Sample records for activity eva glove

  1. EVA Glove Research Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Alvin M.; Peterson, Steven W.; Main, John A.; Dickenson, Rueben D.; Shields, Bobby L.; Lorenz, Christine H.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the basic research portion of the extravehicular activity (EVA) glove research program is to gain a greater understanding of the kinematics of the hand, the characteristics of the pressurized EVA glove, and the interaction of the two. Examination of the literature showed that there existed no acceptable, non-invasive method of obtaining accurate biomechanical data on the hand. For this reason a project was initiated to develop magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for biomechanical data acquisition and visualization. Literature reviews also revealed a lack of practical modeling methods for fabric structures, so a basic science research program was also initiated in this area.

  2. The Effects of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Glove Pressure on Tactility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Shelby; Miranda, Mesloh; England, Scott; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to quantify finger tactility, while wearing a Phase VI Extravehicular Activity (EVA) glove. Subjects were fully suited in an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) suit. Data was collected under three conditions: bare-handed, gloved at 0 psi, and gloved at 4.3 psi. In order to test tactility, a series of 30 tactile stimuli (bumps) were created that varied in both height and width. With the hand obscured, subjects applied pressure to each bump until detected tactilely. The amount of force needed to detect each bump was recorded using load cells located under a force-plate. The amount of force needed to detect a bump was positively related to width, but inversely related to height. In addition, as the psi of the glove increased, more force was needed to detect the bump. In terms of application, it was possible to determine the optimal width and height a bump needs to be for a specific amount of force applied for tactility.

  3. A prototype power assist EVA glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, John A.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.

    1991-01-01

    The most recent generation of space suit EVA gloves has addressed the problem of loose fit and stiffness in the fingers, but it remains difficult to build a glove assembly with low metacarpophalangeal joint stiffness. Fatigue due to constantly displacing the glove from a neutral position has been reported as the limiting factor in some EVA activities. This paper outlines an actuation system that uses gas filled bladders attached to the back of the EVA glove to provide the necessary force to bend the glove at the metacarpal joint, thus providing greater endurance during finger grasping tasks. A simple on-off controller senses hand movement through small pressure sensors between the finger and the glove restraint. The controller then fills or exhausts the bladders on the back of the glove to effectively move the neutral position of the glove as the hand inside moves.

  4. Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) glove evaluation test protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinman-Sweeney, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most critical components of a space suit is the gloves, yet gloves have traditionally presented significant design challenges. With continued efforts at glove development, a method for evaluating glove performance is needed. This paper presents a pressure-glove evaluation protocol. A description of this evaluation protocol, and its development is provided. The protocol allows comparison of one glove design to another, or any one design to bare-handed performance. Gloves for higher pressure suits may be evaluated at current and future design pressures to drive out differences in performance due to pressure effects. Using this protocol, gloves may be evaluated during design to drive out design problems and determine areas for improvement, or fully mature designs may be evaluated with respect to mission requirements. Several different test configurations are presented to handle these cases. This protocol was run on a prototype glove. The prototype was evaluated at two operating pressures and in the unpressurized state, with results compared to bare-handed performance. Results and analysis from this test series are provided, as is a description of the configuration used for this test.

  5. Force-endurance capabilities of extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves at different pressure levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishu, Ram R.; Klute, Glenn K.

    1993-01-01

    The human hand is a very useful multipurpose tool in all environments. However, performance capabilities are compromised considerably when gloves are donned. This is especially true to extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves. The primary intent was to answer the question of how long a person can perform tasks requiring certain levels of exertion. The objective was to develop grip force-endurance relations. Six subjects participated in a factorial experiment involving three hand conditions, three pressure differentials, and four levels of force exertion. The results indicate that, while the force that could be exerted depended on the glove, pressure differential, and the level of exertion, the endurance time at any exertion level depended just on the level of exertion expressed as a percentage of maximum exertion possible at that condition. The impact of these findings for practitioners as well as theoreticians is discussed.

  6. Investigation of the effects of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) and Launch and Entry (LES) gloves on performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishu, Ram R.

    1992-01-01

    Human capabilities such as dexterity, manipulability, and tactile perception are unique and render the hand as a very versatile, effective and a multipurpose tool. This is especially true for unknown environments such as the EVA environment. In the microgravity environment interfaces, procedures, and activities are too complex, diverse, and defy advance definition. Under these conditions the hand becomes the primary means of locomotion, restraint, and material handling. Facilitation of these activities, with simultaneous protection from the cruel EVA environment are the two, often conflicting, objectives of glove design. The objectives of this study was (1) to assess the effects of EVA gloves at different pressures on human hand capabilities, (2) to devise a protocol for evaluating EVA gloves, (3) to develop force time relations for a number of EVA glove pressure combinations, and (4) to evaluate two types of launch and entry suit gloves. The objectives were achieved through three experiments. The experiments for achieving objectives 1, 2, and 3 were performed in the glove box in building 34. In experiment 1 three types of EVA gloves were tested at five pressure differentials. A number of performance measures were recorded. In experiment 2 the same gloves as in experiment 1 were evaluated in a reduced number of pressure conditions. The performance measure was endurance time. Six subjects participated in both the experiments. In experiment 3 two types of launch and entry suit gloves were evaluated using a paradigm similar to experiment 1. Currently the data is being analyzed. However for this report some summary analyses have been performed. The results indicate that a) With EVA gloves strength is reduced by nearly 50 percent, b) performance decrements increase with increasing pressure differential, c) TMG effects are not consistent across the three gloves tested, d) some interesting gender glove interactions were observed, some of which may have been due to the extent (or lack of) fit of the glove to the hand, and e) differences in performance exist between partial pressure suit glove and full pressure suit glove, especially in the unpressurized condition.

  7. Phase VI Advanced EVA Glove Development and Certification for the International Space Station

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Graziosi; James Stein; Amy Ross; Joseph Kosmo

    Since the early 1980's, the Shuttle Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) glove design has evolved to meet the challenge of space based tasks. These tasks have typically been satellite retrieval and repair or EVA based flight experiments. With the start of the International Space Station (ISS) assembly, the number of EVA based missions is increasing far beyond what has been required

  8. FY13 High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) Collaboration: Glove Injury Data Mining Effort - Training Data Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Christopher; Benson, Elizabeth; England, Scott; Charvat, Jacqueline; Norcross, Jason; McFarland, Shane; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    From the time hand-intensive tasks were first created for EVAs, discomforts and injuries have been noted.. There have been numerous versions of EVA gloves for US crew over the past 50 years, yet pain and injuries persist. The investigation team was tasked with assisting in a glove injury assessment for the High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) project.center dot To aid in this assessment, the team was asked to complete the following objectives: - First, to develop the best current understanding of what glove-related injuries have occurred to date, and when possible, identify the specific mechanisms that caused those injuries - Second, to create a standardized method for comparison of glove injury potential from one glove to another. center dot The overall goal of the gloved hand injury assessment is to utilize ergonomics in understanding how these glove injuries are occurring, and to propose mitigations to current designs or design changes in the next generation of EVA gloves.

  9. The Potential of Wearable Sensor Technology for EVA Glove Ergonomic Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Christopher R.; McFarland, Shane M.; Norcross, Jason R.; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    Injuries to the hands are common among astronauts who train for extravehicular activity (EVA). Many of these injuries refer to the gloves worn during EVA as the root cause. While pressurized, the bladder and outer material of these gloves restrict movement and create pressure points while performing tasks, sometimes resulting in pain, muscle fatigue, abrasions, and occasionally a more severe injury, onycholysis (fingernail delamination). The most common injury causes are glove contact (pressure point/rubbing), ill-fitting gloves, and/or performing EVA tasks in pressurized gloves. A brief review of the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health's injury database reveals over 57% of the total injuries to the upper extremities during EVA training occurred either to the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint, fingernail, or the fingertip. Twenty-five of these injuries resulted in a diagnosis of onycholysis.

  10. The Potential of Wearable Sensor Technology for EVA Glove Ergonomic Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Christopher R.; McFarland, Shane; Norcross, Jason R.; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    Injuries to the hands are common among astronauts who train for extravehicular activity (EVA). Many of these injuries refer to the gloves worn during EVA as the root cause. While pressurized, the bladder and outer material of these gloves restrict movement and create pressure points while performing tasks, sometimes resulting in pain, muscle fatigue, abrasions, and occasionally a more severe injury, onycholysis (fingernail delamination). The most common injury causes are glove contact (pressure point/rubbing), ill-fitting gloves, and/or performing EVA tasks in pressurized gloves. A brief review of the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health's injury database reveals over 57% of the total injuries to the upper extremities during EVA training occurred either to the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint, fingernail, or the fingertip. Twenty-five of these injuries resulted in a diagnosis of onycholysis

  11. A human factors evaluation of Extravehicular Activity gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, John M.; Briganti, Michael; Cleland, John; Winfield, Dan

    1989-01-01

    One of the major problems faced in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) glove development has been the absence of concise and reliable methods to measure the effects of EVA gloves on human-hand capabilities. NASA has sponsored a program to develop a standardized set of tests designed to assess EVA-gloved hand capabilities in six performance domains: Range of Motion, Strength, Tactile Perception, Dexterity, Fatigue, and Comfort. Based upon an assessment of general human-hand functioning and EVA task requirements, several tests within each performance domain were developed to provide a comprehensive evaluation. All tests were designed to be conducted in a glove box with the bare hand, an EVA glove without pressure, an EVA glove at operation pressure. Thus, the differential effect on performance of the glove with and without pressure was tested. Bare hand performance was used to 'calibrate' the effects. Ten subjects participated in the test setup as a repeated-measures experimental design. The paper will report the results of the test program.

  12. EVA space suit Evaporative Cooling/Heating Glove System (ECHGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coss, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    A new astronaut glove, the Evaporative Cooling/Heating Glove System (ECHGS), was designed and developed to allow the handling of objects between -200 F and +200 F. Active heating elements, positioned at each finger pad, provide additional heat to the finger pads from the rest of the finger. A water evaporative cooling system provides cooling by the injection of water to the finger areas and the subsequent direct evaporation to space. Thin, flexible insulation has been developed for the finger areas to limit thermal conductivity. Component and full glove tests have shown that the glove meets and exceeds the requirements to hold a 11/2 inch diameter bar at + or - 200 F for three minutes within comfort limits. The ECHGS is flexible, lightweight and comfortable. Tactility is reasonable and small objects can be identified especially by the fingertips beyond the one half width active elements.

  13. Simplified Abrasion Test Methodology for Candidate EVA Glove Lay-Ups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabel, Emily; Aitchison, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, space suit outer-layer fabrics were badly abraded after performing just a few extravehicular activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots that penetrated the outer-layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than 8 hrs of surface operations. Current plans for the exploration planetary space suits require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on a lunar or Martian surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last 40 years and improve on the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo Program. Over the past 25 years the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division has focused on tumble testing as means of simulating wear on the outer layer of the space suit fabric. Most recently, in 2009, testing was performed on 4 different candidate outer layers to gather baseline data for future use in design of planetary space suit outer layers. In support of the High Performance EVA Glove Element of the Next Generation Life Support Project, testing a new configuration was recently attempted in which require 10% of the fabric per replicate of that need in 2009. The smaller fabric samples allowed for reduced per sample cost and flexibility to test small samples from manufacturers without the overhead to have a production run completed. Data collected from this iteration was compared to that taken in 2009 to validate the new test method. In addition the method also evaluated the fabrics and fabric layups used in a prototype thermal micrometeoroid garment (TMG) developed for EVA gloves under the NASA High Performance EVA Glove Project. This paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, results of the validation study, and results of the TMG testing.

  14. Feasibility Assessment of an EVA Glove Sensing Platform to Evaluate Potential Hand Injury Risk Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Christopher R.; McFarland, Shane M.

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the hands are common among astronauts who train for extravehicular activity (EVA). When the gloves are pressurized, they restrict movement and create pressure points during tasks, sometimes resulting in pain, muscle fatigue, abrasions, and occasionally more severe injuries such as onycholysis. A brief review of the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health's injury database reveals that 58% of total astronaut hand and arm injuries from NBL training between 1993 and 2010 occurred either to the fingernail, MCP, or fingertip. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of using small sensors to measure force acting on the fingers and hand within pressurized gloves and other variables such as blood perfusion, skin temperature, humidity, fingernail strain, skin moisture, among others. Tasks were performed gloved and ungloved in a pressurizable glove box. The test demonstrated that fingernails saw greater transverse strain levels for tension or compression than for longitudinal strain, even during axial fingertip loading. Blood perfusion peaked and dropped as the finger deformed during finger presses, indicating an initial dispersion and decrease of blood perfusion levels. Force sensitive resistors to force plate comparisons showed similar force curve patterns as fingers were depressed, indicating suitable functionality for future testing. Strategies for proper placement and protection of these sensors for ideal data collection and longevity through the test session were developed and will be implemented going forward for future testing.

  15. Hypervelocity Impacts on ISS Handrails and Evaluation of Alternative Materials to Prevent Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Glove Damage During EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eruc; Davis, B. Alan; Ordonez, Erick

    2009-01-01

    During post-flight processing of STS-116, damage to crewmember Robert Curbeam's Phase VI Glove Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment was discovered. This damage consisted of: loss of RTV-157 palm pads on the thumb area on the right glove, a 0.75 inch cut in the Vectran adjacent to the seam and thumb pad (single event cut), constituting the worst glove damage ever recorded for the U.S. space program. The underlying bladder and restraint were found not be damaged by this event. Evaluation of glove damage found that the outer Vectran fibers were sliced as a result of contact with a sharp edge or pinch point rather than general wear or abrasion (commonly observed on the RTV pads). Damage to gloves was also noted on STS-118 and STS-120. One potential source of EMU glove damages are sharp crater lips on external handrails, generated by micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts. In this paper, the results of a hypervelocity impact (HVI) test program on representative and actual ISS handrails are presented. These tests were performed in order to characterize impact damage profiles on ISS handrails and evaluate alternatives for limiting risk to future missions. It was determined that both penetrating and non-penetrating MMOD impacts on aluminum and steel ISS handrails are capable of generating protruding crater profiles which exceed the heights required for EMU glove abrasion risk by an order of magnitude. Testing demonstrated that flexible overwraps attached to the outside of existing handrails are capable of limiting contact between hazardous crater formations and crewmember gloves during extravehicular activity (EVA). Additionally, replacing metallic handrails with high strength, low ductility, fiber reinforced composite materials would limit the formation of protruding crater lips on new ISS modules.

  16. Climbing the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Wall - Safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuentes, Jose; Greene, Stacie

    2010-01-01

    The success of the EVA team, that includes the EVA project office, Crew Office, Mission Operations, Engineering and Safety, is assured by the full integration of all necessary disciplines. Safety participation in all activities from hardware development concepts, certification and crew training, provides for a strong partnership within the team. Early involvement of Safety on the EVA team has mitigated risk and produced a high degree of mission success.

  17. Active personal radiation monitor for lunar EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straume, Tore; Borak, Tom; Braby, L. A.; Lusby, Terry; Semones, Edward J.; Vazquez, Marcelo E.

    As astronauts return to the Moon-and this time, work for extended periods-there will be a critical need for crew personnel radiation monitoring as they operate lunar rovers or otherwise perform a myriad of extravehicular activities (EVAs). Our focus is on development of a small personal radiation monitor for lunar EVA that responds to the complex radiation quality and changing dose rates on the Moon. Of particular concern are active monitoring capabilities that provide both early warning and radiation dosimetry information during solar particle events (SPEs). To accomplish this, we are developing small detectors integrated with modern high speed, low power microelectronics to measure dose-rate and dose-mean lineal energy in real time. The monitor is designed to perform over the range of dose rates and LETs expected from both GCR and SPE radiations during lunar EVA missions. The monitor design provides simultaneous measurement of dose-equivalent rates at two tissue-equivalent depths simulating skin and marrow. The compact personal monitor is estimated to be the size of a cell phone and would fit on an EVA spacesuit (e.g., in backpack) or in a toolbox. The four-year development effort (which began December 2007) will result in a prototype radiation monitor field tested and characterized for the major radiations expected on the surface of the Moon. We acknowledge support from NSBRI through grants to NASA Ames Research Center (T. Straume, PI) and Colorado State University (T. Borak, PI).

  18. Development of a Pre-Prototype Power Assisted Glove End Effector for Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to develop an EVA power tool which is capable of performing a variety of functions while at the same time increasing the EVA crewmember's effectiveness by reducing hand fatigue associated with gripping tools through a pressurized EMU glove. The Power Assisted Glove End Effector (PAGE) preprototype hardware met or exceeded all of its technical requirements and has incorporated acoustic feedback to allow the EVA crewmember to monitor motor loading and speed. If this tool is to be developed for flight use, several issues need to be addressed. These issues are listed.

  19. STS-64 Mission Photograph - Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Mark Lee floats freely as he tests the new backpack called the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. SAFER is designed for use in the event a crew member becomes untethered while conducting an EVA. The STS-64 mission marked the first untethered U.S. EVA in 10 years, and was launched on September 9, 1994, aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery.

  20. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Technology Development Status and Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Westheimer, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011, Extravehicular activity (EVA) technology development became a technology foundational domain under a new program Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration. The goal of the EVA technology effort is to further develop technologies that will be used to demonstrate a robust EVA system that has application for a variety of future missions including microgravity and surface EVA. Overall the objectives will be reduce system mass, reduce consumables and maintenance, increase EVA hardware robustness and life, increase crew member efficiency and autonomy, and enable rapid vehicle egress and ingress. Over the past several years, NASA realized a tremendous increase in EVA system development as part of the Exploration Technology Development Program and the Constellation Program. The evident demand for efficient and reliable EVA technologies, particularly regenerable technologies was apparent under these former programs and will continue to be needed as future mission opportunities arise. The technological need for EVA in space has been realized over the last several decades by the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle, and the International Space Station (ISS) programs. EVAs were critical to the success of these programs. Now with the ISS extension to 2028 in conjunction with a current forecasted need of at least eight EVAs per year, the EVA technology life and limited availability of the EMUs will become a critical issue eventually. The current Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) has vastly served EVA demands by performing critical operations to assemble the ISS and provide repairs of satellites such as the Hubble Space Telescope. However, as the life of ISS and the vision for future mission opportunities are realized, a new EVA systems capability could be an option for the future mission applications building off of the technology development over the last several years. Besides ISS, potential mission applications include EVAs for missions to Near Earth Objects (NEO), Phobos, or future surface missions. Surface missions could include either exploration of the Moon or Mars. Providing an EVA capability for these types of missions enables in-space construction of complex vehicles or satellites, hands on exploration of new parts of our solar system, and engages the public through the inspiration of knowing that humans are exploring places that they have never been before. This paper offers insight into what is currently being developed and what the potential opportunities are in the forecast

  1. 7. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, IN SPACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, IN SPACE SUIT AFTER TESTING IN NEUTRAL BUOYANCY TANK. AVERAGE COST OF SUIT IS $1,000,000. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. STS-109 Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Inside the Space Shuttle Columbia's cabin, astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, controlled the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) on the crew cabin's aft flight deck to assist fellow astronauts during the STS-109 mission Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA). The RMS was used to capture the telescope and secure it into Columbia's cargo bay. The Space Shuttle Columbia STS-109 mission lifted off March 1, 2002 with goals of repairing and upgrading the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama had the responsibility for the design, development, and construction of the HST, which is the most powerful and sophisticated telescope ever built. STS-109 upgrades to the HST included: replacement of the solar array panels; replacement of the power control unit (PCU); replacement of the Faint Object Camera (FOC) with a new advanced camera for Surveys (ACS); and installation of the experimental cooling system for the Hubble's Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-object Spectrometer (NICMOS), which had been dormant since January 1999 when its original coolant ran out. Lasting 10 days, 22 hours, and 11 minutes, the STS-109 mission was the 108th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle Program.

  3. Spacesuit glove manufacturing enhancements through the use of advanced technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadogan, David; Bradley, David; Kosmo, Joseph

    The sucess of astronauts performing extravehicular activity (EVA) on orbit is highly dependent upon the performance of their spacesuit gloves.A study has recently been conducted to advance the development and manufacture of spacesuit gloves. The process replaces the manual techniques of spacesuit glove manufacture by utilizing emerging technologies such as laser scanning, Computer Aided Design (CAD), computer generated two-dimensional patterns from three-dimensionl surfaces, rapid prototyping technology, and laser cutting of materials, to manufacture the new gloves. Results of the program indicate that the baseline process will not increase the cost of the gloves as compared to the existing styles, and in production, may reduce the cost of the gloves. perhaps the most important outcome of the Laserscan process is that greater accuracy and design control can be realized. Greater accuracy was achieved in the baseline anthropometric measurement and CAD data measurement which subsequently improved the design feature. This effectively enhances glove performance through better fit and comfort.

  4. Spacesuit glove manufacturing enhancements through the use of advanced technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadogan, David; Bradley, David; Kosmo, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The sucess of astronauts performing extravehicular activity (EVA) on orbit is highly dependent upon the performance of their spacesuit gloves.A study has recently been conducted to advance the development and manufacture of spacesuit gloves. The process replaces the manual techniques of spacesuit glove manufacture by utilizing emerging technologies such as laser scanning, Computer Aided Design (CAD), computer generated two-dimensional patterns from three-dimensionl surfaces, rapid prototyping technology, and laser cutting of materials, to manufacture the new gloves. Results of the program indicate that the baseline process will not increase the cost of the gloves as compared to the existing styles, and in production, may reduce the cost of the gloves. perhaps the most important outcome of the Laserscan process is that greater accuracy and design control can be realized. Greater accuracy was achieved in the baseline anthropometric measurement and CAD data measurement which subsequently improved the design feature. This effectively enhances glove performance through better fit and comfort.

  5. Spacesuit Glove-Induced Hand Trauma and Analysis of Potentially Related Risk Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charvat, Chacqueline M.; Norcross, Jason; Reid, Christopher R.; McFarland, Shane M.

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the hands are common among astronauts who train for extravehicular activity (EVA). When the gloves are pressurized, they restrict movement and create pressure points during tasks, sometimes resulting in pain, muscle fatigue, abrasions, and occasionally more severe injuries such as onycholysis. Glove injuries, both anecdotal and recorded, have been reported during EVA training and flight persistently through NASA's history regardless of mission or glove model. Theories as to causation such as glove-hand fit are common but often lacking in supporting evidence. Previous statistical analysis has evaluated onycholysis in the context of crew anthropometry only. The purpose of this study was to analyze all injuries (as documented in the medical records) and available risk factor variables with the goal to determine engineering and operational controls that may reduce hand injuries due to the EVA glove in the future. A literature review and data mining study were conducted between 2012 and 2014. This study included 179 US NASA crew who trained or completed an EVA between 1981 and 2010 (crossing both Shuttle and ISS eras) and wore either the 4000 Series or Phase VI glove during Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit EVA training and flight. All injuries recorded in medical records were analyzed in their association to candidate risk factor variables. Those risk factor variables included demographic characteristics, hand anthropometry, glove fit characteristics, and training/EVA characteristics. Utilizing literature, medical records and anecdotal causation comments recorded in crewmember injury data, investigators were able to identify several risk factors associated with increased risk of glove related injuries. Prime among them were smaller hand anthropometry, duration of individual suited exposures, and improper glove-hand fit as calculated by the difference in the anthropometry middle finger length compared to the baseline EVA glove middle finger length.

  6. STS-64 Mission Onboard Photograph - Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Mark Lee (red stripe on extravehicular activity suit) tests the new backpack called Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER), a system designed for use in the event a crew member becomes untethered while conducting an EVA. The Lidar-In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) is shown in the foreground. The LITE payload employs lidar, which stands for light detection and ranging, a type of optical radar using laser pulses instead of radio waves to study Earth's atmosphere. Unprecedented views were obtained of cloud structures, storm systems, dust clouds, pollutants, forest burning, and surface reflectance. The STS-64 mission marked the first untethered U.S. EVA in 10 years, and was launched on September 9, 1994, aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery.

  7. 8. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, GETTING OUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, GETTING OUT OF SPACE SUIT AFTER TESTING IN NEUTRAL BUOYANCY TANK. AVERAGE COST OF SUIT $1,000,000. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. Extravehicular Activity/Air Traffic Control (EVA/ATC) test report. [communication links to the astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaro, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    During extravehicular activity (EVA), communications between the EVA astronaut and the space shuttle orbiter are maintained by means of transceiver installed in the environmental support system backpack. Onboard the orbiter, a transceiver line replaceable unit and its associated equipment performs the task of providing a communications link to the astronaut in the extravehicular activity/air traffic control (EVA/ATC) mode. Results of the acceptance tests that performed on the system designed and fabricated for EVA/ATC testing are discussed.

  9. Extravehicular Activity/Air Traffic Control (EVA/ATC) test report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaro, D. J.

    1982-02-01

    During extravehicular activity (EVA), communications between the EVA astronaut and the space shuttle orbiter are maintained by means of transceiver installed in the environmental support system backpack. Onboard the orbiter, a transceiver line replaceable unit and its associated equipment performs the task of providing a communications link to the astronaut in the extravehicular activity/air traffic control (EVA/ATC) mode. Results of the acceptance tests that performed on the system designed and fabricated for EVA/ATC testing are discussed.

  10. Shuttle EVA description and design criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The STS extravehicular mobility unit, orbiter EVA provisions, EVA equipment, factors affecting employment of EVA, EVA mission integration, baselined extravehicular activity are discussed. Design requirements are also discussed.

  11. Glove Gardens

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chicago Children's Museum

    2008-01-01

    In this activity, learners create a garden in a disposable glove. They learn about the conditions necessary to make the seeds sprout and actively participate in caring for their plants. Learners sign a "Glove Garden Owner's Agreement" (included in PDF) outlining what they must do to care for their gardens. Learners also make predictions about how fast and tall their plants will grow and then measure and record the results.

  12. Testing and evaluation for astronaut extravehicular activity (EVA) operability.

    PubMed

    Shields, N; King, L C

    1998-09-01

    Because it is the human component that defines space mission success, careful planning is required to ensure that hardware can be operated and maintained by crews on-orbit. Several methods exist to allow researchers and designers to better predict how hardware designs will behave under the harsh environment of low Earth orbit, and whether designs incorporate the necessary features for Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) operability. Testing under conditions of simulated microgravity can occur during the design concept phase when verifying design operability, during mission training, or concurrently with on-orbit mission operations. The bulk of testing is focused on normal operations, but also includes evaluation of credible mission contingencies or "what would happen if" planning. The astronauts and cosmonauts who fly these space missions are well prepared and trained to survive and be productive in Earth's orbit. The engineers, designers, and training crews involved in space missions subject themselves to Earth based simulation techniques that also expose them to extreme environments. Aircraft falling ten thousand feet, alternating g-loads, underwater testing at 45 foot depth, enclosure in a vacuum chamber and subject to thermal extremes, each carries with it inherent risks to the humans preparing for space missions. PMID:12190075

  13. Automatic antenna switching design for Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randhawa, Manjit S.

    1987-11-01

    An Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) crewmember had two-way communications with the space station in the Ku-band frequency (12 to 18 GHz). The maximum range of the EVA communications link with the space station is approximately one kilometer for nominal values for transmitter power, antenna gains, and receiver noise figure. The EVA Communications System, that will continue to function regardless of the astronaut's position and orientation, requires an antenna system that has full spherical coverage. Three or more antennas that can be flush mounted on the astronaut's space suit (EMU) and/or his propulsive backpack (MMU), will be needed to provide the desired coverage. As the astronaut moves in the space station, the signal received by a given EVA antenna changes. An automatic antenna switching system is needed that will switch the communication system to the antenna with the largest signal strength. A design for automatic antenna switching is presented and discussed.

  14. Automatic antenna switching design for Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randhawa, Manjit S.

    1987-01-01

    An Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) crewmember had two-way communications with the space station in the Ku-band frequency (12 to 18 GHz). The maximum range of the EVA communications link with the space station is approximately one kilometer for nominal values for transmitter power, antenna gains, and receiver noise figure. The EVA Communications System, that will continue to function regardless of the astronaut's position and orientation, requires an antenna system that has full spherical coverage. Three or more antennas that can be flush mounted on the astronaut's space suit (EMU) and/or his propulsive backpack (MMU), will be needed to provide the desired coverage. As the astronaut moves in the space station, the signal received by a given EVA antenna changes. An automatic antenna switching system is needed that will switch the communication system to the antenna with the largest signal strength. A design for automatic antenna switching is presented and discussed.

  15. Studies Relating to EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JA1, the discussion focuses on the following topics: The Staged Decompression to the Hypobaric Atmosphere as a Prophylactic Measure Against Decompression Sickness During Repetitive EVA; A New Preoxygenation Procedure for Extravehicular Activity (EVA); Metabolic Assessments During Extra-Vehicular Activity; Evaluation of Safety of Hypobaric Decompressions and EVA From Positions of Probabilistic Theory; Fatty Acid Composition of Plasma Lipids and Erythrocyte Membranes During Simulation of Extravehicular Activity; Biomedical Studies Relating to Decompression Stress with Simulated EVA, Overview; The Joint Angle and Muscle Signature (JAMS) System - Current Uses and Future Applications; and Experimental Investigation of Cooperative Human-Robotic Roles in an EVA Work Site.

  16. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, William; Harris, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) was favorably impressed by the operational risk management approach taken by the Human Research Program (HRP) Integrated Research Plan (IRP) to address the stated life sciences issues. The life sciences community at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) seems to be focused on operational risk management. This approach is more likely to provide risk managers with the information they need at the time they need it. Concerning the information provided to the SRP by the EVA Physiology, Systems, and Performance Project (EPSP), it is obvious that a great deal of productive activity is under way. Evaluation of this information was hampered by the fact that it often was not organized in a fashion that reflects the "Gaps and Tasks" approach of the overall Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) effort, and that a substantial proportion of the briefing concerned subjects that, while interesting, are not part of the HHC Element (e.g., the pressurized rover presentation). Additionally, no information was provided on several of the tasks or how they related to work underway or already accomplished. This situation left the SRP having to guess at the efforts and relationship to other elements, and made it hard to easily map the EVA Project efforts currently underway, and the data collected thus far, to the gaps and tasks in the IRP. It seems that integration of the EPSP project into the HHC Element could be improved. Along these lines, we were concerned that our SRP was split off from the other participating SRPs at an early stage in the overall agenda for the meeting. In reality, the concerns of EPSP and other projects share much common ground. For example, the commonality of the concerns of the EVA and exercise physiology groups is obvious, both in terms of what reduced exercise capacity can do to EVA capability, and how the exercise performed during an EVA could contribute to an overall exercise countermeasure prescription.

  17. Mars EVA Suit Airlock (MESA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, Stephen; Böttcher, Jörg; Steinsiek, Frank

    The Astrium Space Infrastructure Division has begun an in-house research activity of an Earth-based simulation facility supporting future manned missions to Mars. This research unit will help to prepare and support planned missions in the following ways: 1) to enable the investigation and analysis of contamination issues in advance of a human visit to Mars; 2) as a design tool to investigate and simulate crew operations; 3) to simulate crew operation during an actual mission; 4) to enable on-surface scientific operations without leaving the shirt-sleeve habitation environment ("glove box principle"). The MESA module is a surface EVA facility attached to the main habitation or laboratory module, or mobile pressurized rover. It will be sealed, but not pressurized, and provide protection against the harsh Martian environment. This module will include a second crew airlock for safety reasons. The compartment can also be used to provide an external working bench and experiment area for the crew. A simpler MESA concept provides only an open shelter against wind and dust. This concept does not incorporate working and experimental areas. The principle idea behind the MESA concept is to tackle the issue of contamination by minimizing the decontamination processes needed to clean surface equipment and crew suit surfaces after an EVA excursion prior to the astronaut re-entering the habitable area. The technical solution envisages the use of a dedicated crew suit airlock. This airlock uses an EVA suit which is externally attached by its back-pack to the EVA compartment area facing the Martian environment. The crew donns the suit from inside the habitable volume through the airlock on the back of the suit. The surface EVA can be accomplished after closing the back-pack and detaching the suit. A special technical design concept foresees an extendable suit back-pack, so that the astronaut can operate outside and in the vincinity of the module. The key driver in the investigation is the problem of contamination of the habitable volume by EVA and sampling activities and the transport of Earth-generated contaminants to Mars.

  18. Astronaut Extravehicular Activity : safety, injury & countermeasures; &, Orbital collisions & space debris : incidence, impact & international policy

    E-print Network

    Opperman, Roedolph A. (Roedolph Adriaan)

    2010-01-01

    Extravehicular Activity (EVA) spacesuits are a key enabling technology which allow astronauts to survive and work in the harsh environment of space. Of the entire spacesuit, the gloves may perhaps be considered the most ...

  19. Exploration EVA System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearney, Lara

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, the President announced a new Vision for Space Exploration. NASA's Office of Exploration Systems has identified Extravehicular Activity (EVA) as a critical capability for supporting the Vision for Space Exploration. EVA is required for all phases of the Vision, both in-space and planetary. Supporting the human outside the protective environment of the vehicle or habitat and allow ing him/her to perform efficient and effective work requires an integrated EVA "System of systems." The EVA System includes EVA suits, airlocks, tools and mobility aids, and human rovers. At the core of the EVA System is the highly technical EVA suit, which is comprised mainly of a life support system and a pressure/environmental protection garment. The EVA suit, in essence, is a miniature spacecraft, which combines together many different sub-systems such as life support, power, communications, avionics, robotics, pressure systems and thermal systems, into a single autonomous unit. Development of a new EVA suit requires technology advancements similar to those required in the development of a new space vehicle. A majority of the technologies necessary to develop advanced EVA systems are currently at a low Technology Readiness Level of 1-3. This is particularly true for the long-pole technologies of the life support system.

  20. Compression under a mechanical counter pressure space suit glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldie, James M A.; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Tourbier, Dietmar; Webb, Paul; Jarvis, Christine W.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Current gas-pressurized space suits are bulky stiff shells severely limiting astronaut function and capability. A mechanical counter pressure (MCP) space suit in the form of a tight elastic garment could dramatically improve extravehicular activity (EVA) dexterity, but also be advantageous in safety, cost, mass and volume. The purpose of this study was to verify that a prototype MCP glove exerts the design compression of 200 mmHg, a pressure similar to the current NASA EVA suit. Methods: Seven male subjects donned a pressure measurement array and MCP glove on the right hand, which was placed into a partial vacuum chamber. Average compression was recorded on the palm, the bottom of the middle finger, the top of the middle finger and the dorsum of the hand at pressures of 760 (ambient), 660 and 580 mmHg. The vacuum chamber was used to simulate the pressure difference between the low breathing pressure of the current NASA space suits (approximately 200 mmHg) and an unprotected hand in space. Results: At ambient conditions, the MCP glove compressed the dorsum of the hand at 203.5 +/- 22.7 mmHg, the bottom of the middle finger at 179.4 +/- 16.0 mmHg, and the top of the middle finger at 183.8 +/- 22.6 mmHg. The palm compression was significantly lower (59.6 +/- 18.8 mmHg, p<0.001). There was no significant change in glove compression with the chamber pressure reductions. Conclusions: The MCP glove compressed the dorsum of the hand and middle finger at the design pressure.

  1. Improving Glove Barrier Effectiveness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dietmar Rabussay; Denise M. Korniewicz

    1997-01-01

    Perioperative staff members depend on surgical gloves to prevent disease transmission between themselves and patients, but these gloves frequently fail during use. Three approaches can make surgical gloves more effective barriers: preventing glove failures, monitoring glove integrity, and improving glove quality. Failure prevention includes modifying surgical techniques, improving instruments and equipment, streamlining teamwork, selecting the most appropriate gloves, double gloving,

  2. Determination of ring correction factors for leaded gloves used in grab sampling activities at Hanford tank farms

    SciTech Connect

    RATHBONE, B.A.

    1999-06-24

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of lead lined gloves in reducing extremity dose from two sources specific to tank waste sampling activities: (1) sludge inside glass sample jars and (2) sludge as thin layer contamination on the exterior surface of sample jars. The response of past and present Hanford Extremity Dosimeters (ring) designs under these conditions is also evaluated.

  3. Mitigation of EMU Cut Glove Hazard from Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris Impacts on ISS Handrails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric L.; Davis, Bruce A.; Ordonez, Erick

    2009-01-01

    Recent cut damages sustained on crewmember gloves during extravehicular activity (ISS) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) have been caused by contact with sharp edges or a pinch point according to analysis of the damages. One potential source are protruding sharp edged crater lips from micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts on metallic handrails along EVA translation paths. A number of hypervelocity impact tests were performed on ISS handrails, and found that mm-sized projectiles were capable of inducing crater lip heights two orders of magnitude above the minimum value for glove abrasion concerns. Two techniques were evaluated for mitigating the cut glove hazard of MMOD impacts on ISS handrails: flexible overwraps which act to limit contact between crewmember gloves and impact sites, and; alternate materials which form less hazardous impact crater profiles. In parallel with redesign efforts to increase the cut resilience of EMU gloves, the modifications to ISS handrails evaluated in this study provide the means to significantly reduce cut glove risk from MMOD impact craters

  4. Space shuttle EVA opportunities. [a technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, D. A., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A technology assessment is presented on space extravehicular activities (EVA) that will be possible when the space shuttle orbiter is completed and launched. The use of EVA in payload systems design is discussed. Also discussed is space crew training. The role of EVA in connection with the Large Space Telescope and Skylab are described. The value of EVA in constructing structures in space and orbital assembly is examined. Excellent color illustrations are provided which show the proposed EVA functions that were described.

  5. EVA-SCRAM operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanigan, Lee A.; Tamir, David; Weeks, Jack L.; Mcclure, Sidney R.; Kimbrough, Andrew G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper wrestles with the on-orbit operational challenges introduced by the proposed Space Construction, Repair, and Maintenance (SCRAM) tool kit for Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA). SCRAM undertakes a new challenging series of on-orbit tasks in support of the near-term Hubble Space Telescope, Extended Duration Orbiter, Long Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, other orbital platforms, and even the future manned Lunar/Mars missions. These new EVA tasks involve welding, brazing, cutting, coating, heat-treating, and cleaning operations. Anticipated near-term EVA-SCRAM applications include construction of fluid lines and structural members, repair of punctures by orbital debris, refurbishment of surfaces eroded by atomic oxygen, and cleaning of optical, solar panel, and high emissivity radiator surfaces which have been degraded by contaminants. Future EVA-SCRAM applications are also examined, involving mass production tasks automated with robotics and artificial intelligence, for construction of large truss, aerobrake, and reactor shadow shield structures. Realistically achieving EVA-SCRAM is examined by addressing manual, teleoperated, semi-automated, and fully-automated operation modes. The operational challenges posed by EVA-SCRAM tasks are reviewed with respect to capabilities of existing and upcoming EVA systems, such as the Extravehicular Mobility Unit, the Shuttle Remote Manipulating System, the Dexterous End Effector, and the Servicing Aid Tool.

  6. Glove reinforcement: an alternative to double gloving.

    PubMed

    Alrawi, S; Houshan, L; Satheesan, R; Raju, R; Cunningham, J; Acinapura, A

    2001-08-01

    Gloves, worn by the surgical team to prevent transmission of infections from and to patients, are prone to tears and perforations. This study was done to determine the frequency and sites of unrecognized glove perforation during surgical procedures. The percentage of glove perforation was 14%. Of the punctures, 73% occurred in one of four contiguous locations on the glove. We recommend glove reinforcement at these locations to provide better protection, as well as to reduce the burden of double gloving. PMID:11700884

  7. Design, development and evaluation of Stanford/Ames EVA prehensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Larry J.; Aldrich, J.; Leblanc, M.; Sabelman, E.; Schwandt, D.

    1988-01-01

    Space Station operations and maintenance are expected to make unprecedented demands on astronaut EVA. With Space Station expected to operate with an 8 to 10 psi atmosphere (4 psi for Shuttle operations), the effectivness of pressurized gloves is called into doubt at the same time that EVA activity levels are to be increased. To address the need for more frequent and complex EVA missions and also to extend the dexterity, duration, and safety of EVA astronauts, NASA Ames and Stanford University have an ongoing cooperative agreement to explore and compare alternatives. This is the final Stanford/Ames report on manually powered Prehensors, each of which consists of a shroud forming a pressure enclosure around the astronaut's hand, and a linkage system to transfer the motions and forces of the hand to mechanical digits attached to the shroud. All prehensors are intended for attachment to a standard wrist coupling, as found on the AX-5 hard suit prototype, so that realistic tests can be performed under normal and reduced gravity as simulated by water flotation.

  8. Thermoregulation and heat exchange in a nonuniform thermal environment during simulated extended EVA. Extravehicular activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koscheyev, V. S.; Leon, G. R.; Hubel, A.; Nelson, E. D.; Tranchida, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonuniform heating and cooling of the body, a possibility during extended duration extravehicular activities (EVA), was studied by means of a specially designed water circulating garment that independently heated or cooled the right and left sides of the body. The purpose was to assess whether there was a generalized reaction on the finger in extreme contradictory temperatures on the body surface, as a potential heat status controller. METHOD: Eight subjects, six men and two women, were studied while wearing a sagittally divided experimental garment with hands exposed in the following conditions: Stage 1 baseline--total body garment inlet water temperature at 33 degrees C; Stage 2--left side inlet water temperature heated to 45 degrees C; right side cooled to 8 degrees C; Stage 3--left side inlet water temperature cooled to 8 degrees C, right side heated to 45 degrees C. RESULTS: Temperatures on each side of the body surface as well as ear canal temperature (Tec) showed statistically significant Stage x Side interactions, demonstrating responsiveness to the thermal manipulations. Right and left finger temperatures (Tfing) were not significantly different across stages; their dynamic across time was similar. Rectal temperature (Tre) was not reactive to prevailing cold on the body surface, and therefore not informative. Subjective perception of heat and cold on the left and right sides of the body was consistent with actual temperature manipulations. CONCLUSIONS: Tec and Tre estimates of internal temperature do not provide accurate data for evaluating overall thermal status in nonuniform thermal conditions on the body surface. The use of Tfing has significant potential in providing more accurate information on thermal status and as a feedback method for more precise thermal regulation of the astronaut within the EVA space suit.

  9. In Vivo Noninvasive Analysis of Human Forearm Muscle Function and Fatigue: Applications to EVA Operations and Training Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fotedar, L. K.; Marshburn, T.; Quast, M. J.; Feeback, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Forearm muscle fatigue is one of the major limiting factors affecting endurance during performance of deep-space extravehicular activity (EVA) by crew members. Magnetic resonance (MR) provides in vivo noninvasive analysis of tissue level metabolism and fluid exchange dynamics in exercised forearm muscles through the monitoring of proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31-MRS) parameter variations. Using a space glove box and EVA simulation protocols, we conducted a preliminary MRS/MRI study in a small group of human test subjects during submaximal exercise and recovery and following exhaustive exercise. In assessing simulated EVA-related muscle fatigue and function, this pilot study revealed substantial changes in the MR image longitudinal relaxation times (T2) as an indicator of specific muscle activation and proton flux as well as changes in spectral phosphocreatine-to-phosphate (PCr/Pi) levels as a function of tissue bioenergetic potential.

  10. Advanced EVA system design requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Design requirements and criteria for the Space Station Advanced Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) including crew enclosures, portable life support systems, maneuvering propulsion systems, and related extravehicular activity (EVA) support equipment were defined and established. The EVA mission requirements, environments, and medical and physiological requirements, as well as opertional, procedures, and training issues were considered.

  11. Improved Gloves for Firefighters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R.; Arons, I. J.

    1983-01-01

    New firefighter's gloves are more flexible and comfortable than previous designs. Since some firefighters prefer gloves made of composite materials while others prefer dip-coated gloves, both types were developed. New gloves also find uses in foundries, steelmills, and other plants where they are substituted for asbestos gloves.

  12. Study to evaluate the effect of EVA on payload systems. Volume 1: Executive summary. [project planning of space missions employing extravehicular activity as a means of cost reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, J. W.; Kraly, E. F.

    1975-01-01

    Programmatic benefits to payloads are examined which can result from the routine use of extravehicular activity (EVA) during space missions. Design and operations costs were compared for 13 representative baseline payloads to the costs of those payloads adapted for EVA operations. The EVA-oriented concepts developed in the study were derived from these baseline concepts and maintained mission and program objectives as well as basic configurations. This permitted isolation of cost saving factors associated specifically with incorporation of EVA in a variety of payload designs and operations. The study results were extrapolated to a total of 74 payload programs. Using appropriate complexity and learning factors, net EVA savings were extrapolated to over $551M for NASA and U.S. civil payloads for routine operations. Adding DOD and ESRO payloads increases the net estimated savings of $776M. Planned maintenance by EVA indicated an estimated $168M savings due to elimination of automated service equipment. Contingency problems of payloads were also analyzed to establish expected failure rates for shuttle payloads. The failure information resulted in an estimated potential for EVA savings of $1.9 B.

  13. H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and the Operations Concept for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Blome, Elizabeth; Tetsuya, Sakashita

    2011-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle fleet imminent in 2011, a new operations concept will become reality to meet the transportation challenges of the International Space Station (ISS). The planning associated with the retirement of the Space Shuttle has been underway since the announcement in 2004. Since then, several companies and government entities have had to look for innovative low-cost commercial orbital transportation systems to continue to achieve the objectives of ISS delivery requirements. Several options have been assessed and appear ready to meet the large and demanding delivery requirements of the ISS. Options that have been identified that can facilitate the challenge include the Russian Federal Space Agency's Soyuz and Progress spacecraft, European Space Agency's Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA s) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). The newest of these options is the JAXA's HTV. This paper focuses on the HTV, mission architecture and operations concept for Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) hardware, the associated launch system, and details of the launch operations approach.

  14. H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and the Operations Concept for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda

    2010-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle fleet imminent in 2011, a new concept of operations will become reality to meet the transportation challenges of the International Space Station (ISS). The planning associated with the retirement of the Space Shuttle has been underway since the announcement in 2004. Since then, several companies and government entities have had to look for innovative low-cost commercial orbital transportation systems to continue to achieve the objectives of ISS delivery requirements. Several options have been assessed and appear ready to meet the large and demanding delivery requirements of the ISS. Options that have been identified that can facilitate the challenge include the Russian Federal Space Agency's Soyuz and Progress spacecraft, European Space Agency's Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and the Boeing Delta IV Heavy (DIV-H). The newest of these options is the JAXA's HTV. This paper focuses on the HTV, mission architecture and operations concept for Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) hardware, the associated launch system, and details of the launch operations approach.

  15. Effective Presentation of Metabolic Rate Information for Lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackin, Michael A.; Gonia, Philip; Lombay-Gonzalez, Jose

    2010-01-01

    During human exploration of the lunar surface, a suited crewmember needs effective and accurate information about consumable levels remaining in their life support system. The information must be presented in a manner that supports real-time consumable monitoring and route planning. Since consumable usage is closely tied to metabolic rate, the lunar suit must estimate metabolic rate from life support sensors, such as oxygen tank pressures, carbon dioxide partial pressure, and cooling water inlet and outlet temperatures. To provide adequate warnings that account for traverse time for a crewmember to return to a safe haven, accurate forecasts of consumable depletion rates are required. The forecasts must be presented to the crewmember in a straightforward, effective manner. In order to evaluate methods for displaying consumable forecasts, a desktop-based simulation of a lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) has been developed for the Constellation lunar suite s life-support system. The program was used to compare the effectiveness of several different data presentation methods.

  16. Interviews with the Apollo lunar surface astronauts in support of planning for EVA systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, Mary M.; Eppler, Dean B.; Morrow, Daniel G.

    1994-01-01

    Focused interviews were conducted with the Apollo astronauts who landed on the moon. The purpose of these interviews was to help define extravehicular activity (EVA) system requirements for future lunar and planetary missions. Information from the interviews was examined with particular attention to identifying areas of consensus, since some commonality of experience is necessary to aid in the design of advanced systems. Results are presented under the following categories: mission approach; mission structure; suits; portable life support systems; dust control; gloves; automation; information, displays, and controls; rovers and remotes; tools; operations; training; and general comments. Research recommendations are offered, along with supporting information.

  17. Synthetic surgical gloves.

    PubMed

    2000-01-01

    Surgical gloves are used by healthcare workers primarily to minimize the transmission of bloodborne pathogens and other potential infectants. Gloves made of synthetic materials are getting more attention with the increasing prevalence of allergies to natural rubber latex (NRL) among patients and medical staff. However, synthetic gloves are perceived by some people as providing less protection and being less comfortable than NRL gloves. In this study, we evaluated eight models of synthetic surgical gloves from six manufacturers. We examined their barrier effectiveness (that is, their resistance to viral penetration, resistance to puncture, and strength) durability, and comfort and compared these characteristics to those of NRL gloves. We found that all the gloves offered good barrier protection, but that their level of comfort varied widely. Three gloves were rated Preferred, three were Acceptable, and the remaining two gloves were Not Recommended. PMID:10748995

  18. EVA Skills Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Parazynski and a colleague from Extravehicular Activity (EVA), Robotics, & Crew Systems Operations (DX) worked closely to build the EVA Skills Training Program, and for the first time, defined the gold standards of EVA performance, allowing crewmembers to increase their performance significantly. As part of the program, individuals had the opportunity to learn at their own rate, taking additional water time as required, to achieve that level of performance. This focus on training to one's strengths and weaknesses to bolster them enabled the Crew Office and DX to field a much larger group of spacewalkers for the daunting "wall of EVA" required for the building and maintenance of the ISS. Parazynski also stressed the need for designers to understand the capabilities and the limitations of a human in a spacesuit, as well as opportunities to improve future generations of space. He shared lessons learned (how the Crew Office engaged in these endeavors) and illustrated the need to work as a team to develop these complex systems.

  19. Interoperability Trends in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Space Operations for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Gerald E.

    1999-01-01

    No other space operations in the 21 st century more comprehensively embody the challenges and dependencies of interoperability than EVA. This discipline is already functioning at an W1paralleled level of interagency, inter-organizational and international cooperation. This trend will only increase as space programs endeavor to expand in the face of shrinking budgets. Among the topics examined in this paper are hardware-oriented issues. Differences in design standards among various space participants dictate differences in the EVA tools that must be manufactured, flown and maintained on-orbit. Presently only two types of functional space suits exist in the world. However, three versions of functional airlocks are in operation. Of the three airlocks, only the International Space Station (ISS) Joint Airlock can accommodate both types of suits. Due to functional differences in the suits, completely different operating protocols are required for each. Should additional space suit or airlock designs become available, the complexity will increase. The lessons learned as a result of designing and operating within such a system are explored. This paper also examines the non-hardware challenges presented by interoperability for a discipline that is as uniquely dependent upon the individual as EVA. Operation of space suits (essentially single-person spacecrafts) by persons whose native language is not that of the suits' designers is explored. The intricacies of shared mission planning, shared control and shared execution of joint EVA's are explained. For example, once ISS is fully functional, the potential exists for two crewmembers of different nationality to be wearing suits manufactured and controlled by a third nation, while operating within an airlock manufactured and controlled by a fourth nation, in an effort to perform tasks upon hardware belonging to a fifth nation. Everything from training issues, to procedures development and writing, to real-time operations is addressed. Finally, this paper looks to the management challenges presented by interoperability in general. With budgets being reduced among all space-faring nations, the need to expand cooperation in the highly expensive field of human space operations is only going to intensify. The question facing management is not if the trend toward interoperation will continue, but how to best facilitate its doing so. Real-world EVA interoperability experience throughout the ShuttlelMir and ISS Programs is discussed to illustrate the challenges and

  20. Post-Shuttle EVA Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Witt, Vincent; Chullen, Cinda

    2010-01-01

    The expected retirement of the NASA Space Transportation System (also known as the Space Shuttle ) by 2011 will pose a significant challenge to Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The EVA hardware currently used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed assuming that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for refurbishment, or if necessary for failure investigation. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support hardware and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2015, and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, the EVA 2010 Project was jointly initiated by NASA and the One EVA contractor team. The challenges addressed were to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, to secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, to protect for EMU hardware operability on-orbit, and to determine the source of high water purity to support recharge of PLSSs (no longer available via Shuttle). EVA 2010 Project includes the following tasks: the development of a launch fixture that would allow the EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to be launched on-board alternate vehicles; extension of the EMU hardware maintenance interval from 3 years (current certification) to a minimum of 6 years (to extend to 2015); testing of recycled ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) water for use in the EMU cooling system in lieu of water resupplied by International Partner (IP) vehicles; development of techniques to remove & replace critical components in the PLSS on-orbit (not routine); extension of on-orbit certification of EVA tools; and development of an EVA hardware logistical plan to support the ISS without the Space Shuttle. Assumptions for the EVA 2010 Project included no more than 8 EVAs per year for ISS EVA operations in the Post-Shuttle environment and limited availability of cargo upmass on IP launch vehicles. From 2010 forward, EVA operations on-board the ISS without the Space Shuttle will be a paradigm shift in safely operating EVA hardware on orbit and the EVA 2010 effort was initiated to accommodate this significant change in EVA evolutionary history. 1

  1. Grow a Garden in a Glove

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-03-22

    Learners use a transparent plastic glove as a container to grow seeds. A different kind of seed can be planted in each finger. A few days after planting, learners will see the seeds begin to sprout in the glove. Use this activity to illustrate the process of germination.

