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1

EVA Glove Research Team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of the basic research portion of the extravehicular activity (EVA) glove research program is to gain a greater understanding of the kinematics of the hand, the characteristics of the pressurized EVA glove, and the interaction of the two. Examination of the literature showed that there existed no acceptable, non-invasive method of obtaining accurate biomechanical data on the hand. For this reason a project was initiated to develop magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for biomechanical data acquisition and visualization. Literature reviews also revealed a lack of practical modeling methods for fabric structures, so a basic science research program was also initiated in this area.

Strauss, Alvin M.; Peterson, Steven W.; Main, John A.; Dickenson, Rueben D.; Shields, Bobby L.; Lorenz, Christine H.

1992-01-01

2

Extravehicular activities limitations study. Volume 2: Establishment of physiological and performance criteria for EVA gloves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the major probelms faced in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) glove development has been the absence of concise and reliable methods to measure the effects of EVA gloves on human hand capabilities. This report describes the development of a standardized set of tests designed to assess EVA-gloved hand capabilities in six measurement domains: Range of Motion, Strength, Tactile Perception, Dexterity, Fatigue, and Comfort. Based on an assessment of general human hand functioning and EVA task requirements several tests within each measurement domain were developed to provide a comprehensive evaluation. All tests were designed to be conducted in a glove box with the bare hand as a baseline and the EVA glove at operating pressure. A test program was conducted to evaluate the tests using a representative EVA glove. Eleven test subjects participated in a repeated-measures design. The report presents the results of the tests in each capability domain.

Ohara, John M.; Briganti, Michael; Cleland, John; Winfield, Dan

1988-01-01

3

Investigation of the effects of extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves on performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective was to assess the effects of extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves at different pressures on human hand capabilities. A factorial experiment was performed in which three types of EVA gloves were tested at five pressure differentials. The independent variables tested in this experiment were gender, glove type, pressure differential, and glove make. Six subjects participated in an experiment where a number of dexterity measures, namely time to tie a rope, and the time to assemble a nut and bolt were recorded. Tactility was measured through a two point discrimination test. The results indicate that with EVA gloves strength is reduced by nearly 50 percent, there is a considerable reduction in dexterity, performance decrements increase with increasing pressure differential, and some interesting gender glove interactions were observed, some of which may have been due to the extent (or lack of) fit of the glove to the hand. The implications for the designer are discussed.

Bishu, Ram R.; Klute, Glenn

1993-01-01

4

Power assist EVA glove development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Structural modeling of the EVA glove indicates that flexibility in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint can be improved by selectively lowering the elasticity of the glove fabric. Two strategies are used to accomplish this. One method uses coil springs on the back of the glove to carry the tension in the glove skin due to pressurization. These springs carry the loads normally borne by the glove fabric, but are more easily deformed. An active system was also designed for the same purpose and uses gas filled bladders attached to the back of the EVA glove that change the dimensions of the back of the glove and allow the glove to bend at the MCP joint, thus providing greater flexibility at this joint. A threshold control scheme was devised to control the action of the joint actuators. Input to the controller was provided by thin resistive pressure sensors placed between the hand and the pressurized glove. The pressure sensors consist of a layer of polyester film that has a thin layer of ink screened on the surface. The resistivity of the ink is pressure dependent, so an extremely thin pressure sensor can be fabricated by covering the ink patch with another layer of polyester film and measuring the changing resistance of the ink with a bridge circuit. In order to sense the force between the hand and the glove at the MCP joint, a sensor was placed on the palmar face of the middle finger. The resultant signal was used by the controller to decide whether to fill or exhaust the bladder actuators on the back of the glove. The information from the sensor can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a given control scheme or glove design since the magnitude of the measured pressures gives some idea of the torque required to bend a glove finger at the MCP joint. Tests of this actuator, sensor, and control system were conducted in an 57.2 kPa glove box by performing a series of 90 degree finger bends with a glove without an MCP joint assembly, a glove with the coil spring assembly, and with the four fingered actuated glove. The tests of these three glove designs confirm the validity of the model.

Main, John A.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.

1992-01-01

5

Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) glove evaluation test protocol  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the most critical components of a space suit is the gloves, yet gloves have traditionally presented significant design challenges. With continued efforts at glove development, a method for evaluating glove performance is needed. This paper presents a pressure-glove evaluation protocol. A description of this evaluation protocol, and its development is provided. The protocol allows comparison of one glove design to another, or any one design to bare-handed performance. Gloves for higher pressure suits may be evaluated at current and future design pressures to drive out differences in performance due to pressure effects. Using this protocol, gloves may be evaluated during design to drive out design problems and determine areas for improvement, or fully mature designs may be evaluated with respect to mission requirements. Several different test configurations are presented to handle these cases. This protocol was run on a prototype glove. The prototype was evaluated at two operating pressures and in the unpressurized state, with results compared to bare-handed performance. Results and analysis from this test series are provided, as is a description of the configuration used for this test.

Hinman-Sweeney, E. M.

1994-01-01

6

Evaluation of a Hybrid Elastic EVA Glove  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The hybrid elastic design is based upon an American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) glove designed by at the Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) in 1985. This design uses an elastic restraint layer instead of convolute joints to achieve greater dexterity and mobility during EVA (extravehicular activity). Two pilot studies and a main study were conducted using the hybrid elastic glove and 4000-series EMU (extravehicular activity unit) glove. Data on dexterity performance, joint range of motion, grip strength and perceived exertion was assessed for the EMU and hybrid elastic gloves with correlations to a barehanded condition. During this study, 30 test subjects performed multiple test sessions using a hybrid elastic glove and a 4000- series shuttle glove in a 4.3psid pressure environment. Test results to date indicate that the hybrid elastic glove performance is approximately similar to the performance of the 4000-series glove.

Korona, F. Adam; Akin, David

2002-01-01

7

Force-endurance capabilities of extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves at different pressure levels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The human hand is a very useful multipurpose tool in all environments. However, performance capabilities are compromised considerably when gloves are donned. This is especially true to extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves. The primary intent was to answer the question of how long a person can perform tasks requiring certain levels of exertion. The objective was to develop grip force-endurance relations. Six subjects participated in a factorial experiment involving three hand conditions, three pressure differentials, and four levels of force exertion. The results indicate that, while the force that could be exerted depended on the glove, pressure differential, and the level of exertion, the endurance time at any exertion level depended just on the level of exertion expressed as a percentage of maximum exertion possible at that condition. The impact of these findings for practitioners as well as theoreticians is discussed.

Bishu, Ram R.; Klute, Glenn K.

1993-01-01

8

Investigation of the effects of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) and Launch and Entry (LES) gloves on performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human capabilities such as dexterity, manipulability, and tactile perception are unique and render the hand as a very versatile, effective and a multipurpose tool. This is especially true for unknown environments such as the EVA environment. In the microgravity environment interfaces, procedures, and activities are too complex, diverse, and defy advance definition. Under these conditions the hand becomes the primary means of locomotion, restraint, and material handling. Facilitation of these activities, with simultaneous protection from the cruel EVA environment are the two, often conflicting, objectives of glove design. The objectives of this study was (1) to assess the effects of EVA gloves at different pressures on human hand capabilities, (2) to devise a protocol for evaluating EVA gloves, (3) to develop force time relations for a number of EVA glove pressure combinations, and (4) to evaluate two types of launch and entry suit gloves. The objectives were achieved through three experiments. The experiments for achieving objectives 1, 2, and 3 were performed in the glove box in building 34. In experiment 1 three types of EVA gloves were tested at five pressure differentials. A number of performance measures were recorded. In experiment 2 the same gloves as in experiment 1 were evaluated in a reduced number of pressure conditions. The performance measure was endurance time. Six subjects participated in both the experiments. In experiment 3 two types of launch and entry suit gloves were evaluated using a paradigm similar to experiment 1. Currently the data is being analyzed. However for this report some summary analyses have been performed. The results indicate that a) With EVA gloves strength is reduced by nearly 50 percent, b) performance decrements increase with increasing pressure differential, c) TMG effects are not consistent across the three gloves tested, d) some interesting gender glove interactions were observed, some of which may have been due to the extent (or lack of) fit of the glove to the hand, and e) differences in performance exist between partial pressure suit glove and full pressure suit glove, especially in the unpressurized condition.

Bishu, Ram R.

1992-01-01

9

The Effects of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Glove Pressure on Hand Strength  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the new vision of space travel aimed at traveling back to the Moon and eventually to Mars, NASA is designing a new spacesuit glove. The purpose of this study was to baseline hand strength while wearing the current Extravehicular Activity (EVA) glove, the Phase VI. By varying the pressure in the glove, hand strength could be characterized as a function of spacesuit pressure. This finding is of extreme importance when evaluating missions that require varying suit pressures associated with different operations within NASA's current human spaceflight program, Constellation. This characterization fed directly into the derivation of requirements for the next EVA glove. This study captured three types of maximum hand strength: grip, lateral pinch, and pulp-2 pinch. All three strengths were measured under varying pressures and compared to a bare-hand condition. The resulting standardized data was reported as a percentage of the bare-hand strength. The first wave of tests was performed while the subjects, four female and four male, were wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) suit supported by a suit stand. This portion of the test collected data from the barehand, suited unpressurized, and suited pressurized (4.3 psi) conditions. In addition, the effects of the Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment (TMG) on hand strength were examined, with the suited unpressurized and pressurized cases tested with and without a TMG. It was found that, when pressurized and with the TMG, the Phase VI glove reduced applied grip strength to a little more than half of the subject s bare-hand strength. The lateral pinch strength remained relatively constant while the pulp-2 pinch strength actually increased with pressure. The TMG was found to decrease maximum applied grip strength by an additional 10% for both pressurized and unpressurized cases, while the pinch strengths saw little to no change. In developing requirements based on human subjects, it is important to attempt to derive results that encompass the variation within the entire population. The current EMU does not accommodate humans at the extremes of the anthropometric spectrum. To account for this and to ensure that these requirements cover the population, another phase of testing will be conducted in a differential pressure glove box. This phase will focus on smaller females and very large males that do not have a properly fitted EMU suit. Instead, they would wear smaller or larger gloves and be tested in the glove box as a means to compare and contrast their strength capabilities against the EMU accommodated hand size subjects. The glove box s ability to change pressures easily will also allow for a wider range of glove pressures to be tested. Compared to the data collected on the subjects wearing the EMU suit, it is expected that there will be similar ratios to bare-hand. It is recommended that this topic be sent to the Physical Ergonomics Board for review.

Rajulu, Sudhakar; Mesloh, Miranda; Thompson, Shelby; England, Scott; Benson, Liz

2009-01-01

10

High Performance EVA Glove Collaboration: Glove Injury Data Mining Effort  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human hands play a significant role during extravehicular activity (EVA) missions and Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) training events, as they are needed for translating and performing tasks in the weightless environment. It is because of this high frequency usage that hand- and arm-related injuries and discomfort are known to occur during training in the NBL and while conducting EVAs. Hand-related injuries and discomforts have been occurring to crewmembers since the days of Apollo. While there have been numerous engineering changes to the glove design, hand-related issues still persist. The primary objectives of this study are therefore to: 1) document all known EVA glove-related injuries and the circumstances of these incidents, 2) determine likely risk factors, and 3) recommend ergonomic mitigations or design strategies that can be implemented in the current and future glove designs. METHODS: The investigator team conducted an initial set of literature reviews, data mining of Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) databases, and data distribution analyses to understand the ergonomic issues related to glove-related injuries and discomforts. The investigation focused on the injuries and discomforts of U.S. crewmembers who had worn pressurized suits and experienced glove-related incidents during the 1980 to 2010 time frame, either during training or on-orbit EVA. In addition to data mining of the LSAH database, the other objective of the study was to find complimentary sources of information such as training experience, EVA experience, suit-related sizing data, and hand-arm anthropometric data to be tied to the injury data from LSAH. RESULTS: Past studies indicated that the hand was the most frequently injured part of the body during both EVA and NBL training. This study effort thus focused primarily on crew training data in the NBL between 2002 and 2010. Of the 87 recorded training incidents, 19 occurred to women and 68 to men. While crew ages ranged from thirties to fifties, the age category most affected was in the forties range. Incident rate calculations (incidents per 100 training runs) revealed that the 2002, 2003, and 2004 time periods registered the highest reported incident rate levels (3.4, 6.1, and 4.1 respectively) when compared to the following years (all = 1.0). In addition to general hand-arm discomfort being the highest reported result from training, specific types of hand injuries or symptoms included erythema, fingernail delamination, abrasions, muscle soreness/fatigue, paresthesia, bruising, blanching, and edema. Specific body locations most affected by hand injuries included the metacarpophalangeal joints, fingernails, finger crotches, fingers in general, interphalangeal joints, and fingertips. Causes of injuries reported in the LSAH data were primarily attributed to the forces that the gloved hands were exposed to due to hand intensive tasks and/or poor glove sizing. DISCUSSION: Although the age data indicate that most injuries are reported by male crewmembers in their forties, that is also the dominant gender and age range of most EVA crew therefore it is not an unexpected finding. Age and gender analysis will continue as more details on the uninjured population is accrued. While there is a reasonable mechanism to link training quantity to injury, the results were inconsistent and point to the need for a consistent method of suit-related injury screening and documentation. For instance, the high-incident rate levels for the years 2002 to 2004 could be attributed to a comprehensive medical review of crewmembers post-NBL EVA training that occurred from July 19, 2002 to January 16, 2004. Furthermore, there could have been increased awareness from an investigation at the NBL. These investigations may have temporarily increased the fidelity of reported injuries and discomforts during these dates as compared to surrounding years, when injury signs and symptom were no longer actively being investigated but rather voluntarily reported. Data mining for possible mechanistic factors continues and include

Reid, C. R.; Benosn, E.; England, S.; Norcross, J. R.; McFarland, S. M.; Rajulu, S.

