent activities of Au-nanoparticles can be accounted for by the changes in the adsorption free energies of the substrate resazurin and the product resorufin because of the nanosize effect. We also observe size-dependent differential selectivity of the Au-nanoparticles between two parallel product dissociation pathways, with larger nanoparticles less selective between the two pathways. The particle size also strongly influences the surface-restructuring-coupled catalytic dynamics; both the catalysis-induced and the spontaneous dynamic surface restructuring occur more readily for smaller Au-nanoparticles due to their higher surface energies. Using a simple thermodynamic model, we analyze the catalysis- and size-dependent dynamic surface restructuring quantitatively; the results provide estimates on the activation energies and time scales of spontaneous dynamic surface restructuring that are fundamental to heterogeneous catalysis in both the nano- and the macro-scale. This study further exemplifies the power of the single-molecule approach in probing the intricate workings of nanoscale catalysts. PMID

  5. Erythromycin exerts in vivo anti-inflammatory activity downregulating cell adhesion molecule expression

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, María-Jesús; Nabah, Yafa Naim Abu; Cerdá-Nicolás, Miguel; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Issekutz, Andrew C; Cortijo, Julio; Morcillo, Esteban J

    2004-01-01

    Macrolides have long been used as anti-bacterial agents; however, there is some evidence that may exert anti-inflammatory activity. Therefore, erythromycin was used to characterize the mechanisms involved in their in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. Erythromycin pretreatment (30 mg kg−1 day−1 for 1 week) reduced the lipopolysaccharide (LPS; intratracheal, 0.4 mg kg−1)-induced increase in neutrophil count and elastase activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity, but failed to decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and macrophage-inflammatory protein-2 augmented levels in BALF. Erythromycin pretreatment also prevented lung P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA upregulation in response to airway challenge with LPS. Mesentery superfusion with LPS (1 μg ml−1) induced a significant increase in leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions at 60 min. Erythromycin pretreatment abolished the increases in these parameters. LPS exposure of the mesentery for 4 h caused a significant increase in leukocyte rolling flux, adhesion and emigration, which were inhibited by erythromycin by 100, 93 and 95%, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LPS exposure of the mesentery for 4 h caused a significant enhancement in P-selectin, E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression that was downregulated by erythromycin pretreatment. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that erythromycin pretreatment inhibited LPS-induced CD11b augmented expression in rat neutrophils. In conclusion, erythromycin inhibits leukocyte recruitment in the lung and this effect appears mediated through downregulation of CAM expression. Therefore, macrolides may be useful in the control of neutrophilic pulmonary diseases. PMID:15665859

  6. Effects of the small molecule HERG activator NS1643 on Kv11.3 channels.

    PubMed

    Bilet, Arne; Bauer, Christiane K

    2012-01-01

    NS1643 is one of the small molecule HERG (Kv11.1) channel activators and has also been found to increase erg2 (Kv11.2) currents. We now investigated whether NS1643 is also able to act as an activator of Kv11.3 (erg3) channels expressed in CHO cells. Activation of rat Kv11.3 current occurred in a dose-dependent manner and maximal current increasing effects were obtained with 10 µM NS1643. At this concentration, steady-state outward current increased by about 80% and the current increase was associated with a significant shift in the voltage dependence of activation to more negative potentials by about 15 mV. In addition, activation kinetics were accelerated, whereas deactivation was slowed. There was no significant effect on the kinetics of inactivation and recovery from inactivation. The strong current-activating agonistic effect of NS1643 did not result from a shift in the voltage dependence of Kv11.3 channel inactivation and was independent from external Na(+) or Ca(2+). At the higher concentration of 20 µM, NS1643 induced clearly less current increase. The left shift in the voltage dependence of activation reversed and the voltage sensitivity of activation dramatically decreased along with a slowing of Kv11.3 channel activation. These data show that, in comparison to other Kv11 family members, NS1643 exerts distinct effects on Kv11.3 channels with especially pronounced partial antagonistic effects at higher concentration. PMID:23226420

  7. Micro 3D ERT tomography for data assimilation modelling of active root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanella, Daniela; Busato, Laura; Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Binley, Andrew; Putti, Mario; Consoli, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Within the soil-plant-atmosphere system, root activity plays a fundamental role, as it connects different domains and allows a large part of the water and nutrient exchanges necessary for plant sustenance. The understanding of these processes is not only useful from an environmental point of view, making a fundamental contribution to the understanding of the critical zone dynamics, but also plays a pivotal role in precision agriculture, where the optimisation of water resources exploitation is mandatory and often carried out through deficit irrigation techniques. In this work, we present the results of non-invasive monitoring of the active root zone of two orange trees (Citrus sinensis, cv Tarocco Ippolito) located in an orange orchard in eastern Sicily (Italy) and drip irrigated with two different techniques: partial root drying and 100% crop evapotranspiration. The main goal of the monitoring activity is to assess possible differences between the developed root systems and the root water uptake between the two irrigation strategies. The monitoring is conducted using 3D micro-electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) based on an apparatus composed of a number of micro-boreholes (about 1.2 m deep) housing 12 electrodes each, plus a number of surface electrodes. Time-lapse measurements conducted both with long-term periodicity and short-term repetition before and after irrigation clearly highlight the presence and distribution of root water uptake zone both at shallow and larger depth, likely to correspond to zones utilized during the irrigation period (shallow) and during the time when the crop is not irrigated (deep). Subsidiary information is available in terms of precipitation, sap flow measurements and micrometeorological evapotranspiration estimates. This data ensemble lends itself to the assimilation into a variably saturated flow model, where both soil hydraulic parameters and root distribution shall be identified. Preliminary results in this directions show

  8. Micro 3D ERT tomography for data assimilation modelling of active root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Busato, L.; Vanella, D.; Consoli, S.; Binley, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Within the soil-plant-atmosphere system, root activity plays a fundamental role, as it connects different domains and allows a large part of the water and nutrient exchanges necessary for plant sustenance. The understanding of these processes is not only useful from an environmental point of view, making a fundamental contribution to the understanding of the critical zone dynamics, but also plays a pivotal role in precision agriculture, where the optimisation of water resources exploitation is mandatory and often carried out through deficit irrigation techniques. In this work, we present the results of non-invasive monitoring of the active root zone of two orange trees (Citrus sinensis, cv Tarocco Ippolito) located in an orange orchard in eastern Sicily (Italy) and drip irrigated with two different techniques: partial root drying and 100% crop evapotranspiration. The main goal of the monitoring activity is to assess possible differences between the developed root systems and the root water uptake between the two irrigation strategies. The monitoring is conducted using 3D micro-electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) based on an apparatus composed of a number of micro-boreholes (about 1.2 m deep) housing 12 electrodes each, plus a number of surface electrodes. Time-lapse measurements conducted both with long-term periodicity and short-term repetition before and after irrigation clearly highlight the presence and distribution of root water uptake zone both at shallow and larger depth, likely to correspond to zones utilized during the irrigation period (shallow) and during the time when the crop is not irrigated (deep). Subsidiary information is available in terms of precipitation, sap flow measurements and micrometeorological evapotranspiration estimates. This data ensemble lends itself to the assimilation into a variably saturated flow model, where both soil hydraulic parameters and root distribution shall be identified. Preliminary results in this directions show

  9. Fault zone structure and inferences on past activities of the active Shanchiao Fault in the Taipei metropolis, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Lee, J.; Chan, Y.; Lu, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Taipei Metropolis, home to around 10 million people, is subject to seismic hazard originated from not only distant faults or sources scattered throughout the Taiwan region, but also active fault lain directly underneath. Northern Taiwan including the Taipei region is currently affected by post-orogenic (Penglai arc-continent collision) processes related to backarc extension of the Ryukyu subduction system. The Shanchiao Fault, an active normal fault outcropping along the western boundary of the Taipei Basin and dipping to the east, is investigated here for its subsurface structure and activities. Boreholes records in the central portion of the fault were analyzed to document the stacking of post- Last Glacial Maximum growth sediments, and a tulip flower structure is illuminated with averaged vertical slip rate of about 3 mm/yr. Similar fault zone architecture and post-LGM tectonic subsidence rate is also found in the northern portion of the fault. A correlation between geomorphology and structural geology in the Shanchiao Fault zone demonstrates an array of subtle geomorphic scarps corresponds to the branch fault while the surface trace of the main fault seems to be completely erased by erosion and sedimentation. Such constraints and knowledge are crucial in earthquake hazard evaluation and mitigation in the Taipei Metropolis, and in understanding the kinematics of transtensional tectonics in northern Taiwan. Schematic 3D diagram of the fault zone in the central portion of the Shanchiao Fault, displaying regional subsurface geology and its relation to topographic features.

  10. Regulation of invertase activity in different root zones of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings in the course of osmotic adjustment under water deficit conditions.

    PubMed

    Königshofer, Helga; Löppert, Hans-Georg

    2015-07-01

    Osmotic adjustment of roots is an essential adaptive mechanism to sustain water uptake and root growth under water deficit. In this paper, the role of invertases (β-fructofuranosidase, EC 3.2.1.26) in osmotic adjustment was investigated in the root tips (cell division and elongation zone) and the root maturation zone of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Josef) in the course of osmotic stress imposed by 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000. The two root zones investigated differed distinctly in the response of invertases to water deprivation. In the root tips, the activity of the vacuolar and cell wall-bound invertases increased markedly under water stress resulting in the accumulation of hexoses (glucose and fructose) that contributed significantly to osmotic adjustment. A transient rise in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) preceded the enhancement of invertases upon exposure to osmotic stress. Treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) abolished the stress induced H2O2 production and suppressed the stimulation of the vacuolar invertase activity, whereas the activity of the cell wall-bound invertase was not influenced by DPI. As a consequence of the inhibitory effect of DPI on the vacuolar invertase, hexose levels and osmotic adjustment were also markedly decreased in the root tips under water deficit in the presence of DPI. These data suggest that H2O2 probably generated by a NADPH oxidase is required as a signalling molecule for the up-regulation of the vacuolar invertase activity in the root tips under osmotic stress, thereby enhancing the capacity for osmotic adjustment. In the root maturation zone, an early H2O2 signal could not be detected in response to PEG application. Only an increase in the glucose level that was not paralleled by fructose and a slight stimulation of the activity of the vacuolar invertase occurred in the maturation zone after water deprivation. The stress induced accumulation of glucose in the maturation zone was not

  11. Peptidomimetic Small Molecules Disrupt Type IV Secretion System Activity in Diverse Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Carrie L.; Good, James A. D.; Kumar, Santosh; Krishnan, K. Syam; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Loh, John T.; Chappell, Joseph; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria utilize complex type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) to translocate diverse effector proteins or DNA into target cells. Despite the importance of T4SSs in bacterial pathogenesis, the mechanism by which these translocation machineries deliver cargo across the bacterial envelope remains poorly understood, and very few studies have investigated the use of synthetic molecules to disrupt T4SS-mediated transport. Here, we describe two synthetic small molecules (C10 and KSK85) that disrupt T4SS-dependent processes in multiple bacterial pathogens. Helicobacter pylori exploits a pilus appendage associated with the cag T4SS to inject an oncogenic effector protein (CagA) and peptidoglycan into gastric epithelial cells. In H. pylori, KSK85 impedes biogenesis of the pilus appendage associated with the cag T4SS, while C10 disrupts cag T4SS activity without perturbing pilus assembly. In addition to the effects in H. pylori, we demonstrate that these compounds disrupt interbacterial DNA transfer by conjugative T4SSs in Escherichia coli and impede vir T4SS-mediated DNA delivery by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in a plant model of infection. Of note, C10 effectively disarmed dissemination of a derepressed IncF plasmid into a recipient bacterial population, thus demonstrating the potential of these compounds in mitigating the spread of antibiotic resistance determinants driven by conjugation. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of synthetic small molecules that impair delivery of both effector protein and DNA cargos by diverse T4SSs. PMID:27118587

  12. The energy balance and pressure in the solar transition zone for network and active region features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, K. R.; Bartoe, J.-D. F.; Brueckner, G. E.; Vanhoosier, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    The electron pressure and energy balance in the solar transition zone are determined for about 125 network and active region features on the basis of high spectral and spatial resolution extreme ultraviolet spectra. Si III line intensity ratios obtained from the Naval Research Laboratory high-resolution telescope and spectrograph during a rocket flight are used as diagnostics of electron density and pressure for solar features near 3.5 x 10 to the 4th K. Observed ratios are compared with the calculated dependence of the 1301 A/1312 A and 1301 A/1296 A line intensity ratios on electron density, temperature and pressure. Electron densities ranging from 2 x 10 to the 10th/cu cm to 10 to the 12th/cu cm and active region pressures from 3 x 10 to the 15th to 10 to the 16th/cu cm K are obtained. Energy balance calculations reveal the balance of the divergence of the conductive flux and turbulent energy dissipation by radiative energy losses in a plane-parallel homogeneous transition zone (fill factor of 1), and an energy source requirement for a cylindrical zone geometry (fill factor less than 0.04).

  13. Microearthquake activity on the Orozco Fracture Zone: Preliminary results from Project ROSE

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-10

    We present preliminary hypocenter determinations for 52 earthquakes recorded by a large multiinstitutional network of ocean bottom seismometers and ocean bottom hydrophones in the Orozco Fracture Zone in the eastern Pacific during late February to mid-March 1979. The network was deployed as part of the Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment, also known as Project ROSE. The Orozco Fracture Zone is Physiographically complex, and the pattern of microearthquake hypocenters at least partly reflects this complexity. All of the well-located epicenters lie within the active transform fault segment of the fracture zone. About half of the recorded earthquakes were aligned along a narrow trough that extends eastward from the northern rise crest intersection in the approximate direction of the Cocos-Pacific relative plate motion; these events appear to be characterized by strike-slip faulting. The second major group of activity occurred in the central portion of the transform fault; the microearthquakes in this group do not display a preferred alignment parallel to the direction of spreading, and several are not obviously associated with distinct topographic features. Hypocentral depth was well resolved for many of the earthquakes reported here. Nominal depths range from 0 to 17 km below the seafloor.

  14. Expression of amyloid precursor protein-like molecule in astroglial cells of the subventricular zone and rostral migratory stream of the adult rat forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Yasuoka, Katsunori; Hirata, Kazuho; Kuraoka, Akio; He, Jian-wen; Kawabuchi, Masaru

    2004-01-01

    In adult mammals, new neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle (LV) migrate tangentially through the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to the olfactory bulb (OB), where they mature into local interneurons. Using a monoclonal antibody for the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) (mAb 22C11), which is specific for the amino-terminal region of the secreted form of APP and recognizes all APP isoforms and APP-related proteins, immunoreactivity was detected in specific subpopulations of cells in the SVZ and RMS of the adult rat forebrain. In the SVZ, APP-like immunoreactivity was detected in the ependymal cells lining the LV and some of the subependymal cells. The latter were regarded as astrocytes, because they were positive for the glial markers, S-100 protein (S-100) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). APP-like immunoreactive astrocytes exhibited strong labelling of the perinuclear cytoplasm and often possessed a long, fine process similar to that found with radial glia. The process extended to an APP-like immunoreactive meshwork in the RMS that consisted of cytoplasmic processes of astrocytes forming ‘glial tubes’. Double-immunofluorescent labelling with a highly polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) confirmed that the APP-like immunoreactive astrocytes in the SVZ and meshwork in the RMS made close contact with PSA-NCAM-immunopositive neuroblasts, suggesting an interaction between APP-containing cells and neuroblasts. This region of the adult brain is a useful in vivo model to investigate the role of APP in neurogenesis. PMID:15291796

  15. Post-Spaceflight (STS-135) Mouse Splenocytes Demonstrate Altered Activation Properties and Surface Molecule Expression

    PubMed Central

    Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in immune function have been documented during or post-spaceflight and in ground based models of microgravity. Identification of immune parameters that are dysregulated during spaceflight is an important step in mitigating crew health risks during deep space missions. The in vitro analysis of leukocyte activity post-spaceflight in both human and animal species is primarily focused on lymphocytic function. This report completes a broader spectrum analysis of mouse lymphocyte and monocyte changes post 13 days orbital flight (mission STS-135). Analysis includes an examination in surface markers for cell activation, and antigen presentation and co-stimulatory molecules. Cytokine production was measured after stimulation with T-cell mitogen or TLR-2, TLR-4, or TLR-5 agonists. Splenocyte surface marker analysis immediate post-spaceflight and after in vitro culture demonstrated unique changes in phenotypic populations between the flight mice and matched treatment ground controls. Post-spaceflight splenocytes (flight splenocytes) had lower expression intensity of CD4+CD25+ and CD8+CD25+ cells, lower percentage of CD11c+MHC II+ cells, and higher percentage of CD11c+MHC I+ populations compared to ground controls. The flight splenocytes demonstrated an increase in phagocytic activity. Stimulation with ConA led to decrease in CD4+ population but increased CD4+CD25+ cells compared to ground controls. Culturing with TLR agonists led to a decrease in CD11c+ population in splenocytes isolated from flight mice compared to ground controls. Consequently, flight splenocytes with or without TLR-agonist stimulation showed a decrease in CD11c+MHC I+, CD11c+MHC II+, and CD11c+CD86+ cells compared to ground controls. Production of IFN-γ was decreased and IL-2 was increased from ConA stimulated flight splenocytes. This study demonstrated that expression of surface molecules can be affected by conditions of spaceflight and impaired responsiveness persists under culture

  16. Dendrimers and Polyamino-Phenolic Ligands: Activity of New Molecules Against Legionella pneumophila Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Barbieri, Federica; Ottaviani, Maria F.; Giorgi, Luca; Bruscolini, Francesca; Manti, Anita; Battistelli, Michela; Sabatini, Luigia; Pianetti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae). Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration 10-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall twofold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85 and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection treatments of water systems

  17. Dendrimers and Polyamino-Phenolic Ligands: Activity of New Molecules Against Legionella pneumophila Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Barbieri, Federica; Ottaviani, Maria F; Giorgi, Luca; Bruscolini, Francesca; Manti, Anita; Battistelli, Michela; Sabatini, Luigia; Pianetti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae). Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration 10-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall twofold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85 and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection treatments of water systems in

  18. Screening of Pharmacologically Active Small Molecule Compounds Identifies Antifungal Agents Against Candida Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Watamoto, Takao; Egusa, Hiroshi; Sawase, Takashi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Candida species have emerged as important and common opportunistic human pathogens, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. The current antifungal therapies either have toxic side effects or are insufficiently effect. The aim of this study is develop new small-molecule antifungal compounds by library screening methods using Candida albicans, and to evaluate their antifungal effects on Candida biofilms and cytotoxic effects on human cells. Wild-type C. albicans strain SC5314 was used in library screening. To identify antifungal compounds, we screened a small-molecule library of 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds (LOPAC1280TM) using an antifungal susceptibility test (AST). To investigate the antifungal effects of the hit compounds, ASTs were conducted using Candida strains in various growth modes, including biofilms. We tested the cytotoxicity of the hit compounds using human gingival fibroblast (hGF) cells to evaluate their clinical safety. Only 35 compounds were identified by screening, which inhibited the metabolic activity of C. albicans by >50%. Of these, 26 compounds had fungistatic effects and nine compounds had fungicidal effects on C. albicans. Five compounds, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate, ellipticine and CV-3988, had strong fungicidal effects and could inhibit the metabolic activity of Candida biofilms. However, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate and ellipticine were cytotoxic to hGF cells at low concentrations. CV-3988 showed no cytotoxicity at a fungicidal concentration. Four of the compounds identified, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate and ellipticine, had toxic effects on Candida strains and hGF cells. In contrast, CV-3988 had fungicidal effects on Candida strains, but low cytotoxic effects on hGF cells. Therefore, this screening reveals agent, CV-3988 that was previously unknown to be antifungal agent, which could be a novel therapies for superficial mucosal candidiasis. PMID

  19. 78 FR 58273 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 7-Mayaguez, Puerto Rico: Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 7--Mayaguez, Puerto Rico: Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Patheon Puerto Rico, Inc. (Pharmaceutical Products); Caguas and Manat , Puerto Rico The Puerto Rico Industrial Development...

  20. 78 FR 30270 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 61-San Juan, Puerto Rico, Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 61--San Juan, Puerto Rico, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Janssen Ortho LLC (Pharmaceutical Products Production), Gurabo, Puerto Rico The Puerto Rico Trade and Export Company, grantee...

  1. 77 FR 75406 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, GA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Perkins Shibaura...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, GA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Perkins Shibaura Engines LLC, (Diesel Engines), Griffin, GA Perkins Shibaura Engines LLC (Perkins Shibaura), an operator of FTZ 26, submitted...

  2. 78 FR 64197 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 8-Toledo, Ohio, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Whirlpool...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 8--Toledo, Ohio, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Whirlpool Corporation, Subzone 8I, (Washing Machines), Clyde and Green Springs, Ohio Whirlpool Corporation (Whirlpool) submitted...

  3. 78 FR 62583 - Foreign-Trade Zone 39-Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Lasko...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 39--Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Lasko Products, Inc. (Household Electric Fans); Fort Worth, Texas On May 21, 2013, Lasko Products, Inc., submitted a notification of...

  4. 77 FR 63290 - Foreign-Trade Zone 74-Baltimore, MD, Authorization of Production Activity, J.D. Neuhaus LP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... public comment (77 FR 39209, 7/2/2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 74--Baltimore, MD, Authorization of Production Activity, J.D. Neuhaus LP, (Overhead Lifting Equipment Production), Sparks, MD On June 13, 2012, the...

  5. 77 FR 63290 - Foreign-Trade Zone 121-Albany, NY; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Albany Molecular...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 121--Albany, NY; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Albany Molecular Research, Inc., Subzone 121A, (Pharmaceutical Chemicals Production), Rensselaer, NY Albany Molecular Research, Inc....

  6. 78 FR 7395 - Foreign-Trade Zone 129-Bellingham, WA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; T.C. Trading...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 129--Bellingham, WA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; T.C. Trading Company, Inc. (Eyeglass Assembly and Kitting); Blaine, WA The Port of Bellingham, grantee of FTZ 129, submitted a notification...

  7. 78 FR 58995 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 138-Columbus, Ohio; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Rolls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 138--Columbus, Ohio; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Rolls Royce Energy Systems, Inc. (Industrial Gas Turbines, Power Generation Turbines, and Generator Sets); Mount Vernon, Ohio...

  8. Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of HIV-1 NC Proteins Investigated by Single Molecule DNA Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark C.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Bloomfield, Victor A.

    2002-03-01

    HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone protein that is responsible for facilitating numerous nucleic acid rearrangements throughout the reverse transcription cycle of HIV-1. To understand the mechanism of NC’s chaperone function, we carried out single molecule DNA stretching studies in the presence of NC and mutant forms of NC. Using an optical tweezers instrument, we stretch single DNA molecules from the double-stranded helical state to the single-stranded (coil) state. Based on the observed cooperativity of DNA force-induced melting, we find that the fraction of melted base pairs at room temperature is increased dramatically in the presence of NC. Thus, upon NC binding, increased thermal fluctuations cause continuous melting and reannealing of base pairs so that DNA strands are able to rapidly sample configurations in order to find the lowest energy state. While NC destabilizes the double-stranded form of DNA, a mutant form of NC that lacks the zinc finger structures does not. DNA stretching experiments carried out in the presence of NC variants containing more subtle changes in the zinc finger structures were conducted to elucidate the contribution of each individual finger to NC’s chaperone activity, and these results will be reported.

  9. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  10. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H; Goodman, Myron F; Rueda, David

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ∼ 5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer. PMID:26681117

  11. New Approaches to Measuring Sticky Molecules: Improvement of Instrumental Response Times Using Active Passivation.

    PubMed

    Roscioli, J R; Zahniser, M S; Nelson, D D; Herndon, S C; Kolb, C E

    2016-03-10

    A novel method has been developed to improve sampling system response times for nominally "sticky" molecules such as HNO3 and NH3. The method reported here makes use of active, continuous passivation, where the instrument interfaces are continuously exposed to 0.01-1 ppm of fluorinated acidic or basic surfactants. To reduce HNO3 response times, perfluoroheptanoic acid and perfluorobutanesulfonic acid vapors are evaluated as passivation species. 1H,1H-perfluorooctylamine is used to improve NH3 response times. The resulting time responses using the perfluoroalkanoic acids are on the order of 0.4-0.7 s for a 75% quantitative recovery of HNO3, and 1-5 s for 90% recovery. Similar response time improvements are seen in detection of NH3 using perfluorooctylamine (<1 s for a 75% recovery, ∼2 s for 90% recovery). This generally applicable methodology significantly improves the capability of eddy covariance flux and real-time plume-based measurements of highly polar molecules that have historically been hampered by slow response times due to adsorption on sampling system surfaces. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by field measurements of HNO3 eddy covariance fluxes in a central U.S. prairie. PMID:26106902

  12. A Method of Permeabilization of Drosophila Embryos for Assays of Small Molecule Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila embryo has long been a powerful laboratory model for elucidating molecular and genetic mechanisms that control development. The ease of genetic manipulations with this model has supplanted pharmacological approaches that are commonplace in other animal models and cell-based assays. Here we describe recent advances in a protocol that enables application of small molecules to the developing fruit fly embryo. The method details steps to overcome the impermeability of the eggshell while maintaining embryo viability. Eggshell permeabilization across a broad range of developmental stages is achieved by application of a previously described d-limonene embryo permeabilization solvent (EPS1) and by aging embryos at reduced temperature (18 °C) prior to treatments. In addition, use of a far-red dye (CY5) as a permeabilization indicator is described, which is compatible with downstream applications involving standard red and green fluorescent dyes in live and fixed preparations. This protocol is applicable to studies using bioactive compounds to probe developmental mechanisms as well as for studies aimed at evaluating teratogenic or pharmacologic activity of uncharacterized small molecules. PMID:25046169

  13. Modulation of P-glycoprotein activity by cannabinoid molecules in HK-2 renal cells

    PubMed Central

    Nieri, Paola; Romiti, Nadia; Adinolfi, Barbara; Chicca, Andrea; Massarelli, Ilaria; Chieli, Elisabetta

    2006-01-01

    Endogenous and synthetic cannabinoid molecules have been investigated as possible MDR-1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) modulators in HK-2-immortalized renal cells, using calcein acetoxymethylester (calcein-AM) as a P-gp substrate. Among the endocannabinoid molecules tested, anandamide (AEA), but not 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) or palmitoyl-ethanolamide (PEA), increased the intracellular fluorescence emitted by calcein, a metabolic derivative of the P-gp substrate calcein-AM, indicative of a reduction in transport capacity. All the three synthetic cannabimimetics tested, that is, R-(+)-methanandamide (R(+)-MET), AM 251 and CP55,940 significantly increased calcein accumulation in the cytosol. RT–PCR demonstrated that HK-2 cells do not express CB1 or CB2 cannabinoid receptors. R(+)-MET, AM251 and CP55,940 were also evaluated as modulators of P-gp expression, by Western blot analysis. Only AM251 weakly enhanced the protein levels (by 1.2-fold) after a 4-day-long incubation with the noncytotoxic drug concentration 2 μM. The present data provide the first evidence that the endocannabinoid AEA and different synthetic cannabinoids may inhibit the P-gp activity in vitro via a cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanism. PMID:16715117

  14. Novel lead structures and activation mechanisms for CO-releasing molecules (CORMs).

    PubMed

    Schatzschneider, U

    2015-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous small signalling molecule in the human body, produced by the action of haem oxygenase on haem. Since it is very difficult to apply safely as a gas, solid storage and delivery forms for CO are now explored. Most of these CO-releasing molecules (CORMs) are based on the inactivation of the CO by coordinating it to a transition metal centre in a prodrug approach. After a brief look at the potential cellular target structures of CO, an overview of the design principles and activation mechanisms for CO release from a metal coordination sphere is given. Endogenous and exogenous triggers discussed include ligand exchange reactions with medium, enzymatically-induced CO release and photoactivated liberation of CO. Furthermore, the attachment of CORMs to hard and soft nanomaterials to confer additional target specificity to such systems is critically assessed. A survey of analytical methods for the study of the stoichiometry and kinetics of CO release, as well as the tracking of CO in living systems by using fluorescent probes, concludes this review. CORMs are very valuable tools for studying CO bioactivity and might lead to new drug candidates; however, in the design of future generations of CORMs, particular attention has to be paid to their drug-likeness and the tuning of the peripheral 'drug sphere' for specific biomedical applications. Further progress in this field will thus critically depend on a close interaction between synthetic chemists and researchers exploring the physiological effects and therapeutic applications of CO. PMID:24628281

  15. Gas pressure and electron density at the level of the active zone of hollow cathode arc discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minoo, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    A model for the longitudinal variations of the partial pressures of electrons, ions, and neutral particles is proposed as a result of an experimental study of pressure variations at the level of the active zone as a function of the various discharge parameters of a hollow cathode arc. The cathode region where the temperature passes through its maximum is called active zone. The proposed model embodies the very important variations which the partial electron and neutral particles pressures undergo at the level of the active zone.

  16. A Pipeline for Screening Small Molecules with Growth Inhibitory Activity against Burkholderia cenocepacia

    PubMed Central

    Selin, Carrie; Stietz, Maria S.; Blanchard, Jan E.; Hall, Dennis G.; Brown, Eric D.; Cardona, Silvia T.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with the bacteria Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are very difficult to eradicate in cystic fibrosis patients due the intrinsic resistance of Bcc to most available antibiotics and the emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains during antibiotic treatment. In this work, we used a whole-cell based assay to screen a diverse collection of small molecules for growth inhibitors of a relevant strain of Bcc, B. cenocepacia K56-2. The primary screen used bacterial growth in 96-well plate format and identified 206 primary actives among 30,259 compounds. From 100 compounds with no previous record of antibacterial activity secondary screening and data mining selected a total of Bce bioactives that were further analyzed. An experimental pipeline, evaluating in vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activity, toxicity and in vivo antibacterial activity using C. elegans was used for prioritizing compounds with better chances to be further investigated as potential Bcc antibacterial drugs. This high throughput screen, along with the in vitro and in vivo analysis highlights the utility of this experimental method to quickly identify bioactives as a starting point of antibacterial drug discovery. PMID:26053039

  17. Screening and characterization of molecules that modulate the biological activity of IFNs-I.

    PubMed

    Bürgi, Milagros; Zapol'skii, Viktor A; Hinkelmann, Bettina; Köster, Mario; Kaufmann, Dieter E; Sasse, Florenz; Hauser, Hansjörg; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Kratje, Ricardo; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Oggero, Marcos

    2016-09-10

    Type I Interferons (IFNs-I) are species-specific glycoproteins which play an important role as primary defence against viral infections and that can also modulate the adaptive immune system. In some autoimmune diseases, interferons (IFNs) are over-produced. IFNs are widely used as biopharmaceuticals for a variety of cancer indications, chronic viral diseases, and for their immuno-modulatory action in patients with multiple sclerosis; therefore, increasing their therapeutic efficiency and decreasing their side effects is of high clinical value. In this sense, it is interesting to find molecules that can modulate the activity of IFNs. In order to achieve that, it was necessary to establish a simple, fast and robust assay to analyze numerous compounds simultaneously. We developed four reporter gene assays (RGAs) to identify IFN activity modulator compounds by using WISH-Mx2/EGFP, HeLa-Mx2/EGFP, A549-Mx2/EGFP, and HEp2-Mx2/EGFP reporter cell lines (RCLs). All of them present a Z' factor higher than 0.7. By using these RGAs, natural and synthetic compounds were analyzed simultaneously. A total of 442 compounds were studied by the Low Throughput Screening (LTS) assay using the four RCLs to discriminate between their inhibitory or enhancing effects on IFN activity. Some of them were characterized and 15 leads were identified. Finally, one promising candidate with enhancing effect on IFN-α/-β activity and five compounds with inhibitory effect were described. PMID:27346232

  18. Topical Anti-inflammatory Activity of New Hybrid Molecules of Terpenes and Synthetic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Theoduloz, Cristina; Delporte, Carla; Valenzuela-Barra, Gabriela; Silva, Ximena; Cádiz, Solange; Bustamante, Fernanda; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess changes in the activity of anti-inflammatory terpenes from Chilean medicinal plants after the formation of derivatives incorporating synthetic anti-inflammatory agents. Ten new hybrid molecules were synthesized combining terpenes (ferruginol (1), imbricatolic acid (2) and oleanolic acid (3)) with ibuprofen (4) or naproxen (5). The topical anti-inflammatory activity of the compounds was assessed in mice by the arachidonic acid (AA) and 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA) induced ear edema assays. Basal cytotoxicity was determined towards human lung fibroblasts, gastric epithelial cells and hepatocytes. At 1.4 µmol/mouse, a strong anti-inflammatory effect in the TPA assay was observed for oleanoyl ibuprofenate 12 (79.9%) and oleanoyl ibuprofenate methyl ester 15 (80.0%). In the AA assay, the best activity was observed for 12 at 3.2 µmol/mouse, with 56.8% reduction of inflammation, in the same range as nimesulide (48.9%). All the terpenyl-synthetic anti-inflammatory hybrids showed better effects in the TPA assay, with best activity for 6, 12 and 15. The cytotoxicity of the compounds 8 and 10 with a free COOH, was higher than that of 2. The derivatives from 3 were less toxic than the triterpene. Several of the new compounds presented better anti-inflammatory effect and lower cytotoxicity than the parent terpenes. PMID:26096431

  19. A Pipeline for Screening Small Molecules with Growth Inhibitory Activity against Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    PubMed

    Selin, Carrie; Stietz, Maria S; Blanchard, Jan E; Gehrke, Sebastian S; Bernard, Sylvain; Hall, Dennis G; Brown, Eric D; Cardona, Silvia T

    2015-01-01

    Infections with the bacteria Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are very difficult to eradicate in cystic fibrosis patients due the intrinsic resistance of Bcc to most available antibiotics and the emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains during antibiotic treatment. In this work, we used a whole-cell based assay to screen a diverse collection of small molecules for growth inhibitors of a relevant strain of Bcc, B. cenocepacia K56-2. The primary screen used bacterial growth in 96-well plate format and identified 206 primary actives among 30,259 compounds. From 100 compounds with no previous record of antibacterial activity secondary screening and data mining selected a total of Bce bioactives that were further analyzed. An experimental pipeline, evaluating in vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activity, toxicity and in vivo antibacterial activity using C. elegans was used for prioritizing compounds with better chances to be further investigated as potential Bcc antibacterial drugs. This high throughput screen, along with the in vitro and in vivo analysis highlights the utility of this experimental method to quickly identify bioactives as a starting point of antibacterial drug discovery. PMID:26053039

  20. Landform development in a zone of active Gedi Fault, Eastern Kachchh rift basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothyari, Girish Ch.; Rastogi, B. K.; Morthekai, P.; Dumka, Rakesh K.