  2. Extravehicular Activity Asteroid Exploration and Sample Collection Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipila, Stephanie A.; Scoville, Zebulon C.; Bowie, Jonathan T.; Buffington, Jesse A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the challenging primary objectives associated with NASA's Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) is to demonstrate deep space Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and tools and to obtain asteroid samples to return to Earth for further study. Prior Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) spacewalks have benefited from engineered EVA interfaces which have been designed and manufactured on Earth. Rigid structurally mounted handrails, and tools with customized interfaces and restraints optimize EVA performance. For ARCM, EVA complexity increases due to the uncertainty of the asteroid properties. The variability of rock size, shape and composition, as well as behavior of the asteroid capture mechanism will complicate EVA translation, tool restraint, and body stabilization. The unknown asteroid hardness and brittleness will complicate tool use. The rock surface will introduce added safety concerns for cut gloves and debris control. Feasible solutions to meet ARCM EVA objectives were identified using experience gained during Apollo, Shuttle, and ISS EVAs, terrestrial mountaineering practices, NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 16 mission, and during Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory testing in the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) suit. This paper will summarize the overall operational concepts for conducting EVAs for the ARCM mission including translation paths and body restraint methods, potential tools used to extract the samples, design implications for the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) for EVA, and the results of early development testing of potential EVA tasks.

  3. [Individual protective devices: gloves].

    PubMed

    Zannol, F

    2003-01-01

    Gloves are an essential device to avoid cutaneous contact with aggressive agents. There is no "ideal glove"; therefore, it is necessary to select them on the basis of their effectiveness. Gloves can protect from different hazards: mechanical, chemical, biological, thermical and electrical. Specific protective gloves can be used for certain risk factors: i.e. welding operations, concussions and vibrations, food manipulation and health care. Protecting gloves are made of different materials, natural and synthetic, according to the risk they are projected for. Often the same glove can protect against multiple hazards. Finally, the choice of an "adequate" glove should be the result of a fruitful collaboration among employers, industrial hygienists and occupational physician. PMID:12872506

  4. Advanced EVA system design requirements study: EVAS/space station system interface requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    The definition of the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems interface requirements and accomodations for effective integration of a production EVA capability into the space station are contained. A description of the EVA systems for which the space station must provide the various interfaces and accomodations are provided. The discussion and analyses of the various space station areas in which the EVA interfaces are required and/or from which implications for EVA system design requirements are derived, are included. The rationale is provided for all EVAS mechanical, fluid, electrical, communications, and data system interfaces as well as exterior and interior requirements necessary to facilitate EVA operations. Results of the studies supporting these discussions are presented in the appendix.

  5. Anti-vibration gloves?

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sue; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    For exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV), personal protective equipment is sold in the form of anti-vibration (AV) gloves, but it remains unclear how much these gloves actually reduce vibration exposure or prevent the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome in the workplace. This commentary describes some of the issues that surround the classification of AV gloves, the assessment of their effectiveness and their applicability in the workplace. The available information shows that AV gloves are unreliable as devices for controlling HTV exposures. Other means of vibration control, such as using alternative production techniques, low-vibration machinery, routine preventative maintenance regimes, and controlling exposure durations are far more likely to deliver effective vibration reductions and should be implemented. Furthermore, AV gloves may introduce some adverse effects such as increasing grip force and reducing manual dexterity. Therefore, one should balance the benefits of AV gloves and their potential adverse effects if their use is considered. PMID:25381184

  6. Metabolic rate control during extravehicular activity simulations and measurement techniques during actual EVAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A description of the methods used to control and measure metabolic rate during ground simulations is given. Work levels attained at the Space Environment Simulation Laboratory are presented. The techniques and data acquired during ground simulations are described and compared with inflight procedures. Data from both the Skylab and Apollo Program were utilized and emphasis is given to the methodology, both in simulation and during flight. The basic techniques of work rate assessment are described. They include oxygen consumption, which was useful for averages over long time periods, heart rate correlations based on laboratory calibrations, and liquid cooling garment temperature changes. The relative accuracy of these methods as well as the methods of real-time monitoring at the Mission Control Center are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the metabolic measurement techniques are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to the problem of utilizing oxygen decrement for short time periods and heart rate at low work levels. A summary is given of the effectiveness of work rate control and measurements; and current plans for future EVA monitoring are discussed.

  7. Stability of EVA modules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. Petersen; J. H. Wohlgemuth

    1991-01-01

    Reported observations on laminated glass superstrate modules with crosslinked ethylene\\/vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant include increased crosslinking of EVA, discoloration of the encapsulant, and formation of acetic acid within the module, following lengthy service in the field. One firm has begun a study of its EVA modules, obtaining and analyzing samples that have been operating in the field for eight to

  8. APOLLO 14 EVA View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, photographed this sweeping view showing fellow Moon-explorer astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., mission commander, and the Apollo 14 Lunar Module (LM). A small cluster of rocks and a few prints made by the lunar overshoes of Mitchell are in the foreground. Mitchell was standing in the boulder field, located just north by northwest of the LM, when he took this picture during the second Apollo 14 extravehicular activity (EVA-2), on February 6, 1971. While astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit, Shepard and Mitchell descended in the LM to explore the Moon.

  9. GLOVEBOX GLOVE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Korinko

    2012-01-01

    A task was undertaken to determine primarily the permeation behavior of various glove compounds from four manufacturers. As part of the basic characterization task, the opportunity to obtain additional mechanical and thermal properties presented itself. Consequently, a total of fifteen gloves were characterized for permeation, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Puncture Resistance, Tensile Properties and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. Detailed reports were written for

  10. Main problems of the Russian Orlan-M space suit utilization for EVAs on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, I. P.; Pozdnyakov, S. S.; Severin, G. I.; Stoklitsky, A. Yu.

    2001-03-01

    In the recent years the Russian Orlan-M space suits have been improved as applied to their operational requirements for the ISS. A special attention is paid to enhancement of EVA crew efficiency and safety. The paper considers the main problems regarding specific features of the Russian space suit operation in the ISS, and analyses measures on their solution. In particular, the problems associated with the following are considered: enhancement of the anthropometric range for the EVA crewmembers; use of some US EMU elements and unified NASA equipment elements; Orlan-M operation support in the wide range of the ISS thermal conditions; use of Simplified Aid For Extravehicular activity Rescue (SAFER) designed as a self-rescue device, which will be used for an EVA crewmember return in the event that he (she) breaks away inadvertently from the ISS surface. The paper states the main space suit differences with reference to solution of the above problems. The paper presents briefly the design of space suit arms developed for crewmembers with small anthropometric parameters, as well as peculiarities and test results for the gloves with enhanced thermal protection. Measures on further space suit development with the purpose to improve its performances are considered.

  11. Therapy gloves for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Troynikov, Olga; Massy-Westropp, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that causes pain, joint stiffness and swelling leading to impaired hand function and difficulty with daily activities. Wearing therapy gloves has been recommended by occupational therapists as one of the alternative treatment methods for rheumatoid arthritis. This study aims to review the available literature on the effects of wearing therapy gloves on patients’ hand function and symptoms as well as to discuss the attributes of gloves that might influence the glove performance. An electronic databases search of MEDLINE, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Occupational Therapy Systematic Evaluation of Evidence, Wiley Online Library, ScienceDirect and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial was performed. Eight articles met the inclusion criteria, and covered seven clinical trials and one case study. Seven outcome measures were identified from the included studies and were then classified into two categories: hand function and hand symptoms. The hand symptoms such as pain, stiffness and swelling improve substantially when the therapy gloves are used. However, marginal or no improvement in hand function (with the exception of grip strength) linked to the use of therapy gloves is being reported. Further research is needed to quantify the effectiveness of therapy gloves, especially in improvement of hand function and in patients’ interest in wearing therapy gloves. Furthermore, future studies should include parameters which might influence therapy gloves’ performance, such as duration of trials, interface pressure generated by the gloves on the underlying skin and tissue, glove fit and construction, as well as thermophysiological comfort. PMID:25435925

  12. EVA Performance Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peacock, Brian; Maida, James; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut physical performance capabilities in micro gravity EV A or on planetary surfaces when encumbered by a life support suit and debilitated by a long exposure to micro gravity will be less than unencumbered pre flight capabilities. The big question addressed by human factors engineers is: what can the astronaut be expected to do on EVA or when we arrive at a planetary surface? A second question is: what aids to performance will be needed to enhance the human physical capability? These questions are important for a number of reasons. First it is necessary to carry out accurate planning of human physical demands to ensure that time and energy critical tasks can be carried out with confidence. Second it is important that the crew members (and their ground or planetary base monitors) have a realistic picture of their own capabilities, as excessive fatigue can lead to catastrophic failure. Third it is important to design appropriate equipment to enhance human sensory capabilities, locomotion, materials handling and manipulation. The evidence from physiological research points to musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and neurovestibular degradation during long duration exposure to micro gravity . The evidence from the biomechanics laboratory (and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory) points to a reduction in range of motion, strength and stamina when encumbered by a pressurized suit. The evidence from a long history of EVAs is that crewmembers are indeed restricted in their physical capabilities. There is a wealth of evidence in the literature on the causes and effects of degraded human performance in the laboratory, in sports and athletics, in industry and in other physically demanding jobs. One approach to this challenge is through biomechanical and performance modeling. Such models must be based on thorough task analysis, reliable human performance data from controlled studies, and functional extrapolations validated in analog contexts. The task analyses currently carried out for EVA activities are based more on extensive domain experience than any formal analytic structure. Conversely, physical task analysis for industrial and structured evidence from training and EV A contexts. Again on earth there is considerable evidence of human performance degradation due to encumbrance and fatigue. These industrial models generally take the form of a discounting equation. The development of performance estimates for space operations, such as timeline predictions for EVA is generally based on specific input from training activity, for example in the NBL or KC135. uniformed services tasks on earth are much more formalized. Human performance data in the space context has two sources: first there is the micro analysis of performance in structured tasks by the space physiology community and second there is the less structured evidence from training and EV A contexts.

  13. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  14. A new glove puncture detection system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theodore T. Manson; William G. Bromberg; John G. Thacker; Walter McGregor; Raymond F. Morgan; Richard F. Edlich

    1995-01-01

    A new glove detection system has been developed for early and accurate detection of a hole in the glove. It consists of an inner glove colored by a green dye and outer glove. When a breach in the outer glove occurs, the inner glove develops a dark patch around the needle puncture hole, a visible indicator for immediate glove change.

  15. Astronaut Bernard Harris on RMS during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut Bernard A. Harris, Jr., payload commander, watches astronaut C. Michael Foale (out of frame), mission specialist, during the late phases of their shared extravehicular activity (EVA) in the STS-63 Space Shuttle Discovery's cargo bay.

  16. Astronaut Bernard Harris on RMS during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut Bernard A. Harris, Jr., payload commander, standing on a foot restraint attached to the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm carries astronaut C. Michael Foale, mission specialist, during their shared extravehicular activity (EVA) in the Space Shuttle Discovery's cargo bay.

  17. Surgical Gloves: Current Problems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maher O. Osman; Steen L. Jensen

    1999-01-01

    .   One century ago surgical gloves were introduced to practice as part of the new antiseptic technique and originally to protect\\u000a the hands of the surgeon and his assistants from the harmful dermatologic effects of powerful antiseptics (e.g., carbolic\\u000a acid) in use at that time. Since then, the wearing of gloves during surgery has been standard practice. Furthermore, the protection

  18. GLOVEBOX GLOVE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2012-05-14

    A task was undertaken to determine primarily the permeation behavior of various glove compounds from four manufacturers. As part of the basic characterization task, the opportunity to obtain additional mechanical and thermal properties presented itself. Consequently, a total of fifteen gloves were characterized for permeation, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Puncture Resistance, Tensile Properties and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. Detailed reports were written for each characterization technique used. This report contains the summary of the results.

  19. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portree, David S. F.; Trevino, Robert C.

    1997-01-01

    Spacewalkers enjoy a view of Earth once reserved for Apollo, Zeus, and other denizens of Mt. Olympus. During humanity's first extravehicular activity (EVA), Alexei Leonov floated above Gibraltar, the rock ancient seafarers saw as the gateway to the great unknown Atlantic. The symbolism was clear, Leonov stepped past a new Gibraltar when he stepped into space. More than 32 years and 154 EVAs later, Jerry Linenger conducted an EVA with Vladimir Tsibliyev as part of International Space Station Phase 1. They floated together above Gibraltar. Today the symbolism has new meaning: humanity is starting to think of stepping out of Earth orbit, space travel's new Gibraltar, and perhaps obtaining a new olympian view, a close-up look at Olympus Mons on Mars. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology chronicles the 154 EVAs conducted from March 1965 to April 1997. It is intended to make clear the crucial role played by EVA in the history of spaceflight, as well as to chronicle the large body of EVA "lessons learned." Russia and the U.S. define EVA differently. Russian cosmonauts are said to perform EVA any time they are in vacuum in a space suit. A U.S. astronaut must have at least his head outside his spacecraft before he is said to perform an EVA. The difference is based in differing spacecraft design philoso- phies. Russian and Soviet spacecraft have always had a specialized airlock through which the EVA cosmonaut egressed, leaving the main habitable volume of the spacecraft pressurized. The U.S. Gemini and Apollo vehicles, on the other hand, depressurized their entire habitable volume for egress. In this document, we apply the Russian definition to Russian EVAS, and the U.S. definition to U.S. EVAS. Thus, for example, Gemini 4 Command Pilot James McDivitt does not share the honor of being first American spacewalker with Ed White, even though he was suited and in vacuum when White stepped out into space. Non-EVA spaceflights are listed in the chronology to provide context and to display the large num- ber of flights in which EVA played a role. This approach also makes apparent significant EVA gaps, for example, the U.S. gap between 1985 and 1991 following the Challenger accident. This NASA History Monograph is an edited extract from an extensive EVA Chronology and Reference Book being produced by the EVA Project Office, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. The larger work will be published as part of the NASA Formal Series in 1998. The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance rendered by Max Ary, Ashot Bakunts, Gert-Jan Bartelds, Frank Cepollina, Andrew Chaikin, Phillip Clark, Richard Fullerton, Steven Glenn, Linda Godwin, Jennifer Green, Greg Harris, Clifford Hess, Jeffrey Hoffman, David Homan, Steven Hopkins, Nicholas Johnson, Eric Jones, Neville Kidger, Joseph Kosmo, Alexei Lebedev, Mark Lee, James LeBlanc, Dmitri Leshchenskii, Jerry Linenger, Igor Lissov, James McBarron, Clay McCullough, Joseph McMann, Story Musgrave, Dennis Newkirk, James Oberg, Joel Powell, Lee Saegesser, Andy Salmon, Glen Swanson, Joseph Tatarewicz, Kathy Thornton, Chris Vandenberg, Charles Vick, Bert Vis, David Woods, Mike Wright, John Young, and Keith Zimmerman. Special thanks to Laurie Buchanan, John Charles, Janet Kovacevich, Joseph Loftus, Sue McDonald, Martha Munies, Colleen Rapp, and Jerry Ross. Any errors remain the responsibility of the authors.

  20. AN INSTRUMENTED GLOVE FOR SMALL PRIMATES

    PubMed Central

    Overduin, Simon A.; Zaheer, Farah; Bizzi, Emilio; d’Avella, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The Cymanus is a novel flex sensor glove for measuring hand kinematics in primates. It was used to monitor 9 joints of a rhesus macaque performing a grasping task with 25 objects. Over 6 days, the monkey tolerated the glove and showed no significant impairment in performance. The sensors linearly tracked joint angles, with joint trajectories preserved over days. Angular positions discriminated objects as accurately as electromyograms recorded simultaneously from 24 arm and hand muscles, and were maximally informative of object identity at the end of reach-to-grasp. In a further final validation of the glove, muscle activity controlling a joint was correlated with the joint’s angular acceleration 70 ms later. PMID:20034519

  1. Robot hands and extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, Beth

    1987-01-01

    Extravehicular activity (EVA) is crucial to the success of both current and future space operations. As space operations have evolved in complexity so has the demand placed on the EVA crewman. In addition, some NASA requirements for human capabilities at remote or hazardous sites were identified. One of the keys to performing useful EVA tasks is the ability to manipulate objects accurately, quickly and without early or excessive fatigue. The current suit employs a glove which enables the crewman to perform grasping tasks, use tools, turn switches, and perform other tasks for short periods of time. However, the glove's bulk and resistance to motion ultimately causes fatigue. Due to this limitation it may not be possible to meet the productivity requirements that will be placed on the EVA crewman of the future with the current or developmental Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) hardware. In addition, this hardware will not meet the requirements for remote or hazardous operations. In an effort to develop ways for improving crew productivity, a contract was awarded to develop a prototype anthromorphic robotic hand (ARH) for use with an extravehicular space suit. The first step in this program was to perform a a design study which investigated the basic technology required for the development of an ARH to enhance crew performance and productivity. The design study phase of the contract and some additional development work is summarized.

  2. Detection of surgical glove integrity.

    PubMed

    Sohn, R L; Murray, M T; Franko, A; Hwang, P K; Dulchavsky, S A; Grimm, M J

    2000-03-01

    Surgical glove integrity is essential for universal precautions; glove safety is verified by the water load test (WLT). Concerns regarding glove injury have prompted newer testing methodologies, including electrical conductance testing (ECT); however, the sensitivities of these tests are not known. We compared the sensitivity of WLT and ECT in detecting glove needle-stick injury in two commonly used brands of surgical gloves. Punctures were made with hollow-bore and solid surgical needles of various configurations. The WLT failed to detect glove holes from the smallest-caliber needles and only detected the injury in 60 per cent for the largest caliber. The ECT provided a graded index of glove injury in all holes made by both solid surgical needles and hollow-bore needles. The WLT is a poor test for clinical defects in latex surgical gloves; the ECT is significantly more sensitive and provides a gauge of the cross-sectional area of the defect. Interbrand differences in self-sealing properties of surgical gloves were evidenced and may be clinically relevant after glove perforation. PMID:10759204

  3. Glove punctures in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yinusa, W; Li, Y H; Chow, W; Ho, W Y; Leong, J C Y

    2004-02-01

    From February 2001 to May 2001, 792 latex gloves used in 100 operations from three orthopaedic sub-specialties (paediatrics, hand and spine) were tested for puncture by a water infusion test. Sixty-nine gloves from 45 operations were punctured, giving an overall glove perforation rate of 8.7% (69/792) and an operative perforation rate of 45% (45/100). The hand operations had the lowest operative perforation rate (19.4%) while the spine operations had the highest (63.6%). The glove perforation rate increased in bony procedures (60% versus 22.5%), in procedures with major instrumentation (66% versus 18%) and in more lengthy procedures. The thumbs and the left index finger had more punctures than other parts. In addition, the glove perforation rate for single gloving was 9.6% (53/552) while that for the inner glove of double gloving was 0.8% (1/120). Based on these findings, we would like to recommend double gloving and regular glove changing in these high-risk surgeries. PMID:14534831

  4. The Combination Effects of LiCl and the Active Leflunomide Metabolite, A771726, on Viral-Induced Interleukin 6 Production and EV-A71 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Hui-Chen; Shih, Shin-Ru; Chang, Teng-Yuan; Fang, Ming-Yu; Hsu, John T.-A.

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) is a neurotropic virus that can cause severe complications involving the central nervous system. No effective antiviral therapeutics are available for treating EV-A71 infection and drug discovery efforts are rarely focused to target this disease. Thus, the main goal of this study was to discover existing drugs with novel indications that may effectively inhibit EV-A71 replication and the inflammatory cytokines elevation. In this study, we showed that LiCl, a GSK3? inhibitor, effectively suppressed EV-A71 replication, apoptosis and inflammatory cytokines production (Interleukin 6, Interleukin-1?) in infected cells. Furthermore, LiCl and an immunomodular agent were shown to strongly synergize with each other in suppressing EV-A71 replication. The results highlighted potential new treatment regimens in suppressing sequelae caused by EV-A71 replication. PMID:25412347

  5. Astronaut Dale Gardner holds up for sale sign after EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, having just completed the major portion of his second extravehicular activity (EVA) period in three days, holds up a 'for sale' sign. Astronaut Joseph P. ALlen IV, who also participated in the two EVA's, is reflected in Gardner's helmet visor. A portion of each of two recovered satellites is in the lower right corner, with Westar nearer Discovery's aft.

  6. Glove punctures in orthopaedic surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Yinusa; Y. H. Li; W. Chow; W. Y. Ho; J. C. Y. Leong

    2004-01-01

    From February 2001 to May 2001, 792 latex gloves used in 100 operations from three orthopaedic sub-specialties (paediatrics, hand and spine) were tested for puncture by a water infusion test. Sixty-nine gloves from 45 operations were punctured, giving an overall glove perforation rate of 8.7% (69\\/792) and an operative perforation rate of 45% (45\\/100). The hand operations had the lowest

  7. Exploration EVA Purge Flow Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Moses; Conger, Bruce; Campbell, Colin

    2011-01-01

    An advanced future spacesuit will require properly sized suit and helmet purge flow rates in order to sustain a crew member with a failed Portable Life Support System (PLSS) during an Extravehicular Activity (EVA). A computational fluid dynamics evaluation was performed to estimate the helmet purge flow rate required to washout carbon dioxide and to prevent the condensing ("fogging") of water vapor on the helmet visor. An additional investigation predicted the suit purge flow rate required to provide sufficient convective cooling to keep the crew member comfortable. This paper summarizes the results of these evaluations.

  8. A human factors analysis of EVA time requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pate, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE), also known as Ergonomics, is a discipline whose goal is to engineer a safer, more efficient interface between humans and machines. HFE makes use of a wide range of tools and techniques to fulfill this goal. One of these tools is known as motion and time study, a technique used to develop time standards for given tasks. A human factors motion and time study was initiated with the goal of developing a database of EVA task times and a method of utilizing the database to predict how long an ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) should take. Initial development relied on the EVA activities performed during the STS-61 mission (Hubble repair). The first step of the analysis was to become familiar with EVAs and with the previous studies and documents produced on EVAs. After reviewing these documents, an initial set of task primitives and task time modifiers was developed. Videotaped footage of STS-61 EVAs were analyzed using these primitives and task time modifiers. Data for two entire EVA missions and portions of several others, each with two EVA astronauts, was collected for analysis. Feedback from the analysis of the data will be used to further refine the primitives and task time modifiers used. Analysis of variance techniques for categorical data will be used to determine which factors may, individually or by interactions, effect the primitive times and how much of an effect they have.

  9. Emergency vehicle alert system (EVAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Bill; Crump, Roger; Harper, Warren; Myneni, Krishna

    1995-01-01

    The Emergency Vehicle Alert System (EVAS) program is sponsored by the NASA/MSFC Technology Utilization (TU) office. The program was conceived to support the needs of hearing impaired drivers. The objective of the program is to develop a low-cost, small device which can be located in a personal vehicle and warn the driver, via a visual means, of the approach of an emergency vehicle. Many different technologies might be developed for this purpose and each has its own advantages and drawbacks. The requirements for an acoustic detection system, appear to be pretty stringent and may not allow the development of a reliable, low-cost device in the near future. The problems include variations in the sirens between various types of emergency vehicles, distortions due to wind and surrounding objects, competing background noise, sophisticated signal processing requirements, and omni-directional coverage requirements. Another approach is to use a Radio Frequency (RF) signal between the Emergency Vehicle (EV) and the Personal Vehicle (PV). This approach requires a transmitter on each EV and a receiver in each PV, however it is virtually assured that a system can be developed which works. With this approach, the real technology issue is how to make a system work as inexpensively as possible. This report gives a brief summary of the EVAS program from its inception and concentrates on describing the activities that occurred during Phase 4. References 1-3 describe activities under Phases 1-3. In the fourth phase of the program, the major effort to be expended was in development of the microcontroller system for the PV, refinement of some system elements and packaging for demonstration purposes. An EVAS system was developed and demonstrated which used standard spread spectrum modems with minor modifications.

  10. Space Station Human Factors Research Review. Volume 1: EVA Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marc M. (editor); Vykukal, H. C. (editor)

    1988-01-01

    An overview is presented of extravehicular activity (EVA) research and development activities at Ames. The majority of the program was devoted to presentations by the three contractors working in parallel on the EVA System Phase A Study, focusing on Implications for Man-Systems Design. Overhead visuals are included for a mission results summary, space station EVA requirements and interface accommodations summary, human productivity study cross-task coordination, and advanced EVAS Phase A study implications for man-systems design. Articles are also included on subsea approach to work systems development and advanced EVA system design requirements.

  11. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your bare hands. Follow these steps: Grab the top of your right glove with your left hand. Pull toward your fingertips. ... hand. Put 2 right-hand fingers in the top of your left glove. Pull toward your fingertips until you have pulled ...

  12. Curriculum Vitae Eva Lindstrm

    E-print Network

    , part time 2004 June ­ 2009 Dec Researcher, Linguistics, Stockholm University (4-year contract if fullCurriculum Vitae Eva Lindström d.o.b. 26 September 1965 (Stockholm, Sweden) Degrees 2002 Doctor employment 2010 Feb ­ Researcher (3-year full time project Dictionary and Linguistic Archaeology of Kuot, New

  13. Development of an EVA systems cost model. Volume 3: EVA systems cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The EVA systems cost model presented is based on proposed EVA equipment for the space shuttle program. General information on EVA crewman requirements in a weightless environment and an EVA capabilities overview are provided.

  14. Electromyographic quantification of hand performance during simulated extravehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranniger, Claudia Ute

    Pressure-suited humans are the most versatile work system in the space environment. Improvements in extravehicular activity (EVA) technology strive to enhance performance of manual tasks on orbit; however, methods with which to quantitatively assess these improvements are rare. This research encompasses the development of a system which can be used to quantify gloved hand performance during end-to-end EVA tasks, based both on hand motion and muscle activity. The system is unique in that it incorporates the physiological characteristics of the hand and forearm within the pressure suit glove, rather than simply evaluating the glove alone. Tracking of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the large flexor and extensor muscles of the hand, and of finger deflection within the glove, enables examination of both muscle activity levels and fatigue throughout a task. Two metrics suited to analysis of realistic, dynamic activities have been developed. A Task Intensity metric based on the amplitude distribution of the EMG signal provides a measure of the muscular effort required to complete individual activities. A mean power frequency (MPF) analysis tool derived from wavelet theory provides EMG spectral information indicative of muscle fatigue. The wavelet-based frequency analysis method is superior to traditional Fourier-based methods because it inherently provides temporal resolution of the signal, enabling decomposition of dynamic (nonstationary) and isometric (stationary) EMG signals alike. The Task Intensity and wavelet MPF analysis tools have been used to assess the gloved hand performance during representative EVA tasks completed in the suited neutral buoyancy environment, and to assess changes in muscle use during trials of a new power-assisted EVA glove. Results suggest that the metrics developed herein can be used to rank tasks based on relative muscular effort and fatigue, and that the scope of the results is naturally limited to the muscles under investigation. Application of these metrics to the optimization of a hypothetical mission timeline via tailoring of specific tasks to reduce muscle exertion, and ordering of tasks to allow fatigued muscle groups to recover, is illustrated.

  15. Glove perforation during oral surgical procedures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruth Lopes; Belmiro Cavalcanti; Egito Vasconcelos; Luiz Carlos Ferreira da Silva; Gabriela Granja Porto; B. Vasconcelos

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of glove perforation among undergraduates and residents performing maxillofacial surgery and identify procedures associated with the perforations. Study Design: For this purpose, 200 pairs of surgical gloves were used. For inspecting the perforations, the gloves were filled with water, at least 500 ml. Results: Sixteen gloves (8%) were perforated,

  16. A new glove for glovebox workers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Macdonald; H. L. Nekimken; R. E. Hermes; J. M. Castro; M. E. Evans

    1996-01-01

    Lead-lined gloves used during the processing of nuclear materials within gloveboxes is an example of a barrier. To help prevent work contamination, current practice includes visual inspection and radiological monitoring of each glove on a regular basis. One administrative control requires radiological workers to monitor their hands upon removal form the glovebox gloves. In reality, either a catastrophic glove failure

  17. Astronaut Edgar Mitchell looks at traverse map during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, Apollo 14 lunar module pilot, moves across the lunar surface as he looks over a traverse map during extravehicular activity (EVA). Lunar dust can be seen clinging to the boots and legs of the space suit.

  18. Astronaut Richard Gordon returns to hatch of spacecraft following EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., pilot for the Gemini 11 space flight, returns to the hatch of the spacecraft following extravehicular activity (EVA). This picture was taken over the Atlantic Ocean at approximately 160 nautical miles above the earth's surface.

  19. Astronaut Michael Foale on RMS arm during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut C. Michael Foale (red stripe), mission specialist, on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm prepares to grab SPARTAN 204 as astronaut Bernard A. Harris Jr., payload commander, looks on during the STS-63 extravehicular activity (EVA).

  20. EVA Design, Verification, and On-Orbit Operations Support Using Worksite Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagale, Thomas J.; Price, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) design is a very large and complex orbiting structure with thousands of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) worksites. These worksites are used to assemble and maintain the ISS. The challenge facing EVA designers was how to design, verify, and operationally support such a large number of worksites within cost and schedule. This has been solved through the practical use of computer aided design (CAD) graphical techniques that have been developed and used with a high degree of success over the past decade. The EVA design process allows analysts to work concurrently with hardware designers so that EVA equipment can be incorporated and structures configured to allow for EVA access and manipulation. Compliance with EVA requirements is strictly enforced during the design process. These techniques and procedures, coupled with neutral buoyancy underwater testing, have proven most valuable in the development, verification, and on-orbit support of planned or contingency EVA worksites.

  1. Protective gloves on manual sugar cane cutting are really effective?

    PubMed

    Abrahão, R F; Gonzaga, M C; Braunbeck, O A

    2012-01-01

    Problems related to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), specially the use of protective gloves for the manual sugar cane cutting, motivated this research, made possible by a tripartite negotiation involving the Ministry of Labor, the Union of Rural Workers and the Employer's Association of sugarcane agribusiness. The main objective was to evaluate, from an ergonomics perspective, the impact of use of the gloves during the manual cane sugar cutting, raising questions on safety, effectiveness and comfort. The research was carried in a sugarcane industry of São Paulo for two seasons involving 47 workers who made a qualitative analysis of acceptance of four models of protective gloves. The methodology included the use of semi-structured interviews, questionnaires and field observations and the experimental determination of the coefficient of static friction developed between the gloves and the surfaces of the machete handle. The main results indicate the general inadequacy of the gloves currently used forcing the employees to improvise. Workers found the glove of leather and nylon scraping the best reported for comfort in use. The overall results highlight the problem of detachment of test standards for the manufacture of PPE, ignoring users and the activity to be performed. PMID:22317487

  2. CETA truck and EVA restraint system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, David C.; Merson, Wayne R.

    1991-01-01

    The Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) experiment is an extravehicular activity (EVA) Space Transportation System (STS) based flight experiment which will explore various modes of transporting astronauts and light equipment for Space Station Freedom (SSF). The basic elements of CETA are: (1) two 25 foot long sections of monorail, which will be EVA assembled in the STS cargo bay to become a single 50 ft. rail called the track; (2) a wheeled baseplate called the truck which rolls along the track and can accept three cart concepts; and (3) the three carts which are designated manual, electric, and mechanical. The three carts serve as the astronaut restraint and locomotive interfaces with the track. The manual cart is powered by the astronaut grasping the track's handrail and pulling himself along. The electric cart is operated by an astronaut turning a generator which powers the electric motor and drives the cart. The mechanical cart is driven by a Bendix type transmission and is similar in concept to a man-propelled railroad cart. During launch and landing, the truck is attached to the deployable track by means of EVA removable restraint bolts and held in position by a system of retractable shims. These shims are positioned on the exterior of the rail for launch and landing and rotate out of the way for the duration of the experiment. The shims are held in position by strips of Velcro nap, which rub against the sides of the shim and exert a tailored force. The amount of force required to rotate the shims was a major EVA concern, along with operational repeatability and extreme temperature effects. The restraint system was tested in a thermal-vac and vibration environment and was shown to meet all of the initial design requirements. Using design inputs from the astronauts who will perform the EVA, CETA evolved through an iterative design process and represented a cooperative effort.

  3. Astronaut Alan Shepard walks toward MET during first EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., foreground, Apollo 14 commander, walks toward the Modularized Equipment Transporter (MET), out of view at right, during the first Apollo 14 extravehicular activity (EVA-1). An EVA checklist is attached to Shepard's left wrist. Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, is in the background working at a subpackage of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP). The cylindrical keg-like object directly under Mitchell's extended left hand is the Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE).

  4. Knitted outer gloves in primary hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tanner, J; Wraighte, P; Howard, P

    2006-01-01

    A randomised trial was carried out to determine the rate of perforation to inner gloves when comparing latex with knitted gloves during hip and knee arthroplasty. Members of the surgical team were randomised to wear either two pairs of latex gloves (standard double gloving) or a knitted glove on top of a latex glove. In addition, participants completed a visual analogue assessment of their overall satisfaction with the gloves. A total of 406 inner gloves were tested for perforations over a four-month period: 23% of inner gloves were perforated when latex outer gloves were used and 6% of inner gloves were perforated when knitted outer gloves were used. In total, there were 64 perforations to the inner gloves; only one of these perforations was detected by the glove wearer. Wearing knitted outer gloves during hip and knee arthroplasty statistically significantly reduces the risk of perforation to inner latex gloves (p<0.0001). PMID:19219780

  5. How often does glove perforation occur in surgery? comparison between single gloves and a double-gloving system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tero Laine; Pertti Aarnio

    2001-01-01

    Background: In surgery, intact gloves protect the surgeon from bloodborne pathogens and the surgical wound from microorganisms on the skin of the surgeon. However, glove perforation is very common, and puncture rates as high as 61% are published in the literature. One objective of this study was to compare puncture rates between a unique double-gloving puncture indication system and single-use

  6. Measurement of baseball glove and hand dynamics

    E-print Network

    LaCrosse, Brian A

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus was developed that provides a dynamic representation of the hand-glove interaction inside a baseball glove during catching situations. Until recent history, baseball manufacturers relied primarily upon player ...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW GLOVE FOR GLOVE BOXES WITH HIGH-LEVEL PERFORMANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Blancher, J.; Poirier, J.M.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the results of a joint technological program of COGEMA and MAPA to develop a new generation of glove for glove boxes. The mechanical strength of this glove is twice as high as the best characteristics of gloves available on the market. This new generation of product has both a higher level of performance and better ergonomics.

  8. Glove box for water pit applications

    DOEpatents

    Mills, William C. (Richland, WA); Rabe, Richard A. (North Fork, ID)

    2005-01-18

    A glove box assembly that includes a glove box enclosure attached to a longitudinally extending hollow tube having an entranceway, wherein the portion of the tube is in a liquid environment. An elevator member is provided for raising an object that is introduced into the hollow tube from the liquid environment to a gas environment inside the glove box enclosure while maintaining total containment.

  9. Investigation of natural latex rubber gloves

    SciTech Connect

    Vessel, E.M.

    1993-03-19

    Seventy five percent of natural latex rubber gloves used in laboratories at the Savannah River Site are not reused. A cost analysis performed by the SRS Procurement Department determined that a net savings of $1,092,210 could be achieved annually by recycling latex rubber gloves. The Materials Technology Section, at the request of the Procurement Department, examined some mechanical and chemical properties of latex rubber gloves manufactured by Ansell Edmont, which had been purchased by the site specifications for protective clothing. It also examined mechanical properties of re-cycled gloves purchased by specifications and of {open_quotes}off the shelf{close_quotes} gloves manufactured by North Brothers Company. Finally, water vapor transmission studies, simulating tritium permeation, were performed on gloves from both manufacturers. These studies were performed to determine whether latex rubber gloves can be recycled or whether using only new, unwashed gloves is required in areas where tritium exposure is a possibility. The results of these studies indicate that the acceptable glove characteristics, required in the WSRC Manual 5Q1.11, Protective Clothing Specifications, are not adversely affected after washing and drying the gloves manufactured by Ansell Edmont for seven cycles. Results also indicate that natural latex rubber gloves manufactured by North Brothers comply with most of the acceptable glove characteristics specified in the WSRC Manual 5Q1.11. Statistical analysis of the water vapor permeation data show that there is no correlation between permeation rates and the manufacturer.

  10. 8 JMBA Global Marine Environment Mermaid's Glove

    E-print Network

    Watson, Andrew

    8 JMBA Global Marine Environment Mermaid's Glove Nowadays Faroe islanders live a very post the nineteenth century. The njararvøttur was then used as a kind of tinder when lighting fires. Mermaid's glove by Börge Pettersson. Also Published in JMBA Svanberg, I. Human usage of mermaid's glove sponge (Isodictya

  11. A new glove for glovebox workers

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, J.M.; Nekimken, H.L.; Hermes, R.E.; Castro, J.M.; Evans, M.E.

    1996-10-01

    Lead-lined gloves used during the processing of nuclear materials within gloveboxes is an example of a barrier. To help prevent work contamination, current practice includes visual inspection and radiological monitoring of each glove on a regular basis. One administrative control requires radiological workers to monitor their hands upon removal form the glovebox gloves. In reality, either a catastrophic glove failure or the formation of pinholes can cause contamination which is detected after the fact. Real-time monitoring of glove integrity during use would help prevent the spread of contamination, minimize decontamination costs, and protect the glovebox worker. Another benefit of real-time monitoring is remotely alerting proper personnel of a glovebox glove breech. One of the most exciting aspects of this technology is the rapid detection of a breech in the glovebox glove. A puncture to a glove can be detected followed by an alert to a worker in less than a second. The benefits of a real-time monitoring system for glove integrity are immense. Examples of benefits using this new glove are: reducing work stoppage, personnel contamination, glovebox glove replacements, and the filing of costly reports. The primary application of this technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory would be protecting the worker with these newly designed lead-lined gloves.

  12. PUNCTURE TEST CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Korinko; G. Chapman

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the puncture resistance of 15 gloves that are used or proposed for use in the Tritium Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS). These data will serve as a baseline for characterization and may be incorporated into the glove procurement specification. The testing was conducted in agreement with ASTM D120 and all of the gloves

  13. EVA assembly of large space structure element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Bush, H. G.; Heard, W. L., Jr.; Stokes, J. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a test program to assess the potential of manned extravehicular activity (EVA) assembly of erectable space trusses are described. Seventeen tests were conducted in which six "space-weight" columns were assembled into a regular tetrahedral cell by a team of two "space"-suited test subjects. This cell represents the fundamental "element" of a tetrahedral truss structure. The tests were conducted under simulated zero-gravity conditions. Both manual and simulated remote manipulator system modes were evaluated. Articulation limits of the pressure suit and zero gravity could be accommodated by work stations with foot restraints. The results of this study have confirmed that astronaut EVA assembly of large, erectable space structures is well within man's capabilities.

  14. Views of EVA performed during STS-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Two STS-6 mission specialists busy near the aft bulkhead were photographed with a 70mm camera. Astronauts F. Story Musgrave (at winch device near center) and Donald H. Peterson are setting up winch operations at the aft bulkhead as a simulation for a contingency extravehicular activity (EVA). The orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods are seen in the background (30211); Musgrave translates down the Challenger's payload bay door hinge line with a bag of latch tools. In the lower left foreground are three canisters containing three getaway special (GAS) experiments. Part of the starboard wing and OMS pod are seen in the background. The gold-foil protected object on the right is the airborne support equipment for the inertial upper stage (IUS) (30212); Peterson (starboard side) and Musgrave evaluate the handrail system on the starboard longeron and aft bulkhead during an EVA. Behind them the vertical stabilizer and OMS pods frame a portion of Mexico's state of Jalisco (30213); Musgrave sus

  15. Serum Elastase Activity, Serum Elastase Inhibitors, and Occurrence of Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques The Etude sur le Vieillissement Artériel (EVA) Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahmoud Zureik; Ladislas Robert; Dominique Courbon; Pierre-Jean Touboul; Latifa Bizbiz; Pierre Ducimetière

    Background—In the last decades, interest has increased in the potential deleterious atherogenic effects of some cellular elastase activities. The results of experimental and clinical investigations were inconsistent. In this report, we assessed the associations of serum elastase activity and serum elastase inhibitors with carotid plaque occurrence during the 4-year follow-up in a population of 859 subjects free of coronary heart

  16. High pressure space suit glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, W.

    1973-01-01

    The High Pressure Space Suit Glove Program yielded one prototype glove assembly with an operating pressure of 8.0 psi. The following developments are reported: (1) A new layup technique for incorporation of the mini-convolute systems; (2) modification in the mini-convolute construction to assure cycle life at 8.0 psi in excess of 100,000 cycles; (3) the development of a unique non-orthogonal low torque wrist joint; (4) the development of a low torque single axis joint for use in the thumb and finger first metacarpal joints; and (5) a number of approaches to 1st metacarpal joints were fabricated and tested to establish the joint technqiues.

  17. Incidence of glove failure during orthopedic operations and the protective effect of double gloves.

    PubMed Central

    Thanni, Lateef O. A.; Yinusa, W.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of double gloves in protecting against the exposure of surgical team members' hands to blood. METHODOLOGY: Five-hundred-ninety-six gloves were studied during 71 orthopedic operations using the water-loading test (filling a glove with water and occluding its cuff tightly to identify leaking points). RESULTS: In all, 73 glove perforations occurred, but only nine resulted in exposure to blood (blood touching the skin). The incidence of glove perforation was 12% (73/596), and overall exposure (blood touching the skin) per operation was 13% (9/71). The latter would have been 87% (62/71) but for the use of double gloves. Sixteen percent of the perforations in double gloves were in the inner gloves, while 84% were in the outer gloves. Exposure of surgeons was reduced from 54% to 10%, first assistants from 27% to 3%, and second assistants from 7% to 0 (p < 0.02, df = 2) by double-gloving. Significantly more perforations occurred during operations on bone, compared with soft tissue operations, p < 0.0001, RR = 4 (95% CL 1.87-8.55). The most common sites of glove perforation were the index finger (47%), thumb, and the palm region: 14% each. More glove perforations occurred in nondominant hands. CONCLUSION: Double-gloving offers additional protection to surgeons and assistants by preventing hand exposure to blood intraoperatively. PMID:14717474

  18. A Human Factors Analysis of EVA Time Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pate, Dennis W.

    1997-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE) is a discipline whose goal is to engineer a safer, more efficient interface between humans and machines. HFE makes use of a wide range of tools and techniques to fulfill this goal. One of these tools is known as motion and time study, a technique used to develop time standards for given tasks. During the summer of 1995, a human factors motion and time study was initiated with the goals of developing a database of EVA task times and developing a method of utilizing the database to predict how long an EVA should take. Initial development relied on the EVA activities performed during the STS-61 (Hubble) mission. The first step of the study was to become familiar with EVA's, the previous task-time studies, and documents produced on EVA's. After reviewing these documents, an initial set of task primitives and task-time modifiers was developed. Data was collected from videotaped footage of two entire STS-61 EVA missions and portions of several others, each with two EVA astronauts. Feedback from the analysis of the data was used to further refine the primitives and modifiers used. The project was continued during the summer of 1996, during which data on human errors was also collected and analyzed. Additional data from the STS-71 mission was also collected. Analysis of variance techniques for categorical data was used to determine which factors may affect the primitive times and how much of an effect they have. Probability distributions for the various task were also generated. Further analysis of the modifiers and interactions is planned.

  19. Application of shuttle EVA systems to payloads. Volume 1: EVA systems and operational modes description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Descriptions of the EVA system baselined for the space shuttle program were provided, as well as a compendium of data on available EVA operational modes for payload and orbiter servicing. Operational concepts and techniques to accomplish representative EVA payload tasks are proposed. Some of the subjects discussed include: extravehicular mobility unit, remote manipulator system, airlock, EVA translation aids, restraints, workstations, tools and support equipment.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF TENSILE STRENGTH OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    A task was undertaken to compare various properties of different glovebox gloves, having various compositions, for use in gloveboxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One aspect of this project was to determine the tensile strength (TS) of the gloves. Longitudinal tensile samples were cut from 15 different gloves and tensile tested. The stress, load, and elongation at failure were determined. All of the gloves that are approved for glovebox use and listed in the glovebox procurement specification met the tensile and elongation requirements. The Viton{reg_sign} compound gloves are not listed in the specification, but exhibited lower tensile strengths than permissible based on the Butyl rubber requirements. Piercan Polyurethane gloves were the thinnest samples and exhibited the highest tensile strength of the materials tested.

  1. The Space Station Freedom evolution-phase: Crew-EVA demand for robotic substitution by task primitive

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Smith; J. Estus; C. Heneghan; C. Nainan

    1989-01-01

    Space Station Freedom represents a significant demand for automation and robotics services as substitutes for crew-performed extravehicular activities (crew-EVA). Results are reported from a study aimed at identifying this demand for crew-performed activities and the crew-task primitive distributions derived for input to future robotic substitution studies. Generic EVA tasks are developed from historical EVA mission timelines, and a set of

  2. Incidence of glove perforation during episiotomy repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Arena; N. Maffulli; I. Vocaturo; G. Scognamiglio

    1992-01-01

    Summary  A total of 416 gloves were tested for punctures after 200 episiotomy repairs. Evidence of perforation was found in 34 (8%)\\u000a of the gloves used and in only half the cases did the surgeon actually realise that a perforation had occurred. The left index\\u000a finger and thumb were more often perforated than other parts of the gloves. The implications of

  3. Russian-American Cooperation in EVA Area (from Russian Perspective)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsygankov, O. S.; Alexandrov, A. P.; Poleschuk, A. F.

    Russian and American extravehicular activity (EVA) specialists started cooperation after Russia entered the ISS Program. Practical work began in the framework of the Mir-NASA Program, when astronauts J. Linenger, M. Foale and D. Wolf were trained in Russia and participated in the EVA on MIR. This was the intercourse of two experiences, two equal schools each formed under specific conditions. The Report studies the peculiarities of national EVA schools, shows the experience in their integration for the ISS purposes. Organizational aspects of the ISS Program to optimize the implementation of the EVA tasks are presented. It gives examples of the cooperation and development of the hardware equally compatible both with EMU and ORLAN-M space suits, impacts of different schools on the operational methods. It presents proposals on the further integration of the Russian and American schools, considers the prerequisites and perspectives of maximally integrated EVA system for the ISS and the possibility of its incorporation in future in to the mission to Mars.

  4. PUNCTURE TEST CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    An experiment was conducted to determine the puncture resistance of 15 gloves that are used or proposed for use in the Tritium Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS). These data will serve as a baseline for characterization and may be incorporated into the glove procurement specification. The testing was conducted in agreement with ASTM D120 and all of the gloves met or exceeded the minimum requirements. Butyl gloves exhibited puncture resistance nearly 2.5 times the minimum requirements at SRS while Polyurethane was nearly 7.5x the minimum.

  5. Shoulder Injuries in US Astronauts Related to EVA Suit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, R. A.; McCulloch, P.; Van Baalen, Mary; Minard, Charles; Watson, Richard; Blatt, T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: For every one hour spent performing extravehicular activity (EVA) in space, astronauts in the US space program spend approximately six to ten hours training in the EVA spacesuit at NASA-Johnson Space Center's Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL). In 1997, NASA introduced the planar hard upper torso (HUT) EVA spacesuit which subsequently replaced the existing pivoted HUT. An extra joint in the pivoted shoulder allows increased mobility but also increased complexity. Over the next decade a number of astronauts developed shoulder problems requiring surgical intervention, many of whom performed EVA training in the NBL. This study investigated whether changing HUT designs led to shoulder injuries requiring surgical repair. Methods: US astronaut EVA training data and spacesuit design employed were analyzed from the NBL data. Shoulder surgery data was acquired from the medical record database, and causal mechanisms were obtained from personal interviews Analysis of the individual HUT designs was performed as it related to normal shoulder biomechanics. Results: To date, 23 US astronauts have required 25 shoulder surgeries. Approximately 48% (11/23) directly attributed their injury to training in the planar HUT, whereas none attributed their injury to training in the pivoted HUT. The planar HUT design limits shoulder abduction to 90 degrees compared to approximately 120 degrees in the pivoted HUT. The planar HUT also forces the shoulder into a forward flexed position requiring active retraction and extension to increase abduction beyond 90 degrees. Discussion: Multiple factors are associated with mechanisms leading to shoulder injury requiring surgical repair. Limitations to normal shoulder mechanics, suit fit, donning/doffing, body position, pre-existing injury, tool weight and configuration, age, in-suit activity, and HUT design have all been identified as potential sources of injury. Conclusion: Crewmembers with pre-existing or current shoulder injuries or certain anthropometric body types should conduct NBL EVA training in the pivoted HUT.

  6. September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Appendix G -Gloves

    E-print Network

    Wilcock, William

    September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Appendix G - Gloves UW Environmental Health and Safety Page G-1 Appendix G - Gloves Contents A. CHOOSING GLOVES................................................................................G-2 1. Primary Concern.............................................................................G-2

  7. Electrostatic Discharge Issues in International Space Station Program EVAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2009-01-01

    EVA activity in the ISS program encounters several dangerous ESD conditions. The ISS program has been aggressive for many years to find ways to mitigate or to eliminate the associated risks. Investments have included: (1) Major mods to EVA tools, suit connectors & analytical tools (2) Floating Potential Measurement Unit (3) Plasma Contactor Units (4) Certification of new ISS flight attitudes (5) Teraflops of computation (6) Thousands of hours of work by scores of specialists (7) Monthly management attention at the highest program levels. The risks are now mitigated to a level that is orders of magnitude safer than prior operations

  8. Exploiting wearable goniometer technology for motion sensing gloves.

    PubMed

    Carbonaro, Nicola; Dalle Mura, Gabriele; Lorussi, Federico; Paradiso, Rita; De Rossi, Danilo; Tognetti, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents an innovative wearable kinesthetic glove realized with knitted piezoresistive fabric (KPF) sensor technology. The glove is conceived to capture hand movement and gesture by using KPF in a double-layer configuration working as angular sensors (electrogoniometers). The sensing glove prototype is endowed by three KPF goniometers, used to track flexion and extension movement of metacarpophalangeal joint of thumb, index, and middle fingers. The glove is devoted to the continuous monitoring of patients during their daily-life activities, in particular for stroke survivors during their rehabilitation. The prototype performances have been evaluated in comparison with an optical tracking system considered as a gold standard both for relieving static and dynamic posture and gesture of the hand. The introduced prototype has shown very interesting figures of merit. The angular error, evaluated through the standard Bland Altman analysis, has been estimated in ±3° which is slightly less accurate than commercial electrogoniometers. Moreover, a new conceptual prototype design, preliminary evaluated within this study, is presented and discussed in order to solve actual limitations in terms of number and type of sensor connections, avoiding mechanical constraints given by metallic inextensible wires and improving user comfort. PMID:24835230

  9. Sensing and Force-Feedback Exoskeleton (SAFE) Glove.

    PubMed

    Ben-Tzvi, Pinhas; Ma, Zhou

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation and experimental validation of a novel robotic haptic exoskeleton device to measure the user's hand motion and assist hand motion while remaining portable and lightweight. The device consists of a five-finger mechanism actuated with miniature DC motors through antagonistically routed cables at each finger, which act as both active and passive force actuators. The SAFE Glove is a wireless and self-contained mechatronic system that mounts over the dorsum of a bare hand and provides haptic force feedback to each finger. The glove is adaptable to a wide variety of finger sizes without constraining the range of motion. This makes it possible to accurately and comfortably track the complex motion of the finger and thumb joints associated with common movements of hand functions, including grip and release patterns. The glove can be wirelessly linked to a computer for displaying and recording the hand status through 3D Graphical User Interface (GUI) in real-time. The experimental results demonstrate that the SAFE Glove is capable of reliably modeling hand kinematics, measuring finger motion and assisting hand grasping motion. Simulation and experimental results show the potential of the proposed system in rehabilitation therapy and virtual reality applications. PMID:25494512

  10. The Education of Eva Hoffman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proefriedt, William

    1991-01-01

    Reviews the autobiography of Eva Hoffman, "Lost in Translation: A Life in a New Language" (Dutton, 1989). Hoffman, whose family left Poland in the 1950s, offers a consciously bicultural view of the immigrant experience, in contrast to many autobiographies of those who forsake the old world for the new. (DM)

  11. Permeation of chemicals through glove-box glove materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vahdat, N,; Johnson, J.S.; Neidhardt, A.; Cheng, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Weitzman, D. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-06-30

    The resistance of two commercial gloves to 20 chemicals commonly used in glove boxes was studied. The chemicals were inorganic acids/bases/salts, organic acids, alcohols, glycols, halogen compounds, sulfur compounds, and hydrocarbons. The ASTM cell was used to study permeation of volatile organic compounds through protective clothing materials using air, flame ionization detector/gas chromatography; a modified version of the cell was used with isopropanol for the nonvolatile organic compounds. Permeation of inorganic compounds through the elastomers was studied using the ASTM cell with water, conductivity meter. A Teflon cell was used with HF and ammonium hydrofluoride. Results: Hypalon protects against all chemicals except trichloroethylene (TCE) and CCl{sub 4}. Acetic acid and ethanol permeated through neoprene, which also did not protect against TCE and CCl{sub 4}. Sulfuric acid dissolved neoprene in 5 h. Kerosene permeated through neoprene in 5 h. Although neoprene showed good resistance to cutting oil, TCE in cutting oil broke through in 61 min. Neoprene showed good protection against all the other chemicals with no breakthrough before 6 h.