2014-01-01

11

A new method of measuring the stiffness of astronauts' EVA gloves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hand fatigue is one of the most important problems of astronauts during their missions to space. This fatigue is due to the stiffness of the astronauts' gloves known as Extravehicular Activity (EVA) gloves. The EVA glove has a multilayered, bulky structure and is pressurized against the vacuum of space. In order to evaluate the stiffness of EVA gloves, different methods have been proposed in the past. In particular, the effects of wearing an EVA glove on the performance of the hands have been published by many researchers to represent the stiffness of the EVA glove. In this paper, a new method for measuring the stiffness of EVA gloves is proposed. A tendon-actuated finger probe is designed and used as an alternative to the human index finger in order to be placed inside an EVA glove and measure its stiffness. The finger probe is equipped with accelerometers, which work as tilt sensors, to measure the angles of its phalanges. The phalanges are actuated by applying different amount of torque using the tendons of the finger probe. Moreover, a hypobaric glove box is designed and realized to simulate the actual operating pressure of the EVA glove and to measure its stiffness in both pressurized and non-pressurized conditions. In order to prove the right performance of the proposed finger probe, an Orlam-DM EVA glove is used to perform a number of tests. The equation of stiffness for the PIP joint of this glove is extracted from the results acquired from the tests. This equation presents the torque required to flex the middle phalanx of the glove. Then, the effect of pressurization on the stiffness is highlighted in the last section. This setup can be used to measure the stiffness of different kinds of EVA gloves and allows direct, numerical comparison of their stiffness.

Mousavi, Mehdi; Appendino, Silvia; Battezzato, Alessandro; Bonanno, Alberto; Chen Chen, Fai; Crepaldi, Marco; Demarchi, Danilo; Favetto, Alain; Pescarmona, Francesco

2014-04-01

12

Phase VI Advanced EVA Glove Development and Certification for the International Space Station  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the early 1980's, the Shuttle Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) glove design has evolved to meet the challenge of space based tasks. These tasks have typically been satellite retrieval and repair or EVA based flight experiments. With the start of the International Space Station (ISS) assembly, the number of EVA based missions is increasing far beyond what has been required

David Graziosi; James Stein; Amy Ross; Joseph Kosmo

13

The Potential of Wearable Sensor Technology for EVA Glove Ergonomic Evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Injuries to the hands are common among astronauts who train for extravehicular activity (EVA). Many of these injuries refer to the gloves worn during EVA as the root cause. While pressurized, the bladder and outer material of these gloves restrict movement and create pressure points while performing tasks, sometimes resulting in pain, muscle fatigue, abrasions, and occasionally a more severe injury, onycholysis (fingernail delamination). The most common injury causes are glove contact (pressure point/rubbing), ill-fitting gloves, and/or performing EVA tasks in pressurized gloves. A brief review of the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health's injury database reveals over 57% of the total injuries to the upper extremities during EVA training occurred either to the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint, fingernail, or the fingertip. Twenty-five of these injuries resulted in a diagnosis of onycholysis

Reid, Christopher R.; McFarland, Shane; Norcross, Jason R.; Rajulu, Sudhakar

2014-01-01

14

The Potential of Wearable Sensor Technology for EVA Glove Ergonomic Evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Injuries to the hands are common among astronauts who train for extravehicular activity (EVA). Many of these injuries refer to the gloves worn during EVA as the root cause. While pressurized, the bladder and outer material of these gloves restrict movement and create pressure points while performing tasks, sometimes resulting in pain, muscle fatigue, abrasions, and occasionally a more severe injury, onycholysis (fingernail delamination). The most common injury causes are glove contact (pressure point/rubbing), ill-fitting gloves, and/or performing EVA tasks in pressurized gloves. A brief review of the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health's injury database reveals over 57% of the total injuries to the upper extremities during EVA training occurred either to the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint, fingernail, or the fingertip. Twenty-five of these injuries resulted in a diagnosis of onycholysis.

Reid, Christopher R.; McFarland, Shane M.; Norcross, Jason R.; Rajulu, Sudhakar

2014-01-01

15

Use of Traditional and Novel Methods to Evaluate the Influence of an EVA Glove on Hand Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The gloved hand is one of an astronaut s primary means of interacting with the environment, and any restrictions imposed by the glove can strongly affect performance during extravehicular activity (EVA). Glove restrictions have been the subject of study for decades, yet previous studies have generally been unsuccessful in quantifying glove mobility and tactility. Past studies have tended to focus on the dexterity, strength, and functional performance of the gloved hand; this provides only a circumspect analysis of the impact of each type of restriction on the glove s overall capability. The aim of this study was to develop novel capabilities to provide metrics for mobility and tactility that can be used to assess the performance of a glove in a way that could enable designers and engineers to improve their current designs. A series of evaluations were performed to compare unpressurized and pressurized (4.3 psi) gloved conditions with the ungloved condition. A second series of evaluations were performed with the Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment (TMG) removed. This series of tests provided interesting insight into how much of an effect the TMG has on gloved mobility - in some cases, the presence of the TMG restricted glove mobility as much as pressurization did. Previous hypotheses had assumed that the TMG would have a much lower impact on mobility, but these results suggest that an improvement in the design of the TMG could have a significant impact on glove performance. Tactility testing illustrated the effect of glove pressurization, provided insight into the design of hardware that interfaces with the glove, and highlighted areas of concern. The metrics developed in this study served to benchmark the Phase VI EVA glove and to develop requirements for the next-generation glove for the Constellation program.

Benson, Elizabeth A.; England, Scott A.; Mesloh, Miranda; Thompson, Shelby; ajulu, Sudhakar

2010-01-01

16

EVA space suit Evaporative Cooling/Heating Glove System (ECHGS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new astronaut glove, the Evaporative Cooling/Heating Glove System (ECHGS), was designed and developed to allow the handling of objects between -200 F and +200 F. Active heating elements, positioned at each finger pad, provide additional heat to the finger pads from the rest of the finger. A water evaporative cooling system provides cooling by the injection of water to the finger areas and the subsequent direct evaporation to space. Thin, flexible insulation has been developed for the finger areas to limit thermal conductivity. Component and full glove tests have shown that the glove meets and exceeds the requirements to hold a 11/2 inch diameter bar at + or - 200 F for three minutes within comfort limits. The ECHGS is flexible, lightweight and comfortable. Tactility is reasonable and small objects can be identified especially by the fingertips beyond the one half width active elements.

Coss, F. A.

1976-01-01

17

[Study of mechanical effects of the EVA glove on finger base with finite element modeling].  

PubMed

The hand strength of astronauts, when they are outside the space capsule, is highly influenced by the residual pressure (the pressure difference between inside pressure and outside one of the suit) of extravehicular activity spacesuit glove and the pressure exerted by braided fabric. The hand strength decreases significantly on extravehicular activity, severely reducing the operation efficiency. To measure mechanical influence caused by spacesuit glove on muscle-tendon and joints, the present paper analyzes the movement anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of gripping, and then proposes a grip model. With phalangeal joint simplified as hinges, seven muscles as a finger grip energy unit, the Hill muscle model was used to compute the effects. We also used ANSYS in this study to establish a 3-D finite element model of an index finger which included both bones and muscles with glove, and then we verified the model. This model was applied to calculate the muscle stress in various situations of bare hands or hands wearing gloves in three different sizes. The results showed that in order to achieve normal grip strength with the influence caused by superfluous press, the finger's muscle stress should be increased to 5.4 times of that in normal situation, with most of the finger grip strength used to overcome the influence of superfluous pressure. When the gap between the finger surface and the glove is smaller, the mechanical influence which superfluous press made will decrease. The results would provide a theoretical basis for the design of the EVA Glove. PMID:24059053

Li, Zhuoyou; Ding, Li; Yue, Guodong

2013-08-01

18

A human factors evaluation of Extravehicular Activity gloves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the major problems faced in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) glove development has been the absence of concise and reliable methods to measure the effects of EVA gloves on human-hand capabilities. NASA has sponsored a program to develop a standardized set of tests designed to assess EVA-gloved hand capabilities in six performance domains: Range of Motion, Strength, Tactile Perception, Dexterity, Fatigue, and Comfort. Based upon an assessment of general human-hand functioning and EVA task requirements, several tests within each performance domain were developed to provide a comprehensive evaluation. All tests were designed to be conducted in a glove box with the bare hand, an EVA glove without pressure, an EVA glove at operation pressure. Thus, the differential effect on performance of the glove with and without pressure was tested. Bare hand performance was used to 'calibrate' the effects. Ten subjects participated in the test setup as a repeated-measures experimental design. The paper will report the results of the test program.

O'Hara, John M.; Briganti, Michael; Cleland, John; Winfield, Dan

1989-01-01

19

The development of a test methodology for the evaluation of EVA gloves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the development of a standardized set of tests designed to assess EVA-gloved hand capabilities in six measurement domains: range of motion, strength, tactile perception, dexterity, fatigue, and comfort. Based upon an assessment of general human-hand functioning and EVA task requirements, several tests within each measurement domain were developed to provide a comprehensive evaluation. All tests were designed to be conducted in a glove box with the bare hand as a baseline and the EVA glove at operating pressure.

O'Hara, John M.; Cleland, John; Winfield, Dan

1988-01-01

20

Hypervelocity Impacts on ISS Handrails and Evaluation of Alternative Materials to Prevent Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Glove Damage During EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During post-flight processing of STS-116, damage to crewmember Robert Curbeam's Phase VI Glove Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment was discovered. This damage consisted of: loss of RTV-157 palm pads on the thumb area on the right glove, a 0.75 inch cut in the Vectran adjacent to the seam and thumb pad (single event cut), constituting the worst glove damage ever recorded for the U.S. space program. The underlying bladder and restraint were found not be damaged by this event. Evaluation of glove damage found that the outer Vectran fibers were sliced as a result of contact with a sharp edge or pinch point rather than general wear or abrasion (commonly observed on the RTV pads). Damage to gloves was also noted on STS-118 and STS-120. One potential source of EMU glove damages are sharp crater lips on external handrails, generated by micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts. In this paper, the results of a hypervelocity impact (HVI) test program on representative and actual ISS handrails are presented. These tests were performed in order to characterize impact damage profiles on ISS handrails and evaluate alternatives for limiting risk to future missions. It was determined that both penetrating and non-penetrating MMOD impacts on aluminum and steel ISS handrails are capable of generating protruding crater profiles which exceed the heights required for EMU glove abrasion risk by an order of magnitude. Testing demonstrated that flexible overwraps attached to the outside of existing handrails are capable of limiting contact between hazardous crater formations and crewmember gloves during extravehicular activity (EVA). Additionally, replacing metallic handrails with high strength, low ductility, fiber reinforced composite materials would limit the formation of protruding crater lips on new ISS modules.

Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eruc; Davis, B. Alan; Ordonez, Erick

2009-01-01

21

Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO): Design and Testing of an Extravehicular Activity Glove Adapted for Human-Computer Interface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO) system enables an extravehicular activity (EVA) glove to be dual-purposed as a human-computer interface device. This paper describes the design and human participant testing of a right-handed GECO glove in a pressurized glove box. As part of an investigation into the usability of the GECO system for EVA data entry, twenty participants were asked to complete activities including (1) a Simon Says Games in which they attempted to duplicate random sequences of targeted finger strikes and (2) a Text Entry activity in which they used the GECO glove to enter target phrases in two different virtual keyboard modes. In a within-subjects design, both activities were performed both with and without vibrotactile feedback. Participants' mean accuracies in correctly generating finger strikes with the pressurized glove were surprisingly high, both with and without the benefit of tactile feedback. Five of the subjects achieved mean accuracies exceeding 99% in both conditions. In Text Entry, tactile feedback provided a statistically significant performance benefit, quantified by characters entered per minute, as well as reduction in error rate. Secondary analyses of responses to a NASA Task Loader Index (TLX) subjective workload assessments reveal a benefit for tactile feedback in GECO glove use for data entry. This first-ever investigation of employment of a pressurized EVA glove for human-computer interface opens up a wide range of future applications, including text "chat" communications, manipulation of procedures/checklists, cataloguing/annotating images, scientific note taking, human-robot interaction, and control of suit and/or other EVA systems.

Adams, Richard J.; Olowin, Aaron; Krepkovich, Eileen; Hannaford, Blake; Lindsay, Jack I. C.; Homer, Peter; Patrie, James T.; Sands, O. Scott

2013-01-01

22

Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO): Design and Testing of an Extravehicular Activity Glove Adapted for Human-Computer Interface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO) system enables an extravehicular activity (EVA) glove to be dual-purposed as a human-computer interface device. This paper describes the design and human participant testing of a right-handed GECO glove in a pressurized glove box. As part of an investigation into the usability of the GECO system for EVA data entry, twenty participants were asked to complete activities including (1) a Simon Says Games in which they attempted to duplicate random sequences of targeted finger strikes and (2) a Text Entry activity in which they used the GECO glove to enter target phrases in two different virtual keyboard modes. In a within-subjects design, both activities were performed both with and without vibrotactile feedback. Participants mean accuracies in correctly generating finger strikes with the pressurized glove were surprisingly high, both with and without the benefit of tactile feedback. Five of the subjects achieved mean accuracies exceeding 99 in both conditions. In Text Entry, tactile feedback provided a statistically significant performance benefit, quantified by characters entered per minute, as well as reduction in error rate. Secondary analyses of responses to a NASA Task Loader Index (TLX) subjective workload assessments reveal a benefit for tactile feedback in GECO glove use for data entry. This first-ever investigation of employment of a pressurized EVA glove for human-computer interface opens up a wide range of future applications, including text chat communications, manipulation of procedureschecklists, cataloguingannotating images, scientific note taking, human-robot interaction, and control of suit andor other EVA systems.