    2016-02-01

    An earthquake of 2006 Mw 5.7 occurred along east-west trending Gedi Fault (GF) to the north of the Kachchh rift basin in western India which had the epicenter in the Wagad upland, which is approximately 60 km northeast of the 2001 Mw 7.7 earthquake site (or epicenter). Development of an active fault scarp, shifting of a river channel, offsetting of streams and uplift of the ground indicate that the terrain is undergoing active deformation. Based on detailed field investigations, three major faults that control uplifts have been identified in the GF zone. These uplifts were developed in a step-over zone of the GF, and formed due to compressive force generated by left-lateral motion within the segmented blocks. In the present research, a terrace sequence along the north flowing Karaswali river in a tectonically active GF zone has been investigated. Reconstructions based on geomorphology and terrace stratigraphy supported by optical chronology suggest that the fluvial aggradation in the Wagad area was initiated during the strengthening (at ~ 8 ka) and declining (~ 4 ka) of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM). The presence of younger valley fill sediments which are dated ~ 1 ka is ascribed to a short lived phase of renewed strengthening of ISM before present day aridity. Based on terrace morphology two major phases of enhanced uplift have been estimated. The older uplift event dated to 8 ka is represented by the Tertiary bedrock surfaces which accommodated the onset of valley-fill aggradation. The younger event of enhanced uplift dated to 4 ka was responsible for the incision of the older valley fill sediments and the Tertiary bedrock. These ages suggest that the average rate of uplift ranges from 0.3 to 1.1 mm/yr during the last 9 ka implying active nature of the area.

  1. Regulation of Synaptic Vesicle Docking by Different Classes of Macromolecules in Active Zone Material

    PubMed Central

    Szule, Joseph A.; Harlow, Mark L.; Jung, Jae Hoon; De-Miguel, Francisco F.; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2012-01-01

    The docking of synaptic vesicles at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of axon terminals is essential for their fusion with the membrane and exocytosis of their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Dense networks of macromolecules, called active zone material, (AZM) are attached to the presynaptic membrane next to docked vesicles. Electron tomography has shown that some AZM macromolecules are connected to docked vesicles, leading to the suggestion that AZM is somehow involved in the docking process. We used electron tomography on the simply arranged active zones at frog neuromuscular junctions to characterize the connections of AZM to docked synaptic vesicles and to search for the establishment of such connections during vesicle docking. We show that each docked vesicle is connected to 10–15 AZM macromolecules, which fall into four classes based on several criteria including their position relative to the presynaptic membrane. In activated axon terminals fixed during replacement of docked vesicles by previously undocked vesicles, undocked vesicles near vacated docking sites on the presynaptic membrane have connections to the same classes of AZM macromolecules that are connected to docked vesicles in resting terminals. The number of classes and the total number of macromolecules to which the undocked vesicles are connected are inversely proportional to the vesicles’ distance from the presynaptic membrane. We conclude that vesicle movement toward and maintenance at docking sites on the presynaptic membrane are directed by an orderly succession of stable interactions between the vesicles and distinct classes of AZM macromolecules positioned at different distances from the membrane. Establishing the number, arrangement and sequence of association of AZM macromolecules involved in vesicle docking provides an anatomical basis for testing and extending concepts of docking mechanisms provided by biochemistry. PMID:22438915

  2. Benzimidazole-1,2,3-triazole Hybrid Molecules: Synthesis and Evaluation for Antibacterial/Antifungal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ouahrouch, Abdelaaziz; Ighachane, Hana; Taourirte, Moha; Engels, Joachim W; Sedra, My Hassan; Lazrek, Hassan B

    2014-01-01

    A novel series of hybrid molecules 4a–i and 5a–i were prepared by condensation of 4-(trimethylsilylethynyl)benzaldehyde 1 with substituted o-phenylenediamines. These in turn were reacted with 2-(azidomethoxy)ethyl acetate in a Cu alkyne–azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) to generate the 1,2,3-triazole pharmacophore under microwave assistance. The newly synthesized compounds were examined for their in vitro antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and the phytopathogenic fungi Verticillium dahliae and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis. 2-((4-(4-(5-Trifluoromethyl benzimidazol-2-yl)phenyl)-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methoxy)ethanol 5e showed a moderate inhibition of 30% in the Foa sporulation test. PMID:25088180

  3. Tetrandrine identified in a small molecule screen to activate mesenchymal stem cells for enhanced immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zijiang; Concannon, John; Ng, Kelvin S.; Seyb, Kathleen; Mortensen, Luke J.; Ranganath, Sudhir; Gu, Fangqi; Levy, Oren; Tong, Zhixiang; Martyn, Keir; Zhao, Weian; Lin, Charles P.; Glicksman, Marcie A.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Pre-treatment or priming of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) prior to transplantation can significantly augment the immunosuppressive effect of MSC-based therapies. In this study, we screened a library of 1402 FDA-approved bioactive compounds to prime MSC. We identified tetrandrine as a potential hit that activates the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent immunosuppressive agent, by MSC. Tetrandrine increased MSC PGE2 secretion through the NF-κB/COX-2 signaling pathway. When co-cultured with mouse macrophages (RAW264.7), tetrandrine-primed MSC attenuated the level of TNF-α secreted by RAW264.7. Furthermore, systemic transplantation of primed MSC into a mouse ear skin inflammation model significantly reduced the level of TNF-α in the inflamed ear, compared to unprimed cells. Screening of small molecules to pre-condition cells prior to transplantation represents a promising strategy to boost the therapeutic potential of cell therapy. PMID:27457881

  4. Broadband standoff detection of large molecules by mid-infrared active coherent laser spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Neil A; Molero, Francisco; Weidmann, Damien

    2015-01-26

    A widely tunable active coherent laser spectrometer (ACLaS) has been demonstrated for standoff detection of broadband absorbers in the 1280 to 1318 cm-1 spectral region using an external cavity quantum cascade laser as a mid-infrared source. The broad tuning range allows detection and quantification of vapor phase molecules, such as dichloroethane, ethylene glycol dinitrate, and tetrafluoroethane. The level of confidence in molecular mixing ratios retrieved from interfering spectral measurements is assessed in a quantitative manner. A first qualitative demonstration of condensed phase chemical detection on nitroacetanilide has also been conducted. Detection performances of the broadband ACLaS have been placed in the context of explosive detection and compared to that obtained using distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers. PMID:25835851

  5. Interactions of water, methanol and diethyl ether molecules with the surface of oxidized activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salame, Issa I.; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    Two samples of oxidized activated carbon of wood origin were used as adsorbents of water, methanol, and diethyl ether. Structural and chemical characteristics of the samples' surfaces were obtained using adsorption of nitrogen and Boehm titration. The adsorption isotherms of water and methanol were measured using a volumetric apparatus whereas the adsorption of diethyl ether was studied by means of inverse gas chromatography at finite concentration. Then the isotherms at three different temperatures were used to calculate the isosteric heats of adsorption. The results showed that the strength of interaction depends on the porosity of the sample and its surface chemistry. The effect of surface chemistry and the presence of oxygenated groups are predominant in the case of water and the least important in the case of diethyl ether. This is the result of the chemical nature of the molecules, their sizes, and the relative strengths of the dispersive interactions in small pores in comparison with hydrogen bonding to surface functional groups.

  6. Delivery of molecules into cells using carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Prerona; Qian, Wei; El-Sayed, Mostafa A; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2010-08-01

    A major barrier to drug and gene delivery is crossing the cell's plasma membrane. Physical forces applied to cells via electroporation, ultrasound and laser irradiation generate nanoscale holes in the plasma membrane for direct delivery of drugs into the cytoplasm. Inspired by previous work showing that laser excitation of carbon nanoparticles can drive the carbon-steam reaction to generate highly controlled shock waves, we show that carbon black nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses can facilitate the delivery of small molecules, proteins and DNA into two types of cells. Our initial results suggest that interaction between the laser energy and carbon black nanoparticles may generate photoacoustic forces by chemical reaction to create transient holes in the membrane for intracellular delivery. PMID:20639882

  7. Developing novel organocatalyzed aldol reactions for the enantioselective synthesis of biologically active molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bhanushali, Mayur; Zhao, Cong-Gui

    2011-01-01

    Aldol reaction is one of the most important methods for the formation of carbon-carbon bonds. Because of its significance and usefulness, asymmetric versions of this reaction have been realized with different approaches in the past. Over the last decade, the area of organocatalysis has made significant progresses. As one of most studied reactions in organocatalyses, organocatalyzed aldol reaction has emerged as a powerful tool for the synthesis of a large number of useful products in optically enriched forms. In this review, we summarize our efforts on the development of novel organocatalyzed aldol reactions for the enantioselective synthesis of biological active molecules. Literatures closely related to our studies are also covered. PMID:21918584

  8. A small molecule modulates Jumonji histone demethylase activity and selectively inhibits cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Chang, Jianjun; Varghese, Diana; Dellinger, Michael; Kumar, Subodh; Best, Anne M.; Ruiz, Julio; Bruick, Richard; Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Xu, Junjie; Babinski, David J.; Frantz, Doug E.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Quinn, Amy M.; Simeonov, Anton; Easmon, Johnny; Martinez, Elisabeth D.

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacological inhibition of general transcriptional regulators has the potential to block growth through targeting multiple tumorigenic signaling pathways simultaneously. Here, using an innovative cell-based screen, we identify a structurally unique small molecule (named JIB-04) which specifically inhibits the activity of the Jumonji family of histone demethylases in vitro, in cancer cells, and in tumors in vivo. Unlike known inhibitors, JIB-04 is not a competitive inhibitor of α-ketoglutarate. In cancer but not in patient-matched normal cells, JIB-04 alters a subset of transcriptional pathways and blocks viability. In mice, JIB-04 reduces tumor burden and prolongs survival. Importantly, we find that patients with breast tumors that overexpress Jumonji demethylases have significantly lower survival. Thus JIB-04, a novel inhibitor of Jumonji demethylases in vitro and in vivo, constitutes a unique potential therapeutic and research tool against cancer, and validates the use of unbiased cellular screens to discover chemical modulators with disease relevance. PMID:23792809

  9. Activation of the Proapoptotic Bcl-2 Protein Bax by a Small Molecule Induces Tumor Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guoping; Zhu, Yanglong; Eno, Colins O.; Liu, Yanlong; DeLeeuw, Lynn; Burlison, Joseph A.; Chaires, Jonathan B.; Trent, John O.

    2014-01-01

    The proapoptotic Bcl-2 protein Bax by itself is sufficient to initiate apoptosis in almost all apoptotic paradigms. Thus, compounds that can facilitate disruptive Bax insertion into mitochondrial membranes have potential as cancer therapeutics. In our study, we have identified small-molecule compounds predicted to associate with the Bax hydrophobic groove by a virtual-screen approach. Among these, one lead compound (compound 106) promotes Bax-dependent but not Bak-dependent apoptosis. Importantly, this compound alters Bax protein stability in vitro and promotes the insertion of Bax into mitochondria, leading to Bax-dependent permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Furthermore, as a single agent, compound 106 inhibits the growth of transplanted tumors, probably by inducing apoptosis in tumors. Our study has revealed a compound that activates Bax and induces Bax-dependent apoptosis, which may lead to the development of new therapeutic agents for cancer. PMID:24421393

  10. Tetrandrine identified in a small molecule screen to activate mesenchymal stem cells for enhanced immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zijiang; Concannon, John; Ng, Kelvin S; Seyb, Kathleen; Mortensen, Luke J; Ranganath, Sudhir; Gu, Fangqi; Levy, Oren; Tong, Zhixiang; Martyn, Keir; Zhao, Weian; Lin, Charles P; Glicksman, Marcie A; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Pre-treatment or priming of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) prior to transplantation can significantly augment the immunosuppressive effect of MSC-based therapies. In this study, we screened a library of 1402 FDA-approved bioactive compounds to prime MSC. We identified tetrandrine as a potential hit that activates the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent immunosuppressive agent, by MSC. Tetrandrine increased MSC PGE2 secretion through the NF-κB/COX-2 signaling pathway. When co-cultured with mouse macrophages (RAW264.7), tetrandrine-primed MSC attenuated the level of TNF-α secreted by RAW264.7. Furthermore, systemic transplantation of primed MSC into a mouse ear skin inflammation model significantly reduced the level of TNF-α in the inflamed ear, compared to unprimed cells. Screening of small molecules to pre-condition cells prior to transplantation represents a promising strategy to boost the therapeutic potential of cell therapy. PMID:27457881

  11. Single-Molecule Observation of a Mechanically Activated Cis-to-Trans Cyclopropane Isomerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junpeng; Kouznetsova, Tatiana B; Craig, Stephen L

    2016-08-24

    The mechanochemical activation of cis-gem-difluorocyclopropane (cis-gDFC) mechanophore in toluene was characterized with single-molecule force spectroscopy. Unlike previously reported behavior in methyl benzoate (MB), two transitions are observed in the force vs extension curves of cis-gDFC polymers in toluene. The first transition occurs at the same force of ∼1300 pN observed previously in MB, but a second transition is observed at forces of ∼1800 pN that reveal the partial formation of the trans-gDFC isomer. The behavior is attributed to competing reactions of the cis-gDFC at the 1300 pN plateau: addition of oxygen to a ring-opened diradicaloid intermediate, and isomerization of cis-gDFC to its trans isomer. PMID:27500711

  12. Expression of activated molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongli; Xu, Wenyan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Huaquan; Fu, Rong; Wu, Yuhong; Qu, Wen; Wang, Guojin; Guan, Jing; Song, Jia; Xing, Limin; Shao, Zonghong

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the expression of activation molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA)/Evans patients. The expression of CD80, CD86, and CD69 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was detected using flow cytometry in 30 AIHA/Evans patients, 18 normal controls (NC) and nine chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in untreated patients was higher than that in remission patients (P < 0.05), NC (P < 0.01) and CLL patients (P < 0.01). CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was higher than that on CD5(-)B lymphocytes in untreated patients (P > 0.05), but lower than those of CD5(-)B lymphocytes in remission patients and NC (P < 0.05). CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes of untreated patients was higher than that of remission patients (P < 0.05), NC (P < 0.01). CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than that of NC, remission (P < 0.05), and untreated patients (P > 0.05). CD80 and CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was negatively correlated with hemoglobin (HB), C3, C4 (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with reticulocyte (Ret) (P < 0.05). CD69 on CD5(+) and CD5(-)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than those of AIHA/Evans patients and NC (P < 0.05). The active molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of AIHA/Evans patients differ from those on CD5(-) and clonal CD5(+)B lymphocytes. PMID:26968550

  13. Counteracting Interactions between Lipopolysaccharide Molecules with Differential Activation of Toll-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Martin, Michael; Schifferle, Robert E.; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated counteracting interactions between the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Escherichia coli (Ec-LPS) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg-LPS), which induce cellular activation through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2, respectively. We found that Ec-LPS induced tolerance in THP-1 cells to subsequent tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) induction by Pg-LPS, though the reverse was not true, and looked for explanatory differential effects on the signal transduction pathway. Cells exposed to Pg-LPS, but not to Ec-LPS, displayed persisting expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase without apparent degradation, presumably allowing prolonged relay of downstream signals. Accordingly, cells pretreated with Pg-LPS, but not with Ec-LPS, were effectively activated in response to subsequent exposure to either LPS molecule, as evidenced by assessing nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity. In fact, Pg-LPS primed THP-1 cells for enhanced NF-κB activation and TNF-α release upon restimulation with the same LPS. This was a dose-dependent effect and correlated with upregulation of surface TLR2 expression. Furthermore, we observed inhibition of NF-κB-dependent transcription in a reporter cell line pretreated with Ec-LPS and restimulated with Pg-LPS (compared to cells pretreated with medium only and restimulated with Pg-LPS), but not when the reverse treatment was made. Although Pg-LPS could not make cells tolerant to subsequent activation by Ec-LPS, Pg-LPS inhibited Ec-LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 release when the two molecules were added simultaneously into THP-1 cell cultures. Pg-LPS also suppressed P. gingivalis FimA protein-induced NF-κB-dependent transcription in the 3E10/huTLR4 reporter cell line, which does not express TLR2. This rules out competition for common signaling intermediates, suggesting that Pg-LPS may block component(s) of the TLR4 receptor complex. Interactions between TLR2 and TLR4 agonists may be important in the

  14. Active Crustal Faults in the Forearc Region, Guerrero Sector of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, Krzysztof; Ramírez-Herrera, Maria Teresa; Kostoglodov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the characteristics and the seismogenic potential of crustal faults on the overriding plate in an area of high seismic hazard associated with the occurrence of subduction earthquakes and shallow earthquakes of the overriding plate. We present the results of geomorphic, structural, and fault kinematic analyses conducted on the convergent margin between the Cocos plate and the forearc region of the overriding North American plate, within the Guerrero sector of the Mexican subduction zone. We aim to determine the active tectonic processes in the forearc region of the subduction zone, using the river network pattern, topography, and structural data. We suggest that in the studied forearc region, both strike-slip and normal crustal faults sub-parallel to the subduction zone show evidence of activity. The left-lateral offsets of the main stream courses of the largest river basins, GPS measurements, and obliquity of plate convergence along the Cocos subduction zone in the Guerrero sector suggest the activity of sub-latitudinal left-lateral strike-slip faults. Notably, the regional left-lateral strike-slip fault that offsets the Papagayo River near the town of La Venta named "La Venta Fault" shows evidence of recent activity, corroborated also by GPS measurements (4-5 mm/year of sinistral motion). Assuming that during a probable earthquake the whole mapped length of this fault would rupture, it would produce an event of maximum moment magnitude Mw = 7.7. Even though only a few focal mechanism solutions indicate a stress regime relevant for reactivation of these strike-slip structures, we hypothesize that these faults are active and suggest two probable explanations: (1) these faults are characterized by long recurrence period, i.e., beyond the instrumental record, or (2) they experience slow slip events and/or associated fault creep. The analysis of focal mechanism solutions of small magnitude earthquakes in the upper plate, for the period between 1995

  15. Along strike variation of tremor activities and thermal structures in various subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, S.; Ide, S.; Yoshioka, S.

    2012-12-01

    A family of slow earthquakes, e.g., deep low frequency tremors, low frequency earthquakes (LFEs), very low frequency earthquakes (VLFs) and slow slip events (SSEs), are observed in various subduction zones. These phenomena represent shear slip on the plate interface, and they are thought to be related to brittle-ductile transition behavior on the plate interface because they are often located near the transition zones of interplate coupling estimated from GPS data. Such slip behavior along the plate interface would be controlled by temperature. Furthermore, tremors are considered to be related to fluid dehydrated from the subducting slab, through temperature dependent chemical reactions. Therefore, tremors occurrences are expected to be influenced by temperature, though some studies have questioned about the relationship between tremor activity and temperature. Here we investigate the source locations of deep tremor using an envelope correlation method and compare them with the temperature and shear strength profiles along the plate interface calculated using a numerical model (Yoshioka and Sanshadokoro, 2002). The study areas include New Zealand, southern Chile, and Mexico, where tremor behavior changes significantly along the strike of the plate interface. Investigating such along-strike variation in individual subduction zone may clarify the temperature dependence of tremor because environmental conditions affecting tremor occurrence are similar, unlike the comparison between different subduction zones. In the Hikurangi subduction zone beneath the North Island, New Zealand, the depth of SSE are quite different along the strike, e.g., deeper in the central region and shallower in the northern region (e.g. Wallace and Beavan, 2010). We reanalyze tremors detected by previous studies (Kim et al., 2011; Ide, 2012) to estimate their absolute depth and confirm that tremors in North Island are on the plate interface in both the central and the northern regions. Thermal

  16. Bioorthogonal Cyclization-Mediated In Situ Self-Assembly of Small Molecule Probes for Imaging Caspase Activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Deju; Shuhendler, Adam J.; Cui, Lina; Tong, Ling; Tee, Sui Seng; Tikhomirov, Grigory; Felsher, Dean W.; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-01-01

    Directed self-assembly of small molecules in living systems could enable a myriad of applications in biology and medicine, and it has been widely used to synthesize supramolecules and nano/microstructures in solution and in living cells. However, controlling self-assembly of synthetic small molecules in living animals is challenging because of the complex and dynamic in vivo physiological environment. Here we employed an optimized first-order bioorthogonal cyclization reaction to control self-assembly of a fluorescent small molecule, and demonstrated its in vivo applicability by imaging of casapae-3/7 activity in human tumor xenograft mouse models of chemotherapy. The in situ assembled fluorescent nanoparticles have been successfully imaged in both apoptotic cells and tumor tissues using three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy. This strategy combines the advantages offered by small molecules with those of nanomaterials and should find widespread use for non-invasive imaging of enzyme activity in vivo. PMID:24848238

  17. Bioorthogonal cyclization-mediated in situ self-assembly of small-molecule probes for imaging caspase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ye, Deju; Shuhendler, Adam J; Cui, Lina; Tong, Ling; Tee, Sui Seng; Tikhomirov, Grigory; Felsher, Dean W; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-06-01

    Directed self-assembly of small molecules in living systems could enable a myriad of applications in biology and medicine, and already this has been used widely to synthesize supramolecules and nano/microstructures in solution and in living cells. However, controlling the self-assembly of synthetic small molecules in living animals is challenging because of the complex and dynamic in vivo physiological environment. Here we employ an optimized first-order bioorthogonal cyclization reaction to control the self-assembly of a fluorescent small molecule, and demonstrate its in vivo applicability by imaging caspase-3/7 activity in human tumour xenograft mouse models of chemotherapy. The fluorescent nanoparticles assembled in situ were imaged successfully in both apoptotic cells and tumour tissues using three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy. This strategy combines the advantages offered by small molecules with those of nanomaterials and should find widespread use for non-invasive imaging of enzyme activity in vivo. PMID:24848238

  18. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (CDw150) is homophilic but self-associates with very low affinity.

    PubMed

    Mavaddat, N; Mason, D W; Atkinson, P D; Evans, E J; Gilbert, R J; Stuart, D I; Fennelly, J A; Barclay, A N; Davis, S J; Brown, M H

    2000-09-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activating molecule ((SLAM) CDw150) is a glycoprotein that belongs to the CD2 subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily and is expressed on the surface of activated T- and B-cells. It has been proposed that SLAM is homophilic and required for bidirectional signaling during T- and B-cell activation. Previous work has suggested that the affinity of SLAM self-association might be unusually high, undermining the concept that protein interactions mediating transient cell-cell contacts, such as those involving leukocytes, have to be weak in order that such contacts are readily reversible. Using surface plasmon resonance-based methods and analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), we confirm that SLAM is homophilic. However, we also establish a new theoretical treatment of surface plasmon resonance-derived homophilic binding data, which indicates that SLAM-SLAM interactions (solution K(d) approximately 200 micrometer) are in fact considerably weaker than most other well characterized protein-protein interactions at the cell surface (solution K(d) approximately 0.4-20 micrometer), a conclusion that is supported by the AUC analysis. Whereas further analysis of the AUC data imply that SLAM could form "head to head" dimers spanning adjacent cells, the very low affinity raises important questions regarding the physiological role and/or properties of such interactions. PMID:10831600

  19. Antiproliferation Activity of a Small Molecule Repressor of Liver Receptor Homolog 1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Mari, Yelenis; Chang, Mi Ra; Khan, Tanya; Kuruvilla, Dana; Nuhant, Philippe; Kumar, Naresh; West, Graham M.; Duckett, Derek R.; Roush, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1; NR5A2) is a potent regulator of cholesterol metabolism and bile acid homeostasis. Recently, LRH-1 has been shown to play an important role in intestinal inflammation and in the progression of estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancers and pancreatic cancer. Structural studies have revealed that LRH-1 can bind phospholipids and the dietary phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine activates LRH-1 activity in rodents. Here we characterize the activity of a novel synthetic nonphospholipid small molecule repressor of LRH-1, SR1848 (6-[4-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-3-cyclohexyl-1H-pyrimidine-2,4-dione). In cotransfection studies, SR1848 reduced LRH-1-dependent expression of a reporter gene and in cells that endogenously express LRH-1 dose dependently reduced the expression of cyclin-D1 and -E1, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. The cellular effects of SR1848 treatment are recapitulated after transfection of cells with small-interfering RNA targeting LRH-1. Immunocytochemistry analysis shows that SR1848 induces rapid translocation of nuclear LRH-1 to the cytoplasm. Combined, these results suggest that SR1848 is a functional repressor of LRH-1 that impacts expression of genes involved in proliferation in LRH-1–expressing cancers. Thus, SR1848 represents a novel chemical scaffold for the development of therapies targeting malignancies driven by LRH-1. PMID:25473120

  20. Small-Molecule Procaspase-3 Activation Sensitizes Cancer to Treatment with Diverse Chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Botham, Rachel C; Roth, Howard S; Book, Alison P; Roady, Patrick J; Fan, Timothy M; Hergenrother, Paul J

    2016-08-24

    Conventional chemotherapeutics remain essential treatments for most cancers, but their combination with other anticancer drugs (including targeted therapeutics) is often complicated by unpredictable synergies and multiplicative toxicities. As cytotoxic anticancer chemotherapeutics generally function through induction of apoptosis, we hypothesized that a molecularly targeted small molecule capable of facilitating a central and defining step in the apoptotic cascade, the activation of procaspase-3 to caspase-3, would broadly and predictably enhance activity of cytotoxic drugs. Here we show that procaspase-activating compound 1 (PAC-1) enhances cancer cell death induced by 15 different FDA-approved chemotherapeutics, across many cancer types and chemotherapeutic targets. In particular, the promising combination of PAC-1 and doxorubicin induces a synergistic reduction in tumor burden and enhances survival in murine tumor models of osteosarcoma and lymphoma. This PAC-1/doxorubicin combination was evaluated in 10 pet dogs with naturally occurring metastatic osteosarcoma or lymphoma, eliciting a biologic response in 3 of 6 osteosarcoma patients and 4 of 4 lymphoma patients. Importantly, in both mice and dogs, coadministration of PAC-1 with doxorubicin resulted in no additional toxicity. On the basis of the mode of action of PAC-1 and the high expression of procaspase-3 in many cancers, these results suggest the combination of PAC-1 with cytotoxic anticancer drugs as a potent and general strategy to enhance therapeutic response. PMID:27610416

  1. Small-Molecule Procaspase-3 Activation Sensitizes Cancer to Treatment with Diverse Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics remain essential treatments for most cancers, but their combination with other anticancer drugs (including targeted therapeutics) is often complicated by unpredictable synergies and multiplicative toxicities. As cytotoxic anticancer chemotherapeutics generally function through induction of apoptosis, we hypothesized that a molecularly targeted small molecule capable of facilitating a central and defining step in the apoptotic cascade, the activation of procaspase-3 to caspase-3, would broadly and predictably enhance activity of cytotoxic drugs. Here we show that procaspase-activating compound 1 (PAC-1) enhances cancer cell death induced by 15 different FDA-approved chemotherapeutics, across many cancer types and chemotherapeutic targets. In particular, the promising combination of PAC-1 and doxorubicin induces a synergistic reduction in tumor burden and enhances survival in murine tumor models of osteosarcoma and lymphoma. This PAC-1/doxorubicin combination was evaluated in 10 pet dogs with naturally occurring metastatic osteosarcoma or lymphoma, eliciting a biologic response in 3 of 6 osteosarcoma patients and 4 of 4 lymphoma patients. Importantly, in both mice and dogs, coadministration of PAC-1 with doxorubicin resulted in no additional toxicity. On the basis of the mode of action of PAC-1 and the high expression of procaspase-3 in many cancers, these results suggest the combination of PAC-1 with cytotoxic anticancer drugs as a potent and general strategy to enhance therapeutic response. PMID:27610416

  2. Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM or CD166) Modulates Bone Phenotype and Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, R. Adam; Chitteti, Brahmananda R.; Egan, Patrick H.; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Himes, Evan R.; Meijome, Tomas; Srour, Edward F.; Fuchs, Robyn K.; Kacena, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM/CD166), is expressed on osteoblasts (OB) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) residing in the hematopoietic niche, and may have important regulatory roles in bone formation. Because HSC numbers are reduced 77% in CD166−/− mice, we hypothesized that changes in bone phenotype and consequently the endosteal niche may partially be responsible for this alteration. Therefore, we investigated bone phenotype and OB function in CD166−/− mice. Although osteoclastic measures were not affected by loss of CD166, CD166−/− mice exhibited a modest increase in trabecular bone fraction (42%), and increases in osteoid deposition (72%), OB number (60%), and bone formation rate (152%). Cortical bone geometry was altered in CD166−/− mice resulting in up to 81% and 49% increases in stiffness and ultimate force, respectively. CD166−/− OB displayed elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization, and increased mRNA expression of Fra 1, ALP, and osteocalcin. Overall, CD166−/− mice displayed modestly elevated trabecular bone volume fraction with increased OB numbers and deposition of osteoid, and increased OB differentiation in vitro, possibly suggesting more mature OB are secreting more osteoid. This may explain the decline in HSC number in vivo because immature OB are mainly responsible for hematopoiesis enhancing activity. PMID:25730656

  3. High pressure chemistry of red phosphorus by photo-activated simple molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppatelli, M.; Fanetti, S.; Bini, R.; Caporali, M.; Peruzzini, M.

    2014-05-01

    High pressure (HP) is very effective in reducing intermolecular distances and inducing unexpected chemical reactions. In addition the photo-activation of the reactants in HP conditions can lead to very efficient and selective processes. The chemistry of phosphorus is currently based on the white molecular form. The red polymeric allotrope, despite more stable and much less toxic, has not attracted much attention so far. However, switching from the white to the red form would benefit any industrial procedure, especially from an environmental point of view. On the other side, water and ethanol are renewable, environmental friendly and largely available molecules, usable as reactants and photo-activators in HP conditions. Here we report a study on the HP photo-induced reactivity of red phosphorus with water and ethanol, showing the possibility of very efficient and selective processes, leading to molecular hydrogen and valuable phosphorus compounds. The reactions have been studied by means of FTIR and Raman spectroscopy and pressure has been generated using membrane Diamond (DAC) and Sapphire (SAC) anvil cells. HP reactivity has been activated by the two-photon absorption of near-UV wavelengths and occurred in total absence of solvents, catalysts and radical initiators, at room T and mild pressure conditions (0.2-1.5 GPa).

  4. Focal Activation of Cells by Plasmon Resonance Assisted Optical Injection of Signaling Molecules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Experimental methods for single cell intracellular delivery are essential for probing cell signaling dynamics within complex cellular networks, such as those making up the tumor microenvironment. Here, we show a quantitative and general method of interrogation of signaling pathways. We applied highly focused near-infrared laser light to optically inject gold-coated liposomes encapsulating bioactive molecules into single cells for focal activation of cell signaling. For this demonstration, we encapsulated either inositol trisphosphate (IP3), an endogenous cell signaling second messenger, or adenophostin A (AdA), a potent analogue of IP, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes, and injected these gold-coated liposomes and their contents into the cytosol of single ovarian carcinoma cells to initiate calcium (Ca2+) release from intracellular stores. Upon optical injection of IP3 or AdA at doses above the activation threshold, we observed increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration within the injected cell initiating the propagation of a Ca2+ wave throughout nearby cells. As confirmed by octanol-induced inhibition, the intercellular Ca2+ wave traveled via gap junctions. Optical injection of gold-coated liposomes represents a quantitative method of focal activation of signaling cascades of broad interest in biomedical research. PMID:24877558

  5. Lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylinosiol--novel promissing signaling molecules and their possible therapeutic activity.

    PubMed

    Drzazga, Anna; Sowińska, Agata; Koziołkiewicz, Maria

    2014-01-01

    For many years the role of lysophospholipids (LPLs) was associated only with structural and storage components of the cell without any informational function. Today, based on many research projects performed during the last decades, it is clear that some of the LPLs act as hormone-like signaling molecules and thus are very important inter- and intracellular lipid mediators. They can activate specific membrane receptors and/or nuclear receptors regulating many crucial physiological and pathophysiological processes. The LPLs were iden- tified as involved in a majority of cellular processes, including modulation of disease-related mechanisms observed, for instance, in case of diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis and cancer. Among LPLs, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) are becoming attractive research topics. Their recently revealed activities as novel ligands of orphan G protein-coupled receptors (i.e., GPR55 and GPR119) involved in modulation of tumor physiology and insulin secretion seem to be one of the most interesting aspects of these compounds. Moreover, the most recent scientific reports emphasize the significance of the acyl chain structure bound to the glycerol basis of LPL, as it entails different biological properties and activities of the compounds. PMID:25745761

  6. Identification of a small molecule with activity against drug-resistant and persistent tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Sambandan, Dhinakaran; Halder, Rajkumar; Wang, Jianing; Batt, Sarah M.; Weinrick, Brian; Ahmad, Insha; Yang, Pengyu; Zhang, Yong; Kim, John; Hassani, Morad; Huszar, Stanislav; Trefzer, Claudia; Ma, Zhenkun; Kaneko, Takushi; Mdluli, Khisi E.; Franzblau, Scott; Chatterjee, Arnab K.; Johnsson, Kai; Mikusova, Katarina; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Fütterer, Klaus; Robbins, Scott H.; Barnes, S. Whitney; Walker, John R.; Jacobs, William R.; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    A cell-based phenotypic screen for inhibitors of biofilm formation in mycobacteria identified the small molecule TCA1, which has bactericidal activity against both drug-susceptible and -resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and sterilizes Mtb in vitro combined with rifampicin or isoniazid. In addition, TCA1 has bactericidal activity against nonreplicating Mtb in vitro and is efficacious in acute and chronic Mtb infection mouse models both alone and combined with rifampicin or isoniazid. Transcriptional analysis revealed that TCA1 down-regulates genes known to be involved in Mtb persistence. Genetic and affinity-based methods identified decaprenyl-phosphoryl-β-D-ribofuranose oxidoreductase DprE1 and MoeW, enzymes involved in cell wall and molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis, respectively, as targets responsible for the activity of TCA1. These in vitro and in vivo results indicate that this compound functions by a unique mechanism and suggest that TCA1 may lead to the development of a class of antituberculosis agents. PMID:23776209

  7. Crystallographic structure of a small molecule SIRT1 activator-enzyme complex

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Han; Case, April W.; Riera, Thomas V.; Considine, Thomas; Lee, Jessica E.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Zhao, Huizhen; Jiang, Yong; Sweitzer, Sharon M.; Pietrak, Beth; Schwartz, Benjamin; Blum, Charles A.; Disch, Jeremy S.; Caldwell, Richard; Szczepankiewicz, Bruce; Oalmann, Christopher; Yee Ng, Pui; White, Brian H.; Casaubon, Rebecca; Narayan, Radha; Koppetsch, Karsten; Bourbonais, Francis; Wu, Bo; Wang, Junfeng; Qian, Dongming; Jiang, Fan; Mao, Cheney; Wang, Minghui; Hu, Erding; Wu, Joe C.; Perni, Robert B.; Vlasuk, George P.; Ellis, James L.