  12. Utilization of ISS to Develop and Test Operational Concepts and Hardware for Low-Gravity Terrestrial EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    NASA has considerable experience in two areas of Extravehicular Activities (EVA). The first can be defined as microgravity, orbital EVAs. This consists of everything done in low Earth orbit (LEO), from the early, proof of concept EVAs conducted during the Gemini program of the 1960s, to the complex International Space Station (ISS) assembly tasks of the first decade of the 21st century. The second area of expertise is comprised of those EVAs conducted on the lunar surface, under a gravitational force one-sixth that of Earth. This EVA expertise encapsulates two extremes - microgravity and Earthlike gravitation - but is insufficient as humans expand their exploration purview, most notably with respect to spacewalks conducted on very low-gravity bodies, such as near- Earth objects (NEO) and the moons of Mars. The operational and technical challenges of this category of EVA have yet to be significantly examined, and as such, only a small number of operational concepts have been proposed thus far. To ensure mission success, however, EVA techniques must be developed and vetted to allow the selection of operational concepts that can be utilized across an assortment of destinations whose physical characteristics vary. This paper examines the utilization of ISS-based EVAs to test operational concepts and hardware in preparation for a low-gravity terrestrial EVA. While the ISS cannot mimic some of the fundamental challenges of a low-gravity terrestrial EVA - such as rotation rate and surface composition - it may be the most effective test bed available.

  13. Latex glove penetration by pathogens: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Neal, J G; Jackson, E M; Suber, F; Edlich, R F

    1998-01-01

    Universal precautions mandate the use of examination and surgical gloves to protect the health professional from contact with the HIV virus. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the literature on the barrier properties of examination and surgical gloves measured by water leakage and viral penetration. The literature data indicate that glove composition, glove manufacturer, glove design (examination vs. surgical), and mechanical manipulation had considerable influence on glove performance when tested for leakage and viral penetration. In general, latex gloves were found to be superior to vinyl gloves as barriers to water leakage and viral penetration. PMID:10186969

  14. Astronaut Richard Gordon practices attaching camera to film EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., prime crew pilot for the Gemini 11 space flight, practices attaching to a Gemini boilerplate a camera which will film his extravehicular activity (EVA) outside the spacecraft. The training exercise is being conducted in the Astronaut Training Building, Kennedy Space Center, Florida.

  15. Rolling-Convolute Joint For Pressurized Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Bassick, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Rolling-convolute metacarpal/finger joint enhances mobility and flexibility of pressurized glove. Intended for use in space suit to increase dexterity and decrease wearer's fatigue. Also useful in diving suits and other pressurized protective garments. Two ring elements plus bladder constitute rolling-convolute joint balancing torques caused by internal pressurization of glove. Provides comfortable grasp of various pieces of equipment.

  16. Michael Bhne, Andreas Bolte, Eva Koch, Ilsegret Niestradt-Bietau, Eva Charlotte Ritter, Tanja RotrmelMichael Bhne, Andreas Bolte, Agnes Filipiak, Katharina Gefele, Eva Koch, Ilsegret Niestradt-Bietau, Eva Charlotte Ritter, Tanja Rotrmel Informationsverans

    E-print Network

    Hellebrand, Sybille

    Michael Böhne, Andreas Bolte, Eva Koch, Ilsegret Niestradt-Bietau, Eva Charlotte Ritter, Tanja RotärmelMichael Böhne, Andreas Bolte, Agnes Filipiak, Katharina Gefele, Eva Koch, Ilsegret Niestradt! #12;Michael Böhne, Andreas Bolte, Eva Koch, Ilsegret Niestradt-Bietau, Eva Charlotte Ritter, Tanja

  17. An investigation of space suit mobility with applications to EVA operations

    E-print Network

    Schmidt, Patricia Barrett, 1974-

    2001-01-01

    The primary aim of this thesis is to advance the current understanding of astronauts' capabilities and limitations in space-suited extravehicular activity (EVA) by compiling a detailed database of the torques needed to ...

  18. Cardiac surgical procedures and glove reinforcements.

    PubMed

    Alrawi, Sadir J; Houshan, Iyad; Zanial, Suhaib A; Cunningham, Joseph N; Acinapura, Anthony J; Raju, Ramanathan

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the frequency and site of glove perforation during cardiac surgical procedures. Over a period of six months, gloves from 206 surgical team members were collected at the conclusion of surgery. All cases of known perforations were eliminated from the study. The percentage of glove perforation was 14%. The distribution of perforation across locations of the hand was significantly unequal (P = 0.001). We found that 73% of the punctures occurred in one of four contiguous locations on the glove: the radial side of the index finger (28%), the radial side of the thumb (21%), the palmar side of the index (14%), and the palmar side of the thumb (10%). Therefore, we recommend glove reinforcement on these locations that would provide better protection against transmission of infectious agents. Discomfort from restricted dexterity and impaired sense of touch with double gloving renders glove reinforcement a suitable alternative for universal precautions, especially in cardiac surgery while high level of perfection and dexterity were needed in lengthy, critical operations. PMID:11937466

  19. Bacterial migration through punctured surgical gloves under real surgical conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nils-Olaf Hübner; Anna-Maria Goerdt; Natalie Stanislawski; Ojan Assadian; Claus-Dieter Heidecke; Axel Kramer; Lars Ivo Partecke

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to confirm recent results from a previous study focussing on the development of a method to measure the bacterial translocation through puncture holes in surgical gloves under real surgical conditions. METHODS: An established method was applied to detect bacterial migration from the operating site through the punctured glove. Biogel™ double-gloving surgical gloves were

  20. The main results of EVA medical support on the Mir Space Station.

    PubMed

    Katuntsev, V P; Osipov, Yu Yu; Barer, A S; Gnoevaya, N K; Tarasenkov, G G

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the main results of medical support of 78 two-person extravehicular activities (EVAs) which have been conducted in the Mir Space Program. Thirty-six male crewmembers participated in these EVAs. Maximum length of a space walk was equal to 7 h 14 min. The total duration of all space walks reached 717.1 man-hours. The maximum frequency of EVA's execution was 10 per year. Most of the EVAs (67) have been performed at mission elapsed time ranging from 31 to 180 days. The oxygen atmosphere of the Orlan space suit with a pressure of 40 kPa in combination with the normobaric cabin environment and a short (30 min) oxygen prebreathe protocol have minimized the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). There has been no incidence of DCS during performed EVAs. At the peak activity, metabolic rates and heart rates increased up to 9.9-13 kcal/min and 150-174 min-1, respectively. The medical problems have centred on feeling of moderate overcooling during a rest period in a shadow after the high physical loads, episodes with tachycardia accompanied by cardiac rhythm disorders at the moments of emotional stress, pains in the muscles and general fatigue after the end of a hard EVA. All of the EVAs have been completed safely. PMID:14740657

  1. Metabolism and heat dissipation during Apollo EVA periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    The extravehicular activity life support equipment, suit temperature control, metabolic rate measurement methods, and energy production are discussed. The Apollo crewmen were able to perform planned extravehicular activities and to extend them to the maximum time allowable without medical problems. The metabolic rates experienced during the lunar surface extravehicular activities were lower than conservative premission estimates. A manually controlled liquid cooling garment was effectively used to minimize fatigue and water loss from sweating during lunar surface extravehicular activities. Gas cooling was adequate during the short zero-g extravehicular activities performed from the command module. The prediction of EVA workloads became more reliable as inflight data was accumulated. The prediction of the average metabolic cost of an EVA was more reliable than the cost of an individual short-term task.

  2. The WPI space glove design project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgin, W. W.; Hoffman, A. H.; Ault, H. K.; Lutz, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) was one of four colleges and universities awarded NASA grants for student design and development of an improved glove for space suits. This paper traces the design, development and testing of the WPI prototype glove. Test results showed that the glove did not significantly limit hand and finger motion when pressurized at 8 psi, except in the spherical grip mode. This project demonstrated that problems originating from space technology provide excellent vehicles for student learning and can generate creative solutions.

  3. Dynamics, control and sensor issues pertinent to robotic hands for the EVA retriever system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclauchlan, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Basic dynamics, sensor, control, and related artificial intelligence issues pertinent to smart robotic hands for the Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever system are summarized and discussed. These smart hands are to be used as end effectors on arms attached to manned maneuvering units (MMU). The Retriever robotic systems comprised of MMU, arm and smart hands, are being developed to aid crewmen in the performance of routine EVA tasks including tool and object retrieval. The ultimate goal is to enhance the effectiveness of EVA crewmen.

  4. STS-34 Mission Specialists Chang-Diaz and Baker with EVA tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (center) and MS Ellen S. Baker (right) examine extravehicular activity (EVA) tools along with Rockwell Space Operations (RSO) technician Wayne J. Wedlake prior EVA contingency exercise (underwater simulation) in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Chang-Diaz and Baker will practice using the EVA tools and rehearse chores which would require manual action outside the spacecraft in the event of failure of remote systems in the WETF's 25 ft pool.

  5. Commercial Spacewalking: Designing an EVA Qualification Program for Space Tourism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    In the near future, accessibility to space will be opened to anyone with the means and the desire to experience the weightlessness of microgravity, and to look out upon both the curvature of the Earth and the blackness of space, from the protected, shirt-sleeved environment of a commercial spacecraft. Initial forays will be short-duration, suborbital flights, but the experience and expertise of half a century of spaceflight will soon produce commercial vehicles capable of achieving low Earth orbit. Even with the commercial space industry still in its infancy, and manned orbital flight a number of years away, there is little doubt that there will one day be a feasible and viable market for those courageous enough to venture outside the vehicle and into the void, wearing nothing but a spacesuit, armed with nothing but preflight training. What that Extravehicular Activity (EVA) preflight training entails, however, is something that has yet to be defined. A number of significant factors will influence the composition of a commercial EVA training program, but a fundamental question remains: 'what minimum training guidelines must be met to ensure a safe and successful commercial spacewalk?' Utilizing the experience gained through the development of NASA's Skills program - designed to qualify NASA and International Partner astronauts for EVA aboard the International Space Station - this paper identifies the attributes and training objectives essential to the safe conduct of an EVA, and attempts to conceptually design a comprehensive training methodology meant to represent an acceptable qualification standard.

  6. Advanced EVA Capabilities: A Study for NASA's Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concept Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results of a study carried out as part of NASA s Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts Program examining the future technology needs of extravehicular activities (EVAs). The intent of this study is to produce a comprehensive report that identifies various design concepts for human-related advanced EVA systems necessary to achieve the goals of supporting future space exploration and development customers in free space and on planetary surfaces for space missions in the post-2020 timeframe. The design concepts studied and evaluated are not limited to anthropomorphic space suits, but include a wide range of human-enhancing EVA technologies as well as consideration of coordination and integration with advanced robotics. The goal of the study effort is to establish a baseline technology "road map" that identifies and describes an investment and technical development strategy, including recommendations that will lead to future enhanced synergistic human/robot EVA operations. The eventual use of this study effort is to focus evolving performance capabilities of various EVA system elements toward the goal of providing high performance human operational capabilities for a multitude of future space applications and destinations. The data collected for this study indicate a rich and diverse history of systems that have been developed to perform a variety of EVA tasks, indicating what is possible. However, the data gathered for this study also indicate a paucity of new concepts and technologies for advanced EVA missions - at least any that researchers are willing to discuss in this type of forum.

  7. Permeation of Cyclohexanol Through Disposable Nitrile Gloves

    E-print Network

    Mathews, Airek Royce

    2013-01-01

    were used to puncture the glove material in predeterminedpuncture and mounted into the bushing adapter (Figure 6.4). If the whole gloveglove materials with a 30-gauge acupuncture needle. (6) Punctures

  8. Components of the ALSEP deployed during Apollo 14 first EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Several components of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) are deployed in this photograph taken during the first Apollo 14 extravehicular activity (EVA-1). The larger object with antenna is the ALSEP Central Station. The Active Seismic Experiment (ASE) morter package assembly is to the rear left of the Central Station. The Charged Particle Lunar Environmental Experiment (CPLEE) is to the right rear of the Central Station. A portion of the Modularized Equipment Transporter (MET) can be seen in the left foreground.

  9. Astronauts Mitchell and Shepard during first Apollo 14 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, operates the Active Seismic Experiment's thumper during the first Apollo 14 extravehicular activity (EVA-1) on the Moon. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, walks near deployed components of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) in the background. This photograph was taken by an automatic 16mm camera mounted on the Apollo lunar hand tool carrier aboard the Modularized Equipment Transporter (MET).

  10. Exploration Architecture Options - ECLSS, TCS, EVA Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe; Henninger, Don

    2011-01-01

    Many options for exploration of space have been identified and evaluated since the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) was announced in 2004. The Augustine Commission evaluated human space flight for the Obama administration then the Human Exploration Framework Teams (HEFT and HEFT2) evaluated potential exploration missions and the infrastructure and technology needs for those missions. Lunar architectures have been identified and addressed by the Lunar Surface Systems team to establish options for how to get to, and then inhabit and explore, the moon. This paper will evaluate the options for exploration of space for the implications of architectures on the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLSS), Thermal Control (TCS), and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems.

  11. Dust Tolerant EVA-Compatible Connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Townsend, Ivan I., III

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop connectors (quick disconnects and umbilical systems) that can be repetitively and reliably mated and de-mated during Lunar surface extra-vehicular activities. These standardized interfaces will be required for structural integrity and commodities transfer between linked surface elements. QD's fittings are needed for EVA spacesuit Primary Life Support Systems as well as liquid cooled garment circulation and suit heat rejection. Umbilical electro-mechanical systems (connectors) are needed between discrete surface systems for transfer of air, power, fluid (water), and data must be capable of being operated by extra vehicular astronaut crew members and/or robotic assistants. There exists an urgent need to prevent electro-statically charged dust and debris from clogging and degrading the interface seals and causing leakage and spills of hazardous commodities, contaminating the flowstream, and degrading the mechanisms needed for umbilical connection. Other challenges include modularity, standardization, autonomous operation, and lifetime sealing issues.

  12. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Architecture Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanco, Raul A.; Bowie, Jonathan T.; Watson, Richard D.; Sipila, Stephanie A.

    2014-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability for Orion. The EVAs will involve a two-person crew for approximately four hours. Currently, two EVAs are planned with one contingency EVA in reserve. Providing this EVA capability is very challenging due to system level constraints and a new and unknown environment. The goal of the EVA architecture for ARCM is one that builds upon previously developed technologies and lessons learned, and that accomplishes the ARCM mission while providing a stepping stone to future missions and destinations. The primary system level constraints are to 1) minimize system mass and volume and 2) minimize the interfacing impacts to the baseline Orion design. In order to minimize the interfacing impacts and to not perturb the baseline Orion schedule, the concept of adding "kits" to the baseline system is proposed. These kits consist of: an EVA kit (converts LEA suit to EVA suit), EVA Servicing and Recharge Kit (provides suit consumables), the EVA Tools, Translation Aids & Sample Container Kit (the tools and mobility aids to complete the tasks), the EVA Communications Kit (interface between the EVA radio and the MPCV), and the Cabin Repress Kit (represses the MPCV between EVAs). This paper will focus on the trade space, analysis, and testing regarding the space suit (pressure garment and life support system). Historical approaches and lessons learned from all past EVA operations were researched. Previous and current, successfully operated EVA hardware and high technology readiness level (TRL) hardware were evaluated, and a trade study was conducted for all possible pressure garment and life support options. Testing and analysis was conducted and a recommended EVA system architecture was proposed. Pressure garment options that were considered for this mission include the currently in-use ISS EVA Mobility Unit (EMU), all variations of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES), and the Exploration Z-suit. For this mission, the pressure garment that was selected is the Modified ACES (MACES) with EVA enhancements. Life support options that were considered included short closed-loop umbilicals, long open-loop umbilicals, the currently in-use ISS EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS), and the currently in development Exploration PLSS. For this mission, the life support option that was selected is the Exploration PLSS. The greatest risk in the proposed architecture is viewed to be the comfort and mobility of the baseline MACES and the delicate balance between adding more mobility features while not compromising landing safety. Feasibility testing was accomplished in low fidelity analogs and in the JSC Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) to validate the concept before a final recommendation on the architecture was made. The proposed architecture was found to meet the mission constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the required suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the rest of the tools and equipment required to accomplish the mission. This work and further definition of the remaining kits will be conducted in government fiscal year 14.

  13. Taking Literacy Beyond The Classroom Eva Hornecker

    E-print Network

    Hornecker, Eva

    Taking Literacy Beyond The Classroom Eva Hornecker The Open University, UK eva@ehornecker.de John ­ in this case to literacy. After describing a fieldtrip to support creative writing, which employed Ubi ­ in this case to literacy and creative writing. A major skill to be taught in primary school is literacy

  14. Minimizing Glovebox Glove Breaches: PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M. E. (Cournoyer, Michael E.); Andrade, R.M. (Rose M.); Taylor, D. J. (David J.); Stimmel, J. J. (Jay J.); Zaelke, R. L. (Robyn L.); Balkey, J. J. (James J.)

    2005-01-01

    As a matter of good business practices, a team of glovebox experts from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been assembled to proactively investigate processes and procedures that minimize unplanned breaches in the glovebox, e.g., glove failures. A major part of this effort involves the review of glovebox glove failures that have occurred at the Plutonium Facility and at the Chemical and Metallurgy Research Facility. Information dating back to 1993 has been compiled from formal records. This data has been combined with information obtained from a baseline inventory of about 9,000 glovebox gloves. The key attributes tracked include those related to location, the glovebox glove, type and location of breaches, the worker, and the consequences resulting from breaches. This glovebox glove failure analysis yielded results in the areas of the ease of collecting this type of data, the causes of most glove failures that have occurred, the effectiveness of current controls, and recommendations to improve hazard control systems. As expected, a significant number of breaches involve high-risk operations such as grinding, hammering, using sharps (especially screwdrivers), and assembling equipment. Surprisingly, tasks such as the movement of equipment and material between gloveboxes and the opening of cans are also major contributions of breaches. Almost half the gloves fail within a year of their install date. The greatest consequence for over 90% of glovebox glove failures is alpha contamination of protective clothing. Personnel self-monitoring at the gloveboxes continues to be the most effective way of detecting glovebox glove failures. Glove failures from these tasks can be reduced through changes in procedures and the design of remote-handling apparatus. The Nuclear Materials Technology Division management uses this information to improve hazard control systems to reduce the number of unplanned breaches in the glovebox further. As a result, excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone and excess exposure to the radiological sources associated with unplanned breaches in the glovebox have been minimized. In conclusion, investigations of control failures, near misses, and accidents contribute to an organization's scientific and technological excellence by providing information that can be used to increase its operational safety.

  15. Allergic reactions to glove materials Gloves are common in research laboratories. The selection

    E-print Network

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    -immune reaction affecting the skin, and should not be confused with an allergy. Exposure to glove materials can to natural rubber latex proteins and/or synthetic chemicals in the glove material. Latex allergy is an Ig a protein. Latex products can cause Type I allergy as well as Type IV allergy. Type I allergy to latex

  16. Glove punctures in major and minor orthopaedic surgery with double gloving.

    PubMed

    Ersozlu, Salim; Sahin, Orcun; Ozgur, Ahmet Fevzi; Akkaya, Tolga; Tuncay, Cengiz

    2007-12-01

    We assessed the frequency of glove perforation during major and minor orthopaedic surgeries, in order to determine the efficacy of double gloving. A total number of 1528 gloves (622 inner and 906 outer) used in 200 procedures (100 major-100 minor), and 100 pairs of unused gloves were examined. Glove perforation rate, incidence among surgical team, location of perforation and duration of surgery were compared. The overall perforation rate was 15.8% (242/1528). Perforation rates for major versus minor surgical procedures were 21.6% and 3.6%, respectively. The perforation rate for the unused control group was 1% (2/200). Inner-outer gloves perforation rates were 3.7% (23/622) and 22.7% (206/906), respectively. Surgeons had a higher perforation rate compared with the other staff. The right thumb and left index finger had more punctures than other fingers. Routine use of double gloving during orthopaedic procedures is recommended, because this significantly reduces the perforation of inner gloves. PMID:18260490

  17. Manned NEO Mission EVA Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    The President has proposed to land astronauts on an asteroid by 2025. However, Manned NEO (Near Earth Objects) Missions will present a host of new and exciting problems that will need to be better defined and solved before such a mission is launched. Here I will focus on the challenges for conducting asteroidal EVAs. Specfically, crew locomotion, sampling, drilling, documentation, and instrument deployment issues arising from the micro gravity environments associated with NEOs. Therefore, novel methods and techniques will need to be developed and tested in order to achieve specific mission science objectives. Walking or driving on the surface will not be a realistic option due to the small sizes (10 s to 100 s of meters in diameter) and hence extremely low gravity of the present day known candidate NEOs. EVAs will have to be carried out with crew members either using a self propelled device (akin to the MMU and SAFER units used on Shuttle/ISS) and or tethers. When using tethers a grid system could be deployed which is anchored to the asteroid. These anchor points could be inserted by firing penetrators into the surface from the spacecraft while it is still at a safe standoff distance. These penetrators would pull double duty by being laden with scientific instrumentation to probe the subsurface. Dust and debris generated by sample collection and locomotion in a microgravity environment could also pose some problems that will require forethought.

  18. A Cabin Air Separator for EVA Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Presently, the Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVAs) conducted from the Quest Joint Airlock on the International Space Station use high pressure, high purity oxygen that is delivered to the Space Station by the Space Shuttle. When the Space Shuttle retires, a new method of delivering high pressure, high purity oxygen to the High Pressure Gas Tanks (HPGTs) is needed. One method is to use a cabin air separator to sweep oxygen from the cabin air, generate a low pressure/high purity oxygen stream, and compress the oxygen with a multistage mechanical compressor. A main advantage to this type of system is that the existing low pressure oxygen supply infrastructure can be used as the source of cabin oxygen. ISS has two water electrolysis systems that deliver low pressure oxygen to the cabin, as well as chlorate candles and compressed gas tanks on cargo vehicles. Each of these systems can feed low pressure oxygen into the cabin, and any low pressure oxygen source can be used as an on-board source of oxygen. Three different oxygen separator systems were evaluated, and a two stage Pressure Swing Adsorption system was selected for reasons of technical maturity. Two different compressor designs were subjected to long term testing, and the compressor with better life performance and more favorable oxygen safety characteristics was selected. These technologies have been used as the basis of a design for a flight system located in Equipment Lock, and taken to Preliminary Design Review level of maturity. This paper describes the Cabin Air Separator for EVA Oxygen (CASEO) concept, describes the separator and compressor technology trades, highlights key technology risks, and describes the flight hardware concept as presented at Preliminary Design Review (PDR)

  19. The micro conical system: Lessons learned from a successful EVA/robot-compatible mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gittleman, Mark; Johnston, Alistair

    1996-01-01

    The Micro Conical System (MCS) is a three-part, multi-purpose mechanical interface system used for acquiring and manipulating masses on-orbit by either extravehicular activity (EVA) or telerobotic means. The three components of the system are the micro conical fitting (MCF), the EVA micro tool (EMCT), and the Robot Micro Conical Tool (RMCT). The MCS was developed and refined over a four-year period. This period culminated with the delivery of 358 Class 1 and Class 2 micro conical fittings for the International Space Station and with its first use in space to handle a 1272 kg (2800 lbm) Spartan satellite (11000 times greater than the MCF mass) during an EVA aboard STS-63 in February, 1995. The micro conical system is the first successful EVA/robot-compatible mechanism to be demonstrated in the external environment aboard the U.S. Space Shuttle.

  20. Human Space Exploration and Radiation Exposure from EVA: 1981-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, A. R.; Saganti, S. P.; Erickson, G. M.; Saganti, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    There are several risks for any human space exploration endeavor. One such inevitable risk is exposure to the space radiation environment of which extra vehicular activity (EVA) demands more challenges due to limited amount of protection from space suit shielding. We recently compiled all EVA data comprising low-earth orbit (LEO) from Space Shuttle (STS) flights, International Space Station (ISS) expeditions, and Shuttle-Mir missions. Assessment of such radiation risk is very important, particularly for the anticipated long-term, deep-space human explorations in the near future. We present our assessment of anticipated radiation exposure and space radiation dose contribution to each crew member from a listing of 350 different EVA events resulting in more than 1000+ hrs of total EVA time. As of July 12, 2011, 197 astronauts have made spacewalks (out of 520 people who have gone into Earth orbit). Only 11 women have been on spacewalks.

  1. Apollo 16 lunar module 'Orion' photographed from distance during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 Lunar Module 'Orion' is photographed from a distance by Astronaut Chares M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, aboard the moving Lunar Roving Vehicle. Astronauts Duke and John W. Young, commander, were returing from the third Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-2). The RCA color television camera mounted on the LRV is in the foreground. A portion of the LRV's high-gain antenna is at top left.

  2. Hubble Space Telescope EVA Power Ratchet Tool redesign

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul W. Richards; Chan Park; Lee Brown

    1993-01-01

    The Power Ratchet Tool (PRT) is a self contained, power-driven, 3\\/8 inch drive ratchet wrench which will be used by astronauts during Extravehicular Activities (EVA). This battery-powered tool is controlled by a dedicated electonic controller. The PRT was flown during the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Deployment Mission STS-31 to deploy the solar arrays if the automatic mechanisms failed. The PRT

  3. DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYSIS CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2012-02-29

    As part of the characterization of various glovebox glove material from four vendors, the permeability of gas through each type as a function of temperature was determined and a discontinuity in the permeability with temperature was revealed. A series of tests to determine the viscoelastic properties of the glove materials as a function of temperature using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was initiated. The glass transition temperature and the elastic and viscoelastic properties as a function of temperature up to maximum use temperature were determined for each glove material. The glass transition temperatures of the gloves were -60 C for butyl, -30 C for polyurethane, -16 C Hypalon{reg_sign}, - 16 C for Viton{reg_sign}, and -24 C for polyurethane-Hypalon{reg_sign}. The glass transition was too complex for the butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} and butyl-Viton{reg_sign} composite gloves to be characterized by a single glass transition temperature. All of the glass transition temperatures exceed the vendor projected use temperatures.

  4. Occult glove perforation during ophthalmic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Apt, L; Miller, K M

    1992-01-01

    We examined the latex surgical gloves used by 56 primary surgeons in 454 ophthalmic surgical procedures performed over a 7-month period. Of five techniques used to detect pinholes, air inflation with water submersion and compression was found to be the most sensitive, yielding a 6.80% prevalence in control glove pairs and a 21.8% prevalence in postoperative study glove pairs, for a 15.0% incidence of surgically induced perforations (P = 0.000459). The lowest postoperative perforation rate was 11.4% for cataract and intraocular lens surgery, and the highest was 41.7% for oculoplastic procedures. Factors that correlated significantly with the presence of glove perforations as determined by multiple logistic regression analysis were oculoplastic and pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus surgical procedures, surgeon's status as a fellow in training, operating time, and glove size. The thumb and index finger of the nondominant hand contained the largest numbers of pinholes. These data suggest strategies for reducing the risk of cross-infection during ophthalmic surgery. PMID:1494836

  5. Health risk assessments of DEHP released from chemical protective gloves.

    PubMed

    Chao, Keh-Ping; Huang, Chan-Sheng; Wei, Chung-Ying

    2015-02-11

    The substance di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is widely used as a plasticizer in chemical protective gloves to improve their flexibility and workability. However, it is possible that workers using protective gloves to handle various solvents may be exposed to DEHP leached by the solvents. Using an ASTM F739 permeation cell, it was found that BTEX solvents permeating through the glove samples dissolved DEHP from the gloves. Even without continuously contacting the permeant, DEHP was released from the contaminated glove samples during the desorption experiments. The DEHP leaching amounts were found to be inversely correlated to the permeability coefficients of BTEX in the glove samples. This result implied that the larger the amount of DEHP released from the glove samples, the higher the permeation resistance of gloves. Although chemical protective gloves provide adequate skin exposure protection to workers, the dermal exposure model developed herein indicates that leaching of DEHP from the glove samples may pose a potential health risk to the workers who handle BTEX. This study suggests that the selection of protective gloves should not only be concerned with the chemical resistance of the gloves but also the health risk associated with leaching of chemicals, such as DEHP, used in the manufacturing of the gloves. PMID:25261760

  6. Conversion of IVA Human Computer Model to EVA Use and Evaluation and Comparison of the Result to Existing EVA Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, George S.; Williams, Jermaine C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the methods, rationale, and comparative results of the conversion of an intravehicular (IVA) 3D human computer model (HCM) to extravehicular (EVA) use and compares the converted model to an existing model on another computer platform. The task of accurately modeling a spacesuited human figure in software is daunting: the suit restricts the human's joint range of motion (ROM) and does not have joints collocated with human joints. The modeling of the variety of materials needed to construct a space suit (e. g. metal bearings, rigid fiberglass torso, flexible cloth limbs and rubber coated gloves) attached to a human figure is currently out of reach of desktop computer hardware and software. Therefore a simplified approach was taken. The HCM's body parts were enlarged and the joint ROM was restricted to match the existing spacesuit model. This basic approach could be used to model other restrictive environments in industry such as chemical or fire protective clothing. In summary, the approach provides a moderate fidelity, usable tool which will run on current notebook computers.

  7. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowie, Jonathan T.; Kelly, Cody; Buffington, Jesse; Watson, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability from the Orion spacecraft. For this mission, the pressure garment that was selected, for both functions, is the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) with EVA enhancements and the life support option that was selected is the Exploration Portable Life Support System (PLSS). The proposed architecture was found to meet the mission constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the required suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the rest of the tools and equipment required to accomplish the mission. This work has continued over the last year to better define the operations and hardware maturation of these systems. EVA simulations have been completed in the NBL and interfacing options have been prototyped and analyzed with testing planned for late 2014. For NBL EVA simulations, in 2013, components were procured to allow in-house build up for four new suits with mobility enhancements built into the arms. Boots outfitted with clips that fit into foot restraints have also been added to the suit and analyzed for possible loads. Major suit objectives accomplished this year in testing include: evaluation of mobility enhancements, ingress/egress of foot restraint, use of foot restraint for worksite stability, ingress/egress of Orion hatch with PLSS mockup, and testing with two crew members in the water at one time to evaluate the crew's ability to help one another. Major tool objectives accomplished this year include using various other methods for worksite stability, testing new methods for asteroid geologic sampling and improving the fidelity of the mockups and crew equipment. These tests were completed on a medium fidelity capsule mockup, asteroid vehicle mockup, and asteroid mockups that were more accurate for an asteroid type EVA than previous tests. Another focus was the design and fabrication of the interface between the MACES and the PLSS. The MACES was not designed to interface with a PLSS, hence an interface kit must accommodate the unique design qualities of the MACES and provide the necessary life support function connections to the PLSS. A prototype interface kit for MACES to PLSS has been designed and fabricated. Unmanned and manned testing of the interface will show the usability of the kit while wearing a MACES. The testing shows viability of the kit approach as well as the operations concept. The design will be vetted through suit and PLSS experts and, with the findings from the testing, the best path forward will be determined. As the Asteroid Redirect Mission matures, the suit/life support portion of the mission will mature along with it and EVA Tools & Equipment can be iterated to accommodate the overall mission objectives and compromises inherent in EVA Suit optimization. The goal of the EVA architecture for ARCM is to continue to build on the previously developed technologies and lessons learned, and accomplish the ARCM EVAs while providing a stepping stone to future missions and destinations.

  8. Overview of EVA PRA for TPS Repair for Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigler, Mark; Duncan, Gary; Roeschel, Eduardo; Canga, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Following the Columbia accident in 2003, NASA developed techniques to repair the Thermal Protection System (TPS) in the event of damage to the TPS as one of several actions to reduce the risk to future flights from ascent debris, micro-meteoroid and/or orbital debris (MMOD). Other actions to help reduce the risk include improved inspection techniques, reduced shedding of debris from the External Tank and ability to rescue the crew with a launch on need vehicle. For the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing Mission the crew rescue capability was limited by the inability to safe haven on the International Space Station (ISS), resulting in a greater reliance on the repair capability. Therefore it was desirable to have an idea of the risk associated with conducting a repair, where the repair would have to be conducted using an Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA). Previously, focused analyses had been conducted to quantify the risk associated with certain aspects of an EVA, for example the EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) or Space Suit; however, the analyses were somewhat limited in scope. A complete integrated model of an EVA which could quantify the risk associated with all of the major components of an EVA had never been done before. It was desired to have a complete integrated model to be able to assess the risks associated with an EVA to support the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) in making risk informed decisions. In the case of the HST Servicing Mission, this model was developed to assess specifically the risks associated with performing a TPS repair EVA. This paper provides an overview of the model that was developed to support the HST mission in the event of TPS damage. The HST Servicing Mission was successfully completed on May 24th 2009 with no critical TPS damage; therefore the model was not required for real-time mission support. However, it laid the foundation upon which future EVA quantitative risk assessments could be based.

  9. Maturing Pump Technology for EVA Applications in a Collaborative Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, Edward; Dionne, Steven; Gervais, Edward; Anchondo, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The transition from low earth orbit Extravehicular Activity (EVA) for construction and maintenance activities to planetary surface EVA on asteroids, moons, and, ultimately, Mars demands a new spacesuit system. NASA's development of that system has resulted in dramatically different pumping requirements from those in the current spacesuit system. Hamilton Sundstrand, Cascon, and NASA are collaborating to develop and mature a pump that will reliably meet those new requirements in space environments and within the design constraints imposed by spacesuit system integration. That collaboration, which began in the NASA purchase of a pump prototype for test evaluation, is now entering a new phase of development. A second generation pump reflecting the lessons learned in NASA's testing of the original prototype will be developed under Hamilton Sundstrand internal research funding and ultimately tested in an integrated Advanced Portable Life Support System (APLSS) in NASA laboratories at the Johnson Space Center. This partnership is providing benefit to both industry and NASA by supplying a custom component for EVA integrated testing at no cost to the government while providing test data for industry that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to duplicate in industry laboratories. This paper discusses the evolving collaborative process, component requirements and design development based on early NASA test experience, component stand alone test results, and near term plans for integrated testing at JSCs.

  10. Uso de luvas de látex no contexto hospitalar: ainda um conhecimento polêmico?* The use of latex gloves in the hospital context: is it still a polemic knowledge?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcos Aurélio; Seixas dos Reis; Mônica Yoneda; Fernanda Marcolino; Vanderlei Jose Haas; Denise de Andrade

    Introduction: The use of sterile latex or procedure gloves has not been uniform among professionals. Objectives: Evaluate nursing professionals' knowledge regarding the use of gloves in different care activities, aiming to identify principles, consensus and con- troversies. Material and method: It is a cross-sectional study carried out in two hospitals in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. A structu- red

  11. Ballast system for maintaining constant pressure in a glove box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A ballast system for a glove box including a fixed platform on which is mounted an inflatable bag on top of which resides a cover and a weight. The variable gas volume of the inflatable bag communicates with that of the glove box via a valved tube. The weight and gas volume are selected to maintain a relatively constant pressure in the glove box despite variations in the glove box volume while avoiding the use of complicated valving apparatus.

  12. Ballast system for maintaining constant pressure in a glove box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J. (inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A ballast system is disclosed for a glove box including a fixed platform on which is mounted an inflatable bag on top of which resides a cover and a weight. The variable gas volume of the inflatable bag communicates with that of the glove box via a valved tube. The weight and the gas volume are selected to maintain a relatively constant pressure in the glove box despite variations in the glove box volume while avoiding the use of complicated valving apparatus.

  13. Ballast system for maintaining constant pressure in a glove box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1989-09-01

    A ballast system is disclosed for a glove box including a fixed platform on which is mounted an inflatable bag on top of which resides a cover and a weight. The variable gas volume of the inflatable bag communicates with that of the glove box via a valved tube. The weight and the gas volume are selected to maintain a relatively constant pressure in the glove box despite variations in the glove box volume while avoiding the use of complicated valving apparatus.

  14. 21 CFR 800.20 - Patient examination gloves and surgeons' gloves; sample plans and test method for leakage defects...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...inspection level II in determining the sample size for any lot size. As shown in...Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number Defective...Examination Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number...

  15. 21 CFR 800.20 - Patient examination gloves and surgeons' gloves; sample plans and test method for leakage defects...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...inspection level II in determining the sample size for any lot size. As shown in...Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number Defective...Examination Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number...

  16. 21 CFR 800.20 - Patient examination gloves and surgeons' gloves; sample plans and test method for leakage defects...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...inspection level II in determining the sample size for any lot size. As shown in...Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number Defective...Examination Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number...

  17. 21 CFR 800.20 - Patient examination gloves and surgeons' gloves; sample plans and test method for leakage defects...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...inspection level II in determining the sample size for any lot size. As shown in...Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number Defective...Examination Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number...

  18. Study of how frequently surgeons’ gloves are perforated during operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Burrow; G. Pinchbeck

    2006-01-01

    Surgical gloves were collected after 231 first opinion and referral surgical procedures performed at the University of Liverpool Small Animal Hospital. They were tested for defects by the water load test and the site of any defects was recorded; 10·2 per cent of the gloves had defects, and at least one glove became defective during 51 (22·1 per cent) of

  19. Guidance Document Gloves/PersonalProtectiveEquipment(PPE)

    E-print Network

    Guidance Document Gloves/PersonalProtectiveEquipment(PPE) PPE is equipment worn to minimize of PPE include gloves, eye protection, respirators, aprons and coveralls. PPE is only one element the worker and must be worn properly. Some types of PPE, such as chemical- resistant gloves, are disposable

  20. Hydration and Conductivity in Natural Rubber Latex Gloves

    E-print Network

    Bennett, John K.

    to tearing or puncture, as well as feeling ``tacky''. In addition, a heavily hydrated glove may be lessHydration and Conductivity in Natural Rubber Latex Gloves John K. Bennett, PhD, PE Department of natural rubber latex (NRL) gloves have been of clinical interest since the concept of using an electrical

  1. Mechanisms to improve the mechanical performance of surgical gloves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle Hoyt Watkins

    1997-01-01

    The use of gloves as a barrier to cross infection in the medical industry has increased substantially due to the heightened awareness of viral transmission, especially the human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B virus. The glove must allow for tactile sensation, comfort and long use times, while providing equally critical mechanical performance. The majority of surgical gloves are made

  2. The Astronaut Glove Challenge: Big Innovation from a (Very) Small Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Many measurements were taken by test engineers from Hamilton Sundstrand, the prime contractor for the current EVA suit. Because the raw measurements needed to be converted to torques and combined into a final score, it was impossible to keep track of who was ahead in this phase. The final comfort and dexterity test was performed in a depressurized glove box to simulate real on-orbit conditions. Each competitor was required to exercise the glove through a defined set of finger, thumb, and wrist motions without any sign of abrasion or bruising of the competitor's hand. I learned a lot about arm fatigue! This was a pass-fail event, and both of the remaining competitors came through intact. After taking what seemed like an eternity to tally the final scores, the judges announced that I had won the competition. My glove was the only one to have achieved lower finger-bending torques than the Phase VI glove. Looking back, I see three sources of the success of this project that I believe also operate in other programs where small teams have broken new ground in aerospace technologies. These are awareness, failure, and trust. By remaining aware of the big picture, continuously asking myself, "Am I converging on a solution?" and "Am I converging fast enough?" I was able to see that my original design was not going to succeed, leading to the decision to start over. I was also aware that, had I lingered over this choice or taken time to analyze it, I would not have been ready on the first day of competition. Failure forced me to look outside conventional thinking and opened the door to innovation. Choosing to make incremental failures enabled me to rapidly climb the learning curve. Trusting my "gut" feelings-which are really an internalized accumulation of experiences-and my newly acquired skills allowed me to devise new technologies rapidly and complete both gloves just in time. Awareness, failure, and trust are intertwined: failure provides experiences that inform awareness and provide decision-making opportunities that build trust among team members and managers while opening minds to new pathways for development. All three are necessary for teams-large or small-to achieve big innovation.

  3. Astronauts Meade tests SAFER system during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Carl J. Meade tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system some 130 nautical miles above Earth. The end of the Remote Manipulator System's (RMS) robot arm, with an unoccupied foot restraint attached, is at frame's edge.

  4. Research on EVA-inorganic nanocomposites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhang Wanxi; Zhang Chunxiao; Li Hongji

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, polymer\\/inorganic nanocomposites have already attracted the interests. In this paper, EVA\\/inorganic nanocomposites of direct-dispersed, one-step and two-step were prepared by melt blending. The preparation, morphological Structure and mechanical properties of these composites were systematically investigated, which laid the foundations for the further experimental. The dispersibility of nanoparticles in EVA matrix was characterized by FESEM and FT-IR In

  5. Combustion toxicity of fire retarded EVA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Richard Hull; Rita E Quinn; Irene G Areri; David A Purser

    2002-01-01

    A Purser furnace has been used to investigate the combustion toxicity of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) with and without fire retardants, under different fire conditions. Steady state flaming combustion has been studied at equivalence ratios ? varying from 0.5 to 1.5 by driving the materials through the furnace at 750 °C. Yields of CO and CO2 for EVA containing 27% vinyl

  6. Apollo 14 Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Conducting EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 14 mission commander Alan B. Shepard is seen here conducting extravehicular activity (EVA) related to the mission deployed scientific laboratory called Apollo Lunar Scientific Experiments Package (ALSEP). He is standing next to the central station of the ALSEP, which was deployed during the mission's first EVA. The Apollo 14, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Shepard; Command Module pilot Stuart A. Roosa, and Lunar Module pilot Edgar D. Mitchell, lifted off from launch complex 39A at KSC on January 31, 1971. It was the third manned lunar landing, the first manned landing in exploration of the lunar highlands, and it demonstrated pinpoint landing capability. The major goal of Apollo 14 was the scientific exploration of the Moon in the foothills of the rugged Fra Mauro region. The EVA of astronauts Shepard and Mitchell included setting up the ALSEP, and collecting a total of about 95 pounds (43 kilograms) of Moon rock and soil for a geological investigation back on the Earth. Apollo 14 safely returned to Earth on February 9, 1971.

  7. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowie, Jonathan; Buffington, Jesse; Hood, Drew; Kelly, Cody; Naids, Adam; Watson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability from the Orion spacecraft. For this mission, the pressure garment selected for both functions is the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) with EVA enhancements and the life support option that was selected is the Exploration Portable Life Support System (PLSS) currently under development for Advanced Exploration Systems (AES). The proposed architecture meets the ARCM constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the tools and equipment necessary to accomplish the mission. This work has continued over the last year to better define the operations and hardware maturation of these systems. EVA simulations were completed in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) and interfacing options were prototyped and analyzed with testing planned for late 2014. This paper discusses the work done over the last year on the MACES enhancements, the use of tools while using the suit, and the integration of the PLSS with the MACES.

  8. Enhanced Controlled Transdermal Delivery of Ambroxol from the EVA Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Cho, C. W.; Kim, D. B.; Cho, H. W.; Shin, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    To avoid the systemic adverse effects that might occur after oral administration, transdermal delivery of ambroxol was studied as a method for maintaining proper blood levels for an extended period. Release of ambroxol according to concentration and temperature was determined, and permeation of drug through rat skin was studied using two chamber-diffusion cells. The solubility according to PEG 400 volume fraction was highest at 40% PEG 400. The rate of drug release from the EVA matrix increased with increased temperature and drug loading doses. A linear relationship existed between the release rate and the square root of loading rate. The activation energy (Ea) was measured from the slope of the plot of log P versus 1000/T and was found to be 10.71, 10.39, 10.33 and 9.87 kcal/mol for 2, 3, 4 and 5% loading dose from the EVA matrix, respectively. To increase the permeation rate of ambroxol across rat skin from the EVA matrix, various penetration enhancers such as fatty acids (saturated, unsaturated), propylene glycols, glycerides, pyrrolidones, and non-ionic surfactants were used. The enhancing effects of the incorporated enhancers on the skin permeation of ambroxol were evaluated using Franz diffusion cells fitted with intact excised rat skin at 37° using 40% PEG 400 solution as a receptor medium. Among the enhancers used, polyoxyethylene-2-oleyl ether increased the permeation rate by 4.25-fold. In conclusion, EVA matrix containing plasticizer and permeation enhancer could be developed for enhanced transdermal delivery of ambroxol. PMID:23325993

  9. A Moving Robotic Hand System for Whole-Glove Permeation and Penetration: Captan and Nitrile Gloves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Phalen; Shane Que Hee

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a robotic hand to test the influence of hand movement on the permeation\\/penetration of captan through disposable nitrile rubber gloves. An available robotic hand was modified to within one standard deviation of the anthropometric 50th percentile male hand. Permeation tests used a nylon inspection glove interposed between medium-size outer and inner nitrile

  10. Biomedical Support of U.S. Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Dervay, J. P.; Gillis, D.; McMann, H. J.; Thomas, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    The world's first extravehicular activity (EVA) was performed by A. A. Leonov on March 18, 1965 during the Russian Voskhod-2 mission. The first US EVA was executed by Gemini IV astronaut Ed White on June 3, 1965, with an umbilical tether that included communications and an oxygen supply. A hand-held maneuvering unit (HHMU) also was used to test maneuverability during the brief EVA; however the somewhat stiff umbilical limited controlled movement. That constraint, plus difficulty returning through the vehicle hatch, highlighted the need for increased thermal control and improved EVA ergonomics. Clearly, requirements for a useful EVA were interrelated with the vehicle design. The early Gemini EVAs generated requirements for suits providing micro-meteor protection, adequate visual field and eye protection from solar visual and infrared radiation, gloves optimized for dexterity while pressurized, and thermal systems capable of protecting the astronaut while rejecting metabolic heat during high workloads. Subsequent Gemini EVAs built upon this early experience and included development of a portable environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) and an astronaut maneuvering unit. The ECLSS provided a pressure vessel and controller with functional control over suit pressure, oxygen flow, carbon dioxide removal, humidity, and temperature control. Gemini EVA experience also identified the usefulness of underwater neutral buoyancy and altitude chamber task training, and the importance of developing reliable task timelines. Improved thermal management and carbon dioxide control also were required for high workload tasks. With the Apollo project, EVA activity was primarily on the lunar surface; and suit durability, integrated liquid cooling garments, and low suit operating pressures (3.75 pounds per square inch absolute [psia] or 25.8 kilopascal [kPa],) were required to facilitate longer EVAs with ambulation and significant physical workloads with average metabolic rates of 1000 BTU/hr and peaks of up to 2200 BTU/hr. Mobility was further augmented with the Lunar Roving Vehicle. The Apollo extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) was made up of over 15 components, ranging from a biomedical belt for capturing and transmitting biomedical data, urine and fecal containment systems, a liquid cooling garment, communications cap, a modular portable life support system (PLSS), a boot system, thermal overgloves, and a bubble helmet with eye protection. Apollo lunar astronauts performed successful EVAs on the lunar surface from a 5 psia (34.4 kPa) 100% oxygen environment in the Lunar Lander. A maximum of three EVAs were performed on any mission. For Skylab a modified A7LB suit, used for Apollo 15, was selected. The Skylab astronaut life support assembly (ALSA) provided umbilical support through the life support umbilical (LSU) and used open loop oxygen flow, rather than closed-loop as in Apollo missions. Thermal control was provided by liquid water circulated by spacecraft pumps and electrical power also was provided from the spacecraft via the umbilical. The cabin atmosphere of 5 psia (34.4 kPa), 70% oxygen, provided a normoxic atmosphere and because of the very low nitrogen partial pressures, no special protocols were required to protect against decompression sickness (DCS) as was the case with the Apollo spacecraft with a 5 psi, 100% oxygen environment.

  11. Applications of EVA guidelines and design criteria. Volume 3: EVA systems cost model formating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a model for estimating the impact of manned EVA costs on future payloads is discussed. Basic information on the EV crewman requirements, equipment, physical and operational characteristics, and vehicle interfaces is provided. The cost model is being designed to allow system designers to quantify the impact of EVA on vehicle and payload systems.

  12. Biosensors for EVA: Muscle Oxygen and pH During Walking, Running and Simulated Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. M. C.; Ellerby, G.; Scott, P.; Stroud, L.; Norcross, J.; Pesholov, B.; Zou, F.; Gernhardt, M.; Soller, B.

    2009-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI-funded project is looking to extend this methodology to examine activities which more appropriately represent EVA activities, such as walking and running and to better understand factors that determine the metabolic cost of exercise in both normal and lunar gravity. Our 4 year project specifically addresses risk: ExMC 4.18: Lack of adequate biomedical monitoring capability for Constellation EVA Suits and EPSP risk: Risk of compromised EVA performance and crew health due to inadequate EVA suit systems.

  13. Extravehicular activity at geosynchronous earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Nicholas, Jr.; Schulze, Arthur E.; Carr, Gerald P.; Pogue, William

    1988-01-01

    The basic contract to define the system requirements to support the Advanced Extravehicular Activity (EVA) has three phases: EVA in geosynchronous Earth orbit; EVA in lunar base operations; and EVA in manned Mars surface exploration. The three key areas to be addressed in each phase are: environmental/biomedical requirements; crew and mission requirements; and hardware requirements. The structure of the technical tasks closely follows the structure of the Advanced EVA studies for the Space Station completed in 1986.

  14. Comparison Of Human Modelling Tools For Efficiency Of Prediction Of EVA Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dischinger, H. Charles, Jr.; Loughead, Tomas E.

    1998-01-01

    Construction of the International Space Station (ISS) will require extensive extravehicular activity (EVA, spacewalks), and estimates of the actual time needed continue to rise. As recently as September, 1996, the amount of time to be spent in EVA was believed to be about 400 hours, excluding spacewalks on the Russian segment. This estimate has recently risen to over 1100 hours, and it could go higher before assembly begins in the summer of 1998. These activities are extremely expensive and hazardous, so any design tools which help assure mission success and improve the efficiency of the astronaut in task completion can pay off in reduced design and EVA costs and increased astronaut safety. The tasks which astronauts can accomplish in EVA are limited by spacesuit mobility. They are therefore relatively simple, from an ergonomic standpoint, requiring gross movements rather than time motor skills. The actual tasks include driving bolts, mating and demating electric and fluid connectors, and actuating levers; the important characteristics to be considered in design improvement include the ability of the astronaut to see and reach the item to be manipulated and the clearance required to accomplish the manipulation. This makes the tasks amenable to simulation in a Computer-Assisted Design (CAD) environment. For EVA, the spacesuited astronaut must have his or her feet attached on a work platform called a foot restraint to obtain a purchase against which work forces may be actuated. An important component of the design is therefore the proper placement of foot restraints.

  15. Glove perforation and contamination in primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Al-Maiyah, M; Bajwa, A; Mackenney, P; Port, A; Gregg, P J; Hill, D; Finn, P

    2005-04-01

    We conducted a randomised, controlled trial to determine whether changing gloves at specified intervals can reduce the incidence of glove perforation and contamination in total hip arthroplasty. A total of 50 patients were included in the study. In the study group (25 patients), gloves were changed at 20-minute intervals or prior to cementation. In the control group (25 patients), gloves were changed prior to cementation. In addition, gloves were changed in both groups whenever there was a visible puncture. Only outer gloves were investigated. Contamination was tested by impression of gloved fingers on blood agar and culture plates were subsequently incubated at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. The number of colonies and types of organisms were recorded. Glove perforation was assessed using the water test. The incidence of perforation and contamination was significantly lower in the study group compared with the control group. Changing gloves at regular intervals is an effective way to decrease the incidence of glove perforation and bacterial contamination during total hip arthroplasty. PMID:15795210

  16. The durability of examination gloves used on intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of examination gloves is part of the standard precautions to prevent medical staff from transmission of infectious agents between patients. Gloves also protect the staff from infectious agents originating from patients. Adequate protection, however, depends on intact gloves. The risk of perforation of examination gloves is thought to correlate with duration of wearing, yet, only very few prospective studies have been performed on this issue. Methods A total number of 1500 consecutively used pairs of examination gloves of two different brands and materials (latex and nitrile) were collected over a period of two months on two ICU’s. Used gloves were examined for micro perforations using the “water-proof-test” according to EN 455–1. Cox-regression for both glove types was used to estimate optimal changing intervals. Results Only 26% of gloves were worn longer than 15 min. The total perforation rate was 10.3% with significant differences and deterioration of integrity of gloves between brands (p<0.001). Apart from the brand, “change of wound dressing” (p = 0.049) and “washing patients” (p = 0.001) were also significantly associated with an increased risk of perforation. Conclusion Medical gloves show marked differences in their durability that cannot be predicted based on the technical data routinely provided by the manufacturer. Based on the increase of micro perforations over time and the wearing behavior, recommendations for maximum wearing time of gloves should be given. Changing of gloves after 15 min could be a good compromise between feasibility and safety. HCWs should be aware of the benefits and limitations of medical gloves. To improve personal hygiene hand disinfection should be further encouraged. PMID:23687937

  17. Clinical evaluation of the bionic glove

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dejan Popovi?; Aleksandar Stojanovi?; Andjelka Pjanovi?; Slobodanka Radosavljevi?; Mirjana Popovi?; Stevan Jovi?; Dragan Vulovi?