Adams, Richard J.; Olowin, Aaron; Krepkovich, Eileen; Hannaford, Blake; Lindsay, Jack I. C.; Homer, Peter; Patrie, James T.; Sands, O. Scott

2013-01-01

23

An Approach for Performance Assessments of Extravehicular Activity Gloves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Suit Assembly (SSA) Development Team at NASA Johnson Space Center has invested heavily in the advancement of rear-entry planetary exploration suit design but largely deferred development of extravehicular activity (EVA) glove designs, and accepted the risk of using the current flight gloves, Phase VI, for unique mission scenarios outside the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) Program realm of experience. However, as design reference missions mature, the risks of using heritage hardware have highlighted the need for developing robust new glove technologies. To address the technology gap, the NASA Game-Changing Technology group provided start-up funding for the High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) Project in the spring of 2012. The overarching goal of the HPEG Project is to develop a robust glove design that increases human performance during EVA and creates pathway for future implementation of emergent technologies, with specific aims of increasing pressurized mobility to 60% of barehanded capability, increasing the durability by 100%, and decreasing the potential of gloves to cause injury during use. The HPEG Project focused initial efforts on identifying potential new technologies and benchmarking the performance of current state of the art gloves to identify trends in design and fit leading to establish standards and metrics against which emerging technologies can be assessed at both the component and assembly levels. The first of the benchmarking tests evaluated the quantitative mobility performance and subjective fit of two sets of prototype EVA gloves developed ILC Dover and David Clark Company as compared to the Phase VI. Both companies were asked to design and fabricate gloves to the same set of NASA provided hand measurements (which corresponded to a single size of Phase Vi glove) and focus their efforts on improving mobility in the metacarpal phalangeal and carpometacarpal joints. Four test subjects representing the design-to hand anthropometry completed range of motion, grip/pinch strength, dexterity, and fit evaluations for each glove design in pressurized conditions, with and without thermal micrometeoroid garments (TMG) installed. This paper provides a detailed description of hardware and test methodologies used and lessons learned.

Aitchison, Lindsay; Benosn, Elizabeth

2014-01-01

24

A Combination of Traditional and Novel Methods Used to Evaluate the Impact of an EVA Glove on Hand Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The gloved hand is an astronaut s primary means of interacting with the environment, so performance on an EVA is strongly impacted by any restrictions imposed by the glove. As a result, these restrictions have been the subject of study for decades. However, previous studies have generally been unsuccessful in quantifying glove mobility and tactility. Instead, studies have tended to focus on the dexterity, strength and functional performance of the gloved hand. Therefore, it has been difficult to judge the impact of each type of restriction on the glove s overall capability. The lack of basic information on glove mobility in particular, is related to the difficulty in instrumenting a gloved hand to allow an accurate evaluation. However, the current study aims at developing novel technological capabilities to provide metrics for mobility and tactility that can be used to assess the performance of a glove in a way that could enable designers and engineers to improve upon their current designs. A series of evaluations were performed in ungloved, unpressurized and pressurized (4.3 psi) conditions, to allow a comparison across pressures and to the baseline barehanded condition. In addition, a subset of the testing was also performed with the Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment (TMG) removed. This test case in particular provided some interesting insight into how much of an impact the TMG has on gloved mobility -- in some cases, as much as pressurization of the glove. Previous rule-of-thumb estimates had assumed that the TMG would have a much lower impact on mobility, while these results suggest that an improvement in the TMG could actually have a significant impact on glove performance. Similarly, tactility testing illustrated the impact of glove pressurization on tactility and provided insight on the design of interfaces to the glove. The metrics described in this paper have been used to benchmark the Phase VI EVA glove and to develop requirements for the next generation glove for the Constellation program.

Rajulu, Sudhakar; Benson, Elizabeth; England, Scott; Mesloh, Miranda; Thompson, Shelby

2009-01-01

25

Benchmarking Evaluation Results for Prototype Extravehicular Activity Gloves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Suit Assembly (SSA) Development Team at NASA Johnson Space Center has invested heavily in the advancement of rear-entry planetary exploration suit design but largely deferred development of extravehicular activity (EVA) glove designs, and accepted the risk of using the current flight gloves, Phase VI, for unique mission scenarios outside the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) Program realm of experience. However, as design reference missions mature, the risks of using heritage hardware have highlighted the need for developing robust new glove technologies. To address the technology gap, the NASA Game-Changing Technology group provided start-up funding for the High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) Project in the spring of 2012. The overarching goal of the HPEG Project is to develop a robust glove design that increases human performance during EVA and creates pathway for future implementation of emergent technologies, with specific aims of increasing pressurized mobility to 60% of barehanded capability, increasing the durability by 100%, and decreasing the potential of gloves to cause injury during use. The HPEG Project focused initial efforts on identifying potential new technologies and benchmarking the performance of current state of the art gloves to identify trends in design and fit leading to establish standards and metrics against which emerging technologies can be assessed at both the component and assembly levels. The first of the benchmarking tests evaluated the quantitative mobility performance and subjective fit of four prototype gloves developed by Flagsuit LLC, Final Frontier Designs, LLC Dover, and David Clark Company as compared to the Phase VI. All of the companies were asked to design and fabricate gloves to the same set of NASA provided hand measurements (which corresponded to a single size of Phase Vi glove) and focus their efforts on improving mobility in the metacarpal phalangeal and carpometacarpal joints. Four test subjects representing the design ]to hand anthropometry completed range of motion, grip/pinch strength, dexterity, and fit evaluations for each glove design in both the unpressurized and pressurized conditions. This paper provides a comparison of the test results along with a detailed description of hardware and test methodologies used.

Aitchison, Lindsay; McFarland, Shane

2012-01-01

26

Climbing the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Wall - Safely  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The success of the EVA team, that includes the EVA project office, Crew Office, Mission Operations, Engineering and Safety, is assured by the full integration of all necessary disciplines. Safety participation in all activities from hardware development concepts, certification and crew training, provides for a strong partnership within the team. Early involvement of Safety on the EVA team has mitigated risk and produced a high degree of mission success.

Fuentes, Jose; Greene, Stacie

2010-01-01

27

Phase VI Glove Durability Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 -- 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a dust free, manufactured microgravity EVA environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 -- 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 -- 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of International Space Station (ISS)-based EVA tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected periodically throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the development of improved cycle model tables. This paper provides a detailed description of the test hardware and methodology, shares the results of the testing, and provides recommendations for future work.

Mitchell, Kathryn

2011-01-01

28

Active personal radiation monitor for lunar EVA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As astronauts return to the Moon-and this time, work for extended periods-there will be a critical need for crew personnel radiation monitoring as they operate lunar rovers or otherwise perform a myriad of extravehicular activities (EVAs). Our focus is on development of a small personal radiation monitor for lunar EVA that responds to the complex radiation quality and changing dose rates on the Moon. Of particular concern are active monitoring capabilities that provide both early warning and radiation dosimetry information during solar particle events (SPEs). To accomplish this, we are developing small detectors integrated with modern high speed, low power microelectronics to measure dose-rate and dose-mean lineal energy in real time. The monitor is designed to perform over the range of dose rates and LETs expected from both GCR and SPE radiations during lunar EVA missions. The monitor design provides simultaneous measurement of dose-equivalent rates at two tissue-equivalent depths simulating skin and marrow. The compact personal monitor is estimated to be the size of a cell phone and would fit on an EVA spacesuit (e.g., in backpack) or in a toolbox. The four-year development effort (which began December 2007) will result in a prototype radiation monitor field tested and characterized for the major radiations expected on the surface of the Moon. We acknowledge support from NSBRI through grants to NASA Ames Research Center (T. Straume, PI) and Colorado State University (T. Borak, PI).

Straume, Tore; Borak, Tom; Braby, L. A.; Lusby, Terry; Semones, Edward J.; Vazquez, Marcelo E.

29

STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-110 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and Lee M.E. Morin work in tandem on the fourth scheduled EVA session for the STS-110 mission aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis. Ross is anchored on the mobile foot restraint on the International Space Station's (ISS) Canadarm2, while Morin works inside the S0 (S-zero) truss. The STS-110 mission prepared the Station for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting a 43-foot-long S0 truss and preparing the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 Truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and marked the first time all spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

2002-01-01

30

STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-110 Mission astronauts Steven L. Smith (right) and Rex J. Walheim work in tandem on the third scheduled EVA session in which they released the locking bolts on the Mobile Transporter and rewired the Station's robotic arm (out of frame). Part of the Destiny laboratory and a glimpse of the Earth's horizon are seen in the lower portion of this digital image. The STS-110 mission prepared the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-zero) Truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 truss weighing in at 27,000 pounds was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and marked the first time all spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

2002-01-01

31

STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-110 Mission astronaut Rex J. Walheim, accompanied by astronaut Steven L. Smith (out of frame) translates along the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS) during the third scheduled EVA session. The duo released the locking bolts on the Mobile Transporter and rewired the Station's robotic arm. The STS-110 mission prepared the ISS for future space walks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-Zero) Truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 truss weighing in at 27,000 pounds was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver space walkers around the Station and marked the first time all space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

2002-01-01

32

Phase VI Glove Durability Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 - 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a clean, controlled ISS environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 - 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 - 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of ISS-based tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected at periodic intervals throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the development of improved cycle model tables. This paper provides a detailed description of the test hardware and methodology, shares the results of the testing, and provides recommendations for future work.

Mitchell, Kathryn C.

2010-01-01

33

Active Solid State Dosimetry for Lunar EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary threat to astronauts from space radiation is high-energy charged particles, such as electrons, protons, alpha and heavier particles, originating from galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), solar particle events (SPEs) and trapped radiation belts in Earth orbit. There is also the added threat of secondary neutrons generated as the space radiation interacts with atmosphere, soil and structural materials.[1] For Lunar exploration missions, the habitats and transfer vehicles are expected to provide shielding from standard background radiation. Unfortunately, the Lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suit is not expected to afford such shielding. Astronauts need to be aware of potentially hazardous conditions in their immediate area on EVA before a health and hardware risk arises. These conditions would include fluctuations of the local radiation field due to changes in the space radiation field and unknown variations in the local surface composition. Should undue exposure occur, knowledge of the dynamic intensity conditions during the exposure will allow more precise diagnostic assessment of the potential health risk to the exposed individual.[2

Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Chen, Liang-Yu.

2006-01-01

34

Astronaut Noriega During Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this image, STS-97 astronaut and mission specialist Carlos I. Noriega waves at a crew member inside Endeavor's cabin during the mission's final session of Extravehicular Activity (EVA). Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000, the STS-97 mission's primary objective was the delivery, assembly, and activation of the U.S. electrical power system onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the station aboard a space shuttle. The electrical system will eventually provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment.

2000-01-01

35

Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An effort was initiated by NASA/JSC in 2001 to develop an Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT) for the sizing of Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) architecture and studies. Its intent was to support space suit development efforts and to aid in conceptual designs for future human exploration missions. Its basis was the Life Support Options Performance Program (LSOPP), a spacesuit and portable life support system (PLSS) sizing program developed for NASA/JSC circa 1990. EVAS_SAT estimates the mass, power, and volume characteristics for user-defined EVAS architectures, including Suit Systems, Airlock Systems, Tools and Translation Aids, and Vehicle Support equipment. The tool has undergone annual changes and has been updated as new data have become available. Certain sizing algorithms have been developed based on industry standards, while others are based on the LSOPP sizing routines. The sizing algorithms used by EVAS_SAT are preliminary. Because EVAS_SAT was designed for use by members of the EVA community, subsystem familiarity on the part of the intended user group and in the analysis of results is assumed. The current EVAS_SAT is operated within Microsoft Excel 2003 using a Visual Basic interface system.

Brown, Cheryl B.; Conger, Bruce C.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Bue, Grant C.; Rouen, Michael N.

2007-01-01

36

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Technology Development Status and Forecast  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011, Extravehicular activity (EVA) technology development became a technology foundational domain under a new program Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration. The goal of the EVA technology effort is to further develop technologies that will be used to demonstrate a robust EVA system that has application for a variety of future missions including microgravity and surface EVA. Overall the objectives will be reduce system mass, reduce consumables and maintenance, increase EVA hardware robustness and life, increase crew member efficiency and autonomy, and enable rapid vehicle egress and ingress. Over the past several years, NASA realized a tremendous increase in EVA system development as part of the Exploration Technology Development Program and the Constellation Program. The evident demand for efficient and reliable EVA technologies, particularly regenerable technologies was apparent under these former programs and will continue to be needed as future mission opportunities arise. The technological need for EVA in space has been realized over the last several decades by the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle, and the International Space Station (ISS) programs. EVAs were critical to the success of these programs. Now with the ISS extension to 2028 in conjunction with a current forecasted need of at least eight EVAs per year, the EVA technology life and limited availability of the EMUs will become a critical issue eventually. The current Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) has vastly served EVA demands by performing critical operations to assemble the ISS and provide repairs of satellites such as the Hubble Space Telescope. However, as the life of ISS and the vision for future mission opportunities are realized, a new EVA systems capability could be an option for the future mission applications building off of the technology development over the last several years. Besides ISS, potential mission applications include EVAs for missions to Near Earth Objects (NEO), Phobos, or future surface missions. Surface missions could include either exploration of the Moon or Mars. Providing an EVA capability for these types of missions enables in-space construction of complex vehicles or satellites, hands on exploration of new parts of our solar system, and engages the public through the inspiration of knowing that humans are exploring places that they have never been before. This paper offers insight into what is currently being developed and what the potential opportunities are in the forecast

Chullen, Cinda; Westheimer, David T.