    2015-01-01

    SIRT1, the founding member of the mammalian family of seven NAD+-dependent sirtuins, is composed of 747 amino acids forming a catalytic domain and extended N- and C-terminal regions. We report the design and characterization of an engineered human SIRT1 construct (mini-hSIRT1) containing the minimal structural elements required for lysine deacetylation and catalytic activation by small molecule sirtuin-activating compounds (STACs). Using this construct, we solved the crystal structure of a mini-hSIRT1-STAC complex, which revealed the STAC-binding site within the N-terminal domain of hSIRT1. Together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and site-directed mutagenesis using full-length hSIRT1, these data establish a specific STAC-binding site and identify key intermolecular interactions with hSIRT1. The determination of the interface governing the binding of STACs with human SIRT1 facilitates greater understanding of STAC activation of this enzyme, which holds significant promise as a therapeutic target for multiple human diseases. PMID:26134520

  8. The Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily Molecule LIGHT Promotes Keratinocyte Activity and Skin Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Herro, Rana; Da Silva Antunes, Ricardo; Aguilera, Amelia Roman; Tamada, Koji; Croft, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Several inflammatory diseases including scleroderma and atopic dermatitis display dermal thickening, epidermal hypertrophy, or excessive accumulation of collagen. Factors that might promote these features are of interest for clinical therapy. We previously reported that LIGHT, a TNF superfamily molecule, mediated collagen deposition in the lungs in response to allergen. We therefore tested whether LIGHT might similarly promote collagen accumulation and features of skin fibrosis. Strikingly, injection of recombinant soluble LIGHT into naïve mice, either subcutaneously or systemically, promoted collagen deposition in the skin, and dermal and epidermal thickening. This replicated the activity of bleomycin, an antibiotic that has been previously used in models of scleroderma in mice. Moreover skin fibrosis induced by bleomycin was dependent on endogenous LIGHT activity. The action of LIGHT in vivo was mediated via both of its receptors, HVEM and LTβR, and was dependent on the innate cytokine TSLP and TGF-β. Furthermore, we found that HVEM and LTβR were expressed on human epidermal keratinocytes, and that LIGHT could directly promote TSLP expression in these cells. We reveal an unappreciated activity of LIGHT on keratinocytes and suggest that LIGHT may be an important mediator of skin inflammation and fibrosis in diseases such as scleroderma or atopic dermatitis. PMID:25789702

  9. Crystallographic structure of a small molecule SIRT1 activator-enzyme complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Han; Case, April W.; Riera, Thomas V.; Considine, Thomas; Lee, Jessica E.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Zhao, Huizhen; Jiang, Yong; Sweitzer, Sharon M.; Pietrak, Beth; Schwartz, Benjamin; Blum, Charles A.; Disch, Jeremy S.; Caldwell, Richard; Szczepankiewicz, Bruce; Oalmann, Christopher; Yee Ng, Pui; White, Brian H.; Casaubon, Rebecca; Narayan, Radha; Koppetsch, Karsten; Bourbonais, Francis; Wu, Bo; Wang, Junfeng; Qian, Dongming; Jiang, Fan; Mao, Cheney; Wang, Minghui; Hu, Erding; Wu, Joe C.; Perni, Robert B.; Vlasuk, George P.; Ellis, James L.

    2015-07-01

    SIRT1, the founding member of the mammalian family of seven NAD+-dependent sirtuins, is composed of 747 amino acids forming a catalytic domain and extended N- and C-terminal regions. We report the design and characterization of an engineered human SIRT1 construct (mini-hSIRT1) containing the minimal structural elements required for lysine deacetylation and catalytic activation by small molecule sirtuin-activating compounds (STACs). Using this construct, we solved the crystal structure of a mini-hSIRT1-STAC complex, which revealed the STAC-binding site within the N-terminal domain of hSIRT1. Together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and site-directed mutagenesis using full-length hSIRT1, these data establish a specific STAC-binding site and identify key intermolecular interactions with hSIRT1. The determination of the interface governing the binding of STACs with human SIRT1 facilitates greater understanding of STAC activation of this enzyme, which holds significant promise as a therapeutic target for multiple human diseases.

  10. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Mochrie, Simon; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body looking for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) to antigen induces signaling cascades that lead to B cell activation and eventual production of high affinity antibodies. During activation, BCR organize into signaling microclusters, which are platforms for signal amplification. The physical processes underlying receptor movement and aggregation are not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of single BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using TIRF imaging and single particle tracking. The tracks obtained are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM) a systems-level analysis that allows the identification of different short-time diffusive states from a set of single particle tracks. We identified five different diffusive states on wild type cells, which correspond to different molecular states of the BCR. By using actin polymerization inhibitors and mutant cells lacking important actin regulators we were able to identify the BCR molecule configuration associated with each diffusive state.

  11. Mutational Analysis of Rab3 Function for Controlling Active Zone Protein Composition at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Roche, John P.; Alsharif, Peter; Graf, Ethan R.

    2015-01-01

    At synapses, the release of neurotransmitter is regulated by molecular machinery that aggregates at specialized presynaptic release sites termed active zones. The complement of active zone proteins at each site is a determinant of release efficacy and can be remodeled to alter synapse function. The small GTPase Rab3 was previously identified as playing a novel role that controls the distribution of active zone proteins to individual release sites at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Rab3 has been extensively studied for its role in the synaptic vesicle cycle; however, the mechanism by which Rab3 controls active zone development remains unknown. To explore this mechanism, we conducted a mutational analysis to determine the molecular and structural requirements of Rab3 function at Drosophila synapses. We find that GTP-binding is required for Rab3 to traffick to synapses and distribute active zone components across release sites. Conversely, the hydrolytic activity of Rab3 is unnecessary for this function. Through a structure-function analysis we identify specific residues within the effector-binding switch regions that are required for Rab3 function and determine that membrane attachment is essential. Our findings suggest that Rab3 controls the distribution of active zone components via a vesicle docking mechanism that is consistent with standard Rab protein function. PMID:26317909

  12. Soluble adhesion molecules correlate with surface expression in an in vitro model of endothelial activation.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Anders G; Dige, Anders; Krog, Jan; Tønnesen, Else; Wogensen, Lise

    2013-10-01

    Endothelial activation is a pivotal event in the development and progression of inflammation. Central to endothelial activation is the up-regulation of cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) including E-selectin (CD62E), ICAM-1 (CD54), VCAM-1 (CD106) and PECAM-1 (CD31). These CAMs are also found in soluble forms (sCAMs). In this in vitro study of endothelial activation, we examined whether the levels of sCAMs correlate with the endothelial surface expression of CAMs in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Such a correlation would support the use of sCAMs as surrogate markers for endothelial activation in inflammatory conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured with various concentrations of TNF-α for 8 hr and at a fixed concentration of TNF-α for various durations. The levels of soluble and surface-bound E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and PECAM-1 were quantified by flow cytometry. TNF-α stimulation increased CAM and sCAM expression in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. There was a significant positive correlation between the levels of ICAM-1 and sICAM-1 and between the levels of VCAM and sVCAM-1 in both the dose-response and time-response experiments. A positive correlation between the levels of E-selectin and sE-selectin was observed in the time-response experiment. This study supports the use of sCAMs as potential biomarkers of endothelial activation. In particular, the use of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and sE-selectin seems promising. PMID:23724832

  13. New therapeutic targets to develop molecules active in drug-resistant epilepsies.

    PubMed

    SidAhmed-Mezi, Mounia; Pumain, René; Louvel, Jacques; Sokoloff, Pierre; Laschet, Jacques

    2010-07-01

    We have shown that the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is the kinase involved in the endogenous phosphorylation of the alpha1 subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor (GABA(A)R), maintaining GABA(A)-R function. GABA(A)R endogenous phosphorylation is opposed by one or several atypical phosphatases. We have shown in addition, using cerebral tissue obtained during epilepsy surgery and control tissue from patients undergoing brain tumor surgery, that both endogenous phosphorylation and GABA(A)R function are significantly reduced in the "epileptogenic" cerebral cortex when compared to control. This dysfunction likely contributes to seizure generation and/or transition from the interictal to the ictal state. The therapeutic challenge is to alleviate the endogenous phosphorylation deficiency of GABA(A)R in the epileptogenic cortical tissue, either through activating the endogenous kinase activity, or inhibiting dephosphorylation of the alpha1 subunit. Following the first trail, we have shown that spermine (the most effective polyamine) increases the GAPDH kinase activity on GABA(A)R and that subsequently such modulation potentiates its function as assessed by rundown studies on isolated neurons. Following the second trail, we have developed methods to identify these atypical membrane-bound phosphatases. Their activities were detected using two synthetic phosphopeptides corresponding to the alpha1 regions of phosphorylation by GAPDH. After purification, the active fractions are submitted to proteomic analysis by nanoLC-Maldi-TOF/TOF for protein identification. Two candidate proteins have been identified, which will be used as targets for high-throughput screening in order to develop original antiepileptic molecules. PMID:20618399

  14. Oscillatory dynamics of the biologically active zone in in situ bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Regan E.; Luce, Benjamin P.

    2002-10-01

    In situ bioremediation is a promising biotechnology for removing aqueous phase contaminants from groundwater. The system of three partial differential equations used to model bioremediation has a traveling wave solution which loses stability in a Hopf bifurcation, giving rise to oscillating fronts. To understand the origin of these oscillations, we construct a simplified model of the biologically active zone, a time delay differential equation with state-dependent delay. Despite its simplicity the new model mimics the dynamical characteristics of the bioremediation equations remarkably well and yields an approximate parametric expression for the oscillation onset point.

  15. The origin of spontaneous electrical activity at the end-plate zone.

    PubMed

    Brown, W F; Varkey, G P

    1981-12-01

    Two types of spontaneous electrical activity are present at the end-plate zone: low-voltage negative potentials that correspond to miniature end-plate potentials, and larger voltage negative-positive potentials. The electrogenic origin of the latter has been uncertain. The origin of these larger potentials was investigated in the rat phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation and in human gastrocnemius muscle just prior to intubation during administration of preoperative anesthesia. In the hemidiaphragm the larger voltage negative-positive potentials were rarely triggered by intracellular or tungsten microelectrodes. The negative-positive potentials, however, were clearly triggered by contact of the concentric needle electrode with muscle hemidiaphragm at the end-plate region. The potentials were abolished by curare. Likewise, the equivalent potentials observed at the human gastrocnemius end-plate zone were blocked by neuromuscular blocking agents. Therefore, these positive-negative discharges represent postsynaptic muscle fiber action potentials and not nerve fiber activity. They were probably presynaptically activated by mechanical irritation of the motor axon terminal and preterminal branches. PMID:6275771

  16. Role of Bassoon and Piccolo in Assembly and Molecular Organization of the Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Gundelfinger, Eckart D.; Reissner, Carsten; Garner, Craig C.

    2016-01-01

    Bassoon and Piccolo are two very large scaffolding proteins of the cytomatrix assembled at the active zone (CAZ) where neurotransmitter is released. They share regions of high sequence similarity distributed along their entire length and seem to share both overlapping and distinct functions in organizing the CAZ. Here, we survey our present knowledge on protein-protein interactions and recent progress in understanding of molecular functions of these two giant proteins. These include roles in the assembly of active zones (AZ), the localization of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) in the vicinity of release sites, synaptic vesicle (SV) priming and in the case of Piccolo, a role in the dynamic assembly of the actin cytoskeleton. Piccolo and Bassoon are also important for the maintenance of presynaptic structure and function, as well as for the assembly of CAZ specializations such as synaptic ribbons. Recent findings suggest that they are also involved in the regulation activity-dependent communication between presynaptic boutons and the neuronal nucleus. Together these observations suggest that Bassoon and Piccolo use their modular structure to organize super-molecular complexes essential for various aspects of presynaptic function. PMID:26793095

  17. Membrane Active Small Molecules Show Selective Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Activity with No Detectable Resistance and Eradicate Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Jiaul; Konai, Mohini M; Gonuguntla, Spandhana; Manjunath, Goutham B; Samaddar, Sandip; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-07-23

    Treating bacterial biofilms with conventional antibiotics is limited due to ineffectiveness of the drugs and higher propensity to develop bacterial resistance. Development of new classes of antibacterial therapeutics with alternative mechanisms of action has become imperative. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluations of novel membrane-active small molecules featuring two positive charges, four nonpeptidic amide groups, and variable hydrophobic/hydrophilic (amphiphilic) character. The biocides synthesized via a facile methodology not only displayed good antibacterial activity against wild-type bacteria but also showed high activity against various drug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE), and β-lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Further, these biocides not only inhibited the formation of biofilms but also disrupted the established S. aureus and E. coli biofilms. The membrane-active biocides hindered the propensity to develop bacterial resistance. Moreover, the biocides showed negligible toxicity against mammalian cells and thus bear potential to be used as therapeutic agents. PMID:26102297

  18. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John Je; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. PMID:27115346

  19. Endothelial juxtaposition of distinct adult stem cells activates angiogenesis signaling molecules in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Elham; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Siavashi, Vahid; Araghi, Atefeh

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of therapeutic angiogenesis needs a comprehensive understanding of endothelial cell (EC) function and biological factors and cells that interplay with ECs. Stem cells are considered the key components of pro- and anti-angiogenic milieu in a wide variety of physiopathological states, and interactions of EC-stem cells have been the subject of controversy in recent years. In this study, the potential effects of three tissue-specific adult stem cells, namely rat marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs) and rat muscle-derived satellite cells (rSCs), on the endothelial activation of key angiogenic signaling molecules, including VEGF, Ang-2, VEGFR-2, Tie-2, and Tie2-pho, were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (RLMECs) were cocultured with the stem cells or incubated with the stem cell-derived conditioned media on Matrigel. Following HUVEC-stem cell coculture, CD31-positive ECs were flow sorted and subjected to western blotting to analyze potential changes in the expression of the pro-angiogenic signaling molecules. Elongation and co-alignment of the stem cells were seen along the EC tubes in the EC-stem cell cocultures on Matrigel, with cell-to-cell dye communication in the EC-rBMSC cocultures. Moreover, rBMSCs and rADSCs significantly improved endothelial tubulogenesis in both juxtacrine and paracrine manners. These two latter stem cells dynamically up-regulated VEGF, Ang-2, VREGR-2, and Tie-2 but down-regulated Tie2-pho and the Tie2-pho/Tie-2 ratio in HUVECs. Induction of pro-angiogenic signaling in ECs by marrow- and adipose-derived MSCs further indicates the significance of stem cell milieu in angiogenesis dynamics. PMID:26068799

  20. Novel lead structures and activation mechanisms for CO-releasing molecules (CORMs)

    PubMed Central

    Schatzschneider, U

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous small signalling molecule in the human body, produced by the action of haem oxygenase on haem. Since it is very difficult to apply safely as a gas, solid storage and delivery forms for CO are now explored. Most of these CO-releasing molecules (CORMs) are based on the inactivation of the CO by coordinating it to a transition metal centre in a prodrug approach. After a brief look at the potential cellular target structures of CO, an overview of the design principles and activation mechanisms for CO release from a metal coordination sphere is given. Endogenous and exogenous triggers discussed include ligand exchange reactions with medium, enzymatically-induced CO release and photoactivated liberation of CO. Furthermore, the attachment of CORMs to hard and soft nanomaterials to confer additional target specificity to such systems is critically assessed. A survey of analytical methods for the study of the stoichiometry and kinetics of CO release, as well as the tracking of CO in living systems by using fluorescent probes, concludes this review. CORMs are very valuable tools for studying CO bioactivity and might lead to new drug candidates; however, in the design of future generations of CORMs, particular attention has to be paid to their drug-likeness and the tuning of the peripheral ‘drug sphere’ for specific biomedical applications. Further progress in this field will thus critically depend on a close interaction between synthetic chemists and researchers exploring the physiological effects and therapeutic applications of CO. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-6 PMID:24628281

  1. The coding genome of splenic marginal zone lymphoma: activation of NOTCH2 and other pathways regulating marginal zone development

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Davide; Trifonov, Vladimir; Fangazio, Marco; Bruscaggin, Alessio; Rasi, Silvia; Spina, Valeria; Monti, Sara; Vaisitti, Tiziana; Arruga, Francesca; Famà, Rosella; Ciardullo, Carmela; Greco, Mariangela; Cresta, Stefania; Piranda, Daniela; Holmes, Antony; Fabbri, Giulia; Messina, Monica; Rinaldi, Andrea; Wang, Jiguang; Agostinelli, Claudio; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Lucioni, Marco; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Serra, Roberto; Franceschetti, Silvia; Deambrogi, Clara; Daniele, Giulia; Gattei, Valter; Marasca, Roberto; Facchetti, Fabio; Arcaini, Luca; Inghirami, Giorgio; Bertoni, Francesco; Pileri, Stefano A.; Deaglio, Silvia; Foà, Robin; Pasqualucci, Laura; Rabadan, Raul

    2012-01-01

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is a B cell malignancy of unknown pathogenesis, and thus an orphan of targeted therapies. By integrating whole-exome sequencing and copy-number analysis, we show that the SMZL exome carries at least 30 nonsilent gene alterations. Mutations in NOTCH2, a gene required for marginal-zone (MZ) B cell development, represent the most frequent lesion in SMZL, accounting for ∼20% of cases. All NOTCH2 mutations are predicted to cause impaired degradation of the NOTCH2 protein by eliminating the C-terminal PEST domain, which is required for proteasomal recruitment. Among indolent B cell lymphoproliferative disorders, NOTCH2 mutations are restricted to SMZL, thus representing a potential diagnostic marker for this lymphoma type. In addition to NOTCH2, other modulators or members of the NOTCH pathway are recurrently targeted by genetic lesions in SMZL; these include NOTCH1, SPEN, and DTX1. We also noted mutations in other signaling pathways normally involved in MZ B cell development, suggesting that deregulation of MZ B cell development pathways plays a role in the pathogenesis of ∼60% SMZL. These findings have direct implications for the treatment of SMZL patients, given the availability of drugs that can target NOTCH, NF-κB, and other pathways deregulated in this disease. PMID:22891273

  2. House dust mite extracts activate cultured human dermal endothelial cells to express adhesion molecules and secrete cytokines.

    PubMed

    Arlian, Larry G; Elder, B Laurel; Morgan, Marjorie S

    2009-05-01

    The human skin contacts molecules from house dust mites that are ubiquitous in many environments. These mite-derived molecules may penetrate the skin epidermis and dermis and contact microvascular endothelial cells and influence their function. The purpose of this study was to determine the response of normal human dermal microvascular endothelial cells to extracts of the dust mites, Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and Euroglyphus maynei with and without endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide). Endothelial cells were stimulated with mite extracts and the expression of surface molecules and the secretion of cytokines were measured in the absence and presence of polymyxin B to bind endotoxin. All three mite extracts stimulated endothelial cells to express intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and E-selectin and to secrete interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), and granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Euroglyphus maynei-induced expression of all the cell surface molecules was not inhibited when the endotoxin activity in the mite extract was inhibited. In contrast, endothelial cells challenged with D. farinae or D. pteronyssinus extract depleted of endotoxin activity expressed only constitutive levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. D. farinae and E. maynei extracts depleted of endotoxin activity still induced secretion of IL-8 and MCP-1 but at reduced levels. Only constitutive amounts of IL-6, G-CSF, and GM-CSF were secreted in response to any of the endotoxin-depleted mite extracts. Extracts of D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and E. maynei contain both endotoxins and other molecules that can stimulate expression of cell adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors and the secretion of cytokines by normal human microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:19496432

  3. Fasciola hepatica Kunitz Type Molecule Decreases Dendritic Cell Activation and Their Ability to Induce Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Falcón, Cristian R.; Masih, Diana; Gatti, Gerardo; Sanchez, María Cecilia; Motrán, Claudia C.; Cervi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The complete repertoire of proteins with immunomodulatory activity in Fasciola hepatica (Fh) has not yet been fully described. Here, we demonstrated that Fh total extract (TE) reduced LPS-induced DC maturation, and the DC ability to induce allogeneic responses. After TE fractionating, a fraction lower than 10 kDa (F<10 kDa) was able to maintain the TE properties to modulate the DC pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production induced by LPS. In addition, TE or F<10 kDa treatment decreased the ability of immature DC to stimulate the allogeneic responses and induced a novo allogeneic CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. In contrast, treatment of DC with T/L or F<10 kDa plus LPS (F<10/L) induced a regulatory IL-27 dependent mechanism that diminished the proliferative and Th1 and Th17 allogeneic responses. Finally, we showed that a Kunitz type molecule (Fh-KTM), present in F<10 kDa, was responsible for suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production in LPS-activated DC, by printing tolerogenic features on DC that impaired their ability to induce inflammatory responses. These results suggest a modulatory role for this protein, which may be involved in the immune evasion mechanisms of the parasite. PMID:25486609

  4. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice.

    PubMed

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  5. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A.; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  6. VAMP4 Is an Essential Cargo Molecule for Activity-Dependent Bulk Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson-Fish, Jessica C.; Kokotos, Alexandros C.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Smillie, Karen J.; Cousin, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The accurate formation of synaptic vesicles (SVs) and incorporation of their protein cargo during endocytosis is critical for the maintenance of neurotransmission. During intense neuronal activity, a transient and acute accumulation of SV cargo occurs at the plasma membrane. Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant SV endocytosis mode under these conditions; however, it is currently unknown how ADBE mediates cargo retrieval. We examined the retrieval of different SV cargo molecules during intense stimulation using a series of genetically encoded pH-sensitive reporters in neuronal cultures. The retrieval of only one reporter, VAMP4-pHluorin, was perturbed by inhibiting ADBE. This selective recovery was confirmed by the enrichment of endogenous VAMP4 in purified bulk endosomes formed by ADBE. VAMP4 was also essential for ADBE, with a cytoplasmic di-leucine motif being critical for this role. Therefore, VAMP4 is the first identified ADBE cargo and is essential for this endocytosis mode to proceed. PMID:26607000

  7. Inhibiting NF-κB Activation by Small Molecules As a Therapeutic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Subash C; Sundaram, Chitra; Reuter, Simone; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2010-01-01

    Because nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a ubiquitously expressed proinflammatory transcription factor that regulates the expression of over 500 genes involved in cellular transformation, survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and inflammation, the NF-κB signaling pathway has become a potential target for pharmacological intervention. A wide variety of agents can activate NF-κB through canonical and noncanonical pathways. Canonical pathway involves various steps including the phosphorylation, ubiquitnation, and degradation of the inhibitor of NF-κB (IκBα), which leads to the nuclear translocation of the p50- p65 subunits of NF-κB followed by p65 phosphorylation, acetylation and methylation, DNA binding, and gene transcription. Thus, agents that can inhibit protein kinases, protein phosphatases, proteasomes, ubiquitnation, acetylation, methylation, and DNA binding steps have been identified as NF-κB inhibitors. Here, we review the small molecules that suppress NF-κB activation and thus may have therapeutic potential. PMID:20493977

  8. A novel molecule with notable activity against multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vasu; Okello, Maurice O; Mangu, Naveen K; Seo, Byung I; Gund, Machhindra G

    2015-03-15

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is emerging as a serious global health problem, which has been elevated through co-infection involving HIV and MDR-Mtb. The discovery of new compounds with anti-MDR TB efficacy and favorable metabolism profiles is an important scientific challenge. Using computational biology and ligand docking data, we have conceived a multifunctional molecule, 2, as a potential anti-MDR TB agent. This compound was produced through a multi-step synthesis. It exhibited significant in vitro activity against MDR-TB (MIC 1.56μg/mL) and its half-life (t1/2) in human liver microsomes was 14.4h. The metabolic profiles of compound 2 with respect to human cytochrome P450 (CYP) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isozymes were favorable. Compound 2 also had relatively low in vitro cytotoxicity in uninfected macrophages. It displayed synergistic behavior against MDR-TB in combination with PA-824. Interestingly, compound 2 also displayed in vitro anti-HIV activity. PMID:25677656

  9. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans polysaccharide synthesis by molecules targeting glycosyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhi; Chen, Lulu; Li, Jiyao; Li, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Glycosyltransferase (Gtf) is one of the crucial virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans, a major etiological pathogen of dental caries. All the available evidence indicates that extracellular polysaccharide, particularly glucans produced by S. mutans Gtfs, contribute to the cariogenicity of dental biofilms. Therefore, inhibition of Gtf activity and the consequential polysaccharide synthesis may impair the virulence of cariogenic biofilms, which could be an alternative strategy to prevent the biofilm-related disease. Up to now, many Gtf inhibitors have been recognized in natural products, which remain the major and largely unexplored source of Gtf inhibitors. These include catechin-based polyphenols, flavonoids, proanthocyanidin oligomers, polymeric polyphenols, and some other plant-derived compounds. Metal ions, oxidizing agents, and some other synthetic compounds represent another source of Gtf inhibitors, with some novel molecules either discovered by structure-based virtual screening or synthesized based on key structures of known inhibitors as templates. Antibodies that inhibit one or more Gtfs have also been developed as topical agents. Although many agents have been shown to possess potent inhibitory activity against glucan synthesis by Gtfs, bacterial cell adherence, and caries development in animal models, much research remains to be performed to find out their mechanism of action, biological safety, cariostatic efficacies, and overall influence on the entire oral community. As a strategy to inhibit the virulence of cariogenic microbes rather than eradicate them from the microbial community, Gtf inhibition represents an approach of great potential to prevent dental caries. PMID:27105419

  10. Measles Virus Entry Through the Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule Governs Efficacy of Mantle Cell Lymphoma Radiovirotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Miest, Tanner S; Frenzke, Marie; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    We developed here a vaccine-identical measles virus (MV) as an oncolytic agent against mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is difficult to cure but radiosensitive. We armed the virus with the sodium-iodide symporter, which concentrates iodide within infected cells enabling noninvasive imaging and combination radiovirotherapy. Through high-resolution in vivo and ex vivo imaging, we visualized the spread of infections in primary and metastatic tumors for over 2 weeks after therapy, documenting homogeneous virus seeding and spread restricted to perfused tissue. Infection of metastases was more rapid and intense than primary tumors, achieving isotope uptake within about threefold the efficiency of the thyroid. Virotherapy combined with systemic 131I resulted in more rapid disease regression than either therapy alone. In addition to ubiquitous CD46, vaccine MV retains cell entry through its immune cell-specific receptor signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM). We asked whether both receptors could sustain effective oncolysis of MCL. Strikingly, only SLAM-dependent entry sustained efficient viral spread, tumor regression, and prolonged survival. These observations shift the focus of future clinical trials to SLAM-expressing hematologic malignancies and suggest that oncolytic vectors may depend on tissue-specific receptors for both cell entry and activation of responses assisting their replication. PMID:23913184

  11. Synthesis of extremely large mesoporous activated carbon and its unique adsorption for giant molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hisashi; Kakii, Takuhiro; Hirota, Yoshifumi

    1996-02-01

    The steam invigoration of pitches (softening points 85 and 280{degrees}C) homogenized with 1-3 wt% of organo rare0earth metal complexes such as Ln(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3} or Ln(acac) (Ln=Y, Yb) at 930{degrees}C provided activated carbons with an extremely high mesopore ration, >70%. The resulted activated carbon selectively adsorbs giant molecules such as Vitamin B{sub 12}, blue acid 90 dye, dextran, nystatin, and humic acid, reflecting their large mesopore volumes. To understand what kind of carbon skeleton in pitch is suited for generation of high mesopore ration, the steam invigoration of a series of condensed polynuclear aromatics (COPNA) resins prepared from naphthlene, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene, or perylene and p-xylene-{alpha},{alpha}{prime}-diol were conducted in the presence of rare-earth metal complexes. As a result, COPNA resins containing phenanthrene, perylene, and pyrene generated large mesopore volume. 35 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. A Microfluidic Approach for Investigating the Temperature Dependence of Biomolecular Activity with Single-Molecule Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Ho, Joseph; Fei, Jingyi; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Lin, Qiao

    2013-01-01

    We present a microfluidic approach for single-molecule studies of the temperature-dependent behavior of biomolecules, using a platform that combines microfluidic sample handling, on-chip temperature control, and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy of surface-immobilized biomolecules. With efficient, rapid, and uniform heating by microheaters and in situ temperature measurements within a microfluidic flowcell by micro temperature sensors, closed-loop, accurate temperature control is achieved. To demonstrate its utility, the temperature-controlled microfluidic flowcell is coupled to a prism-based TIRF microscope and is used to investigate the temperature-dependence of ribosome and transfer RNA (tRNA) structural dynamics that are required for the rapid and precise translocation of tRNAs through the ribosome during protein synthesis. Our studies reveal that the previously characterized, thermally activated transitions between two global conformational states of the pre-translocation (PRE) ribosomal complex persist at physiological temperature. In addition, the temperature-dependence of the rates of transition between these two global conformational states of the PRE complex reveal well-defined, measurable, and disproportionate effects, providing a robust experimental framework for investigating the thermodynamic activation parameters that underlie transitions across these barriers. PMID:20981364

  13. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling. PMID:26702150

  14. Redox Switches for Single-Molecule Magnet Activity: An Ab Initio Insight.

    PubMed

    Vieru, Veacheslav; Chibotaru, Liviu F

    2016-04-01

    A dinuclear Co(II) complex (1) featuring unprecedented anodic and cathodic switches for single-molecule magnet (SMM) activity has been recently investigated (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 14670). The presence of sandwiched radicals in different oxidation states of this compound mediates magnetic coupling between the high-spin (S=3/2) cobalt ions, which gives rise to SMM activity in both the oxidized ([1(OEt2 )](+) ) and reduced ([1](-) ) states. This feature represents the first example of a SMM exhibiting fully reversible, dual ON/OFF switchability. Here we apply ab initio and broken-symmetry DFT calculations to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for magnetic properties and magnetization blocking in these compounds. It is found that due to the strong delocalization of the magnetic molecular orbital, there is a strong antiferromagnetic interaction between the radical and cobalt ions. The lack of high axiality of the cobalt centres explains why these compounds possess slow relaxation of magnetization only in an applied dc magnetic field. PMID:26918833

  15. Mapping Active Fault Zones in Southern California Using Master Multispectral Imagery Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. C.; Peltzer, G. F.; Hook, S. J.; Alley, R.; Myers, J.; Coffland, B.; Dominguez, R.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2004-12-01

    Recent studies of active fault zones using the GPS and InSAR techniques have revealed slip rates that often differ from the slip rates determined from geological observations. This discrepancy is principally due to the different time windows over which surface movements are integrated in both approaches. If surface velocities near faults vary over cycles of several hundreds of years, it becomes important to document the slip history along faults over various time scales as it has been recorded in the Quaternary deposits along the fault. To this endeavor, we have acquired sets of images of the major active faults in Southern California using the MODIS/ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER) instrument. The lines are flown at low altitude above the ground to provide 4 to 5 m spatial resolution in the 50 spectral bands (0.5 to 13 microns) of the instrument. A preliminary set of data was acquired in the summer 2003 over the Garlock and the Blackwater faults in the Mojave. A more extensive campaign carried out in September 2004 covered more than 1000 km of fault lines from the central section of the San Andreas fault to the Salton Sea area. The data are being processed to extract reflectance and emissivity information. Preliminary analysis of the 2003 data confirmed the strong potential of the MASTER thermal bands to identify changes in surface emissivity due to subtle variations of the mineral composition of the deposits. Additional information on the near surface structure of the fault zones can be obtained by combining day and night surface temperature maps, as buried sections of faults are revealed by thermal capacity contrasts between the two sides of a given fault. The paper will present the data set acquired during the 2003 and 2004 campaigns and the status of the raw data processing into geo-referenced emissivity and reflectivity maps of the fault zones.

  16. Active Focal Zone Sharpening for High-Precision Treatment Using Histotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a focal zone sharpening strategy that produces more precise lesions for pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy, or histotripsy. Precise and well-confined lesions were produced by locally suppressing cavitation in the periphery of the treatment focus without affecting cavitation in the center. The local suppression of cavitation was achieved using cavitation nuclei preconditioning pulses to actively control cavitation in the periphery of the focus. A 1-MHz 513-element therapeutic array was used to generate both the therapy and the nuclei preconditioning pulses. For therapy, 10-cycle bursts at 100-Hz pulse repetition frequency with P−/P+ pressure of 21/76 MPa were delivered to the geometric focus of the therapeutic array. For nuclei preconditioning, a different pulse was delivered to an annular region immediately surrounding the focus before each therapy pulse. A parametric study on the effective pressure, pulse duration, and delivery time of the preconditioning pulse was conducted in red blood cell-gel phantoms, where cavitational damage was indicated by the color change resulting from local cell lysis. Results showed that a short-duration (20 µs) preconditioning pulse at a medium pressure (P−/P+ pressure of 7.2/13.6 MPa) delivered shortly before (30 µs) the therapy pulse substantially suppressed the peripheral damage by 77 ± 13% while complete fractionation in the focal center was maintained. High-speed imaging of the bubble cloud showed a substantial decrease in the maximum width of the bubble cloud by 48 ± 24% using focal zone sharpening. Experiments in ex vivo livers confirmed that highly confined lesions were produced in real tissues as well as in the phantoms. This study demonstrated the feasibility of active focal zone sharpening using cavitation nuclei preconditioning, allowing for increased treatment precision compared with the natural focal width of the therapy transducer. PMID:21342816

  17. Cotton Rat (Sigmodon hispidus) Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (CD150) Is an Entry Receptor for Measles Virus

    PubMed Central

    Carsillo, Thomas; Huey, Devra; Levinsky, Amy; Obojes, Karola; Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) replicate measles virus (MV) after intranasal infection in the respiratory tract and lymphoid tissue. We have cloned the cotton rat signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (CD150, SLAM) in order to investigate its role as a potential receptor for MV. Cotton rat CD150 displays 58% and 78% amino acid homology with human and mouse CD150, respectively. By staining with a newly generated cotton rat CD150 specific monoclonal antibody expression of CD150 was confirmed in cotton rat lymphoid cells and in tissues with a pattern of expression similar to mouse and humans. Previously, binding of MV hemagglutinin has been shown to be dependent on amino acids 60, 61 and 63 in the V region of CD150. The human molecule contains isoleucine, histidine and valine at these positions and binds to MV-H whereas the mouse molecule contains valine, arginine and leucine and does not function as a receptor for MV. In the cotton rat molecule, amino acids 61 and 63 are identical with the mouse molecule and amino acid 60 with the human molecule. After transfection with cotton rat CD150 HEK 293 T cells became susceptible to infection with single cycle VSV pseudotype virus expressing wild type MV glycoproteins and with a MV wildtype virus. After infection, cells expressing cotton rat CD150 replicated virus to lower levels than cells expressing the human molecule and formed smaller plaques. These data might explain why the cotton rat is a semipermissive model for measles virus infection. PMID:25295727

  18. Oncolytic Activity of a Recombinant Measles Virus, Blind to Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule, Against Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amagai, Yosuke; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Yoneda, Misako; Shoji, Koichiro; Furukawa, Yoichi; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a distinctive antitumor therapy based on the cancer-cell-specific infectivity and killing activity of viruses, which exert a considerable antitumor effect with only a few treatments. Because colorectal cancer cells often acquire resistance to the molecular-targeted therapies and alternative treatments are called for, in this study, we evaluated the oncolytic activity against colorectal cancer cells of a recombinant measles virus (rMV-SLAMblind), which is blind to signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) and infects target cells via nectin-4/poliovirus receptor-related 4 protein. We examined 10 cell lines including 8 cell lines that were resistant to epidermal-growth-factor-receptor (EGFR) targeted therapy. rMV-SLAMblind infected and lysed the nectin-4-positive cell lines dependently on nectin-4 expression, in spite of mutation in EGFR cascade. Tumour progression in xenograft models was also abrogated by the virus, and the infection of cancer cells in vivo by the virus was demonstrated with both flow cytometry and a histological analysis. Therefore, rMV-SLAMblind is considered a novel therapeutic agent for colorectal cancers, including those resistant to molecular-targeted therapies. PMID:27090874

  19. Oncolytic Activity of a Recombinant Measles Virus, Blind to Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule, Against Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Amagai, Yosuke; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Yoneda, Misako; Shoji, Koichiro; Furukawa, Yoichi; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a distinctive antitumor therapy based on the cancer-cell-specific infectivity and killing activity of viruses, which exert a considerable antitumor effect with only a few treatments. Because colorectal cancer cells often acquire resistance to the molecular-targeted therapies and alternative treatments are called for, in this study, we evaluated the oncolytic activity against colorectal cancer cells of a recombinant measles virus (rMV-SLAMblind), which is blind to signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) and infects target cells via nectin-4/poliovirus receptor-related 4 protein. We examined 10 cell lines including 8 cell lines that were resistant to epidermal-growth-factor-receptor (EGFR) targeted therapy. rMV-SLAMblind infected and lysed the nectin-4-positive cell lines dependently on nectin-4 expression, in spite of mutation in EGFR cascade. Tumour progression in xenograft models was also abrogated by the virus, and the infection of cancer cells in vivo by the virus was demonstrated with both flow cytometry and a histological analysis. Therefore, rMV-SLAMblind is considered a novel therapeutic agent for colorectal cancers, including those resistant to molecular-targeted therapies. PMID:27090874

  20. Simultaneous measurement of DNA motor protein conformation and activity with combined optical trap and single-molecule fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemla, Yann

    2013-03-01

    We present single-molecule measurements of Superfamily 1 UvrD helicase DNA unwinding that reveal directly how helicase stoichiometry and conformation regulate motor activity. Using a new instrument that combines high resolution optical tweezers with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, we record DNA unwinding activity with base pair-scale resolution (via optical tweezers) simultaneously with helicase stoichiometry and conformation (via fluorescence). Quantifying the fluorescence signal from labeled UvrD, we observe that pairs of UvrD molecules are required for long distance unwinding but that individual molecules exhibit limited, non-processive unwinding activity. UvrD is also known to exhibit two different conformations, `closed' and `open', based on the orientation of its 2B regulatory domain. The function of these conformations has remained elusive. Measuring the fluorescence of FRET labeled proteins, we detect directly the conformation of the 2B domain of individual UvrD molecules during unwinding activity. We observe that UvrD is in the `closed' conformation during DNA unwinding but surprisingly switches to the `open' conformation upon reversal of helicase direction, i.e. when UvrD switches strands and translocates on the opposing strand with the DNA junction rezipping behind it. We hypothesize that the 2B domain acts as a conformational switch that controls DNA unwinding vs. re-annealing. Work supported by NSF (PHY-082261, Center for the Physics of Living Cells) and NIH (R21 RR025341A)

  1. An Integrated Geospatial System for earthquake precursors assessment in Vrancea tectonic active zone in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, Maria A.; Savastru, Roxana S.; Savastru, Dan M.