    1999-01-01

    Objective: Clinical evaluation of the Bionic Glove, a prototype of a new functional electrical stimulation device designed to improve the function of the paralyzed hand after spinal cord injury.Patients: Twelve people with spinal cord injury at C5-C7 who had used the device 6 months or more.Setting: Measurements were made at the Institute “Dr Miroslav Zotovi?” in Belgrade as a part

  18. EVA/ORU model architecture using RAMCOST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ntuen, Celestine A.; Park, Eui H.; Wang, Y. M.; Bretoi, R.

    1990-01-01

    A parametrically driven simulation model is presented in order to provide a detailed insight into the effects of various input parameters in the life testing of a modular space suit. The RAMCOST model employed is a user-oriented simulation model for studying the life-cycle costs of designs under conditions of uncertainty. The results obtained from the EVA simulated model are used to assess various mission life testing parameters such as the number of joint motions per EVA cycle time, part availability, and number of inspection requirements. RAMCOST first simulates EVA completion for NASA application using a probabilistic like PERT network. With the mission time heuristically determined, RAMCOST then models different orbital replacement unit policies with special application to the astronaut's space suit functional designs.

  19. The Feasibility of Using Electrical Means for Monitoring Barrier Integrity in Natural Rubber Latex Gloves

    E-print Network

    Bennett, John K.

    Gloves: Hydration, Conductivity, and Protein Content in Natural Rubber Latex Gloves John K. Bennett, Ph latex (NRL) surgical and examination gloves. Health concerns have also elevated the importance of these gloves as reliable biological barriers. NRL gloves manufactured in the U.S. must currently meet or exceed

  20. Astronaut Thomas Mattingly performs EVA during Apollo 16 transearth coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, performs extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 16 transearth coast. mattingly is assisted by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. Mattingly inspected the SIM bay of the Service Module, and retrieved film from the Mapping and Panoramic cameras. Mattingly is wearing the helmet of Astronaut John W. Young, commander. The helmet's lunar extravehicular visor assembly helped protect Mattingly's eyes frmo the bright sun. This view is a frame from motion picture film exposed by a 16mm Maurer camera.

  1. Apollo 16 lunar module 'Orion' photographed from distance during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 Lunar Module 'Orion' is photographed from a distance by Astronaut Chares M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, aboard the moving Lunar Roving Vehicle. Astronauts Duke and John W. Young, commander, were returning from the excursion to Stone Mountain during the second Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-2). The RCA color television camera mounted on the LRV is in the foreground. A portion of the LRV's high-gain antenna is at top left. Smoky Mountain rises behind the LM in this north-looking view at the Descartes landing site.

  2. STS-117 Astronauts John Olivas and Jim Reilly During EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    STS-117 astronauts and mission specialists Jim Reilly (center frame), and John 'Danny' Olivas (bottom center), participated in the first Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) as construction resumed on the International Space Station (ISS). Among other tasks, the two connected power, data, and cooling cables between trusses 1 (S1) and 3 (S3), released the launch restraints from and deployed the four solar array blanket boxes on S4, and released the cinches and winches holding the photovoltaic radiator on S4. The primary mission objective was the installment of the second and third starboard truss segments (S3 and S4).

  3. EVA tools and equipment reference book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fullerton, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    This document contains a mixture of tools and equipment used throughout the space shuttle-based extravehicular activity (EVA) program. Promising items which have reached the prototype stage of development are also included, but should not be considered certified ready for flight. Each item is described with a photo, a written discussion, technical specifications, dimensional drawings, and points of contact for additional information. Numbers on the upper left-hand corner of each photo may be used to order specific pictures from NASA and contractor photo libraries. Points of contact were classified as either operational or technical. An operational contact is an engineer from JSC Mission Operations Directorate who is familiar with the basic function and on-orbit use of the tool. A technical contact would be the best source of detailed technical specifications and is typically the NASA subsystem manager. The technical information table for each item uses the following terms to describe the availability or status of each hardware item: Standard - Flown on every mission as standard manifest; Flight specific - Potentially available for flight, not flown every mission (flight certification cannot be guaranteed and recertification may be required); Reference only - Item no longer in active inventory or not recommended for future use, some items may be too application-specific for general use; and Developmental - In the prototype stage only and not yet available for flight. The current availability and certification of any flight-specific tool should be verified with the technical point of contact. Those tools built and fit checked for Hubble Space Telescope maintenance are program dedicated and are not available to other customers. Other customers may have identical tools built from the existing, already certified designs as an optional service.

  4. A soft robotic exomusculature glove with integrated sEMG sensing for hand rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Delph, Michael A; Fischer, Sarah A; Gauthier, Phillip W; Luna, Carlos H Martinez; Clancy, Edward A; Fischer, Gregory S

    2013-06-01

    Stroke affects 750,000 people annually, and 80% of stroke survivors are left with weakened limbs and hands. Repetitive hand movement is often used as a rehabilitation technique in order to regain hand movement and strength. In order to facilitate this rehabilitation, a robotic glove was designed to aid in the movement and coordination of gripping exercises. This glove utilizes a cable system to open and close a patients hand. The cables are actuated by servomotors, mounted in a backpack weighing 13.2 lbs including battery power sources. The glove can be controlled in terms of finger position and grip force through switch interface, software program, or surface myoelectric (sEMG) signal. The primary control modes of the system provide: active assistance, active resistance and a preprogrammed mode. This project developed a working prototype of the rehabilitative robotic glove which actuates the fingers over a full range of motion across one degree-of-freedom, and is capable of generating a maximum 15N grip force. PMID:24187244

  5. Permeation of glove materials by physiologically harmful chemicals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOHN R. WILLIAMS

    1979-01-01

    The breakthrough times and permeation rates of 1,4-dichloro-2-butene, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, and 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene for eleven commercially available gloves were determined. Four methods of determining the breakthrough time and permeation rate were evaluated. A wide variation in the glove material thickness and protection time was found showing that the adequate protection time can only be determined by testing the proposed glove

  6. Development of Wireless RFID Glove for Various Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changwon; Kim, Minchul; Park, Jinwoo; Oh, Jeonghoon; Eom, Kihwan

    Radio Frequency Identification is increasingly popular technology with many applications. The majority of applications of RFID are supply-chain management. In this paper, we proposed the development of wireless RFID Glove for various applications in real life. Proposed wireless RFID glove is composed of RFID reader of 13.56 MHz and RF wireless module. Proposed Gloves were applied to two applications. First is the interactive leaning and second is Meal aid system for blind people. The experimental results confirmed good performances.

  7. Human-Centric Teaming in a Multi-Agent EVA Assembly Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehnmark, Fredrik; Currie, Nancy; Ambrose, Robert O.; Culbert, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Human Space Flight program depends heavily on spacewalks performed by pairs of suited human astronauts. These Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVAs) are severely restricted in both duration and scope by consumables and available manpower.An expanded multi-agent EVA team combining the information-gathering and problem-solving skills of human astronauts with the survivability and physical capabilities of highly dexterous space robots is proposed. A 1-g test featuring two NASA/DARPA Robonaut systems working side-by-side with a suited human subject is conducted to evaluate human-robot teaming strategies in the context of a simulated EVA assembly task based on the STS-61B ACCESS flight experiment.

  8. The use of various handwashing agents to decontaminate gloved hands.

    PubMed

    Douglas, C W; Millward, T A; Clark, A

    1989-07-22

    It has been suggested that gloved hands could be washed between patient treatments in the dental surgery and gloves re-used, provided they are undamaged. A series of experiments are described, which evaluate the effectiveness of four handwashing agents at removing defined bacterial inoculae from two types of latex rubber glove, a dedicated dental procedure glove (Regent Biogel D) which has a rough surface and a smooth-surfaced examination glove (Microtouch). The four agents tested were povidone iodine (Betadine), chlorhexidine (Hibiscrub), 60% iso-propyl alcohol, and a detergent triclosan preparation (Kleenex washcream). The Biogel D gloves required slightly shorter washing times to eradicate organisms than the Microtouch gloves. It was found that washing with water alone reduced the organisms on gloves by 300-1000-fold, but a minimum washing time of 20 seconds with povidone iodine or chlorhexidine was required to eradicate all the organisms inoculated, except bacterial spores, from both glove surfaces. Povidone-iodine and chlorhexidine were more effective washing agents than iso-propyl alcohol and triclosan soap. PMID:2775587

  9. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  10. Effect of the inner glove environment on permeation rates and breakthrough times of selected solvent/glove combinations

    E-print Network

    Mathurin, David Ring

    1985-01-01

    OF THE TEST APPARATUS 2. 5444 4. 444m sas cm Section view of the test appartus. (A) Teflone gasket. (B) Teflono" gasket. (C) Glove material test specimen. (D) Teflone gasket. (E) Stainless steel wire support screen. (F) Teflone gasket. (G) pyrexe glass...EFFECT OF THE INNER GLOVE ENVIRONMENT ON PERMEATION RATES AND HREAKTHROUGH TIMES OF SELECTED SOLVENT/GLOVE COMBINATIONS A Thesis DAVID RING MATHURZN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University in partial fulfillment...

  11. Water Pump Development for the EVA PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Goldman, Jeff; Morris, Kim; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design, fabricate, and test a preflight prototype pump for use in the Extravehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump will accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting noncondensable gas without becoming "air locked." The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, sealless, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. Although the planned flight unit will use a sensorless motor with custom designed controller, the preflight prototype to be provided for this project incorporates Hall effect sensors, allowing an interface with a readily available commercial motor controller. This design approach reduced the cost of this project and gives NASA more flexibility in future PLSS laboratory testing. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES will simulate the vacuum environment in which the flight pump will operate. Testing will verify that the pump meets design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure rise, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, and restart capability. Pump testing is currently scheduled for March, 2009, after which the pump will be delivered to NASA for further testing.

  12. Precis of Evolution in Four Eva Jablonka

    E-print Network

    of evolution, Darwin recognized that the conditions of life play a role in the generation of hereditary been important. Keywords: cultural evolution; Darwinism; directed mutations; epigenetic inheritancePre´cis of Evolution in Four Dimensions Eva Jablonka Cohn Institute for the History and Philosophy

  13. TEJAS - TELEROBOTICS/EVA JOINT ANALYSIS SYSTEM VERSION 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objective of space telerobotics as a research discipline is the augmentation and/or support of extravehicular activity (EVA) with telerobotic activity; this allows increased emplacement of on-orbit assets while providing for their "in situ" management. Development of the requisite telerobot work system requires a well-understood correspondence between EVA and telerobotics that to date has been only partially established. The Telerobotics/EVA Joint Analysis Systems (TEJAS) hypermedia information system uses object-oriented programming to bridge the gap between crew-EVA and telerobotics activities. TEJAS Version 1.0 contains twenty HyperCard stacks that use a visual, customizable interface of icon buttons, pop-up menus, and relational commands to store, link, and standardize related information about the primitives, technologies, tasks, assumptions, and open issues involved in space telerobot or crew EVA tasks. These stacks are meant to be interactive and can be used with any database system running on a Macintosh, including spreadsheets, relational databases, word-processed documents, and hypermedia utilities. The software provides a means for managing volumes of data and for communicating complex ideas, relationships, and processes inherent to task planning. The stack system contains 3MB of data and utilities to aid referencing, discussion, communication, and analysis within the EVA and telerobotics communities. The six baseline analysis stacks (EVATasks, EVAAssume, EVAIssues, TeleTasks, TeleAssume, and TeleIssues) work interactively to manage and relate basic information which you enter about the crew-EVA and telerobot tasks you wish to analyze in depth. Analysis stacks draw on information in the Reference stacks as part of a rapid point-and-click utility for building scripts of specific task primitives or for any EVA or telerobotics task. Any or all of these stacks can be completely incorporated within other hypermedia applications, or they can be referenced as is, without requiring data to be transferred into any other database. TEJAS is simple to use and requires no formal training. Some knowledge of HyperCard is helpful, but not essential. All Help cards printed in the TEJAS User's Guide are part of the TEJAS Help Stack and are available from a pop-up menu any time you are using TEJAS. Specific stacks created in TEJAS can be exchanged between groups, divisions, companies, or centers for complete communication of fundamental information that forms the basis for further analyses. TEJAS runs on any Apple Macintosh personal computer with at least one megabyte of RAM, a hard disk, and HyperCard 1.21, or later version. TEJAS is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. HyperCard and Macintosh are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.

  14. Development of Damp-Heat Resistant Self-Primed EVA and Non-EVA Encapsulant Formulations at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    2005-11-01

    Self-primed ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and non-EVA (PMG) encapsulant formulations were developed that have greater resistance to damp heat exposure at 85 deg C and 85% relative humidity (RH) (in terms of adhesion strength to glass substrates) than a commonly used commercial EVA product. The self-primed EVA formulations were developed on the basis of high-performing glass priming formulations that have previously proven to significantly enhance the adhesion strength of unprimed and primed EVA films on glass substrates during damp heat exposure. The PMG encapsulant formulations were based on an ethylene-methylacrylate copolymer containing glycidyl methacrylate.

  15. Integrity of Disposable Nitrile Exam Gloves Exposed to Simulated Movement

    PubMed Central

    Phalen, Robert N.; Wong, Weng Kee

    2011-01-01

    Every year, millions of health care, first responder, and industry workers are exposed to chemical and biological hazards. Disposable nitrile gloves are a common choice as both a chemical and physical barrier to these hazards, especially as an alternative to natural latex gloves. However, glove selection is complicated by the availability of several types or formulations of nitrile gloves, such as low-modulus, medical-grade, low-filler, and cleanroom products. This study evaluated the influence of simulated movement on the physical integrity (i.e., holes) of different nitrile exam glove brands and types. Thirty glove products were evaluated out-of-box and after exposure to simulated whole-glove movement for 2 hr. In lieu of the traditional 1-L water-leak test, a modified water-leak test, standardized to detect a 0.15 ± 0.05 mm hole in different regions of the glove, was developed. A specialized air inflation method simulated bidirectional stretching and whole-glove movement. A worst-case scenario with maximum stretching was evaluated. On average, movement did not have a significant effect on glove integrity (chi-square; p=0.068). The average effect was less than 1% between no movement (1.5%) and movement (2.1%) exposures. However, there was significant variability in glove integrity between different glove types (p ? 0.05). Cleanroom gloves, on average, had the highest percentage of leaks, and 50% failed the water-leak test. Low-modulus and medical-grade gloves had the lowest percentages of leaks, and no products failed the water-leak test. Variability in polymer formulation was suspected to account for the observed discrepancies, as well as the inability of the traditional 1-L water-leak test to detect holes in finger/thumb regions. Unexpectedly, greater than 80% of the glove defects were observed in the finger and thumb regions. It is recommended that existing water-leak tests be re-evaluated and standardized to account for product variability. PMID:21476169

  16. Determining the Radiation Damage Effect on Glovebox Glove Material.

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M. E. (Michael E.); Balkey, J. J. (James J.); Andrade, R.M. (Rose M.)

    2005-01-01

    The Nuclear Material Technology (NMT) Division has the largest inventory of glove box gloves at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The minimization of unplanned breaches in the glovebox, e.g., glove failures, is a primary concern in the daily operations in NMT Division facilities, including the Plutonium Facility (PF-4) at TA-55 and Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility. Glovebox gloves in these facilities are exposed to elevated temperatures and exceptionally aggressive radiation environments (particulate {sup 239}Pu and {sup 238}Pu). Predictive models are needed to estimate glovebox glove service lifetimes, i.e. change-out intervals. Towards this aim aging studies have been initiated that correlate changes in mechanical (physical) properties with degradation chemistry. This present work derives glovebox glove change intervals based on previously reported mechanical data of thermally aged hypalon glove samples. Specifications for 30 mil tri-layered hypalon/lead glovebox gloves (TLH) and 15 mil hypalon gloves (HYP) have already been established. The relevant mechanical properties are shown on Table 1. Tensile strength is defined as the maximum load applied in breaking a tensile test piece divided by the original cross-sectional area of the test piece (Also termed maximum stress and ultimate tensile stress). Ultimate elongation is the elongation at time of rupture (Also termed maximum strain). The specification for the tensile test and ultimate elongation are the minimum acceptable values. In addition, the ultimate elongation must not vary 20% from the original value. In order to establish a service lifetimes for glovebox gloves in a thermal environment, the mechanical properties of glovebox glove materials were studied.

  17. The breakthrough time and permeation rate of three organic chemicals for selected glove combinations

    E-print Network

    Binion, Pete Edwin

    1992-01-01

    to determine the 13 effectiveness of wearing two pairs of surgical gloves to prevent exposure to potentiaUy infective material a total of 728 outer gloves were exainined. Eleven percent of the outer gloves were found to be punctured. When the outer glove... was worn with inner gloves less than 1% of both gloves had punctures. The authors concluded that double gloving does offer some degree of protection against contamination. & l In a study conducted by Mefistrom the use of protective gloves to minimize...

  18. Anthropomorphic Robot Hand And Teaching Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engler, Charles D., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Robotic forearm-and-hand assembly manipulates objects by performing wrist and hand motions with nearly human grasping ability and dexterity. Imitates hand motions of human operator who controls robot in real time by programming via exoskeletal "teaching glove". Telemanipulator systems based on this robotic-hand concept useful where humanlike dexterity required. Underwater, high-radiation, vacuum, hot, cold, toxic, or inhospitable environments potential application sites. Particularly suited to assisting astronauts on space station in safely executing unexpected tasks requiring greater dexterity than standard gripper.

  19. Design options for improving protective gloves for industrial assembly work.

    PubMed

    Dianat, Iman; Haslegrave, Christine M; Stedmon, Alex W

    2014-07-01

    The study investigated the effects of wearing two new designs of cotton glove on several hand performance capabilities and compared them against the effects of barehanded, single-layered and double cotton glove conditions when working with hand tools (screwdriver and pliers). The new glove designs were based on the findings of subjective hand discomfort assessments for this type of work and aimed to match the glove thickness to the localised pressure and sensitivity in different areas of the hand as well as to provide adequate dexterity for fine manipulative tasks. The results showed that the first prototype glove and the barehanded condition were comparable and provided better dexterity and higher handgrip strength than double thickness gloves. The results support the hypothesis that selective thickness in different areas of the hand could be applied by glove manufacturers to improve the glove design, so that it can protect the hands from the environment and at the same time allow optimal hand performance capabilities. PMID:24636726

  20. Construct-a-Glove. Science by Design Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulis, Lee

    This book is one of four books in the Science-by-Design Series created by TERC and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). It offers high school students a challenging, hands-on opportunity to compare the function and design of many types of handwear from a hockey mitt to a surgical glove, and design and test a glove to their own…

  1. The Use of Latex Gloves in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Cathy Koeppen

    2006-01-01

    In 1987, when the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the use of universal precautions in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the demand for medical gloves dramatically increased. Unfortunately, the manufacturing techniques for the most widely-used gloves--natural rubber latex--also changed, in order to expedite production.…

  2. Haptic Glove Technology: Skill Development through Video Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargerhuff, Mary Ellen; Cowan, Heidi; Oliveira, Francisco; Quek, Francis; Fang, Bing

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a recently developed haptic glove system and describes how the participants used a video game that was purposely designed to train them in skills that are needed for the efficient use of the haptic glove. Assessed skills included speed, efficiency, embodied skill, and engagement. The findings and implications for future…

  3. Retained portion of latex glove during femoral nailing. Case report.

    PubMed

    Sadat-Ali, M; Marwah, S; al-Habdan, I

    1996-11-01

    A case of retained glove during Kuntscher intramedullary nailing is described. An abscess around the glove could have lead to osteomyelitis. One need to be cautious feeling the top end of the nail while femoral nailing to avoid such a complication. PMID:9141352

  4. Frequency of glove puncture in the post mortem room

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Weston; G Locker

    1992-01-01

    The post mortem room is a potential source of danger from contamination caused by glove punctures. The objective of this study was to assess the incidence of hand injury and hand contamination during post mortem examinations. A prospective study of injury and glove puncture rate was conducted during post mortem examinations performed in 1990 on adults in Northwick Park Hospital

  5. Glove thermal insulation: local heat transfer measures and relevance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hayet Sari; Maurice Gartner; Alain Hoeft; Victor Candas

    2004-01-01

    When exposed to cold, the hands need to be protected against heat loss not only in order to reduce thermal discomfort, but also to keep their efficiency. Although gloves are usually the most common protection, their thermal insulation is generally unknown. The aim of this study was to measure the heat losses from a gloved hand with a special interest

  6. Do surgical personnel really need to double-glove?

    PubMed

    Thomas-Copeland, Janet

    2009-02-01

    In 2007, AORN's Recommended Practices Task Force revised the "Recommended practices on prevention of transmissible infections in the perioperative practice setting" to recommend that health care practitioners double-glove during invasive procedures. Previously, AORN had suggested that wearing two pairs of gloves might be indicated for some procedures. Research on the protective effects of double gloving provides compelling evidence that surgical personnel should double-glove during all surgical procedures. Statistics on unreported injuries and conversion rates of HIV and hepatitis B indicate that change is difficult; however, research also suggests that objections to double-gloving can be overcome and a practice change implemented to ensure the safety of health care workers and patients alike. PMID:19297797

  7. RoboGlove - A Robonaut Derived Multipurpose Assistive Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, Myron; Ihrke, C. A.; Bridgwater, L. B.; Davis, D. R.; Linn, D. M.; Laske, E. A.; Ensley, K. G.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    The RoboGlove is an assistive device that can augment human strength, endurance or provide directed motion for use in rehabilitation. RoboGlove is a spinoff of the highly successful Robonaut 2 (R2) system developed as part of a partnership between General Motors and NASA. This extremely lightweight device employs an actuator system based on the R2 finger drive system to transfer part or the entire grasp load from human tendons to artificial ones contained in the glove. Steady state loads ranging from 15 to 20 lbs. and peaks approaching 50 lbs. are achievable. The technology holds great promise for use with space suit gloves to reduce fatigue during space walks. Tactile sensing, miniaturized electronics, and on-board processing provide sufficient flexibility for applications in many industries. The following describes the design, mechanical/electrical integration, and control features of the glove.

  8. The 757 NLF glove flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, L. Jim; Bielak, G. W.; Behbehani, R. A.; Chen, A. W.; Rozendaal, Roger A.

    1987-01-01

    A major concern in the application of a laminar flow wing design to commercial transports is whether laminar flow can be sustained in the presence of the noise environment due to wing mounted turbofan engines. To investigate this issue, a flight test program was conducted using the Boeing 757 flight research airplane with a portion of the wing modified to obtain natural laminar flow. The flight test had two primary objectives. The first was to measure the noise levels on the upper and lower surface of the wing for a range of flight conditions. The second was to investigate the effect of engine noise on laminar boundary layer transition. The noise field on the wing and transition location on the glove were then measured as a function of the engine power setting at a given flight condition. The transition and noise measurement on the glove show that there is no apparent effect of engine noise on the upper surface transition location. On the lower surface, the transition location moved forward 2 to 3 percent chord. A boundary layer stability analysis to the flight data showed that cross flow disturbances were the dominant cause of transition at most flight conditions.

  9. Resistance of double-glove hole puncture indication systems to surgical needle puncture.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Wind, Tyler C; Hill, Lisa G; Thacker, John G

    2003-01-01

    Double-gloving has been shown to reduce conclusively the risk of operating room personnel's exposure to blood. Limiting risk of exposure to blood by double-gloving provides protection against the transmission of bloodborne diseases. Realizing the importance of double-gloving, a double-glove hole puncture indication system exists that accurately detects the presence of glove hole puncture in the presence of fluid. Once a glove puncture is recognized by this double-glove hole puncture indication system, it provides a warning to the surgeon to remove the punctured gloves, wash hands, and don a new, sterile double-glove hole puncture indication system. While accurately identifying the presence of glove hole puncture in the presence of fluid, this double-glove hole puncture indication system also has resistance to needle puncture superior to that of single gloves. It is the purpose of this study to document the resistance to needle puncture of latex and non-latex double-glove hole puncture indication systems using a reproducible experimental model. The resistance to needle puncture of the double-glove systems was significantly greater than that of the undergloves or outer gloves alone. The resistance to glove puncture of the non-latex and latex single and double-glove systems was significantly greater than those encountered by the latex single and double-glove systems, respectively. On the basis of their accuracy in detecting glove hole puncture, combined with their demonstrated superior resistance to surgical needle puncture as compared to single gloves, these latex and non-latex double-glove hole puncture indication systems are recommended for all surgical procedures. PMID:14510281

  10. EVA Systems Flight Controller Talks With Students - Duration: 10 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, EVA Systems Flight Controller Sandy Fletcher participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students from Northtowne Ele...

  11. 76 FR 6683 - Information Related to Risks and Benefits of Powdered Gloves; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ...how best to address the risks in light of any benefits...and consumers of the risks associated with glove...Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C...peritoneal tissue after surgery, as well as glove powder's...gloves must consider the risks of these gloves in...

  12. Comparing the Level of Dexterity offered by Latex and Nitrile SafeSkin Gloves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JO SAWYER; ALLAN BENNETT

    2005-01-01

    An increase in the occurrence of latex allergy has been concurrent with the increasing use of latex gloves by laboratory and healthcare workers. In recent years nitrile gloves have been used to replace latex gloves to prevent latex allergy. Nitrile gloves offer a comparable level of protection against chemical and biological agents and are more puncture resistant. However, if manual

  13. Comparison of Human Modeling Tools for Efficiency of Prediction of EVA Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dischinger, H. Charles, Jr.; Loughead, Tomas E.

    1998-01-01

    Design of ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) interfaces for International Space Station is important to successful assembly. This is highlighted by the recent rise in the estimate of time required for EVA during the assembly to 900 hours. The traditional method of evaluating EVA design is examination of mockups in neutral buoyancy testing. While effective, this is costly. Any tools for streamlining this process have positive cost and schedule implications for Station design. The human modelling software package Jack has been shown to be a useful tool in computer-aided design of space hardware requiring actuation in EVA. The package has been used to aid in the design of flight hardware for a Station Assembly Mission; evaluation was based on comparison of the computer simulations with neutral buoyancy simulations. When used to predict the feasibility of tasks, the software was found to be effective for reach and visibility evaluation. Some limitations have been encountered in prediction of work clearances. Another human simulator is currently being evaluated using the same hardware and comparisons to the same Neutral Buoyancy simulations. Preliminary results for ERGO, which is derived from robotics software, indicate similar strengths and weaknesses.

  14. Mars EVA Suit Airlock (MESA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen Ransom; Jörg Böttcher; Frank Steinsiek

    2002-01-01

    The Astrium Space Infrastructure Division has begun an in-house research activity of an Earth-based simulation facility supporting future manned missions to Mars. This research unit will help to prepare and support planned missions in the following ways: 1) to enable the investigation and analysis of contamination issues in advance of a human visit to Mars; 2) as a design tool

  15. Biomechanical performance of powder-free examination gloves 1 1 Selected Topics: Wound Care is coordinated by Richard F. Edlich, MD, PhD, of the University of Virginia Medical Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D Fisher; Vikram R Reddy; Freddie M Williams; Kant Y Lin; John G Thacker; Richard F Edlich

    1999-01-01

    Biomechanical performance studies were undertaken for powder-free, latex and nitrile examination gloves. Using standardized tests, examination glove performance was judged by measuring glove thickness, glove puncture force, glove tape adhesion force, glove donning force, glove stiffness, and immediate unrecovered stretch. Even though the nitrile examination gloves were thinner than the latex examination gloves, they exhibited a greater puncture resistance. In

  16. STS-117 Astronauts John Olivas and Jim Reilly During EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    STS-117 astronauts and mission specialists Jim Reilly (out of frame), and John 'Danny' Olivas (partially obscured, center), participated in the first Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) as construction resumed on the International Space Station (ISS). Among other tasks, the two connected power, data, and cooling cables between trusses 1 (S1) and 3 (S3), released the launch restraints from and deployed the four solar array blanket boxes on S4, and released the cinches and winches holding the photovoltaic radiator on S4. The primary mission objective was the installment of the second and third starboard truss segments (S3 and S4). The horizon of Earth and a crescent moon are visible on the right.

  17. 8. Front (east) side of incinerator and glove boxes. Ash ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Front (east) side of incinerator and glove boxes. Ash canning hood to the left, combustion chamber in the middle, incinerator hood to the right. Looking west. - Plutonium Finishing Plant, Waste Incinerator Facility, 200 West Area, Richland, Benton County, WA

  18. Mapping From an Instrumented Glove to a Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, Michael

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to solve the problem of mapping from (1) a glove instrumented with joint-angle sensors to (2) an anthropomorphic robot hand. Such a mapping is needed to generate control signals to make the robot hand mimic the configuration of the hand of a human attempting to control the robot. The mapping problem is complicated by uncertainties in sensor locations caused by variations in sizes and shapes of hands and variations in the fit of the glove. The present mapping algorithm is robust in the face of these uncertainties, largely because it includes a calibration sub-algorithm that inherently adapts the mapping to the specific hand and glove, without need for measuring the hand and without regard for goodness of fit. The algorithm utilizes a forward-kinematics model of the glove derived from documentation provided by the manufacturer of the glove. In this case, forward-kinematics model signifies a mathematical model of the glove fingertip positions as functions of the sensor readings. More specifically, given the sensor readings, the forward-kinematics model calculates the glove fingertip positions in a Cartesian reference frame nominally attached to the palm. The algorithm also utilizes an inverse-kinematics model of the robot hand. In this case, inverse-kinematics model signifies a mathematical model of the robot finger-joint angles as functions of the robot fingertip positions. Again, more specifically, the inverse-kinematics model calculates the finger-joint commands needed to place the fingertips at specified positions in a Cartesian reference frame that is attached to the palm of the robot hand and that nominally corresponds to the Cartesian reference frame attached to the palm of the glove. Initially, because of the aforementioned uncertainties, the glove fingertip positions calculated by the forwardkinematics model in the glove Cartesian reference frame cannot be expected to match the robot fingertip positions in the robot-hand Cartesian reference frame. A calibration must be performed to make the glove and robot-hand fingertip positions correspond more precisely. The calibration procedure involves a few simple hand poses designed to provide well-defined fingertip positions. One of the poses is a fist. In each of the other poses, a finger touches the thumb. The calibration subalgorithm uses the sensor readings from these poses to modify the kinematical models to make the two sets of fingertip positions agree more closely.

  19. First flight test results of the Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue (SAFER) propulsion unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Carl J.

    1995-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) is a small, self-contained, propulsive-backpack system that provides free-flying mobility for an astronaut engaged in a space walk, also known as extravehicular activity (EVA.) SAFER contains no redundant systems and is intended for contingency use only. In essence, it is a small, simplified version of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) last flown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1985. The operational SAFER unit will only be used to return an adrift EVA astronaut to the spacecraft. Currently, if an EVA crew member inadvertently becomes separated from the Space Shuttle, the Orbiter will maneuver to within the crew member's reach envelope, allowing the astronaut to regain contact with the Orbiter. However, with the advent of operations aboard the Russian MIR Space Station and the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle will not be available to effect a timely rescue. Under these conditions, a SAFER unit would be worn by each EVA crew member. Flight test of the pre-production model of SAFER occurred in September 1994. The crew of Space Shuttle Mission STS-64 flew a 6.9 hour test flight which included performance, flying qualities, systems, and operational utility evaluations. We found that the unit offers adequate propellant and control authority to stabilize and enable the return of a tumbling/separating crew member. With certain modifications, production model of SAFER can provide self-rescue capability to a separated crew member. This paper will present the program background, explain the flight test results and provide some insight into the complex operations of flight test in space.

  20. EVA Hazards due to TPS Inspection and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Christine E.

    2007-01-01

    Tile inspection and repair activities have implicit hazards associated with them. When an Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) crewmember and associated hardware are added into the equation, additional hazards are introduced. Potential hazards to the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), the Orbiter or the crew member themselves are created. In order to accurately assess the risk of performing a TPS inspection or repair, an accurate evaluation of potential hazards and how adequately these hazards are controlled is essential. The EMU could become damaged due to sharp edges, protrusions, thermal extremes, molten metal or impact with the Orbiter. Tools, tethers and the presence of a crew member in the vicinity of the Orbiter Thermal Protection System (TPS) pose hazards to the Orbiter. Hazards such as additional tile or Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) damage from a loose tool, safety tethers, crewmember or arm impact are introduced. Additionally, there are hazards to the crew which should be addressed. Crew hazards include laser injury, electrical shock, inability to return to the airlock for EMU failures or Orbiter rapid safing scenarios, as well as the potential inadvertent release of a crew member from the arm/boom. The aforementioned hazards are controlled in various ways. Generally, these controls are addressed operationally versus by design, as the majority of the interfaces are to the Orbiter and the Orbiter design did not originally account for tile repair. The Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS), for instance, was originally designed to deploy experiments, and therefore has insufficient design controls for retention of the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS). Although multiple methods to repair the Orbiter TPS exist, the majority of the hazards are applicable no matter which specific repair method is being performed. TPS Inspection performed via EVA also presents some of the same hazards. Therefore, the hazards common to all TPS inspection or repair methods will be addressed.

  1. Research SummaryComparison of nitrile and latex examination gloves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R G Chadwick

    2004-01-01

    Objective The aim of the current study was to assess the puncture resistance and stiffness of nitrile and latex dental examination gloves.Methods Puncture resistance was measured by employing an adapted version of ASTM F1342-91 using both a 316 stainless steel puncture probe (0.8 mm diameter) and a dental injection needle (0.45 mm diameter) interfaced to a tensile testing apparatus. Glove

  2. Puncture evaluation of radiological gloves to assess use performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steckle W. P. Jr; R. P. Mittelstet; J. M. Castro; M. E. Smith

    2002-01-01

    Tensile testing of gloves is an accepted method for the qualification of a new glove material or the qualification of a production run. Most often these tests are performed in accordance to ASTM standards, i.e. - D412-98a Standard Test Methods (STM) for Vulcanized Rubber and Thermoplastic Rubbers and Thermoplastic Elastomers-Tension, Unfortunately for elastomers such protocols do not exist for puncture

  3. Understanding Skill in EVA Mass Handling. Volume 4; An Integrated Methodology for Evaluating Space Suit Mobility and Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, P. Vernon; Newman, Dava

    1999-01-01

    The empirical investigation of extravehicular activity (EVA) mass handling conducted on NASA's Precision Air-Bearing Floor led to a Phase I SBIR from JSC. The purpose of the SBIR was to design an innovative system for evaluating space suit mobility and stability in conditions that simulate EVA on the surface of the Moon or Mars. The approach we used to satisfy the Phase I objectives was based on a structured methodology for the development of human-systems technology. Accordingly the project was broken down into a number of tasks and subtasks. In sequence, the major tasks were: 1) Identify missions and tasks that will involve EVA and resulting mobility requirements in the near and long term; 2) Assess possible methods for evaluating mobility of space suits during field-based EVA tests; 3) Identify requirements for behavioral evaluation by interacting with NASA stakeholders;.4) Identify necessary and sufficient technology for implementation of a mobility evaluation system; and 5) Prioritize and select technology solutions. The work conducted in these tasks is described in this final volume of the series on EVA mass handling. While prior volumes in the series focus on novel data-analytic techniques, this volume addresses technology that is necessary for minimally intrusive data collection and near-real-time data analysis and display.

  4. Student perceptions and effectiveness of an innovative learning tool: Anatomy Glove Learning System.

    PubMed

    Lisk, Kristina; McKee, Pat; Baskwill, Amanda; Agur, Anne M R

    2015-01-01

    A trend in anatomical education is the development of alternative pedagogical approaches to replace or complement experiences in a cadaver laboratory; however, empirical evidence on their effectiveness is often not reported. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Anatomy Glove Learning System (AGLS), which enables students to learn the relationship between hand structure and function by drawing the structures onto a worn glove with imprinted bones. Massage therapy students (n = 73) were allocated into two groups and drew muscles onto either: (1) the glove using AGLS instructional videos (3D group); or (2) paper with palmar/dorsal views of hand bones during an instructor-guided activity (2D group). A self-confidence measure and knowledge test were completed before, immediately after, and one-week following the learning conditions. Self-confidence of hand anatomy in the 3D group gradually increased (3.2/10, 4.7/10, and 4.8/10), whereas self-confidence in the 2D group began to decline one-week later (3.2/10, 4.4/10, and 3.9/10). Knowledge of hand anatomy improved in both groups immediately after learning, (P < 0.001). Students' perceptions of AGLS were also assessed using a 10-pt Likert scale evaluation questionnaire (10 = high). Students perceived the AGLS videos (mean = 8.3 ± 2.0) and glove (mean = 8.1 ± 1.8) to be helpful in improving their understanding of hand anatomy and the majority of students preferred AGLS as a learning tool (mean = 8.6 ± 2.2). This study provides evidence demonstrating that AGLS and the traditional 2D learning approach are equally effective in promoting students' self-confidence and knowledge of hand anatomy. PMID:24757171

  5. Experiments with an EVA Assistant Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burridge, Robert R.; Graham, Jeffrey; Shillcutt, Kim; Hirsh, Robert; Kortenkamp, David

    2003-01-01

    Human missions to the Moon or Mars will likely be accompanied by many useful robots that will assist in all aspects of the mission, from construction to maintenance to surface exploration. Such robots might scout terrain, carry tools, take pictures, curate samples, or provide status information during a traverse. At NASA/JSC, the EVA Robotic Assistant (ERA) project has developed a robot testbed for exploring the issues of astronaut-robot interaction. Together with JSC's Advanced Spacesuit Lab, the ERA team has been developing robot capabilities and testing them with space-suited test subjects at planetary surface analog sites. In this paper, we describe the current state of the ERA testbed and two weeks of remote field tests in Arizona in September 2002. A number of teams with a broad range of interests participated in these experiments to explore different aspects of what must be done to develop a program for robotic assistance to surface EVA. Technologies explored in the field experiments included a fuel cell, new mobility platform and manipulator, novel software and communications infrastructure for multi-agent modeling and planning, a mobile science lab, an "InfoPak" for monitoring the spacesuit, and delayed satellite communication to a remote operations team. In this paper, we will describe this latest round of field tests in detail.

  6. Contamination of Critical Surfaces from NVR Glove Residues Via Dry Handling and Solvent Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovinski, Marjorie F.

    2004-01-01

    Gloves are often used to prevent the contamination of critical surfaces during handling. The type of glove chosen for use should be the glove that produces the least amount of non-volatile residue (NVR). This paper covers the analysis of polyethylene, nitrile, latex, vinyl, and polyurethane gloves using the contact transfer and gravimetric determination methods covered in the NASA GSFC work instruction Gravimetric Determination and Contact Transfer of Non-volatile Residue (NVR) in Cleanroom Glove Samples, 541-WI-5330.1.21 and in the ASTM Standard E-1731M-95, Standard Test Method for Gravimetric Determination of Non-Volatile Residue from Cleanroom Gloves. The tests performed focus on contamination of critical surfaces at the molecular level. The study found that for the most part, all of the gloves performed equally well in the contact transfer testing. However, the polyethylene gloves performed the best in the gravimetric determination testing, and therefore should be used whenever solvent contact is a possibility. The nitrile gloves may be used as a substitute for latex gloves when latex sensitivity is an issue. The use of vinyl gloves should be avoided, especially if solvent contact is a possibility. A glove database will be established by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Code 541 to compile the results from future testing of new gloves and different glove lots.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2013-01-24

    A task was undertaken to characterize glovebox gloves that are currently used in the facilities at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as some experimental and advanced compound gloves that have been proposed for use. Gloves from four manufacturers were tested for permeation in hydrogen and air, thermal stability, tensile properties, puncture resistance and dynamic mechanical response. The gloves were compared to each other within the type and also to the butyl rubber glove that is widely used at the SRS. The permeation testing demonstrated that the butyl compounds from three of the vendors behaved similarly and exhibited hydrogen permeabilities of .52‐.84 x10{sup ‐7} cc H{sub 2}*cm / (cm{sup 2}*atm). The Viton? glove performed at the lower edge of this bound, while the more advanced composite gloves exhibited permeabilities greater than a factor of two compared to butyl. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the amount of material lost under slightly aggressive conditions. Glove losses are important since they can affect the life of glovebox stripper systems. During testing at 90, 120, and 150?C, the samples lost most of the mass in the initial 60 minutes of thermal exposure and as expected increasing the temperature increased the mass loss and shortened the time to achieve a steady state loss. The ranking from worst to best was Jung butyl‐Hypalon? with 12.9 %, Piercan Hypalon? with 11.4 %, and Jung butyl‐Viton? with 5.2% mass loss all at approximately 140?C. The smallest mass losses were experienced by the Jung Viton? and the Piercan polyurethane. Tensile properties were measured using a standard dog bone style test. The butyl rubber exhibited tensile strengths of 11‐15 MPa and elongations or 660‐843%. Gloves made from other compounds exhibited lower tensile strengths (5 MPa Viton) to much higher tensile strengths (49 MPa Urethane) with a comparable range of elongation. The puncture resistance of the gloves was measured in agreement with an ASTM standard. The Butyl gloves exhibited puncture resistance from 183 ? 296 lbs/in for samples of 0.020 ? 0.038? thick. Finally, the glass transition temperature and the elastic and viscoelastic properties as a function of temperature up to maximum use temperature were determined for each glove material using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. The glass transition temperatures of the gloves were ‐60?C for butyl, ‐30?C for polyurethane, ‐ 16?C Hypalon?, ‐16?C for Viton?, and ‐24?C for polyurethane‐Hypalon?. The glass transition was too complex for the butyl‐Hypalon? and butyl‐Viton? composite gloves to be characterized by a single glass transition temperature. All of the glass transition temperatures exceed the vendor projected use temperatures.

  8. Hazard Analysis for Building 34 Vacuum Glove Box Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meginnis, Ian

    2014-01-01

    One of the characteristics of an effective safety program is the recognition and control of hazards before mishaps or failures occur. Conducting potentially hazardous tests necessitates a thorough hazard analysis in order to prevent injury to personnel, and to prevent damage to facilities and equipment. The primary purpose of this hazard analysis is to define and address the potential hazards and controls associated with the Building 34 Vacuum Glove Box Assembly, and to provide the applicable team of personnel with the documented results. It is imperative that each member of the team be familiar with the hazards and controls associated with his/her particular tasks, assignments and activities while interfacing with facility test systems, equipment and hardware. In fulfillment of the stated purposes, the goal of this hazard analysis is to identify all hazards that have the potential to harm personnel, damage the facility or its test systems or equipment, test articles, Government or personal property, or the environment. This analysis may also assess the significance and risk, when applicable, of lost test objectives when substantial monetary value is involved. The hazards, causes, controls, verifications, and risk assessment codes have been documented on the hazard analysis work sheets in Appendix A of this document. The preparation and development of this report is in accordance with JPR 1700.1, "JSC Safety and Health Handbook" and JSC 17773 Rev D "Instructions for Preparation of Hazard Analysis for JSC Ground Operations".

  9. Application of EVA guidelines and design criteria. Volume 2: EVA workstation conceptual designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    Several EV workstation concepts were developed and are documented. The workstation concepts were developed following a comprehensive analysis of potential EV missions, functions, and tasks as interpreted from NASA and contractor space shuttle and space station studies, mission models, and related reports. The design of a versatile, portable EVA workstation is aimed at reducing the design and development costs for each mission and aiding in the development of on-orbit serviceable payloads.

  10. On permeability of methyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate through protective gloves in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Andreasson, Harriet; Boman, Anders; Johnsson, Stina; Karlsson, Stig; Barregård, Lars

    2003-12-01

    Continuous glove use is more common in dentistry than in most other occupations, and the glove should offer protection against blood-borne infections, skin irritants and contact allergens. Methacrylate monomers are potent contact allergens, and it is known that these substances may penetrate the glove materials commonly used. The aim of this study was to assess the permeability of various types of gloves to methyl methacrylate (MMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) with special reference to combinations with ethanol or acetone. The permeation rate and time lag breakthrough (lag-BT) for MMA (neat, or diluted to 30% in ethanol or acetone), HEMA (30% in water, ethanol, or acetone) and TEGDMA (30% in ethanol or acetone) were investigated for different protective gloves. Nine different types of gloves were tested for one or several of these methacrylates. The lag-BT for neat MMA was gloves. For 30% MMA in ethanol or acetone, the latex gloves and the polyethene-copolymer glove showed the best protection, but the lag-BTs were short for all gloves. For HEMA and TEGDMA, the lag-BTs were generally longer than for MMA. A neoprene glove seemed to be the best choice for protection against penetration of HEMA and TEGDMA. The decision on which types of gloves to use should also take into account the risks of latex allergy and contact allergy to rubber chemicals and the convenience of the gloves for fine manual work. PMID:14632691

  11. The setting of vinyl polysiloxane and condensation silicone putties when mixed with gloved hands.

    PubMed

    Reitz, C D; Clark, N P

    1988-03-01

    Neither the vinyl nor the latex gloves tested affected any of the condensation silicone putties tested. The vinyl gloves tested had no effect on any of the vinyl polysiloxane putties. Some brands of latex gloves as received from the distributor caused severe retardation or complete inhibition of setting in most vinyl polysiloxane putties; other brands of latex gloves affected the setting in the vinyl polysiloxane putties to varying degrees. Washing the latex gloves decreased the effect of inhibition of setting on the putty but did not eliminate it. Thus, latex gloves should not be worn while mixing or handling vinyl polysiloxane putties. Putties should not be dispensed while wearing latex gloves as the entire jar can become contaminated. If gloves are removed to mix the putty, hands should be washed thoroughly; however, this violates the barrier technique and is not recommended. Vinyl gloves may be worn over latex gloves (or by themselves), for dispensing and mixing the putty; but the vinyl gloves should not be contaminated with powder from the latex gloves. To assure compatibility, the putty/glove combination should always be checked. PMID:3162493

  12. Design and simulation of EVA tools and robot end effectors for servicing missions of the HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1995-10-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was launched into near-earth orbit by the Space Shuttle Discovery on April 24, 1990. The payload of two cameras, two spectrographs, and a high-speed photometer is supplemented by three fine-guidance sensors that can be used for astronomy as well as for star tracking. A widely reported spherical aberration in the primary mirror causes HST to produce images of much lower quality than intended. A Space Shuttle repair mission in January 1994 installed small corrective mirrors that restored the full intended optical capability of the HST. A Second Servicing Mission (SM2) scheduled in 1997 will involve considerable Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). To reduce EVA time, the addition of robotic capability in the remaining servicing missions has been proposed. Toward that end, two concept designs for a general purpose end effector for robots are presented in this report.

  13. Underwater views of STS-5 crewmen Lenoir and Allen during EVA training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Underwater views of STS-5 crewmen Lenoir and Allen during EVA training. Mission Specialist/Astronaut Joseph P. Allen, wearing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and weighted down to achieve neutral buoyancy, uses a communication system to talk with fellow Mission Specialist/Astronaut William B. Lenoir (out of frame) during underwater simulation of STS-5 extravehicular activity (EVA) (35899); Both mission specialists coordinate their efforts on a chore near the airlock hatch during training. Lenoir is facing the camera. Their background is a full-scale mock-up of the shuttle payload bay (35900); Lenoir works underwater with a portable foot restraint during training underwater. Allen's backpack or mockup for a portable life support system (PLSS) is seen in one corner of the frame (35901).

  14. Moments applied in the manual assembly of space structures - Ease biomechanics results from STS-61B. [Experimental Assembly of Structures in EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cousins, D.; Akin, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the level and pattern of moments applied in the manual assembly of a space structure were made in extravehicular activity (EVA) and neutral buoyancy simulation (NBS). The Experimental Assembly of Structures in EVA program included the repeated assembly of a 3.6 m tetrahedral truss structure in EVA on STS-61B after extensive neutral buoyancy crew training. The flight and training structures were of equivalent mass and geometry to allow a direct correlation between EVA and NBS performance. A stereo photographic motion camera system was used to reconstruct in three dimensions rotational movements of structural beams during assembly. Moments applied in these manual handling tasks were calculated on the basis of the reconstructed movements taking into account effects of inertia, drag and virtual mass. Applied moments of 2.0 Nm were typical for beam rotations in EVA. Corresponding applied moments in NBS were typically up to five times greater. Moments were applied as impulses separated by several seconds of coasting in both EVA and NBS. Decelerating impulses were only infrequently observed in NBS.

  15. ISS Update: Robonaut Glove Test (Part 2) - Duration: 2 minutes, 45 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Chris Ihrke, General Motors Lead Engineer for the Robo-Glove Project, about the Robonaut glove test. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson an...

  16. Mechanisms to improve the mechanical performance of surgical gloves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Michelle Hoyt

    1997-11-01

    The use of gloves as a barrier to cross infection in the medical industry has increased substantially due to the heightened awareness of viral transmission, especially the human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B virus. The glove must allow for tactile sensation, comfort and long use times, while providing equally critical mechanical performance. The majority of surgical gloves are made of natural rubber latex which do not give a critical level of cut-resistance or puncture-resistance. Natural rubber latex gloves are also known to cause latex allergy with hypersensitivity reactions ranging from mild skin rashes to more severe bronchial asthma, anaphylactic reactions, and even death. It has been postulated natural rubber latex (NRL) proteins cause these allergic reactions. The research that has been conducted comprises two approaches that have been explored for improving the cut-resistance of surgical gloves. The first method involves an integral fiber-latex structure that possesses the combination of high reversible extensibility, barrier performance and retention of tactile sense. Improvement in mechanical properties in excess of 85% has been achieved as well as an improvement in cut-resistance. The second method involves the incorporation of a low concentration of ultra high molecular weight (UHMW) polyacrylamide. Although the initial premise for using a UHMW polymer was that it would bridge the latex compound particulates to improve strength, an entirely different mechanism for the enhancement of strength was explored through a parallel investigation of the release of proteins from cured natural rubber. However, no mechanism was conclusively identified. To address the allergy aspects of NRL, a thorough examination of the release of naturally-occurring latex proteins from cured natural rubber latex glove material was conducted in order to identify mechanisms for eliminating and/or reducing the potential allergens. The initial study examined the release of loaded proteins from cured NR and NR that contained PA in the initial latex compound and the results showed the likelihood of binding between proteins and PA.

  17. Comparing the level of dexterity offered by latex and nitrile SafeSkin gloves.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Jo; Bennett, Allan

    2006-04-01

    An increase in the occurrence of latex allergy has been concurrent with the increasing use of latex gloves by laboratory and healthcare workers. In recent years nitrile gloves have been used to replace latex gloves to prevent latex allergy. Nitrile gloves offer a comparable level of protection against chemical and biological agents and are more puncture resistant. However, if manual dexterity is compromised by nitrile gloves to a greater degree than latex then this may increase the risk of sharps injuries. The Purdue pegboard test, which measures both gross and fine finger dexterity, was used to test the dexterity levels of two glove types used at HPA CEPR; Kimberly-Clark SafeSkin nitrile and latex laboratory gloves. There was a statistically significant 8.6% increase in fine finger dexterity provided by latex compared with nitrile SafeSkin laboratory gloves but no difference in gross dexterity between the glove types. There was no significant relationship between glove dexterity and age or gender. The selection of glove size was influenced by the digit length of participants. Moreover, those with longer, thinner fingers appeared to have an advantage when using nitrile SafeSkin gloves. The level of dexterity provided by latex and nitrile SafeSkin gloves for tasks on a gross dexterity level are comparable and health workers will benefit from the non-allergenic properties of nitrile. For tasks requiring fine finger dexterity nitrile SafeSkin gloves may impede dexterity. Despite this, the degree of restriction appears to have a negligible impact on safety in this study when compared with the risk of latex sensitization and subsequent allergy. In addition to glove material, working practices must also take into account glove size, fit, grip and thickness, as these factors can all influence dexterity. PMID:16357028

  18. Thermal degradation and rheological behaviour of EVA\\/montmorillonite nanocomposites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Riva; M Zanetti; M Braglia; G Camino; L Falqui

    2002-01-01

    The study is focused on the co-polymer poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate) (EVA) used in telecommunication cable manufacturing. Different modified fillosilicates and EVA polymer were mixed at 120 °C in a Brabender mixer AEW330 in order to obtain polymer layered silicate nanocomposites(PLSN). Exfoliated nanocomposites were obtained with montmorillonite exchanged with methyl tallow bis(2-hydroxyethyl) ammonium and fluorohectorite exchanged with octadecylammonium, whereas with montmorillonite exchanged with dimethyl

  19. Tactile Gloves for Autonomous Grasping with the NASA\\/DARPA Robonaut

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toby B. Martin; Robert O. Ambrose; Myron A. Diftler; Robert Platt Jr.; Melissa Butzer

    2004-01-01

    Tactile data from rugged gloves are providing the foundation for developing autonomous grasping skills for the NASA\\/DARPA Robonaut, a dexterous humanoid robot. These custom gloves compliment the human like dexterity available in the Robonaut hands. Multiple versions of the gloves are discussed, showing a progression in using advanced materials and construction techniques to enhance sensitivity and overall sensor coverage. The

  20. Glove punctures and postoperative skin flora of hands in cardiac surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne M Eklund; Juhani Ojajärvi; Kirsi Laitinen; Matti Valtonen; Kalervo A Werkkala

    2002-01-01

    Background. Surgical gloves are frequently perforated during operations, including heart operations. This infection risk factor is inadequately studied.Methods. After preoperative hand disinfection and at the end of 116 heart operations, bacterial samples from hands of surgeons, altogether 800 samples, were taken. Glove punctures were examined with water test.Results. Surgeons changed 70 gloves because of breakage during operations. Additionally, 154 of

  1. Dexterity test data contribute to proper glovebox over-glove use

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lawton, Cindy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Castro, Amanda M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costigan, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Apel, D M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Neal, G E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Castro, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Michelotti, R A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-21

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). The glovebox gloves are the weakest part of this engineering control. The Glovebox Glove Integrity Program, which controls glovebox gloves from procurement to disposal at TA-55, manages this vulnerability. A key element of this program is to consider measures that lower the overall risk of glovebox operations. Proper selection of over-gloves is one of these measures. Line management owning glovebox processes have the responsibility to approve the appropriate personal protective equipment/glovebox glove/over-glove combination. As low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) considerations to prevent unplanned glovebox glove openings must be balanced with glove durability and worker dexterity, both of which affect the final overall risk to the worker. In this study, the causes of unplanned glovebox glove openings, the benefits of over-glove features, the effect of over-gloves on task performance using standard dexterity tests, the pollution prevention benefits, and the recommended over-gloves for a task are presented.