2010-01-01

37

Application of Spacesuit Glove Requirements Tools to Athletic and Personal Protective Equipment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Despite decades of ongoing improvement, astronauts must still struggle with inhibited dexterity and accelerated fatigue due to the requirement of wearing a pressurized Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) glove. Recent research in the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center has focused on developing requirements for improvements in the design of the next generation of EVA glove. In the course of this research, it was decided to expand the scope of the testing to include a variety of commercially available athletic and consumer gloves to help provide a more recognizable comparison for investigators and designers to evaluate the current state of EVA glove mobility and strength. This comparison is being provided with the hope that innovative methods may help commercial development of gloves for various athletic and personal protective endeavors.

England, Scott; Benson, Elizabeth; Melsoh, Miranda; Thompson, Shelby; Rajulu, Sudhakar

2010-01-01

38

Shuttle EVA description and design criteria  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS extravehicular mobility unit, orbiter EVA provisions, EVA equipment, factors affecting employment of EVA, EVA mission integration, baselined extravehicular activity are discussed. Design requirements are also discussed.

1983-01-01

39

Extravehicular Activity/Air Traffic Control (EVA/ATC) test report. [communication links to the astronaut  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During extravehicular activity (EVA), communications between the EVA astronaut and the space shuttle orbiter are maintained by means of transceiver installed in the environmental support system backpack. Onboard the orbiter, a transceiver line replaceable unit and its associated equipment performs the task of providing a communications link to the astronaut in the extravehicular activity/air traffic control (EVA/ATC) mode. Results of the acceptance tests that performed on the system designed and fabricated for EVA/ATC testing are discussed.

Tomaro, D. J.

1982-01-01

40

Astronaut Thuot during extravehicular activity (EVA) training in CCT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In Space Vehicle Mockup Facility, astronaut Pierre J. Thuot retrieves gear to rehearse a suit donning exercise on the middeck. Thuot's realistic environs are provided by the shuttle crew compartment trainer (CCT). Thuot, mission specialist, and four other NASA astronauts will spend two weeks in space aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia in March of 1994. He and astronaut Andrew M. Allen have been rehearsing contingency space walks. There is no scheduled extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-62 flight.

1993-01-01

41

Use MACES IVA Suit for EVA Mobility Evaluations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of an Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) suit for a spacewalk or Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) was evaluated for mobility and usability in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) environment. The Space Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) has been modified (MACES) to integrate with the Orion spacecraft. The first several missions of the Orion MPCV spacecraft will not have mass available to carry an EVA specific suit so any EVA required will have to be performed by the MACES. Since the MACES was not designed with EVA in mind, it was unknown what mobility the suit would be able to provide for an EVA or if a person could perform useful tasks for an extended time inside the pressurized suit. The suit was evaluated in multiple NBL runs by a variety of subjects including crewmembers with significant EVA experience. Various functional mobility tasks performed included: translation, body positioning, carrying tools, body stabilization, equipment handling, and use of tools. Hardware configurations included with and without TMG, suit with IVA gloves and suit with EVA gloves. Most tasks were completed on ISS mockups with existing EVA tools. Some limited tasks were completed with prototype tools on a simulated rocky surface. Major findings include: demonstration of the ability to weigh-out the suit, understanding the need to have subjects perform multiple runs prior to getting feedback, determination of critical sizing factors, and need for adjustment of suit work envelop. The early testing has demonstrated the feasibility of EVA's limited duration and limited scope. Further testing is required with more flight like tasking and constraints to validate these early results. If the suit is used for EVA, it will require mission specific modifications for umbilical management or PLSS integration, safety tether attachment, and tool interfaces. These evaluations are continuing through calendar year 2014.

Watson, Richard D.

2014-01-01

42

Risk Management in EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of risk management in Extravehicular Activities (EVA). The contents include: 1) EVA Office at NASA - JSC; 2) EVA Project Risk Management: Why and When; 3) EVA Office Risk Management: How; 4) Criteria for Closing a Risk; 5) Criteria for Accepting a Risk; 6) ISS IRMA Reference Card Data Entry Requirement s; 7) XA/ EVA Office Risk Activity Summary; 8) EVA Significant Change Summary; 9) Integrated Risk Management Application (XA) Matrix, March 31, 2004; 10) ISS Watch Item: 50XX Summary Report; and 11) EVA Project RM Usefulness

Hall, Jonathan; Lutomski, M.

2006-01-01

43

STS-110 Astronaut Jerry Ross Performs Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis on April 8, 2002, the STS-110 mission prepared the International Space Station (ISS) for future space walks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long Starboard side S0 (S-zero) truss and preparing the first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver space walkers around the Station and was the first time all of a shuttle crew's space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. In this photograph, Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, mission specialist, anchored on the end of the Canadarm2, moves near the newly installed S0 truss. Astronaut Lee M. E. Morin, mission specialist, (out of frame), worked in tandem with Ross during this fourth and final scheduled session of EVA for the STS-110 mission. The final major task of the space walk was the installation of a beam, the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0. The spur will be used by space walkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss.

2002-01-01

44

STS-97 Astronaut Tarner Performs Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Joseph R. Tanner, STS-97 mission specialist, is seen during a session of Extravehicular Activity (EVA), performing work on the International Space Station (ISS). Part of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm and a section of the newly deployed solar array panel are in the background. The primary objective of the STS-97 mission was the delivery, assembly, and activation of the U.S. electrical power system on board the ISS. The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the station aboard a space shuttle. The electrical system will eventually provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment. The STS-97 crew of five launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000 for an 11 day mission.

2000-01-01

45

STS-61B Astronaut Spring During EASE Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The crew assigned to the STS-61B mission included Bryan D. O'Conner, pilot; Brewster H. Shaw, commander; Charles D. Walker, payload specialist; mission specialists Jerry L. Ross, Mary L. Cleave, and Sherwood C. Spring; and Rodolpho Neri Vela, payload specialist. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis November 28, 1985 at 7:29:00 pm (EST), the STS-61B mission's primary payload included three communications satellites: MORELOS-B (Mexico); AUSSAT-2 (Australia); and SATCOM KU-2 (RCA Americom). Two experiments were conducted to test assembling erectable structures in space: EASE (Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity), and ACCESS (Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structure). In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the EASE and ACCESS were developed and demonstrated at MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). In this STS-61B onboard photo, astronaut Spring was working on the EASE during an Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The primary objective of this experiment was to test the structural assembly concepts for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction.

1985-01-01

46

Testing and evaluation for astronaut extravehicular activity (EVA) operability.  

PubMed

Because it is the human component that defines space mission success, careful planning is required to ensure that hardware can be operated and maintained by crews on-orbit. Several methods exist to allow researchers and designers to better predict how hardware designs will behave under the harsh environment of low Earth orbit, and whether designs incorporate the necessary features for Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) operability. Testing under conditions of simulated microgravity can occur during the design concept phase when verifying design operability, during mission training, or concurrently with on-orbit mission operations. The bulk of testing is focused on normal operations, but also includes evaluation of credible mission contingencies or "what would happen if" planning. The astronauts and cosmonauts who fly these space missions are well prepared and trained to survive and be productive in Earth's orbit. The engineers, designers, and training crews involved in space missions subject themselves to Earth based simulation techniques that also expose them to extreme environments. Aircraft falling ten thousand feet, alternating g-loads, underwater testing at 45 foot depth, enclosure in a vacuum chamber and subject to thermal extremes, each carries with it inherent risks to the humans preparing for space missions. PMID:12190075

Shields, N; King, L C

1998-09-01

47

STS-64 Extravehicular activity (EVA) training view in WETF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boeing's Kari Rueter checks the helmet of astronaut Mark C. Lee prior to the mission specialist's participation in an underwater rehearsal for a space walk. This rehearsal was held in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) (39774); Astronaut Carl J. Meade, STS-64 mission specialist, listens to ground monitors during a simulation of a space walk. Meade, who shared the rehearsal in the JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) pool with crew mate astronaut Mark C. Lee, is equipped with a training version of the new EVA hardware called the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system (39775).

1994-01-01

48

Calculating and Mitigating the Risk of a Cut Glove to a Space Walking Astronaut  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the high risk operations on the International Space Station (ISS) is conducting a space walk, or an Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). Threats to the space walking crew include airlock failures, space suit failures, and strikes from micro ]meteoroids and orbital debris (MM/OD). There are risks of becoming untethered from the space station, being pinched between the robotic arm and a piece of equipment, tearing your suit on a sharp edge, and other human errors that can be catastrophic. For decades NASA identified and tried to control sharp edges on external structure and equipment by design; however a new and unexpected source of sharp edges has since become apparent. Until recently, one of the underappreciated environmental risks was damage to EVA gloves during a spacewalk. The ISS has some elements which have been flying in the environment of space for over 14 years. It has and continues to be bombarded with MM/OD strikes that have created small, sharp craters all over the structure, including the dedicated EVA handrails and surrounding structure. These craters are capable of cutting through several layers of the EVA gloves. Starting in 2006, five EVA crewmembers reported cuts in their gloves so large they rendered the gloves unusable and in some cases cut the spacewalk short for the safety of the crew. This new hazard took engineers and managers by surprise. NASA has set out to mitigate this risk to safety and operations by redesigning the spacesuit gloves to be more resilient and designing a clamp to isolate MM/OD strikes on handrails, and is considering the necessity of an additional tool to repair strikes on non ]handrail surfaces (such as a file). This paper will address how the ISS Risk Team quantified an estimate of the MM/OD damage to the ISS, and the resulting likelihood of sustaining a cut glove in order to measure the effectiveness of the solutions being investigated to mitigate this risk to the mission and crew.

Castillo, Theresa; Haught, Megan

2013-01-01

49

STS-26 MS Nelson prepares for EVA exercises at JSC's WETF Bldg 29  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, wearing extravehicular mobilty unit (EMU) and communications carrier assembly (CCA), stands on poolside platform while technicians assist him with EMU gloves. Nelson dons EMU for contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) exercises in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

1988-01-01

50

Astronaut David Wolf participates in training for contingency EVA in WETF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut David A. Wolf participates in training for contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-58 mission. The mission specialist was about to be submerged to a point of neutral buoyancy in the JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). In this view, Wolf is aided by technicians in donning the gloves for his extravehicular mobility unit (EMU).

1993-01-01

51

Studies Relating to EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this session, Session JA1, the discussion focuses on the following topics: The Staged Decompression to the Hypobaric Atmosphere as a Prophylactic Measure Against Decompression Sickness During Repetitive EVA; A New Preoxygenation Procedure for Extravehicular Activity (EVA); Metabolic Assessments During Extra-Vehicular Activity; Evaluation of Safety of Hypobaric Decompressions and EVA From Positions of Probabilistic Theory; Fatty Acid Composition of Plasma Lipids and Erythrocyte Membranes During Simulation of Extravehicular Activity; Biomedical Studies Relating to Decompression Stress with Simulated EVA, Overview; The Joint Angle and Muscle Signature (JAMS) System - Current Uses and Future Applications; and Experimental Investigation of Cooperative Human-Robotic Roles in an EVA Work Site.

1997-01-01

52

Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) was favorably impressed by the operational risk management approach taken by the Human Research Program (HRP) Integrated Research Plan (IRP) to address the stated life sciences issues. The life sciences community at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) seems to be focused on operational risk management. This approach is more likely to provide risk managers with the information they need at the time they need it. Concerning the information provided to the SRP by the EVA Physiology, Systems, and Performance Project (EPSP), it is obvious that a great deal of productive activity is under way. Evaluation of this information was hampered by the fact that it often was not organized in a fashion that reflects the "Gaps and Tasks" approach of the overall Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) effort, and that a substantial proportion of the briefing concerned subjects that, while interesting, are not part of the HHC Element (e.g., the pressurized rover presentation). Additionally, no information was provided on several of the tasks or how they related to work underway or already accomplished. This situation left the SRP having to guess at the efforts and relationship to other elements, and made it hard to easily map the EVA Project efforts currently underway, and the data collected thus far, to the gaps and tasks in the IRP. It seems that integration of the EPSP project into the HHC Element could be improved. Along these lines, we were concerned that our SRP was split off from the other participating SRPs at an early stage in the overall agenda for the meeting. In reality, the concerns of EPSP and other projects share much common ground. For example, the commonality of the concerns of the EVA and exercise physiology groups is obvious, both in terms of what reduced exercise capacity can do to EVA capability, and how the exercise performed during an EVA could contribute to an overall exercise countermeasure prescription.