    2015-10-01

    With the development of space-based technologies to measure surface geophysical parameters and deformation at the boundaries of tectonic plates and large faults, earthquake science has entered a new era. Using time series satellite data for earthquake prediction, it is possible to pursue the behaviors of earthquake precursors in the future and to announce early warnings when the differences between the predicted value and the observed value exceed the pre-define threshold value. Starting with almost one week prior to a moderate or strong earthquake a transient thermal infrared rise in LST of several Celsius degrees (oC) and the increased OLR values higher than the normal have been recorded around epicentral areas, function of the magnitude and focal depth, which disappeared after the main shock. Also are recorded associated geomagnetic and ionospheric distrurbances. Vrancea tectonic active zone in Romania is characterized by a high seismic hazard in European- Mediterranean region, being responsible of strong or moderate intermediate depth and normal earthquakes generation on a confined epicentral area. Based on recorded geophysical parameters anomalies was developed an integrated geospatial system for earthquake precursors assessment in Vrancea active seismic zone. This system integrates derived from time series MODIS Terra/Aqua, NOAA-AVHRR, ASTER, Landsat TM/ETM satellite data multi geophysical parameters (land surface temperature -LST, outgoing long-wave radiation- OLR, and mean air temperature- AT as well as geomagnetic and ionospheric data in synergy with in-situ data for surveillance and forecasting of seismic events.

  2. 78 FR 60826 - Foreign-Trade Zone 155-Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... (78 FR 35604, 06/13/2013). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the activity is... Production Activity; Caterpillar, Inc. (Excavator and Frame Assembly Production); Victoria, Texas On May 29... proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Caterpillar, Inc.,...

  3. Early activated hepatic stellate cell-derived molecules reverse acute hepatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Ju; Song, Lu-Jun; Yi, Tuo; Shen, Kun-Tang; Wang, Hong-Shan; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Li, Min; Xu, Jian-Min; Niu, Wei-Xin; Qin, Xin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To test whether hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) at different activation stages play different roles in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced acute liver injury (ALI). METHODS: HSCs were isolated from mouse liver and cultured in vitro. Morphological changes of initiation HSCs [HSCs (5d)] and perpetuation HSCs [HSCs (p3)] were observed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. The protective effects of HSC-derived molecules, cell lysates and HSC-conditioned medium (HSC-CM) were tested in vivo by survival and histopathological analyses. Liver injury was determined by measuring aminotransferase levels in the serum and by histologic examination of tissue sections under a light microscope. Additionally, to determine the molecular mediators of the observed protective effects of initiation HSCs, we examined HSC-CM using a high-density protein array. RESULTS: HSCs (5d) and HSCs (p3) had different morphological and phenotypic traits. HSCs (5d) presented a star-shaped appearance with expressing α-SMA at non-uniform levels between cells. However, HSCs (p3) evolved into myofibroblast-like cells without lipid droplets and expressed a uniform and higher level of α-SMA. HSC-CM (5d), but not HSC-CM (p3), provided a significant survival benefit and showed a dramatic reduction of hepatocellular necrosis and panlobular leukocyte infiltrates in mice exposed to APAP. However, this protective effect was abrogated at higher cell masses, indicating a therapeutic window of effectiveness. Furthermore, the protein array screen revealed that HSC-CM (5d) was composed of many chemokines and growth factors that correlated with inflammatory inhibition and therapeutic activity. When compared with HSC-CM (p3), higher levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1γ, hepatocyte growth factor, interleukin-10, and matrix metalloproteinase-2, but lower levels of stem cell factor and Fas-Ligand were observed in HSC-CM (5d). CONCLUSION: These data indicated

  4. Direct Measurements of Local Coupling between Myosin Molecules Are Consistent with a Model of Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Walcott, Sam; Kad, Neil M.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contracts due to ATP-dependent interactions of myosin motors with thin filaments composed of the proteins actin, troponin, and tropomyosin. Contraction is initiated when calcium binds to troponin, which changes conformation and displaces tropomyosin, a filamentous protein that wraps around the actin filament, thereby exposing myosin binding sites on actin. Myosin motors interact with each other indirectly via tropomyosin, since myosin binding to actin locally displaces tropomyosin and thereby facilitates binding of nearby myosin. Defining and modeling this local coupling between myosin motors is an open problem in muscle modeling and, more broadly, a requirement to understanding the connection between muscle contraction at the molecular and macro scale. It is challenging to directly observe this coupling, and such measurements have only recently been made. Analysis of these data suggests that two myosin heads are required to activate the thin filament. This result contrasts with a theoretical model, which reproduces several indirect measurements of coupling between myosin, that assumes a single myosin head can activate the thin filament. To understand this apparent discrepancy, we incorporated the model into stochastic simulations of the experiments, which generated simulated data that were then analyzed identically to the experimental measurements. By varying a single parameter, good agreement between simulation and experiment was established. The conclusion that two myosin molecules are required to activate the thin filament arises from an assumption, made during data analysis, that the intensity of the fluorescent tags attached to myosin varies depending on experimental condition. We provide an alternative explanation that reconciles theory and experiment without assuming that the intensity of the fluorescent tags varies. PMID:26536123

  5. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R; Fry, Stephen C

    2015-09-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes' biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme-cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors - especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting (1)O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  6. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R.; Fry, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes’ biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme–cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors – especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen (1O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting 1O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (−)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  7. Active/passive microwave sensor comparison of MIZ-ice concentration estimates. [Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, B. A.; Cavalieri, D. J.; Keller, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Active and passive microwave data collected during the 1984 summer Marginal Ice Zone Experiment in the Fram Strait (MIZEX 84) are used to compare ice concentration estimates derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to those obtained from passive microwave imagery at several frequencies. The comparison is carried out to evaluate SAR performance against the more established passive microwave technique, and to investigate discrepancies in terms of how ice surface conditions, imaging geometry, and choice of algorithm parameters affect each sensor. Active and passive estimates of ice concentration agree on average to within 12%. Estimates from the multichannel passive microwave data show best agreement with the SAR estimates because the multichannel algorithm effectively accounts for the range in ice floe brightness temperatures observed in the MIZ.

  8. How Large Scale Flows in the Solar Convection Zone may Influence Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Large scale flows within the solar convection zone are the primary drivers of the Sun s magnetic activity cycle. Differential rotation can amplify the magnetic field and convert poloidal fields into toroidal fields. Poleward meridional flow near the surface can carry magnetic flux that reverses the magnetic poles and can convert toroidal fields into poloidal fields. The deeper, equatorward meridional flow can carry magnetic flux toward the equator where it can reconnect with oppositely directed fields in the other hemisphere. These axisymmetric flows are themselves driven by large scale convective motions. The effects of the Sun s rotation on convection produce velocity correlations that can maintain the differential rotation and meridional circulation. These convective motions can influence solar activity themselves by shaping the large-scale magnetic field pattern. While considerable theoretical advances have been made toward understanding these large scale flows, outstanding problems in matching theory to observations still remain.

  9. Fault mirrors in seismically active fault zones: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Li-Wei; Song, Sheng-Rong; Suppe, John; Yeh, En-Chao

    2016-03-01

    Fault mirrors (FMs) are naturally polished and glossy fault slip surfaces that can record seismic deformation at shallow depths. They are important for investigating the processes controlling dynamic fault slip. We characterize FMs in borehole samples from the hanging wall damage zone of the active Hsiaotungshi reverse fault, Taiwan. Here we report the first documented occurrence of the combination of silica gel and melt patches coating FMs, with the silica gel resembling those observed on experimentally formed FMs that were cataclastically generated. In addition, the melt patches, which are unambiguous indicators of coseismic slip, suggest that the natural FMs were produced at seismic rates, presumably resulting from flash heating at asperities on the slip surfaces. Since flash heating is efficient at small slip, we propose that these natural FMs represent fossils of small earthquakes, formed in either coseismic faulting and folding or aftershock deformation in the active Taiwan fold-and-thrust belt.

  10. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  11. Variability in Shallow Subduction Zone Locking Inferred From Earthquake Activity Near Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Newman, A. V.; Thomas, A. M.; Farmer, G. T.

    2006-12-01

    At the collisional plate interface of subduction zones, the majority of the world's large and great earthquakes are produced. Thus, to understand the processes that control earthquake generation here, it is important to improve our characterization of activity along the interface. We evaluate ~1000 earthquakes recorded in the shallow subduction environment of the Middle America Trench (MAT) near Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, in terms of its frequency-magnitude distribution (Log10N=a-bM) of the microseismicity. Globally, earthquake distributions have b-values near 1, meaning a 10-fold decrease in activity with each unit magnitude, M increase, and can be used to characterize the strength of locking. The unique geometry of Nicoya over the active seismogenic interface gives us a rare opportunity to explore the region with unparalleled precision. From more than 7000 earthquakes recorded by the 1999-2001 CRSEIZE project, we estimated magnitudes, and precisely relocated events using a locally derived 3D V_p and V_p/V_s velocity model (DeShon et al., 2006). Using geometric constraints and events with lowest horizontal error (<2 km σ), we created a subset of best resolved slab and interface activity. Using a methodology similar to Wiemer et al. (2001), we determined the mean and spatial variability of b. We find that generally the interface below Nicoya has b=1.4, much higher than subduction zone averages of b=0.5 to 0.8 ( Bayrak et al., 2002), thus inferring a generally weak interface. More interestingly, there was strong spatial variability in b (and hence coupling). A well resolved zone of lower b (~1), is observed offshore the central Nicoya coast, in a region previously identified as strongly coupled by modeling of GPS observed deformation (Norabuena et al., 2004). Extremely high values are on either side (b > 2), near previous large interface earthquakes in 1990 and 1992. We infer that the low b-value area offshore central Nicoya identifies a more strongly

  12. Late Quaternary tectonic activity and paleoseismicity of the Eastern Messinia Fault Zone, SW Peloponessus (Messinia, Greece).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkaniotis, Sotirios; Betzelou, Konstantina; Zygouri, Vassiliki; Koukouvelas, Ioannis; Ganas, Athanassios

    2015-04-01

    The southwestern part of Peloponnesus, Messinia and Laconia, is an area of significant tectonic activity situated near the Hellenic trench. Most of the deformation in this area is accommodated by the Eastern Messinia Fault Zone, bordering the western part of Taygetos Mt range and the west coast of Mani peninsula. The Eastern Messinia Fault Zone (EMFZ) is a complex system of primarily normal faults dipping westwards with a strike of NNW-SSE to N-S direction attaining a total length of more than 100 km from the northern Messinia plain in the north to the southern part of Mani peninsula in the south. The continuity of the EMFZ is disrupted by overlapping faults and relay ramp structures. The central part of the EMFZ, from the town of Oichalia to the city of Kalamata, was investigated by detailed field mapping of fault structures and post-alpine sediment formations together with re-evaluation of historical and modern seismicity. Several fault segments with lengths of 6 to 10 km were mapped, defined and evaluated according to their state of activity and age. Analysis of fault striation measurements along fault planes of the fault zone shows a present regime of WSW-ENE extension, in accordance with focal mechanisms from modern seismicity. Known faults like the Katsareika and Verga faults near the city of Kalamata are interpreted as older-generation faults that are re-activated (e.g. the 1986 Ms 6.0 Kalamata earthquake on Verga Fault) as part of a system of distributed deformation. New fault segments, some of them previously unmapped like the Asprohoma fault to the west of Kalamata, and offshore faults like Kitries and Kourtissa, are being assigned to the EMFZ. Moreover, a paleoseismological trench was excavated in the northern part of Pidima fault segment, one of the most prominent active segments of the central part of the EMFZ, in order to examine the paleoearthquake record of the fault system. A significant number of historical and instrumental earthquakes in the area

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-independent activation of unfolded protein response kinases by a small molecule ATP-mimic.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Aaron S; Alfaro, Jennifer; Morales-Soto, Marisol A; Dar, Arvin C; McCullagh, Emma; Gotthardt, Katja; Li, Han; Acosta-Alvear, Diego; Sidrauski, Carmela; Korennykh, Alexei V; Bernales, Sebastian; Shokat, Kevan M; Walter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Two ER membrane-resident transmembrane kinases, IRE1 and PERK, function as stress sensors in the unfolded protein response. IRE1 also has an endoribonuclease activity, which initiates a non-conventional mRNA splicing reaction, while PERK phosphorylates eIF2α. We engineered a potent small molecule, IPA, that binds to IRE1's ATP-binding pocket and predisposes the kinase domain to oligomerization, activating its RNase. IPA also inhibits PERK but, paradoxically, activates it at low concentrations, resulting in a bell-shaped activation profile. We reconstituted IPA-activation of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation from purified components. We estimate that under conditions of maximal activation less than 15% of PERK molecules in the reaction are occupied by IPA. We propose that IPA binding biases the PERK kinase towards its active conformation, which trans-activates apo-PERK molecules. The mechanism by which partial occupancy with an inhibitor can activate kinases may be wide-spread and carries major implications for design and therapeutic application of kinase inhibitors. PMID:25986605

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-independent activation of unfolded protein response kinases by a small molecule ATP-mimic

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Aaron S; Alfaro, Jennifer; Morales-Soto, Marisol A; Dar, Arvin C; McCullagh, Emma; Gotthardt, Katja; Li, Han; Acosta-Alvear, Diego; Sidrauski, Carmela; Korennykh, Alexei V; Bernales, Sebastian; Shokat, Kevan M; Walter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Two ER membrane-resident transmembrane kinases, IRE1 and PERK, function as stress sensors in the unfolded protein response. IRE1 also has an endoribonuclease activity, which initiates a non-conventional mRNA splicing reaction, while PERK phosphorylates eIF2α. We engineered a potent small molecule, IPA, that binds to IRE1's ATP-binding pocket and predisposes the kinase domain to oligomerization, activating its RNase. IPA also inhibits PERK but, paradoxically, activates it at low concentrations, resulting in a bell-shaped activation profile. We reconstituted IPA-activation of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation from purified components. We estimate that under conditions of maximal activation less than 15% of PERK molecules in the reaction are occupied by IPA. We propose that IPA binding biases the PERK kinase towards its active conformation, which trans-activates apo-PERK molecules. The mechanism by which partial occupancy with an inhibitor can activate kinases may be wide-spread and carries major implications for design and therapeutic application of kinase inhibitors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05434.001 PMID:25986605

  15. A measles virus selectively blind to signaling lymphocytic activation molecule shows anti-tumor activity against lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Yoneda, Misako; Amagai, Yosuke; Obayashi, Kunie; Ikeda, Fusako; Shoji, Koichiro; Murakami, Yoshinori; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2015-09-22

    Lung cancer cells, particularly those of non-small-cell lung cancer, are known to express Nectin-4. We previously generated a recombinant measles virus that uses Nectin-4 as its receptor but cannot bind its original principal receptor, signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). This virus (rMV-SLAMblind) infects and kills breast cancer cells in vitro and in a subcutaneous xenograft model. However, it has yet to be determined whether rMV-SLAMblind is effective against other cancer types and in other tumor models that more closely represent disease. In this study, we analyzed the anti-tumor activity of this virus towards lung cancer cells using a modified variant that encodes green fluorescent protein (rMV-EGFP-SLAMblind). We found that rMV-EGFP-SLAMblind efficiently infected nine, human, lung cancer cell lines, and its infection resulted in reduced cell viability of six cell lines. Administration of the virus into subcutaneous tumors of xenotransplanted mice suppressed tumor growth. In addition, rMV-EGFP-SLAMblind could target scattered tumor masses grown in the lungs of xenotransplanted mice. These results suggest that rMV-SLAMblind is oncolytic for lung cancer and that it represents a promising tool for the treatment of this disease. PMID:26317644

  16. Morbilliviruses Use Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecules (CD150) as Cellular Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tatsuo, Hironobu; Ono, Nobuyuki; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2001-01-01

    Morbilliviruses comprise measles virus, canine distemper virus, rinderpest virus, and several other viruses that cause devastating human and animal diseases accompanied by severe immunosuppression and lymphopenia. Recently, we have shown that human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) is a cellular receptor for measles virus. In this study, we examined whether canine distemper and rinderpest viruses also use canine and bovine SLAMs, respectively, as cellular receptors. The Onderstepoort vaccine strain and two B95a (marmoset B cell line)-isolated strains of canine distemper virus caused extensive cytopathic effects in normally resistant CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells after expression of canine SLAM. The Ako vaccine strain of rinderpest virus produced strong cytopathic effects in bovine SLAM-expressing CHO cells. The data on entry with vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes bearing measles, canine distemper, or rinderpest virus envelope proteins were consistent with development of cytopathic effects in SLAM-expressing CHO cell clones after infection with the respective viruses, confirming that SLAM acts at the virus entry step (as a cellular receptor). Furthermore, most measles, canine distemper, and rinderpest virus strains examined could any use of the human, canine, and bovine SLAMs to infect cells. Our findings suggest that the use of SLAM as a cellular receptor may be a property common to most, if not all, morbilliviruses and explain the lymphotropism and immunosuppressive nature of morbilliviruses. PMID:11390585

  17. The Catalytic Activity of Protein-Disulfide Isomerase Requires a Conformationally Flexible Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, G.; Kober, F; Lewandrowski, U; Sickmann, A; Lennarz, W; Schindelin, H

    2008-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the formation of the correct pattern of disulfide bonds in secretory proteins. A low resolution crystal structure of yeast PDI described here reveals large scale conformational changes compared with the initially reported structure, indicating that PDI is a highly flexible molecule with its catalytic domains, a and a?, representing two mobile arms connected to a more rigid core composed of the b and b? domains. Limited proteolysis revealed that the linker between the a domain and the core is more susceptible to degradation than that connecting the a? domain to the core. By restricting the two arms with inter-domain disulfide bonds, the molecular flexibility of PDI, especially that of its a domain, was demonstrated to be essential for the enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo. The crystal structure also featured a PDI dimer, and a propensity to dimerize in solution and in the ER was confirmed by cross-linking experiments and the split green fluorescent protein system. Although sedimentation studies suggested that the self-association of PDI is weak, we hypothesize that PDI exists as an interconvertible mixture of monomers and dimers in the endoplasmic reticulum due to its high abundance in this compartment.

  18. Members of the thrombospondin gene family bind stromal interaction molecule 1 and regulate calcium channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Mark; Nadler, Monica; Okuhara, Dayne; Thompson, Jill; Shuttleworth, Trevor; Lawler, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The thrombospondins (TSPs) are a family of matricellular proteins that regulate cellular phenotype through interactions with a myriad of other proteins and proteoglycans. We have identified a novel interaction of the members of the TSP gene family with stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). This association is robust since it is preserved in Triton X-100, can be detected with multiple anti-TSP-1 and anti-STIM1 antibodies, and is detected in a wide range of cell types. We have also found that STIM1 co-immunoprecipitates with TSP-4 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and that a recombinant version of the N-terminal domain of STIM1 binds to the signature domain of TSP-1 and COMP. The association of the TSPs with STIM1 is observed in both the presence and absence of calcium indicating that the calcium-dependent conformation of the signature domain of TSPs is not required for binding. Thus, this interaction could occur in the ER under conditions of normal or low calcium concentration. Furthermore, we observed that the expression of COMP in HEK 293 cells decreases STIM1-mediated calcium release activated calcium (CRAC) channel currents and increases arachidonic acid calcium (ARC) channel currents. These data indicate that the TSPs regulate STIM1 function and participate in the reciprocal regulation of two channels that mediate calcium entry into the cell. PMID:24845346

  19. The new generation drug candidate molecules: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding and anticancer activity properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gölcü, Ayşegül; Muslu, Harun; Kılıçaslan, Derya; Çeşme, Mustafa; Eren, Özge; Ataş, Fatma; Demirtaş, İbrahim

    2016-09-01

    The new generation drug candidate molecules [Cu(5-Fu)2Cl2H2O] (NGDCM1) and [Zn(5-Fu)2(CH3COO)2] (NGDCM2) were obtained from the reaction of copper(II) and zinc(II) salts with the anticancer drug 5-fluoracil (5-Fu). These compounds have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the compounds were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of the compounds have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the 5-Fu and metal derivatives with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. Thermal decomposition of the compounds lead to the formation of CuO and ZnO as final products. The effect of proliferation 5-Fu, NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 were examined on the HeLa cells using real-time cell analyzer with three different concentrations.

  20. Structure–activity exploration of a small-molecule Lipid II inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Steven; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M; Chauhan, Jay; Opperman, Timothy J; MacKerell, Alexander D; de Leeuw, Erik PH

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified low-molecular weight compounds that act as inhibitors of Lipid II, an essential precursor of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Lipid II comprises specialized lipid (bactoprenol) linked to a hydrophilic head group consisting of a peptidoglycan subunit (N-acetyl glucosamine [GlcNAc]–N-acetyl muramic acid [MurNAc] disaccharide coupled to a short pentapeptide moiety) via a pyrophosphate. One of our lead compounds, a diphenyl-trimethyl indolene pyrylium, termed BAS00127538, interacts with the MurNAc moiety and the isoprenyl tail of Lipid II. Here, we report on the structure–activity relationship of BAS00127538 derivatives obtained by in silico analyses and de novo chemical synthesis. Our results indicate that Lipid II binding and bacterial killing are related to three features: the diphenyl moiety, the indolene moiety, and the positive charge of the pyrylium. Replacement of the pyrylium moiety with an N-methyl pyridinium, which may have importance in stability of the molecule, did not alter Lipid II binding or antibacterial potency. PMID:25987836

  1. Dimeric aluminum-phosphorus compounds as masked frustrated Lewis pairs for small molecule activation.

    PubMed

    Roters, Steffi; Appelt, Christian; Westenberg, Hauke; Hepp, Alexander; Slootweg, J Chris; Lammertsma, Koop; Uhl, Werner

    2012-08-14

    Hydroalumination of aryldialkynylphosphines RP(C≡C-(t)Bu)(2) (R = Ph, Mes) with equimolar quantities of diethylaluminum hydride afforded mixed alkenyl-alkynyl cyclic dimers in which the dative aluminum-phosphorus bonds are geminal to the exocyclic alkenyl groups. Addition of triethylaluminum to isolated 1 (R = Ph) or to the in situ generated species (R = Mes) caused diethylaluminum ethynide elimination to yield the arylethylphosphorus dimers 2 and 3. These possess a chair-like Al(2)C(2)P(2) heterocycle with intermolecular Al-P interactions. The boat conformation (4) was obtained by the reaction of (t)Bu-P(C≡C-(t)Bu)(2) with di(tert-butyl)aluminum hydride. Despite being dimeric, 2 behaves as a frustrated Lewis pair and activates small molecules. The reaction with carbon dioxide gave cis/trans isomeric AlPC(2)O heterocycles that differ only by the configuration of the exocyclic alkenyl unit. Four isomers resulted from the reaction with phenyl isocyanate. This is caused by cis/trans isomerization of the initial C=O adduct and subsequent rearrangement to the AlPC(2)N heterocycle, being the C=N adduct. PMID:22411491

  2. Stellar Activity Mimics a Habitable-zone Planet around Kapteyn's Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2015-06-01

    Kapteyn’s star is an old M subdwarf believed to be a member of the Galactic halo population of stars. A recent study has claimed the existence of two super-Earth planets around the star based on radial velocity (RV) observations. The innermost of these candidate planets—Kapteyn b (P = 48 days)—resides within the circumstellar habitable zone (HZ). Given recent progress in understanding the impact of stellar activity in detecting planetary signals, we have analyzed the observed HARPS data for signatures of stellar activity. We find that while Kapteyn’s star is photometrically very stable, a suite of spectral activity indices reveal a large-amplitude rotation signal, and we determine the stellar rotation period to be 143 days. The spectral activity tracers are strongly correlated with the purported RV signal of “planet b,” and the 48-day period is an integer fraction (1/3) of the stellar rotation period. We conclude that Kapteyn b is not a planet in the HZ, but an artifact of stellar activity.

  3. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  4. Determination of the Absolute Number of Cytokine mRNA Molecules within Individual Activated Human T Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Marshall, Gwen; Hockett, Richard D.; Bucy, R. Pat; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A primary function of activated T cells is the expression and subsequent secretion of cytokines, which orchestrate the differentiation of other lymphocytes, modulate antigen presenting cell activity, and alter vascular endothelium to mediate an immune response. Since many features of immune regulation probably result from modest alterations of endogenous rates of multiple interacting processes, quantitative analysis of the frequency and specific activity of individual T cells is critically important. Using a coordinated set of quantitative methods, the absolute number of molecules of several key cytokine mRNA species in individual T cells has been determined. The frequency of human blood T cells activated in vitro by mitogens and recall protein antigens was determined by intracellular cytokine protein staining, in situ hybridization for cytokine mRNA, and by limiting dilution analysis for cytokine mRNA+ cells. The absolute number of mRNA molecules was simultaneously determined in both homogenates of the entire population of cells and in individual cells obtained by limiting dilution, using a quantitative, competitive RT-PCR assay. The absolute numbers of mRNA molecules in a population of cells divided by the frequency of individual positive cells, yielded essentially the same number of mRNA molecules per cell as direct analysis of individual cells by limiting dilution analysis. Mean numbers of mRNA per positive cell from both mitogen and antigen activated T cells, using these stimulation conditions, were 6000 for IL-2, 6300 for IFN-gamma, and 1600 for IL-4.

  5. Antibacterial Activity of and Resistance to Small Molecule Inhibitors of the ClpP Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Corey L.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Sauer, Robert T.; Sello, Jason K.

    2014-01-01

    There is rapidly mounting evidence that intracellular proteases in bacteria are compelling targets for antibacterial drugs. Multiple reports suggest that the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other actinobacteria may be particularly sensitive to small molecules that perturb the activities of self-compartmentalized peptidases, which catalyze intracellular protein turnover as components of ATP-dependent proteolytic machines. Here, we report chemical syntheses and evaluations of structurally diverse β-lactones, which have a privileged structure for selective, suicide inhibition of the self-compartmentalized ClpP peptidase. β-lactones with certain substituents on the α- and β-carbons were found to be toxic to M. tuberculosis. Using an affinity-labeled analog of a bioactive β-lactone in a series of chemical proteomic experiments, we selectively captured the ClpP1P2 peptidase from live cultures of two different actinobacteria that are related to M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we found that the growth inhibitory β-lactones also inactivate the M. tuberculosis ClpP1P2 peptidase in vitro via formation of a covalent adduct at the ClpP2 catalytic serine. Given the potent antibacterial activity of these compounds and their medicinal potential, we sought to identify innate mechanisms of resistance. Using a genome mining strategy, we identified a genetic determinant of β-lactone resistance in Streptomyces coelicolor, a non-pathogenic relative of M. tuberculosis. Collectively, these findings validate the potential of ClpP inhibition as a strategy in antibacterial drug development and define a mechanism by which bacteria could resist the toxic effects of ClpP inhibitors. PMID:24047344

  6. Cross Talk between Neuroregulatory Molecule and Monocyte: Nerve Growth Factor Activates the Inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Datta-Mitra, Ananya; Kundu-Raychaudhuri, Smriti; Mitra, Anupam; Raychaudhuri, Siba P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence points to a role for the extra-neuronal nerve growth factor (NGF) in acquired immune responses. However, very little information is available about its role and underlying mechanism in innate immunity. The role of innate immunity in autoimmune diseases is becoming increasingly important. In this study, we explored the contribution of pleiotropic NGF in the innate immune response along with its underlying molecular mechanism with respect to IL-1β secretion. Methods Human monocytes, null and NLRP3 deficient THP-1 cell lines were used for this purpose. We determined the effect of NGF on secretion of IL-1β at the protein and mRNA levels. To determine the underlying molecular mechanism, the effect of NGF on NLRP1/NLRP3 inflammasomes and its downstream key protein, activated caspase-1, were evaluated by ELISA, immunoflorescence, flow cytometry, and real-time PCR. Results In human monocytes and null THP-1 cell line, NGF significantly upregulates IL-1β at protein and mRNA levels in a caspase-1 dependent manner through its receptor, TrkA. Furthermore, we observed that NGF induces caspase-1 activation through NLRP1/NLRP3 inflammasomes, and it is dependent on the master transcription factor, NF-κB. Conclusions To best of our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the mechanistic aspect of a neuroregulatory molecule, NGF, in innate immune response, and thus enriches our understanding regarding its pathogenic role in inflammation. These observations add further evidence in favor of anti-NGF therapy in autoimmune diseases and also unlock a new area of research about the role of NGF in IL-1β mediated diseases. PMID:25876154

  7. Activation of carbon-hydrogen bonds in alkanes and other organic molecules using organotransition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, R.G.

    1991-10-01

    We have recently begun to investigate the interaction of C-H activating iridium and rhodium complexes with functionalized organic molecules, to determine the effect of functional groups on the process, as well as to investigate the propensity of Ir and Rh to insert into C-H versus other types of X-H bonds. Recent experiments have demonstrated that xenon liquefied at -70{degrees}C and 10 atm pressure serves as an inert solvent for the C-H oxidative addition reaction. We have been able to prepare and isolate, for the first time, C-H oxidative addition products formed from high-melting solid substrates such as naphthalene, adamantane, and even cubane; the latter case represents the first observation of C-H oxidative addition at a tertiary C-H bond. Liquid xenon has also allowed us to carry out more conveniently the C-H oxidative addition reactions of low-boiling gases that are difficult to liquefy, such as methane. Recently we have also been able to carry out analogous studies in the gas phase. Under these conditions, ``naked`` rather than solvated Cp*Rh(CO) is formed, and this species reacts with cyclohexane at nearly gas-kinetic rates. Under the conditions, collision between Cp*Rh(CO) and cyclohexane is the slowest step in the overall C-H activation process. In contrast, in solution association of solvent with free Cp*Rh(CO) is so rapid that the step involving C-H bond cleavage in the coordinated alkane complex becomes rate-determining. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Activation of carbon-hydrogen bonds in alkanes and other organic molecules using organotransition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, R.G.