  2. Investigating the Physical Properties of Latex Gloves John K. Bennett, PhD

    E-print Network

    Bennett, John K.

    Investigating the Physical Properties of Latex Gloves John K. Bennett, PhD Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Rice University, Houston, Texas Researchers at the Rice University Latex Glove gloves. The goal of this effort is to develop an understanding of the relationship between the electrical

  3. EVA Assembly of Large Space Structure Neutral Buoyancy, Zero-Gravity Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    EVA Assembly of Large Space Structure Neutral Buoyancy, Zero-Gravity Simulation: NASA-LaRC Nestable Columns and Joints. The film depicts an extravehicular activity (EVA) that involved the assembly of six 'space-weight' columns into a regular tetrahedral cell by a team of two 'space'-suited test subjects. This cell represents the fundamental 'element' of a tetrahedral truss structure. The tests were conducted under simulated zero-gravity conditions, achieved by neutral buoyancy in water. The cell was assembled on an 'outrigger' assembly aid off the side of a mockup of the Shuttle Orbiter cargo bay. Both manual and simulated remote manipulator system (RMS) modes were evaluated. The simulated RMS was used only to transfer stowed hardware from the cargo bay to the work sites. Articulation limits of the pressure suit and zero gravity could be accommodated by work stations with foot restraints. The results of this study have confirmed that astronaut EVA assembly of large, erectable space structur is well within man's capabilities. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070031008. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  4. Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity Through Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring crew health during manned space missions has always been an important factor to ensure that the astronauts can complete the missions successfully and within safe physiological limits. The necessity of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to complete EVA tasks exceeded the life support capabilities for cooling and humidity control and, as a result, crew members ended the EVAs fatigued and overworked. This paper discusses the importance of real-time monitoring of metabolic rate during EVAs, and provides a historical look at energy expenditure during EVAs through the Apollo Program.

  5. Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity Through Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring crew health during manned space missions has always been an important factor to ensure that the astronauts can complete the missions successfully and within safe physiological limits. The necessity of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to complete EVA tasks exceeded the life support capabilities for cooling and humidity control and crewmembers (CMs) ended the EVAs fatigued and overworked. This paper discusses the importance of real-time monitoring of metabolic rate during EVA, and provides a historical look at energy expenditure during EVA through the Apollo program.

  6. Wearable Joystick For Gloves-on Human/Computer Interaction

    E-print Network

    Voyles, Richard

    -free at the glove. In order to evaluate the wearable joystick, we take into consideration two metrics during exploited shortcomings in traditional input devices and suggested different input devices, such as Cyber the problem from a functional standpoint, but also present a novel metric from usability and ergonomic

  7. Modeling of RTF Glove-Box and Stripper System

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.

    2001-03-28

    The glove box-stripper system for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) has been modeled to determine its steady-state performance. To permit comparison, simulations of modified cases were compared with a standard or base case. This paper discusses tests conducted, results obtained and makes recommendations.

  8. Airborne particles from latex gloves in the hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Newsom, S W; Shaw, P

    1997-01-01

    Air sampling studies are described which show high levels of airborne starch powder contamination in areas where powdered latex gloves are used. Furthermore, culture of collected samples show a clear association between starch particles and bacterial colonies in an experimental system suggesting that airborne particles could act as a vector for pathogens in the hospital environment. PMID:9195181

  9. Minimizing glovebox glove breaches, Part 4: control charts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Cournoyer; M. B. Lee; S. Schreiber

    2007-01-01

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility, plutonium isotopes and other actinides are handled in a glovebox environment. The spread of radiological contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the worker's breathing zone, are minimized and\\/or prevented through the use of glovebox technology. Evaluating the glovebox configuration, the glovebox gloves are the most vulnerable part of this engineering control.

  10. MINIMIZING GLOVEBOX GLOVE BREACHES, PART IV: CONTROL CHARTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL E. COURNOYER; MICHELLE B. LEE; STEPHEN B. SCHREIBER

    2007-01-01

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility, plutonium. isotopes and other actinides are handled in a glovebox environment. The spread of radiological contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the worker's breathing zone, are minimized and\\/or prevented through the use of glovebox technology. Evaluating the glovebox configuration, the glovebo gloves are the most vulnerable part of this engineering control.

  11. 2. PEAVEY GLOVE ELEVATOR, WORKHOUSE (NO. 1 HOUSE) WOOD FRAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PEAVEY GLOVE ELEVATOR, WORKHOUSE (NO. 1 HOUSE) WOOD FRAME CONSTRUCTION, SHIPLOADER SIDE. WEST WALL. MARINE LEG ADDED SOME TIME BETWEEN 1907-1919. METAL PASSENGER ELEVATOR SHAFT ADDED IN EARLY 1970S. - Peavey Globe Elevator, No. 1 House, West Gate Basin & Howard's Bay, east side of slip, Superior, Douglas County, WI

  12. INTERIOR PHOTO OF THE REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY OF SHIELDED GLOVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR PHOTO OF THE REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY OF SHIELDED GLOVE BOXES IN OPERATING CORRIDOR (CPP-627). INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-55-1524. Unknown Photographer, 1955 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. 8. VIEW OF GLOVE BOXES USED IN THE ANION EXCHANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF GLOVE BOXES USED IN THE ANION EXCHANGE PROCESS. THE ANION EXCHANGE PROCESS PURIFIED AND CONCENTRATED PLUTONIUM-BEARING NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS TO MAKE THEM ACCEPTABLE AS FEED FOR CONVERSION TO METAL. (6/20/60) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  14. Experimental set-up and sensory glove interface for microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Amirouche, F; Martin, J R; Gonzalez, M; Fergusson, L

    2008-01-01

    One of the most fundamental prerequisites for successful microsurgery is thoughtful and adequate training. A combination of knowledge, technical skill, and decision making directly influences the surgical outcome. This study aims to analyse microsurgical hand coordinations quantitatively and to study the utility of a sensory glove interface in identifying the hand coordination patterns during microsurgery. A sensory glove interface used to measure the angular flexion-extension movements of the major interphalangeal joints of the hand, the grasp pressure, and the relative hand movements has been developed. Experiments of two suturing techniques were conducted with five experienced microsurgeons, and microsurgery practice was examined. The custom sensory glove interface required both signal conditioning and amplification which was directly interfaced with a custom-designed LABView software code. The sensory glove interface was calibrated using regression techniques and the set-up was validated using the Bland-Altman correlation technique. The hand coordination patterns were analysed using principal-component analysis. Pareto plots showing the contribution of the principal components were analysed. The contributions of the first two sensory data components have also been compared with hand coordination studies. The temporal variations provided new insights into the underlying synergetic mechanisms and in particular the relation between different suture techniques on grasp pressure. PMID:18335721

  15. Tactile Gloves for Autonomous Grasping With the NASA/DARPA Robonaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, T. B.; Ambrose, R. O.; Diftler, M. A.; Platt, R., Jr.; Butzer, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Tactile data from rugged gloves are providing the foundation for developing autonomous grasping skills for the NASA/DARPA Robonaut, a dexterous humanoid robot. These custom gloves compliment the human like dexterity available in the Robonaut hands. Multiple versions of the gloves are discussed, showing a progression in using advanced materials and construction techniques to enhance sensitivity and overall sensor coverage. The force data provided by the gloves can be used to improve dexterous, tool and power grasping primitives. Experiments with the latest gloves focus on the use of tools, specifically a power drill used to approximate an astronaut's torque tool.

  16. Minimizing EVA Airlock Time and Depress Gas Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Lafuse, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the need and solution for minimizing EVA airlock time and depress gas losses using a new method that minimizes EVA out-the-door time for a suited astronaut and reclaims most of the airlock depress gas. This method consists of one or more related concepts that use an evacuated reservoir tank to store and reclaim the airlock depress gas. The evacuated tank can be an inflatable tank, a spent fuel tank from a lunar lander descent stage, or a backup airlock. During EVA airlock operations, the airlock and reservoir would be equalized at some low pressure, and through proper selection of reservoir size, most of the depress gas would be stored in the reservoir for later reclamation. The benefit of this method is directly applicable to long duration lunar and Mars missions that require multiple EVA missions (up to 100, two-person lunar EVAs) and conservation of consumables, including depress pump power and depress gas. The current ISS airlock gas reclamation method requires approximately 45 minutes of the astronaut s time in the airlock and 1 KW in electrical power. The proposed method would decrease the astronaut s time in the airlock because the depress gas is being temporarily stored in a reservoir tank for later recovery. Once the EVA crew is conducting the EVA, the volume in the reservoir would be pumped back to the cabin at a slow rate. Various trades were conducted to optimize this method, which include time to equalize the airlock with the evacuated reservoir versus reservoir size, pump power to reclaim depress gas versus time allotted, inflatable reservoir pros and cons (weight, volume, complexity), and feasibility of spent lunar nitrogen and oxygen tanks as reservoirs.

  17. Overall design and implementation of the virtual glove.

    PubMed

    Placidi, Giuseppe; Avola, Danilo; Iacoviello, Daniela; Cinque, Luigi

    2013-11-01

    Post-stroke patients and people suffering from hand diseases often need rehabilitation therapy. The recovery of original skills, when possible, is closely related to the frequency, quality, and duration of rehabilitative therapy. Rehabilitation gloves are tools used both to facilitate rehabilitation and to control improvements by an evaluation system. Mechanical gloves have high cost, are often cumbersome, are not re-usable and, hence, not usable with the healthy hand to collect patient-specific hand mobility information to which rehabilitation should tend. The approach we propose is the virtual glove, a system that, unlike tools based on mechanical haptic interfaces, uses a set of video cameras surrounding the patient hand to collect a set of synchronized videos used to track hand movements. The hand tracking is associated with a numerical hand model that is used to calculate physical, geometrical and mechanical parameters, and to implement some boundary constraints such as joint dimensions, shape, joint angles, and so on. Besides being accurate, the proposed system is aimed to be low cost, not bulky (touch-less), easy to use, and re-usable. Previous works described the virtual glove general concepts, the hand model, and its characterization including system calibration strategy. The present paper provides the virtual glove overall design, both in real-time and in off-line modalities. In particular, the real-time modality is described and implemented and a marker-based hand tracking algorithm, including a marker positioning, coloring, labeling, detection and classification strategy, is presented for the off-line modality. Moreover, model based hand tracking experimental measurements are reported, discussed and compared with the corresponding poses of the real hand. An error estimation strategy is also presented and used for the collected measurements. System limitations and future work for system improvement are also discussed. PMID:24209938

  18. Physiological and technological considerations for Mars mission extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, James M.; Sedej, Melaine M.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of the suit is a function of the needs of human physiology, the ambient environment outside the suit, and the type of activity to be accomplished while in the suit. The physiological requirements that must be provided for in the Martian Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suit will be reviewed. The influence of the Martian environment on the EVA suit and EVA capabilities is elaborated, and the Martian environment is compared with the lunar environment. The differences that may influence the EVA design are noted. The type, nature, and duration of activities to be done in transit to Mars and on the Martian surface will be evaluated and the impact of these activities on the requirements for EVA systems will be discussed. Furthermore, the interaction between Martian surface transportation systems and EVA systems will be covered. Finally, options other than EVA will be considered such as robotics, nonanthropometric suits, and vehicles with anthropometric extremities or robotic end effectors.

  19. STS-37 crewmembers work with CETA during EVA training in JSC's WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-37 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Jerry L. Ross and MS Jerome Apt operate crew and equipment translation aid (CETA) electrical hand pedal cart during training session in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Wearing extravehicular mobility units (EMUs), Ross and Apt practice a extravehicular activity (EVA) spacewalk they will perform in OV-104's payload bay during STS-37. CETA is a type of railroad hand cart planned as a spacewalker's transportation system along the truss of Space Station Freedom (SSF). Apt is pulling Ross along to test the cart's ability to carry a person plus cargo. SCUBA divers monitor astronauts' underwater activity.

  20. Glove barriers to bacterial cross-contamination between hands to food.

    PubMed

    Montville, R; Chen, Y; Schaffner, D W

    2001-06-01

    Human hands are an important source of microbial contamination of foods. However, published data on the effectiveness of handwashing and glove use in a foodservice setting are limited. Bacterial transfer through foodservice quality gloves was quantified using nalidixic acid-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes (a nonpathogenic surrogate with attachment characteristics similar to Salmonella). Five transfer rates were determined: chicken to bare hand, chicken to hand through gloves, bare hand to lettuce, hand to lettuce through gloves (with low inoculum on hands), and hand to lettuce through gloves (with high inoculum on hands). At least 30 observations were made for each percent transfer rate using 30 individual volunteers. The logarithm of percent transfer data were then fit to distributions: chicken to bare hand, normal (0.71, 0.42); chicken to hand through gloves, gamma (5.91, 0.40, -5.00); bare hand to lettuce, logistic (1.16, 0.30); hand to lettuce through gloves (low inoculum), normal (0.35, 0.88); hand to lettuce through gloves (high inoculum), normal (-2.52, 0.61). A 0.01% transfer was observed from food to hands and from hands to food when subjects wore gloves and a 10% transfer was observed without a glove barrier. These results indicate that gloves are permeable to bacteria although transfer from hands to food through a glove barrier was less than without a glove barrier. Our results indicate that gloves may reduce both bacterial transfer from food to the hands of foodservice workers and in subsequent transfer from hands back to food. PMID:11403136

  1. Pegasus Rocket Wing and PHYSX Glove Undergoes Stress Loads Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Pegasus Hypersonic Experiment (PHYSX) Project's Pegasus rocket wing with attached PHYSX glove rests after load-tests at Scaled Composites, Inc., in Mojave, California, in January 1997. Technicians slowly filled water bags beneath the wing, to create the pressure, or 'wing-loading,' required to determine whether the wing could withstand its design limit for stress. The wing sits in a wooden triangular frame which serves as the test-rig, mounted to the floor atop the waterbags. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia, is the manufacturer of the Pegasus vehicle, while Vandenberg Air Force Base served as a pre-launch assembly facility for the launch that included the PHYSX experiment. NASA used data from Pegasus launches to obtain considerable data on aerodynamics. By conducting experiments in a piggyback mode on Pegasus, some critical and secondary design and development issues were addressed at hypersonic speeds. The vehicle was also used to develop hypersonic flight instrumentation and test techniques. NASA's B-52 carrier-launch vehicle was used to get the Pegasus airborne during six launches from 1990 to 1994. Thereafter, an Orbital Sciences L-1011 aircraft launched the Pegasus. The Pegasus launch vehicle itself has a 400- to 600-pound payload capacity in a 61-cubic-foot payload space at the front of the vehicle. The vehicle is capable of placing a payload into low earth orbit. This vehicle is 49 feet long and 50 inches in diameter. It has a wing span of 22 feet. (There is also a Pegasus XL vehicle that was introduced in 1994. Dryden has never launched one of these vehicles, but they have greater thrust and are 56 feet long.)

  2. Stable, Circulation-Preserving, Simplicial Fluids Sharif Elcott, Yiying Tong, Eva Kanso, Peter Schroder, Mathieu Desbrun

    E-print Network

    Desbrun, Mathieu

    Stable, Circulation-Preserving, Simplicial Fluids Sharif Elcott, Yiying Tong, Eva Kanso, Peter Schr¨oder Tong, Eva Kanso, Peter Schr¨oder, and Mathieu Desbrun fluid flow simulations. Current methods in fluid

  3. Recent advances in the use of zinc borates in flame retardancy of EVA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Serge Bourbigot; Michel Le Bras; Robert Leeuwendal; Kelvin K. Shen; David Schubert

    1999-01-01

    In this work, zinc borates are used as synergistic agents in EVA–ATH and EVA–Mg(OH)2 flame-retardant (FR) formulations and as smoke suppressants. Moreover, the study by solid state NMR of the residues sampled at different times during cone calorimeter experiments of the formulations EVA–ATH and EVA–ATH\\/Zinc borate allows to propose a mechanism of action of the FR systems. It is demonstrated

  4. Reliability and performance of innovative surgical double-glove hole puncture indication systems.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Wind, Tyler C; Heather, Cynthia L; Thacker, John G

    2003-01-01

    During operative procedures, operating room personnel wear sterile surgical gloves designed to protect them and their patients against transmissible infections. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has set compliance policy guides for manufacturers of gloves. The FDA allows surgeons' gloves whose leakage defect rates do not exceed 1.5 acceptable quality level (AQL) to be used in operating rooms. The implications of this policy are potentially enormous to operating room personnel and patients. This unacceptable risk to the personnel and patient could be significantly reduced by the use of sterile double surgical gloves. Because double-gloves are also susceptible to needle puncture, a double-glove hole indication system is urgently needed to immediately detect surgical needle glove punctures. This warning would allow surgeons to remove the double-gloves, wash their hands, and then don a sterile set of double-gloves with an indication system. During the last decade, Regent Medical has devised non-latex and latex double-glove hole puncture indication systems. The purpose of this comprehensive study is to detect the accuracy of the non-latex and latex double-glove hole puncture indication systems using five commonly used sterile surgical needles: the taper point surgical needle, tapercut surgical needle, reverse cutting edge surgical needle, taper cardiopoint surgical needle, and spatula surgical needle. After subjecting both the non-latex and latex double-glove hole puncture indication systems to surgical needle puncture in each glove fingertip, these double-glove systems were immersed in a sterile basin of saline, after which the double-gloved hands manipulated surgical instruments. Within two minutes, both the non-latex and latex hole puncture indication systems accurately detected needle punctures in all of the surgical gloves, regardless of the dimensions of the surgical needles. In addition, the size of the color change visualized through the translucent outer glove did not correlate with needle diameter. On the basis of this extensive experimental evaluation, both the non-latex and latex double-glove hole puncture indication systems should be used in all operative procedures by all operating room personnel. PMID:14510280

  5. Glove use and the relative risk of acute hand injury: a case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Sorock, Gary S; Lombardi, David A; Peng, David K; Hauser, Russ; Eisen, Ellen A; Herrick, Robert F; Mittleman, Murray A

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between glove use and acute traumatic occupational hand injury. We used a case-crossover, within-subject study design to control for differences between individuals such as occupation, injury history, age, gender, risk-taking behavior, manual dexterity, and muscle strength. A total of 1166 hand-injured workers were interviewed regarding the use of gloves at the time of the injury. The self-reported average duration of glove use in the previous work month was the measure of expected exposure to wearing gloves. Nineteen percent of subjects reported wearing gloves at the time of the injury. The expected exposure to glove use in the past work month was 27.9%. Glove use was associated with a lower risk of lacerations and punctures but not crush, fractures, avulsions, amputations, dislocations; the risk of the former two injury types was estimated to be 60-70% lower while wearing gloves. Glove use is only one component of a comprehensive hand injury prevention approach that might include the identification and elimination of sharp hazards, engineering controls, safety warnings, training in high-risk situation awareness, and proper selection and timing of glove use. PMID:15204876

  6. Efficacy of double gloving technique in major and minor oral surgical procedures: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Padhye, Mukul N.; Girotra, Charu; Khosla, Aman R.; Gupta, Kavita V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: A prospective analysis was carried out over a 1-year period to assess gloves used during 100 major and 100 minor oral surgical procedures to test for efficacy of double gloving in oral surgical procedures. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of double gloving technique in preventing cross infection in both major and minor oral surgical procedures. Materials and Methods: Gloves used during 100 major and 100 minor oral surgical procedures were analyzed to check for glove perforations and skin punctures. 100 sterile gloves were tested as control. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square test was used to determine whether there was any difference between the expected and observed values in various categories. Results: A higher number of glove perforations was seen in minor oral surgical procedures compared with major surgeries, dominant hand compared with the nondominant, outer gloves compared with the inner, in procedures which took a longer duration of time to complete, in procedures involving wiring and in the index finger followed by the thumb and the palm. Conclusion: Double gloving technique using sterile gloves can be used as an effective means of infection control for all major and minor surgical procedures, especially high-risk procedures involving patients who maybe suffering from or carriers of blood-borne infections. PMID:23483758

  7. AN OPTICAL COMPARISON OF SILICONE AND EVA ENCAPSULANTS UNDER VARIOUS SPECTRA

    E-print Network

    AN OPTICAL COMPARISON OF SILICONE AND EVA ENCAPSULANTS UNDER VARIOUS SPECTRA Keith R. McIntosh, 1) by using a silicone encapsulant rather than EVA. This increase is primarily due to photons of wavelengths less than ~400 nm being transmitted by silicone but blocked by EVA. The highest increase in efficiency

  8. Sensory substitution for space gloves and for space robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach-Y-rita, P.; Webster, J. G.; Tompkins, W. J.; Crabb, T.

    1987-01-01

    Sensory substitution systems for space applications are described. Physical sensors replace missing human receptors and feed information to the interpretive centers of a different sense. The brain is plastic enough so that, with training, the subject localizes the input as if it were received through the missing receptors. Astronauts have difficulty feeling objects through space suit gloves because of their thickness and because of the 4.3 psi pressure difference. Miniature force sensors on the glove palm drive an electrotactile belt around the waist, thus augmenting the missing tactile sensation. A proposed teleoperator system with telepresence for a space robot would incorporate teleproprioception and a force sensor/electrotactile belt sensory substitution system for teletouch.

  9. Astronauts Carl Meade and Mark Lee test SAFER during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Backdropped against the darkness of space some 130 nautical miles above Earth, astronaut Mark C. Lee (red stripe on EVA suit) tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. Astronaut Carl J. Meade, tethered to Discovery, at bottom center, got his turn later using the new SAFER hardware. The scen was captured with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera operated by a fellow crew member in the shirt-sleeve environment of the Space Shuttle Discovery's cabin. Part of the hardware for the Lidar-In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) is in left foreground.

  10. STS-65 Mission Specialist Chiao in EMU prepares for WETF contingency EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Mission Specialist Leroy Chiao, fully suited in an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and helmet, prepares to be lowered into a 25-feet deep pool at the Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Chiao will practice door and latch contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) procedures once underwater. Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas will join Chiao in the simulation. The two crewmates will be submerged and made to be neutrally buoyant in order to rehearse the contingency tasks that would require a spacewalk. No spacewalks are scheduled for the STS-65 International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) mission.

  11. Astronaut Dunbar, in EMU, is lowered into JSC's WETF pool for EVA simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Astronaut Bonnie J. Dunbar, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), stands on platform as it is lowered into JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. Astronaut Guion S. Bluford is on the opposite side of the platform. Once underwater the astronaut team will rehearse planned and contingency extravehicular activities (EVAs). Two SCUBA-equipped divers assist in the training exercise. NOTE: Since this photograph was taken, Dunbar has been named as the payload commander (PLC) for STS-50 United States Microgravity Laboratory 1 (USML-1) mission aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102.

  12. STS-65 Mission Specialist Chiao in EMU prepares for WETF contingency EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Mission Specialist Leroy Chiao, fully suited in an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and helmet, stands on a platform and prepares to be lowered into a 25-feet deep pool at the Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Chiao will practice door and latch contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) procedures once underwater. Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas will join Chiao in the simulation. The two crewmates will be submerged and made to be neutrally buoyant in order to rehearse the contingency tasks that would require a spacewalk. No spacewalks are scheduled for the STS-65 International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) mission.

  13. EVA tools are documented during the STS-57 bench review at Boeing's FEPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The contents of stowage Volume D is displayed on a table top during the STS-57 bench review conducted at Boeing's Flight Equipment Processing Facility (FEPF) near the JSC site. A diagram identifies the location of these extravehicular activity (EVA) tools within the stowage area and their specific names. Included are an antenna cutter, EURECA cable cutter, a portable foot restraint (PFR) articulating socket, PFR socket bridge fitting, a shrouded rigid screwdriver and an extension, a tool caddy, and extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) batteries. Photo taken by NASA JSC contract photographer Benny Benavides.

  14. MINIMIZING GLOVEBOX GLOVE BREACHES, PART IV: CONTROL CHARTS

    SciTech Connect

    COURNOYER, MICHAEL E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LEE, MICHELLE B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SCHREIBER, STEPHEN B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-05

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility, plutonium. isotopes and other actinides are handled in a glovebox environment. The spread of radiological contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the worker's breathing zone, are minimized and/or prevented through the use of glovebox technology. Evaluating the glovebox configuration, the glovebo gloves are the most vulnerable part of this engineering control. Recognizing this vulnerability, the Glovebox Glove Integrity Program (GGIP) was developed to minimize and/or prevent unplanned openings in the glovebox environment, i.e., glove failures and breaches. In addition, LANL implement the 'Lean Six Sigma (LSS)' program that incorporates the practices of Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma technologies and tools to effectively improve administrative and engineering controls and work processes. One tool used in LSS is the use of control charts, which is an effective way to characterize data collected from unplanned openings in the glovebox environment. The benefit management receives from using this tool is two-fold. First, control charts signal the absence or presence of systematic variations that result in process instability, in relation to glovebox glove breaches and failures. Second, these graphical representations of process variation detennine whether an improved process is under control. Further, control charts are used to identify statistically significant variations (trends) that can be used in decision making to improve processes. This paper discusses performance indicators assessed by the use control charts, provides examples of control charts, and shows how managers use the results to make decisions. This effort contributes to LANL Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations.

  15. Nursing wound care survey: Sterile and nonsterile glove choice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lowell C. Wise; Jane Hoffman; Lynne Grant; Janet Bostrom

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The application of sterile and clean procedure to the practice of wound care nursing was examined.Design: This prospective, descriptive study surveyed staff nurses regarding glove use.Subjects and Setting: Seven hundred forty-three staff nurses from five health care agencies in the San Francisco Bay Area responded to the survey.Instruments: A self-report wound care survey instrument was developed by Nursing Consortium

  16. Removal of lithium antimonide from a radioactive glove box.

    SciTech Connect

    Leibowitz, L.; McDeavitt, S. M.; Graczyk, D. G.; Smith, F. P.

    2000-10-01

    A sample of lithium antimonide (L{sub 3}3Sb) was prepared in a radioactive helium-atmosphere glove box, some of which spread throughout the box. Because of the potential for stibine generation should the Li{sub 3}Sb contact water, some effort was devoted to assessing the extent of possible stibine formation and methods for removing the Li{sub 3}Sb from the box. This note summarizes our findings and the waste disposal procedures used.

  17. Cotton liners to mediate glove comfort for greenhouse applicators.

    PubMed

    Stone, J; Coffman, C; Imerman, P M; Song, K; Shelley, M

    2005-10-01

    Greenhouse applicators' acceptance of cotton knit gloves worn as liners under nitrile chemical-resistant gloves (CRG) for pesticide application was investigated through a wear study in Iowa and New York. Comfort was assessed by questionnaires and interviews with 10 applicators. Contamination levels of four pesticides on CRG and liners at thumb, forefinger, palm, and cuff locations were determined by chemical analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography or gas chromatography. Applicators reported feeling more comfortable with cotton liners under their CRG than without and that cotton liners were easy to manage. Contamination was significantly greater on nitrile CRG than on cotton liners underneath, but a few liner specimens had measurable contamination. No significant contamination differences were found between right- and left-hand gloves. Contamination varied significantly by hand location, with cuffs least, and by pesticide, with chlorpyrifos most. These results support the Environmental Protection Agency's recommendation that liners should be disposable, but further work on liners and their laundering feasibility seems indicated. PMID:16132418

  18. Puncture evaluation of radiological gloves to assess use performance

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W. P. (Warren P.), Jr.; Mittelstet, R. P.; Castro, J. M. (Julio M.); Smith, M. E. (Mark E.)

    2002-01-01

    Tensile testing of gloves is an accepted method for the qualification of a new glove material or the qualification of a production run. Most often these tests are performed in accordance to ASTM standards, i.e. - D412-98a Standard Test Methods (STM) for Vulcanized Rubber and Thermoplastic Rubbers and Thermoplastic Elastomers-Tension, Unfortunately for elastomers such protocols do not exist for puncture testing. There are however several test methods for the puncture resistance of Protective Clothing [F1342-91(1996)e2], Barrier FiIms and Laminates[F1306-90(1998)], and Coated Fabrics [D751-001]. Each of these standards uses different probe geometries and testing rates. Initial testing of the gloves has been performed using the standard one inch ball burst fixture as supplied by Instron. Samples tested using this fixture usually did not burst within the travel of the test fixture, except for lead lined hypalon. Three fixtures were fabricated in accordance to the aforementioned ASTM standards. Results for these fixtures for several materials will be reported along with the observed rate dependence.

  19. Effect of the inner glove environment on permeation rates and breakthrough times of selected solvent/glove combinations 

    E-print Network

    Mathurin, David Ring

    1985-01-01

    of the American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal. conseratively low, for the National Safety Council estimated that, in 1981, the annual losses due to occupationally induced dermatitis exceeded 100 million dollars. ~4~ lf protective glove materials... reflect the performance of that protective garment under field conditions? Stated differently, should permeation studies be conducted under the conditions of garment use? Considering the incidence of occupationally-induced dermatitis, the variety...

  20. The breakthrough time and permeation rate of three organic chemicals for selected glove combinations 

    E-print Network

    Binion, Pete Edwin

    1992-01-01

    rates and breakthrough times were determined for the five different glove combinations versus three test chemicals using the Miran-lA infrared analyzer in a closed loop system. The polymers tested were natural rubber (NR), polyvinyl chloride (PVC... time and permeation rate when tested against three different challenge chemicals. PVC gloves with nitrile liners appeared to provide the most protection time against breakthrough for all three chemicals. The PVC gloves showed excellent resistance...

  1. Effect of gloves on prehensile forces during lifting and holding tasks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroshi Kinoshita

    1999-01-01

    The effect of gloves on the spatio-temporal characteristics of prehensile forces during lifting and holding tasks was investigated. Participants (n= 10) lifted a force transducer equipped object (weight = 0.29 N) with various types of gloves and barehanded using a two-fingered precision grip. Rubber surgical gloves of varied thicknesses (0.24, 0.61 and 1.02 mm) were worn to examine the effect

  2. Dexterity test data contribute to reduction in leaded glovebox gloves use

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lawton, Cindy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Castro, Amanda M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costigan, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schreiber, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (T A-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes. Using an integrated approach, controls have been developed and implemented through an efficient Glovebox Glove Integrity Program. A key element of this program is to consider measures that lower the overall risk of glovebox operations. Line management who own glovebox processes through this program make decisions on which type of glovebox gloves (hereafter referred to as gloves), the weakest component of this safety-significant system, would perform best in these aggressive environments. As Low as Reasonably Achievable considerations must be balanced with glove durability and worker dexterity, both of which affect the final overall risk of the operation. In the past, lead-loaded (leaded) gloves made from Hypalon(reg.) were the primary glove for programmatic operations at TA55. Replacing leaded gloves with unleaded gloves for certain operations would lower the overall risk as well as reduce the amount of mixed transuranic waste. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations. In this report, the pros and cons of wearing leaded gloves, the effect of leaded gloves versus unleaded gloves on task performance using standard dexterity tests, the justification for switching from leaded to unleaded gloves, and the pollution prevention benefits of this dramatic change in the glovebox system are presented.

  3. Custom Unit Pump Development for the EVA PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Little, Frank; Oinuma, Ryoji; Larsen, Ben; Goldman, Jeff; Reinis, Filip; Trevino, Luis

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design and test a pre-flight prototype pump for use in the Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump must accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting non-condensable gas without becoming air locked. The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, seal-less, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES verified that the pump meets the design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure drop, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, gas ingestion, and restart capability under both ambient and vacuum conditions. The pump operated at 40 to 240 lbm/hr flow rate, 35 to 100 oF pump temperature, and 5 to 10 psid pressure rise. Power consumption of the pump controller at the nominal operating point in both ambient and vacuum conditions was 9.5 W, which was less than the 12 W predicted. Gas ingestion capabilities were tested by injecting 100 cc of air into the fluid line; the pump operated normally throughout this test.

  4. EVA Tutorial #3 ISSUES ARISING IN EXTREME VALUE ANALYSIS

    E-print Network

    Katz, Richard

    1 EVA Tutorial #3 ISSUES ARISING IN EXTREME VALUE ANALYSIS Rick Katz Institute for Mathematics mean & unit variance) -- Fisher & Tippett (1928) proposed Weibull type of GEV as penultimate(n) (2 ln n ) 1/2 , for large n Penultimate approximation is Weibull type with n - 1 / (2 ln n

  5. EUCLIDEAN MINIMA AND CENTRAL DIVISION ALGEBRAS EVA BAYERFLUCKIGER*

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EUCLIDEAN MINIMA AND CENTRAL DIVISION ALGEBRAS EVA BAYER­FLUCKIGER* Ecole Polytechnique F, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland jerome.chaubert@gmail.com. Abstract. The notion of Euclidean minimum and establish some general results in this new context. Keywords: Euclidean minimum, central division algebras

  6. Evaluation report on the website EVA EASTON Authentic American Pronunciation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHEN Hua-ying

    This paper has done an evaluation review on the website EVA EASTON Authentic American Pronunciation based on the CALICO Software Review Guidelines, with demonstration of the different features of the website, and a session teaching plan for the course English Pronunciation with the support of the online resource from this website, and it also provides the review results of the

  7. The rheology of recycled EVA\\/LDPE modified bitumen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moisés García-Morales; Pedro Partal; Francisco J. Navarro; Francisco Martínez-Boza; Malcolm R. Mackley; Críspulo Gallegos

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes linear viscoelasticity, at low and intermediate temperatures, and the flow behaviour, at high temperatures, of polymer modified bitumen (PMB) containing 5 and 9 wt% recycled EVA\\/LDPE. The relationship between flow behaviour and microstructure of the modified bitumen was also considered, by comparison of experiments carried out in capillary and rotational rheometers and photomicrographs taken using a microscopy system

  8. Effect of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) closed cell foam on transmitted forces in mouthguard material

    PubMed Central

    Westerman, B; Stringfellow, P; Eccleston, J; Harbrow, D

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To compare transmitted forces through ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) mouthguard material and the same EVA material with gas inclusions in the form of a closed cell foam. Method: EVA mouthguard materials with and without foam gas inclusions and 4 mm thick were impacted with a constant force from an impact pendulum. Various porosity levels in the foam materials were produced by 1%, 5%, and 10% by weight foaming agent. The forces transmitted through the EVA after energy absorption by the test materials were measured with a force sensor and compared. Results: Only minor non-significant differences in transmitted forces through the EVA with and without foam were shown. Conclusions: The inclusion of gas in the form of a closed cell foam in 4 mm thick EVA mouthguard materials did not improve the impact performance of the EVA mouthguard material. PMID:12055116

  9. Permeability of different types of medical protective gloves to acrylic monomers.

    PubMed

    Lönnroth, Emma-Christin; Wellendorf, Hanne; Ruyter, Eystein

    2003-10-01

    Dental personnel and orthopedic surgeons are at risk when manually handling products containing methyl methacrylate (MMA). Dental products may also contain cross-linking agents such as ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) or 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate (1,4-BDMA). Skin contact with monomers can cause hand eczema, and the protection given by gloves manufactured from different types of material is not well known. The aim of this study was to determine the breakthrough time (BTT, min) as a measure of protection (according to the EU standard EN-374-3) for a mixture consisting of MMA, EGDMA and 1,4-BDMA. Fifteen different gloves representing natural rubber latex material, synthetic rubber material (e.g. nitrile rubbers), and synthetic polymer material were tested. The smallest monomer MMA permeated within 3 min through all glove materials. A polyethylene examination glove provided the longest protection period to EGDMA and 1, 4-BDMA (> 120 min and 25.0 min), followed by the surgical glove Tactylon (6.0 min and 8.7 min) and the nitrile glove Nitra Touch (5.0 min and 8.7 min). This study showed that the breakthrough time (based on permeation rate) cannot be regarded as a 'safe limit'. When the permeation rate is low, monomers may have permeated before BTT can be determined. Using double gloves with a synthetic rubber inner glove and a natural rubber outer glove provided longer protection when the inner glove was rinsed in water before placing the outer glove on top. PMID:12974690

  10. Virus-inhibiting surgical glove to reduce the risk of infection by enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    Bricout, Fernand; Moraillon, Anne; Sonntag, Philippe; Hoerner, Pierre; Blackwelder, William; Plotkin, Stanley

    2003-04-01

    Needle puncture and other accidents that occur during surgery and other procedures may lead to viral infections of medical personnel, notably by hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), now that hepatitis B can be prevented by vaccination. A new surgical glove called G-VIR, which contains a disinfecting agent for enveloped viruses, has been developed. Herpes simplex type 1 (HSV) was used as a standard enveloped virus in both in vitro and in vivo tests of the virucidal capacity of the glove. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) were used as models for HCV and HIV, respectively. For in vitro study, a contaminated needle was passed through a glove and residual virus was titrated; for in vivo studies, animals were stuck with a contaminated needle through a glove. Despite variation in virus enumeration inherent in the puncture technique, statistical evaluation showed that infection was reproducibly and substantially reduced by passage through the virucidal layer. For BVDV, the amount of virus passing through the virucidal glove was reduced in 82% of pairwise comparisons with control gloves that lacked the virucidal agent; when plaque counts were adjusted to a common dilution, the median count for the virucidal glove was on the average reduced >10-fold. In experiments in which the proportion of wells infected with FIV was measured, the ratio of TCID(50) values (control glove to G-VIR) was >15, and probably much higher. For HSV, the amount of virus passing through the virucidal glove was reduced in 81% of comparisons with control gloves; the median of adjusted plaque counts was reduced on the average approximately eightfold or ninefold. In vivo tests with FIV and HSV in cats and mice, respectively, found smaller percentage reductions in infection than the in vitro tests but confirmed the virucidal effect of the gloves. PMID:12601762

  11. Evaluation of the impact of non-uniform neutron radiation fields on the dose received by glove box radiation workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Arthur Bryan

    The effort to estimate the radiation dose received by an occupationally exposed worker is a complex task. Regulatory guidance assumes that the stochastic risks from uniform and non-uniform whole-body irradiations are equal. An ideal uniform irradiation of the whole body would require a broad parallel radiation field of relatively high-energy radiation, which many occupationally exposed workers do not experience. In reality, workers are exposed to a non-uniform irradiation of the whole body such as a radiation field with one or more types of radiation, each with varying energies and/or fluence rates, incident on the worker. Most occupational radiation exposure at LANL is due to neutron radiation. Many of these exposures originate from activities performed in glove boxes with nuclear materials. A standard Los Alamos 2 x 2 x 2 glove box is modeled with the source material being clean weapons grade plutonium. Dosimeter tally planes were modeled to stimulate the various positions that a dosimeter can be worn. An anthropomorphic phantom was used to determine whole body dose. Various geometries of source position and phantom location were used to determine the effects of streaming on the radiation dose a worker may receive. Based on computational and experimental results, the effects of a non-uniform radiation field have on radiation dose received by a worker in a glove box environment are: (1) Dosimeter worn at chest level can overestimate the whole body dose between a factor of two to six depending on location of the phantom with the source material close to the front of the glove box, (2) Dosimeter should be worn at waist level instead of chest level to more accurately reflect the whole body dose received, (3) Dose can be significantly higher for specific locations of the worker relative to the position of the source, (4) On the average the testes contribute almost 44% of the whole body dose for a male, and (5) Appropriate design considerations such as more shielding on the bottom of the glove box and controls such as the use of internal or external shielding can reduce the effects on dose from these non-uniform fields.

  12. Effectiveness of a Surgical Glove Port for Single Port Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michihiro Hayashi; Mitsuhiro Asakuma; Koji Komeda; Yoshiharu Miyamoto; Fumitoshi Hirokawa; Nobuhiko Tanigawa

    2010-01-01

    Background  A new surgical concept, such as single port surgery (SPS), usually raises many questions regarding safety, usefulness, appropriateness,\\u000a applicability, and cost. Because many new port devices have been developed, choosing the type of port device for SPS is the\\u000a most important factor. We herein briefly report our newly developed SPS port made using a standard surgical glove.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  SPS starts with

  13. Physically Accurate Haptic Rendering of Elastic Object for a Haptic Glove

    E-print Network

    Lee, Chan-Su

    Physically Accurate Haptic Rendering of Elastic Object for a Haptic Glove Chan-Su Lee Abstract(BEM) using Java. The system is tested with Rutgers Master II haptic glove. This report covers related to a user (haptic feedback) has become an important topic of research in virtual environments and madecal

  14. The bionic glove: An electrical stimulator garment that provides controlled grasp and hand opening in quadriplegia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arthur Prochazka; Michel Gauthier; Marguerite Wieler; Zoltan Kenwell

    1997-01-01

    Objective: This report describes the operation of the Bionic Glove, a new functional electrical stimulation (FES) device designed to improve the function of the paralyzed hand after spinal cord injury (SCI) or stroke.Design: Signals from a sensor in the glove detecting voluntary wrist movement are used to control FES of muscles either to produce hand-grasp or to open the hand.

  15. Thermal Analysis of a Metallic Wing Glove for a Mach-8 Boundary-Layer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Leslie; Richards, W. Lance

    1998-01-01

    A metallic 'glove' structure has been built and attached to the wing of the Pegasus(trademark) space booster. An experiment on the upper surface of the glove has been designed to help validate boundary-layer stability codes in a free-flight environment. Three-dimensional thermal analyses have been performed to ensure that the glove structure design would be within allowable temperature limits in the experiment test section of the upper skin of the glove. Temperature results obtained from the design-case analysis show a peak temperature at the leading edge of 490 F. For the upper surface of the glove, approximately 3 in. back from the leading edge, temperature calculations indicate transition occurs at approximately 45 sec into the flight profile. A worst-case heating analysis has also been performed to ensure that the glove structure would not have any detrimental effects on the primary objective of the Pegasus a launch. A peak temperature of 805 F has been calculated on the leading edge of the glove structure. The temperatures predicted from the design case are well within the temperature limits of the glove structure, and the worst-case heating analysis temperature results are acceptable for the mission objectives.

  16. Lead contamination of surgical gloves by contact with a lead hand.

    PubMed

    Mehra, A; Deakin, D E; Khan, A; Sheehan, T M T; Nightingale, P; Deshmukh, S C

    2011-01-01

    Background. "Lead hands" are frequently used to maintain hand and finger position in hand surgery. The malleability and strength of lead make it ideal for this purpose. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of lead transferred to a surgeon's glove during handling of a lead hand. Method. Sterile surgical gloves were wiped over the surface of a lead hand. The number of wipes was varied, the gloves were then sent to a trace elements laboratory, and the lead content transferred to each glove was determined. Results. The amount of lead transferred to each glove increased with increasing exposure to the lead hand. After twenty wipes, up to 2?mg of lead was transferred to the surgeon's glove. Covering the lead hand with a sterile drape markedly reduced the lead transferred to the surgeon's glove. Conclusion. Significant amount of lead is transferred on to the gloves after handling a lead hand. This risks wound contamination and a foreign body reaction. Covering the lead hand with a sterile drape may minimise the risk of surgical wound contamination. PMID:24977071

  17. AIDS prevention: improving nurses' compliance with glove wearing through performance feedback.

    PubMed Central

    DeVries, J E; Burnette, M M; Redmon, W K

    1991-01-01

    A performance feedback procedure was used to increase glove wearing by nurses in a hospital emergency room in situations in which contact with body fluids was highly likely. Infection-control nurses provided biweekly performance feedback to staff nurses on an individual private basis to inform them of the percentage of contact opportunities in which they wore gloves. Observations made prior to (baseline) and during feedback in a multiple baseline design across 4 subjects indicated that substantial increases in glove wearing in target situations occurred after implementation of the feedback program and that increases occurred across most of the specific situations in which glove wearing was advised. Percentage increases in glove wearing ranged from 22% to 49% across subjects. The results are discussed in terms of prevention of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) by use of universal precautions. PMID:1797773

  18. Decontamination, Dismantling and Refurbishing of the PETRA Glove Box at the Tritium Laboratory, Karlsruhe

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell-Nichols, C.J.; Glugla, M.; Doerr, L.; Berndt, U. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-07-15

    The PETRA facility at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) has finished its useful life and the glove box and auxiliary systems are being refurbished. During the lifetime of PETRA the glove box became contaminated with a small amount of tritium but the source has not been positively identified. Removing large redundant components would be hazardous as this would require removing the glove box panels and thus exposing the inner surfaces to moist air which would release tritium. Over several months defined amounts of water have been introduced into the glove box daily which has liberated significant quantities of tritium which has subsequently been absorbed by the in-built tritium retention system. This technique has slowly reduced the tritium liberated at each step. The large components, such as a getter bed, catalyst bed and a permeator, have been detritiated as far as possible in-situ in readiness for disposal once it is safe to remove them from the glove box.

  19. A glimpse from the inside of a space suit: What is it really like to train for an EVA?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gast, Matthew A.; Moore, Sandra K.

    2011-01-01

    The beauty of the view from the office of a spacewalking astronaut gives the impression of simplicity, but few beyond the astronauts, and those who train them, know what it really takes to get there. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) training is an intense process that utilizes NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) to develop a very specific skill set needed to safely construct and maintain the orbiting International Space Station. To qualify for flight assignments, astronauts must demonstrate the ability to work safely and efficiently in the physically demanding environment of the space suit, possess an acute ability to resolve unforeseen problems, and implement proper tool protocols to ensure no tools will be lost in space. Through the insights and the lessons learned by actual EVA astronauts and EVA instructors, this paper will take you on a journey through an astronaut's earliest experiences working in the space suit, termed the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), in the underwater training environment of the NBL. This work details an actual Suit Qualification NBL training event, outlines the numerous challenges the astronauts face throughout their initial training, and the various ways they adapt their own abilities to overcome them. The goal of this paper is to give everyone a small glimpse into what it is really like to work in a space suit.

  20. Glove use in laboratories 1. Chemical to be used: Consult the compatibility charts to ensure that the

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Robert E.

    protection, as the glove will be more resistant to physical damage, like tears and cracks, but it will harder: A nylon cryogenic glove will be damaged if a hot item is handled, where as a "hot mitt" will not protect before touching personal items, such as phones, computers, pens and one's skin. 2. Do not wear gloves out

  1. An investigation of the effect of prolonged glove wearing on the hand skin health of dental healthcare workers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. K Boyle; A Forsyth; J Bagg; K Stroubou; C. E. M Griffiths; F. J. T Burke

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. Glove wearing during patient treatment has been central to dental surgery infection control for over 15 years. However, little is known about the cutaneous effects of glove wearing on the hands of dental healthcare workers (DHCWs). The objective of this project was to assess the hand skin health of DHCWs before and after wearing gloves of two types and

  2. Non-touch suturing technique fails to reduce glove puncture rates in an accident and emergency department

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T K McAdam; R E McLaughlin; B McNicholl

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of introducing a safer non-touch suturing technique into an inner city emergency department.Methods: The rate of glove perforation, measured by electrical conductance, was used as a marker. Gloves (Bodyguards) used in suturing were collected over a two month period. Two half day suture workshops were then conducted in the emergency department and gloves were collected

  3. Astronaut Carl Meade tests SAFER system during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Carl J. Meade tests the new Simplified Aid for Eva Rescue (SAFER) system 130 nautical miles above Earth. The scene was captured with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera with a 30mm lens attached. The hardware supporting the LIDAR-in-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) is in the lower right. A TV camera on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm records the space walk.

  4. EVA - Evaluation of Energy Concepts: Case Study of Siedlungswerk, Stuttgart

    E-print Network

    Stefan, P.; Mahler, B.; Fisch, M. N.

    2006-01-01

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol. VI-3-4 EVA - Evaluation of Energy Concepts: Case Study of Siedlungswerk, Stuttgart Plesser Stefan, Boris Mahler, M. Norbert Fisch IGS... ? Institute of Building Services and Energy Design, Technical University Braunschweig, Germany November 2006 stefan.plesser@gmx.de Abstract: This paper presents the evaluation and optimization results of the office building Siedlungswerk as part...

  5. Non-Venting Thermal and Humidity Control for EVA Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo; Bue, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Future EVA suits need processes and systems to control internal temperature and humidity without venting water to the environment. This paper describes an absorption-based cooling and dehumidification system as well as laboratory demonstrations of the key processes. There are two main components in the system: an evaporation cooling and dehumidification garment (ECDG) that removes both sensible heat and latent heat from the pressure garment, and an absorber radiator that absorbs moisture and rejects heat to space by thermal radiation. This paper discusses the overall design of both components, and presents recent data demonstrating their operation. We developed a design and fabrication approach to produce prototypical heat/water absorbing elements for the ECDG, and demonstrated by test that these elements could absorb heat and moisture at a high flux. Proof-of-concept tests showed that an ECDG prototype absorbs heat and moisture at a rate of 85 W/ft under conditions that simulate operation in an EVA suit. The heat absorption was primarily due to direct absorption of water vapor. It is possible to construct large, flexible, durable cooling patches that can be incorporated into a cooling garment with this system. The proof-of-concept test data was scaled to calculate area needed for full metabolic loads, thus showing that it is feasible to use this technology in an EVA suit. Full-scale, lightweight absorber/radiator modules have also been built and tested. They can reject heat at a flux of 33 W/ft while maintaining ECDG operation at conditions that will provide a cool and dry environment inside the EVA suit.

  6. Protective glove use and hygiene habits modify the associations of specific pesticides with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Melissa; Tanner, Caroline M; Goldman, Samuel M; Bhudhikanok, Grace S; Blair, Aaron; Chade, Anabel; Comyns, Kathleen; Hoppin, Jane A; Kasten, Meike; Korell, Monica; Langston, J William; Marras, Connie; Meng, Cheryl; Richards, Marie; Ross, G Webster; Umbach, David M; Sandler, Dale P; Kamel, Freya

    2015-02-01

    Pesticides have been associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), and protective gloves and workplace hygiene can reduce pesticide exposure. We assessed whether use of gloves and workplace hygiene modified associations between pesticides and PD. The Farming and Movement Evaluation (FAME) study is a nested case-control study within the Agricultural Health Study. Use of protective gloves, other PPE, and hygiene practices were determined by questionnaire (69 cases and 237 controls were included). We considered interactions of gloves and hygiene with ever-use of pesticides for all pesticides with ?5 exposed and unexposed cases and controls in each glove-use stratum (paraquat, permethrin, rotenone, and trifluralin). 61% of respondents consistently used protective gloves and 87% consistently used ?2 hygiene practices. Protective glove use modified the associations of paraquat and permethrin with PD: neither pesticide was associated with PD among protective glove users, while both pesticides were associated with PD among non-users (paraquat OR 3.9 [95% CI 1.3, 11.7], interaction p=0.15; permethrin OR 4.3 [95% CI 1.2, 15.6] interaction p=0.05). Rotenone was associated with PD regardless of glove use. Trifluralin was associated with PD among participants who used <2 hygiene practices (OR 5.5 [95% CI 1.1, 27.1]) but was not associated with PD among participants who used 2 or more practices (interaction p=0.02). Although sample size was limited in the FAME study, protective glove use and hygiene practices appeared to be important modifiers of the association between pesticides and PD and may reduce risk of PD associated with certain pesticides. PMID:25461423

  7. Dexterity tests data contribute to reduction in leaded glovebox gloves use

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lawton, Cindy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Castro, Amanda M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alphaemitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces and airborne contamination and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes. Through an integrated approach, controls have been developed and implemented through an efficient Glovebox Glove Integrity Program (GGJP). A key element of this program is to consider measures that lower the overall risk of glovebox operations. Line management owning glovebox processes through this program make decisions on which type of glovebox gloves (the weakest component of this safety significant system) would perform in these aggressive environments. As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) considerations must be balanced with glove durability and worker dexterity, both of which affect the final overall risk of the operation. In the past, lead-loaded (leaded) glovebox gloves made from Hypalon(reg.) had been the workhorse of programmatic operations at TA-55. Replacing leaded gloves with unleaded gloves for certain operations would lower the overall risk as well as reduced the amount of mixed TRU waste. This effort contributes to Los Alamos National Laboratory Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations. In the following report, the pros and cons of wearing leaded glovebox gloves, the effect of leaded gloves versus unleaded gloves on task performance using standard dexterity tests, the justification for switching from leaded to unleaded gloves, and pollution prevention benefits of this dramatic change in the glovebox system are presented.