Norfleet, William; Harris, Bernard

2009-01-01

53

Mars EVA Suit Airlock (MESA)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Astrium Space Infrastructure Division has begun an in-house research activity of an Earth-based simulation facility supporting future manned missions to Mars. This research unit will help to prepare and support planned missions in the following ways: 1) to enable the investigation and analysis of contamination issues in advance of a human visit to Mars; 2) as a design tool to investigate and simulate crew operations; 3) to simulate crew operation during an actual mission; 4) to enable on-surface scientific operations without leaving the shirt-sleeve habitation environment ("glove box principle"). The MESA module is a surface EVA facility attached to the main habitation or laboratory module, or mobile pressurized rover. It will be sealed, but not pressurized, and provide protection against the harsh Martian environment. This module will include a second crew airlock for safety reasons. The compartment can also be used to provide an external working bench and experiment area for the crew. A simpler MESA concept provides only an open shelter against wind and dust. This concept does not incorporate working and experimental areas. The principle idea behind the MESA concept is to tackle the issue of contamination by minimizing the decontamination processes needed to clean surface equipment and crew suit surfaces after an EVA excursion prior to the astronaut re-entering the habitable area. The technical solution envisages the use of a dedicated crew suit airlock. This airlock uses an EVA suit which is externally attached by its back-pack to the EVA compartment area facing the Martian environment. The crew donns the suit from inside the habitable volume through the airlock on the back of the suit. The surface EVA can be accomplished after closing the back-pack and detaching the suit. A special technical design concept foresees an extendable suit back-pack, so that the astronaut can operate outside and in the vincinity of the module. The key driver in the investigation is the problem of contamination of the habitable volume by EVA and sampling activities and the transport of Earth-generated contaminants to Mars.

Ransom, Stephen; Böttcher, Jörg; Steinsiek, Frank

54

EVA medical problems.  

PubMed

The experience gained in the USSR allows the following conclusions: physiological responses to EVA do not depend on flight duration in qualitative and quantitative terms. Physiological responses to EVA are mainly determined by following 3 factors: physiological activities; space suit environmental parameters; physiological stress. This paper reviews problems, associated with altitude decompression sickness; thermal regulation of the body, visual function and physiological psychological stress as well as individual EVA experience in physiological responses. PMID:11537123

Barer, A S

1991-01-01

55

NASA Research Announcement Phase 1 Report and Phase 2 Proposal for the Development of a Power Assisted Space Suit Glove Assembly.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In July of 1996, ILC Dover was awarded Phase 1 of a contract for NASA to develop a prototype Power Assisted Space Suit glove to enhance the performance of astronauts during Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA). This report summarizes the work performed to date ...

D. Cadogan B. Lingo

1996-01-01

56

Basketball glove  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

An athletic glove especially adapted for handling a basketball includes a palm layer and a top layer sewn together at their lateral edges to provide a substantially partially thumbless, fingertipless, wristless, four fingered glove body construction having the outer surface of the palm layer being covered by a plurality of rubberized protruding friction elements having a hemispherical shape substantially the same size and shape as protruding elements upon the surface of a basketball. The palm layer and the top layer are made of a spandex type material adapted to stretch and closely conform to the anatomy of the hand of a wearer of the basketball glove. The glove resists rotation and reversal of direction of a moving basketball approaching and contacting the hand of a basketball player. The glove also dampens impact, so that the basketball has less of a tendency to jump out of the hands of a player during a fast moving basketball game.

1996-03-26

57

Results from an Investigation into Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Training Related Shoulder Injuries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The number and complexity of extravehicular activities (EVAs) required for the completion and maintenance of the International Space Station (ISS) is unprecedented. The training required to successfully complete this magnitude of space walks presents a real risk of overuse musculoskeletal injuries to the EVA crew population. There was mounting evidence raised by crewmembers, trainers, and physicians at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) between 1999 and 2002 that suggested a link between training in the Neutral - Buoyancy Lab (NBL) and the several reported cases of shoulder injuries. The short- and long-term health consequences of shoulder injury to astronauts in training as well as the potential mission impact associated with surgical intervention to assigned EVA crew point to this as a critical problem that must be mitigated. Thus, a multi-directorate tiger team was formed in December of 2002 led by the EVA Office and Astronaut Office at the JSC. The primary objectives of this Tiger Team were to evaluate the prevalence of these injuries and substantiate the relationship to training in the NBL with the crew person operating in the EVA Mobility Unit (EMU). Between December 2002 and June of 2003 the team collected data, surveyed crewmembers, consulted with a variety of physicians, and performed tests. The results of this effort were combined with the vast knowledge and experience of the Tiger Team members to formulate several findings and over fifty recommendations. This paper summarizes those findings and recommendations as well as the process by which these were determined. The Tiger Team concluded that training in the NBL was directly linked to several major and minor shoulder injuries that had occurred. With the assistance of JSC flight surgeons, outside consultants, and the lead crewmember/physician on the team, the mechanisms of injury were determined. These mechanisms were then linked to specific aspects of the hardware design, operational techniques, and the training environment. During the 1999 to 2003 time frame many variables converged to make it impossible to determine with any accuracy which one or two root causes were primarily involved. Therefore a broad range of recommendations was established to prevent future injury to crewmembers training in the NBL in the near term. Many of these recommendations are lessons learned that are essentially timeless and therefore should be passed on to future EVA endeavors to ensure that hardware designs and operational techniques utilized in the future consider the demands of training on the human body here on earth.

Johnson, Brian J.; Williams, David R.

2004-01-01

58

Augmented robotic device for EVA hand manoeuvres  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During extravehicular activities (EVAs), pressurised space suits can lead to difficulties in performing hand manoeuvres and fatigue. This is often the cause of EVAs being terminated early, or taking longer to complete. Assistive robotic gloves can be used to augment the natural motion of a human hand, meaning work can be carried out more efficiently with less stress to the astronaut. Lightweight and low profile solutions must be found in order for the assistive robotic glove to be easily integrated with a space suit pressure garment. Pneumatic muscle actuators combined with force sensors are one such solution. These actuators are extremely light, yet can output high forces using pressurised gases as the actuation drive. Their movement is omnidirectional, so when combined with a flexible exoskeleton that itself provides a degree of freedom of movement, individual fingers can be controlled during flexion and extension. This setup allows actuators and other hardware to be stored remotely on the user's body, resulting in the least possible mass being supported by the hand. Two prototype gloves have been developed at the University of Sydney; prototype I using a fibreglass exoskeleton to provide flexion force, and prototype II using torsion springs to achieve the same result. The gloves have been designed to increase the ease of human movements, rather than to add unnatural ability to the hand. A state space control algorithm has been developed to ensure that human initiated movements are recognised, and calibration methods have been implemented to accommodate the different characteristics of each wearer's hands. For this calibration technique, it was necessary to take into account the natural tremors of the human hand which may have otherwise initiated unexpected control signals. Prototype I was able to actuate the user's hand in 1 degree of freedom (DOF) from full flexion to partial extension, and prototype II actuated a user's finger in 2 DOF with forces achieved comparable to those of a natural, healthy hand. The minimum mass held by the user on the hand was 240 g, with remote hardware, including a compressed air bottle, having a further mass of 1.6 kg. These results indicate that the design is able to augment human motion in a low profile, low mass package, and could be a valuable addition to a space suit during an EVA.

Matheson, Eloise; Brooker, Graham

2012-12-01

59

STS-26 MS Nelson prepares for EVA exercises at JSC's WETF Bldg 29  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, wearing liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG), works with inner glove before donning extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) lower torso (positioned on chair between technicians). Nelson, standing with technicians on the poolside, is preparing for contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) exercises in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

1988-01-01

60

STS-97 Astronaut Tarner During Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this image, STS-97 astronaut and mission specialist Joseph R. Tanner uses a 35mm camera to expose a photo of his helmet visor during the flight's first space walk. The blue and white planet Earth, some 235 statute miles away, is visible in the left portion of the visor. The primary objective of the STS-97 mission was the delivery, assembly, and activation of the U.S. electrical power system onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the station aboard a space shuttle. The electrical system will eventually provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment. The STS-97 crew of five launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000 for an 11 day mission.

2000-01-01

61

STS-97 Astronaut Tarner During Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this image, planet Earth, some 235 statute miles away, forms the back drop for this photo of STS-97 astronaut and mission specialist Joseph R. Tanner, taken during the third of three space walks. The mission's goal was to perform the delivery, assembly, and activation of the U.S. electrical power system onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the station aboard a space shuttle. The electrical system will eventually provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment. The STS-97 crew of five launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000 for an 11 day mission.

2000-01-01

62

EVA safety: Space suit system interoperability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results and the recommendations of the International Academy of Astronautics extravehicular activities (IAA EVA) Committee work are presented. The IAA EVA protocols and operation were analyzed for harmonization procedures and for the standardization of safety critical and operationally important interfaces. The key role of EVA and how to improve the situation based on the identified EVA space suit system interoperability deficiencies were considered.

Skoog, A. I.; McBarron, J. W.; Abramov, L. P.; Zvezda, A. O.

1995-01-01

63

EVA safety design guidelines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An Extravehicular Mobility Unit is a closed and isolated environment that protects the astronaut from exposure to space environment. Eighty-four percent of the possible hardware failures occurring during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) would result in an abort of the EVA. Fifty-two percent of these failure modes would result in a loss of a critical life support function and directly compromise crew safety. Crew safety is not, however, limited to controlling hardware failures. Safety can be compromised by improper in-flight servicing or induced by interfacing equipment during EVA related activity. This paper addresses these potential hazard sources and approaches used to enhance equipment reliability and astronaut safety.

Tremblay, Paul

64

Mitigation of EMU Cut Glove Hazard from Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris Impacts on ISS Handrails  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent cut damages sustained on crewmember gloves during extravehicular activity (ISS) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) have been caused by contact with sharp edges or a pinch point according to analysis of the damages. One potential source are protruding sharp edged crater lips from micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts on metallic handrails along EVA translation paths. A number of hypervelocity impact tests were performed on ISS handrails, and found that mm-sized projectiles were capable of inducing crater lip heights two orders of magnitude above the minimum value for glove abrasion concerns. Two techniques were evaluated for mitigating the cut glove hazard of MMOD impacts on ISS handrails: flexible overwraps which act to limit contact between crewmember gloves and impact sites, and; alternate materials which form less hazardous impact crater profiles. In parallel with redesign efforts to increase the cut resilience of EMU gloves, the modifications to ISS handrails evaluated in this study provide the means to significantly reduce cut glove risk from MMOD impact craters

Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric L.; Davis, Bruce A.; Ordonez, Erick

2009-01-01

65

EVA-SCRAM operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper wrestles with the on-orbit operational challenges introduced by the proposed Space Construction, Repair, and Maintenance (SCRAM) tool kit for Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA). SCRAM undertakes a new challenging series of on-orbit tasks in support of the near-term Hubble Space Telescope, Extended Duration Orbiter, Long Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, other orbital platforms, and even the future manned Lunar/Mars missions. These new EVA tasks involve welding, brazing, cutting, coating, heat-treating, and cleaning operations. Anticipated near-term EVA-SCRAM applications include construction of fluid lines and structural members, repair of punctures by orbital debris, refurbishment of surfaces eroded by atomic oxygen, and cleaning of optical, solar panel, and high emissivity radiator surfaces which have been degraded by contaminants. Future EVA-SCRAM applications are also examined, involving mass production tasks automated with robotics and artificial intelligence, for construction of large truss, aerobrake, and reactor shadow shield structures. Realistically achieving EVA-SCRAM is examined by addressing manual, teleoperated, semi-automated, and fully-automated operation modes. The operational challenges posed by EVA-SCRAM tasks are reviewed with respect to capabilities of existing and upcoming EVA systems, such as the Extravehicular Mobility Unit, the Shuttle Remote Manipulating System, the Dexterous End Effector, and the Servicing Aid Tool.

Flanigan, Lee A.; Tamir, David; Weeks, Jack L.; Mcclure, Sidney R.; Kimbrough, Andrew G.

1994-01-01

66

Dynamic analysis of astronaut motions in microgravity: Applications for Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simulations of astronaut motions during extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks were performed using computational multibody dynamics methods. The application of computational dynamic simulation to EVA was prompted by the realization that physical microgravity simulators have inherent limitations: viscosity in neutral buoyancy tanks; friction in air bearing floors; short duration for parabolic aircraft; and inertia and friction in suspension mechanisms. These limitations can mask critical dynamic effects that later cause problems during actual EVA's performed in space. Methods of formulating dynamic equations of motion for multibody systems are discussed with emphasis on Kane's method, which forms the basis of the simulations presented herein. Formulation of the equations of motion for a two degree of freedom arm is presented as an explicit example. The four basic steps in creating the computational simulations were: system description, in which the geometry, mass properties, and interconnection of system bodies are input to the computer; equation formulation based on the system description; inverse kinematics, in which the angles, velocities, and accelerations of joints are calculated for prescribed motion of the endpoint (hand) of the arm; and inverse dynamics, in which joint torques are calculated for a prescribed motion. A graphical animation and data plotting program, EVADS (EVA Dynamics Simulation), was developed and used to analyze the results of the simulations that were performed on a Silicon Graphics Indigo2 computer. EVA tasks involving manipulation of the Spartan 204 free flying astronomy payload, as performed during Space Shuttle mission STS-63 (February 1995), served as the subject for two dynamic simulations. An EVA crewmember was modeled as a seven segment system with an eighth segment representing the massive payload attached to the hand. For both simulations, the initial configuration of the lower body (trunk, upper leg, and lower leg) was a neutral microgravity posture. In the first simulation, the payload was manipulated around a circular trajectory of 0.15 m radius in 10 seconds. It was found that the wrist joint theoretically exceeded its ulnal deviation limit by as much as 49. 8 deg and was required to exert torques as high as 26 N-m to accomplish the task, well in excess of the wrist physiological limit of 12 N-m. The largest torque in the first simulation, 52 N-m, occurred in the ankle joint. To avoid these problems, the second simulation placed the arm in a more comfortable initial position and the radius and speed of the circular trajectory were reduced by half. As a result, the joint angles and torques were reduced to values well within their physiological limits. In particular, the maximum wrist torque for the second simulation was only 3 N-m and the maximum ankle torque was only 6 N-m.