    1991-10-01

    We have recently begun to investigate the interaction of C-H activating iridium and rhodium complexes with functionalized organic molecules, to determine the effect of functional groups on the process, as well as to investigate the propensity of Ir and Rh to insert into C-H versus other types of X-H bonds. Recent experiments have demonstrated that xenon liquefied at -70{degrees}C and 10 atm pressure serves as an inert solvent for the C-H oxidative addition reaction. We have been able to prepare and isolate, for the first time, C-H oxidative addition products formed from high-melting solid substrates such as naphthalene, adamantane, and even cubane; the latter case represents the first observation of C-H oxidative addition at a tertiary C-H bond. Liquid xenon has also allowed us to carry out more conveniently the C-H oxidative addition reactions of low-boiling gases that are difficult to liquefy, such as methane. Recently we have also been able to carry out analogous studies in the gas phase. Under these conditions, naked'' rather than solvated Cp*Rh(CO) is formed, and this species reacts with cyclohexane at nearly gas-kinetic rates. Under the conditions, collision between Cp*Rh(CO) and cyclohexane is the slowest step in the overall C-H activation process. In contrast, in solution association of solvent with free Cp*Rh(CO) is so rapid that the step involving C-H bond cleavage in the coordinated alkane complex becomes rate-determining. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Alignment of Synaptic Vesicle Macromolecules with the Macromolecules in Active Zone Material that Direct Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron’s axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle’s luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly’s chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly’s shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for

  10. Rab3-GEF Controls Active Zone Development at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction123

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Haneui; Chen, Shirui; Roche, John P.; Ai, Minrong; Wu, Chunlai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Synaptic signaling involves the release of neurotransmitter from presynaptic active zones (AZs). Proteins that regulate vesicle exocytosis cluster at AZs, composing the cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ). At the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), the small GTPase Rab3 controls the distribution of CAZ proteins across release sites, thereby regulating the efficacy of individual AZs. Here we identify Rab3-GEF as a second protein that acts in conjunction with Rab3 to control AZ protein composition. At rab3-GEF mutant NMJs, Bruchpilot (Brp) and Ca2+ channels are enriched at a subset of AZs, leaving the remaining sites devoid of key CAZ components in a manner that is indistinguishable from rab3 mutant NMJs. As the Drosophila homologue of mammalian DENN/MADD and Caenorhabditis elegans AEX-3, Rab3-GEF is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rab3 that stimulates GDP to GTP exchange. Mechanistic studies reveal that although Rab3 and Rab3-GEF act within the same mechanism to control AZ development, Rab3-GEF is involved in multiple roles. We show that Rab3-GEF is required for transport of Rab3. However, the synaptic phenotype in the rab3-GEF mutant cannot be fully explained by defective transport and loss of GEF activity. A transgenically expressed GTP-locked variant of Rab3 accumulates at the NMJ at wild-type levels and fully rescues the rab3 mutant but is unable to rescue the rab3-GEF mutant. Our results suggest that although Rab3-GEF acts upstream of Rab3 to control Rab3 localization and likely GTP-binding, it also acts downstream to regulate CAZ development, potentially as a Rab3 effector at the synapse. PMID:27022630

  11. Equid herpesvirus 1 infection of endothelial cells requires activation of putative adhesion molecules: an in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, D; HAMBLIN, A; EDINGTON, N

    2002-01-01

    Antisera to activated equine endothelial cells, which detected surface molecules of 116 kD, 97 kD, 42 kD and 38 kD, were made to investigate the role of endothelial adhesion molecules in equid herpes virus 1 infection. These putative adhesion molecules could be induced by 17-β oestradiol, chorionic gonadotrophin, or IL-2, as well as by LPS and PWM. In an in vitro flow system, using equine veins or arteries, equid herpesvirus 1 in leucocytes was only transferred to infect endothelial cells if both leucocytes and endothelial cells expressed these surface molecules. Blocking of the membrane molecules with polyclonal antibodies prevented transfer of virus to the endothelial cells, indicating that the adhesion molecules had a key role in effecting transfer of virus. These in vitro observations give particular insight into the reports that in the natural course of infection in horses infection of endothelial cells is restricted to certain tissues, and in a wider context the results illustrate the complexity of factors that may direct tissue tropism. PMID:12165084

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of Tomato Flower Pedicel Tissues Reveals Abscission Zone-Specific Modulation of Key Meristem Activity Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiuli; Zhang, Rongzhi; Wu, Liang; Liang, Yanchun; Mao, Long

    2013-01-01

    Tomato flower abscises at the anatomically distinct abscission zone that separates the pedicel into basal and apical portions. During abscission, cell separation occurs only at the abscission zone indicating distinctive molecular regulation in its cells. We conducted a transcriptome analysis of tomato pedicel tissues during ethylene promoted abscission. We found that the abscission zone was the most active site with the largest set of differentially expressed genes when compared with basal and apical portions. Gene Ontology analyses revealed enriched transcription regulation and hydrolase activities in the abscission zone. We also demonstrate coordinated responses of hormone and cell wall related genes. Besides, a number of ESTs representing homologs of key Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem activity genes were found to be preferentially expressed in the abscission zone, including WUSCHEL (WUS), KNAT6, LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN PROTEIN 1(LBD1), and BELL-like homeodomain protein 1 (BLH1), as well as tomato axillary meristem genes BLIND (Bl) and LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (Ls). More interestingly, the homologs of WUS and the potential functional partner OVATE FAMILIY PROTEIN (OFP) were subsequently down regulated during abscission while Bl and AGL12 were continuously and specifically induced in the abscission zone. The expression patterns of meristem activity genes corroborate the idea that cells of the abscission zone confer meristem-like nature and coincide with the course of abscission and post-abscission cell differentiation. Our data therefore propose a possible regulatory scheme in tomato involving meristem genes that may be required not only for the abscission zone development, but also for abscission. PMID:23390523

  13. Transcriptome analysis of tomato flower pedicel tissues reveals abscission zone-specific modulation of key meristem activity genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Liu, Danmei; Li, Aili; Sun, Xiuli; Zhang, Rongzhi; Wu, Liang; Liang, Yanchun; Mao, Long

    2013-01-01

    Tomato flower abscises at the anatomically distinct abscission zone that separates the pedicel into basal and apical portions. During abscission, cell separation occurs only at the abscission zone indicating distinctive molecular regulation in its cells. We conducted a transcriptome analysis of tomato pedicel tissues during ethylene promoted abscission. We found that the abscission zone was the most active site with the largest set of differentially expressed genes when compared with basal and apical portions. Gene Ontology analyses revealed enriched transcription regulation and hydrolase activities in the abscission zone. We also demonstrate coordinated responses of hormone and cell wall related genes. Besides, a number of ESTs representing homologs of key Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem activity genes were found to be preferentially expressed in the abscission zone, including WUSCHEL (WUS), KNAT6, LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN PROTEIN 1(LBD1), and BELL-like homeodomain protein 1 (BLH1), as well as tomato axillary meristem genes BLIND (Bl) and LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (Ls). More interestingly, the homologs of WUS and the potential functional partner OVATE FAMILIY PROTEIN (OFP) were subsequently down regulated during abscission while Bl and AGL12 were continuously and specifically induced in the abscission zone. The expression patterns of meristem activity genes corroborate the idea that cells of the abscission zone confer meristem-like nature and coincide with the course of abscission and post-abscission cell differentiation. Our data therefore propose a possible regulatory scheme in tomato involving meristem genes that may be required not only for the abscission zone development, but also for abscission. PMID:23390523

  14. An enzymatic deconjugation method for the analysis of small molecule active drugs on antibody-drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Gu, Christine; Gruenhagen, Jason; Yehl, Peter; Chetwyn, Nik P; Medley, Colin D

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are complex therapeutic agents that use the specific targeting properties of antibodies and the highly potent cytotoxicity of small molecule drugs to selectively eliminate tumor cells while limiting the toxicity to normal healthy tissues. Two critical quality attributes of ADCs are the purity and stability of the active small molecule drug linked to the ADC, but these are difficult to assess once the drug is conjugated to the antibody. In this study, we report a enzyme deconjugation approach to cleave small molecule drugs from ADCs, which allows the drugs to be subsequently characterized by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The model ADC we used in this study utilizes a valine-citrulline linker that is designed to be sensitive to endoproteases after internalization by tumor cells. We screened several proteases to determine the most effective enzyme. Among the 3 cysteine proteases evaluated, papain had the best efficiency in cleaving the small molecule drug from the model ADC. The deconjugation conditions were further optimized to achieve complete cleavage of the small molecule drug. This papain deconjugation approach demonstrated excellent specificity and precision. The purity and stability of the active drug on an ADC drug product was evaluated and the major degradation products of the active drug were identified. The papain deconjugation method was also applied to several other ADCs, with the results suggesting it could be applied generally to ADCs containing a valine-citrulline linker. Our results indicate that the papain deconjugation method is a powerful tool for characterizing the active small molecule drug conjugated to an ADC, and may be useful in ensuring the product quality, efficacy and the safety of ADCs. PMID:26891281

  15. An attempt to monitor tectonic forces in the Vrancea active geodynamic zone: The Baspunar experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Zlagnean, Luminita; Plopeanu, Marin

    2013-04-01

    (sparsely) run in the area, have provided inconsistent results on the PCF current dynamics. The Baspunar Geodynamic Observatory (BGO) has been designed and implemented by the Solid Earth Dynamics Department in the Institute of Geodynamics of the Romanian Academy in order to reveal and monitor eventual motions along PCF in the attempt to correlate variations in the slip rate with changes in the seismicity released within Vrancea zone. The first BGO records were strongly affected by changes in the atmospheric parameters. Consequently, technical measures and special corrections for the removal or at least mitigation of the effects created by changes in temperature, air pressure and humidity have been applied to the observations. In order to improve the signal to noise ratio, some mathematical filters have been applied too. The paper is aimed at revealing results of the geodetic observations along with preliminary geodynamic considerations. On the overall, after about two years of monitoring, PCF appears as an active tectonic contact. It mainly behaves as a left-lateral fault, but some short episodes with a reverse slip (dextral) were also pointed out. Correlations with crustal and intermediate-depth earthquakes occurring in both cases within the bending zone of East Carpathians are illustrated and discussed.

  16. Diabatic heating profiles over the continental convergence zone during the monsoon active spells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Rajib; Sur, Sharmila; Joseph, Susmitha; Sahai, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    The present paper aims to bring out the robust common aspects of spatio-temporal evolution of diabatic heating during the monsoon intraseasonal active phases over the continental tropical convergence zone (CTCZ). The robustness of spatio-temporal features is determined by comparing the two state-of-the art reanalyses: NCEP Climate Forecast System reanalysis and Modern ERA Retrospective Analysis. The inter-comparison is based on a study period of 26 years (1984-2009). The study confirms the development of deep heating over the CTCZ region during the active phase and is consistent between the two datasets. However, the detailed temporal evolution of the vertical structure (e.g., vertical tilts) of heating differs at times. The most important common feature from both the datasets is the significant vertical redistribution of heating with the development of shallow (low level) heating and circulation over the CTCZ region 3-7 days after the peak active phase. The shallow circulation is found to be associated with increased vertical shear and relative vorticity over certain regions in the subcontinent. This increased vertical shear and relative vorticity in the lower levels could be crucial in the sustenance of rainfall after the peak active phase. Model experiments with linear dynamics affirm the role of shallow convection in increasing the lower level circulation as observed.

  17. SAD-B Phosphorylation of CAST Controls Active Zone Vesicle Recycling for Synaptic Depression.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Sumiko; Hida, Yamato; Tanifuji, Shota; Hagiwara, Akari; Hamada, Shun; Abe, Manabu; Ma, Huan; Yasumura, Misato; Kitajima, Isao; Sakimura, Kenji; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2016-09-13

    Short-term synaptic depression (STD) is a common form of activity-dependent plasticity observed widely in the nervous system. Few molecular pathways that control STD have been described, but the active zone (AZ) release apparatus provides a possible link between neuronal activity and plasticity. Here, we show that an AZ cytomatrix protein CAST and an AZ-associated protein kinase SAD-B coordinately regulate STD by controlling reloading of the AZ with release-ready synaptic vesicles. SAD-B phosphorylates the N-terminal serine (S45) of CAST, and S45 phosphorylation increases with higher firing rate. A phosphomimetic CAST (S45D) mimics CAST deletion, which enhances STD by delaying reloading of the readily releasable pool (RRP), resulting in a pool size decrease. A phosphonegative CAST (S45A) inhibits STD and accelerates RRP reloading. Our results suggest that the CAST/SAD-B reaction serves as a brake on synaptic transmission by temporal calibration of activity and synaptic depression via RRP size regulation. PMID:27626661

  18. Assessment of the biological activity of soils in the subtropical zone of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, M. P.; Orujova, N. I.

    2009-10-01

    The enzymatic activity; the microbial population; and the intensities of the nitrification, ammonification, CO2emission, and cellulose decomposition were studied in gray-brown, meadow-sierozemic, meadow-forest alluvial, and yellow (zheltozem) gley soils in the subtropical zone of Azerbaijan under natural vegetation, crop rotation systems with vegetables, and permanent vegetable crops. On this basis, the biological diagnostics of these soils were suggested and the soil ecological health was evaluated. It was shown that properly chosen crop rotation systems on irrigated lands make it possible to preserve the fertility of the meadow-forest alluvial and zheltozem-gley soils and to improve the fertility of the gray-brown and meadow-sierozemic soils.

  19. Nanoscale dynamics of synaptic vesicle trafficking and fusion at the presynaptic active zone

    PubMed Central

    Vaithianathan, Thirumalini; Henry, Diane; Akmentin, Wendy; Matthews, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) is a macromolecular complex that facilitates the supply of release-ready synaptic vesicles to support neurotransmitter release at synapses. To reveal the dynamics of this supply process in living synapses, we used super-resolution imaging to track single vesicles at voltage-clamped presynaptic terminals of retinal bipolar neurons, whose CAZ contains a specialized structure—the synaptic ribbon—that supports both fast, transient and slow, sustained modes of transmission. We find that the synaptic ribbon serves a dual function as a conduit for diffusion of synaptic vesicles and a platform for vesicles to fuse distal to the plasma membrane itself, via compound fusion. The combination of these functions allows the ribbon-type CAZ to achieve the continuous transmitter release required by synapses of neurons that carry tonic, graded visual signals in the retina. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13245.001 PMID:26880547

  20. Seismic evidence for active underplating below the megathrust earthquake zone in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hisanori; Takeda, Tetsuya; Obara, Kazushige; Kasahara, Keiji

    2010-07-01

    Determining the structure of subduction zones is important for understanding mechanisms for the generation of interplate phenomena such as megathrust earthquakes. The peeling off of the uppermost part of a subducting slab and accretion to the bottom of an overlying plate (underplating) at deep regions has been inferred from exhumed metamorphic rocks and deep seismic imaging, but direct seismic evidence of this process is lacking. By comparing seismic reflection profiles with microearthquake distributions in central Japan, we show that repeating microearthquakes occur along the bottom interface of the layer peeling off from the subducting Philippine Sea plate. This region coincides with the location of slow-slip events that may serve as signals for monitoring active underplating. PMID:20616277

  1. Growth of the active zone in nitride based long wavelength laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossow, U.; Jönen, H.; Brendel, M.; Dräger, A.; Langer, T.; Hoffmann, L.; Bremers, H.; Hangleiter, A.

    2011-01-01

    In xGa 1- xN/GaN quantum well (QW) structures grown on c-plane surfaces for long wavelength light emitters have been investigated intended. We reached indium concentrations of xIn≥0.35 with good optical and structural quality. For QW thicknesses dQW≤2 nm a fully strained layer structure is observed. QWs of such high indium concentrations, however, are very sensitive to the growth conditions of the subsequent layers and thermal stability/degradation becomes an important issue. We modified the growth of the QWs to avoid or minimize V-pit formation without temperature ramping in the barriers and showed that their properties were unchanged when used in the active zone of a laser structure.

  2. Determination of dissociation constants of pharmacologically active xanthones by capillary zone electrophoresis with diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaomu; Gong, Suxuan; Bo, Tao; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2004-12-24

    In this article, the dissociation constants (pKa) of 10 pharmacologically active xanthones isolated from herbal medicine Securidaca inappendiculata were determined by capillary zone electrophoresis with diode array detection. The pKa values determined by the method based on the electrophoretic mobilities (calculated from migration times) have been proved by the method based on UV absorbance calculated from the online spectra corresponding peaks. No conspicuous difference was observed between the two methods with acceptable reproducibility. Two pKa values (pKa1 and pKa2) were found for four xanthones while generally the 10 compounds possess the pKa values ranging from 6.4 to 9.2. PMID:15641365

  3. Structure-activity relationship studies of strigolactone-related molecules for branching inhibition in garden pea: molecule design for shoot branching.

    PubMed

    Boyer, François-Didier; de Saint Germain, Alexandre; Pillot, Jean-Paul; Pouvreau, Jean-Bernard; Chen, Victor Xiao; Ramos, Suzanne; Stévenin, Arnaud; Simier, Philippe; Delavault, Philippe; Beau, Jean-Marie; Rameau, Catherine

    2012-08-01

    Initially known for their role in the rhizosphere in stimulating the seed germination of parasitic weeds such as the Striga and Orobanche species, and later as host recognition signals for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, strigolactones (SLs) were recently rediscovered as a new class of plant hormones involved in the control of shoot branching in plants. Herein, we report the synthesis of new SL analogs and, to our knowledge, the first study of SL structure-activity relationships for their hormonal activity in garden pea (Pisum sativum). Comparisons with their action for the germination of broomrape (Phelipanche ramosa) are also presented. The pea rms1 SL-deficient mutant was used in a SL bioassay based on axillary bud length after direct SL application on the bud. This assay was compared with an assay where SLs were fed via the roots using hydroponics and with a molecular assay in which transcript levels of BRANCHED1, the pea homolog of the maize TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 gene were quantified in axillary buds only 6 h after application of SLs. We have demonstrated that the presence of a Michael acceptor and a methylbutenolide or dimethylbutenolide motif in the same molecule is essential. It was established that the more active analog 23 with a dimethylbutenolide as the D-ring could be used to control the plant architecture without strongly favoring the germination of P. ramosa seeds. Bold numerals refer to numbers of compounds. PMID:22723084

  4. 78 FR 45181 - Foreign-Trade Zone 230-Piedmont Triad Area, North Carolina, Authorization of Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... inviting public comment (78 FR 23220, 4-18-2013). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of... Production Activity, Oracle Flexible Packaging, Inc., (Foil-Backed Paperboard), Winston-Salem, North Carolina... proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Oracle Flexible...

  5. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone.

    PubMed

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Wegner, Martin; Mueller, Benjamin F; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  6. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: Deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  7. The property of fault zone and fault activity of Shionohira Fault, Fukushima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshimo, K.; Aoki, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Niwa, M.; Kametaka, M.; Sakai, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The April 11, 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori Earthquake (hereafter the 4.11 earthquake) formed co-seismic surface ruptures trending in the NNW-SSE direction in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, which were newly named as the Shionohira Fault by Ishiyama et al. (2011). This earthquake was characterized by a westward dipping normal slip faulting, with a maximum displacement of about 2 m (e.g., Kurosawa et al., 2012). To the south of the area, the same trending lineaments were recognized to exist even though no surface ruptures occurred by the earthquake. In an attempt to elucidate the differences of active and non-active segments of the fault, this report discusses the results of observation of fault outcrops along the Shionohira Fault as well as the Coulomb stress calculations. Only a few outcrops have basement rocks of both the hanging-wall and foot-wall of the fault plane. Three of these outcrops (Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto) were selected for investigation. In addition, a fault outcrop (Nameishi-minami) located about 300 m south of the southern tip of the surface ruptures was investigated. The authors carried out observations of outcrops, polished slabs and thin sections, and performed X-ray diffraction (XRD) to fault materials. As a result, the fault zones originating from schists were investigated at Kyodo-gawa and Betto. A thick fault gouge was cut by a fault plane of the 4.11 earthquake in each outcrop. The fault materials originating from schists were fault bounded with (possibly Neogene) weakly deformed sandstone at Shionohira. A thin fault gouge was found along the fault plane of 4.11 earthquake. A small-scale fault zone with thin fault gouge was observed in Nameishi-minami. According to XRD analysis, smectite was detected in the gouges from Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto, while not in the gouge from Nameishi-minami.

  8. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Benjamin F.; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N.; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  9. The River Network, Active Tectonics and the Mexican Subduction Zone, Southwest Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, K.; Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.; Kostoglodov, V.; Basili, R.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers, their profiles and network reflect the integration of multiple processes and forces that are part of the fundamental controls on the relief structure of mountain belts. The motivation of this study is to understand active tectonic processes in the forearc region of subduction zones, by distinguishing evidence of active deformation using the river network and topography. To this end, morphotectonic and structural studies have been conducted on fifteen drainage basins on the mountain front, parallel to the Mexican subduction zone, where the Cocos plate underthrusts the North American plate. The southwest - northeast Cocos plate subduction stress regime initiated ca. 20 MA. NE-SW to NNE-SSW normal faults as well as sub-latitudinal to NW-SE strike-slip faults (both dextral and sinistral) constitute the majority of mesofaults recorded in the field within the studied drainage basins. Occasionally dextral N-S strike-slip faults also occur. The stress tensor reconstruction suggests two main evolution stages of these faults: 1) the older is dominated by a NW-SE to WNW-ESE extensional regime and 2) the younger is a transcurrent regime, with NNE-SSW σ1 axis. The drainage pattern is strongly controlled by tectonic features, whereas lithology is only a subordinate factor, with only one exception (Petatlán river). Generally, major rivers flow from north to south mainly through NE-SW and NNE-SSW normal faults, and/or sub-longitudinal dextral (also locally sinistral) strike-slip faults. In the central and eastern part of the studied area, rivers also follow NW-SE structures, which are generally normal or sinistral strike-slip faults (rarely reverse). In most cases, local deflections of the river main courses are related to sub-latitudinal strike-slip faults, both dextral and sinistral. Within the current stress field related to the active Cocos subduction, both normal and strike-slip fault sets could be reactivated. Our analysis suggests that strike-slip faults, mainly

  10. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Elicit Anti-Tumorigenic and Anti-Angiogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Placencio, Veronica R.; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Miyata, Toshio; DeClerck, Yves A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown a paradoxical positive correlation between elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitior-1 (PAI-1) in tumors and blood of cancer patients with poor clinical outcome, suggesting that PAI-1 could be a therapeutic target. Here we tested two orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitors of PAI-1 (TM5275 and TM5441) for their efficacy in pre-clinical models of cancer. We demonstrated that these inhibitors decreased cell viability in several human cancer cell lines with an IC50 in the 9.7 to 60.3 μM range and induced intrinsic apoptosis at concentrations of 50 μM. In vivo, oral administration of TM5441 (20 mg/kg daily) to HT1080 and HCT116 xenotransplanted mice increased tumor cell apoptosis and had a significant disruptive effect on the tumor vasculature that was associated with a decrease in tumor growth and an increase in survival that, however, were not statistically significant. Pharmacokinetics studies indicated an average peak plasma concentration of 11.4 μM one hour after oral administration and undetectable levels 23 hours after administration. The effect on tumor vasculature in vivo was further examined in endothelial cells (EC) in vitro and this analysis indicated that both TM5275 and TM5441 inhibited EC branching in a 3D Matrigel assay at concentrations where they had little effect on EC apoptosis. These studies bring novel insight on the activity of PAI-1 inhibitors and provide important information for the future design of inhibitors targeting PAI-1 as therapeutic agents in cancer. PMID:26207899

  11. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John JE; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14530.001 PMID:27115346

  12. Phosphate Activation via Reduced Oxidation State Phosphorus (P). Mild Routes to Condensed-P Energy Currency Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Terence P.; Bryant, David E.; Herschy, Barry; Marriott, Katie E. R.; Cosgrove, Nichola E.; Pasek, Matthew A.; Atlas, Zachary D.; Cousins, Claire R.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of mechanisms for phosphorylating organic and inorganic molecules is a key step en route to the earliest living systems. At the heart of all contemporary biochemical systems reside reactive phosphorus (P) molecules (such as adenosine triphosphate, ATP) as energy currency molecules to drive endergonic metabolic processes and it has been proposed that a predecessor of such molecules could have been pyrophosphate [P2O74−; PPi(V)]. Arguably the most geologically plausible route to PPi(V) is dehydration of orthophosphate, Pi(V), normally a highly endergonic process in the absence of mechanisms for activating Pi(V). One possible solution to this problem recognizes the presence of reactive-P containing mineral phases, such as schreibersite [(Fe,Ni)3P] within meteorites whose abundance on the early Earth would likely have been significant during a putative Hadean-Archean heavy bombardment. Here, we propose that the reduced oxidation state P-oxyacid, H-phosphite [HPO32−; Pi(III)] could have activated Pi(V) towards condensation via the intermediacy of the condensed oxyacid pyrophosphite [H2P2O52−; PPi(III)]. We provide geologically plausible provenance for PPi(III) along with evidence of its ability to activate Pi(V) towards PPi(V) formation under mild conditions (80 °C) in water. PMID:25369812

  13. Gas emissions and active tectonics within the submerged section of the North Anatolian Fault zone in the Sea of Marmara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Géli, L.; Henry, P.; Zitter, T.; Dupré, S.; Tryon, M.; Çağatay, M. N.; de Lépinay, B. Mercier; Le Pichon, X.; Şengör, A. M. C.; Görür, N.; Natalin, B.; Uçarkuş, G.; Özeren, S.; Volker, D.; Gasperini, L.; Burnard, P.; Bourlange, S.; Marnaut Scientific Party

    2008-09-01

    The submerged section of the North Anatolian fault within the Marmara Sea was investigated using acoustic techniques and submersible dives. Most gas emissions in the water column were found near the surface expression of known active faults. Gas emissions are unevenly distributed. The linear fault segment crossing the Central High and forming a seismic gap - as it has not ruptured since 1766, based on historical seismicity, exhibits relatively less gas emissions than the adjacent segments. In the eastern Sea of Marmara, active gas emissions are also found above a buried transtensional fault zone, which displayed micro-seismic activity after the 1999 events. Remarkably, this zone of gas emission extends westward all along the southern edge of Cinarcik basin, well beyond the zone where 1999 aftershocks were observed. The long term monitoring of gas seeps could hence be highly valuable for the understanding of the evolution of the fluid-fault coupling processes during the earthquake cycle within the Marmara Sea.

  14. Probing Microbial Activity in a Perched Water Body Located in a Deep Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Y.; Taylor, J. L.; Henriksen, J. R.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Hubbard, S. S.; Spycher, N.; Weathers, T. S.; Ginn, T. R.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Smith, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    Waste releases to the vadose zone are a legacy of past activities at a number of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), 90Sr has been detected in perched water bodies underlying the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) facility. Microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) using urea-hydrolyzing microbes is one proposed approach for immobilization of 90Sr in the subsurface. The sequestration mechanism is co-precipitation in calcite, promoted by the production of carbonate alkalinity from ureolysis. In order to assess the potential efficacy of MICP at INTEC a field study was conducted at the INL Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP). The VZRP is located approximately 3 km from INTEC and shares many of the same hydrologic and lithologic features but in a non-contaminated setting. We conducted experiments over two field seasons in a perched water body located approximately 15 meters below land surface, using a 5-spot wellfield design. During the first season amendments (molasses and urea) were injected into the central well and water was extracted from two wells on either side, located along a diagonal. Water samples were characterized for microbial abundance, ureolytic activity and ureC gene numbers, along with solution composition. Before, during and after the injections cross-borehole geophysical imaging was performed, using various combinations of the available wells. During the second field season in situ static experiments were conducted to specifically characterize attached and unattached microbial communities, using surrogate substrates colonized during a 12 week incubation. Based on the field data a first order in situ urea hydrolysis rate constant of 0.034 d-1 was estimated. This was more than an order of magnitude higher than rate constants estimated above-ground using water samples, suggesting that attached microorganisms were responsible for >90% of the observed urea hydrolysis activity. The

  15. Conformational, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of biologically active N,N-dimethyltryptamine molecule: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Öner, Nazmiye; Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2014-12-10

    The effective psychoactive properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) known as the near-death molecule have encouraged the imagination of many research disciplines for several decades. Although there is no theoretical study, a number of paper composed by experimental techniques have been reported for DMT molecule. In this study, the molecular modeling of DMT was carried out using B3LYP and HSEh1PBE levels of density functional theory (DFT). Our calculations showed that the energy gap between HOMO and LUMO is low, demonstrating that DMT is a biologically active molecule. Large hyperconjugation interaction energies imply that molecular charge transfer occurs in DMT. Moreover, NLO analysis indicates that DMT can be used an effective NLO material. PMID:24983923

  16. Conformational, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of biologically active N,N-dimethyltryptamine molecule: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öner, Nazmiye; Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2014-12-01

    The effective psychoactive properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) known as the near-death molecule have encouraged the imagination of many research disciplines for several decades. Although there is no theoretical study, a number of paper composed by experimental techniques have been reported for DMT molecule. In this study, the molecular modeling of DMT was carried out using B3LYP and HSEh1PBE levels of density functional theory (DFT). Our calculations showed that the energy gap between HOMO and LUMO is low, demonstrating that DMT is a biologically active molecule. Large hyperconjugation interaction energies imply that molecular charge transfer occurs in DMT. Moreover, NLO analysis indicates that DMT can be used an effective NLO material.

  17. Probabilistic secretion of quanta and the synaptosecretosome hypothesis: evoked release at active zones of varicosities, boutons, and endplates.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M R; Gibson, W G; Robinson, J

    1997-01-01

    A quantum of transmitter may be released upon the arrival of a nerve impulse if the influx of calcium ions through a nearby voltage-dependent calcium channel is sufficient to activate the vesicle-associated calcium sensor protein that triggers exocytosis. A synaptic vesicle, together with its calcium sensor protein, is often found complexed with the calcium channel in active zones to form what will be called a "synaptosecretosome." In the present work, a stochastic analysis is given of the conditions under which a quantum is released from the synaptosecretosome by a nerve impulse. The theoretical treatment considers the rise of calcium at the synaptosecretosome after the stochastic opening of a calcium channel at some time during the impulse, followed by the stochastic binding of calcium to the vesicle-associated protein and the probability of this leading to exocytosis. This allows determination of the probabilities that an impulse will release 0, 1, 2,... quanta from an active zone, whether this is in a varicosity, a bouton, or a motor endplate. A number of experimental observations of the release of transmitter at the active zones of sympathetic varicosities and boutons as well as somatic motor endplates are described by this analysis. These include the likelihood of the secretion of only one quantum at an active zone of endplates and of more than one quantum at an active zone of a sympathetic varicosity. The fourth-power relationship between the probability of transmitter release at the active zones of sympathetic varicosities and motor endplates and the external calcium concentration is also explained by this approach. So, too, is the fact that the time course of the increased rate of quantal secretion from a somatic active zone after an impulse is invariant with changes in the amount of calcium that enters through its calcium channel, whether due to changes consequent on the actions of autoreceptor agents such as adenosine or to facilitation. The increased

  18. A single-chain bispecific Fv2 molecule produced in mammalian cells redirects lysis by activated CTL.

    PubMed

    Jost, C R; Titus, J A; Kurucz, I; Segal, D M

    1996-02-01

    Single-chain Fv (sFv) molecules consist of the two variable domains of an antibody (Ab) connected by a polypeptide spacer and contain the binding activities of their parental antibodies (Abs). In this paper we have attached the C-terminus of 2C11-sFv (anti-mouse CD3 epsilon-chain) to the N-terminus of OKT9-sFv (anti-human transferrin receptor [TfR]) through a 23 amino acid inter-sFv linker consisting primarily of CH1 region residues from 2C11, to form a single-chain bispecific Fv2 [bs(sFv)2] molecule. The bs(sFv)2 was expressed in COS-7 cells, and was secreted at the same rate as the two parental sFvs. The secreted protein had both anti-CD3 and anti-TfR binding activities. Essentially all of the secreted bs(sFv)2 molecules bound TfR and the binding affinity of the bs(sFv)2 was comparable to that of OKT9 sFv and Fab. Thus, the attachment of the inter-sFv linker to the N-terminus of OKT9-sFv did not impair its binding function. The bs(sFv)2 retained both binding specificities after long-term storage at 4 degrees C or overnight incubation at 37 degrees C. It redirected activated mouse CTL to specifically lyse human TfR+ target cells at low (ng/ml) concentrations and was much more active than a chemically cross-linked heteroconjugate prepared from the same parental mAbs. Because bs(sFv)2 molecules secreted by mammalian cells are homogeneous proteins containing two binding sites in a single polypeptide chain, they hold great promise as an easily obtainable, economic source of a bispecific molecule suitable for in vivo use. PMID:8649442

  19. Coupling factor 6 downregulates platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 via c-Src activation and acts as a proatherogenic molecule.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Akiko; Osanai, Tomohiro; Katoh, Chisato; Tanaka, Makoto; Tomita, Hirofumi; Morimoto, Takeshi; Murakami, Reiichi; Magota, Koji; Okumura, Ken

    2008-09-01

    Coupling factor 6 (CF6), a component of ATP synthase, suppresses the generation of prostacyclin and nitric oxide (NO). Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is involved in shear-induced NO production. To investigate the linkage between the actions of CF6 and PECAM-1, we examined the effects of CF6 on PECAM-1 expression and shear-mediated NO release, comparatively with those of angiotensin II (AngII). Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) with CF6 at 10(-7)M or AngII at 10(-7)M for 24h suppressed PECAM-1 gene and protein expression. CF6 or AngII activated c-Src at 15 min in HUVEC, and blockade of c-Src with PP1, its specific inhibitor, restored them. Efrapeptin, an inhibitor of ATPase, attenuated CF6-induced suppression of PECAM-1 gene expression by blockade of acidification, whereas superoxide dismutase or apocinin, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, blocked AngII-induced suppression of PECAM-1. Exposure of the cells to shear stress at 25 dynes/cm(2) for 30 min enhanced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(1177) and NO release. Pretreatment with CF6 or AngII for 24h attenuated them in HUVEC and HAEC. These suggest that CF6 downregulates PECAM-1 expression via c-Src activation and attenuates shear-induced NO release presumably by suppressing eNOS phosphorylation. PMID:18243211

  20. Observations of Seafloor Deformation and Methane Venting within an Active Fault Zone Offshore Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.; Brewer, P. G.; Vrijenhoek, R.; Lundsten, L.

    2013-12-01

    Detailed mapping surveys of the floor and flanks of the Santa Monica Basin, San Pedro Basin, and San Diego Trough were conducted during the past seven years using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) built and operated by MBARI specifically for seafloor mapping. The AUV collected data provide up to 1 m resolution multibeam bathymetric grids with a vertical precision of 0.15 m. Along with high-resolution multibeam, the AUV also collects chirp seismic reflection profiles. Structures within the uppermost 10-20 m of the seafloor, which in the surveys presented here is composed of recent sediment drape, can typically be resolved in the sub-bottom reflectors. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives allowed for ground-truth observations and sampling within the surveyed areas. The objectives of these dives included finding evidence of recent seafloor deformation and locating areas where chemosynthetic biological communities are supported by fluid venting. Distinctive seafloor features within an active fault zone are revealed in unprecedented detail in the AUV generated maps and seismic reflection profiles. Evidence for recent fault displacements include linear scarps which can be as small as 20 cm high but traceable for several km, right lateral offsets within submarine channels and topographic ridges, and abrupt discontinuities in sub-bottom reflectors, which in places appear to displace seafloor sediments. Several topographic highs that occur within the fault zone appear to be anticlines related to step-overs in these faults. These topographic highs are, in places, topped with circular mounds that are up to 15 m high and have ~30° sloping sides. The crests of the topographic highs and the mounds both have distinctive rough morphologies produced by broken pavements of irregular blocks of methane-derived authigenic carbonates, and by topographic depressions, commonly more than 2 m deep. These areas of distinctive rough topography are commonly associated with living

  1. Identification and biological activities of a new antiangiogenic small molecule that suppresses mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Park, Ju Yeol; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} YCG063 was screened as a new angiogenesis inhibitor which suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation in a phenotypic cell-based screening of a small molecule-focused library. {yields} The compound inhibited in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} This new small molecule tool will provide a basis for a better understanding of angiogenesis driven under hypoxic conditions. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with multiple cellular functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In particular, high levels of mitochondrial ROS in hypoxic cells regulate many angiogenesis-related diseases, including cancer and ischemic disorders. Here we report a new angiogenesis inhibitor, YCG063, which suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation in a phenotypic cell-based screening of a small molecule-focused library with an ArrayScan HCS reader. YCG063 suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation under a hypoxic condition in a dose-dependent manner, leading to the inhibition of in vitro angiogenic tube formation and chemoinvasion as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) at non-toxic doses. In addition, YCG063 decreased the expression levels of HIF-1{alpha} and its target gene, VEGF. Collectively, a new antiangiogenic small molecule that suppresses mitochondrial ROS was identified. This new small molecule tool will provide a basis for a better understanding of angiogenesis driven under hypoxic conditions.

  2. How water molecules affect the catalytic activity of hydrolases - A XANES study of the local structures of peptide deformylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Peixin; Wang, Yu; Chu, Wangsheng; Guo, Xiaoyun; Yang, Feifei; Yu, Meijuan; Zhao, Haifeng; Dong, Yuhui; Xie, Yaning; Gong, Weimin; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-12-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a prokaryotic enzyme that catalyzes the deformylation of nascent peptides generated during protein synthesis and water molecules play a key role in these hydrolases. Using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and ab initio calculations we accurately probe the local atomic environment of the metal ion binding in the active site of PDF at different pH values and with different metal ions. This new approach is an effective way to monitor existing correlations among functions and structural changes. We show for the first time that the enzymatic activity depends on pH values and metal ions via the bond length of the nearest coordinating water (Wat1) to the metal ion. Combining experimental and theoretical data we may claim that PDF exhibits an enhanced enzymatic activity only when the distance of the Wat1 molecule with the metal ion falls in the limited range from 2.15 to 2.55 Å.

  3. Biochemical and toxicological evaluation of nano-heparins in cell functional properties, proteasome activation and expression of key matrix molecules.