  8. Suppression of Surgeons' Bacterial Hand Flora during Surgical Procedures with a New Antimicrobial Surgical Glove

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Axel; Ouriel, Kenneth; Suchomel, Miranda; McLaws, Mary-Louise; Rottman, Martin; Leaper, David; Assadian, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Perforations of surgical gloves are common and increase with the duration of glove wear. Skin flora, re-grown after pre-operative disinfection of the hands, may contaminate a surgical site. An antimicrobial surgical glove with chlorhexidine on its inner surface has been developed. We hypothesized that by suppressing the re-growth of skin flora during the complete course of a surgical procedure, antimicrobial gloves may reduce the risk of surgical site contamination in the event of an intra-operative glove breach. Methods: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, single-center trial, to measure any differences in the bacterial skin populations of surgeons' hands during surgical procedures done with antimicrobial and non-antimicrobial surgical gloves [ISRCTN71391952]. In this study, 25 pairs of gloves were retrieved from 14 surgeons who donned them randomly on their dominant or non-dominant hand. The number of bacteria retrieved from glove fluid was measured and expressed as colony forming units (CFU)/mL. Results: The median cfu/mL of antimicrobial gloves was 0.00 (LQ: 0.00?CFU/mL; UQ: 0.00?cfu/mL), with a mean log10 cfu/mL=0.02 (range: 0.00–0.30). The median CFU/mL of non-antimicrobial gloves was 54.00 (LQ: 3.00?cfu/mL; UQ: 100.00?cfu/mL) with a mean log10 CFU/mL=1.32 (range: 0.00–2.39). After a mean operating time of 112?min, the difference in the log10 CFU/mL was 1.30 (p<0.001). Conclusions: A new antimicrobial surgical glove suppressed surgeons' hand flora during operative procedures. In the event of a glove breach, the use of such a glove may have the potential to prevent bacterial contamination of a sterile surgical site, thereby decreasing the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) and increasing patient safety. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm this concept. PMID:24116857

  9. Human factors in space station architecture 2. EVA access facility: A comparative analysis of 4 concepts for on-orbit space suit servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marc M.; Bussolari, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Four concepts for on-orbit spacesuit donning, doffing, servicing, check-out, egress and ingress are presented. These are: the Space Transportation System (STS) Type (shuttle system enlarged), the Transit Airlock (Shuttle Airlock with suit servicing removed from the pump-down chamber), the Suitport (a rear-entry suit mates to a port in the airlock wall), and the Crewlock (a small, individual, conformal airlock). Each of these four concepts is compared through a series of seven steps representing a typical Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) mission: (1) Predonning suit preparation; (2) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) preparation; (3) Suit Donning and Final Check; (4) Egress/Ingress; (5) Mid-EVA rest period; (6) Post-EVA Securing; (7) Non-Routine Maintenance. The different characteristics of each concept are articulated through this step-by-step approach. Recommendations concerning an approach for further evaluations of airlock geometry, anthropometrics, ergonomics, and functional efficiency are made. The key recommendation is that before any particular airlock can be designed, the full range of spacesuit servicing functions must be considered, including timelines that are most supportive of EVA human productivity.

  10. Ease of donning of new powder-free non-latex and latex double-glove hole puncture indication systems.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Wind, Tyler C; Heather, Cynthia L; Thacker, John G

    2003-01-01

    Cornstarch on surgical gloves is often used as a detackifying agent and a lubricant to facilitate glove donning. During the last century, scientific studies have demonstrated that cornstarch produces tissue injury in literally every part of the body. Because this glove lubricant cannot be removed from the glove, Dr. David Podell, an ophthalmologic surgeon, and his cousin, Howard Podell, a chemical engineer, devised the first powder-free surgical glove that could be donned easily. They coated the inner surface of the surgical glove with a methacrylate polymer lining that was bonded to the natural rubber latex. This special coating acts as a lubricant to facilitate donning with damp, wet, or dry hands. In our earlier experimental studies, we confirmed that these polymer-lined latex gloves could be donned with either wet or dry hands. More recently, the polymer-coated latex gloves were incorporated into a double-glove hole puncture indication system that accurately detected glove holes in the presence of fluid. Because this discovery has been expanded into the development of a non-latex double-glove hole puncture indication system, we have expanded our biomechanical performance studies to examine the glove donning forces of the latex and non-latex glove hole puncture indication systems. The maximum donning forces recorded for the non-latex undergloves were significantly lower than those encountered by the same respective sizes of the latex underglove. The donning forces of the thin Biogel Super-Sensitive outer gloves were remarkably similar to the donning forces of the Biogel Indicator undergloves. The thicker Biogel outer gloves encountered greater donning forces than that noted for the Biogel Super-Sensitive outer gloves. The donning forces recorded for the non-latex outer gloves were remarkably similar to those noted for the latex Biogel outer gloves. Because the results of this biomechanical performance study demonstrated that the latex and non-latex double-glove hole puncture indication systems can be easily donned by surgeons using relatively low donning forces, this study provides convincing evidence that these double-glove hole puncture indication systems can be used in all surgical procedures. PMID:14510282

  11. Delayed contact hypersensitivity and surgical glove penetration with acrylic bone cements.

    PubMed

    Jensen, J S; Trap, B; Skydsgaard, K

    1991-02-01

    Skin hypersensitivity was investigated in guinea-pig maximization tests with extracts from pellets of conventional polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) bone cements (Palacos R, Simplex RO) and a new methylmethacrylate/n-decylmethacrylate/isobornylmethacrylate (MMA/DMA/IBMA) mixture (Boneloc), but none of the three cements produced evidence of delayed contact hypersensitivity. Testings of the pure monomer compounds showed MMA to be an extreme sensitizer, whereas DMA and IBMA were only mild sensitizers. Fingers from three brands of surgical rubber gloves and a polystyrene-butadiene glove were immersed in water and filled with conventional MMA monomer, MMA/DMA/IBMA monomer or bone cements in the dough state, allowing cure inside the glove. In the surrounding water, no DMA or IBMA could be detected. The MMA concentrations were lower with MMA/DMA/IBMA monomer and curing Boneloc cement. The most resistant to conventional PMMA cement was one of the rubber gloves, whereas the polystyrene-butadiene glove allowed the highest penetration, and even dissolved in MMA monomer. The potential occupational hazard of skin sensitization is reduced with MMA/DMA/IBMA bone cement, preferably in combination with rubber gloves; but also polystyrene-butadiene gloves provide adequate protection. PMID:2003382

  12. Analysis of Asymmetric Aircraft Aerodynamics Due to an Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshorn, Fletcher

    2011-01-01

    Aerodynamic analysis on a business jet with a wing glove attached to one wing is presented and discussed. If a wing glove is placed over a portion of one wing, there will be asymmetries in the aircraft as well as overall changes in the forces and moments acting on the aircraft. These changes, referred to as deltas, need to be determined and quantified to make sure the wing glove does not have a drastic effect on the aircraft flight characteristics. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver was used to analyze a full aircraft, with and without a glove, at a variety of flight conditions and angles of attack and sideslip. Changes in the aircraft lift, drag and side force, along with roll, pitch and yawing moment are presented. Span lift and moment distributions are also presented for a more detailed look at the effects of the glove on the aircraft. Aerodynamic flow phenomena due to the addition of the glove and its fairing are discussed. Results show that the glove used here does not present a drastic change in forces and moments on the aircraft, but an added torsional moment around the quarter-chord of the wing may be a cause for some structural concerns.

  13. Analysis of Asymmetric Aircraft Aerodynamics Due to an Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshorn, Fletcher

    2011-01-01

    Aerodynamic computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wing glove attached to one wing of a business jet is presented and discussed. A wing glove placed on only one wing will produce asymmetric aerodynamic effects that will result in overall changes in the forces and moments acting on the aircraft. These changes, referred to as deltas, need to be determined and quantified to ensure that the wing glove does not have a significant effect on the aircraft flight characteristics. TRANAIR (Calmar Research Corporation, Cato, New York), a nonlinear full potential solver, and Star-CCM+ (CD-adapco, Melville, New York), a finite volume full Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics solver, are used to analyze a full aircraft with and without the glove at a variety of flight conditions, aircraft configurations, and angles of attack and sideslip. Changes in the aircraft lift, drag, and side force along with roll, pitch, and yaw are presented. Span lift and moment distributions are also presented for a more detailed look at the effects of the glove on the aircraft. Aerodynamic flow phenomena due to the addition of the glove are discussed. Results show that the glove produces only small changes in the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the aircraft, most of which are insignificant.

  14. Standardization of needlestick injury and evaluation of a novel virus-inhibiting protective glove.

    PubMed

    Krikorian, R; Lozach-Perlant, A; Ferrier-Rembert, A; Hoerner, P; Sonntag, P; Garin, D; Crance, J-M

    2007-08-01

    Rubber surgical gloves worn as a barrier to prevent contamination from body fluids offer relative protection against contamination through direct percutaneous injuries involving needles, scalpel blades or bone fragments. To determine the main experimental parameters influencing the volume of blood transmitted by a hollow-bore needle (worst case scenario) during an accidental puncture, we designed an automatic puncture apparatus. Herpes simplex type 1 virus (HSV1), a model for enveloped viruses, was used as a 'marker' in an in-vitro gelatine model. Of the experimental parameters studied, the most critical influences were found to be needle diameter and puncture depth, whereas puncture speed, puncture angle and glove-stretching feature appeared to be less influential. A single glove reduced the volume of blood transferred by 52% compared with no glove, but double gloving offered no additional protection against hollow-bore needle punctures. Using 'standardized' puncture conditions, the virus-inhibiting surgical glove G-VIR elicited an 81% reduction in the amount of HSV1 transmitted as compared with single or double latex glove systems. PMID:17688971

  15. Effect of Chlorhexidine Bathing and Other Infection Control Practices on the Benefits of Universal Glove and Gown (BUGG) Trial: A Subgroup Analysis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Daniel J; Pineles, Lisa; Shardell, Michelle; Sulis, Carol; Kett, Daniel H; Bowling, Jason; Belton, Beverly M; Harris, Anthony D

    2015-06-01

    We report the results of a subgroup analysis of the Benefits of Universal Glove and Gown trial. In 20 intensive care units, the reduction in acquisition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus observed in this trial was observed in units also using chlorhexidine bathing and in those that previously performed active surveillance. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2015;00(0): 1-4. PMID:25707404

  16. [Skin protection at work in Croatian hairdressers (results of the EvaHair questionnaire developed within the EU project "SafeHair")].

    PubMed

    Kujundži? Brkulj, Marija; Macan, Jelena

    2013-06-01

    Hairdressers are under a high occupational risk of developing various health disorders, particularly regarding the skin. The "SafeHair" project was implemented from 2010 to 2012, with the aim to develop health and safety standards for the prevention of occupational skin diseases in hairdressing. Croatian hairdressers participated in the project. The aim of this work was to establish the actual status of skin protection in Croatian hairdressers. Data were collected by the EvaHair questionnaire developed within the "SafeHair" project. A total of 213 questionnaires were analysed. The sample comprised 133 (64%) salon owners, 46 (22%) employees, and 31 (14%) trainees. Thirty-six (17%) subjects confirmed the presence of skin disorders in their salons in the last 3 years, and almost all of the subjects (98%) considered the prevention of occupational skin diseases important. We found a high proportion (from 40% to 50%) of non-answered questions about risk assessment. Protective gloves were mostly used when exposed to chemicals (88%), but rarely for hair washing (13%). They were available to the majority of subjects (95%), but 32% of subjects had trouble wearing them. Hairdressers with over 30 years of working experience used gloves for washing and cutting hair more frequently than those with less than 30 years of experience (p<0.05). Education on skin protection was more often provided (39%) than education on the protection of the respiratory (15%) and musculosceletal (18%) systems. A high proportion of subjects needed assistance with interpreting laws, regulations, and information about products (57%), as well as in the implementation of risk assessment methods (49%). The results indicate a need for further education on the health risks and the implementation of protective measures. This should be carried out during vocational education and later in the form of permanent education. PMID:23819939

  17. Evaluation of the rate, location, and morphology of perforations in surgical gloves worn in urological operations.

    PubMed

    Weber, Lothar W

    2003-01-01

    Surgical perforation or intrinsic defects within the polymer membranes of surgical gloves are responsible for an increased exposure, and consequently infection risk, to HIV and HCV or other infectious diseases for the medical healthcare professional. A prospective field study was undertaken to evaluate the number and location of glove perforations, tested by the waterfill test. The morphology of these perforations was then inspected by stereo light and scanning electron microscopy. By comparing in-use defects to simulated defects created by medical instruments in unused gloves it was possible to categorize perforations caused by intrinsic defects or extrinsic mechanical stress. In six different types of surgical gloves collected from 720 urological operations the waterfill test revealed leakage rates of 6.6 percent to 12.3 percent. Further assessment of these gloves revealed intrinsic polymer material defect rates of 0.2 percent to 3.3 percent. The in-use acquired instrumental and mechanical perforation rate ranged from 4.6 percent to 12.15 percent. Perforations were mostly located at the index finger (left > right) or the thumbs. The morphology of the intrinsic defects was visualized as either incorporated membranous air bubbles or granular areas. The simulation of defects by surgical instruments in unused gloves resulted in the production of a catalog for comparison with defects seen in used gloves. This knowledge of the location and cause of these perforations highlights the need for a better avoidance strategy and/or establishment of a schedule for routine glove change by surgeons. In addition, the intrinsic polymer film quality of gloves can be improved by a lower incidence of air bubbles together with less granular sites. PMID:12650551

  18. Evaluation of two polymeric blends (EVA\\/PLA and EVA\\/PEG) as coating film materials for paclitaxel-eluting stent application

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xi Liu; Lei Lei; Jing-Wen Hou; Mu-Fei Tang; Sheng-Rong Guo; Zhong-Min Wang; Ke-Min Chen

    2011-01-01

    The ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA)\\/Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) blend and EVA\\/Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) blend were\\u000a applied as the drug carrier materials for a bi-layer drug-loaded stent coating film, which consisted of a paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded\\u000a layer and a drug-free EVA layer. The changes of weight and appearance of the drug-free polymeric blend films with increasing\\u000a time were examined by

  19. Morphological and Mechanical Properties of Polypropylene[PP]/Poly(Ethylene Vinyl Acetate)[EVA] Blends. I. Homopolymer PP/Eva Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Vargas, E.

    2000-10-01

    Morphological and mechanical properties of polypropylene [PP]/poly(ethylene vinyl acetate) [EVA] blends have been studied. Infrared results using thin films first indicated a transition toward compatibility between both components at concentrations above 40% EVA. The transition was verified with different experimental techniques and it was associated to morphological changes and mechanical properties. The PP/EVA blends were mechanically evaluated in terms of impact and tensile strength to determine the influence of blending on the performance properties of these materials. Agreement was found between the transition and the enhancement of both elongation at break and impact strength.

  20. In-Situ Leak Testing And Replacement Of Glovebox Isolator, Or Containment Unit Gloves

    DOEpatents

    Castro, Julio M. (Santa Fe, NM); Macdonald, John M. (Santa Fe, NM); Steckle, Jr., Warren P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-11-02

    A test plug for in-situ testing a glove installed in a glovebox is provided that uses a top plate and a base plate, and a diametrically expandable sealing mechanism fitting between the two plates. The sealing mechanism engages the base plate to diametrically expand when the variable distance between the top plate and the bottom plate is reduced. An inlet valve included on the top plate is used to introducing a pressurized gas to the interior of the glove, and a pressure gauge located on the top plate is used to monitor the interior glove pressure.

  1. The Effects of Lunar Dust on EVA Systems During the Apollo Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Mission documents from the six Apollo missions that landed on the lunar surface have been studied in order to catalog the effects of lunar dust on Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) systems, primarily the Apollo surface space suit. It was found that the effects could be sorted into nine categories: vision obscuration, false instrument readings, dust coating and contamination, loss of traction, clogging of mechanisms, abrasion, thermal control problems, seal failures, and inhalation and irritation. Although simple dust mitigation measures were sufficient to mitigate some of the problems (i.e., loss of traction) it was found that these measures were ineffective to mitigate many of the more serious problems (i.e., clogging, abrasion, diminished heat rejection). The severity of the dust problems were consistently underestimated by ground tests, indicating a need to develop better simulation facilities and procedures.

  2. The Effects of Lunar Dust on EVA Systems During the Apollo Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Mission documents from the six Apollo missions that landed on the lunar surface have been studied in order to catalog the effects of lunar dust on Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) systems, primarily the Apollo surface space suit. It was found that the effects could be sorted into nine categories: vision obscuration, false instrument readings, dust coating and contamination, loss of traction, clogging of mechanisms, abrasion, thermal control problems, seal failures, and inhalation and irritation. Although simple dust mitigation measures were sufficient to mitigate some of the problems (i.e., loss of traction) it was found that these measures were ineffective to mitigate many of the more serious problems (i.e., clogging, abrasion, diminished heat rejection). The severity of the dust problems were consistently underestimated by ground tests, indicating a need to develop better simulation facilities and procedures.

  3. Characterization of irradiation-induced crosslink of epoxidised natural rubber\\/ethylene vinyl acetate (ENR50\\/EVA) blend

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Zurina; H. Ismail; C. T. Ratnam

    2006-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on tensile, dynamic mechanical properties, thermal properties and morphology of ENR-50, EVA and ENR-50\\/EVA blend was investigated. All the samples were irradiated using a 3.0MeV electron beam (EB) machine with doses ranging from 20 to 100kGy. Results indicate that the gel fraction of ENR-50, EVA and ENR-50\\/EVA blend increases with irradiation dose. Concerning tensile properties, it

  4. Selenium and Mortality in the Elderly: Results from the EVA Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Tasnime Akbaraly; Josiane Arnaud; Isabelle Hininger-Favier; Veronique Gourlet; Anne-Marie Roussel; Claudine Berr

    2005-01-01

    Background: Inadequate plasma selenium can ad- versely affect the maintenance of optimal health; there- fore, reported decreases in plasma selenium in an aging population are cause for concern. To further examine this hypothesis, we explored the relationships between plasma selenium and mortality in an elderly population: the EVA (Etude du Vieillissement Arteriel) study. Methods: The EVA study was a 9-year

  5. Financial Efficiency of Electric Power Listed Company Based on EVA Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Duan; Li Tian; Haolin Hong

    2008-01-01

    EVA is the performance measurement indicator as the center of creating the shareholder value. With calculation of annual fund utilization efficiency of the electric power listed company by EVA model, it is approved that the blindness of electric power enterprises in choosing equity financing has reduced fund utilization efficiency. Considering the high rate of return on assets as well as

  6. Studies on anticorrosive properties of thermally sprayable EVA and EVAl coating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. Tambe; S. K. Singh; M. Patri; Dhirendra Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Application of polymeric coatings is one of the methods for protection of mild steel against corrosion. In the present work, blends of different grades of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) with varying vinyl acetate (VAc) content viz. 18%, 28%, 40% and hydrolyzed EVA i.e., ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVAl) with low density polyethylene (PE) have been used as binder for development of

  7. EVA, Economic profit and cash value added do NOT measure shareholder value creation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pablo Fernández

    2002-01-01

    We analyze 582 American companies using EVA, MVA, NOPAT and WACC data provided by Stern Stewart. For each of the 582 companies, we have calculated the 10-year correlation between the increase in the MVA (Market Value Added) each year and each year's EVA, NOPAT and WACC. For 296 (of the 582) companies, the correlation between the increase in the MVA

  8. Techniques for Improving the Performance of Future EVA Maneuvering Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor W.

    1995-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) is a small propulsive backpack that was developed as an in-house effort at Johnson Space Center; it is a lightweight system which attaches to the underside of the Primary Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) backpack of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). SAFER provides full six-axis control, as well as Automatic Attitude Hold (AAH), by means of a set of cold-gas nitrogen thrusters and a rate sensor-based control system. For compactness, a single hand controller is used, together with mode switching, to command all six axes. SAFER was successfully test-flown on the STS-64 mission in September 1994 as a Development Test Objective (DTO); development of an operational version is now proceeding. This version will be available for EVA self-rescue on the International Space Station and Mir, starting with the STS-86/Mir-7 mission in September 1997. The DTO SAFER was heavily instrumented, and produced in-flight data that was stored in a 12 MB computer memory on-board. This has allowed post-flight analysis to yield good estimates for the actual mass properties (moments and products of inertia and center of mass location) encountered on-orbit. By contrast, Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) post-flight results were generated mainly from analysis of video images, and so were not very accurate. The main goal of the research reported here was to use the detailed SAFER on-orbit mass properties data to optimize the design of future EVA maneuvering systems, with the aim being to improve flying qualities and/or reduce propellant consumption. The Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division Virtual Reality (VR) Laboratory proved to be a valuable research tool for such studies. A second objective of the grant was to generate an accurate dynamics model in support of the reflight of the DTO SAFER on STS-76/Mir-3. One complicating factor was the fact that a hand controller stowage box was added to the underside of SAFER on this flight; the position of this box was such that two of the SAFER jets plume it. A second complication was that the EVA astronaut will sometimes be transporting a massive experiment package. This will not only alter the overall mass properties significantly, but can itself also be plumed.

  9. Boudreaux the Robot (a.k.a. EVA Robotic Assistant)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillcutt, Kimberly; Burridge, Robert; Graham, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    The EVA Robotic Assistant is a prototype for an autonomous rover designed to assist human astronauts. The primary focus of the research is to explore the interaction between humans and robots, particularly in extreme environments, and to develop a software infrastructure that could be applied to any type of assistant robot, whether for planetary exploration or orbital missions. This paper describes the background and current status of the project, the types of scenarios addressed in field demonstrations, the hardware and software that comprise the current prototype, and future research plans.

  10. Astronauts Carl Meade and Mark Lee test SAFER during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts Carl J. Meade and Mark C. Lee (red stripe on suit) test the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system some 130 nautical miles from Earth. The pair was actually performing an in-space rehearsal or demonstration of a contingency rescue using the never-before flown hardware. Meade, who here wears the small back-pack unit with its complementary chest-mounted control unit, and Lee, anchored to Discovery's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robot arm, took turns using the SAFER hardware during their shared space walk of September 16, 1994.

  11. Astronauts Meade and Lee test SAFER system during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts Carl J. Meade and Mark C. Lee (red strip on suit) test the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system some 130 nautical miles above Earth. The pair was actually performing an in-space rehearsal or demonstration of a contingency rescue using the never-before flown hardware. Meade, who here wears the small back-pack unit with its complementary chest-mounted control unit, and Lee (anchored to the Space Shuttle Discovery's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robot arm) took turns using the SAFER hardware during their shared space walk.

  12. Baseline tests of the EVA contractor electric passenger vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozek, J. M.; Tryon, H. B.; Slavick, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The EVA Contactor four door sedan, an electric passenger vehicle, was tested to characterize the state-of-the-art of electric vehicles. It is a four passenger sedan that was converted to an electric vehicle. It is powered by 16 series connected 6 volt electric vehicle batteries through a four step contactor controller actuated by a foot accelerator pedal. The controller changes the voltage applied to the separately excited DC motor. The braking system is a vacuum assisted hydraulic braking system. Regenerative braking was also provided.

  13. Simulation and preparation of surface EVA in reduced gravity at the Marseilles Bay subsea analogue sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, P.; Gardette, B.; Chirié, B.; Collina-Girard, J.; Delauze, H. G.

    2012-12-01

    Extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts during space missions is simulated nowadays underwater in neutral buoyancy facilities. Certain aspects of weightlessness can be reproduced underwater by adding buoyancy to a diver-astronaut, therefore exposing the subject to the difficulties of working without gravity. Such tests were done at the COMEX' test pool in Marseilles in the 1980s to train for a French-Russian mission to the MIR station, for the development of the European HERMES shuttle and the COLUMBUS laboratory. However, space agencies are currently studying missions to other destinations than the International Space Station in orbit, such as the return to the Moon, NEO (near-Earth objects) or Mars. All these objects expose different gravities: Moon has one sixth of Earth's gravity, Mars has a third of Earth's gravity and asteroids have virtually no surface gravity; the astronaut "floats" above the ground. The preparation of such missions calls for a new concept in neutral buoyancy training, not on man-made structures, but on natural terrain, underwater, to simulate EVA operations such as sampling, locomotion or even anchoring in low gravity. Underwater sites can be used not only to simulate the reduced gravity that astronauts will experience during their field trips, also human factors like stress are more realistically reproduced in such environment. The Bay of Marseille hosts several underwater sites that can be used to simulate various geologic morphologies, such as sink-holes which can be used to simulate astronaut descends into craters, caves where explorations of lava tubes can be trained or monolithic rock structures that can be used to test anchoring devices (e.g., near Earth objects). Marseilles with its aerospace and maritime/offshore heritage hosts the necessary logistics and expertise that is needed to perform such simulations underwater in a safe manner (training of astronaut-divers in local test pools, research vessels, subsea robots and submarines). COMEX is currently preparing a space mission simulation in the Marseilles Bay (foreseen in June 2012), and the paper will give an overview of the different underwater analogue sites that are available to the scientific community for the simulation of surface EVA or the test of scientific instruments and devices.

  14. Evidence-Based Approach to the Analysis of Serious Decompression Sickness with Application to EVA Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny

    2001-01-01

    It is important to understand the risk of serious hypobaric decompression sickness (DCS) in order to develop procedures and treatment responses to mitigate the risk. Since it is not ethical to conduct prospective tests about serious DCS with humans, the necessary information was gathered from 73 published reports. We hypothesize that a 4-hr 100% oxygen (O2) prebreathe results in a very low risk of serious DCS, and test this through analysis. We evaluated 258 tests containing information from 79,366 exposures in attitude chambers. Serious DCS was documented in 918 men during the tests. Serious DCS are signs and symptoms broadly classified as Type II DCS. A risk function analysis with maximum likelihood optimization was performed to identify significant explanatory variables, and to create a predictive model for the probability of serious DCS [P(serious DCS)]. Useful variables were Tissue Ratio, the planned time spent at altitude (T(sub alt)), and whether or not repetitive exercise was performed at altitude. Tissue Ratio is P1N2/P2, where P1N2 is calculated nitrogen (N2) pressure in a compartment with a 180-min half-time for N2 pressure just before ascent, and P2 is ambient pressure after ascent. A prebreathe and decompression profile Shuttle astronauts use for extravehicular activity (EVA) includes a 4-hr prebreathe with 100% O2, an ascent to P2 = 4.3 lb per sq. in. absolute, and a T(sub alt) = 6 hr. The P(serious DCS) is: 0.0014 (0.00096 - 0.00196, 95% confidence interval) with exercise and 0.00025 (0.00016 - 0.00035) without exercise. Given 100 Shuttle EVAs to date and no report of serious DCS, the true risk is less than 0.03 with 95% confidence (Binomial Theorem). It is problematic to estimate the risk of serious DCS since it appears infrequently, even if the estimate is based on thousands of altitude chamber exposures. The true risk to astronauts may lie between the extremes of the confidence intervals (0.00016 - 0.00196) since the contribution of other factors, particularly exercise, to the risk of serious DCS during EVA is unknown. A simple model that only accounts for four important variables in retrospective data is still helpful to increase our understanding about the risk of serious DCS.

  15. Test of the Fishbein and Ajzen models as predictors of health care workers' glove use.

    PubMed

    Levin, P F

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of health care workers' glove use when there is a potential for blood exposure. The study hypothesis was that an extension of the theory of planned behavior would explain more of the variance in glove use behavior than the theory of reasoned action or theory of planned behavior. A random sample of nurses and laboratory workers (N = 527) completed a 26-item questionnaire with acceptable content validity and reliability estimates. Using structural equation modeling techniques, intention, attitude, and perceived risk were significant predictors of behavior. Perceived control and attitude were the significant determinants of intention. The theory of reasoned action was the most parsimonious model, explaining 70% of the variance in glove use behavior. The theory of planned behavior extension was a viable model to study behavior related to glove use and reducing workers' risks to bloodborne diseases. PMID:10435547

  16. The efficacy of wearing barrier cream under gloves in health care oroviders 

    E-print Network

    Lambden, Jennifer Lyn

    1997-01-01

    regulations has resulted in increased hand skin problems in health care providers (HCPs).2@6 Hand skin problems related to wearing gloves include red, chapped skin; non-specific irritant dermatitis; and allergic reactions to rubber products...

  17. Glove Changing Habits in Mobile Food Vendors in New York City.

    PubMed

    Basch, Corey H; Guerra, Laura A; MacDonald, Zerlina; Marte, Myladys; Basch, Charles E

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how often mobile food cart vendors in New York City (NYC) changed gloves after exchanging money, which is required by the current NYC health code as one of various measures to prevent foodborne illness. A total of 100 carts (10 carts in 10 zones) throughout Manhattan were observed. In the majority (56.9 %, n = 1,026) of the 1,804 money exchanges, food cart vendors did not change their gloves. Not changing gloves after exchanging money was widespread regardless of food type served (46.6 % for breakfast to 63.7 % for lunch), and across all 10 zones. Not changing gloves after touching money may result in indirect transmission of agents of disease and pose health risks for consumers. PMID:25559110

  18. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation related to the paper of the same name describing Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of low speed stall aerodynamics of a swept wing with a laminar flow wing glove.

  19. Effect of protective glove exposure to industrial contaminants on their resistance to mechanical risks.

    PubMed

    Dolez, Patricia I; Gauvin, Chantal; Lara, Jaime; Vu-Khanh, Toan

    2010-01-01

    In several industrial environments, mechanical risks are often combined with various contaminants such as oils and greases, which may reduce the performance of protective gloves against mechanical hazards. However, glove properties are characterized on new and clean specimens, and little is known about their residual resistance once contaminated and over time. In this study, a series of protective gloves used in metalworking companies and garages were exposed to relevant oils and greases. Used gloves were also obtained from a food processing center and a garage. Their residual resistance to mechanical risks (cutting, puncture and tearing) was evaluated using standard test methods. Results revealed in some instances a large decrease in resistance to mechanical risks. Since a corresponding change in the material aspect may not always be easily observable, this may lead to serious safety breaches. These findings demonstrate the need to further the research in this domain. PMID:20540838

  20. The efficacy of wearing barrier cream under gloves in health care oroviders

    E-print Network

    Lambden, Jennifer Lyn

    1997-01-01

    regulations has resulted in increased hand skin problems in health care providers (HCPs).2@6 Hand skin problems related to wearing gloves include red, chapped skin; non-specific irritant dermatitis; and allergic reactions to rubber products...

  1. Pollution prevention benefits of non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves - 11000

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dodge, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-11

    Radiation shielding is commonly used to protect the glovebox worker from unintentional direct and secondary radiation exposure, while working with plutonium-238 and plutonium-239. Shielding glovebox gloves are traditionally composed of lead-based materials, i.e., hazardous waste. This has prompted the development of new, non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves. No studies, however, have investigated the pollution prevention benefits of these new glovebox gloves. We examined both leaded and non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves. The nonhazardous substitutes are higher in cost, but this is offset by eliminating the costs associated with onsite waste handling of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) items. In the end, replacing lead with non-hazardous substitutes eliminates waste generation and future liability.

  2. Enhanced Adhesion of EVA Laminates to Primed Glass Substrates Subjected to Damp-Heat Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    2005-02-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of glass-surface priming to promote enhanced adhesion of EVA laminates during damp-heat exposure at 85 C and 85% relative humidity. The primary objective was to develop advanced encapsulant formulations by incorporation of various primer formulations that exhibit improved adhesion during damp-heat exposure. Several primer formulations were identified that greatly enhanced the EVA adhesion strength, including to the extent that peeling could not be initiated, even for the laminates of the glass substrate/fast-cure EVA15295P/TPE backsheet (a Tedlar/polyester/EVA tri-laminate) that were exposed in a damp-heat test chamber for more than 750 h. The results show that a synergistic increase in the interfacial hydrophobicity, siloxane density, and cross-linking density are the key attributes to the improvement in the EVA adhesion strength.

  3. In-use barrier integrity of gloves: Latex and nitrile superior to vinyl

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert Rego; Lorraine Roley

    1999-01-01

    Background: Although gloves manufactured with different materials have comparable barrier properties when removed directly from the box and tested, their actual on-the-job barrier performance may be extremely different. Although effective in static, pre-use conditions, barrier properties may be compromised once challenged by the rigorous hand and finger movements associated with many health care procedures. Gloves are meant to act as

  4. Evaluation of Glove Bag Containment and Asbestos Abatement Clearance: Methodologies for Asbestos Removal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phillip A. Froehlich; Bruce A. Hollett

    1993-01-01

    In a study of the effectiveness of glove bags to control asbestos exposures to workers and contamination of the environment, a four-man crew removed asbestos in eight rooms in four schools. The workers had little prior experience using glove bags and received on-the-job training in proper techniques during the early stages of the study. Daily personal breathing zone (PBZ) samples

  5. Norovirus Transmission between Hands, Gloves, Utensils, and Fresh Produce during Simulated Food Handling

    PubMed Central

    Aho, E.; Mikkelä, A.; Ranta, J.; Tuominen, P.; Rättö, M.; Maunula, L.

    2014-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs), a leading cause of food-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, are easily transferred via ready-to-eat (RTE) foods, often prepared by infected food handlers. In this study, the transmission of HuNoV and murine norovirus (MuNoV) from virus-contaminated hands to latex gloves during gloving, as well as from virus-contaminated donor surfaces to recipient surfaces after simulated preparation of cucumber sandwiches, was inspected. Virus transfer was investigated by swabbing with polyester swabs, followed by nucleic acid extraction from the swabs with a commercial kit and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. During gloving, transfer of MuNoV dried on the hand was observed 10/12 times. HuNoV, dried on latex gloves, was disseminated to clean pairs of gloves 10/12 times, whereas HuNoV without drying was disseminated 11/12 times. In the sandwich-preparing simulation, both viruses were transferred repeatedly to the first recipient surface (left hand, cucumber, and knife) during the preparation. Both MuNoV and HuNoV were transferred more efficiently from latex gloves to cucumbers (1.2% ± 0.6% and 1.5% ± 1.9%) than vice versa (0.7% ± 0.5% and 0.5% ± 0.4%). We estimated that transfer of at least one infective HuNoV from contaminated hands to the sandwich prepared was likely to occur if the hands of the food handler contained 3 log10 or more HuNoVs before gloving. Virus-contaminated gloves were estimated to transfer HuNoV to the food servings more efficiently than a single contaminated cucumber during handling. Our results indicate that virus-free food ingredients and good hand hygiene are needed to prevent HuNoV contamination of RTE foods. PMID:24951789

  6. Using Gloves Coated With a Dermal Therapy Formula to Improve Skin Condition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deborah D. Davis; Robert A. Harper

    2005-01-01

    •THIRTY-ONE HEALTH CARE WORKERS, of whom 24 (77%) were perioperative nurses, evaluated a new nonlatex surgical glove with a coating consisting of ingredients clinically proven to have beneficial effects on skin health.•IN THIS ONE-DAY, clinical self-assessment study, nurses and other health care workers compared the condition of the skin on their hands before and after wearing these surgical gloves.•EIGHTY-ONE PERCENT

  7. Effects of Exposure Time, Material Type, and Granular Pesticide on Glove Contamination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Guo; J. Stone; H. M. Stahr; M. Shelley

    2001-01-01

    Chemical-resistant gloves are recommended for pesticide applicators to reduce their exposure to agricultural chemicals. In\\u000a this research, three chemical-resistant glove materials—nitrile, neoprene, and barrier laminate—were studied in relation to\\u000a contamination with granular terbufos and tefluthrin. Surfaces of specimens backed with alpha cellulose were contaminated with\\u000a 300 mg of either granular terbufos or tefluthrin for 1-, 2-, 4-, 8-, 16-, and

  8. Puncture resistance and stiffness of nitrile and latex dental examination gloves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H B Patel; F J T Burke; G J P Fleming

    2004-01-01

    Objective The aim of the current study was to assess the puncture resistance and stiffness of nitrile and latex dental examination gloves.Methods Puncture resistance was measured by employing an adapted version of ASTM F1342-91 using both a 316 stainless steel puncture probe (0.8 mm diameter) and a dental injection needle (0.45 mm diameter) interfaced to a tensile testing apparatus. Glove

  9. Glove Use and the Relative Risk of Acute Hand Injury: A Case-Crossover Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary S. Sorock; David A. Lombardi; David K. Peng; Russ Hauser; Ellen A. Eisen; Robert F. Herrick; Murray A. Mittleman

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between glove use and acute traumatic occupational hand injury. We used a case-crossover, within-subject study design to control for differences between individuals such as occupation, injury history, age, gender, risk-taking behavior, manual dexterity, and muscle strength. A total of 1166 hand-injured workers were interviewed regarding the use of gloves at

  10. Nurses' intentions to wear gloves during venipuncture procedures: a behavioral psychology perspective.

    PubMed

    Doi, Suhail A R; Amigo, Maria Florencia

    2007-06-01

    Registered nurses working at a teaching hospital in Kuwait were surveyed to assess the psychosocial variables associated with their intention to comply with glove-wearing recommendations. Perceived consequences and normative beliefs, as well as sex and years of nursing experience, significantly influenced their behavioral intentions, suggesting that improvements in intention to comply are more likely to come from practical demonstrations that show nurses the potential outcomes of both using and not using gloves. PMID:17520556

  11. Implementation of Wearable Sensor Glove using Pulse-wave Sensor, Conducting Fabric and Embedded System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Youngbum Lee; Byungwoo Lee; Chungkeun Lee; Myoungho Lee

    2006-01-01

    Today, there are research trends about the wearable sensor device that measures various bio-signals and provides healthcare services to user using e-health technology. This study describes the wearable sensor glove using pulse-wave sensor, conducting fabric and embedded system. This wearable sensor glove is based on the pulse-wave measurement system which is able to measure the pulse wave signal in much

  12. Efficacy of three surface disinfectants for dental radiographic films and gloves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M Coogan; M Patel; D Mladenova

    2004-01-01

    Contaminated radiographic films and gloves may transmit infectious diseases.Objective. To determine whether Pre Sept (NaDC), a sodium dichloroisocyanurate based disinfectant; Bronocide SP (AIP) an alcohol–phenol–iodine disinfectant and polyvinyl pyrrolidine iodine (PVPI) can be used to disinfect radiographic films and gloves.Study design. Radiographic films were contaminated with Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacilli or saliva and placed in either 0.1, 0.25 or

  13. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared LED light source. The compact grating spectrometer was replaced with a chip-scale spectrometer. With this new design, the sensor is 4 in 2 in 0.5 in, weighs 60 g, and no fiber optic cables are needed. The sensor, which contains the light source and the spectrometer, is adhered directly to the skin with medical grade adhesive. The sensor can be powered via the USB port of the laptop computer that controls the sensor operation. Alternatively, for studies in the spacesuit, the sensor can be powered by a small battery pack and operated by an ultra-portable hand-held computer. Both the handheld computer and battery pack will easily fit within the PLSS of the test spacesuit. System automation was significantly improved, to add features suggested by our colleagues in the Cardiovascular Laboratory and the NASA JSC Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures Project. The functionality and portability of this system were demonstrated in our UMass laboratory.

  14. Custom Unit Pump Design and Testing for the EVA PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Goldman, Jeff; Morris, Kim; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design and test a pre-flight prototype pump for use in the Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump must accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting non-condensable gas without becoming air locked. The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, sealless, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. Although the planned flight unit will use a sensorless motor with custom designed controller, the pre-flight prototype to be provided for this project incorporates Hall effect sensors, allowing an interface with a readily available commercial motor controller. This design approach reduced the cost of this project and gives NASA more flexibility in future PLSS laboratory testing. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES verified that the pump meets the design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure drop, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, gas ingestion , and restart capability under both ambient and vacuum conditions. The pump operated between 40 and 240 lbm/hr flowrate, 35 to 100 F pump temperature range, and 5 to 10 psid pressure rise. Power consumption of the pump controller at the nominal operating point in both ambient and vacuum conditions was 9.5 W, which was less than the 12 W predicted. Gas ingestion capabilities were tested by injecting 100 cc of air into the fluid line; the pump operated normally throughout this test. The test results contained a number of anomalies, specifically power increases and a few flow stoppages, that prompted TEES and Honeywell to disassemble and inspect the pump. Inspection indicated contamination in the pump and fit issues may have played roles in the observed anomalies. Testing following reassembly indicated that the performance of the pump 1) matched both the predicted performance values, 2) the performance values measured prior to disassembly, and 3) was free of the anomalies noted in the pre-disassembly testing.

  15. Towards understanding the mechanisms and the kinetics of nanoparticle penetration through protective gloves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinches, L.; Peyrot, C.; Lemarchand, L.; Boutrigue, N.; Zemzem, M.; Wilkinson, K. J.; Hallé, S.; Tufenkji, N.

    2015-05-01

    Parallel to the increased use of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) in the formulation of commercial products or in medicine, numerous health & safety agencies have recommended the application of the precautionary principle to handle ENP; namely, the recommendation to use protective gloves against chemicals. However, recent studies reveal the penetration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles through nitrile rubber protective gloves in conditions simulating occupational use. This project is designed to understand the links between the penetration of gold nanoparticles (nAu) through nitrile rubber protective gloves and the mechanical and physical behaviour of the elastomer material subjected to conditions simulating occupational use (i.e., mechanical deformations (MD) and sweat). Preliminary analyses show that nAu suspensions penetrate selected glove materials after exposure to prolonged (3 hours) dynamic deformations. Significant morphological changes are observed on the outer surface of the glove sample; namely, the number and the surface of the micropores on the surface increase. Moreover, nitrile rubber protective gloves are also shown to be sensitive to the action of nAu suspension and to the action of the saline solution used to simulate sweat (swelling).

  16. RoboGlove-A Grasp Assist Device for Earth and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ihrke, C. A.; Bridgwater, L. B.; Rogers, J. M.; Davis, D. R.; Linn, D. M.; Laske, E. A.; Ensley, K. G.; Lee, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    The RoboGlove is an assistive device that can augment human strength, endurance or provide directed motion for use in rehabilitation. RoboGlove is a spinoff of the highly successful Robonaut 2 (R2) system developed as part of a partnership between General Motors and NASA. This extremely lightweight device employs an actuator system based on the R2 finger drive system to transfer part or the entire grasp load from human tendons to artificial ones contained in the glove. Steady state loads ranging from 15 to 20 lbs. and peaks approaching 50 lbs. are achievable. Work is underway to integrate the RoboGlove system with a space suit glove to add strength or reduce fatigue during spacewalks. Tactile sensing, miniaturized electronics, and on-board processing provide sufficient flexibility for applications in many industries. The following describes the design, mechanical/electrical integration, and control features of the glove in an assembly-line configuration and discusses work toward the space suit application.

  17. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2014-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft's swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  18. Analysis of Low Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2014-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft's swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  19. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong

    2013-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft s swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First AIAA CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  20. Mobile Agents: A Distributed Voice-Commanded Sensory and Robotic System for Surface EVA Assistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Alena, Rick; Crawford, Sekou; Dowding, John; Graham, Jeff; Kaskiris, Charis; Tyree, Kim S.; vanHoof, Ronnie

    2003-01-01

    A model-based, distributed architecture integrates diverse components in a system designed for lunar and planetary surface operations: spacesuit biosensors, cameras, GPS, and a robotic assistant. The system transmits data and assists communication between the extra-vehicular activity (EVA) astronauts, the crew in a local habitat, and a remote mission support team. Software processes ("agents"), implemented in a system called Brahms, run on multiple, mobile platforms, including the spacesuit backpacks, all-terrain vehicles, and robot. These "mobile agents" interpret and transform available data to help people and robotic systems coordinate their actions to make operations more safe and efficient. Different types of agents relate platforms to each other ("proxy agents"), devices to software ("comm agents"), and people to the system ("personal agents"). A state-of-the-art spoken dialogue interface enables people to communicate with their personal agents, supporting a speech-driven navigation and scheduling tool, field observation record, and rover command system. An important aspect of the engineering methodology involves first simulating the entire hardware and software system in Brahms, and then configuring the agents into a runtime system. Design of mobile agent functionality has been based on ethnographic observation of scientists working in Mars analog settings in the High Canadian Arctic on Devon Island and the southeast Utah desert. The Mobile Agents system is developed iteratively in the context of use, with people doing authentic work. This paper provides a brief introduction to the architecture and emphasizes the method of empirical requirements analysis, through which observation, modeling, design, and testing are integrated in simulated EVA operations.

  1. F-111 TACT natural laminar flow glove flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Steers, L. L.; Trujillo, B.

    1981-01-01

    Improvements in cruise efficiency on the order of 15 to 40% are obtained by increasing the extent of laminar flow over lifting surfaces. Two methods of achieving laminar flow are being considered, natural laminar flow and laminar flow control. Natural laminar flow (NLF) relies primarily on airfoil shape while laminar flow control involves boundary layer suction or blowing with mechanical devices. The extent of natural laminar flow that could be achieved with consistency in a real flight environment at chord Reynolds numbers in the range of 30 x 10(6) power was evaluated. Nineteen flights were conducted on the F-111 TACT airplane having a NLF airfoil glove section. The section consists of a supercritical airfoil providing favorable pressure gradients over extensive portions of the upper and lower surfaces of the wing. Boundary layer measurements were obtained over a range of wing leading edge sweep angles at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 0.85. Data were obtained for natural transition and for a range of forced transition locations over the test airfoil.

  2. Extravehicular Activity and Planetary Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffington, J. A.; Mary, N. A.

    2015-03-01

    The extravehicular activity presentation will discuss the effects and dependencies of the EVA system design on the technology and operations for contamination control and planetary protection on surface of Mars.

  3. An assessment of the incidence of punctures in latex and non-latex dental examination gloves in routine clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F J T Burke; S McHugh; C A Murray

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the puncture resistance of a recently introduced non-latex, nitrile dental glove in comparison with a latex glove worn during routine clinical dental procedures.Setting Dentists in general dental practice working within the UK during 1999.Subjects and methods 2,020 gloves worn by five general dental practitioners were examined for punctures following standard clinical use by a water inflation method.

  4. cross infectionFor those of you allergic to latex, nitrile could be the glove material for you

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Bagg

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the puncture resistance of a recently introduced non-latex, nitrile dental glove in comparison with a latex glove worn during routine clinical dental procedures.Setting Dentists in general dental practice working within the UK during 1999.Subjects and methods 2,020 gloves worn by five general dental practitioners were examined for punctures following standard clinical use by a water inflation method.

  5. Factors influencing the end of the service life of protective gloves used in car repair shops: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Emilia, Irzma?ska; Agnieszka, Stefko; Katarzyna, Dy?ska-Kukulska

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an end-of-service-life study on 2 kinds of protective gloves designed for workplaces in which workers are exposed to mineral oils and mechanical factors. The authors developed their own end-of-service-life study method that takes into account factors occurring during real-life use of protective gloves. The examined gloves were subjected to mechanical, chemical, and physical factors. The objective of the study was to compare the protective in new gloves subjected to a laboratory simulation test and in gloves used at workplaces in car repair shops. A further goal was to design a glove assessment procedure that would ensure comprehensive analysis of the actual level of performance provided by gloves exposed to selected chemical and mechanical factors as well as subjected to the influence of temperature and humidity, mechanical damage, and chemical degradation of material. The results lead to the conclusion that simultaneous exposure of protective gloves to mechanical, chemical, and physical factors significantly decreases their performance levels. Furthermore, similar performance levels were obtained for gloves subjected to laboratory simulation tests and for those used in the workplace. PMID:24965322

  6. ESEM analysis of polymeric film in EVA-modified cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, D.A. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California at Berkeley (United States)]. E-mail: denise@ecv.ufsc.br; Monteiro, P.J.M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California at Berkeley (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Portland cement pastes modified by 20% weight (polymer/cement ratio) of poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (EVA) were prepared, cured, and immersed in water for 11 days. The effects of water saturation and drying on the EVA polymeric film formed in cement pastes were observed using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). This technique allowed the imaging of the EVA film even in saturated samples. The decrease of the relative humidity inside the ESEM chamber did not cause any visual modification of the polymeric film during its drying.

  7. Ultraviolet-ray irradiation and degradation evaluation of the sealing agent EVA film for solar cells under high temperature and humidity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takeshi Kojima; Takeshi Yanagisawa

    2005-01-01

    We used ultraviolet-ray irradiation and conditions of high temperature and humidity to study the stability of a compound of a special type of ethylene acetic acid vinyl (EVA) capsule composed of EVA\\/quartz and quartz\\/EVA\\/quartz, focusing on their deterioration over time. The cause of deterioration of the quartz\\/EVA\\/quartz was analyzed. It was observed that the quality of transmission of quartz\\/EVA\\/quartz increased

  8. Eva M. Reese, excerpts from an oral history.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Sarah E

    2005-01-01

    Eva Miller Reese is a former director of the Visiting Nurse Services of New York (1964-1976) and a past secretary of the Public Health Nursing section of the American Public Health Association. She is also the 1974 recipient of the Haven Emerson Award, the highest honor awarded by the Public Health Association of New York City. A nationally renowned leader in public health nursing, Reese influenced the course of home care nursing during a turbulent time of social unrest and Great Society initiatives in health care. Throughout her career, Reese continually advocated for coordinated, cost-effective services. Self-effacing and soft-spoken during a 1998 interview, Reese conjured an image of her younger self, and remembered some of the realities of reaching adulthood during the Great Depression. Her reflections on home health care, nursing, and the role of public health agencies are rooted in core values of social justice and multidisciplinary action. PMID:16150020

  9. Person to Person Biological Heat Bypass During EVA Emergencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koscheyev, Victor S.; Leon, Gloria R.; Lee, Joo-Young; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Berowiski, Anna; Trevino, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    During EVA and other extreme environments, mutual human support is sometimes the last way to survive when there is a failure of the life support equipment. The possibility to transfer a coolant to remove heat or a warming fluid to increase heat from one individual to another to support the thermal balance of the individual with system failure was assessed. The following scenarios were considered: 1. one participant has a cooling system that is not working well and already has a body heat deficit equal to 100-120 kcal and a finger temperature decline to 25 C; 2. one participant has the same status of overcooling and the other mild overheating. Preliminary findings showed promise in using such sharing tactics to extend the time duration of survival in extreme situations when there is a high metabolic rate in the donor.

  10. Advanced Design Heat PumpRadiator for EVA Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Passow, Christian; Phillips, Scott; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Absorption cooling using a LiCl/water heat pump can enable lightweight and effective thermal control for EVA suits without venting water to the environment. The key components in the system are an absorber/radiator that rejects heat to space and a flexible evaporation cooling garment that absorbs heat from the crew member. This paper describes progress in the design, development, and testing of the absorber/radiator and evaporation cooling garment. New design concepts and fabrication approaches will significantly reduce the mass of the absorber/radiator. We have also identified materials and demonstrated fabrication approaches for production of a flexible evaporation cooling garment. Data from tests of the absorber/radiator s modular components have validated the design models and allowed predictions of the size and weight of a complete system.

  11. Architectural development of an advanced EVA Electronic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    An advanced electronic system for future EVA missions (including zero gravity, the lunar surface, and the surface of Mars) is under research and development within the Advanced Life Support Division at NASA Ames Research Center. As a first step in the development, an optimum system architecture has been derived from an analysis of the projected requirements for these missions. The open, modular architecture centers around a distributed multiprocessing concept where the major subsystems independently process their own I/O functions and communicate over a common bus. Supervision and coordination of the subsystems is handled by an embedded real-time operating system kernel employing multitasking software techniques. A discussion of how the architecture most efficiently meets the electronic system functional requirements, maximizes flexibility for future development and mission applications, and enhances the reliability and serviceability of the system in these remote, hostile environments is included.