Newman, Dava J.

1995-01-01

67

Wissler Simulations of a Liquid Cooled and Ventilation Garment (LCVG) for Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to provide effective cooling for astronauts during extravehicular activities (EVAs), a liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) is used to remove heat by a series off tubes through which cooling water is circulated. To better predict the effectiveness of the LCG and determine possible modifications to improve performance, computer simulations dealing with the interaction of the cooling garment with the human body have been run using the Wissler Human Model. Simulations have been conducted to predict the heat removal rate for various liquid cooled garment configurations. The current LCVG uses 48 cooling tubes woven into a fabric with cooling water flowing through the tubes. The purpose of the current project is to decrease the overall weight of the LCVG system. In order to achieve this weight reduction, advances in the garment heat removal rates need to be obtained. Currently, increasing the fabric s thermal conductivity along with also examining an increase in the cooling tube conductivity to more efficiently remove the excess heat generated during EVA is being simulated. Initial trials varied cooling water temperature, water flow rate, garment conductivity, tube conductivity, and total number of cooling tubes in the LCVG. Results indicate that the total number of cooling tubes could be reduced to 22 and still achieve the desired heat removal rate of 361 W. Further improvements are being made to the garment network used in the model to account for temperature gradients associated with the spacing of the cooling tubes over the surface of the garment

Kesterson, Matthew; Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis

2006-01-01

68

EVA worksite analysis--use of computer analysis for EVA operations development and execution.  

PubMed

To sustain the rate of extravehicular activity (EVA) required to assemble and maintain the International Space Station, we must enhance our ability to plan, train for, and execute EVAs. An underlying analysis capability has been developed to ensure EVA access to all external worksites as a starting point for ground training, to generate information needed for on-orbit training, and to react quickly to develop contingency EVA plans, techniques, and procedures. This paper describes the use of computer-based EVA worksite analysis techniques for EVA worksite design. EVA worksite analysis has been used to design 80% of EVA worksites on the U.S. portion of the International Space Station. With the launch of the first U.S. element of the station, EVA worksite analysis is being developed further to support real-time analysis of unplanned EVA operations. This paper describes this development and deployment of EVA worksite analysis for International Space Station (ISS) mission support. PMID:11542524

Anderson, D

1999-01-01

69

A Human Machine Interface for EVA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

EVA astronauts work in a challenging environment that includes high rate of muscle fatigue, haptic and proprioception impairment, lack of dexterity and interaction with robotic equipment. Currently they are heavily dependent on support from on-board crew and ground station staff for information and robotics operation. They are limited to the operation of simple controls on the suit exterior and external robot controls that are difficult to operate because of the heavy gloves that are part of the EVA suit. A wearable human machine interface (HMI) inside the suit provides a powerful alternative for robot teleoperation, procedure checklist access, generic equipment operation via virtual control panels and general information retrieval and presentation. The HMI proposed here includes speech input and output, a simple 6 degree of freedom (dof) pointing device and a heads up display (HUD). The essential characteristic of this interface is that it offers an alternative to the standard keyboard and mouse interface of a desktop computer. The astronaut's speech is used as input to command mode changes, execute arbitrary computer commands and generate text. The HMI can respond with speech also in order to confirm selections, provide status and feedback and present text output. A candidate 6 dof pointing device is Measurand's Shapetape, a flexible "tape" substrate to which is attached an optic fiber with embedded sensors. Measurement of the modulation of the light passing through the fiber can be used to compute the shape of the tape and, in particular, the position and orientation of the end of the Shapetape. It can be used to provide any kind of 3d geometric information including robot teleoperation control. The HUD can overlay graphical information onto the astronaut's visual field including robot joint torques, end effector configuration, procedure checklists and virtual control panels. With suitable tracking information about the position and orientation of the EVA suit, the overlaid graphical information can be registered with the external world. For example, information about an object can be positioned on or beside the object. This wearable HMI supports many applications during EVA including robot teleoperation, procedure checklist usage, operation of virtual control panels and general information or documentation retrieval and presentation. Whether the robot end effector is a mobile platform for the EVA astronaut or is an assistant to the astronaut in an assembly or repair task, the astronaut can control the robot via a direct manipulation interface. Embedded in the suit or the astronaut's clothing, Shapetape can measure the user's arm/hand position and orientation which can be directly mapped into the workspace coordinate system of the robot. Motion of the users hand can generate corresponding motion of the robot end effector in order to reposition the EVA platform or to manipulate objects in the robot's grasp. Speech input can be used to execute commands and mode changes without the astronaut having to withdraw from the teleoperation task. Speech output from the system can provide feedback without affecting the user's visual attention. The procedure checklist guiding the astronaut's detailed activities can be presented on the HUD and manipulated (e.g., move, scale, annotate, mark tasks as done, consult prerequisite tasks) by spoken command. Virtual control panels for suit equipment, equipment being repaired or arbitrary equipment on the space station can be displayed on the HUD and can be operated by speech commands or by hand gestures. For example, an antenna being repaired could be pointed under the control of the EVA astronaut. Additionally arbitrary computer activities such as information retrieval and presentation can be carried out using similar interface techniques. Considering the risks, expense and physical challenges of EVA work, it is appropriate that EVA astronauts have considerable support from station crew and ground station staff. Reducing their dependence on such personnel may under many circumst

Hartmann, L.

70

Insulated Glove Design Brief  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, you will be researching, designing, building, and improving an insulated glove system. You will use both technological design and scientific inquiry as processes to investigate and improve the performance of your prototype. This free selection includes the Table of Contents.

Pulis, Lee; Press, Nsta; Terc

2000-01-01

71

Improved Gloves for Firefighters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New firefighter's gloves are more flexible and comfortable than previous designs. Since some firefighters prefer gloves made of composite materials while others prefer dip-coated gloves, both types were developed. New gloves also find uses in foundries, steelmills, and other plants where they are substituted for asbestos gloves.

Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R.; Arons, I. J.

1983-01-01

72

Survey of Software Problems with Impacts to 'Campout' Protocol Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Prebreathe  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During International Space Station campout protocol ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) preparations, the crew is isolated overnight in the small airlock volume in a reduced pressure, oxygen enriched atmosphere. As such, there are special considerations for the software in terms of air composition, pressure control and emergency responses. For one, the ISS software must monitor and manage two distinct atmospheres. Also, the small airlock volume is especially sensitive to small changes in the environment, and what would be a minor emergency in the larger vehicle volume can have catastrophic results in the isolated airlock. Finally, in cases of emergency, the crew needs to rapidly egress the airlock, which requires an aggressive automatic repressurization to equalize pressure on the hatch. This paper will describe the software which is modified for the airlock campout protocol. In addition, the paper will describe the software problems and hardware problems with software workarounds which have affected campout protocol.

Diderich, Greg; Matty, Christopher M.

2009-01-01

73

Thermoregulation and heat exchange in a nonuniform thermal environment during simulated extended EVA. Extravehicular activities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

BACKGROUND: Nonuniform heating and cooling of the body, a possibility during extended duration extravehicular activities (EVA), was studied by means of a specially designed water circulating garment that independently heated or cooled the right and left sides of the body. The purpose was to assess whether there was a generalized reaction on the finger in extreme contradictory temperatures on the body surface, as a potential heat status controller. METHOD: Eight subjects, six men and two women, were studied while wearing a sagittally divided experimental garment with hands exposed in the following conditions: Stage 1 baseline--total body garment inlet water temperature at 33 degrees C; Stage 2--left side inlet water temperature heated to 45 degrees C; right side cooled to 8 degrees C; Stage 3--left side inlet water temperature cooled to 8 degrees C, right side heated to 45 degrees C. RESULTS: Temperatures on each side of the body surface as well as ear canal temperature (Tec) showed statistically significant Stage x Side interactions, demonstrating responsiveness to the thermal manipulations. Right and left finger temperatures (Tfing) were not significantly different across stages; their dynamic across time was similar. Rectal temperature (Tre) was not reactive to prevailing cold on the body surface, and therefore not informative. Subjective perception of heat and cold on the left and right sides of the body was consistent with actual temperature manipulations. CONCLUSIONS: Tec and Tre estimates of internal temperature do not provide accurate data for evaluating overall thermal status in nonuniform thermal conditions on the body surface. The use of Tfing has significant potential in providing more accurate information on thermal status and as a feedback method for more precise thermal regulation of the astronaut within the EVA space suit.

Koscheyev, V. S.; Leon, G. R.; Hubel, A.; Nelson, E. D.; Tranchida, D.

2000-01-01

74

The use of an extended ventilation tube as a countermeasure for EVA-associated upper extremity medical issues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction: Onycholysis due to repetitive activity in the space suit glove during Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) training and during spaceflight extravehicular activity (EVA) is a common observation. Moisture accumulates in gloves during EVA task performance and may contribute to the development of pain and damage to the fingernails experienced by many astronauts. The study evaluated the use of a long ventilation tube to determine if improved gas circulation into the hand area could reduce hand moisture and thereby decrease the associated symptoms. Methods: The current Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was configured with a ventilation tube that extended down a single arm of the crew member (E) and compared with the unventilated arm (C). Skin surface moisture was measured on both hands immediately after glove removal and a questionnaire administered to determine subjective measures. Astronauts ( n=6) were examined pre- and post-run. Results: There were consistent trends in the reduction of relative hydration ratios at dorsum ( C=3.34, E=2.11) and first ring finger joint ( C=2.46, E=1.96) when the ventilation tube was employed. Ventilation appeared more effective on the left versus the right hand, implying an interaction with hand anthropometry and glove fit. Symptom score was lower on the hand that had the long ventilation tube relative to the control hand in 2/6 EVA crew members. Conclusions: Increased ventilation to the hand was effective in reducing the risks of hand and nail discomfort symptoms from moderate to low in one-third of the subjects. Improved design in the ventilation capability of EVA spacesuits is expected to improve efficiency of air flow distribution.

Jones, J. A.; Hoffman, R. B.; Buckland, D. A.; Harvey, C. M.; Bowen, C. K.; Hudy, C. E.; Strauss, S.; Novak, J.; Gernhardt, M. L.

75

In Vivo Noninvasive Analysis of Human Forearm Muscle Function and Fatigue: Applications to EVA Operations and Training Maneuvers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Forearm muscle fatigue is one of the major limiting factors affecting endurance during performance of deep-space extravehicular activity (EVA) by crew members. Magnetic resonance (MR) provides in vivo noninvasive analysis of tissue level metabolism and fluid exchange dynamics in exercised forearm muscles through the monitoring of proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31-MRS) parameter variations. Using a space glove box and EVA simulation protocols, we conducted a preliminary MRS/MRI study in a small group of human test subjects during submaximal exercise and recovery and following exhaustive exercise. In assessing simulated EVA-related muscle fatigue and function, this pilot study revealed substantial changes in the MR image longitudinal relaxation times (T2) as an indicator of specific muscle activation and proton flux as well as changes in spectral phosphocreatine-to-phosphate (PCr/Pi) levels as a function of tissue bioenergetic potential.

Fotedar, L. K.; Marshburn, T.; Quast, M. J.; Feeback, D. L.

1999-01-01

76

Efficacy of Wrist/Palm Warming as an EVA Countermeasure to Maintain Finger Comfort in Cold Conditions During EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study explored the effectiveness of local wrist/palm warming as a potential countermeasure for providing finger comfort during extended duration EVA. Methods: Six subjects (5 males and 1 female) were evaluated in a sagitally divided liquid cooling/warming garment (LCWG) with modified liquid cooling/warming (LCW) gloves in three different experimental conditions. Condition 1: Stage 1- no LCWG; chamber adaptation with LCW glove inlet water temperature 33 C; Stage 2-LCW glove inlet water temperature cooled to 8 C; Stage 3-LCW glove inlet water temperature warmed to 45 C; Condition 2: Stage1-LCWG and LCW glove inlet water temperature 33 C; Stage 2-LCWG inlet temperature cooled to 31 C, LCW gloves, 8 C; Stage 3-LCWG inlet water temperature remains at 31 C, LCW glove inlet water temperature warmed to 45 C; Condition 3: Stage l -LCWG and LCW gloves 33 C; Stage 2-LCWG inlet water temperature cooled to 28 C, LCW gloves, 8 C; Stage 3-LCWG remains at 28 C, LCW glove water temperature warmed to 45 C. Results: Wrist/palm area warming significantly increased finger temperature (Tfing) and blood perfusion in Stage 3 compared to Stage 2. The LCW gloves were most effective in increasing Stage 3 Tfing in Condition 1; and in increasing blood perfusion in Conditions 1 and 2 compared to Condition 3. Ratings of subjective perception of heat in the hand and overall body heat were higher at Stage 3 than Stage 2, with no significant differences across Conditions. Conclusions: Local wrist/palm warming was effective in increasing blood circulation to the distal extremities, suggesting the potential usefulness of this technique for increasing astronaut thermal comfort during EVA while decreasing power requirements. The LCW gloves were effective in heating the highly cooled fingers when the overall body was in a mild heat deficit.