    PubMed

    Piperigkou, Zoi; Karamanou, Konstantina; Afratis, Nikolaos A; Bouris, Panagiotis; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Belmiro, Celso L R; Pavão, Mauro S G; Vynios, Dimitrios H; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan heparin and its derivatives act strongly on blood coagulation, controlling the activity of serine protease inhibitors in plasma. Nonetheless, there is accumulating evidence highlighting different anticancer activities of these molecules in numerous types of cancer. Nano-heparins may have great biological significance since they can inhibit cell proliferation and invasion as well as inhibiting proteasome activation. Moreover, they can cause alterations in the expression of major modulators of the tumor microenvironment, regulating cancer cell behavior. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of two nano-heparin formulations: one isolated from porcine intestine and the other from the sea squirt Styela plicata, on a breast cancer cell model. We determined whether these nano-heparins are able to affect cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion, as well as proteasome activity and the expression of extracellular matrix molecules. Specifically, we observed that nano-Styela compared to nano-Mammalian analogue has higher inhibitory role on cell proliferation, invasion and proteasome activity. Moreover, nano-Styela regulates cell apoptosis, expression of inflammatory molecules, such as IL-6 and IL-8 and reduces the expression levels of extracellular matrix macromolecules, such as the proteolytic enzymes MT1-MMP, uPA and the cell surface proteoglycans syndecan-1 and -2, but not on syndecan-4. The observations reported in the present article indicate that nano-heparins and especially ascidian heparin are effective agents for heparin-induced effects in critical cancer cell functions, providing an important possibility in pharmacological targeting. PMID:26476401

  4. Impaired hippocampal activity at the goal zone on the place preference task in a DISC1 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuichiro; Sawa, Akira; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Learning deficit is a clinical feature of many mental disorders and is hypothesized to result from an inability to integrate information in neural systems. We showed that transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative form of DISC1, a risk gene for neuropsychiatric disorders, exhibited impaired performance in a reward-place association task when combined with a mild isolation stress. CA1 cells in the mutant mice showed normal place cell properties, but their activity at the goal zone was diminished. This abnormality in hippocampal activity at the goal zone during the task may underlie the learning deficit observed in the DISC1 mutant mice. PMID:26497623

  5. Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic guided waves from microearthquake data

    SciTech Connect

    SGP-TR-150-16

    1995-01-26

    Active fault systems usually provide high-permeability channels for hydrothermal outflow in geothermal fields. Locating such fault systems is of a vital importance to plan geothermal production and injection drilling, since an active fault zone often acts as a fracture-extensive low-velocity wave guide to seismic waves. We have located an active fault zone in the Coso geothermal field, California, by identifying and analyzing a fault-zone trapped Rayleigh-type guided wave from microearthquake data. The wavelet transform is employed to characterize guided-wave's velocity-frequency dispersion, and numerical methods are used to simulate the guided-wave propagation. The modeling calculation suggests that the fault zone is {approx} 200m wide, and has a P wave velocity of 4.80 km/s and a S wave velocity of 3.00 km/s, which is sandwiched between two half spaces with relatively higher velocities (P wave velocity 5.60 km/s, and S wave velocity 3.20 km/s). zones having vertical or nearly vertical dipping fault planes.

  6. Alkyne-tag Raman imaging of bio-active small molecules in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Jun; Palonpon, Almar F.; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Kawata, Satoshi; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-12-01

    Raman microscopy is useful for molecular imaging and analysis of biological specimens. Here, we used alkyne containing a carbon-carbon triple bond as a Raman tag for observing small molecules in live cells. Alkyne tags can maintain original properties of target molecules with providing high chemical specificity owing to its distinct peak in a Raman-silent window of biomolecules. For demonstrations, alkyne-tagged thymidine and coenzyme Q analogue in live cells were visualized with high-spatial resolution. We extended the application of alkyne-tag imaging to visualize cell organelles and specific lipid components in artificial monolayer membranes.

  7. Activation of Carbonyl-Containing Molecules with Solid Lewis Acids in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Leshkov, Yuriy; Davis, Mark E.

    2011-09-28

    Current interest in reacting carbonyl-containing molecules in aqueous media is primarily due to the growing emphasis on conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Recently, solid Lewis acids have been shown to perform catalytic reactions with carbonyl-containing molecules such as sugars in aqueous media. Here, catalysis mediated by Lewis acids is briefly discussed, Lewis acid solids that perform catalysis in aqueous media are then described, and the review is concluded with a few comments on the outlook for the future.

  8. Peculiarities of ULF electromagnetic disturbances before strong earthquakes in seismic active zone of Kamchatka peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytenko, Y. A.; Ismagilov, V. S.; Schekotov, A.; Molchanov, O.; Chebrov, V.; Raspopov, O. M.

    2006-12-01

    Regular observations of ULF electromagnetic disturbances and acoustic emissions at st. Karymshino in seismic active zone of Kamchatka peninsula were carried out during 2001-2003 years. Five seismic active periods with strong earthquakes (M>5) were displayed during this period. These EQs occurred at the Pacific at 20-60 km depth at 100-140 km distances to the East from the st. Karymshino. Analysis of normalized dynamic power spectra of data of high-sensitive (0.2 pT/sqrt(Hz)) three-component induction magnetometer achieved a significant disorder of daily variation and increasing of the magnetic disturbance intensities (from 0.2 to ~1 pT) in the whole investigated frequency range (0.2-5 Hz). The anomaly intensity increasing was observed during the 12-18 hours before main seismic shocks. Maximum of the increasing occurred during 4-6 hours before the EQs. An increasing of acoustic emissions (F=30 Hz) was observed during the same period. A sharp decreasing of the magnetic disturbance intensities was observed 2-4 hours before the EQs. We suppose that physical processes in a hearth of forthcoming EQ lead to an irreversible avalanche-like formation of cracks and stimulation of the acoustic and ULF electromagnetic disturbances.

  9. Distribution of dehalogenation activity in subseafloor sediments of the Nankai Trough subduction zone

    PubMed Central

    Futagami, Taiki; Morono, Yuki; Terada, Takeshi; Kaksonen, Anna H.; Inagaki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Halogenated organic matter buried in marine subsurface sediment may serve as a source of electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration of subseafloor microbes. Detection of a diverse array of reductive dehalogenase-homologous (rdhA) genes suggests that subseafloor organohalide-respiring microbial communities may play significant ecological roles in the biogeochemical carbon and halogen cycle in the subseafloor biosphere. We report here the spatial distribution of dehalogenation activity in the Nankai Trough plate-subduction zone of the northwest Pacific off the Kii Peninsula of Japan. Incubation experiments with slurries of sediment collected at various depths and locations showed that degradation of several organohalides tested only occurred in the shallow sedimentary basin, down to 4.7 metres below the seafloor, despite detection of rdhA in the deeper sediments. We studied the phylogenetic diversity of the metabolically active microbes in positive enrichment cultures by extracting RNA, and found that Desulfuromonadales bacteria predominate. In addition, for the isolation of genes involved in the dehalogenation reaction, we performed a substrate-induced gene expression screening on DNA extracted from the enrichment cultures. Diverse DNA fragments were obtained and some of them showed best BLAST hit to known organohalide respirers such as Dehalococcoides, whereas no functionally known dehalogenation-related genes such as rdhA were found, indicating the need to improve the molecular approach to assess functional genes for organohalide respiration. PMID:23479745

  10. An automatic continuous monitoring station for groundwater geochemistry at an active fault zone in SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chun-Wei; Yang, Tsanyao F.; Fu, Ching-Chou; Hilton, David R.; Liu, Tsung-Kwei; Walia, Vivek; Lai, Tzu-Hua

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have revealed that gas compositions of fluid samples collected from southwestern Taiwan where many hot springs and mud volcanoes are distributed along tectonic sutures show significant variation prior to and after some disaster seismic events. Such variations, including radon activity, CH4/CO2, CO2/3He and 3He/4He ratios of gas compositions, are considered to be precursors of earthquakes in this area. To validate the relationship between fluid compositions and local earthquakes, a continuous monitoring station has been established at Yun-Shui, which is an artesian well located at an active fault zone in SW Taiwan. It is equipped with a radon detector and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) for in-situ measurement of the dissolved gas composition. Data is telemetered to Taipei so we are able to monitor variations of gas composition in real time. Furthermore, we also installed a syringe pump apparatus for the retrieval and temporal analysis of helium (SPARTAH) at this station. From the SPARTAH samples, we can obtain detailed time series records of H-O isotopic compositions, DIC concentration and δ13C isotopic ratios, and anion concentration of the water samples at this station. After continuous monitoring for about one year, some anomalies occurred prior to some local earthquakes. It demonstrates that this automated system is feasible for long-term continuous seismo-geochemical research in this area. Keywords: monitoring; geochemistry; isotope; dissolved gases; pre-seismic signal.

  11. Slip Rates of Main Active Fault Zones Through Turkey Inferred From GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozener, H.; Aktug, B.; Dogru, A.; Tasci, L.; Acar, M.; Emre, O.; Yilmaz, O.; Turgut, B.; Halicioglu, K.; Sabuncu, A.; Bal, O.; Eraslan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Active Fault Map of Turkey was revised and published by General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration in 2012. This map reveals that there are about 500 faults can generate earthquakes.In order to understand the earthquake potential of these faults, it is needed to determine the slip rates. Although many regional and local studies were performed in the past, the slip rates of the active faults in Turkey have not been determined. In this study, the block modelling, which is the most common method to produce slip rates, will be done. GPS velocities required for block modeling is being compiled from the published studies and the raw data provided then velocity field is combined. To form a homogeneous velocity field, different stochastic models will be used and the optimal velocity field will be achieved. In literature, GPS site velocities, which are computed for different purposes and published, are combined globally and this combined velocity field are used in the analysis of strain accumulation. It is also aimed to develop optimal stochastic models to combine the velocity data. Real time, survey mode and published GPS observations is being combined in this study. We also perform new GPS observations. Furthermore, micro blocks and main fault zones from Active Fault Map Turkey will be determined and homogeneous velocity field will be used to infer slip rates of these active faults. Here, we present the result of first year of the study. This study is being supported by THE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF TURKEY (TUBITAK)-CAYDAG with grant no. 113Y430.

  12. New insights on the seismogenic potential of the Eastern Betic Shear Zone (SE Iberia): Quaternary activity and paleoseismicity of the SW segment of the Carrascoy Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Banda, Raquel; García-Mayordomo, Julián.; Insua-Arévalo, Juan M.; Salazar, Ángel E.; Rodríguez-Escudero, Emilio; Álvarez-Gómez, Jose A.; Medialdea, Alicia; Herrero, María. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Carrascoy Fault (CAF) is one of the main active faults that form part of the Eastern Betic Shear Zone, a 450 km fault system that accommodates most of the convergence between the Eurasian (Iberia) and Nubian plates in the Betic Cordillera, south Spain. Although the CAF represents a major earthquake threat to the nearby City of Murcia, studies on its Quaternary tectonics and seismogenic potential are scarce to date. We present evidence that supports the division of the CAF into two overlapping segments with contrasting tectonic structure, Quaternary activity, and landform control: a SW segment, characterized by a broad fold-and-thrust zone similar to the forebergs defined in the Gobi-Altai region, and a NE segment, characterized by a sharp mountain front controlled by strike-slip tectonics. We attribute the differentiation into these two segments to the stresses associated with topography, which in turn is a consequence of the shortening component, at the middle Pleistocene, after circa 217.4 ka. For the SW segment we infer the occurrence of 9 to 11, Mw 6.7 paleoearthquakes in the last 30.2 kyr, and a slip rate of 0.37 ± 0.08 m/kyr. We date the occurrence of the last surface rupture event after 2750 B.P., and we estimate an average recurrence period of major events of 3.3 ± 0.7 kyr.

  13. Discovery of an orally active small-molecule irreversible inhibitor of protein disulfide isomerase for ovarian cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shili; Butkevich, Alexey N.; Yamada, Roppei; Zhou, Yu; Debnath, Bikash; Duncan, Roger; Zandi, Ebrahim; Petasis, Nicos A.; Neamati, Nouri

    2012-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein, catalyzes disulfide bond breakage, formation, and rearrangement. The effect of PDI inhibition on ovarian cancer progression is not yet clear, and there is a need for potent, selective, and safe small-molecule inhibitors of PDI. Here, we report a class of propynoic acid carbamoyl methyl amides (PACMAs) that are active against a panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines. Using fluorescent derivatives, 2D gel electrophoresis, and MS, we established that PACMA 31, one of the most active analogs, acts as an irreversible small-molecule inhibitor of PDI, forming a covalent bond with the active site cysteines of PDI. We also showed that PDI activity is essential for the survival and proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells. In vivo, PACMA 31 showed tumor targeting ability and significantly suppressed ovarian tumor growth without causing toxicity to normal tissues. These irreversible small-molecule PDI inhibitors represent an important approach for the development of targeted anticancer agents for ovarian cancer therapy, and they can also serve as useful probes for investigating the biology of PDI-implicated pathways. PMID:22988091

  14. Unequal Activities of Enantiomers via Biological Receptors: Examples of Chiral Drug, Pesticide, and Fragrance Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannschreck, Albrecht; Kiesswetter, Roland; von Angerer, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    A molecule coming from outside an organism can form a ligand-receptor complex. Upon its formation, a message is transmitted, for example, to certain cells. In this way, two enantiomers can emit messages that differ, either quantitatively or qualitatively. In the present article, these facts are taken as a common basis for the actions of chiral…

  15. Probe molecule studies: Active species in alcohol synthesis. Tenth quarterly report, January 1993--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Blackmond, D.G.; Wender, I.; Oukaci, R.; Wang, Jian

    1993-03-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a better understanding of the mechanisms of formation of alcohols and other oxygenates from syngas over supported catalysts. Probe molecules are added in situ during the reaction to help delineate reaction pathways and identify reaction intermediate species. The key of our study is to investigate how the species generated by these probe molecules interact with surface species present during oxygenate formation. The catalysts chosen for this investigation is Co/Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Detailed motivations for studying this system as well as using CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2} as the probe molecule were given in a previous report. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experiments were carried out on calcined and reduced samples of Co(0%)/Cu/ZnO and Co(10%)/Cu/ZnO catalysts. The extent of reduction of the copper and cobalt phases in the Co(0,5 and l0%)/Cu/ZnO catalysts was estimated from XPS, TPR, and XRD results. (C) A Co(5%) /Al/{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was prepared to be used as a base catalyst for the study of probe molecule addition. CO hydrogenation under the same conditions used before was conducted over the Co(5%)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as well as a Co/Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst (ZC45) prepared by coprecipitation method.

  16. Synthesis of Zn-MOF incorporating titanium-hydrides as active sites binding H2 molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongsik; Ok Kim, Dong; Wook Kim, Dong; Sagong, Kil

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the synthetic effort for a Zn-MOF imparting Ti-H as a preferential binding site potentially capturing H2 molecules via Kubas-type interaction. The formation mechanism of Ti-H innate to the final material was potentially demonstrated to follow a radical dissociation rather than a β-hydrogen elimination and a C-H reductive elimination.

  17. Active deformation along the Andaman-Nicobar subduction zone from seismic reflection studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeremans, R. E.; Singh, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Andaman-Sumatra subduction zone is one of the most seismically active regions on Earth and is a prime example of oblique subduction. It is the result of the oblique convergence between the downgoing Indo-Australian and the overriding Eurasian plates, leading to slip partitioning into a trench-normal thrust component along the plate interface and a trench-subparallel strike-slip component along a sliver fault. The direction of convergence is 90° with respect to the trench near Java, reduces to 45° off of northern Sumatra, and becomes almost parallel to the trench along the Andaman-Nicobar portion of the subduction. Rates of subduction vary from 63 mm/yr off of Java, 50 mm/yr near Nias Island, 45 mm/yr northwest of Sumatra, and 39 mm/yr near the Andaman Islands. After the great December 2004 earthquake, the Sumatran section of the subduction zone was heavily investigated using marine geophysical studies, but the deformation processes in the Andaman-Nicobar region remain poorly understood due to the lack of data. Here, we present seismic reflection profiles from the Andaman-Nicobar region that cover the deformation front, the forearc high, and the forearc basin. We find that the presence of thick (> 3 s TWT) sediments lead to slip taking place predominantly along landward vergent frontal faults. The frontal fault vergence changes to seaward due to the thinning (< 2 s TWT) of the sediments in the region where the Ninetyeast ridge subducts. The presence of a thick (> 3 s TWT) 20 km-long unit of undeformed sediments, possibly resulting from the landward vergence of the frontal thrusts, suggests that ~40 km of the Ninetyeast ridge has subducted beneath the Andaman forearc. The forearc is widest between the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, likely due to the subduction of thick sediments. The forearc basin is bounded in the west by a series of backthrusts and is underlain by a continental crust, which was once a part of the Malay Peninsula. The forearc basin is crescent

  18. Active tectonics west of New Zealand's Alpine Fault: South Westland Fault Zone activity shows Australian Plate instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pascale, Gregory P.; Chandler-Yates, Nicholas; Dela Pena, Federico; Wilson, Pam; May, Elijah; Twiss, Amber; Cheng, Che

    2016-04-01

    The 300 km long South Westland Fault Zone (SWFZ) is within the footwall of the Central Alpine Fault (<20 km away) and has 3500 m of dip-slip displacement, but it has been unknown if the fault is active. Here the first evidence for SWFZ thrust faulting in the "stable" Australian Plate is shown with cumulative dip-slip displacements up to 5.9 m (with 3 m throw) on Pleistocene and Holocene sediments and gentle hanging wall anticlinal folding. Cone penetration test (CPT) stratigraphy shows repeated sequences within the fault scarp (consistent with thrusting). Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating constrains the most recent rupture post-12.1 ± 1.7 ka with evidence for three to four events during earthquakes of at least Mw 6.8. This study shows significant deformation is accommodated on poorly characterized Australian Plate structures northwest of the Alpine Fault and demonstrates that major active and seismogenic structures remain uncharacterized in densely forested regions on Earth.

  19. Dual-color STED microscopy reveals a sandwich structure of Bassoon and Piccolo in active zones of adult and aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi; Badawi, Yomna; Mori, Shuuichi; Shigemoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Presynaptic active zones play a pivotal role as synaptic vesicle release sites for synaptic transmission, but the molecular architecture of active zones in mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) at sub-diffraction limited resolution remains unknown. Bassoon and Piccolo are active zone specific cytosolic proteins essential for active zone assembly in NMJs, ribbon synapses, and brain synapses. These proteins are thought to colocalize and share some functions at active zones. Here, we report an unexpected finding of non-overlapping localization of these two proteins in mouse NMJs revealed using dual-color stimulated emission depletion (STED) super resolution microscopy. Piccolo puncta sandwiched Bassoon puncta and aligned in a Piccolo-Bassoon-Piccolo structure in adult NMJs. P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) puncta colocalized with Bassoon puncta. The P/Q-type VGCC and Bassoon protein levels decreased significantly in NMJs from aged mouse. In contrast, the Piccolo levels in NMJs from aged mice were comparable to levels in adult mice. This study revealed the molecular architecture of active zones in mouse NMJs at sub-diffraction limited resolution, and described the selective degeneration mechanism of active zone proteins in NMJs from aged mice. Interestingly, the localization pattern of active zone proteins described herein is similar to active zone structures described using electron microscope tomography. PMID:27321892

  20. Design and synthesis of new hybrid molecules that activate the transcription factor Nrf2 and simultaneously release carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jayne Louise; Fayad Kobeissi, Sarah; Oudir, Souhila; Haas, Benjamin; Michel, Brian; Dubois Randé, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Anthony; Martens, Thierry; Rivard, Michael; Motterlini, Roberto; Foresti, Roberta

    2014-11-01

    The transcription factor Nrf2 and its downstream target heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) are essential protective systems against oxidative stress and inflammation. The products of HO-1 enzymatic activity, biliverdin and carbon monoxide (CO), actively contribute to this protection, suggesting that exploitation of these cellular systems may offer new therapeutic avenues in a variety of diseases. Starting from a CO-releasing compound and a chemical scaffold exhibiting electrophilic characteristics (esters of fumaric acid), we report the synthesis of hybrid molecules that simultaneously activate Nrf2 and liberate CO. These hybrid compounds, which we termed "HYCOs", release CO to myoglobin and activate the CO-sensitive fluorescent probe COP-1, while also potently inducing nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and HO-1 expression and activity in different cell types. Thus, we provide here the first example of a new class of pharmacologically active molecules that target the HO-1 pathway by combining an Nrf2 activator coordinated to a CO-releasing group. PMID:25224540

  1. Ultrapure Blue Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Molecules: Efficient HOMO-LUMO Separation by the Multiple Resonance Effect.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Takuji; Shiren, Kazushi; Nakajima, Kiichi; Nomura, Shintaro; Nakatsuka, Soichiro; Kinoshita, Keisuke; Ni, Jingping; Ono, Yohei; Ikuta, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    Ultrapure blue-fluorescent molecules based on thermally activated delayed fluorescence are developed. Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices employing the new emitters exhibit a deep blue emission at 467 nm with a full-width at half-maximum of 28 nm, CIE coordinates of (0.12, 0.13), and an internal quantum efficiency of ≈100%, which represent record-setting performance for blue OLED devices. PMID:26865384

  2. Group Dynamics in the Language Classroom: Embodied Participation as Active Reception in the Collective Zone of Proximal Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Compernolle, Rémi A.; Williams, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the notion of "active reception" during small-group collaborative interaction in the foreign language classroom, focusing on the embodied participation of a secondary (nonspeaking) interactant, Diane. Drawing on Vygotskian sociocultural theory, we argue that within small-group work, a Zone of Proximal Development…

  3. 78 FR 54234 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity PBR, Inc. d/b/a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... Board (15 CFR part 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 25253... PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries (Polypropylene Geotextiles), Athens, Georgia On April 8, 2013... activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries...

  4. 78 FR 30269 - Foreign-Trade Zone 129-Bellingham, Washington; Authorization of Production Activity; T.C. Trading...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Activity; T.C. Trading Company, Inc. (Eyeglass Assembly and Kitting), Blaine, WA On January 17, 2013, the... Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of T.C. Trading Company, Inc., within Subzone 129B, in Blaine... 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting ] public comment (78 FR 7395, 02/01/2013)....

  5. Major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen and costimulatory molecules on in vitro and in vivo activated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, Gavin P; McCrae, Jame; Hill, Kathryn; Perry, Martin; Baxter, Derek

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that normal human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) contain cytoplasmic ‘stores’ of three key molecules normally associated with antigen presentation and T-cell costimulation, i.e. major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen, CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2). These cytoplasmic molecules were found to translocate to the cell surface within a few minutes following cross-linking (X-L) of Mac-1: an early neutrophil activation signal. In this study we have compared X-L of Mac −1 in parallel with four other well documented in vitro neutrophil activators: phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine, lipopolysaccharide, and phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G–Latex particles. In addition, we have used paired samples of neutrophils obtained from peripheral blood (as a control) and synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis as a source of in vivo activated cells. With the exception of phagocytosis, all activators resulted in the rapid (within 30 min) generation of two populations of activated neutrophils (designated P1 and P2) based on flow-cytometry measurements of size, granularity and phenotype. Significant up-regulation of DR and costimulatory molecules was observed, predominantly on P2 cells, with all activators except phagocytosis. CD80 and CD86 were noted to respond to the various activation signals in a different pattern suggesting that their intracellular granule location may be different. Dual-staining confocal laser microscopy studies showed that CD80 is largely confined to secretory vesicles (SVs) while CD86 appears to have a much wider distribution being found in SVs and within secondary (specific) and primary (azurophilic) granules. Increased surface expression of these antigens was also observed on P2 synovial fluid neutrophils appearing as large heterogeneous clusters on the cell surface when visualized by confocal laser microscopy. PMID:17034427

  6. Cyclosporine A affects the in vitro expression of T cell activation-related molecules and cytokines in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fellman, C L; Stokes, J V; Archer, T M; Pinchuk, L M; Lunsford, K V; Mackin, A J

    2011-04-15

    Cyclosporine is a powerful immunosuppressive drug that is being used with increasing frequency to treat a wide range of immune-mediated diseases in the dog. To date, ideal dosing protocols that will achieve immunosuppression with cyclosporine in dogs remain unclear, and standard methods that can measure effectiveness of immunosuppression have not been established. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of in vitro cyclosporine exposure on a panel of molecules expressed by activated T cells to ascertain their potential as biomarkers of immunosuppression in dogs. Blood was drawn from six healthy dogs, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and activated. Half of the cells were incubated with 200 ng/mL cyclosporine prior to activation, and the other half were not exposed to cyclosporine. Samples were analyzed using flow cytometry, and the expression of intracellular cytokines IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-γ was evaluated after 6, 12, and 24h of drug exposure. Each cytokine exhibited a time-dependent suppression profile, and all but two samples activated in the presence of cyclosporine showed lower cytokine expression than untreated controls. We also evaluated the expression of the surface T cell activation molecules CD25 and CD95 by flow cytometry after 36 h of drug exposure. Expression of these surface molecules decreased significantly when activated in the presence of cyclosporine. Our results suggest that suppressed expression of the markers related to T cell activation could potentially be utilized as an indicator of the efficacy of cyclosporine therapy in dogs. PMID:21227512

  7. Single molecule measurements of DNA helicase activity with magnetic tweezers and t-test based step-finding analysis.

    PubMed

    Seol, Yeonee; Strub, Marie-Paule; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic tweezers is a versatile and easy to implement single-molecule technique that has become increasingly prevalent in the study of nucleic acid based molecular motors. Here, we provide a description of the magnetic tweezers instrument and guidelines for measuring and analyzing DNA helicase activity. Along with experimental methods, we describe a robust method of single-molecule trajectory analysis based on the Student's t-test that accommodates continuous transitions in addition to the discrete transitions assumed in most widely employed analysis routines. To illustrate the single-molecule unwinding assay and the analysis routine, we provide DNA unwinding measurements of Escherichia coli RecQ helicase under a variety of conditions (Na+, ATP, temperature, and DNA substrate geometry). These examples reveal that DNA unwinding measurements under various conditions can aid in elucidating the unwinding mechanism of DNA helicase but also emphasize that environmental effects on DNA helicase activity must be considered in relation to in vivo activity and mechanism. PMID:27131595

  8. SET7/9 Catalytic Mutants Reveal the Role of Active Site Water Molecules in Lysine Multiple Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Del Rizzo, Paul A.; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M.A.; Strunk, Bethany S.; Roiko, Marijo S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Houtz, Robert L.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2010-11-15

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine {epsilon}-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine {epsilon}-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated {epsilon}-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes.

  9. New Antibiotic Molecules: Bypassing the Membrane Barrier of Gram Negative Bacteria Increases the Activity of Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mamelli, Laurent; Petit, Sylvain; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Giglione, Carmela; Lieutaud, Aurélie; Meinnel, Thierry; Artaud, Isabelle; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a major concern in hospitals worldwide and urgently require the development of new antibacterial molecules. Peptide deformylase is an intracellular target now well-recognized for the design of new antibiotics. The bacterial susceptibility to such a cytoplasmic target primarily depends on the capacity of the compound to reach and accumulate in the cytosol. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the respective involvement of penetration (influx) and pumping out (efflux) mechanisms to peptide deformylase inhibitors (PDF-I) activity, the potency of various series was determined using various genetic contexts (efflux overproducers or efflux-deleted strains) and membrane permeabilizers. Depending on the structure of the tested molecules, two behaviors could be observed: (i) for actinonin the first PDF-I characterized, the AcrAB efflux system was the main parameter involved in the bacterial susceptibility, and (ii), for the lastest PDF-Is such as the derivatives of 2-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)-N-hydroxyacetamide, the penetration through the membrane was a important limiting step. Conclusions/Significance Our results clearly show that the bacterial membrane plays a key role in modulating the antibacterial activity of PDF-Is. The bacterial susceptibility for these new antibacterial molecules can be improved by two unrelated ways in MDR strains: by collapsing the Acr efflux activity or by increasing the uptake rate through the bacterial membrane. The efficiency of the second method is associated with the nature of the compound. PMID:19649280

  10. Liparid and macrourid fishes of the hadal zone: in situ observations of activity and feeding behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, A.J.; Fujii, T.; Solan, M.; Matsumoto, A.K.; Bagley, P.M.; Priede, I.G.

    2008-01-01

    Using baited camera landers, the first images of living fishes were recorded in the hadal zone (6000–11 000 m) in the Pacific Ocean. The widespread abyssal macrourid Coryphaenoides yaquinae was observed at a new depth record of approximately 7000 m in the Japan Trench. Two endemic species of liparid were observed at similar depths: Pseudoliparis amblystomopsis in the Japan Trench and Notoliparis kermadecensis in the Kermadec Trench. From these observations, we have documented swimming and feeding behaviour of these species and derived the first estimates of hadal fish abundance. The liparids intercepted bait within 100–200 min but were observed to preferentially feed on scavenging amphipods. Notoliparis kermadecensis act as top predators in the hadal food web, exhibiting up to nine suction-feeding events per minute. Both species showed distinctive swimming gaits: P. amblystomopsis (mean length 22.5 cm) displayed a mean tail-beat frequency of 0.47 Hz and mean caudal : pectoral frequency ratio of 0.76, whereas N. kermadecensis (mean length 31.5 cm) displayed respective values of 1.04 and 2.08 Hz. Despite living at extreme depths, these endemic liparids exhibit similar activity levels compared with shallow-water liparids. PMID:19129104

  11. Synaptophysin 1 Clears Synaptobrevin 2 from the Presynaptic Active Zone to Prevent Short-Term Depression.

    PubMed

    Rajappa, Rajit; Gauthier-Kemper, Anne; Böning, Daniel; Hüve, Jana; Klingauf, Jürgen

    2016-02-16

    Release site clearance is an important process during synaptic vesicle (SV) recycling. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism. Here we identify self-assembly of exocytosed Synaptobrevin 2 (Syb2) and Synaptophysin 1 (Syp1) by homo- and hetero-oligomerization into clusters as key mechanisms mediating release site clearance for preventing cis-SNARE complex formation at the active zone (AZ). In hippocampal neurons from Syp1 knockout mice, neurons expressing a monomeric Syb2 mutant, or after acute block of the ATPase N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), responsible for cis-SNARE complex disassembly, we found strong frequency-dependent short-term depression (STD), whereas retrieval of Syb2 by compensatory endocytosis was only affected weakly. Defects in Syb2 endocytosis were stimulus- and frequency-dependent, indicating that Syp1 is not essential for Syb2 retrieval, but for its efficient clearance upstream of endocytosis. Our findings identify an SV protein as a release site clearance factor. PMID:26854222

  12. Tetraspanin 7 regulates sealing zone formation and the bone-resorbing activity of osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jun-Oh; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Haemin; Kim, Min Kyung; Song, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Zang Hee; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2016-09-01

    Tetraspanin family proteins regulate morphology, motility, fusion, and signaling in various cell types. We investigated the role of the tetraspanin 7 (Tspan7) isoform in the differentiation and function of osteoclasts. Tspan7 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis. When Tspan7 expression was reduced in primary precursor cells by siRNA-mediated gene knock-down, the generation of multinuclear osteoclasts was not affected. However, a striking cytoskeletal abnormality was observed: the formation of the podosome belt structure was inhibited and the microtubular network were disrupted by Tspan7 knock-down. Decreases in acetylated microtubules and levels of phosphorylated Src and Pyk2 in Tspan7 knock-down cells supported the involvement of Tspan7 in cytoskeletal rearrangement signaling in osteoclasts. This cytoskeletal defect interfered with sealing zone formation and subsequently the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts on dentin surfaces. Our results suggest that Tspan7 plays an important role in cytoskeletal organization required for the bone-resorbing function of osteoclasts by regulating signaling to Src, Pyk2, and microtubules. PMID:27416754

  13. Liparid and macrourid fishes of the hadal zone: in situ observations of activity and feeding behaviour.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, A J; Fujii, T; Solan, M; Matsumoto, A K; Bagley, P M; Priede, I G

    2009-03-22

    Using baited camera landers, the first images of living fishes were recorded in the hadal zone (6000-11000 m) in the Pacific Ocean. The widespread abyssal macrourid Coryphaenoides yaquinae was observed at a new depth record of approximately 7000 m in the Japan Trench. Two endemic species of liparid were observed at similar depths: Pseudoliparis amblystomopsis in the Japan Trench and Notoliparis kermadecensis in the Kermadec Trench. From these observations, we have documented swimming and feeding behaviour of these species and derived the first estimates of hadal fish abundance. The liparids intercepted bait within 100-200 min but were observed to preferentially feed on scavenging amphipods. Notoliparis kermadecensis act as top predators in the hadal food web, exhibiting up to nine suction-feeding events per minute. Both species showed distinctive swimming gaits: P. amblystomopsis (mean length 22.5 cm) displayed a mean tail-beat frequency of 0.47 Hz and mean caudal:pectoral frequency ratio of 0.76, whereas N. kermadecensis (mean length 31.5 cm) displayed respective values of 1.04 and 2.08 Hz. Despite living at extreme depths, these endemic liparids exhibit similar activity levels compared with shallow-water liparids. PMID:19129104

  14. Establishment of Active Traces of Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone through an Integrated Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besana-Ostman, G. M.; Vilanova, S.; Flor, A.; Canora, C.; Heleno, S.; Domingues, A.; Narciso, J.; Pinheiro, P.; Pinto, L.; Fonseca, J. F.

    2013-05-01

    Despite the occurrence of at least two damaging earthquakes in historical times - the M~7 1531 and the M6 1909 earthquakes - the Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone (LTVFZ) has only recently been mapped (Besana-Ostman et al., 2012). In addition, a new set of active traces has been identified to the east during recent analysis and field inspections. The major challenges to the identification of active traces within Lower Tagus Valley (LTV) are both the presence of the very dynamic Tagus River (LTR) and the extensive urban and agricultural modifications introduced in the landscape. The detailed reports on the geological effects of the 1909 earthquake, while documenting extensively the secondary, shaking-related effects, provide no indication of surface rupture. The active traces of the northeast-southwest trending left-lateral LTVFZ within the LTV were established through integrated approaches as follows: aerial photo analysis, drainage system and satellite images examination, geomorphic feature identification, field mapping, geomorphic index measurements and trenching. The mapped traces extend to about 80 kilometers long and transect Quaternary and Holocene deposits. The mapped length of the western splay is compatible with an M7.2 earthquake. On the other hand, the newly mapped eastern traces plot almost parallel with the western splay, which may extend southwards to a comparable length. Preliminary analysis of satellite data show some evidence of additional splays located further east and south relative to the LTV. The new active traces suggest that the LTVFZ is a left-stepping left-lateral fault system with a regional NNE-SSW trend. Moreover, its extent and kinematics suggest magnitudes higher than previously assessed for the region. The location of the active traces displays a better correlation with the damage distribution of the historical events. Given the significance and implications of these findings for earthquake hazards assessment in Portugal, further studies

  15. Structures of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain Complexed with Small-Molecule Inhibitors Highlight Active-Site Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Silvaggi,N.; Boldt, G.; Hixon, M.; Kennedy, J.; Tzipori, S.; Janda, K.; Allen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for the use of Clostridial neurotoxins as bioweapons makes the development of small-molecule inhibitors of these deadly toxins a top priority. Recently, screening of a random hydroxamate library identified a small-molecule inhibitor of C. botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain (BoNT/A-LC), 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate, a derivative of which has been shown to have in vivo efficacy in mice and no toxicity. We describe the X-ray crystal structures of BoNT/A-LC in complexes with two potent small-molecule inhibitors. The structures of the enzyme with 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate or 2,4-dichlorocinnamic hydroxamate bound are compared to the structure of the enzyme complexed with L-arginine hydroxamate, an inhibitor with modest affinity. Taken together, this suite of structures provides surprising insights into the BoNT/A-LC active site, including unexpected conformational flexibility at the S1' site that changes the electrostatic environment of the binding pocket. Information gained from these structures will inform the design and optimization of more effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNT/A-LC.