  12. Robonaut 2 - IVA Experiments On-Board ISS and Development Towards EVA Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, Myron; Hulse, Aaron; Badger, Julia; Thackston, Allison; Rogers, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Robonaut 2 (R2) has completed its fixed base activities on-board the ISS and is scheduled to receive its climbing legs in early 2014. In its continuing line of firsts, the R2 torso finished up its on-orbit activities on its stanchion with the manipulation of space blanket materials and performed multiple tasks under teleoperation control by IVA astronauts. The successful completion of these two IVA experiments is a key step in Robonaut's progression towards an EVA capability. Integration with the legs and climbing inside the ISS will provide another important part of the experience that R2 will need prior to performing tasks on the outside of ISS. In support of these on-orbit activities, R2 has been traversing across handrails in simulated zero-g environments and working with EVA tools and equipment on the ground to determine manipulation strategies for an EVA Robonaut. R2 made significant advances in robotic manipulation of deformable materials in space while working with its softgoods task panel. This panel features quarter turn latches that secure a space blanket to the task panel structure. The space blanket covers two cloth cubes that are attached with Velcro to the structure. R2 was able to open and close the latches, pull back the blanket, and remove the cube underneath. R2 simulated cleaning up an EVA worksite as well, by replacing the cube and reattaching the blanket. In order to interact with the softgoods panel, R2 has both autonomously and with a human in the loop identified and localized these deformable objects. Using stereo color cameras, R2 identified characteristic elements on the softgoods panel then extracted the location and orientation of the object in its field of view using stereo disparity and kinematic transforms. R2 used both vision processing and supervisory control to successfully accomplish this important task. Teleoperation is a key capability for Robonaut's effectiveness as an EVA system. To build proficiency, crewmembers have attempted increasingly difficult tasks using R2 inside the Station. After donning motion capture equipment and a virtual reality visor, Expedition 34/35 flight engineer Tom Marshburn began operations with simple hand movements. Having gained confidence, Marshburn guided R2's arms in a leader-follower exercise with crewmate Chris Cassidy. He was also able to use the hand to grab a tumbling roll of tape, a task only demonstrable in microgravity. Later efforts saw Cassidy handle softgoods through shared control with ground operators, mimicking an activity previously achieved using only autonomy. Robotic climbing through the ISS on handrails requires both precision motion and compliant grasps in order to both position grippers on handrails/seat track and prevent large internal forces. R2 climbs using actively controlled compliance and torque limiting to meet both the precision and softness requirements. During a step, the attached leg is controlled to be strong and stiff in order to maintain precision trajectory tracking. The swing leg is controlled to be stiff but weak to minimize unintentional impact forces while maintaining precision. During a simulated dual limb grasp (as shown in Figure 1), the R2 controller maintains one limb rigid and one limb soft to prevent large internal forces from building up. R2's grippers also use a form of force control to limit grip force while not fully closed on either a handrail or seat track thus limiting unintentional forces on cables/objects that may be present in R2's translational path. The on-board torso R2 safety system relies on a single end-effector velocity limit to prevent potential impact forces from exceeding Station maximum load requirements. R2's mobile configuration required modifications to the velocity limiting safety function due to its large, dynamic inertia. R2's legs maneuver the robot's mass creating configuration dependent, joint-relative inertias. A single all-encompassing velocity limit to cover worst case inertia is prohibitively low. The upgraded R2 control and safety systems solve this problem using momentum

  13. Design and test of an NLF wing glove for the variable-sweep transition flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waggoner, Ed G.; Campbell, Richard L.; Phillips, Pam S.; Hallissy, James B.

    1987-01-01

    Gloves for M = 0.7 and 0.8 design points were computationally designed and analyzed at conditions over the proposed flight test envelope. The resulting computational pressure distributions were analyzed in a boundary layer stability code. These results indicate that the available pressure distributions offer a wide range of combinations of cross flow and Tollmien-Schlichting N-factors. The glove designs along with the baseline configuration were tested in an entry into the National Transonic Facility. Analysis of the force and moment data showed no significant differences in the performance and stability and control characteristics between the baseline and gloved configurations. The rolling moment constraint was met over the entire flight test envelope for the gloved configuration. Pressure distributions for the NTF test confirmed the design pressure distributions were achieved. However, it was decided that with minor modifications to the inboard region of the glove, useful available data could be significantly increased by adding another row of pressure orifices at span station 167.

  14. Is the surgical knot tying technique associated with a risk for unnoticed glove perforation? An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The issue of safety in the surgical procedure has recently been widely and openly discussed at the World Health Organization. The use of latex gloves is the current standard of protection during surgery, as they remain intact throughout the procedure. The present study was designed to evaluate the rate of glove perforation during a two-hand technique using polyester sutures in a controlled experimental study. Methods Hypothesis was that the gloves used during a two-hand technique using polyester suture suffer punctures. We used 150 pairs of gloves during the experiment. Each investigator performed 30 tests always using double gloving. They made five surgical knots on each test over a custom-made table specifically developed for the experiment. Ten tests were done at a time with a week- interval. The Control Group (CG) has 30 pairs of intact surgical gloves. The gloves were tested to impermeability by water filling and leaking was observed at three different times. Statistics relating to the perforation rate were analyzed using the chi-square test. A P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results During the experiment there was no loss of gloves by drilling or inadvertent error in performing the impermeability test. No perforations were detected at any time during the impermeability test with the gloves used for sutures. Also, the CG presented no leakage of the liquid used for the test. There was no statistical difference between the groups underwent suture nor between them and the GC. Conclusion Under the studied conditions, the authors’ hypotheses could not be proved. There was no damage to the surgical gloves during the entire experiment. The authors believe that the skin abrasions observed in the ulnar side of the little finger, constant throughout the experiment, must be caused by friction. We feel there is no risk of perforation of surgical gloves during a two-hand technique using polyester suture. PMID:24991234

  15. Enhanced adhesion of EVA laminates to primed glass substrates subjected to damp heat exposure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. J. Pern; G. J. Jorgensen

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of glass-surface priming to promote enhanced adhesion of EVA laminates during damp-heat exposure at 85°C and 85% relative humidity. The primary objective was to develop advanced encapsulant formulations by incorporation of various primer formulations that exhibit improved adhesion during damp-heat exposure. Several primer formulations were identified that greatly enhanced the EVA adhesion strength, including to the

  16. Influence on grip of knife handle surface characteristics and wearing protective gloves.

    PubMed

    Claudon, Laurent

    2006-11-01

    Ten subjects were asked to apply maximum torques on knife handles with either their bare hand or their hand wearing a Kevlar fibre protective glove. Four knife handles (2 roughnesses, 2 hardnesses) were tested. Surface electromyograms of 6 upper limb and shoulder muscles were recorded and subject opinions on both knife handle hardness and friction in the hand were also assessed. The results revealed the significant influence of wearing gloves (p<0.0001), knife type (p<0.0005) and handle hardness (p<0.005) on the applied torque. Wearing Kevlar fibre gloves greatly increased the torque independently of the other two parameters. Under the bare hand condition, a 90 degrees ShA slightly rough handle provided the greatest torque. Subject opinion agreed with the observed effects on recorded torque values except for the hardness factor, for which a preference for the 70 degrees ShA value over the 90 degrees ShA value emerged. PMID:16566891

  17. The Evolution of Extravehicular Activity Operations to Lunar Exploration Based on Operational Lessons Learned During 2009 NASA Desert RATS Field Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Ernest R., Jr.; Welsh, Daren; Coan, Dave; Johnson, Kieth; Ney, Zane; McDaniel, Randall; Looper, Chris; Guirgis, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    This paper will present options to evolutionary changes in several philosophical areas of extravehicular activity (EVA) operations. These areas will include single person verses team EVAs; various loss of communications scenarios (with Mission Control, between suited crew, suited crew to rover crew, and rover crew A to rover crew B); EVA termination and abort time requirements; incapacitated crew ingress time requirements; autonomous crew operations during loss of signal periods including crew decisions on EVA execution (including decision for single verses team EVA). Additionally, suggestions as to the evolution of the make-up of the EVA flight control team from the current standard will be presented. With respect to the flight control team, the major areas of EVA flight control, EVA Systems and EVA Tasks, will be reviewed, and suggested evolutions of each will be presented. Currently both areas receive real-time information, and provide immediate feedback during EVAs as well as spacesuit (extravehicular mobility unit - EMU) maintenance and servicing periods. With respect to the tasks being performed, either EMU servicing and maintenance, or the specific EVA tasks, daily revising of plans will need to be able to be smoothly implemented to account for unforeseen situations and findings. Many of the presented ideas are a result of lessons learned by the NASA Johnson Space Center Mission Operations Directorate operations team support during the 2009 NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS). It is important that the philosophy of both EVA crew operations and flight control be examined now, so that, where required, adjustments can be made to a next generation EMU and EVA equipment that will complement the anticipated needs of both the EVA flight control team and the crews.

  18. Thermal comfort range of a military cold protection glove: database by thermophysiological simulation.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Carsten; Uedelhoven, Wolfgang H; Kurz, Bernhard; Glitz, Karl Jochen

    2008-09-01

    The thermal insulation properties of a military wet/cold protection glove of the German Bundeswehr were investigated using the thermophysiological simulation device CYBOR with a heated full-scale hand model. The aim of this study was the physiology related and more reliable estimation of a database for the thermal comfort range of the glove in terms of environmental limit temperatures and maximum safe wearing times (limit times). For that purpose the simulation device CYBOR is equipped with a control feature allowing the simulation of the physiological effect that the blood flow into the hands as the dominant heat source is reduced with decreasing skin temperature (vasoconstriction effect). In the simulation test, the criterion defining the thermal comfort range of the glove was the maintenance of a minimum hand phantom skin temperature of 15 degrees C. For various assumed metabolic rates between 50 and 175 W m(-2) and environmental temperatures down to -22 degrees C, the maximum safe wearing times within the thermal comfort range of the military glove were estimated between only 20 min and almost 1 h. The used simulation scenario for the prediction of environmental limit temperatures, however, tends to deliver too low values in correlation to the estimated limit times and needs further critical consideration. The estimated data concerning the thermal comfort range of the wet/cold protection glove of the German Bundeswehr leads to the recommendation for a use of this model in mild cold climatic regions. The presented thermophysiological simulation procedure for the evaluation of the cold protection properties of gloves in terms of maximum safe wearing times within the thermal comfort range can be a useful tool to establish practical operating instructions for soldiers or civilians acting in cold environments. PMID:18172670

  19. Protective gloves for use in high-risk patients: how much do they affect the dexterity of the surgeon?

    PubMed

    Phillips, A M; Birch, N C; Ribbans, W J

    1997-03-01

    Twenty-five orthopaedic surgeons underwent eight motor and sensory tests while using four different glove combinations and without gloves. As well as single and double latex, surgeons wore a simple Kevlar glove with latex inside and outside and then wore a Kevlar and Medak glove with latex inside and outside, as recommended by the manufacturers. The effect of learning with each sequence was neutralised by randomising the glove order. The time taken to complete each test was recorded and, where appropriate, error rates were noted. Simple sensory tests took progressively longer to perform so that using the thickest glove combination led to the completion times being doubled. Error rates increased significantly. Tests of stereognosis also took longer and use of the thickest glove combination caused these tests to take three times as long on average. Error rates again increased significantly. However, prolongation of motor tasks was less marked. We conclude that, armed with this quantitative analysis of sensitivity and dexterity impairment, surgeons can judge the relative difficulties that may be incurred as a result of wearing the gloves against the benefits that they offer in protection. PMID:9135240

  20. Fuel Oxidizer Reaction Products (FORP) Contamination of Service Module (SM) and Release of N-nitrosodimethylamine(NDMA)in a Humid Environment from Crew EVA Suits Contaminated with FORP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidl, William; Mikatarian, Ron; Lam, Chiu-Wing; West, Bil; Buchanan, Vanessa; Dee, Louis; Baker, David; Koontz, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The Service Module (SM) is an element of the Russian Segment of the International Space Station (ISS). One of the functions of the SM is to provide attitude control for the ISS using thrusters when the U.S. Control Moment Gyros (CMG's) must be desaturated. Prior to an Extravehicular Activity (EVA) on the Russian Segment, the Docking Compartment (DC1) is depressurized, as it is used as an airlock. When the DC1 is depressurized, the CMG's margin of momentum is insufficient and the SM attitude control thrusters need to fire to desaturate the CMG's. SM roll thruster firings induce contamination onto adjacent surfaces with Fuel Oxidizer Reaction Products (FORP). FORP is composed of both volatile and non-volatile components. One of the components of FORP is the potent carcinogen N-nitrosdimethylamine (NDMA). Since the EVA crewmembers often enter the area surrounding the thrusters for tasks on the aft end of the SM and when translating to other areas of the Russian Segment, the presence of FORP is a concern. This paper will discuss FORP contamination of the SM surfaces, the release of NDMA in a humid environment from crew EVA suits, if they happen to be contaminated with FORP, and the toxicological risk associated with the NDMA release.

  1. Satellite services system analysis study, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The background, ground rules and assumptions, individual design reference mission results and total user benefit projection for the economic benefit analysis are discussed. Radiation protection, extravehicular activity (EVA) operational pressure, mobility effects, tool/glove/effects, anthropometric definition, EVA lighting, and equipment turnaround for the advanced extravehicular maneuvering unit are also discussed.

  2. Allergic reactions to rubber gloves in dental patients: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Smart, E R; Macleod, R I; Lawrence, C M

    1992-06-20

    Three cases of allergy to rubber are described, in which the patients exhibited peri-oral rashes following dental treatment by personnel wearing latex rubber gloves. Two of the patients were aware of possible allergy to domestic rubber products but did not reveal this as part of their medical history. With the increase in numbers of dentists wearing rubber gloves it is probable that there will be many more such cases reported in the future. Rubber products must then be added to the list of potential allergens which may be of some import to the practice of dentistry. PMID:1616768

  3. Novel "glove" access port for single port surgery in right hemicolectomy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Day, Weida; Lau, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    The trend of single port surgery is increasing recently, and it is technically feasible for right hemicolectomy. However, the operation requires special and expensive access port for the insertion of the instruments. Day et al reported the use of a novel "glove" access port for right hemicolectomy in this pilot study. Four single port right hemicolectomies were performed by using this access port. The access port was found to be user-friendly and durable. No adverse outcome was associated with this access port. This "glove" access port is a suitable device for single port right hemicolectomy. PMID:21654290

  4. The breakthrough time and permeation rate of multi-component solvents for selected glove materials

    E-print Network

    Brown, Bruce Gustav

    1987-01-01

    THE BREAKTHROUGH TIME AND PERMEATION RATE OF I'1ULTI-COMPONENT SOLVENTS FOR SELECTED GLOVE MATERIALS A Thesis by BRUCE GUSTAV BROWN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University 1n partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Industr1al Hygiene THE BREAKTHROUGH TIME AND PERMEATION RATE OF MULTI-COMPONENT SOLVENTS FOR GLOVE MATERIALS A Thesis by BRUCE GUSTAV BROWN Approved as to style and content by: Harry 'J. . L...

  5. The effects of glove thickness and work load on female hand performance and fatigue during a infrequent high-intensity gripping task

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chih-Hung Chang; Yuh-Chuan Shih

    2007-01-01

    In various workplaces, gloves are commonly employed to protect the hands with the design rationale of ‘the thicker the gloves, the better the protection’. Therefore, the present paper investigated the effects of glove thickness on hand performance and fatigue during two infrequent high-intensity gripping tasks, such as 5-s and sustained tasks. The hand performance was evaluated by maximum volitional contraction

  6. Key to Degradation and Permeation Ratings E -Excellent Exposure has little or no effect. The glove retains its properties after extended exposure

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    little or no effect. The glove retains its properties after extended exposure G - Good Exposure has minor moderate degradation of the glove. Glove is still useful after short term exposure but caution should® Nitrile Rubber Abrasion Resistance F G G E E E Cut Resistance P G G E E E Puncture (Snag) Resistance P G G

  7. An Improvised “Blow Glove” Device Produces Similar PEP Values to a Commercial PEP Device: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Yaakov; Wiser, Itay; Farber, Nimrod; Hundeshagen, Gabriel; Winkler, Eyal; Kazula-Halabi, Tamar; Haik, Josef

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Postoperative positive expiratory pressure (PEP) therapy promotes increased lung volume, secretion clearance, and improved oxygenation. Several commercial devices exist that produce recommended PEP values (10–20 cmH2O) when the patient breathes through a fixed orifice resistor. It was hypothesized that an inexpensive, improvised “blow glove” device would produce similar PEP values over a wider range of expiration volumes and flow rates. Methods: PEP for different expiration volumes (400–2000 mL) and expiratory flow rates (10–80 L/min) was compared between a commercial PEP device (Resistex, Mercury Medical, Clearwater, FL) and an improvised “blow glove” device, recorded by a Vela ventilator (CareFusion, San Diego, CA). Dynamics in positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) values were evaluated following five consecutive expirations. The “blow glove” device was evaluated using various glove compositions and sizes. Results: The improvised “blow glove” device produced a significantly higher rate of PEP values in the recommended range than the Resistex device (88.9% vs. 20%, p<0.0001). No significant difference was observed between small and large glove sizes (88.9% vs. 82.9%, p>0.05), but the powdered latex glove showed a significantly higher rate of PEP values in the recommended range than the powder-free latex glove (88.9% vs. 44.4%, p<0.001). Conclusions: A “blow glove” PEP device using a powdered latex glove produces PEP values in the recommended range over a wider spectrum of expiratory flow rates and expiration volumes than a commercial PEP device. PMID:25125786

  8. The Effects of Vinyl Acetate and Polyoxyethylene on the Properties of Halogen-free Flame Retardant EVA Composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jia-Li Wei; Bo Yin; Ming-Bo Yang; Jian-Min Feng

    2012-01-01

    The effect of vinyl acetate content on the properties of intumescent flame retardant ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (IFR EVA) material was studied. Ammonium polyphosphate and pentaerythritol (APP\\/PER) was used to prepare the IFR EVA materials. The burning behavior, thermal stabilization and mechanical properties of the IFR EVAs composites were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), limiting oxygen index (LOI), UL-94 test and

  9. Advanced Thermal Status Control of Crews in EVA and Escape Suits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koscheyev, V. S.; Coca, A.; Leon, G. R.

    Over the course of the manned space program, there has been an accumulation of experience on methods to control the thermal status of astronauts in open space. However, there remains a significant need for a simple method to monitor the astronaut's level of heat exchange during EVA, particularly in an emergency period, or during crew escape. The liquid cooling/warming tubing system that covers the body surface creates considerable complexity for evaluating the body's overall thermal response. Moreover, the methods used to monitor core temperature (Tc) are problematic in regard to their invasiveness and accuracy. NASA is currently attempting to develop a unified methodology for protection during EVA and crew escape that would necessarily include the control of astronaut thermal status. The findings from our research program have significant implications for solving this still-vexing problem. Our experimental paradigm centers on the assessment of thermodynamic processes with subjects donned in a specially designed symmetrically divided multi-compartment liquid cooling/warming garment consisting of 16 zones, 8 on each side of the body (hands, forearms, shoulders, torso, head, thighs, calves and feet). This garment configuration enables the study of heat exchange under nonuniform temperatures on the body surface by systematically varying the proportions of nonuniform temperatures (warm/cold) in different experimental conditions. Tc was assessed by rectal (Tr), esophageal (Tes), and ear canal temperature (Tec). Skin temperature (Tsk) was measured by a total of 26 sensors placed symmetrically on the left and right sides of the body, the main magistral vessels (carotid, brachial, femoral), and local vessel networks. We paid particular attention to the thermal status of the fingers by measuring blood perfusion, temperature (Tfing), heat flux, and thermal/comfort perception. The monitoring of Tfing and heat flux in different experimental conditions was highly informative. These indices were the first evidence of changing thermal conditions in the body, and reflected the development of a heat deficit or heat accumulation, depending on the specific experimental protocol (rest, exercise). There was a strong positive correlation between heat accumulation or deficit and Tfing (r = +0.80), and a highly significant negative correlation with Tr (r = -0.87). Standard indices of Tc, i.e., Tr, Tes, and Tec were not very accurate. Further, under exercise or extreme hot/cold environments in which there is a large amount of heat storage/dissipation from the body, the informativeness of the Tfing index degraded, likely because the maximal amount of vessel vasodilation/vasoconstriction had already occurred, and there was a restriction of blood flow through the fingers. It is important to note that these vessel/blood flow changes could also occur in space if the life support system is not responding adequately to stabilize comfort. Our findings strongly suggest that physiological parameters for Tfing and heat flux as a surveyor of comfort can be established, and that they will be reliable indices of thermal homeostasis. For Tfing, these boundaries likely range from 31.5-35.0°C for rest and exercise conditions. Outside of this range, there is a commencement of heat deficit/accumulation; to stabilize comfort, this thermal stress must be actively and forcefully restrained by countermeasures implemented through the life support system. This is particularly important in emergency situations during which thermal status information is crucial for rapidly instituting countermeasures. Because of the high sensitivity of the fingers to changing overall body thermal conditions, we propose that a finger ring with embedded sensors to monitor Tfing or heat flux intensity and establish optimal boundaries for comfort support will be highly effective in enhancing astronaut safety. This device has the potential to simplify and increase the reliability of methods for controlling the thermal status of astronauts while donned in protective suits during liftoff, EVA,

  10. Mars and Extravehicular Activity: A Challenging Synergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipila, S. A.; Mary, N. A.

    2014-07-01

    The Mars environment poses many extreme challenges on the Exploration Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Suit operational concepts and requirements, which must be overcome to allow efficient human exploration on the Mars surface.

  11. View of WETF activity control consoles and monitoring area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    View of the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) activity control consoles and monitoring area during astronuat extravehicular activity (EVA) training. The pool, with divers in it, is seen behind the consoles.

  12. EVA Suit R and D for Performance Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew S.; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    Designing a planetary suit is very complex and often requires difficult trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. To verify that new suit designs meet requirements, full prototypes must be built and tested with human subjects. However, numerous design iterations will occur before the hardware meets those requirements. Traditional draw-prototype-test paradigms for R&D are prohibitively expensive with today's shrinking Government budgets. Personnel at NASA are developing modern simulation techniques which focus on human-centric designs by creating virtual prototype simulations and fully adjustable physical prototypes of suit hardware. During the R&D design phase, these easily modifiable representations of an EVA suit's hard components will allow designers to think creatively and exhaust design possibilities before they build and test working prototypes with human subjects. It allows scientists to comprehensively benchmark current suit capabilities and limitations for existing suit sizes and sizes that do not exist. This is extremely advantageous and enables comprehensive design down-selections to be made early in the design process, enables the use of human performance as design criteria, and enables designs to target specific populations

  13. Preoperative disinfection of surgeons' hands: use of alcoholic solutions and effects of gloves on skin flora.

    PubMed

    Lowbury, E J; Lilly, H A; Ayliffe, G A

    1974-11-16

    A single application of about 10 ml of 95% alcoholic chlorhexidine (0.5%) or tetrabrom-o-methyl phenol (0.1%) rubbed on to the hands until they were dry led to mean reduction in viable bacterial counts from standard handwashings of 97.9 +/- 1.09% and 91.8 +/- 4.63% respectively. After six of such treatments, three on each of two successive days, the mean reductions in relation to viable counts before the first treatment were 99.7 +/- 0.09% for alcoholic chlorhexidine and 99.5 +/- 0.17% for tetrabrom-o-methyl phenol. These reductions were greater than those obtained with 4% chlorhexidine detergent solution- 87.1 +/- 3.5% and 98.2 +/- 1.6%, and with 95% or 70% ethyl alcohol and with aqueous 0.5% chlorhexidine. Preoperative washing of the surgeon's hands with alcoholic chlorhexidine used without addition of water is more effective and less expensive than handwashing with antiseptic detergent preparations and running water.The viable counts of washings from hands treated with various antiseptics, including ethyl alcohol, were lower in relation to the pretreatment levels when gloves had been worn for three hours than when samples for counts were taken immediately after the antiseptic treatment. No such difference was found in samplings from hands washed with unmedicated soap.Tests for residual action of antiseptics on the skin showed a greater effect with alcoholic chlorhexidine than with tetrabrom-o-methyl phenol, though both showed greater residual activity than an Irgasan DP 300 detergent preparation. No residual action was shown after 70% ethyl alcohol. PMID:4609555

  14. Preoperative Disinfection of Surgeons' Hands: Use of Alcoholic Solutions and Effects of Gloves on Skin Flora

    PubMed Central

    Lowbury, E. J. L.; Lilly, H. A.; Ayliffe, G. A. J.

    1974-01-01

    A single application of about 10 ml of 95% alcoholic chlorhexidine (0·5%) or tetrabrom-o-methyl phenol (0·1%) rubbed on to the hands until they were dry led to mean reduction in viable bacterial counts from standard handwashings of 97·9 ± 1·09% and 91·8 ± 4·63% respectively. After six of such treatments, three on each of two successive days, the mean reductions in relation to viable counts before the first treatment were 99·7 ± 0·09% for alcoholic chlorhexidine and 99·5 ± 0·17% for tetrabrom-o-methyl phenol. These reductions were greater than those obtained with 4% chlorhexidine detergent solution— 87·1 ± 3·5% and 98·2 ± 1·6%, and with 95% or 70% ethyl alcohol and with aqueous 0·5% chlorhexidine. Preoperative washing of the surgeon's hands with alcoholic chlorhexidine used without addition of water is more effective and less expensive than handwashing with antiseptic detergent preparations and running water. The viable counts of washings from hands treated with various antiseptics, including ethyl alcohol, were lower in relation to the pretreatment levels when gloves had been worn for three hours than when samples for counts were taken immediately after the antiseptic treatment. No such difference was found in samplings from hands washed with unmedicated soap. Tests for residual action of antiseptics on the skin showed a greater effect with alcoholic chlorhexidine than with tetrabrom-o-methyl phenol, though both showed greater residual activity than an Irgasan DP 300 detergent preparation. No residual action was shown after 70% ethyl alcohol. PMID:4609555

  15. STS-109 Astronaut Michael J. Massimino Peers Into Window of Shuttle During EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 Astronauts Michael J. Massimino and James H. Newman were making their second extravehicular activity (EVA) of their mission when astronaut Massimino, mission specialist, peered into Columbia's crew cabin during a brief break from work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST is latched down just a few feet behind him in Columbia's cargo bay. The Space Shuttle Columbia STS-109 mission lifted off March 1, 2002 with goals of repairing and upgrading the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). STS-109 upgrades to the HST included: replacement of the solar array panels; replacement of the power control unit (PCU); replacement of the Faint Object Camera (FOC) with a new advanced camera for Surveys (ACS); and installation of the experimental cooling system for the Hubble's Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-object Spectrometer (NICMOS), which had been dormant since January 1999 when its original coolant ran out. The Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama had the responsibility for the design, development, and construction of the HST, which is the most powerful and sophisticated telescope ever built. Lasting 10 days, 22 hours, and 11 minutes, the STS-109 mission was the 108th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle Program.

  16. A Glove Interface with Tactile feeling display for Humanoid Robotics and Virtual Reality systems

    E-print Network

    Gini, Giuseppina

    the membrane potential of some skin receptors with an electric field applied by electrodes on the subject-cutaneous Stimulation. Abstract: This paper focuses on the study and the experimentation of a glove interface, in this case only the electro-tactile stimulator was used in order to generate a touch sensation. 1

  17. Building a Class-1 Glove Box for Use with the NIFFTE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, William

    2012-10-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) uses a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure the neutron-induced fission cross sections of actinides with unprecedented accuracy which will aid in the development of the next generation nuclear reactors. Charged particles, including fission fragments, create a trail of electrons within a fill gas through ionization, which then drift in an electric field towards the read-out electronics. Using a MicroMegas mesh, the signal is amplified and then detected by the TPC pad plane. Due to the delicate nature of the MicroMegas mesh, precaution must be taken to prevent damage to the mesh from airborne contaminants which can cause the mesh to short. To avoid radiological contamination, a glove box was chosen for the task of handling and installing actinide targets into the TPC. To protect the TPC electronics, a decision was made to modify the existing glove box to create a Class-1 cleanroom environment. Variables such as glove type, filter, and cleaning agent were tested independently to determine maximum cleanliness, and a procedure for creating an acceptable Class-1 environment inside the glove box for the TPC was developed.

  18. Final report for Allied-Signal Aerospace Company, Kansas City Division on protective glove permeation analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. Swearengen; J. S. Johnson; S. J. Priante

    1990-01-01

    We conducted 25 separate glove fabric permeation studies during this project. The permeations were carried out in the small (1 inch) glass ASTM cell. One other permeation study was carded out with a large (two inch) modified ASTM cell for comparison with the small cell results. We also compared the LLNL procedure from both large and small cells with the

  19. Antivibration gloves: effects on vascular and sensorineural function, an animal model.

    PubMed

    Krajnak, K; Waugh, S; Johnson, C; Miller, R G; Welcome, D; Xu, X; Warren, C; Sarkisian, S; Andrew, M; Dong, R G

    2015-01-01

    Anti-vibration gloves have been used to block the transmission of vibration from powered hand tools to the user, and to protect users from the negative health consequences associated with exposure to vibration. However, there are conflicting reports as to the efficacy of gloves in protecting workers. The goal of this study was to use a characterized animal model of vibration-induced peripheral vascular and nerve injury to determine whether antivibration materials reduced or inhibited the effects of vibration on these physiological symptoms. Rats were exposed to 4 h of tail vibration at 125 Hz with an acceleration 49 m/s(2). The platform was either bare or covered with antivibrating glove material. Rats were tested for tactile sensitivity to applied pressure before and after vibration exposure. One day following the exposure, ventral tail arteries were assessed for sensitivity to vasodilating and vasoconstricting factors and nerves were examined histologically for early indicators of edema and inflammation. Ventral tail artery responses to an ?2C-adrenoreceptor agonist were enhanced in arteries from vibration-exposed rats compared to controls, regardless of whether antivibration materials were used or not. Rats exposed to vibration were also less sensitive to pressure after exposure. These findings are consistent with experimental findings in humans suggesting that antivibration gloves may not provide protection against the adverse health consequences of vibration exposure in all conditions. Additional studies need to be done examining newer antivibration materials. PMID:25965192

  20. An HMM framework for optimal sensor selection with applications to BSN sensor glove design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. King; Louis Atallah; Ara Darzi; Guang-zhong Yang

    2007-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgical training is a challenging task due to the complexity of instrument control and demand on manual dexterity and hand-eye coordination. Currently, training and assessing surgeons for their laparoscopic skills rely mainly on subjective assessment. This paper presents a Body Sensor Network (BSN) sensor glove for laparoscopic gesture recognition and objective assessment of surgical skills. An HMM framework is

  1. Effect of work glove and type of muscle action on grip fatigue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SHIRLEY L. FLEMING; CAROLINE W. JANSEN; SCOTT M. HASSON

    1997-01-01

    Fatigue plays a major role in limiting work performance. The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine the effect of wearing a work glove on handgrip fatigue; (2) to compare the effect of a sustained grip contraction of concentric versus eccentric nature, named in this study isometric and eccentric; and (3) to determine if there is a relationship between

  2. Design of an Instrumentation System for a Boundary Layer Transition Wing Glove Experiment

    E-print Network

    Williams, Thomas 1987-

    2012-08-23

    for differential measurements to be made with an uncertainty of +/- 0.03 degrees. Static pressure ports and high frequency response Kulite transducers will also be employed. Hotfilm sensors will be used to verify the state of the boundary layer on the glove...

  3. The use of aldehyde indicators to determine glutaraldehyde and alkaline glutaraldehyde contamination in chemical protective gloves.

    PubMed

    Vo, Evanly; Zhuang, Zhenzhen

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of aldehyde indicator pads for detection of glutaraldehyde and alkaline glutaraldehyde permeation through chemical protective gloves under simulated in-use conditions. The quantitative analysis of glutaraldehyde permeation through a glove material was determined for Metricide, Wavicide, and 50% glutaraldehyde following a solvent-desorption process and gas chromatographic analysis. All glutaraldehyde solutions exhibited >99% adsorption (including both the glutaraldehyde oligomers of the reaction product and the excess glutaraldehyde) on the pads over the spiking range 0.05-5.0 microL. Breakthrough times for protective gloves were determined using the Thermo-Hand test method, and found to range from 76 to 150, from 170 to 230, and from 232 to 300 min for Metricide, Wavicide, and 50% glutaraldehyde, respectively. Glutaraldehyde recovery was calculated and ranged from 61 to 80% for all glutaraldehyde solutions. The mass of glutaraldehyde in these solutions at the time of breakthrough detection ranged from 17 to 18, from 18 to 19, and from 19 to 20 microg/cm(2) for Wavicide, 50% glutaraldehyde solution, and Metricide, respectively. Aldehyde indicator pads and the Thermo-Hand test method together should find utility in detecting, collecting, and quantitatively analyzing glutaraldehyde permeation samples through chemical protective gloves under simulated in-use conditions. PMID:19330475

  4. Skin Health Improvements Associated with Use of Nitrile Exam Gloves with Dermal Therapy Coating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Harper

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between irritated, damaged skin on the hands of healthcare workers (HCWs) and increased risk of transmission of healthcare-associated infections has led the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to recommend the use of products that help maintain skin integrity.METHOD: Nitrile exam gloves coated with ingredients involved in skin repair, moisturization, and protection of the skin's barrier properties

  5. Enhancement of bend sensor properties as applied in a glove for use in neurorehabilitation settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ninja P. Oess; Johann Wanek; Hubertus J. A. van Hedel

    2010-01-01

    Following hand function impairment caused by a neurological disorder, the functional level of the upper extremities has to be assessed in the clinical and rehabilitation settings. Current hand function evaluation tests are somewhat imprecise. Instrumented gloves allow finger motion monitoring during the performance of skilled tasks, such as grasping objects. As a result, they provide an objective tool for evaluating

  6. Efficacy of three surface disinfectants for dental radiographic films and gloves.

    PubMed

    Coogan, M M; Patel, M; Mladenova, D

    2004-07-01

    Contaminated radiographic films and gloves may transmit infectious diseases. Objective. To determine whether Pre Sept (NaDC), a sodium dichloroisocyanurate based disinfectant; Bronocide SP (AIP) an alcohol-phenol-iodine disinfectant and polyvinyl pyrrolidine iodine (PVPI) can be used to disinfect radiographic films and gloves. Study design. Radiographic films were contaminated with Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacilli or saliva and placed in either 0.1, 0.25 or 0.5 NaDC for 1, 2 or 5 min; PVPI for 5 min or sprayed with AIP. Gloves contaminated with C. albicans, S. mutans or Lactobacilli were sprayed with AIP. After treatment the films and gloves were tested for viable microorganisms. Results. A 0.5% solution of NaDC killed all microorganisms after one-minute exposure. PVPI killed 99.8% and AIP spray between 95.8 and 99% of microorganisms. Conclusions. NaDC was the most successful disinfectant in the laboratory and clinical setting followed by PVPI and AIP. PMID:15193787

  7. The Effect of Handhold Orientation, Size, and Wearing Gloves on Hand-Handhold Breakaway Strength

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Justin G. Young; Charles B. Woolley; James A. Ashton-Miller; Thomas J. Armstrong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of handhold orientation, size (diameter), and wearing a glove on the maximum breakaway strength between a hand and handhold.Background: Manual breakaway strength is known to be greatly reduced for vertical compared with horizontal handholds, but oblique orientations have yet to be studied.Method: For this study, 12 young adults (6

  8. Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE)-Parametric Pressure Distribution Boundary Layer Stability Study and Wing Glove Design Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozendaal, Rodger A.

    1986-01-01

    The Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE) was initiated to establish a boundary-layer transition data base for laminar flow wing design. For this experiment, full-span upper-surface gloves will be fitted to a variable sweep F-14 aircraft. The results of two initial tasks are documented: a parametric pressure distribution/boundary-layer stability study and the design of an upper-surface glove for Mach 0.8. The first task was conducted to provide a data base from which wing-glove pressure distributions could be selected for glove designs. Boundary-layer stability analyses were conducted on a set of pressure distributions for various wing sweep angles, Mach numbers, and Reynolds number in the range of those anticipated for the flight-test program. The design procedure for the Mach 0.8 glove is described, and boundary-layer stability calculations and pressure distributions are presented both at design and off-design conditions. Also included is the analysis of the clean-up glove (smoothed basic wing) that will be flight-tested initially and the analysis of a Mach 0.7 glove designed at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  9. Monitoring Human Performance During Suited Operations: A Technology Feasibility Study Using EMU Gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekdash, Omar; Norcross, Jason; McFarland, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Mobility tracking of human subjects while conducting suited operations still remains focused on the external movement of the suit and little is known about the human movement within it. For this study, accelerometers and bend sensitive resistors were integrated into a custom carrier glove to quantify range of motion and dexterity from within the pressurized glove environment as a first stage feasibility study of sensor hardware, integration, and reporting capabilities. Sensors were also placed on the exterior of the pressurized glove to determine if it was possible to compare a glove joint angle to the anatomical joint angle of the subject during tasks. Quantifying human movement within the suit was feasible, with accelerometers clearly detecting movements in the wrist and reporting expected joint angles at maximum flexion or extension postures with repeatability of plus or minus 5 degrees between trials. Bend sensors placed on the proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints performed less well. It was not possible to accurately determine the actual joint angle using these bend sensors, but these sensors could be used to determine when the joint was flexed to its maximum and provide a general range of mobility needed to complete a task. Further work includes additional testing with accelerometers and the possible inclusion of hardware such as magnetometers or gyroscopes to more precisely locate the joint in 3D space. We hope to eventually expand beyond the hand and glove and develop a more comprehensive suit sensor suite to characterize motion across more joints (knee, elbow, shoulder, etc.) and fully monitor the human body operating within the suit environment.

  10. A preliminary comparison of three dermal exposure sampling methods: rinses, wipes and cotton gloves.

    PubMed

    Ng, Melanie Gorman; de Poot, Stan; Schmid, Kaspar; Cowie, Hilary; Semple, Sean; van Tongeren, Martie

    2014-01-01

    Several methods exist to estimate dermal exposure and it is unclear how comparable they are. These methods fall into three main categories: (i) removal techniques (such as wiping or rinsing); (ii) interception techniques (such as gloves, patches, or coveralls); and (iii) fluorescent tracer techniques. Controlled experiments were conducted to compare two removal methods for exposure to particulate, and a removal method with an interception method for exposure to liquids. Volunteers' hands were exposed to three liquid solutions (glycerol-water solutions of different concentrations) and three particulates (Epsom salts, calcium acetate and zinc oxide) in simulated exposure scenarios. Both hands were exposed and a different sampling method was used on each to allow comparison of methods. Cotton glove samplers and a cotton wipe sampling method were compared for exposure to liquids. For exposure to powders a cotton wipe sampling method was compared to rinsing the hands in deionised water. Wipe and rinse methods generally yielded similar results for Epsom salts and zinc oxide (geometric mean [GM] ratios of wipe-to-rinse measurements of 0.6 and 1.4, respectively) but they did not for calcium acetate (GM wipe-to-rinse ratio of 4.6). For glycerol solutions measurements from the glove samplers were consistently higher than wipe samples. At lower levels of exposure the relative difference between the two methods was greater than at higher levels. At a hand loading level of 24,000 ?g cm(-2) (as measured by wiping) the glove-to-wipe ratio was 1.4 and at a hand loading of 0.09 ?g cm(-2) the ratio was 42.0. Wipe and rinse methods may be directly comparable but the relationship between glove and wipe sampling methods appears to be complex. Further research is necessary to enable conversion of exposure measurements from one metric to another, so as to facilitate more reliable risk assessment. PMID:24281007

  11. Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity: Apollo Skylab Through STS-135

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to conduct an EVA over-tasked the crewmember and exceeded the capabilities of vehicle and space suit life support systems. Energy expenditure was closely evaluated through the Apollo lunar surface EVAs, resulting in modifications to space suit design and EVA operations. After the Apollo lunar surface missions were completed, the United States shifted its focus to long duration human space flight, to study the human response to living and working in a microgravity environment. This paper summarizes the energy expenditure during EVA from Apollo Skylab through STS-135.

  12. Metabolic responses to simulated extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Rebecca C.; Sharer, Peter J.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Rendon, Lisa R.

    1992-01-01

    Automatic control of the liquid cooling garment (LCG) worn by astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA) would more efficiently regulate astronaut thermal comfort and improve astronaut productivity. An experiment was conducted in which subjects performed exercise profiles on a unique, supine upper body ergometer to elicit physiological and thermal responses similar to those achieved during zero-g EVAs. Results were analyzed to quantify metabolic rate, various body temperatures, and other heat balance parameters. Such data may lead to development of a microprocessor-based system to automatically maintain astronaut heat balance during extended EVAs.

  13. Development of an extra-vehicular (EVA) infrared (IR) camera inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazarik, Michael; Johnson, Dave; Kist, Ed; Novak, Frank; Antill, Charles; Haakenson, David; Howell, Patricia; Pandolf, John; Jenkins, Rusty; Yates, Rusty; Stephan, Ryan; Hawk, Doug; Amoroso, Michael

    2006-04-01

    Designed to fulfill a critical inspection need for the Space Shuttle Program, the EVA IR Camera System can detect crack and subsurface defects in the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) sections of the Space Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS). The EVA IR Camera performs this detection by taking advantage of the natural thermal gradients induced in the RCC by solar flux and thermal emission from the Earth. This instrument is a compact, low-mass, low-power solution (1.2cm3, 1.5kg, 5.0W) for TPS inspection that exceeds existing requirements for feature detection. Taking advantage of ground-based IR thermography techniques, the EVA IR Camera System provides the Space Shuttle program with a solution that can be accommodated by the existing inspection system. The EVA IR Camera System augments the visible and laser inspection systems and finds cracks and subsurface damage that is not measurable by the other sensors, and thus fills a critical gap in the Space Shuttle's inspection needs. This paper discusses the on-orbit RCC inspection measurement concept and requirements, and then presents a detailed description of the EVA IR Camera System design.

  14. Development of an Extra-vehicular (EVA) Infrared (IR) Camera Inspection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazarik, Michael; Johnson, Dave; Kist, Ed; Novak, Frank; Antill, Charles; Haakenson, David; Howell, Patricia; Pandolf, John; Jenkins, Rusty; Yates, Rusty

    2006-01-01

    Designed to fulfill a critical inspection need for the Space Shuttle Program, the EVA IR Camera System can detect crack and subsurface defects in the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) sections of the Space Shuttle s Thermal Protection System (TPS). The EVA IR Camera performs this detection by taking advantage of the natural thermal gradients induced in the RCC by solar flux and thermal emission from the Earth. This instrument is a compact, low-mass, low-power solution (1.2cm3, 1.5kg, 5.0W) for TPS inspection that exceeds existing requirements for feature detection. Taking advantage of ground-based IR thermography techniques, the EVA IR Camera System provides the Space Shuttle program with a solution that can be accommodated by the existing inspection system. The EVA IR Camera System augments the visible and laser inspection systems and finds cracks and subsurface damage that is not measurable by the other sensors, and thus fills a critical gap in the Space Shuttle s inspection needs. This paper discusses the on-orbit RCC inspection measurement concept and requirements, and then presents a detailed description of the EVA IR Camera System design.

  15. 2014 Decompression Sickness/Extravehicular Activity Risks Standing Review Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Decompression Sickness (DCS)/Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risks Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on November 4 - 5, 2014. The SRP reviewed the updated Evidence Reports for The Risk of Decompression Sickness (from here on referred to as the 2014 DCS Evidence Report) and the Risk of Injury and Compromised Performance due to EVA Operations (from here on referred to as the 2014 EVA Evidence Report), as well as the Research Plans for these Risks. The SRP appreciated the time and effort that the DCS and EVA disciplines put into their review documents and presentations. The SRP felt that the 2014 DCS Evidence Report and the 2014 EVA Evidence Reports were very thorough and addressed the majority of the known DCS and EVA issues. The researchers at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) have the knowledge base to deal with the DCS and EVA issues. Overall, the SRP thinks the DCS and EVA research teams have compiled excellent reports which address the majority of the literature and background information.

  16. Pegasus Rocket Wing and PHYSX Glove Being Prepared for Stress Loads Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A technician adjusts the Pegasus Hypersonic Experiment (PHYSX) Project's Pegasus rocket wing with attached PHYSX glove before a loads-test at Scaled Composites, Inc., in Mojave, California, in January 1997. For the test, technicians slowly filled water bags beneath the wing to create the pressure, or 'wing-loading,' required to determine whether the wing could withstand its design limit for stress. The wing sits in a wooden triangular frame which serves as the test-rig, mounted to the floor atop the waterbags. PHYSX was launched aboard a Pegasus rocket on October 22, 1998. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia, is the manufacturer of the Pegasus vehicle, while Vandenberg Air Force Base served as a pre-launch assembly facility for the launch that included the PHYSX experiment. NASA used data from Pegasus launches to obtain considerable data on aerodynamics. By conducting experiments in a piggyback mode on Pegasus, some critical and secondary design and development issues were addressed at hypersonic speeds. The vehicle was also used to develop hypersonic flight instrumentation and test techniques. NASA's B-52 carrier-launch vehicle was used to get the Pegasus airborne during six launches from 1990 to 1994. Thereafter, an Orbital Sciences L-1011 aircraft launched the Pegasus. The Pegasus launch vehicle itself has a 400- to 600-pound payload capacity in a 61-cubic-foot payload space at the front of the vehicle. The vehicle is capable of placing a payload into low earth orbit. This vehicle is 49 feet long and 50 inches in diameter. It has a wing span of 22 feet. (There is also a Pegasus XL vehicle that was introduced in 1994. Dryden has never launched one of these vehicles, but they have greater thrust and are 56 feet long.)

  17. Outbreaks where food workers have been implicated in the spread of foodborne disease. Part 8. Gloves as barriers to prevent contamination of food by workers.

    PubMed

    Todd, Ewen C D; Michaels, Barry S; Greig, Judy D; Smith, Debra; Bartleson, Charles A

    2010-09-01

    The role played by food workers and other individuals in the contamination of food has been identified as an important contributing factor leading to foodborne outbreaks. To prevent direct bare hand contact with food and food surfaces, many jurisdictions have made glove use compulsory for food production and preparation. When properly used, gloves can substantially reduce opportunities for food contamination. However, gloves have limitations and may become a source of contamination if they are punctured or improperly used. Experiments conducted in clinical and dental settings have revealed pinhole leaks in gloves. Although such loss of glove integrity can lead to contamination of foods and surfaces, in the food industry improper use of gloves is more likely than leakage to lead to food contamination and outbreaks. Wearing jewelry (e.g., rings) and artificial nails is discouraged because these items can puncture gloves and allow accumulation of microbial populations under them. Occlusion of the skin during long-term glove use in food operations creates the warm, moist conditions necessary for microbial proliferation and can increase pathogen transfer onto foods through leaks or exposed skin or during glove removal. The most important issue is that glove use can create a false sense of security, resulting in more high-risk behaviors that can lead to cross-contamination when employees are not adequately trained. PMID:20828485

  18. Heart Rhythm Monitoring in the Constellation Lunar and Launch/Landing EVA Suit: Recommendations from an Expert Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Hamilton, D.; Jones, J. A.; Alexander, D.

    2008-01-01

    Currently there are several physiological monitoring requirements for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) in the Human-Systems Interface Requirements (HSIR) document, including continuous heart rhythm monitoring. However, it is not known whether heart rhythm monitoring in the lunar surface space suit is a necessary capability for lunar surface operations or in launch/landing suit the event of a cabin depressurization enroute to or from the moon. Methods: Current US astronaut corps demographic information was provided to an expert panel of cardiovascular medicine experts, including specialists in electrophysiology, exercise physiology, interventional cardiology and arrhythmia. This information included averages for male/female age, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, cholesterol, inflammatory markers, echocardiogram, ranges for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores for long duration astronauts, and ranges for heart rate (HR) and metabolic (MET) rates obtained during microgravity and lunar EVA. Results: The panel determined that no uncontrolled hazard was likely to occur in the suit during lunar surface or contingency microgravity ops that would require ECG monitoring in the highly screened US astronaut population. However having the capability for rhythm monitoring inside the vehicle (IVA) was considered critical to manage an astronaut in distress. Discussion: Heart rate (HR) monitoring alone allows effective monitoring of astronaut health and function. Consequently, electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring capability as a clinical tool is not essential in the lunar or launch/landing space suit. However, the panel considered that rhythm monitoring could be useful in certain clinical situations, it was not considered required for safe operations. Also, lunar vehicles should be required to have ECG monitoring capability with a minimum of 5-lead ECG (derived 12- lead) for IVA medical assessments.

  19. Evaluation of two polymeric blends (EVA/PLA and EVA/PEG) as coating film materials for paclitaxel-eluting stent application.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi; Lei, Lei; Hou, Jing-Wen; Tang, Mu-Fei; Guo, Sheng-Rong; Wang, Zhong-Min; Chen, Ke-Min

    2011-02-01

    The ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA)/Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) blend and EVA/Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) blend were applied as the drug carrier materials for a bi-layer drug-loaded stent coating film, which consisted of a paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded layer and a drug-free EVA layer. The changes of weight and appearance of the drug-free polymeric blend films with increasing time were examined by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) tests and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), and the results showed the degradation of PLA and the leaching of PEG from the films. The effects of PLA, PEG and drug contents on in vitro drug release were investigated, and the results demonstrated that the addition of PLA promoted the drug release while the addition of PEG almost did not. Franz cells diffusion test results indicated that the bi-layer structure successfully endowed the stent coating with the release of drug in a unidirectional fashion. The release profiles of films incorporated PTX and the mechanical performance of the film could be customized by readily adjusting the contents of the blend components. Therefore, the polymeric blends could be useful drug carrier materials for drug-loaded stent coating capable of releasing drug in a highly tunable manner. PMID:21221735

  20. Misuse of gloves: the foundation for poor compliance with hand hygiene and potential for microbial transmission?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Girou; S. H. T. Chai; F. Oppein; P. Legrand; D. Ducellier; F. Cizeau; C. Brun-Buisson

    2004-01-01

    Improvement in hand hygiene compliance is important for reducing cross-infection by micro-organisms. The objective of this prospective observational study was to measure how the improper use of gloves limits compliance to hand hygiene and exposes patient's to infection. The study was conducted in five wards (three intensive care units and two medical wards) in a French university hospital. Staff–patient and

  1. Permeation tests of glove and clothing materials against sensitizing chemicals using diphenylmethane diisocyanate as an example.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Erja A; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Ylinen, Katriina; Vuokko, Aki; Suuronen, Katri

    2014-08-01

    Diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) is a sensitizing chemical that can cause allergic contact dermatitis and asthma. Protective gloves and clothing are necessary to prevent skin exposure. Breakthrough times are used for the selection of chemical protective gloves and clothing. In the EN 374-3:2003 European standard, breakthrough time is defined as the time in which the permeation reaches the rate of 1.0 µg min(-1) cm(-2) through the material. Such breakthrough times do not necessarily represent safe limits for sensitizing chemicals. We studied the permeation of 4,4'-MDI through eight glove materials and one clothing material. The test method was derived from the EN 374-3 and ASTM F 739 standards. All measured permeation rates were below 0.1 µg min(-1) cm(-2), and thus, the breakthrough times for all the tested materials were over 480min, when the definitions of EN 374-3 and ASTM F 739 for the breakthrough time were used. Based on the sensitizing capacity of MDI, we concluded that a cumulative permeation of 1.0 µg cm(-2) should be used as the end point of the breakthrough time determination for materials used for protection against direct contact with MDI. Using this criterion for the breakthrough time, seven tested materials were permeated in <480min (range: 23-406min). Affordable chemical protective glove materials that had a breakthrough time of over 75min were natural rubber, thick polyvinylchloride, neoprene-natural rubber, and thin and thick nitrile rubber. We suggest that the current definitions of breakthrough times in the standard requirements for protective materials should be critically evaluated as regards MDI and other sensitizing chemicals, or chemicals highly toxic via the skin. PMID:24936578

  2. The breakthrough time and permeation rate of multi-component solvents for selected glove materials 

    E-print Network

    Brown, Bruce Gustav

    1987-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The concern for evaluating protective clothing is reflected by increasing literature publications on chemical permeation. This concern is due to the many dermatitis and industrial illness cases reported from the working force. According... may cause sk1n dermatitis or result in absorption through the skin to possibly cause systemic injury. Therefore, (S) personal protective equipment is needed to reduce or eliminate possible routes of entry. Gloves are the first line of protect1on...

  3. An ergonomic evaluation of dexterity and tactility with increase in examination\\/surgical glove thickness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JEFFREY B. NELSON; ANIL MITAL

    1995-01-01

    Latex gloves of five different thicknesses (0·21 mm, 0·51 mm, 0·65 mm, 0·76 mm, and 0·83 mm) were manufactured in-house and tested for dexterity and tactility; dexterity and tactility measures with the bare hand were used as control values. Fifteen adult males (mean age = 22·8 years, mean stature = 179 cm, mean body weight = 75·4 kg, mean palm width = 9·9 cm, mean palm depth =

  4. The effects of various thicknesses of chemical protective gloves on manual dexterity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CAROLYN K. BENSEL

    1993-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects on manual dexterity of the thickness of handcovering. Twelve men were timed as they performed five dexterity tests while barehanded and while wearing each of three thicknesses of chemical protective gloves, 0·18 mm, 0·36 mm, and 0·64 mm. The subjects participated in 14 sessions held on consecutive weekdays. Analysis of the data

  5. Cut-resistant protective gloves in pathology—effective and cost-effective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Florian R. Fritzsche; Manfred Dietel; Wilko Weichert; Ann-Christin Buckendahl

    2008-01-01

    Cutting injuries and needle-stitch injuries constitute a potentially fatal danger to both pathologists and autopsy personnel.\\u000a We evaluated such injuries in a large German institute of pathology from 2002 to 2007 and analysed the effect of the introduction\\u000a of cut-resistant gloves on the incidence of these injuries. In the observation period, 64 injuries (48 cutting injuries and\\u000a 16 needle-stitch injuries)

  6. Evaluation of selected glove materials for worker hand protection against exposure to an aqueous aniline solution 

    E-print Network

    Powell, Marc Kendall

    1977-01-01

    the challenge solution as pictured on the right. . . 5. Perkin-Elmer, Model 124, UV absorption spectrophotometer and strip chart recorder. . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Typical quantitative Ultravio'let absorbance spectrum of ani linium ions in 0. I M H2S04...'ical saline. Analysis was made after adding Ehrlich's reagent to develop a color and measured on a spectrophotometer in the visible spectrum. A followup study challenged the glove materials with reagent grade aniline. 40 A study of the literature...