Koscheyev, Victor S.; Leon, Gloria R.; Trevino, Robert C.

2000-01-01

77

Effective Presentation of Metabolic Rate Information for Lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During human exploration of the lunar surface, a suited crewmember needs effective and accurate information about consumable levels remaining in their life support system. The information must be presented in a manner that supports real-time consumable monitoring and route planning. Since consumable usage is closely tied to metabolic rate, the lunar suit must estimate metabolic rate from life support sensors, such as oxygen tank pressures, carbon dioxide partial pressure, and cooling water inlet and outlet temperatures. To provide adequate warnings that account for traverse time for a crewmember to return to a safe haven, accurate forecasts of consumable depletion rates are required. The forecasts must be presented to the crewmember in a straightforward, effective manner. In order to evaluate methods for displaying consumable forecasts, a desktop-based simulation of a lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) has been developed for the Constellation lunar suite s life-support system. The program was used to compare the effectiveness of several different data presentation methods.

Mackin, Michael A.; Gonia, Philip; Lombay-Gonzalez, Jose

2010-01-01

78

H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and the Operations Concept for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hardware  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the retirement of the Space Shuttle fleet imminent in 2011, a new concept of operations will become reality to meet the transportation challenges of the International Space Station (ISS). The planning associated with the retirement of the Space Shuttle has been underway since the announcement in 2004. Since then, several companies and government entities have had to look for innovative low-cost commercial orbital transportation systems to continue to achieve the objectives of ISS delivery requirements. Several options have been assessed and appear ready to meet the large and demanding delivery requirements of the ISS. Options that have been identified that can facilitate the challenge include the Russian Federal Space Agency's Soyuz and Progress spacecraft, European Space Agency's Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and the Boeing Delta IV Heavy (DIV-H). The newest of these options is the JAXA's HTV. This paper focuses on the HTV, mission architecture and operations concept for Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) hardware, the associated launch system, and details of the launch operations approach.

Chullen, Cinda

2010-01-01

79

H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and the Operations Concept for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hardware  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the retirement of the Space Shuttle fleet imminent in 2011, a new operations concept will become reality to meet the transportation challenges of the International Space Station (ISS). The planning associated with the retirement of the Space Shuttle has been underway since the announcement in 2004. Since then, several companies and government entities have had to look for innovative low-cost commercial orbital transportation systems to continue to achieve the objectives of ISS delivery requirements. Several options have been assessed and appear ready to meet the large and demanding delivery requirements of the ISS. Options that have been identified that can facilitate the challenge include the Russian Federal Space Agency's Soyuz and Progress spacecraft, European Space Agency's Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA s) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). The newest of these options is the JAXA's HTV. This paper focuses on the HTV, mission architecture and operations concept for Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) hardware, the associated launch system, and details of the launch operations approach.

Chullen, Cinda; Blome, Elizabeth; Tetsuya, Sakashita

2011-01-01

80

EVA Skills Training  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Parazynski and a colleague from Extravehicular Activity (EVA), Robotics, & Crew Systems Operations (DX) worked closely to build the EVA Skills Training Program, and for the first time, defined the gold standards of EVA performance, allowing crewmembers to increase their performance significantly. As part of the program, individuals had the opportunity to learn at their own rate, taking additional water time as required, to achieve that level of performance. This focus on training to one's strengths and weaknesses to bolster them enabled the Crew Office and DX to field a much larger group of spacewalkers for the daunting "wall of EVA" required for the building and maintenance of the ISS. Parazynski also stressed the need for designers to understand the capabilities and the limitations of a human in a spacesuit, as well as opportunities to improve future generations of space. He shared lessons learned (how the Crew Office engaged in these endeavors) and illustrated the need to work as a team to develop these complex systems.

Parazynski, Scott

2012-01-01

81

STS-26 MS Lounge prepares for contingency EVA exercises in JSC's WETF Bldg 29  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) (not yet joined at waist ring), stands on a poolside platform while technicians position EMU gloves on his hands. The communications carrier assembly dangles from the EMU neck ring. Lounge dons EMU prior to a contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 where he will achieve neutral buoyancy. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

1988-01-01

82

Development of an air-bearing fan for space extravehicular activity (EVA) suit ventilation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A high-speed/variable flow fan has been developed for EVA suit ventilation which combines air bearings with a two-pole, toothless permanent-magnet motor. The fan has demonstrated quiet and vibration-free operation and a 2:1 range in flow rate variation. System weight is 0.9 kg, and input powers range from 12.4 to 42 W.

Fukumoto, Paul; Allen, Norman; Stonesifer, Greg

1992-01-01

83

Development of an air-bearing fan for space extravehicular activity (EVA) suit ventilation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A high-speed/variable flow fan has been developed for EVA suit ventilation which combines air bearings with a two-pole, toothless permanent-magnet motor. The fan has demonstrated quiet and vibration-free operation and a 2:1 range in flow rate variation. System weight is 0.9 kg, and input powers range from 12.4 to 42 W.

Fukumoto, Paul; Allen, Norman; Stonesifer, Greg

1992-07-01

84

Interoperability Trends in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Space Operations for the 21st Century  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

No other space operations in the 21 st century more comprehensively embody the challenges and dependencies of interoperability than EVA. This discipline is already functioning at an W1paralleled level of interagency, inter-organizational and international cooperation. This trend will only increase as space programs endeavor to expand in the face of shrinking budgets. Among the topics examined in this paper are hardware-oriented issues. Differences in design standards among various space participants dictate differences in the EVA tools that must be manufactured, flown and maintained on-orbit. Presently only two types of functional space suits exist in the world. However, three versions of functional airlocks are in operation. Of the three airlocks, only the International Space Station (ISS) Joint Airlock can accommodate both types of suits. Due to functional differences in the suits, completely different operating protocols are required for each. Should additional space suit or airlock designs become available, the complexity will increase. The lessons learned as a result of designing and operating within such a system are explored. This paper also examines the non-hardware challenges presented by interoperability for a discipline that is as uniquely dependent upon the individual as EVA. Operation of space suits (essentially single-person spacecrafts) by persons whose native language is not that of the suits' designers is explored. The intricacies of shared mission planning, shared control and shared execution of joint EVA's are explained. For example, once ISS is fully functional, the potential exists for two crewmembers of different nationality to be wearing suits manufactured and controlled by a third nation, while operating within an airlock manufactured and controlled by a fourth nation, in an effort to perform tasks upon hardware belonging to a fifth nation. Everything from training issues, to procedures development and writing, to real-time operations is addressed. Finally, this paper looks to the management challenges presented by interoperability in general. With budgets being reduced among all space-faring nations, the need to expand cooperation in the highly expensive field of human space operations is only going to intensify. The question facing management is not if the trend toward interoperation will continue, but how to best facilitate its doing so. Real-world EVA interoperability experience throughout the ShuttlelMir and ISS Programs is discussed to illustrate the challenges and

Miller, Gerald E.

1999-01-01

85

Grow a Garden in a Glove  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learners use a transparent plastic glove as a container to grow seeds. A different kind of seed can be planted in each finger. A few days after planting, learners will see the seeds begin to sprout in the glove. Use this activity to illustrate the process of germination.

Museum Of Science And Industry, Chicago

2012-01-01

86

Post-Shuttle EVA Operations on ISS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The expected retirement of the NASA Space Transportation System (also known as the Space Shuttle ) by 2011 will pose a significant challenge to Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The EVA hardware currently used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed assuming that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for refurbishment, or if necessary for failure investigation. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support hardware and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2015, and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, the EVA 2010 Project was jointly initiated by NASA and the One EVA contractor team. The challenges addressed were to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, to secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, to protect for EMU hardware operability on-orbit, and to determine the source of high water purity to support recharge of PLSSs (no longer available via Shuttle). EVA 2010 Project includes the following tasks: the development of a launch fixture that would allow the EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to be launched on-board alternate vehicles; extension of the EMU hardware maintenance interval from 3 years (current certification) to a minimum of 6 years (to extend to 2015); testing of recycled ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) water for use in the EMU cooling system in lieu of water resupplied by International Partner (IP) vehicles; development of techniques to remove & replace critical components in the PLSS on-orbit (not routine); extension of on-orbit certification of EVA tools; and development of an EVA hardware logistical plan to support the ISS without the Space Shuttle. Assumptions for the EVA 2010 Project included no more than 8 EVAs per year for ISS EVA operations in the Post-Shuttle environment and limited availability of cargo upmass on IP launch vehicles. From 2010 forward, EVA operations on-board the ISS without the Space Shuttle will be a paradigm shift in safely operating EVA hardware on orbit and the EVA 2010 effort was initiated to accommodate this significant change in EVA evolutionary history. 1

West, William; Witt, Vincent; Chullen, Cinda

2010-01-01

87

Improved chest recoil using an adhesive glove device for active compression-decompression CPR in a pediatric manikin model?  

PubMed Central

Objective We developed an adhesive glove device (AGD) to perform ACD-CPR in pediatric manikins, hypothesizing that AGD-ACD-CPR provides better chest decompression compared to standard (S)-CPR. Design Split-plot design randomizing 16 subjects to test four manikin-technique models in a crossover fashion to AGD-ACD-CPR vs. S-CPR. Healthcare providers performed 5 min of CPR with 30:2 compression:ventilation ratio in the four manikin models: (1) adolescent; (2) child two-hand; (3) child one-hand; and (4) infant two-thumb. Methods Modified manikins recorded compression pressure (CP), compression depth (CD) and decompression depth (DD). The AGD consisted of a modified oven mitt with an adjustable strap; a Velcro patch was sewn to the palmer aspect. The counter Velcro patch was bonded to the anterior chest wall. For infant CPR, the thumbs of two oven mitts were stitched together with Velcro. Subjects were asked to actively pull up during decompression. Subjects’ heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and recovery time (RT) for HR/RR to return to baseline were recorded. Subjects were blinded to data recordings. Data (mean ± SEM) were analyzed using a two-tailed paired t-test. Significance was defined qualitatively as P ? 0.05. Results Mean decompression depth difference was significantly greater with AGD-ACD-CPR compared to S-CPR; 38–75% of subjects achieved chest decompression to or beyond baseline. AGD-ACD-CPR provided 6–12% fewer chest compressions/minute than S-CPR group. There was no significant difference in CD, CP, HR, RR and RT within each group comparing both techniques. Conclusion A simple, inexpensive glove device for ACD-CPR improved chest decompression with emphasis on active pull in manikins without excessive rescuer fatigue. The clinical implication of fewer compressions/minute in the AGD group needs to be evaluated.

Udassi, Jai P.; Udassi, Sharda; Lamb, Melissa A.; Lamb, Kenneth E.; Theriaque, Douglas W.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Zaritsky, Arno L.; Haque, Ikram U.

2013-01-01

88

Maturing Pump Technology for EVA Applications in a Collaborative Environment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The transition from low earth orbit Extravehicular Activity (EVA) for construction and maintenance activities to planetary surface EVA on asteroids, moons, and, ultimately, Mars demands a new spacesuit system. NASA's development of that system has resulte...

E. Gervais, E. Hodgson, I. Anchondo, S. Dionne

2012-01-01

89

Advanced EVA system design requirements study: EVAS/space station system interface requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The definition of the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems interface requirements and accomodations for effective integration of a production EVA capability into the space station are contained. A description of the EVA systems for which the space station must provide the various interfaces and accomodations are provided. The discussion and analyses of the various space station areas in which the EVA interfaces are required and/or from which implications for EVA system design requirements are derived, are included. The rationale is provided for all EVAS mechanical, fluid, electrical, communications, and data system interfaces as well as exterior and interior requirements necessary to facilitate EVA operations. Results of the studies supporting these discussions are presented in the appendix.

Woods, T. G.

1985-01-01

90

Mitigation of EMU Glove Cut Hazard by MMOD Impact Craters on Exposed ISS Handrails  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent cut damages to crewmember extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) gloves during extravehicular activity (EVA) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) has been found to result from contact with sharp edges or pinch points rather than general wear or abrasion. One possible source of cut-hazards are protruding sharp edged crater lips from impact of micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) particles on external metallic handrails along EVA translation paths. During impact of MMOD particles at hypervelocity an evacuation flow develops behind the shock wave, resulting in the formation of crater lips that can protrude above the target surface. In this study, two methods were evaluated to limit EMU glove cut-hazards due to MMOD impact craters. In the first phase, four flexible overwrap configurations are evaluated: a felt-reusable surface insulation (FRSI), polyurethane polyether foam with beta-cloth cover, double-layer polyurethane polyether foam with beta-cloth cover, and multi-layer beta-cloth with intermediate Dacron netting spacers. These overwraps are suitable for retrofitting ground equipment that has yet to be flown, and are not intended to protect the handrail from impact of MMOD particles, rather to act as a spacer between hazardous impact profiles and crewmember gloves. At the impact conditions considered, all four overwrap configurations evaluated were effective in limiting contact between EMU gloves and impact crater profiles. The multi-layer beta-cloth configuration was the most effective in reducing the height of potentially hazardous profiles in handrail-representative targets. In the second phase of the study, four material alternatives to current aluminum and stainless steel alloys were evaluated: a metal matrix composite, carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), fiberglass, and a fiber metal laminate. Alternative material handrails are intended to prevent the formation of hazardous damage profiles during MMOD impact and are suitable for flight hardware yet to be constructed. Of the four materials evaluated, only the fiberglass formed a less hazardous damage profile than the baseline metallic target. Although the CFRP laminate did not form any noticeable crater lip, brittle protruding fibers are considered a puncture risk. In parallel with EMU glove redesign efforts, modifications to metallic ISS handrails such as those evaluated in this study provide the means to significantly reduce cut-hazards from MMOD impact craters.