  16. Characterization of nitrazine yellow as a photoacoustically active pH reporter molecule.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jordan E; Diaz, Lilibet; Christoff-Tempesta, Ty; Nesbitt, Kathryn M; Reed-Betts, Julia; Sanchez, John; Davies, Kevin W

    2015-04-01

    Throughout the fields of biomedical imaging, materials analysis, and routine chemical analysis, it is desirable to have a toolkit of molecules that can allow noninvasive/remote chemical sensing with minimal sample preparation. Here, we describe the photophysical properties involved in photoacoustic (PA) measurements and present a detailed analysis of the requirements and complications involved in PA sensing. We report the use of nitrazine yellow (NY) as a well-behaved PA pH reporter molecule. Both the basic and acidic forms of NY are photoacoustically well-behaved and allow for rapid and noninvasive measurement of pH in either transparent or turbid media. We also find that the serum protein-bound form of NY is photoacoustically well-behaved and should permit applications in noninvasive 3D imaging (e.g., the lymphatic system). PMID:25741857

  17. Rational modification of the lead molecule: Enhancement in the anticancer and dihydrofolate reductase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jagroop; Kaur, Sukhmeet; Singh, Palwinder

    2016-04-15

    By using molecular docking studies, the practice of fragment based drug discovery is conceptualized by introducing oxindole and iso-propanol moieties in our previous lead molecule 1. The resulting compound 2 exhibited competitive inhibition and favorable Ka and Ki for hDHFR. The screening of compound 2 at 60 cell line panel of human tumor cell lines showed its considerably better efficacy than compound 1 and hence put the candidature of 2 on stronghold for further studies. PMID:26979156

  18. A Natural Small Molecule Harmine Inhibits Angiogenesis and Suppresses Tumour Growth through Activation of p53 in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Fujun; Chen, Yihua; Song, Yajuan; Huang, Li; Zhai, Dong; Dong, Yanmin; Lai, Li; Zhang, Tao; Li, Dali; Pang, Xiufeng; Liu, Mingyao; Yi, Zhengfang

    2012-01-01

    Activation of p53 effectively inhibits tumor angiogenesis that is necessary for tumor growth and metastasis. Reactivation of the p53 by small molecules has emerged as a promising new strategy for cancer therapy. Several classes of small-molecules that activate the p53 pathway have been discovered using various approaches. Here, we identified harmine (β-carboline alkaloid) as a novel activator of p53 signaling involved in inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor growth. Harmine induced p53 phosphorylation and disrupted the p53-MDM2 interaction. Harmine also prevented p53 degradation in the presence of cycloheximide and activated nuclear accumulation of p53 followed by increasing its transcriptional activity in endothelial cells. Moreover, harmine not only induced endothelial cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, but also suppressed endothelial cell migration and tube formation as well as induction of neovascularity in a mouse corneal micropocket assay. Finally, harmine inhibited tumor growth by reducing tumor angiogenesis, as demonstrated by a xenograft tumor model. Our results suggested a novel mechanism and bioactivity of harmine, which inhibited tumor growth by activating the p53 signaling pathway and blocking angiogenesis in endothelial cells. PMID:23300602

  19. Staphylococcus-mediated T-cell activation and spontaneous natural killer cell activity in the absence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Hoynowski, S. M.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    We used major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-deficient transgenic mice to show that in vitro natural killer cell cytotoxicity and T-cell activation by staphylococcal exotoxins (superantigens) are not dependent upon the presence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. T cells can be activated by exotoxins in the presence of exogenously added interleukin 1 or 2 or in the presence of specific antibody without exogenously added cytokines.

  20. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, D. L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of (eta sup 5-C5H4)Rh(CO)2 complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C60 reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface.

  1. A recombinant, soluble, single-chain class I major histocompatibility complex molecule with biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Mage, M G; Lee, L; Ribaudo, R K; Corr, M; Kozlowski, S; McHugh, L; Margulies, D H

    1992-01-01

    Heterodimeric class I major histocompatibility complex molecules, which consist of a 45-kDa heavy-chain and a 12-kDa beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) light chain, bind endogenously synthesized peptides for presentation to antigen-specific T cells. We have synthesized a gene encoding a single-chain, soluble class I molecule derived from mouse H-2Dd, in which the carboxyl terminus of beta 2m is linked via a peptide spacer to the amino terminus of the heavy chain. The chimeric protein is secreted efficiently from transfected L cells, is thermostable, and when loaded with an appropriate antigenic peptide, stimulates an H-2Dd-restricted antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma. Thus, functional binding of peptide does not require the complete dissociation of beta 2m, implying that a heavy chain/peptide complex is not an obligate intermediate in the assembly of the heavy-chain/beta 2m/peptide heterotrimer. Single-chain major histocompatibility complex molecules uniformly loaded with peptide have potential uses for structural studies, toxin or fluor conjugates, and vaccines. Images PMID:1438262

  2. Using naturally occurring polysaccharides to align molecules with nonlinear optical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasthofer, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    The Biophysics and Advanced Materials Branch of the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating polymers with the potential for nonlinear optical (NLO) applications for a number of years. Some of the potential applications for NLO materials include optical communications, computing, and switching. To this point the branch's research has involved polydiacetylenes, phthalocyanins, and other synthetic polymers which have inherent NLO properties. The aim of the present research is to investigate the possibility of using naturally occurring polymers such as polysaccharides or proteins to trap and align small organic molecules with useful NLO properties. Ordering molecules with NLO properties enhances 3rd order nonlinear effects and is required for 2nd order nonlinear effects. Potential advantages of such a system are the flexibility to use different small molecules with varying chemical and optical properties, the stability and cost of the polymers, and the ability to form thin, optically transparent films. Since the quality of any polymer films depends on optimizing ordering and minimizing defects, this work is particularly well suited for microgravity experiments. Polysaccharide and protein polymers form microscopic crystallites which must align to form ordered arrays. The ordered association of crystallites is disrupted by gravity effects and NASA research on protein crystal growth has demonstrated that low gravity conditions can improve crystal quality.

  3. Rates of volcanic activity along the southwest rift zone of Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    Flow-by-flow mapping of the 65 km long subaerial part of the southwest rift zone and adjacent flanks of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii, and about 50 new 14C dates on charcoal from beneath these flows permit estimates of rates of lava accumulation and volcanic growth over the past 10 000 years. The sequence of historic eruptions along the southwest rift zone, beginning in 1868, shows a general pattern of uprift migration and increasing eruptive volume, culminating in the great 1950 eruption. No event comparable to 1950, in terms of volume or vent length, is evident for at least the previous 1000 years. Rates of lava accumulation along the zone have been subequal to those of Kilauea Volcano during the historic period but they were much lower in late prehistoric time (unpubl. Kilauea data by R. T. Holcomb). Rates of surface covering and volcanic growth have been markedly asymmetric along Mauna Loa's southwest rift zone. Accumulation rates have been about half again as great on the northwest side of the rift zone in comparison with the southeast side. The difference apparently reflects a westward lateral shift of the rift zone of Mauna Loa away from Kilauea Volcano, which may have acted as a barrier to symmetrical growth of the rift zone. -Author

  4. Structural Insights into the Activation of Human Relaxin Family Peptide Receptor 1 by Small-Molecule Agonists.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Myhr, Courtney; Huang, Zaohua; Xiao, Jingbo; Barnaeva, Elena; Ho, Brian A; Agoulnik, Irina U; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan J; Southall, Noel; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2016-03-29

    The GPCR relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) mediates the action of relaxin peptide hormone, including its tissue remodeling and antifibrotic effects. The peptide has a short half-life in plasma, limiting its therapeutic utility. However, small-molecule agonists of human RXFP1 can overcome this limitation and may provide a useful therapeutic approach, especially for chronic diseases such as heart failure and fibrosis. The first small-molecule agonists of RXFP1 were recently identified from a high-throughput screening, using a homogeneous cell-based cAMP assay. Optimization of the hit compounds resulted in a series of highly potent and RXFP1 selective agonists with low cytotoxicity, and excellent in vitro ADME and pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we undertook extensive site-directed mutagenesis studies in combination with computational modeling analysis to probe the molecular basis of the small-molecule binding to RXFP1. The results showed that the agonists bind to an allosteric site of RXFP1 in a manner that closely interacts with the seventh transmembrane domain (TM7) and the third extracellular loop (ECL3). Several residues were determined to play an important role in the agonist binding and receptor activation, including a hydrophobic region at TM7 consisting of W664, F668, and L670. The G659/T660 motif within ECL3 is crucial to the observed species selectivity of the agonists for RXFP1. The receptor binding and activation effects by the small molecule ML290 were compared with the cognate ligand, relaxin, providing valuable insights on the structural basis and molecular mechanism of receptor activation and selectivity for RXFP1. PMID:26866459

  5. Molecules and Mechanisms Implicated in the Peculiar Antigenic Activation Process of Human Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harly, Christelle; Peigné, Cassie-Marie; Scotet, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    In human beings, as well as in most non-human primates, the major peripheral γδ T cell subset, which accounts several percent of the whole lymphoid cells pool in adults, carries an heterodimeric TCR composed of Vγ9 and Vδ2 chains. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are specifically and strongly activated by small organic pyrophosphate molecules termed phosphoantigens (phosphoAg). These low molecular weight compounds are metabolites that are produced by either microbes or endogenously, as intermediates of the mammalian mevalonate pathway, and can accumulate intracellularly during cell stress like transformation or infection. Despite the characterization of numerous natural and synthetic phosphoAg, the mechanism(s) underlying the unique and specific antigenic activation process induced by these compounds remains poorly understood. Activation is both TCR- and cell-to-cell contact-dependent, and results of previous studies have also strongly suggested a key contribution of membrane-associated molecules of primate origin expressed on target cells. The recent identification of B7-related butyrophilin (BTN) molecules CD277/BTN3A, and more precisely their BTN3A1 isoforms, as mandatory molecules in the phosphoAg-induced recognition of target cells by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells opens important opportunities for research and applications in this field. Here, we review the unusual and complex antigenic reactivity of human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. We highlight the recent advances in our understanding of this process, and propose a model that integrates the type I glycoprotein BTN3A1 and its intracellular B30.2 domain as a physical intermediate implicated in the detection of dysregulated intracellular levels of phosphoAg and the sensing of cell stress by Vγ9Vδ2T cells. A better understanding of this mechanism will help optimize novel immunotherapeutical approaches that utilize the unique functional potential of this major γδ T cell subset. PMID:25601861

  6. C-H activation generates period-shortening molecules that target cryptochrome in the mammalian circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Iori; Kumar, Anupriya; Yamaguchi, Junichiro; Nishiwaki-Ohkawa, Taeko; Muto, Kei; Kawamura, Rika; Hirota, Tsuyoshi; Yagita, Kazuhiro; Irle, Stephan; Kay, Steve A; Yoshimura, Takashi; Itami, Kenichiro

    2015-06-01

    The synthesis and functional analysis of KL001 derivatives, which are modulators of the mammalian circadian clock, are described. By using cutting-edge C-H activation chemistry, a focused library of KL001 derivatives was rapidly constructed, which enabled the identification of the critical sites on KL001 derivatives that induce a rhythm-changing activity along with the components that trigger opposite modes of action. The first period-shortening molecules that target the cryptochrome (CRY) were thus discovered. Detailed studies on the effects of these compounds on CRY stability implicate the existence of an as yet undiscovered regulatory mechanism. PMID:25960183

  7. Near infrared emission from molecule-like silver clusters confined in zeolite A assisted by thermal activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hui Imakita, Kenji; Rong Gui, Sa Chu; Fujii, Minoru

    2014-07-07

    Strong and broad near infrared (NIR) emission peaked at ~855 nm upon optimal excitation at 342 nm has been observed from molecule-like silver clusters (MLSCs) confined in zeolite A assisted by thermal activation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first observation of NIR emission peaked at longer than 800 nm from MLSCs confined in solid matrices. The decay time of the NIR emission is over 10 μs, which indicates that it is a spin-forbidden transition. The ~855 nm NIR emission shows strong dependence on the silver loading concentration and the thermal activation temperature.

  8. Living microbial ecosystems within the active zone of catagenesis: Implications for feeding the deep biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, B.; Schenk, H. J.; Zink, K.; Ondrak, R.; Dieckmann, V.; Kallmeyer, J.; Mangelsdorf, K.; di Primio, R.; Wilkes, H.; Parkes, R. J.; Fry, J.; Cragg, B.

    2006-06-01

    Earth's largest reactive carbon pool, marine sedimentary organic matter, becomes increasingly recalcitrant during burial, making it almost inaccessible as a substrate for microorganisms, and thereby limiting metabolic activity in the deep biosphere. Because elevated temperature acting over geological time leads to the massive thermal breakdown of the organic matter into volatiles, including petroleum, the question arises whether microorganisms can directly utilize these maturation products as a substrate. While migrated thermogenic fluids are known to sustain microbial consortia in shallow sediments, an in situ coupling of abiotic generation and microbial utilization has not been demonstrated. Here we show, using a combination of basin modelling, kinetic modelling, geomicrobiology and biogeochemistry, that microorganisms inhabit the active generation zone in the Nankai Trough, offshore Japan. Three sites from ODP Leg 190 have been evaluated, namely 1173, 1174 and 1177, drilled in nearly undeformed Quaternary and Tertiary sedimentary sequences seaward of the Nankai Trough itself. Paleotemperatures were reconstructed based on subsidence profiles, compaction modelling, present-day heat flow, downhole temperature measurements and organic maturity parameters. Today's heat flow distribution can be considered mainly conductive, and is extremely high in places, reaching 180 mW/m 2. The kinetic parameters describing total hydrocarbon generation, determined by laboratory pyrolysis experiments, were utilized by the model in order to predict the timing of generation in time and space. The model predicts that the onset of present day generation lies between 300 and 500 m below sea floor (5100-5300 m below mean sea level), depending on well location. In the case of Site 1174, 5-10% conversion has taken place by a present day temperature of ca. 85 °C. Predictions were largely validated by on-site hydrocarbon gas measurements. Viable organisms in the same depth range have been

  9. Evolution of Surface Motor Activation Zones in Hemiplegic Patients During 20 Sessions of FES Therapy with Multi-pad Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Malešević, Jovana; Štrbac, Matija; Isaković, Milica; Kojić, Vladimir; Konstantinović, Ljubica; Vidaković, Aleksandra; Dedijer, Suzana; Kostić, Miloš; Keller, Thierry

    2016-06-13

    The purpose of this study was to examine surface motor activation zones for wrist, fingers and thumb extension movements and their temporal change during 20 therapy sessions using advanced multi-pad functional electrical stimulation system. Results from four hemiplegic patients indicate that certain zones have higher probability of eliciting each of the target movements. However, mutual overlap and variations of the zones are present not just between the subjects, but also on the intrasubject level, reflected through these session to session transformations of the selected virtual electrodes. The obtained results could be used as a priori knowledge for semi-automated optimization algorithm and could shorten the time required for calibration of the multi-pad electrode. PMID:27478575

  10. Evolution of Surface Motor Activation Zones in Hemiplegic Patients During 20 Sessions of FES Therapy with Multi-pad Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Malešević, Jovana; Štrbac, Matija; Isaković, Milica; Kojić, Vladimir; Konstantinović, Ljubica; Vidaković, Aleksandra; Dedijer, Suzana; Kostić, Miloš; Keller, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine surface motor activation zones for wrist, fingers and thumb extension movements and their temporal change during 20 therapy sessions using advanced multi-pad functional electrical stimulation system. Results from four hemiplegic patients indicate that certain zones have higher probability of eliciting each of the target movements. However, mutual overlap and variations of the zones are present not just between the subjects, but also on the intrasubject level, reflected through these session to session transformations of the selected virtual electrodes. The obtained results could be used as a priori knowledge for semi-automated optimization algorithm and could shorten the time required for calibration of the multi-pad electrode. PMID:27478575

  11. X-ray Absorption and Emission Study of Dioxygen Activation by a Small-Molecule Manganese Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Julian A.; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Kovacs, Julie A.; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Manganese K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and Kβ emission (XES) spectroscopies were used to investigate the factors contributing to O–O bond activation in a small-molecule system. The recent structural characterization of a metastable peroxo-bridged dimeric Mn(III)2 complex derived from dioxygen has provided the first opportunity to obtain X-ray spectroscopic data on this type of species. Ground state and time-dependent density functional theory calculations have provided further insight into the nature of the transitions in XAS pre-edge and valence-to-core (VtC) XES spectral regions. An experimentally validated electronic structure description has also enabled the determination of structural and electronic factors that govern peroxo bond activation, and have allowed us to propose both a rationale for the metastability of this unique compound, as well as potential future ligand designs which may further promote or inhibit O–O bond scission. Finally, we have explored the potential of VtC XES as an element-selective probe of both the coordination mode and degree of activation of peroxomanganese adducts. The comparison of these results to a recent VtC XES study of iron-mediated dintrogen activation helps to illustrate the factors that may determine the success of this spectroscopic method for future studies of small-molecule activation at transition metal sites. PMID:26061165

  12. Lysine-Based Small Molecules That Disrupt Biofilms and Kill both Actively Growing Planktonic and Nondividing Stationary Phase Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Konai, Mohini M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-10-01

    The emergence of bacterial resistance is a major threat to global health. Alongside this issue, formation of bacterial biofilms is another cause of concern because most antibiotics are ineffective against these recalcitrant microbial communities. Ideal future antibacterial therapeutics should possess both antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities. In this study we engineered lysine-based small molecules, which showed not only commendable broad-spectrum antibacterial activity but also potent biofilm-disrupting properties. Synthesis of these lipophilic lysine-norspermidine conjugates was achieved in three simple reaction steps, and the resultant molecules displayed potent antibacterial activity against various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) including drug-resistant superbugs MRSA (methicillin-resistant S. aureus), VRE (vancomycin-resistant E. faecium), and β-lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. An optimized compound in the series showed activity against planktonic bacteria in the concentration range of 3-10 μg/mL, and bactericidal activity against stationary phase S. aureus was observed within an hour. The compound also displayed about 120-fold selectivity toward both classes of bacteria (S. aureus and E. coli) over human erythrocytes. This rapidly bactericidal compound primarily acts on bacteria by causing significant membrane depolarization and K(+) leakage. Most importantly, the compound disrupted preformed biofilms of S. aureus and did not trigger bacterial resistance. Therefore, this class of compounds has high potential to be developed as future antibacterial drugs for treating infections caused by planktonic bacteria as well as bacterial biofilms. PMID:27623313

  13. Discovery of a small-molecule binder of the oncoprotein gankyrin that modulates gankyrin activity in the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; O’Connor, Cornelius J.; Zhang, Fengzhi; Galvagnion, Celine; Galloway, Warren R. J. D.; Tan, Yaw Sing; Stokes, Jamie E.; Rahman, Taufiq; Verma, Chandra; Spring, David R.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2016-04-01

    Gankyrin is an ankyrin-repeat oncoprotein whose overexpression has been implicated in the development of many cancer types. Elevated gankyrin levels are linked to aberrant cellular events including enhanced degradation of tumour suppressor protein p53, and inhibition of gankyrin activity has therefore been identified as an attractive anticancer strategy. Gankyrin interacts with several partner proteins, and a number of these protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are of relevance to cancer. Thus, molecules that bind the PPI interface of gankyrin and interrupt these interactions are of considerable interest. Herein, we report the discovery of a small molecule termed cjoc42 that is capable of binding to gankyrin. Cell-based experiments demonstrate that cjoc42 can inhibit gankyrin activity in a dose-dependent manner: cjoc42 prevents the decrease in p53 protein levels normally associated with high amounts of gankyrin, and it restores p53-dependent transcription and sensitivity to DNA damage. The results represent the first evidence that gankyrin is a “druggable” target with small molecules.

  14. Discovery of a small-molecule binder of the oncoprotein gankyrin that modulates gankyrin activity in the cell

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; O’Connor, Cornelius J.; Zhang, Fengzhi; Galvagnion, Celine; Galloway, Warren R. J. D.; Tan, Yaw Sing; Stokes, Jamie E.; Rahman, Taufiq; Verma, Chandra; Spring, David R.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2016-01-01

    Gankyrin is an ankyrin-repeat oncoprotein whose overexpression has been implicated in the development of many cancer types. Elevated gankyrin levels are linked to aberrant cellular events including enhanced degradation of tumour suppressor protein p53, and inhibition of gankyrin activity has therefore been identified as an attractive anticancer strategy. Gankyrin interacts with several partner proteins, and a number of these protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are of relevance to cancer. Thus, molecules that bind the PPI interface of gankyrin and interrupt these interactions are of considerable interest. Herein, we report the discovery of a small molecule termed cjoc42 that is capable of binding to gankyrin. Cell-based experiments demonstrate that cjoc42 can inhibit gankyrin activity in a dose-dependent manner: cjoc42 prevents the decrease in p53 protein levels normally associated with high amounts of gankyrin, and it restores p53-dependent transcription and sensitivity to DNA damage. The results represent the first evidence that gankyrin is a “druggable” target with small molecules. PMID:27046077

  15. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of ({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}X)Rh(CO){sub 2} complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C{sub 60} molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C{sub 60} reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs.

  16. Friction-induced enhancement in the optical activity of interacting chiral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargueño, Pedro; Peñate-Rodríguez, Helen C.; Gonzalo, Isabel; Sols, Fernando; Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2011-11-01

    The stability of chiral molecules described by a non-linear two-state system which accounts for mean-field interactions between different isomers, including any external chiral influence (in particular, the parity violating energy difference) is investigated. By introducing the population and phase difference of the chiral states as a pair of canonical variables, driving an analogy to a bosonic Josephson junction, our study to include dissipative effects in condensed phase described by a Caldeira-Leggett like Hamiltonian is extended using the Langevin formalism. Dissipative effects produce an enhancement in the population difference, not leading to racemization.

  17. Shoreline changes and its impact on activities in the coastal zone in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, A.; Bendixen, M.; Elberling, B.

    2015-12-01

    shorelines. The shoreline changes were estimated using the digital shoreline analysis system (DSAS) of the USGS. The spatial variability of accumulation and erosion patterns was detected and shows a surprising thread for ancient settlements and present-day activities in the coastal zone. The same patterns are finally discussed in terms of coastal risk assessment.

  18. Exoplanet detection. Stellar activity masquerading as planets in the habitable zone of the M dwarf Gliese 581.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Endl, Michael; Roy, Arpita

    2014-07-25

    The M dwarf star Gliese 581 is believed to host four planets, including one (GJ 581d) near the habitable zone that could possibly support liquid water on its surface if it is a rocky planet. The detection of another habitable-zone planet--GJ 581g--is disputed, as its significance depends on the eccentricity assumed for d. Analyzing stellar activity using the Hα line, we measure a stellar rotation period of 130 ± 2 days and a correlation for Hα modulation with radial velocity. Correcting for activity greatly diminishes the signal of GJ 581d (to 1.5 standard deviations) while significantly boosting the signals of the other known super-Earth planets. GJ 581d does not exist, but is an artifact of stellar activity which, when incompletely corrected, causes the false detection of planet g. PMID:24993348

  19. Present-day submarine hydrothermal activity in the Taupo-Rotorua Zone (Bay of Plenty, New Zealand)

    SciTech Connect

    Osipenko, A.B.; Egorov, Yu.O.; Fazlullin, S.M.; Gavrilenko, G.M.; Shul`kin, V.I.; Chertkova, L.V.

    1994-09-01

    We made detailed descriptions of the structure and material composition of sedimentary and water columns in the vicinity of active submarine hydrothermal activity in the southern part of the Bay of Plenty (North Island, New Zealand). Geophysical methods revealed that the hydrothermal system is confined to a tectonically distinct zone with a sedimentary cover characterized by complex structure. Chemical and mineralogical investigations confirmed that the activity of underwater vents exerts no substantial regional influence on the composition and features of ore mineralization in these formations. It is shown that essentially hydrothermal formations distinguishable within areas of otherwise monotypic sediments directly coincide with zones of hydrothermal discharge in the ocean floor. The absence of pronounced hydrothermal anomalies, together with the presence of {open_quotes}tongues{close_quotes} of anomalous concentrations of water-soluble gases suggests that the discharges are primarily hydrothermal in character.

  20. Modification and structure-activity relationship of a small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingsong; Le, Nhut; Heredia, Alonso; Song, Haijing; Redfield, Robert; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes selected modification and structure-activity relationship of the small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor, 4-benzoyl-1-[(4-methoxy-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)oxoacetyl]-2-(R)-methylpiperazine (BMS-378806). The results revealed: i) that both the presence and configuration (R vs. S) of the 3-methyl group on the piperazine moiety are important for the antiviral activity, with the 3-(R)-methyl derivatives showing the highest activity; ii) that the electronegativity of the C-4 substituent on the indole or azaindole ring seems to be important for the activity, with a small, electron-donating group such as a fluoro or a methoxy group showing enhanced activity, while a nitro group diminishes the activity; iii) that the N-1 position of the indole ring is not eligible for modification without losing activity; and iv) that bulky groups around the C-4 position of the indole or azaindole ring diminish the activity, probably due to steric hindrance in the binding. We found that a synthetic bivalent compound with two BMS-378806 moieties being tethered by a spacer demonstrated about 5-fold enhanced activity in an nM range against HIV-1 infection than the corresponding monomeric inhibitor. But the polyacrylamide-based polyvalent compounds did not show inhibitory activity at up to 200 nM. PMID:15858664

  1. Simultaneous Segmentation of Prostatic Zones Using Active Appearance Models With Multiple Coupled Levelsets

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Robert; Ribault, Justin; Gentile, John; Sperling, Dan; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present an improvement to the popular Active Appearance Model (AAM) algorithm, that we call the Multiple-Levelset AAM (MLA). The MLA can simultaneously segment multiple objects, and makes use of multiple levelsets, rather than anatomical landmarks, to define the shapes. AAMs traditionally define the shape of each object using a set of anatomical landmarks. However, landmarks can be difficult to identify, and AAMs traditionally only allow for segmentation of a single object of interest. The MLA, which is a landmark independent AAM, allows for levelsets of multiple objects to be determined and allows for them to be coupled with image intensities. This gives the MLA the flexibility to simulataneously segmentation multiple objects of interest in a new image. In this work we apply the MLA to segment the prostate capsule, the prostate peripheral zone (PZ), and the prostate central gland (CG), from a set of 40 endorectal, T2-weighted MRI images. The MLA system we employ in this work leverages a hierarchical segmentation framework, so constructed as to exploit domain specific attributes, by utilizing a given prostate segmentation to help drive the segmentations of the CG and PZ, which are embedded within the prostate. Our coupled MLA scheme yielded mean Dice accuracy values of .81, .79 and .68 for the prostate, CG, and PZ, respectively using a leave-one-out cross validation scheme over 40 patient studies. When only considering the midgland of the prostate, the mean DSC values were .89, .84, and .76 for the prostate, CG, and PZ respectively. PMID:23997571

  2. Simultaneous Segmentation of Prostatic Zones Using Active Appearance Models With Multiple Coupled Levelsets.

    PubMed

    Toth, Robert; Ribault, Justin; Gentile, John; Sperling, Dan; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-09-01

    In this work we present an improvement to the popular Active Appearance Model (AAM) algorithm, that we call the Multiple-Levelset AAM (MLA). The MLA can simultaneously segment multiple objects, and makes use of multiple levelsets, rather than anatomical landmarks, to define the shapes. AAMs traditionally define the shape of each object using a set of anatomical landmarks. However, landmarks can be difficult to identify, and AAMs traditionally only allow for segmentation of a single object of interest. The MLA, which is a landmark independent AAM, allows for levelsets of multiple objects to be determined and allows for them to be coupled with image intensities. This gives the MLA the flexibility to simulataneously segmentation multiple objects of interest in a new image. In this work we apply the MLA to segment the prostate capsule, the prostate peripheral zone (PZ), and the prostate central gland (CG), from a set of 40 endorectal, T2-weighted MRI images. The MLA system we employ in this work leverages a hierarchical segmentation framework, so constructed as to exploit domain specific attributes, by utilizing a given prostate segmentation to help drive the segmentations of the CG and PZ, which are embedded within the prostate. Our coupled MLA scheme yielded mean Dice accuracy values of .81, .79 and .68 for the prostate, CG, and PZ, respectively using a leave-one-out cross validation scheme over 40 patient studies. When only considering the midgland of the prostate, the mean DSC values were .89, .84, and .76 for the prostate, CG, and PZ respectively. PMID:23997571

  3. The Active and Periactive Zone Organization and the Functional Properties of Small and Large Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Raquel; Tabares, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The arrival of an action potential (AP) at a synaptic terminal elicits highly synchronized quanta release. Repetitive APs produce successive synaptic vesicle (SV) fusions that require management of spent SV components in the presynaptic membrane with minimum disturbance of the secretory apparatus. To this end, the synaptic machinery is structured accordingly to the strength and the range of frequencies at which each particular synapse operates. This results in variations in the number and dimension of Active Zones (AZs), amount and distribution of SVs, and probably, in the primary endocytic mechanisms they use. Understanding better how these structural differences determine the functional response in each case has been a matter of long-term interest. Here we review the structural and functional properties of three distinct types of synapses: the neuromuscular junction (NMJ; a giant, highly reliable synapse that must exocytose a large number of quanta with each stimulus to guarantee excitation of the postsynaptic cell), the hippocampal excitatory small synapse (which most often has a single release site and a relatively small pool of vesicles), and the cerebellar mossy fiber-granule cell synapse (which possesses hundreds of release sites and is able to translocate, dock and prime vesicles at high speed). We will focus on how the release apparatus is organized in each case, the relative amount of vesicular membrane that needs to be accommodated within the periAZ upon stimulation, the different mechanisms for retrieving the excess of membrane and finally, how these factors may influence the functioning of the release sites. PMID:27252645

  4. The Active and Periactive Zone Organization and the Functional Properties of Small and Large Synapses.

    PubMed

    Cano, Raquel; Tabares, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The arrival of an action potential (AP) at a synaptic terminal elicits highly synchronized quanta release. Repetitive APs produce successive synaptic vesicle (SV) fusions that require management of spent SV components in the presynaptic membrane with minimum disturbance of the secretory apparatus. To this end, the synaptic machinery is structured accordingly to the strength and the range of frequencies at which each particular synapse operates. This results in variations in the number and dimension of Active Zones (AZs), amount and distribution of SVs, and probably, in the primary endocytic mechanisms they use. Understanding better how these structural differences determine the functional response in each case has been a matter of long-term interest. Here we review the structural and functional properties of three distinct types of synapses: the neuromuscular junction (NMJ; a giant, highly reliable synapse that must exocytose a large number of quanta with each stimulus to guarantee excitation of the postsynaptic cell), the hippocampal excitatory small synapse (which most often has a single release site and a relatively small pool of vesicles), and the cerebellar mossy fiber-granule cell synapse (which possesses hundreds of release sites and is able to translocate, dock and prime vesicles at high speed). We will focus on how the release apparatus is organized in each case, the relative amount of vesicular membrane that needs to be accommodated within the periAZ upon stimulation, the different mechanisms for retrieving the excess of membrane and finally, how these factors may influence the functioning of the release sites. PMID:27252645

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat: the small-molecule with promising activity against therapeutically challenging haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    Histone acetyl transferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs) are counteracting epigenetic enzymes regulating the turnover of histone acetylation thereby regulating transcriptional events in a precise manner. Deregulation of histone acetylation caused by aberrant expression of HDACs plays a key role in tumour onset and progression making these enzymes as candidate targets for anticancer drugs and therapy. Small-molecules namely histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) modulating the biological function of HDACs have shown multiple biological effects including differentiation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumour models. HDACi in general have been described in plethora of reviews with respect to various cancers. However, no review article is available describing thoroughly the role of inhibitor givinostat (ITF2357 or [6-(diethylaminomethyl) naphthalen-2-yl] methyl N-[4-(hydroxycarbamoyl) phenyl] carbamate) in haematological malignancies. Thus, the present review explores the intricate role of novel inhibitor givinostat in the defined malignancies including multiple myeloma, acute myelogenous leukaemia, Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma apart from myeloproliferative neoplasms. The distinct molecular mechanisms triggered by this small-molecule inhibitor in these cancers to exert cytotoxic effect have also been dealt with. The article also highlights the combination strategy that can be used for enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of this inhibitor in the upcoming future. PMID:27121910

  6. Can Si-doped graphene activate or dissociate O2 molecule?

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Yang, Xiao-chun; Liu, Yue-jie; Zhao, Jing-xiang; Cai, Qing-hai; Wang, Xuan-zhang

    2013-02-01

    Recently, the adsorption and dissociation of oxygen molecule on a metal-free catalyst has attracted considerable attention due to the fundamental and industrial importance. In the present work, we have investigated the adsorption and dissociation of O(2) molecule on pristine and silicon-doped graphene, using density functional theory calculations. We found that O(2) is firstly adsorbed on Si-doped graphene by [2+1] or [2+2] cycloaddition, with adsorption energies of -1.439 and -0.856eV, respectively. Following this, the molecularly adsorbed O(2) can be dissociated in different pathways. In the most favorable reaction path, the dissociation barrier of adsorbed O(2) is significantly reduced from 3.180 to 0.206eV due to the doping of silicon into graphene. Our results may be useful to further develop effective metal-free catalysts for the oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs), thus greatly widening the potential applications of graphene. PMID:23261882

  7. Microbial abundance and activities in relation to water potential in the vadose zones of arid and semiarid sites.

    PubMed

    Kieft, T L; Amy, P S; Brockman, F J; Fredrickson, J K; Bjornstad, B N; Rosacker, L L

    1993-07-01

    Numbers and activities of microorganisms were measured in the vadose zones of three arid and semiarid areas of the western United States, and the influence of water availability was determined. These low-moisture environments have vadose zones that are commonly hundreds of meters thick. The specific sampling locations chosen were on or near U.S. Department of Energy facilities: the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and the Hanford Site (HS) in southcentral Washington State. Most of the sampling locations were uncontaminated, but geologically representative of nearby locations with storage and/or leakage of waste compounds in the vadose zone. Lithologies of samples included volcanic tuff, basalt, glaciofluvial and fluvial sediments, and paleosols (buried soils). Samples were collected aseptically, either by drilling bore-holes (INEL and HS), or by excavation within tunnels (NTS) and outcrop faces (paleosols near the HS). Total numbers of microorganisms were counted using direct microscopy, and numbers of culturable microorganisms were determined using plate-count methods. Desiccation-tolerant microorganisms were quantified by plate counts performed after 24 h desiccation of the samples. Mineralization of (14)C-labeled glucose and acetate was quantified in samples at their ambient moisture contents, in dried samples, and in moistened samples, to test the hypothesis that water limits microbial activities in vadose zones. Total numbers of microorganisms ranged from log 4.5 to 7.1 cells g(-1) dry wt. Culturable counts ranged from log <2 to 6.7 CFU g(-1) dry wt, with the highest densities occurring in paleosol (buried soil) samples. Culturable cells appeared to be desiccation-tolerant in nearly all samples that had detectable viable heterotrophs. Water limited mineralization in some, but not all samples, suggesting that an inorganic nutrient or other factor may limit microbial activities in some vadose zone environments. PMID

  8. Aftershocks illuninate the 2011 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake causative fault zone and nearby active faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, Jr., J. Wright; Shah, Anjana K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Snyder, Stephen L.; Carter, Aina M

    2015-01-01

    Deployment of temporary seismic stations after the 2011 Mineral, Virginia (USA), earthquake produced a well-recorded aftershock sequence. The majority of aftershocks are in a tabular cluster that delineates the previously unknown Quail fault zone. Quail fault zone aftershocks range from ~3 to 8 km in depth and are in a 1-km-thick zone striking ~036° and dipping ~50°SE, consistent with a 028°, 50°SE main-shock nodal plane having mostly reverse slip. This cluster extends ~10 km along strike. The Quail fault zone projects to the surface in gneiss of the Ordovician Chopawamsic Formation just southeast of the Ordovician–Silurian Ellisville Granodiorite pluton tail. The following three clusters of shallow (<3 km) aftershocks illuminate other faults. (1) An elongate cluster of early aftershocks, ~10 km east of the Quail fault zone, extends 8 km from Fredericks Hall, strikes ~035°–039°, and appears to be roughly vertical. The Fredericks Hall fault may be a strand or splay of the older Lakeside fault zone, which to the south spans a width of several kilometers. (2) A cluster of later aftershocks ~3 km northeast of Cuckoo delineates a fault near the eastern contact of the Ordovician Quantico Formation. (3) An elongate cluster of late aftershocks ~1 km northwest of the Quail fault zone aftershock cluster delineates the northwest fault (described herein), which is temporally distinct, dips more steeply, and has a more northeastward strike. Some aftershock-illuminated faults coincide with preexisting units or structures evident from radiometric anomalies, suggesting tectonic inheritance or reactivation.