  7. Auditory stimuli from a sensor glove model modulate cortical audiotactile integration.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Raquel Metzker; Barbosa, Rafael Inácio; Salmón, Carlos Ernesto Garrido; Rondinoni, Carlo; Escorsi-Rosset, Sara; Delsim, Juliana Carla; Barbieri, Cláudio Henrique; Mazzer, Nilton

    2013-08-26

    The purpose of this study was to shed light on cortical audiotactile integration and sensory substitution mechanisms, thought to serve as a basis for the use of a sensor glove in the preservation of the cortical map of the hand after peripheral nerve injuries. Fourteen subjects were selected and randomly assigned either to a training group, trained to replace touch for hearing with the use of a sensor glove, or to a control group, untrained. Training group volunteers had to identify textures just by the sound. In an fMRI experiment, all subjects received three types of stimuli: tactile only, combined audiotactile stimulation, and auditory only. Results indicate that, for trained subjects, a coupling between auditory and somatosensory cortical areas is established through associative areas. Differences in signal correlation between groups point to a pairing mechanism, which, at first, connects functionally the primary auditory and sensory areas (trained subjects). Later, this connection seems to be mediated by associative areas. The training with the sensor glove influences cortical audiotactile integration mechanisms, determining BOLD signal changes in the somatosensory area during auditory stimulation. PMID:23628668

  8. Enhancement of bend sensor properties as applied in a glove for use in neurorehabilitation settings.

    PubMed

    Oess, Ninja P; Wanek, Johann; van Hedel, Hubertus J A

    2010-01-01

    Following hand function impairment caused by a neurological disorder, the functional level of the upper extremities has to be assessed in the clinical and rehabilitation settings. Current hand function evaluation tests are somewhat imprecise. Instrumented gloves allow finger motion monitoring during the performance of skilled tasks, such as grasping objects. As a result, they provide an objective tool for evaluating slight changes in the fine motor skills of the hand. Numerous gloves are based on resistive bend sensors, given that this is an easy to handle, low-cost, and reliable sensing element. When bending is not applied homogeneously along such a sensor, as is the case with finger-joint bending, its output response varies with the sensor's longitudinal position. Our goal is to determine the optimal sensor position with respect to the finger-joint in order to enhance the resolution of the sensors embedded in a glove. The validity of the integrated sensors is evaluated and the accuracy values are given. PMID:21096935

  9. Sensitivity tests on leaded glove material, EMRTC Report FR-95-15: Final test report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.; Davis, L.; Block-Bolten, A.

    1995-06-01

    Small-scale safety and characterization tests were performed on stored radioactive wastes. The materials tested were formed when leaded dry box gloves were exposed to nitric acid. The nitration products exhibited thermal and impact sensitivity which could lead to ignition of explosion. Water was used to separate the nitrated glove material into several fractions; only the insoluble fraction exhibited significant sensitivity to impact. Both the separated and mixed materials were thermally unstable. Self-heating occurred at about 80C or lower, depending on the quantity of material tested. The drop weight impact sensitivity of one sample was greater than that of trinitrotoluene. The electrostatic spark discharge sensitivity of the nitration products was measured to be less than for typical secondary explosives. No sensitivity to friction was measured. These results indicate that the nitrated gloves can probably be handled without extreme risk of ignition. Washing the nitrated materials was found to desensitize the materials, indicating that water could be used as a solvent when storing the materials.

  10. Evaluation of glove material resistance to ethylene glycol dimethyl ether permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Menke, R.; Chelton, C.F.

    1988-08-01

    Some glycol ethers have been reported to cause adverse reproductive effects in exposed male and female workers, and skin absorption has been determined to be an important route of entry of this class of chemicals. Because ethylene glycol dimethyl ether (EGDME) is a possible component of lithium-based primary battery electrolyte systems, a study was undertaken to determine the resistance of various commercially available gloves to permeation of this liquid. The gloves were tested by the ASTM Method F-739-81, and butyl rubber was found to be the most effective barrier to permeation. Further studies determined that the butyl gloves could be reused if they were reconditioned overnight in a vacuum oven at 50 degrees C. When a mixture of ethylene glycol dimethyl ether (30% v/v) and propylene carbonate (70% v/v) was tested, the results indicated that the propylene carbonate retards the permeation of the glycol ether by a factor of 10. This is believed to be caused by the propylene carbonate coating the surface of the butyl membrane to reduce the sorption of EGDME.

  11. Examination of a Standardized Test for Evaluating the Degree of Cure of EVA Encapsulation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Gu, X.; Haldenman, S.; Hidalgo, M.; Malguth, E.; Reid, C. G.; Shioda, T.; Schulze, S. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    The curing of cross-linkable encapsulation is a critical consideration for photovoltaic (PV) modules manufactured using a lamination process. Concerns related to ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA) include the quality (e.g., expiration and uniformity) of the films or completion (duration) of the cross-linking of the EVA within a laminator. Because these issues are important to both EVA and module manufacturers, an international standard has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the degree of cure for EVA encapsulation. The present draft of the standard calls for the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the rapid, enabling secondary (test) method. Both the residual enthalpy- and melt/freeze-DSC methods are identified. The DSC methods are calibrated against the gel content test, the primary (reference) method. Aspects of other established methods, including indentation and rotor cure metering, were considered by the group. Key details of the test procedure will be described.

  12. Integration of Living Machine and Biogas plant Case EVA Centre Lanxmeer, Culemborg

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arjan van Timmeren; Millie Tawil

    This paper focuses on the spatial and architectural integration of a combined waste (or: wastewater)\\/energy system in the EVA Centre (Information Center on Sustainability with conference center, hotel, and Spa & Vitality center) in the deep green district 'Lanxmeer' in Culemborg (the Netherlands). The design of the district and the building is based on permaculture, Reggio Emilia and organic design

  13. Examination of a Standardized Test for Evaluating the Degree of Cure of EVA Encapsulation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Gu, X.; Haldeman, S.; Hidalgo, M.; Malguth, E.; Reid, C.; Shioda, T.; Schulze, S.; Wang, Z.

    2013-11-01

    The curing of cross-linkable encapsulation is a critical consideration for photovoltaic (PV) modules manufactured using a lamination process. Concerns related to ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA) include the quality (e.g., expiration and uniformity) of the films or completion (duration) of the cross-linking of the EVA within a laminator. Because these issues are important to both EVA and module manufacturers, an international standard has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the degree of cure for EVA encapsulation. The present draft of the standard calls for the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the rapid, enabling secondary (test) method. Both the residual enthalpy- and melt/freeze-DSC methods are identified. The DSC methods are calibrated against the gel content test, the primary (reference) method. Aspects of other established methods, including indentation and rotor cure metering, were considered by the group. Key details of the test procedure will be described.

  14. Total Plasma Carotenoid and Mortality in the Elderly:1 -Results of EVA Study-2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Total Plasma Carotenoid and Mortality in the Elderly:1 -Results of EVA Study-2 Tasnime N Akbaraly : 0044(0)49961457915 akbaraly@montp.inserm.fr16 Short running head: Total Plasma Carotenoid and Mortality17 Key words: Total plasma carotenoid, mortality, elderly, longitudinal study18 Word count: 3427

  15. Advanced Thermal Status Control of Crews in EVA and Escape Suits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. S. Koscheyev; A. Coca; G. R. Leon

    2002-01-01

    Over the course of the manned space program, there has been an accumulation of experience on methods to control the thermal status of astronauts in open space. However, there remains a significant need for a simple method to monitor the astronaut's level of heat exchange during EVA, particularly in an emergency period, or during crew escape. The liquid cooling\\/warming tubing

  16. NIKVISION: NATURAL INTERACTION FOR KIDS Javier Marco, Eva Cerezo, Sandra Baldasarri

    E-print Network

    Baldassarri, Sandra

    NIKVISION: NATURAL INTERACTION FOR KIDS Javier Marco, Eva Cerezo, Sandra Baldasarri Advanced hardware, and the kid plays with it the same way he plays with any of his non technological toys elements and installation nor very restricted environment conditions. Regarding kid/computer interaction

  17. Pesticide Glove Permeation Analysis: Comparison of the ASTM F739 Test Method with an Automated Flow-through Reverse-Phase Liquid Chromatography Procedure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RICHARD P. MOODY; LEONARD RITTER

    1990-01-01

    The results of two methods of analysis for measuring glove permeability to pesticides are reported. The standard ASTM F739-85 testing procedure was used to determine breakthrough times and permeation rates for four protective glove materials for two commercially available pesticide formulations. The same glove materials and pesticides then were tested using an in-house developed automated in-vitro diffusion analysis (AIDA) procedure.

  18. A human factors approach towards the design of a new glovebox glove for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Jude M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-06

    Present day glovebox gloves at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are underdeveloped and ergonomically inaccurate. This problem results in numerous sprain and strain injuries every year for employees who perform glovebox work. In addition to injuries, using the current glovebox glove design also contributes to breaches and contamination. The current glove used today at LANL has several problems: (1) The length of the fingers is incorrect, (2) the web spacing between the fingers is nonexistent, (3) the angles between each digit on the finger are incorrect, (4) the thumb is placed inaccurately, and (5) the length of the hand is incorrect. These problems present a need to correct the current glove design to decrease the risk of injuries, breaches, and contamination. Anthropometrics were researched to help find the best range of hand measurements to fix the current glove design. Anthropometrics is the measure of the human physical variation. Anthropometrics for this study were gathered from the American National Survey (ANSUR) data that was conducted by the U.S Army in 1988. The current glovebox glove uses anthropometrics from the 95th to 105th percentile range which is too large so the new gloves are going to implement data from a smaller range of percentile groups. The 105th percentile range represents measurements that exceed the human population but are needed to fit certain circumstance such as wearing several under gloves within the glovebox gloves. Anthropometrics used in this study include: 105th percentile measurements for joint circumference which was unchanged because the room for under gloves plus ease of hand insertion and extraction is needed, 80th percentile measurements for crotch length to allow workers to reach the web spacing in the glove, 20th percentile measurements for finger length to allow workers to reach the end of the glove, standard 10.5cm hand breadth to allow more room to accommodate under gloves, 45 degrees abduction angle for the thumb for better positioning, 45 degrees extension angle for the thumb for better positioning, and various angles for the other fingers to allow a more relaxed and natural fit. 3D modeling was used to implement the anthropometric data listed above onto an existing scanned solid model of a human hand. SolidWorks 2010 3-D modeling package was utilized to manipulate the hand model to represent the anthropometric data researched. The anthropometrics and modifications were reviewed by the University of New Mexico Department of Orthopedics hand surgeons. After all modifications and reviews were completed the model was printed out using stereolithography. The printed out model of the hand was used as a mold to create a prototype glovebox glove. The new mold was taken to Piercan USA to produce a 20mil Polyurethane/Hypalon glovebox glove. The Minnesota Dexterity test and Purdue Pegboard test were used to measure the dexterity of the prototype glovebox glove against a current 15 mil Hypalon LANL glovebox glove. Using the data from the tests a student t test was used to determine if there was a significant difference between the current hypalon glove results and the new prototype glove results. With a 95% confidence level the prototype showed to have a significantly lower mean difference from the current hypalon glovebox glove with the Minnesota Dexterity test. With a 95% confidence level the prototype showed to have a significantly higher mean difference from the current hypalon glovebox glove with the Purdue Pegboard test. A p value method was also performed to confirm the results of the student t test. A survey was also given to glovebox workers to determine if they preferred the new design. The best reaction from glovebox workers was the new thumb position, 73.2% of the sample population agreed with the new thumb position. Developing a new glovebox glove will improve the ergonomics of the hand for work performed, decrease exposure time, decreasing risk of breaching, increasing productivity, reducing injuries, and improving work performance. In the future the new glovebox

  19. A unique exercise facility for simulating orbital extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Rebecca C.; Sharer, Peter J.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1993-01-01

    A unique exercise facility has been developed and used to simulate orbital extravehicular activity (EVA). The device incorporates an arm ergometer into a mechanism which places the subject in the zero-g neutral body posture. The intent of this configuration is to elicit muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and thermoregulatory responses similar to those observed during orbital EVA. Experiments done with this facility will help characterize the astronaut's dynamic heat balance during EVA and will eventually lead to the development of an automated thermal control system which would more effectively maintain thermal comfort.

  20. Enhanced efficacy of triprolidine by transdermal application of the EVA matrix system in rabbits and rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Chul; Choi, Jun-Shik

    2005-09-01

    The bioavailability of triprolidine from the ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) matrix system containing polyoxyethylene-2-oleyl ether was studied to determine the feasibility of enhanced transdermal delivery of triprolidine in rabbits. The antihistamine effects were also confirmed to determine the percutaneous absorption of triprolidine from the EVA matrix system containing a penetration enhancer and plasticizer in rats. The triprolidine-EVA matrix (50mg/kg) was applied to the abdominal skin of rabbits. Blood samples were collected via the femoral artery for 36 h and the plasma concentrations of triprolidine were determined by HPLC. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the LAGRAN computer program. The area under the curve(AUC) was significantly higher in the enhancer group (4582+/-1456 ng/mL h) than that (2958+/-997 ng/mL h) in the control group (P<0.05), showing an approximate 155% increased bioavailability. The average Cmax in the enhancer group (241+/-46.5 ng/mL) was significantly higher than that in the control group (198+/-28.9 ng/mL), (P<0.05). The mean Tmax in the enhancer group (8.0+/-2.57 h) was higher than that in the control group (6.0+/-2.24 h, but this was not statistically significantly. The relative bioavailability of triprolidine in the transdermal application was 35.9% in the control group and 55.6% in the enhancer group compared comparing with that after oral administration. As the triprolidine-EVA matrix, which contains polyoxyethylene-2-oleyl ether as an enhancer and triethyl citrate as a plasticizer was administered to the rabbits via the transdermal routes, the relative bioavailability increased approximately 1.55 fold compared with that in the control group, showing a relatively constant, sustained blood concentration with minimal fluctuation. The antihistamine effect was determined using the Evans blue dye procedure by comparing the changes in the vascular permeability increase following the transdermal application. The vascular permeability increase was reduced significantly by the transdermal application of the EVA-triprolidine system containing triethyl citrate and polyoxyethylene-2-oleyl ether. These results show that the plasticizer and penetration enhancer increase the skin permeation of triprolidine and the triprolidine-EVA matrix system could be developed as a transdermal delivery system providing the increased constant plasma concentration and antihistamine effects. PMID:16005195

  1. Diode laser interrogated single-mode fiber optics with a hetero-core structure for a wearable glove sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, M.; Sasaki, H.; Kubota, Y.; Watanabe, K.

    2008-10-01

    We have developed hetero-core fiber techniques interrogated with a semiconductor diode laser based on single-mode transmission for wearable glove sensing applications. The hetero-core fiber sensor is suitable for the wearable sensing glove because of the advantages of the capable optical intensity-based measurement with the excellent stability of the usage of the single-mode transmission fiber and independence of temperature fluctuation. In order that the hetero-core sensor was unaffected to the random wrinkles at the position of joints in a glove garment, the hetero-core sensor elements were located in the back of hand. As a result, the hetero-core flexion sensor could detect the joint angle of fingers regardless of differences of their size of hands, and the hetero-core sensing technique enables the sensing glove to equip the minimum number of sensors. The optical loss performances of the hetero-core sensors have indicated monotonic characteristics with the flexion angle of joints. The optical loss change is 1.35 dB for the flexion angle of approximately 97.2 degrees with accuracy of detectable flexion angle of 0.84 degree. Real-time hand motion capturing was successfully demonstrated by means of the proposed wearable sensing glove with hetero-core fiber techniques without restricting human natural behaviors.

  2. Design and adaptation of a novel supercritical extraction facility for operation in a glove box for recovery of radioactive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V. Suresh; Kumar, R.; Sivaraman, N.; Ravisankar, G.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

    2010-09-01

    The design and development of a novel supercritical extraction experimental facility adapted for safe operation in a glove box for the recovery of radioactive elements from waste is described. The apparatus incorporates a high pressure extraction vessel, reciprocating pumps for delivering supercritical fluid and reagent, a back pressure regulator, and a collection chamber. All these components of the system have been specially designed for glove box adaptation and made modular to facilitate their replacement. Confinement of these materials must be ensured in a glove box to protect the operator and prevent contamination to the work area. Since handling of radioactive materials under high pressure (30 MPa) and temperature (up to 333 K) is involved in this process, the apparatus needs elaborate safety features in the design of the equipment, as well as modification of a standard glove box to accommodate the system. As a special safety feature to contain accidental leakage of carbon dioxide from the extraction vessel, a safety vessel has been specially designed and placed inside the glove box. The extraction vessel was enclosed in the safety vessel. The safety vessel was also incorporated with pressure sensing and controlling device.

  3. Development of composite materials for non-leaded glove for use in radiological hand protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodoo-Amoo, David Nii Amoo

    Lead is a hazardous material and US congress has mandated the rapid reduction of all hazardous waste generation as a matter of national policy. With the large amount of plutonium handling in numerous projects including the development of MOX fuel, power source etc., hand glove protection for the emitted alpha-beta- and low energy photons is an important issue. Leaded gloves are the prime shields used for radiological hand protection. US Department of Energy laboratories require a substitute material for the lead oxide in the gloves, as a way to reduced mixed waste. To solve this problem, a new blend of non-hazardous materials that have the same radiological properties, approximately the same cost of production, and lastly not potentially fall under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation, to replace the lead oxide currently used in the gloves had been investigated. The investigations have produced alternative materials using calculations (deterministic and Monte Carlo, MCNP) and experiments. The selection of the constituent compounds for the new composite materials, were based on the k-absorption edge energy of the main constituent element(s) in the compound. The formulations of these composites were fashioned on the principle of blending neoprene rubber formulation with several constituent compounds. Calculations based on the Lambert-Beer attenuation law together with the mass attenuation coefficient values from the XCOM cross section database program were used to determine the transmission fractions of these proposed composite materials. Selected composite materials that compared favorably with the leaded-neoprene were fabricated. These fabricated composite materials were tested with attenuation experiments and the results were in excellent agreement with the calculations using the Lambert-Beer law. For the purpose of benchmarking the result of the calculations, Monte Carlo calculations were also made. The success of this research would mean that this new composite material could also replace the lead aprons currently in use, as shields against radiation like x-ray in most hospitals. Based on computational and experimental results, the recommended compositions of the composite materials for the glove are: (i) Erbium III Oxide (Er2O3)---40% and 40 Tungsten Boride (WB) blend with 20% Neoprene formulation, or with the reduced Er2O3, (ii) Erbium III Oxide (Er2O 3)---5% and 75% Tungsten Boride (WB) blend with 20% Neoprene formulation. (iii) Tungsten III Oxide (WO3)---80% blended with 20% Neoprene formulation. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results show that, several heavy metals used in these new materials that would leach out were below the US EPA limit or are not on the list of regulated heavy metals. However, on the original gloves Lead leached out at a concentration of 5.2 mL/L, slightly above the regulatory limit.

  4. Device fabrication scheme for evaporated SPC poly-Si thin-film solar cells on glass (EVA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver Kunz; Zi Ouyang; Johnson Wong; Armin G. Aberle

    2008-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on glass obtained by solid phase crystallisation (SPC) of PECVD-deposited a-Si have good photovoltaic efficiency. In this paper we present a functioning device fabrication scheme for equivalent solar cells made from evaporated SPC poly-Si films (EVA). Respectable efficiencies of above 4% are achieved for both p-type and n-type EVA solar cells on planar glass superstrates.

  5. Extravehicular activity training and hardware design consideration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuot, P. J.; Harbaugh, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Preparing astronauts to perform the many complex extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks required to assemble and maintain Space Station will be accomplished through training simulations in a variety of facilities. The adequacy of this training is dependent on a thorough understanding of the task to be performed, the environment in which the task will be performed, high-fidelity training hardware and an awareness of the limitations of each particular training facility. Designing hardware that can be successfully operated, or assembled, by EVA astronauts in an efficient manner, requires an acute understanding of human factors and the capabilities and limitations of the space-suited astronaut. Additionally, the significant effect the microgravity environment has on the crew members' capabilities has to be carefully considered not only for each particular task, but also for all the overhead related to the task and the general overhead associated with EVA. This paper will describe various training methods and facilities that will be used to train EVA astronauts for Space Station assembly and maintenance. User-friendly EVA hardware design considerations and recent EVA flight experience will also be presented.

  6. Hand in glove: brain and skull in development and dysmorphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The brain originates relatively early in development from differentiated ectoderm that forms a hollow tube and takes on an exceedingly complex shape with development. The skull is made up of individual bony elements that form from neural crest- and mesoderm-derived mesenchyme that unite to provide support and protection for soft tissues and spaces of the head. The meninges provide a protective and permeable membrane between brain and skull. Across evolutionary and developmental time, dynamic changes in brain and skull shape track one another so that their integration is evidenced in two structures that fit soundly regardless of changes in biomechanical and physiologic functions. Evidence for this tight correspondence is also seen in diseases of the craniofacial complex that are often classified as diseases of the skull (e.g., craniosynostosis) or diseases of the brain (e.g., holoprosencephaly) even when both tissues are affected. Our review suggests a model that links brain and skull morphogenesis through coordinated integration of signaling pathways (e.g., FGF, TGF?, Wnt) via processes that are not currently understood, perhaps involving the meninges. Differences in the earliest signaling of biological structure establish divergent designs that will be enhanced during morphogenesis. Signaling systems that pattern the developing brain are also active in patterning required for growth and assembly of the skull and some members of these signaling families have been indicated as causal for craniofacial diseases. Because cells of early brain and skull are sensitive to similar signaling families, variation in the strength or timing of signals or shifts in patterning boundaries that affect one system (neural or skull) could also affect the other system and appropriate co-adjustments in development would be made. Interactions of these signaling systems and of the tissues that they pattern are fundamental to the consistent but labile functional and structural association of brain and skull conserved over evolutionary time obvious in the study of development and disease. PMID:23525521

  7. Influence of the association of the EVA and NBR on the characteristics of modified bitumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensaada, A.; Soudani, K.; Haddadi, S.; Saoula, S.

    2015-03-01

    Durability and the performance of pavement depend mainly on the characteristics of materials which change over time like all other organic substances. They are subject to significant changes due to environmental conditions during the different phases of use. In the present work we investigated experimentally the influence of the association of ethyl vinyl acetate polymer (EVA) with an industrial waste, acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) on the modification of bitumen AC 35-50 and its rheological behavior. The incorporation of NBR and EVA in the bitumen improved its intrinsic characteristics (softening point, penetration and ductility). In addition to improving the characteristics of bituminous binders that will affect the durability of bituminous structures, the environment will be preserved by the recycling of industrial waste.

  8. Characteristics of space charge formed in a laminated LDPE/EVA dielectric under DC stress

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshikatsu [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga (Japan). Dept. of Energy Conversion; [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Kisanuki, Osamu; Sakata, Masataka; Uchiumi, Michihiro [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga (Japan). Dept. of Energy Conversion

    1996-12-31

    A laser-induced pressure pulse (LIPP) method was used for measuring the space charge distribution of LDPE/EVA laminate dielectrics under dc stress. The constant voltage up to {+-}20 kV was applied to a side of the laminates of 0.5 mm thickness for 30 minutes. The other side is grounded. When the amount of space charge was measured by LIPP, both sides were virtually grounded. Space charge built up in or near the interface between LDPE and EVA was mainly investigated. Positive and negative voltage was applied to the side of LDPE in the laminates. It was clarified that the space charge was larger in case of LDPE negatively biased than in case of LDPE positively biased. The density of the space charge ranged around 1 nC/mm{sup 3}. The formation of interfacial space charge is analyzed.

  9. Variable-Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE): Stability code development and clean-up glove data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozendaal, Roger A.

    1987-01-01

    The primary objective of the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE) was to establish an improved swept wing transition criterion. The development of the Unified Stability System gave a way of quickly examining disturbance growth for a wide variety of laminar boundary layers. The disturbance growth traces shown are too scattered to define a transition criteria to replace the F-111 data band, which has been used successfully to design NLF gloves. Still, a careful review of the clean-up glove data may yield cases for which the transition location is known more accurately. Liquid crystal photographs of the clean-up glove show much spanwise variation in the transition front for some conditions, and this further complicates the analyses. Several high quality cases are needed in which the transition front is well defined and at a relatively constant chordwise station.

  10. Laser-induced pressure pulse measurements of space charge in PE\\/EVA laminates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshikatsu Tanaka; Hideaki Shirai; Osamu Kisanuki; Michihiro Uchiumi

    1995-01-01

    The LIPP method was used for measuring the charge distribution at the interface between PE\\/EVA laminate dielectrics under dc stress. High power laser light of 300 mJ\\/pulse was applied to a specially coated surface of the specimen. A short (300 ps) and a long (5 ns) laser pulse were used for thin and thick specimens, respectively. The result of the

  11. Formation and annihilation characteristics of space charge in PE\\/EVA interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshikatsu Tanaka; M. Sakata; T. Oishi; M. Uchiumi

    1997-01-01

    Interfacial space charge was measured for laminated dielectrics by the laser-induced pressure pulse (LIPP) method. Specimens used for experiments consisted of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) of thickness 0.25 mm each and were subjected to d.c. voltages up to 10 kV. The voltage was continuously applied until the space charge in the interface increased nearly to the

  12. Characteristics of space charge formed in a laminated LDPE\\/EVA dielectric under DC stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Tanaka; O. Kisanuki; M. Sakata; M. Uchiumi

    1996-01-01

    A laser-induced pressure pulse (LIPP) method was used for measuring the space charge distribution of LDPE\\/EVA laminate dielectrics under DC stress. A constant voltage up to ±20 kV was applied to a side of laminates of 0.5 mm thickness for 30 minutes. The other side is grounded. When the amount of space charge was measured by LIPP, both sides were

  13. Chemical Evidence for the Dawn of Life on Earth Eva-Maria Krammer,A

    E-print Network

    Ullmann, G. Matthias

    that life emerged on Earth 4.2­3.8 Ga (i.e. 4.2­3.8 Â 109 years) ago. Among the data supporting this age the age of a meteorite, it has been known that the Earth is ,4.55 Ga old. However, although the ageChemical Evidence for the Dawn of Life on Earth Eva-Maria Krammer,A Sophie Bernad,B G. Matthias

  14. REMARKS ON THE DOMINATION NUMBER OF GRAPHS CSABA BIRO, EVA CZABARKA, PETER DANKELMANN, AND LASZLO SZEKELY

    E-print Network

    Biro, Csaba

    Kneser graphs. 1. Introduction Let G = (V, E) be a graph and X V . X is a dominating set if for every v into sets V1, . . . , Vk such that each Vi is a dominating set of G. The domatic number dom(G) of a graph GREMARKS ON THE DOMINATION NUMBER OF GRAPHS CSABA BIR´O, ´EVA CZABARKA, PETER DANKELMANN, AND L

  15. Replacement of lead-loaded glovebox glove with attenuation medium that are not RCRA-hazardous metals

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; George, Gerald L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dodge, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chunglo, Steve [CANBERRA INDUSTRIES

    2010-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). Radiation shielding is commonly used to protect the glovebox worker from unintentional direct and secondary radiation exposure, while working with plutonium-238 and plutonium-239. In these environments, low-energy photons, i.e., those less than 250 keY, are encountered. Shielding glove box gloves are traditionally composed of lead-based materials, but these are now considered hazardous waste. This has prompted the development of new, nonhazardous- shielding gJovebox gloves. No studies, however, have investigated the effectiveness of these new glovebox gloves. We examined both leaded and nonhazardous- shielding glovebox gloves and compared their attenuation effectiveness over the energy range of interest at TA-55. All measurements are referenced to lead sheets, allowing direct comparisons to the common industry standard of 0.1 mm lead equivalent material. The attenuation properties of both types of glovebox gloves vary with energy, making it difficult for manufacturers to claim lead equivalency across the entire energy range used at TA-55. The positions of materials' photon energy absorption edges, which are particularly important to improved attenuation performance, depending upon the choice of radiation energy range, are discussed. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations.

  16. Technology Development for the ExaVolt Antenna (EVA) Suborbital Ultra-High Energy Particle Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginski, Frank; Brakke, Kenneth; Gorham, Peter; Furer, Joshua; Miki, Christian

    We describe technology development for the ExaVolt Antenna (EVA), the next generation balloon-borne ultra-high energy (UHE) particle observatory under development for NASA's suborbital super-pressure balloon program in Antarctica. The design is based on a novel application of toroidal reflector optics, utilizing the super-pressure balloon surface to mount an RF reflector and an internal feed-array suspended inside of the balloon, to create an ultra-large radio antenna system with a synoptic view of the Antarctic ice sheet below it. A 1/20 scale model test with an actual inflated balloon is planned for late Spring 2014 at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. A 5.8~meter diameter super-pressure balloon will be pulsed at 3~GHz to test electronics and data acquisition systems. The 1/20 scale model will also be used to investigate deployment of the EVA system. Feed deployment is a semi-autonomous process that proceeds gradually as the volume of the ascending balloon increases. A mathematical model was developed to analyze deployment of the EVA system. Numerical solutions based on the model will be compared with measurements of ascent-like shapes assumed by the physical model during inflation.

  17. Results of EVA/mobile transporter space station truss assembly tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Judith J.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Bush, Harold G.; Lake, M. S.; Jensen, J. K.; Wallsom, R. E.; Phelps, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    Underwater neutral buoyance tests were conducted to evaluate the use of a Mobile Transporter concept in conjunction with EVA astronauts to construct the Space Station Freedom truss structure. A three-bay orthogonal tetrahedral truss configuration with a 15 foot square cross section was repeatedly assembled by a single pair of pressure suited test subjects working from the Mobile Transporter astronaut positioning devices (mobile foot restraints). The average unit assembly time (which included integrated installation of utility trays) was 27.6 s/strut, or 6 min/bay. The results of these tests indicate that EVA assembly of space station size structures can be significantly enhanced when using a Mobile Transporter equipped with astronaut positioning devices. Rapid assembly time can be expected and are dependent primarily on the rate of translation permissible for on-orbit operations. The concept used to demonstate integrated installation of utility trays requires minimal EVA handling and consequentially, as the results show, has little impact on overall assembly time.

  18. Hazards to surgeons in trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery: use of an electronic device to warn of intraoperative glove perforations.

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    An electronic device intended to detect glove punctures as they occur peroperatively has been described previously. This study reports the experience of its use in 80 orthopaedic cases. The device detected all punctures, except one, where fluid could have contacted the surgeon's hand (n = 16). Wet gowns and drapes are potential routes for transmission of pathogens, and were responsible for the alarm sounding on 30 occasions. This device can minimise the exposure to potentially hazardous body fluids when glove punctures are not clinically apparent. PMID:1416699

  19. Understanding human-space suit interaction to prevent injury during extravehicular activity

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Allison P. (Allison Paige)

    2014-01-01

    Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is a critical component of human spaceflight. Working in gas-pressurized space suits, however, causes fatigue, unnecessary energy expenditure, and injury. The problem of injury is particularly ...

  20. Evaluating the Usability of Pinchigator, a system for Navigating Virtual Worlds using Pinch Gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, George S.; Brookman, Stephen; Dumas, Joseph D. II; Tilghman, Neal

    2003-01-01

    Appropriate design of two dimensional user interfaces (2D U/I) utilizing the well known WIMP (Window, Icon, Menu, Pointing device) environment for computer software is well studied and guidance can be found in several standards. Three-dimensional U/I design is not nearly so mature as 2D U/I, and standards bodies have not reached consensus on what makes a usable interface. This is especially true when the tools for interacting with the virtual environment may include stereo viewing, real time trackers and pinch gloves instead of just a mouse & keyboard. Over the last several years the authors have created a 3D U/I system dubbed Pinchigator for navigating virtual worlds based on the dVise dV/Mockup visualization software, Fakespace Pinch Gloves and Pohlemus trackers. The current work is to test the usability of the system on several virtual worlds, suggest improvements to increase Pinchigator s usability, and then to generalize about what was learned and how those lessons might be applied to improve other 3D U/I systems.

  1. Fast and accurate fitting of relaxation dispersion data using the flexible software package GLOVE

    PubMed Central

    Sugase, Kenji; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Lansing, Jonathan C.

    2013-01-01

    Relaxation dispersion spectroscopy is one of the most widely used techniques for the analysis of protein dynamics. To obtain a detailed understanding of the protein function from the view point of dynamics, it is essential to fit relaxation dispersion data accurately. The grid search method is commonly used for relaxation dispersion curve fits, but it does not always find the global minimum that provides the best-fit parameter set. Also, the fitting quality does not always improve with increase of the grid size although the computational time becomes longer. This is because relaxation dispersion curve fitting suffers from a local minimum problem, which is a general problem in non-linear least squares curve fitting. Therefore, in order to fit relaxation dispersion data rapidly and accurately, we developed a new fitting program called GLOVE that minimizes global and local parameters alternately, and incorporates a Monte-Carlo minimization method that enables fitting parameters to pass through local minima with low computational cost. GLOVE also implements a random search method, which sets up initial parameter values randomly within user-defined ranges. We demonstrate here that the combined use of the three methods can find the global minimum more rapidly and more accurately than grid search alone. PMID:23754491

  2. Handling and analysis of ices in cryostats and glove boxes in view of cometary samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessler, K.; Eich, G.; Heyl, M.; Kochan, H.; Oehler, A.; Patnaik, A.; Schlosser, W.; Schulz, R.

    Comet nucleus sample return mission and other return missions from planets and satellites need equipment for handling and analysis of icy samples at low temperatures under vacuum or protective gas. Two methods are reported which were developed for analysis of small icy samples and which are modified for larger samples in cometary matter simulation experiments (KOSI). A conventional optical cryostat system was modified to allow for transport of samples at 5 K, ion beam irradiation, and measurement in an off-line optical spectrophotometer. The new system consists of a removable window plug containing nozzles for condensation of water and volatiles onto a cold finger. This plug can be removed in a vacuum system, changed against another plug (e.g., with other windows (IR, VIS, VUV) or other nozzles). While open, the samples can be treated under vacuum with cooling by manipulators (cut, removal, sample taking, irradiation with light, photons, or ions). After bringing the plug back, the samples can be moved to another site of analysis. For handling the 30 cm diameter mineral-ice samples from the KOSI experiments an 80x80x80 cm glove box made out of plexiglass was used. The samples were kept in a liquid nitrogen bath, which was filled from the outside. A stream a dry N2 and evaporating gas from the bath purified the glove box from impurity gases and, in particular, H2O, which otherwise would condense onto the samples.

  3. Handling and analysis of ices in cryostats and glove boxes in view of cometary samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roessler, K.; Eich, G.; Heyl, M.; Kochan, H.; Oehler, A.; Patnaik, A.; Schlosser, W.; Schulz, R.

    1989-01-01

    Comet nucleus sample return mission and other return missions from planets and satellites need equipment for handling and analysis of icy samples at low temperatures under vacuum or protective gas. Two methods are reported which were developed for analysis of small icy samples and which are modified for larger samples in cometary matter simulation experiments (KOSI). A conventional optical cryostat system was modified to allow for transport of samples at 5 K, ion beam irradiation, and measurement in an off-line optical spectrophotometer. The new system consists of a removable window plug containing nozzles for condensation of water and volatiles onto a cold finger. This plug can be removed in a vacuum system, changed against another plug (e.g., with other windows (IR, VIS, VUV) or other nozzles). While open, the samples can be treated under vacuum with cooling by manipulators (cut, removal, sample taking, irradiation with light, photons, or ions). After bringing the plug back, the samples can be moved to another site of analysis. For handling the 30 cm diameter mineral-ice samples from the KOSI experiments an 80x80x80 cm glove box made out of plexiglass was used. The samples were kept in a liquid nitrogen bath, which was filled from the outside. A stream a dry N2 and evaporating gas from the bath purified the glove box from impurity gases and, in particular, H2O, which otherwise would condense onto the samples.

  4. Synthesis of Bis(1,2-Dimethylimidazole)Copper(I)Hexafluorophosphate: An Experiment Using a Glove Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niewahner, J. H.; Walters, Keith A.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed description of the synthesis of bis(1,2-dimethylimidazole)copper(I) hexafluorophosphate by using techniques in a glove box is presented. The results shows that the synthesis of the copper complex has a distinct color change indicating by-product oxidation by oxygen.

  5. Isolation of Anaerobic Bacteria from Human Gingiva and Mouse Cecum by Means of a Simplified Glove Box Procedure1

    PubMed Central

    Aranki, Alexander; Syed, Salam A.; Kenney, Ernest B.; Freter, Rolf

    1969-01-01

    An anaerobic glove box constructed of clear flexible vinyl plastic is described. It is sufficiently inexpensive and simple in operation to be used not only in research but also in a clinical laboratory by technicians without special training. Conventional bacteriological techniques may be used inside the glove box for culturing and transferring anaerobic bacteria. The box may be heated to 37 C and thus serve as an anaerobic incubator as well, permitting inspection of cultures at any time. Media may be prepared and agar plates may be poured on the laboratory bench in the conventional manner. An overlay of trace amounts of palladium black catalyst over plated agar media reduces the medium to an oxidation-reduction (O-R) potential of - 300 mv within 2 days after introduction into the glove box. In spite of its greater simplicity, the system matched or excelled the roll tube method with respect to all parameters tested, including O-R potential obtainable in the media, O2 concentration in the gas phase, and efficiency in isolating anaerobic bacteria from the mouse cecum. Comparative studies indicate that the conventional anaerobic jar method was inadequate for the isolation of strict anaerobes from human gingival specimens and from the mouse cecum. This was due to the exposure of specimens and media to air during plating on the open laboratory bench. Anaerobic jars were adequate for maintaining the proper conditions for growth of anaerobic bacteria once these had been established in the glove box. Images PMID:4890748

  6. Natural rubber latex skin testing reagents: Safety and diagnostic accuracy of nonammoniated latex, ammoniated latex, and latex rubber glove extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert G. Hamilton; N. Franklin Adkinson

    1996-01-01

    Background: Nonammoniated latex, ammoniated latex, and rubber glove extracts are the only sources of natural rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) latex that have potential for use as skin testing reagents in the diagnosis of latex allergy. Their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as skin test reagents are unknown. Objective: We conducted a phase 1\\/2 clinical study to examine the safety and diagnostic accuracy

  7. A two-dimensional point-kernel model for dose calculations in a glove-box array

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. E. Kornreich; D. E. Dooley

    1999-01-01

    An associated paper details a model of a room containing glove boxes using the industry standard dose equivalent (dose) estimation tool MCNP. Such tools provide an excellent means for obtaining relatively reliable estimates of radiation transport in a complicated geometric structure. However, creating the input deck that models the complicated geometry is equally complicated. Therefore, an alternative tool is desirable

  8. In vitro evaluation of the efficacy of skin barrier creams and protective gloves on percutaneous absorption of industrial solvents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Korinth; S. Geh; K. H. Schaller; H. Drexler

    2003-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the experiments was to evaluate the efficacy of skin barrier creams (SBCs) and protective gloves and its potential for reduction of percutaneous absorption of industrial solvents. Methods We assessed percutaneous absorption of ethylene glycol (EG), isopropyl alcohol (IA) and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (TMB), using static diffusion cells. These solvents were applied neat (EG, TMB) as well as in

  9. The astronaut and the banana peel: An EVA retriever scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Daniel G.

    1989-01-01

    To prepare for the problem of accidents in Space Station activities, the Extravehicular Activity Retriever (EVAR) robot is being constructed, whose purpose is to retrieve astronauts and tools that float free of the Space Station. Advanced Decision Systems is at the beginning of a project to develop research software capable of guiding EVAR through the retrieval process. This involves addressing problems in machine vision, dexterous manipulation, real time construction of programs via speech input, and reactive execution of plans despite the mishaps and unexpected conditions that arise in uncontrolled domains. The problem analysis phase of this work is presented. An EVAR scenario is used to elucidate major domain and technical problems. An overview of the technical approach to prototyping an EVAR system is also presented.

  10. High-resolution modelling of health impacts from air pollution using the integrated model system EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Jørgen; Andersen, Mikael S.; Bønløkke, Jakob; Christensen, Jesper H.; Geels, Camilla; Hansen, Kaj M.; Jensen, Steen S.; Ketzel, Matthias; Plejdrup, Marlene S.; Sigsgaard, Torben; Silver, Jeremy D.

    2014-05-01

    A high-resolution assessment of health impacts from air pollution and related external cost has been conducted for Denmark using the integrated EVA model system. The EVA system has been further developed by implementing an air quality model with a 1 km x 1 km resolution covering the whole of Denmark. New developments of the integrated model system will be presented as well as results for health impacts and related external costs over several decades. Furthermore, the sensitivity of health impacts to model resolution will be studied. We have developed an integrated model system EVA (Economic Valuation of Air pollution), based on the impact-pathway chain, to assess the health impacts and health-related economic externalities of air pollution resulting from specific emission sources or sectors. The system is used to support policymaking with respect to emission control. In Brandt et al. (2013a; 2013b), the EVA system was used to assess the impacts in Europe and Denmark from the past, present and future total air pollution levels as well as the contribution from the major anthropogenic emission sectors. The EVA system was applied using the hemispheric chemistry-transport model, the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM), with nesting capability for higher resolution over Europe (50 km x 50 km) and Northern Europe (16.7 km x 16.7 km). In this study an Urban Background Model (UBM) has been further developed to cover the whole of Denmark with a 1 km x 1 km resolution and the model has been implemented as a part of the integrated model system, EVA. The EVA system is based on the impact-pathway methodology. The site-specific emissions will result (via atmospheric transport and chemistry) in a concentration distribution, which together with detailed population data, are used to estimate the population-level exposure. Using exposure-response functions and economic valuations, the exposure is transformed into impacts on human health and related external costs. In this study we have used a coupling of two chemistry transport models to calculate the air pollution concentration at different scales; the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model to calculate the air pollution levels with a resolution down to 5.6 km x 5.6 km and the Urban Background Model to further calculate the air pollution at 1 km x 1 km resolution using results from DEHM as boundary conditions. Both the emission data as well as the population density has been represented in the model system with the same high resolution. Previous health impact assessments related to air pollution have been made on a lower resolution. In this study, the integrated model system, EVA, has been used to estimate the health impacts and related external cost for Denmark over a 20 year period (1990-2010) at a 1 km x 1 km resolution. Furthermore, a sensitivity study of the health impact using coarse and fine resolutions in the model system has been carried out to evaluate the effect of improved description of the geographical population distribution with respect to location of local emissions. Brandt, J., J. D. Silver, J. H. Christensen, M. S. Andersen, J. Bønløkke, T. Sigsgaard, C. Geels, A. Gross, A. B. Hansen, K. M. Hansen, G. B. Hedegaard, E. Kaas and L. M. Frohn, 2013. Contribution from the ten major emission sectors in Europe to the Health-Cost Externalities of Air Pollution using the EVA Model System - an integrated modelling approach. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 13, pp. 7725-7746, 2013. Brandt, J., J. D. Silver, J. H. Christensen, M. S. Andersen, J. Bønløkke, T. Sigsgaard, C. Geels, A. Gross, A. B. Hansen, K. M. Hansen, G. B. Hedegaard, E. Kaas and L. M. Frohn, 2013. Assessment of Past, Present and Future Health-Cost Externalities of Air Pollution in Europe and the contribution from international ship traffic using the EVA Model System. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. Vol. 13, pp. 7747-7764, 2013.

  11. Development and biopharmaceutical evaluation of quinupramine-EVA matrix containing penetration enhancer for the enhanced transdermal absorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Chul; Kim, Jin; Kim, Woong-Jang; Kim, Seong-Jin; Cho, Cheong-Weon

    2007-01-01

    To increase the skin permeation of quinupramine through the rat skin, different types of enhancers were added to an ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) matrix containing 2% quinupramine. The effects of the enhancers on the level of quinupramine permeation through the skin were evaluated by using Franz diffusion cells that were fitted with the intact excised rat skin. Among the enhancers used, which included fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated), glycerides, pyrrolidones, and nonionic surfactants, polyoxyethylene-2-oleyl ether showed the best enhancement. The pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of quinupramine from an EVA matrix were examined to determine the level of percutaneous absorption in rats. The percutaneous absorption of quinupramine from the EVA matrix with or without an enhancer was investigated. Quinupramine was administered orally or intravenously to compare the pharmacokinetic parameters with that of the transdermal route. The relative bioavailability of quinupramine in the matrix containing polyoxyethylene-2-oleyl ether as an enhancer was approximately 2.81 times higher than the group without an enhancer. Histological examination revealed that the skin pretreated with the EVA matrix containing the enhancers had a loosely layered stratum corneum. These results show that the quinupramine-EVA matrix containing a permeation enhancer could be a good transdermal delivery system for providing sustained plasma concentrations. PMID:17963142

  12. An operational feasibility assessment for extravehicular activity in human spaceflight under communication delay using an underwater research analogue

    E-print Network

    Stankovi?, Aleksandra, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    As manned space exploration advances beyond low-Earth orbit, new challenges in the planning and execution of mission tasks such as extravehicular activity (EVA) will emerge. One such challenge will be the mitigation of ...

  13. Circulating images of virtual systems: trodes, gloves, and goggles in the eighties and nineties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Mizuko; Fisher, Scott S.

    1997-05-01

    Since the late 80s, the popular imagination surrounding virtual systems has been lively and contested, an intriguing brew of cyberpunk fiction, government and corporate research, and product development, with a dash of countercultural excess. Virtual systems, in their myriad forms, have captured the interest not only of scientists and engineers, but also of a broad spectrum of social actors, including the popular and alternative press, fiction and comic writers, visual artists, film and television producers, as well as large sectors of a curious public, all of whom have produced diverse and creative images of these systems for a range of different audiences. The circulation of images of virtual systems points to some of the ways in which the production of technology can be located not only in engineering labs but also various realms of mass media and public culture. Focusing on images of gloves and goggles, this paper describes some of the pathways through which images of virtual systems have traveled.

  14. Results Summary. Julay 2008 I applied constant force of 0.02 eV/A on every atom in Z direction. And I expect to see the

    E-print Network

    Adler, Joan

    1 Results Summary. Julay 2008 I applied constant force of 0.02 eV/A on every atom in ­Z direction. And I expect to see the nanotube like is shown in the following picture, as I continue to apply the same.02 eV/A applied on every atom The following plot is calculated Forces in X direction of one

  15. Inadequate Standard for Glove Puncture Resistance: Allows Production of Gloves with Limited Puncture Resistance 1 1 This work was supported by a generous gift from John C. McCrane, New York, NY. 2 2 Wound Care is coordinated by Richard F. Edlich, MD, PHD, of the University of Virginia Medical Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elise M Jackson; Mark D Wenger; Jeffrey G Neal; John G Thacker; Richard F Edlich

    1998-01-01

    The National Fire Protection Association has developed standards for glove puncture resistance using a metal puncture probe. Biomechanical performance studies have demonstrated that glove puncture resistance to the probe is significantly greater than that of the hypodermic needle, suggesting that these standards have no clinical relevance. These standards give a false sense of security to health care personnel and sanction

  16. Mechanisms of Injury and Countermeasures for EVA Associated Upper Extremity Medical Issues: Extended Vent Tube Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeff; Hoffman, Ron; Harvey, Craig; Bowen, C. K.; Hudy, C. E.; Tuxhorn, Jennifer; Gernhardt, Mike; Scheuring, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the role that moisture plays in the injury to the fingers and fingernails during EVA training operations in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory. Current Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU, with a PLSS) as configured in the NBL was used for all testing and a vent tube was extended down a single arm of the crewmember during the test; vent tube was moved between left and right arm to serve as experimental condition being investigated and the other arm served as control condition.

  17. The Use of Human Modeling of EVA Tasks as a Systems Engineering Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dischinger, H. Charles, Jr.; Schmidt, Henry J.; Kross, Dennis A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Computer-generated human models have been used in aerospace design for a decade. They have come to be highly reliable for worksite analysis of certain types of EVA tasks. In many design environments, this analysis comes after the structural design is largely complete. However, the use of these models as a development tool is gaining acceptance within organizations that practice good systems engineering processes. The design of the United States Propulsion Module for the International Space Station provides an example of this application. The Propulsion Module will provide augmentation to the propulsion capability supplied by the Russian Service Module Zvezda. It is a late addition to the set of modules provided by the United States to the ISS Program, and as a result, faces design challenges that result from the level of immaturity of its integration into the Station. Among these are heat dissipation and physical envelopes. Since the rest of the Station was designed to maximize the use of the cooling system, little margin is available for the addition of another module. The Propulsion Module will attach at the forward end of the Station, and will be between the Orbiter and the rest of ISS. Since cargo must be removed from the Payload Bay and transferred to Station by the Canadarm, there is a potential for protrusions from the module, such as thruster booms, to interfere with robotic operations. These and similar engineering issues must be addressed as part of the development. In the implementation of good system design, all design solutions should be analyzed for compatibility with all affected subsystems. Human modeling has been used in this project to provide rapid input to system trades of design concepts. For example, the placement of radiators and avionics components for optimization of heat dissipation had to be examined for feasibility of EVA translation paths and worksite development. Likewise, the location of and mechanism for the retraction of thruster booms was partly driven by available Orbiter, robotic arm, and other module envelopes; worksite analysis was required for early assessment of task success. Since these trade studies included the EVA analysis as part of the decision criteria, the design had a high degree of assurance of EVA supportability from the outset. This approach contributes greatly to mission success.

  18. Assessment of nose protector for sport activities: finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Coto, Neide Pena; Meira, Josete Barbosa Cruz; Brito e Dias, Reinaldo; Driemeier, Larissa; de Oliveira Roveri, Guilherme; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito

    2012-04-01

    There has been a significant increase in the number of facial fractures stemming from sport activities in recent years, with the nasal bone one of the most affected structures. Researchers recommend the use of a nose protector, but there is no standardization regarding the material employed. Clinical experience has demonstrated that a combination of a flexible and rigid layer of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) offers both comfort and safety to practitioners of sports. The aim of the present study was the investigation into the stresses generated by the impact of a rigid body on the nasal bone on models with and without an EVA protector. For such, finite element analysis was employed. A craniofacial model was constructed from images obtained through computed tomography. The nose protector was modeled with two layers of EVA (1 mm of rigid EVA over 2 mm of flexible EVA), following the geometry of the soft tissue. Finite element analysis was performed using the LS Dyna program. The bone and rigid EVA were represented as elastic linear material, whereas the soft tissues and flexible EVA were represented as hyperelastic material. The impact from a rigid sphere on the frontal region of the face was simulated with a constant velocity of 20 m s(-1) for 9.1 ?s. The model without the protector served as the control. The distribution of maximal stress of the facial bones was recorded. The maximal stress on the nasal bone surpassed the breaking limit of 0.13-0.34 MPa on the model without a protector, while remaining below this limit on the model with the protector. Thus, the nose protector made from both flexible and rigid EVA proved effective at protecting the nasal bones under high-impact conditions. PMID:21790992

  19. Determining Desirable Cursor Control Device Characteristics for NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Holden, Kritina L.

    2007-01-01

    A test battery was developed for cursor control device evaluation: four tasks were taken from ISO 9241-9, and three from previous studies conducted at NASA. The tasks focused on basic movements such as pointing, clicking, and dragging. Four cursor control devices were evaluated with and without Extravehicular Activity (EVA) gloves to identify desirable cursor control device characteristics for NASA missions: 1) the Kensington Expert Mouse, 2) the Hulapoint mouse, 3) the Logitech Marble Mouse, and 4) the Honeywell trackball. Results showed that: 1) the test battery is an efficient tool for differentiating among input devices, 2) gloved operations were about 1 second slower and had at least 15% more errors; 3) devices used with gloves have to be larger, and should allow good hand positioning to counteract the lack of tactile feedback, 4) none of the devices, as designed, were ideal for operation with EVA gloves.

  20. INTEGRATING ACTIVITY-BASED COSTING AND ECONOMIC VALUE ADDED IN MANUFACTURING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Narcyz Roztocki; Kim LaScola Needy

    This article presents a cost and performance measurement system that integrates activity-based costing (ABC) with the economic value added financial performance measure. This proposed ABC-and-EVA system is a management support tool for managing cost and capital. The integrated ABC-and-EVA system includes the rate of resource consumption (as in a traditional ABC system), but it also includes capital demand. A traditional