  9. Growth and interaction of active faults within a nascent shear zone, central Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskin, M.; Strane, M.

    2006-12-01

    Compilation of new slip-distribution and slip-rate data from the Mojave Desert portion of the Eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) lends insight into the role of fault growth and interaction of conjugate fault systems in accommodating shear. Dextral faults of the Mojave Desert ECSZ approach but do not appear to cut the bounding ENE-striking sinistral Pinto Mountain and Garlock faults. Differing styles of accommodation of these bounding faults occur at opposite ends of the 140 km-long NW-striking Hidalgo-Calico-Blackwater dextral fault system. Total slip and slip rate of the Blackwater fault gradually diminish northward. The fault terminates as a single strand with a zero-slip fault tip before intersecting the Garlock fault. In contrast, the Calico and Hidalgo faults spread displacement southward onto multiple fault strands spaced several kilometers apart. Active folding further distributes displacement onto the adjacent Bullion and Mesquite Lake faults. These mechanisms appear to maintain a uniform gradient of displacement approaching the Pinto Mountain fault. The highest displacement (9.8 ± 0.2 km) and slip rate (1.8 ± 0.3 mm/yr) occur in the central part of the Hidalgo-Calico-Blackwater fault system where strain is concentrated onto a single fault strand. A significant drop in total displacement and slip rate occurs along the northern Calico fault. Strain appears to be transferred here onto ENE-striking sinistral faults that separate domains of clockwise rotation in the central Mojave Desert. The kinematically incompatible intersection of sinistral and dextral faults is accommodated, at least in part, by active folding and uplift of the Calico Mountains and Mud Hills. Total slip and slip rate are not correlative for dextral faults of the Mojave ECSZ, indicating ongoing evolution of the fault network. For example, the Lenwood fault is a highly segmented, immature dextral fault with only 1.0 ± 0.1 km of total displacement yet its slip rate (1.5 ± 0.4 mm/yr) is

  10. More Active Living–oriented County and Municipal Zoning is Associated with Increased Adult Leisure Time Physical Activity—United States, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Chriqui, Jamie F.; Nicholson, Lisa M.; Thrun, Emily; Leider, Julien; Slater, Sandy J.

    2016-01-01

    Although zoning is recognized for its role in facilitating healthy communities, no study has examined whether active living-oriented zoning codes are associated with adult leisure time physical activity (PA). This study sought to fill this gap and hypothesized that adult leisure time PA would be greater in communities with more progressive zoning code reforms and more active living-oriented zoning. Zoning codes for 1,617 county and municipal jurisdictions located in 30 states (covering ~40% of the U.S. population) were evaluated for code reform zoning and 11 active living markers. County-aggregated zoning measures were created for linking with five adult PA behaviors obtained from the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System controlling for individual and county sociodemographics. Zoning elements most associated with adult PA included requirements for mixed use, active and passive recreation, bike parking/street furniture, and bike-pedestrian trails/paths. This study provides new insights as to the role that zoning can play in facilitating adult PA. PMID:27587898

  11. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Activators of Nuclear Factor-κB With Neuroprotective Action Via High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Manuvakhova, Marina S.; Johnson, Guyla G.; White, Misti C.; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Sosa, Melinda; Maddox, Clinton; McKellip, Sara; Rasmussen, Lynn; Wennerberg, Krister; Hobrath, Judith V.; White, E. Lucile; Maddry, Joseph A.; Grimaldi, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal noncytokine-dependent p50/p65 nuclear factor-κB (the primary NF-κB complex in the brain) activation has been shown to exert neuroprotective actions. Thus neuronal activation of NF-κB could represent a viable neuroprotective target. We have developed a cell-based assay able to detect NF-κB expression enhancement, and through its use we have identified small molecules able to up-regulate NF-κB expression and hence trigger its activation in neurons. We have successfully screened approximately 300,000 compounds and identified 1,647 active compounds. Cluster analysis of the structures within the hit population yielded 14 enriched chemical scaffolds. One high-potency and chemically attractive representative of each of these 14 scaffolds and four singleton structures were selected for follow-up. The experiments described here highlighted that seven compounds caused noncanonical long-lasting NF-κB activation in primary astrocytes. Molecular NF-κB docking experiments indicate that compounds could be modulating NF-κB-induced NF-κB expression via enhancement of NF-κB binding to its own promoter. Prototype compounds increased p65 expression in neurons and caused its nuclear translocation without affecting the inhibitor of NF-κB (I-κB). One of the prototypical compounds caused a large reduction of glutamate-induced neuronal death. In conclusion, we have provided evidence that we can use small molecules to activate p65 NF-κB expression in neurons in a cytokine receptor-independent manner, which results in both long-lasting p65 NF-κB translocation/activation and decreased glutamate neurotoxicity. PMID:21046675

  12. Surface active molecules: preparation and properties of long chain n-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Infante, R; Dominguez, J G; Erra, P; Julia, R; Prats, M

    1984-12-01

    Synopsis A new route for the synthesis of long chain N(alpha)-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guamdine alkyl acid derivatives, with cationic or amphoteric character has been established. The general formula of these compounds is shown below. A physico-chemical and antimicrobial study of these products as a function of the alkyl ester or sodium salt (R), the straight chain length of the fatty acid residue (x) and the number of carbons between the omega-guanidine and omega-carboxyl group (n) has been investigated. The water solubility, surface tension, critical micelle concentration (c.m.c.) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (including Pseudomonas) has been determined. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide has been used to condense fatty acids and alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acids. In these conditions protection of the omega-guanidine group is not necessary. The main characteristic of this synthetic procedure is the use of very mild experimental conditions (temperature, pH) to form the amide linkage which leads to pure optical compounds in high yield in the absence of electrolytes. The results show that some structural modifications, particularly the protection of the carboxyl group, promote variations of the surfactant and antimicrobial properties. Only those molecules with the blocked carboxyl group (cationic molecules, where R = Me, Et or Pr) showed a good surfactant and antimicrobial activity. When the carboxyl group was unprotected (amphoteric molecules, where R = Na(+)) the resulting compounds were inactive. PMID:19467126

  13. The time-dependent generalized active space configuration interaction approach to correlated ionization dynamics of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, S.; Larsson, H. R.; Hinz, C.; Bonitz, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this contribution, we review the time-dependent generalized-active-space configuration interaction (TD-GAS-CI) approach to the photoionization dynamics of atoms and molecules including electron correlation effects. It is based on the configuration interaction (CI) expansion of the many-body wave function and the restriction of the determinantal space to a reduced subspace. For its numerically efficient application to photoionization, a partially-rotated basis set is used which adopts features of a localized basis with a good reference description and a grid representation for escaping wave packets. After reviewing earlier applications of the theory, we address the strong-field ionization of a one-dimensional model of the four-electron LiH molecule using TD-GAS-CI and demonstrate the importance of electron-electron correlations in the ionization yield for different orientations of the molecule w.r.t the peak of the linearly polarized laser field. A pronounced orientation-dependent variation of the yield with the pulse duration and the level of considered electron-electron correlations is observed.

  14. Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of specific, small molecule activator of histone acetyltransferase p300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Partha P.; Pavan Kumar, G. V.; Mantelingu, Kempegowda; Kundu, Tapas K.; Narayana, Chandrabhas

    2011-07-01

    We report for the first time, the Raman and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of N-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-2-ethoxy-benzamide (CTB). This molecule is specific activator of human histone acetyltransferase (HAT), p300, and serves as lead molecule to design anti-neoplastic therapeutics. A detailed Raman and SERS band assignments have been performed for CTB, which are compared with the density functional theory calculations. The observed red shift of N sbnd H stretching frequency from the computed wavenumber indicates the weakening of N sbnd H bond resulting from proton transfer to the neighboring oxygen atom. We observe Ag sbnd N vibrational mode at 234 cm -1 in SERS of CTB. This indicates there is a metal-molecule bond leading to chemical enhancement in SERS. We also observe, enhancement in the modes pertaining to substituted benzene rings and methyl groups. Based on SERS analysis we propose the adsorption sites and the orientation of CTB on silver surface.

  15. A small molecule inhibitor for ATPase activity of Hsp70 and Hsc70 enhances the immune response to protein antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Zhang, Haiying; Lee, Bo Ryeong; Kwon, Young-Guen; Ha, Sang-Jun; Shin, Injae

    2015-12-01

    The ATPase activities of Hsp70 and Hsc70 are known to be responsible for regulation of various biological processes. However, little is known about the roles of Hsp70 and Hsc70 in modulation of immune responses to antigens. In the present study, we investigated the effect of apoptozole (Az), a small molecule inhibitor of Hsp70 and Hsc70, on immune responses to protein antigens. The results show that mice administered with both protein antigen and Az produce more antibodies than those treated with antigen alone, showing that Az enhances immune responses to administered antigens. Treatment of mice with Az elicits production of antibodies with a high IgG2c/IgG1 ratio and stimulates the release of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines, suggesting that Az activates the Th1 and Th2 immune responses. The observations made in the present study suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 and Hsc70 activities could be a novel strategy designing small molecule-based adjuvants in protein vaccines.

  16. How water molecules affect the catalytic activity of hydrolases--a XANES study of the local structures of peptide deformylase.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peixin; Wang, Yu; Chu, Wangsheng; Guo, Xiaoyun; Yang, Feifei; Yu, Meijuan; Zhao, Haifeng; Dong, Yuhui; Xie, Yaning; Gong, Weimin; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a prokaryotic enzyme that catalyzes the deformylation of nascent peptides generated during protein synthesis and water molecules play a key role in these hydrolases. Using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and ab initio calculations we accurately probe the local atomic environment of the metal ion binding in the active site of PDF at different pH values and with different metal ions. This new approach is an effective way to monitor existing correlations among functions and structural changes. We show for the first time that the enzymatic activity depends on pH values and metal ions via the bond length of the nearest coordinating water (Wat1) to the metal ion. Combining experimental and theoretical data we may claim that PDF exhibits an enhanced enzymatic activity only when the distance of the Wat1 molecule with the metal ion falls in the limited range from 2.15 to 2.55 Å. PMID:25503313

  17. Ligand uptake in Mycobacterium tuberculosis truncated hemoglobins is controlled by both internal tunnels and active site water molecules

    PubMed Central

    Davidge, Kelly S; Singh, Sandip; Bowman, Lesley AH; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Carballal, Sebastián; Radi, Rafael; Poole, Robert K; Dikshit, Kanak; Estrin, Dario A; Marti, Marcelo A; Boechi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, has two proteins belonging to the truncated hemoglobin (trHb) family. Mt-trHbN presents well-defined internal hydrophobic tunnels that allow O 2 and •NO to migrate easily from the solvent to the active site, whereas Mt-trHbO possesses tunnels that are partially blocked by a few bulky residues, particularly a tryptophan at position G8. Differential ligand migration rates allow Mt-trHbN to detoxify •NO, a crucial step for pathogen survival once under attack by the immune system, much more efficiently than Mt-trHbO. In order to investigate the differences between these proteins, we performed experimental kinetic measurements, •NO decomposition, as well as molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type Mt-trHbN and two mutants, VG8F and VG8W. These mutations introduce modifications in both tunnel topologies and affect the incoming ligand capacity to displace retained water molecules at the active site. We found that a single mutation allows Mt-trHbN to acquire ligand migration rates comparable to those observed for Mt-trHbO, confirming that ligand migration is regulated by the internal tunnel architecture as well as by water molecules stabilized in the active site. PMID:26478812

  18. Ligand uptake in Mycobacterium tuberculosis truncated hemoglobins is controlled by both internal tunnels and active site water molecules.

    PubMed

    Boron, Ignacio; Bustamante, Juan Pablo; Davidge, Kelly S; Singh, Sandip; Bowman, Lesley Ah; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Carballal, Sebastián; Radi, Rafael; Poole, Robert K; Dikshit, Kanak; Estrin, Dario A; Marti, Marcelo A; Boechi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, has two proteins belonging to the truncated hemoglobin (trHb) family. Mt-trHbN presents well-defined internal hydrophobic tunnels that allow O 2 and (•)NO to migrate easily from the solvent to the active site, whereas Mt-trHbO possesses tunnels that are partially blocked by a few bulky residues, particularly a tryptophan at position G8. Differential ligand migration rates allow Mt-trHbN to detoxify (•)NO, a crucial step for pathogen survival once under attack by the immune system, much more efficiently than Mt-trHbO. In order to investigate the differences between these proteins, we performed experimental kinetic measurements, (•)NO decomposition, as well as molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type Mt-trHbN and two mutants, VG8F and VG8W. These mutations introduce modifications in both tunnel topologies and affect the incoming ligand capacity to displace retained water molecules at the active site. We found that a single mutation allows Mt-trHbN to acquire ligand migration rates comparable to those observed for Mt-trHbO, confirming that ligand migration is regulated by the internal tunnel architecture as well as by water molecules stabilized in the active site. PMID:26478812

  19. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, potently inhibits melanoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xueqing; Jiang, Fangzhen; Bao, Qi; Qian, Huan; Fang, Quan; Shao, Zheren

    2016-01-01

    It is vital to develop new therapeutic agents for the treatment of melanoma. In the current study, we studied the potential effect of Compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, in melanoma cells. We showed that C13 exerted mainly cytostatic, but not cytotoxic activities in melanoma cells. C13 potently inhibited proliferation in melanoma cell lines (A375, OCM-1 and B16), but not in B10BR melanocytes. Meanwhile, the AMPK activator inhibited melanoma cell cycle progression by inducing G1-S arrest. Significantly, we failed to detect significant melanoma cell death or apoptosis after the C13 treatment. For the mechanism study, we showed that C13 activated AMPK and inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in melanoma cells through interaction with the α1 subunit. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of AMPKα1 not only blocked C13-mediated AMPK activation but also abolished its antiproliferative activity against melanoma cells. Together, these results show that C13 inhibits melanoma cell proliferation through activating AMPK signaling. Our data suggest that C13 along with other small molecular AMPK activators may be beneficial for patients with melanoma. PMID:26271666

  20. Enhanced activation of cellular AMPK by dual-small molecule treatment: AICAR and A769662

    PubMed Central

    Ducommun, Serge; Ford, Rebecca J.; Bultot, Laurent; Deak, Maria; Bertrand, Luc; Kemp, Bruce E.; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key cellular energy sensor and regulator of metabolic homeostasis. Activation of AMPK provides beneficial outcomes in fighting against metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Currently, there is no allosteric AMPK activator available for the treatment of metabolic diseases, and limited compounds are available to robustly stimulate cellular/tissue AMPK in a specific manner. Here we investigated whether simultaneous administration of two different pharmacological AMPK activators, which bind and act on different sites, would result in an additive or synergistic effect on AMPK and its downstream signaling and physiological events in intact cells. We observed that cotreating primary hepatocytes with the AMP mimetic 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) and a low dose (1 μM) of the allosteric activator A769662 produced a synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation and catalytic activity, which was associated with a more profound increase/decrease in phosphorylation of downstream AMPK targets and inhibition of hepatic lipogenesis compared with single-compound treatment. Mechanistically, we found that cotreatment does not stimulate LKB1, upstream kinase for AMPK, but it protects against dephosphorylation of Thr172 phosphorylation by protein phosphatase PP2Cα in an additive manner in a cell-free assay. Collectively, we demonstrate that AICAR sensitizes the effect of A769662 and promotes AMPK activity and its downstream events. The study demonstrates the feasibility of promoting AMPK activity by using two activators with distinct modes of action in order to achieve a greater activation of AMPK and downstream signaling. PMID:24425763

  1. The fate and transport of nitroglycerin in the unsaturated zone at active and legacy anti-tank firing positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia; Poulin, Isabelle

    2012-11-01

    The environmental fate of nitroglycerin (NG) in the unsaturated zone was evaluated in the context of double-base propellant residue deposition at anti-tank training ranges. Fresh propellant residues were collected during live anti-tank training. Surface soils, sub-surface soils and water samples from the unsaturated zone were collected at an active anti-tank range, and at a legacy site where NG-based propellants have been used. Results show that the residues are composed of intact propellant particles, as well as small quantities of NG, dinitroglycerin (DNG) and nitrate which are rapidly dissolved by precipitation, resulting in sporadic pulses of those compounds in water from the unsaturated zone after rain/snow melt events. The dissolved NG and DNG can be progressively degraded in the unsaturated zone, releasing nitrate as an end-product. Over a period of several years, small propellant particles located at the soil surface can be carried downward through the soil pore system by infiltration water, which explains the presence of NG in sub-surface soils at the legacy site, more than 35 years after site closure. NG is no longer leached from these old particles, therefore the detection of NG in sub-surface soils does not signify that groundwater is at risk of contamination by NG.

  2. The fate and transport of nitroglycerin in the unsaturated zone at active and legacy anti-tank firing positions.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia; Poulin, Isabelle

    2012-11-01

    The environmental fate of nitroglycerin (NG) in the unsaturated zone was evaluated in the context of double-base propellant residue deposition at anti-tank training ranges. Fresh propellant residues were collected during live anti-tank training. Surface soils, sub-surface soils and water samples from the unsaturated zone were collected at an active anti-tank range, and at a legacy site where NG-based propellants have been used. Results show that the residues are composed of intact propellant particles, as well as small quantities of NG, dinitroglycerin (DNG) and nitrate which are rapidly dissolved by precipitation, resulting in sporadic pulses of those compounds in water from the unsaturated zone after rain/snow melt events. The dissolved NG and DNG can be progressively degraded in the unsaturated zone, releasing nitrate as an end-product. Over a period of several years, small propellant particles located at the soil surface can be carried downward through the soil pore system by infiltration water, which explains the presence of NG in sub-surface soils at the legacy site, more than 35 years after site closure. NG is no longer leached from these old particles, therefore the detection of NG in sub-surface soils does not signify that groundwater is at risk of contamination by NG. PMID:23047138

  3. Cloning of the human activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule promoter and identification of its tissue-independent transcriptional activation by Sp1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fang; Mbunkui, Flaubert; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F

    2012-12-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) belongs to the immunoglobulin cell adhesion molecule super family. ALCAM is implicated in tumor progression, inflammation, and the differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells. Hitherto, the identity of regulatory DNA elements and cognate transcription factors responsible for ALCAM gene expression remained unknown. In this report, the human ALCAM promoter was cloned and its transcriptional mechanisms elucidated. The promoter is TATA-less and contains multiple GC-boxes. A proximal 650-bp promoter fragment conferred tissue-independent activation, whereas two contiguous regions upstream of this region negatively influenced promoter activity in a tissue-specific manner. The positive regulatory promoter region was mapped to a core 50 base pair sequence containing a conical Sp1 element. Mutation analysis revealed that this element alone or in tandem with elements immediately upstream was required for maximal promoter activity. Chromatin analysis revealed that Sp1 binds exclusively to the canonical binding sequence in vivo, but not to DNA sequence immediately upstream. Finally, we showed that over-expression of Sp1 significantly increased the basal promoter activity. Thus, Sp1 activated the ALCAM promoter in most cells. These findings have important ramifications for unraveling the roles of ALCAM in inflammation and tumorigenesis. PMID:22941204

  4. Characterization of the common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia antigen (CD10) as an activation molecule on mature human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kiyokawa, N; Kokai, Y; Ishimoto, K; Fujita, H; Fujimoto, J; Hata, J I

    1990-01-01

    Distinct expression pattern of CD10 molecules during B cell activation was analysed using in vivo and in vitro systems. By two-colour flowcytometrical analysis, CD10 was found to be expressed at a specific stage of in vivo activating B cells. The expression of CD10 during B cell activation appeared to be unique from that of other activation-related B cell antigens including L29, MA6, OKT9 and OKT10. Although the expression of CD10 was associated with that of the activation-related B cell antigens, CD10+ B cells could be separated in the distinct fractions to those expressing other activation-related B cell antigens when fractionated by cell gravity. In particular, certain CD10+ B cells were detected positive for the resting B cell antigen, L30. In vitro studies revealed that CD10+ B cells arose from CD10- B cells at an early step of B cell activation, and disappeared lately when activated by Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I. Collectively, CD10 was an antigen transiently expressed at an early phase of B cell activation process. Expression of CD10 and other antigens on Burkitt's lymphomas (15 cases) was studied next. All cases were CD10+, and 87% (13 cases) were also L30+. In addition, six of CD10+ L30+ cases were L29+. This observation suggested that Burkitt's lymphomas were phenotypically similar to the B cells at an early phase of activation, those expressing CD10 and L30, simultaneously. The present study has dissected a precise expression pattern of CD10 on mature B cell activation in vitro and in vivo, and could be implicated for the histogenesis of one of the poorly characterized B cell lymphoma, namely Burkitt's lymphoma. PMID:2138527

  5. Cardiac-Specific SOCS3 Deletion Prevents In Vivo Myocardial Ischemia Reperfusion Injury through Sustained Activation of Cardioprotective Signaling Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Takanobu; Yasukawa, Hideo; Kyogoku, Sachiko; Oba, Toyoharu; Takahashi, Jinya; Nohara, Shoichiro; Minami, Tomoko; Mawatari, Kazutoshi; Sugi, Yusuke; Shimozono, Koutatsu; Pradervand, Sylvain; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Aoki, Hiroki; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) adversely affects cardiac performance and the prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Although myocardial signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 is potently cardioprotective during IRI, the inhibitory mechanism responsible for its activation is largely unknown. The present study aimed to investigate the role of the myocardial suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3, an intrinsic negative feedback regulator of the Janus kinase (JAK)-STAT signaling pathway, in the development of myocardial IRI. Myocardial IRI was induced in mice by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery for 1 h, followed by different reperfusion times. One hour after reperfusion, the rapid expression of JAK-STAT–activating cytokines was observed. We precisely evaluated the phosphorylation of cardioprotective signaling molecules and the expression of SOCS3 during IRI and then induced myocardial IRI in wild-type and cardiac-specific SOCS3 knockout mice (SOCS3-CKO). The activation of STAT3, AKT, and ERK1/2 rapidly peaked and promptly decreased during IRI. This decrease correlated with the induction of SOCS3 expression up to 24 h after IRI in wild-type mice. The infarct size 24 h after reperfusion was significantly reduced in SOCS3-CKO compared with wild-type mice. In SOCS3-CKO mice, STAT3, AKT, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was sustained, myocardial apoptosis was prevented, and the expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) was augmented. Cardiac-specific SOCS3 deletion led to the sustained activation of cardioprotective signaling molecules including and prevented myocardial apoptosis and injury during IRI. Our findings suggest that SOCS3 may represent a key factor that exacerbates the development of myocardial IRI. PMID:26010537

  6. CD26 surface molecule involvement in T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis in rheumatoid and other inflammatory synovitis.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Muscat, C; Bertotto, A; Bistoni, O; Agea, E; Tognellini, R; Fiorucci, G; Cesarotti, M; Bombardieri, S

    1996-07-01

    T cell surface expression and the functional role of CD26 antigen (Ag), a surface ectoenzyme involved in T cell activation and migration across the extracellular matrix, were analyzed in the peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) from patients with inflammatory arthritides. CD26 membrane expression on T cells was detected by cytofluorometry using two different monoclonal antibodies, anti-Ta1 and anti-1F7, while cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma production were evaluated in anti-CD3- or anti-CD2-stimulated cell cultures after Ag surface modulation with anti-1F7. The results showed that Ta1 and 1F7 Ag expression were increased on T cells from PB of patients with active, but not inactive, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most SF T cells from RA or other inflammatory arthritides displayed the memory marker CD45R0 and the Ta1 Ag, but lacked the 1F7 molecule. In addition, in vitro 1F7 modulation, which enhanced RA PB T cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma synthesis, did not synergize with anti-CD3 or anti-CD2 in inducing IL-2-dependent activation of SF T cells, but reduced IFN-gamma production. A spontaneous reappearance of 1F7 Ag on the SF T cell surface was seen after 2-5 days in culture. Phorbol myristate acetate, able to accelerate its reexpression, also restored a normal response of SF T cells to anti-1F7 comitogenic effects. These data confirm a role of the CD26 surface molecule in regulating T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis. This observation may have important implications in the regulation of T cell activity at the joint level during chronic inflammatory processes. PMID:8674237

  7. Synthesis and anti-tumor activity evaluation of rhein-aloe emodin hybrid molecule.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye-Fei; Hu, Xiang-Yu; He, Ying; Deng, Jia-Gang

    2012-02-01

    To improve the anti-tumor effects of rhein and aloe-emodin, a rhein-aloe-emodin hybrid molecule (RH-AE) was synthesized from rhein and aloe-emodin in the presence of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) and 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP). Chemical and spectroscopic methods, such as 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and HR-ESIMS were used for the structure identification of RH-AE. Using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, the in vitro anti-tumor effects were compared between RH-AE, rhein and aloe-emodin on human hepatoma HepG2, human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE, human lung cancer NCI-H460, human ovarian cancer SK-OV-3, and human cervical cancer Hela cells. The results showed that the half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of RH-AE on HepG2, CNE, NCI-H460, SK-OV-3, and Hela cells were significantly lower than those of rhein and aloe-emodin. This showed that RH-AE has a better in vitro anti-tumor effect than rhein and aloe-emodin. PMID:22474959

  8. Antitumor activity of a small-molecule inhibitor of the histone kinase Haspin

    PubMed Central

    Huertas, D; Soler, M; Moreto, J; Villanueva, A; Martinez, A; Vidal, A; Charlton, M; Moffat, D; Patel, S; McDermott, J; Owen, J; Brotherton, D; Krige, D; Cuthill, S; Esteller, M

    2012-01-01

    The approval of histone deacetylase inhibitors for treatment of lymphoma subtypes has positioned histone modifications as potential targets for the development of new classes of anticancer drugs. Histones also undergo phosphorylation events, and Haspin is a protein kinase the only known target of which is phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3 residue (H3T3ph), which is necessary for mitosis progression. Mitotic kinases can be blocked by small drugs and several clinical trials are underway with these agents. As occurs with Aurora kinase inhibitors, Haspin might be an optimal candidate for the pharmacological development of these compounds. A high-throughput screening for Haspin inhibitors identified the CHR-6494 compound as being one promising such agent. We demonstrate that CHR-6494 reduces H3T3ph levels in a dose-dependent manner and causes a mitotic catastrophe characterized by metaphase misalignment, spindle abnormalities and centrosome amplification. From the cellular standpoint, the identified small-molecule Haspin inhibitor causes arrest in G2/M and subsequently apoptosis. Importantly, ex vivo assays also demonstrate its anti-angiogenetic features; in vivo, it shows antitumor potential in xenografted nude mice without any observed toxicity. Thus, CHR-6494 is a first-in-class Haspin inhibitor with a wide spectrum of anticancer effects that merits further preclinical research as a new member of the family of mitotic kinase inhibitors. PMID:21804608

  9. BH3 Response Profiles From Neuroblastoma Mitochondria Predict Activity of Small Molecule Bcl-2 Family Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Kelly C.; Lestini, Brian J.; Gross, Michelle; Ip, Laura; Bhumbla, Ashish; Zhang, Xuemei; Zhao, Huaqing; Liu, Xueyuan; Hogarty, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins regulate mitochondrial apoptosis downstream of diverse stressors. Cancer cells frequently deregulate Bcl-2 proteins leading to chemoresistance. We have optimized a platform for solid tumors in which Bcl-2 family resistance patterns are inferred. Functional mitochondria were isolated from neuroblastoma cell lines, exposed to distinct BH3-domain peptides, and assayed for cytochrome c release. Such BH3 profiles revealed three patterns of cytochrome c response. A subset had a dominant NoxaBH3 response implying Mcl1-dependence. These cells were more sensitive to small molecules that antagonize Mcl1 (AT-101) than those that antagonize Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w (ABT-737). A second subset had a dominant BikBH3 response, implying a Bcl-xL/-w dependence, and was exquisitely sensitive to ABT-737 (IC50 <200 nM). Finally, most neuroblastoma cell lines derived at relapse were relatively resistant to pro-death BH3 peptides and Bcl-2 antagonists. Our findings define heterogeneity for apoptosis resistance in neuroblastoma, help triage emerging Bcl-2 antagonists for clinical use, and provide a platform for studies to characterize post-therapy resistance mechanisms for neuroblastoma and other solid tumors. PMID:19893570

  10. Small-molecule activators of TMEM16A, a calcium-activated chloride channel, stimulate epithelial chloride secretion and intestinal contraction

    PubMed Central

    Namkung, Wan; Yao, Zhen; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Verkman, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    TMEM16A (ANO1) is a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) expressed in secretory epithelia, smooth muscle, and other tissues. Cell-based functional screening of ∼110,000 compounds revealed compounds that activated TMEM16A CaCC conductance without increasing cytoplasmic Ca2+. By patch-clamp, N-aroylaminothiazole “activators” (Eact) strongly increased Cl− current at 0 Ca2+, whereas tetrazolylbenzamide “potentiators” (Fact) were not active at 0 Ca2+ but reduced the EC50 for Ca2+-dependent TMEM16A activation. Of 682 analogs tested, the most potent activator (Eact) and potentiator (Fact) produced large and more sustained CaCC Cl− currents than general agonists of Ca2+ signaling, with EC50 3–6 μM and Cl− conductance comparable to that induced transiently by Ca2+-elevating purinergic agonists. Analogs of activators were identified that fully inhibited TMEM16A Cl− conductance, providing further evidence for direct TMEM16A binding. The TMEM16A activators increased CaCC conductance in human salivary and airway submucosal gland epithelial cells, and IL-4 treated bronchial cells, and stimulated submucosal gland secretion in human bronchi and smooth muscle contraction in mouse intestine. Small-molecule, TMEM16A-targeted activators may be useful for drug therapy of cystic fibrosis, dry mouth, and gastrointestinal hypomotility disorders, and for pharmacological dissection of TMEM16A function.—Namkung, W., Yao, Z., Finkbeiner, W. E., Verkman, A. S. Small-molecule activators of TMEM16A, a calcium-activated chloride channel, stimulate epithelial chloride secretion and intestinal contraction. PMID:21836025

  11. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Biofouling Bacteria and Profiling of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules from Membrane Bioreactor Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling. PMID:24499972

  12. NTB-A Receptor Crystal Structure: Insights into Homophilic Interactions in the Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Receptor Family

    SciTech Connect

    Cao,E.; Ramagopal, U.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Yan, Q.; Lary, J.; Cole, J.; Nathenson, S.; Almo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family includes homophilic and heterophilic receptors that regulate both innate and adaptive immunity. The ectodomains of most SLAM family members are composed of an N-terminal IgV domain and a C-terminal IgC2 domain. NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A) is a homophilic receptor that stimulates cytotoxicity in natural killer (NK) cells, regulates bactericidal activities in neutrophils, and potentiates T helper 2 (Th2) responses. The 3.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the complete NTB-A ectodomain revealed a rod-like monomer that self-associates to form a highly kinked dimer spanning an end-to-end distance of {approx}100 {angstrom}. The NTB-A homophilic and CD2-CD58 heterophilic dimers show overall structural similarities but differ in detailed organization and physicochemical properties of their respective interfaces. The NTB-A structure suggests a mechanism responsible for binding specificity within the SLAM family and imposes physical constraints relevant to the colocalization of SLAM-family proteins with other signaling molecules in the immunological synapse.

  13. On the seismic activity of the Malibu Coast Fault Zone, and other ethical problems in engineering geoscience

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, V.S. . Geosciences Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    The Malibu Coast Fault Zone (MCFZ) merges eastward with the active Santa Monica, Hollywood, Raymond Hill, Sierra Madre, and Cucamonga Faults of the central Transverse Ranges. West of Point Dume, the MCFZ extends offshore to join the active Santa Cruz Island Fault. Active microearthquake seismicity along the MCFZ trend indicates that it is seismogenic. Focal mechanism solutions for several of these earthquakes indicate thrusting along faults with the same orientation as the MCFZ. The geomorphology of the MCFZ is consistent with the interpretation that the MCFZ is active. Scarps in unconsolidated sands along the continental shelf just south of Malibu indicate recent offset. In the Santa Monica Mountains, late Tertiary and Quaternary marine sedimentary strata are exposed on the hanging-wall side of the MCFZ, indicating active uplift of the Santa Monica Mountains. Given the other indicators of fault activity, the trench studies that must still be undertaken across the MCFZ are more likely to establish the chronology of recent displacement along the MCFZ than to indicate that the fault is not active. It has been suggested that the MCFZ has not yet been formally recognized as an active, seismogenic fault zone because of the expected loss of property value should the MCFZ be designated an active fault. Geoscientists fear being held liable for loss of property value, even though their assessment of fault activity may be scientifically valid. What are the ethical responsibilities of geoscientists involved in seismic risk assessment along the MCFZ Are political or financial considerations valid criteria to use in assessing the activity of a fault These are not abstract questions of geoethics, because the lives and properties of countless people are potentially at risk.

  14. Small Molecule APY606 Displays Extensive Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer via Impairing Ras-MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Na; Liu, Zuojia; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been found with abnormal expression or mutation in Ras proteins. Oncogenic Ras activatio