Christiansen, Eric L.; Ryan, Shannon

2009-01-01

91

Extravehicular Activity Asteroid Exploration and Sample Collection Capability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the challenging primary objectives associated with NASA's Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) is to demonstrate deep space Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and tools and to obtain asteroid samples to return to Earth for further study. Prior Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) spacewalks have benefited from engineered EVA interfaces which have been designed and manufactured on Earth. Rigid structurally mounted handrails, and tools with customized interfaces and restraints optimize EVA performance. For ARCM, EVA complexity increases due to the uncertainty of the asteroid properties. The variability of rock size, shape and composition, as well as behavior of the asteroid capture mechanism will complicate EVA translation, tool restraint, and body stabilization. The unknown asteroid hardness and brittleness will complicate tool use. The rock surface will introduce added safety concerns for cut gloves and debris control. Feasible solutions to meet ARCM EVA objectives were identified using experience gained during Apollo, Shuttle, and ISS EVAs, terrestrial mountaineering practices, NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 16 mission, and during Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory testing in the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) suit. This paper will summarize the overall operational concepts for conducting EVAs for the ARCM mission including translation paths and body restraint methods, potential tools used to extract the samples, design implications for the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) for EVA, and the results of early development testing of potential EVA tasks.

Sipila, Stephanie A.; Scoville, Zebulon C.; Bowie, Jonathan T.; Buffington, Jesse A.

2014-01-01

92

Metabolic rate control during extravehicular activity simulations and measurement techniques during actual EVAS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description of the methods used to control and measure metabolic rate during ground simulations is given. Work levels attained at the Space Environment Simulation Laboratory are presented. The techniques and data acquired during ground simulations are described and compared with inflight procedures. Data from both the Skylab and Apollo Program were utilized and emphasis is given to the methodology, both in simulation and during flight. The basic techniques of work rate assessment are described. They include oxygen consumption, which was useful for averages over long time periods, heart rate correlations based on laboratory calibrations, and liquid cooling garment temperature changes. The relative accuracy of these methods as well as the methods of real-time monitoring at the Mission Control Center are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the metabolic measurement techniques are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to the problem of utilizing oxygen decrement for short time periods and heart rate at low work levels. A summary is given of the effectiveness of work rate control and measurements; and current plans for future EVA monitoring are discussed.

Horrigan, D. J.

1975-01-01

93

One hundred US EVAs: A perspective on spacewalks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the 36 years between June 1965 and February 2001, the US human space flight program has conducted 100 spacewalks, or extravehicular activities (EVAs), as NASA officially calls them. EVA occurs when astronauts wearing spacesuits travel outside their protective spacecraft to perform tasks in the space vacuum environment. US EVA started with pioneering feasibility tests during the Gemini Program. The

Richard C Wilde; James W. McBarron; Scott A. Manatt; Harold J. McMann; Richard K. Fullerton

2002-01-01

94

Advanced EVA system design requirements study, executive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Design requirements and criteria for the space station advanced Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) including crew enclosures, portable life support systems, maneuvering propulsion systems, and related EVA support equipment were established. The EVA mission requirements, environments, and medical and physiological requirements, as well as operational, procedures and training issues were considered.

1986-01-01

95

EVA Performance Prediction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut physical performance capabilities in micro gravity EV A or on planetary surfaces when encumbered by a life support suit and debilitated by a long exposure to micro gravity will be less than unencumbered pre flight capabilities. The big question addressed by human factors engineers is: what can the astronaut be expected to do on EVA or when we arrive at a planetary surface? A second question is: what aids to performance will be needed to enhance the human physical capability? These questions are important for a number of reasons. First it is necessary to carry out accurate planning of human physical demands to ensure that time and energy critical tasks can be carried out with confidence. Second it is important that the crew members (and their ground or planetary base monitors) have a realistic picture of their own capabilities, as excessive fatigue can lead to catastrophic failure. Third it is important to design appropriate equipment to enhance human sensory capabilities, locomotion, materials handling and manipulation. The evidence from physiological research points to musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and neurovestibular degradation during long duration exposure to micro gravity . The evidence from the biomechanics laboratory (and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory) points to a reduction in range of motion, strength and stamina when encumbered by a pressurized suit. The evidence from a long history of EVAs is that crewmembers are indeed restricted in their physical capabilities. There is a wealth of evidence in the literature on the causes and effects of degraded human performance in the laboratory, in sports and athletics, in industry and in other physically demanding jobs. One approach to this challenge is through biomechanical and performance modeling. Such models must be based on thorough task analysis, reliable human performance data from controlled studies, and functional extrapolations validated in analog contexts. The task analyses currently carried out for EVA activities are based more on extensive domain experience than any formal analytic structure. Conversely, physical task analysis for industrial and structured evidence from training and EV A contexts. Again on earth there is considerable evidence of human performance degradation due to encumbrance and fatigue. These industrial models generally take the form of a discounting equation. The development of performance estimates for space operations, such as timeline predictions for EVA is generally based on specific input from training activity, for example in the NBL or KC135. uniformed services tasks on earth are much more formalized. Human performance data in the space context has two sources: first there is the micro analysis of performance in structured tasks by the space physiology community and second there is the less structured evidence from training and EV A contexts.

Peacock, Brian; Maida, James; Rajulu, Sudhakar

2004-01-01

96

Main problems of the Russian Orlan-M space suit utilization for EVAs on the ISS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the recent years the Russian Orlan-M space suits have been improved as applied to their operational requirements for the ISS. A special attention is paid to enhancement of EVA crew efficiency and safety. The paper considers the main problems regarding specific features of the Russian space suit operation in the ISS, and analyses measures on their solution. In particular, the problems associated with the following are considered: enhancement of the anthropometric range for the EVA crewmembers; use of some US EMU elements and unified NASA equipment elements; Orlan-M operation support in the wide range of the ISS thermal conditions; use of Simplified Aid For Extravehicular activity Rescue (SAFER) designed as a self-rescue device, which will be used for an EVA crewmember return in the event that he (she) breaks away inadvertently from the ISS surface. The paper states the main space suit differences with reference to solution of the above problems. The paper presents briefly the design of space suit arms developed for crewmembers with small anthropometric parameters, as well as peculiarities and test results for the gloves with enhanced thermal protection. Measures on further space suit development with the purpose to improve its performances are considered.

Abramov, I. P.; Pozdnyakov, S. S.; Severin, G. I.; Stoklitsky, A. Yu.

2001-03-01

97

Glove box shield  

SciTech Connect

According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

Brackenbush, Larry W. (Richland, WA); Hoenes, Glenn R. (Richland, WA)

1981-01-01

98

Glove box shield  

SciTech Connect

According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box. 2 figs.

Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

1981-02-17

99

Advanced EVA system design requirements study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results are presented of a study to identify specific criteria regarding space station extravehicular activity system (EVAS) hardware requirements. Key EVA design issues include maintainability, technology readiness, LSS volume vs. EVA time available, suit pressure/cabin pressure relationship and productivity effects, crew autonomy, integration of EVA as a program resource, and standardization of task interfaces. A variety of DOD EVA systems issues were taken into consideration. Recommendations include: (1) crew limitations, not hardware limitations; (2) capability to perform all of 15 generic missions; (3) 90 days on-orbit maintainability with 50 percent duty cycle as minimum; and (4) use by payload sponsors of JSC document 10615A plus a Generic Tool Kit and Specialized Tool Kit description. EVA baseline design requirements and criteria, including requirements of various subsystems, are outlined. Space station/EVA system interface requirements and EVA accommodations are discussed in the areas of atmosphere composition and pressure, communications, data management, logistics, safe haven, SS exterior and interior requirements, and SS airlock.

Woods, T. G.

1988-01-01

100

Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

Pozhidaev, Aleksey

2012-01-01

101

76 FR 28308 - Compliance Policy Guide: Surgeons' Gloves and Patient Examination Gloves; Defects-Criteria for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FDA-2011-D-0258] Compliance Policy Guide: Surgeons' Gloves and Patient Examination Gloves...availability of Compliance Policy Guide Sec...Surgeons' Gloves and Patient Examination Gloves...document entitled ``Compliance Policy Guide Sec...Surgeons' Gloves and Patient Examination...

2011-05-17

102

EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance [EPSP] Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation gives a general overview of the biomedical and technological challenges of Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The topics covered include: 1) Prebreathe Protocols; 2) Lunar Suit Testing and Development; and 3) Lunar Electric Rover and Exploration Operations Concepts.

Gernhardt, Michael L.

2010-01-01

103

Apollo 15 EVA panorama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mosaic photographs which compose a 360-degree panoramic view of the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennine landing site, taken near the close of the third lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) by Astronauts David Scott and James Irwin. This group of photographs was designated the Rover 'RIP' Pan because the Lunar Roving Vehicle was parked in its final position prior to the two crewmen returning to the Lunar Module. The astronaut taking the pan was standing 325 feet east of the Lunar Module (LM). This mosaic covers a field of view from about souteast to about west-northwest. Visible on the horizon from left to right are: Silver Spur on the Apennine Front; Hadley Delta Mountain and St. George Crater; Bennett Hill; and the LM.

1971-01-01

104

Apollo 15 EVA panorama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mosaic photographs which compose a 360-degree panoramic view of the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennine landing site, taken near the close of the third lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) by Astronauts David Scott and James Irwin. This group of photographs was designated the Rover 'RIP' Pan because the Lunar Roving Vehicle was parked in its final position prior to the two crewmen returning to the Lunar Module. The astronaut taking the pan was standing 325 feet east of the Lunar Module (LM). The Rover was parked about 300 feet east of the LM. This mosaic covers a field of view from about west to about northwest. Visible on the horizon from left to right are: the LM; Hill 305; and the western slope of Mount Hadley. The Rover is some 20-25 feet away in the foreground.

1971-01-01

105

Apollo 15 EVA panorama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mosaic photographs which compose a 360-degree panoramic view of the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennine landing site, taken near the close of the third lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) by Astronauts David Scott and James Irwin. This group of photographs was designated the Rover 'RIP' Pan because the Lunar Roving Vehicle was parked in its final position prior to the two crewmen returning to the Lunar Module. The astronaut taking the pan was standing 325 feet east of the Lunar Module (LM). The Rover was parked about 300 feet east of the LM. This mosaic covers a field of view from about north-northeast to about south. Visible on the horizon from left to right are: Mount Hadley; high peaks of the Apennine Mountains which are farther in the distance than either Mount Hadley or Hadley Delta Mountain; Silver Spur on the Apennine Front; and the eastern portion of Hadley Delta. Note Rover tracks in the foreground.

1971-01-01

106

EVA Physiology and Medical Considerations Working in the Suit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This "EVA Physiology and Medical Considerations Working in the Suit" presentation covers several topics related to the medical implications and physiological effects of suited operations in space from the perspective of a physician with considerable first-hand Extravehicular Activity (EVA) experience. Key themes include EVA physiology working in a pressure suit in the vacuum of space, basic EVA life support and work support, Thermal Protection System (TPS) inspections and repairs, and discussions of the physical challenges of an EVA. Parazynski covers the common injuries and significant risks during EVAs, as well as physical training required to prepare for EVAs. He also shares overall suit physiological and medical knowledge with the next generation of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) system designers.

Parazynski, Scott

2012-01-01

107

PHYSX Glove Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mock-up of the stainless-steel Pegasus Hypersonic Experiment (PHYSX) Projects experimental 'glove' undergoes hot-loads tests at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The thermal ground test simulates heats and pressures the wing glove will experience at hypersonic speeds. Quartz heat lamps subject this model of a Pegasus booster rocket's right wing glove to the extreme heats it will experience at speeds approaching Mach 8. The glove has a highly reflective surface, underneath which are hundreds of temperature and pressure sensors that will send hypersonic flight data to ground tracking facilities during the experimental flight. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia, is the manufacturer of the Pegasus vehicle, while Vandenberg Air Force Base served as a pre-launch assembly facility for the launch that included the PHYSX experiment. NASA used data from Pegasus launches to obtain considerable data on aerodynamics. By conducting experiments in a piggyback mode on Pegasus, some critical and secondary design and development issues were addressed at hypersonic speeds. The vehicle was also used to develop hypersonic flight instrumentation and test techniques. NASA's B-52 carrier-launch vehicle was used to get the Pegasus airborne during six launches from 1990 to 1994. Thereafter, an Orbital Sciences L-1011 aircraft launched the Pegasus. The Pegasus launch vehicle itself has a 400- to 600-pound payload capacity in a 61-cubic-foot payload space at the front of the vehicle. The vehicle is capable of placing a payload into low earth orbit. This vehicle is 49 feet long and 50 inches in diameter. It has a wing span of 22 feet. (There is also a Pegasus XL vehicle that was introduced in 1994. Dryden has never launched one of these vehicles, but they have greater thrust and are 56 feet long.)

1995-01-01

108

Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spacewalkers enjoy a view of Earth once reserved for Apollo, Zeus, and other denizens of Mt. Olympus. During humanity's first extravehicular activity (EVA), Alexei Leonov floated above Gibraltar, the rock ancient seafarers saw as the gateway to the great unknown Atlantic. The symbolism was clear, Leonov stepped past a new Gibraltar when he stepped into space. More than 32 years and 154 EVAs later, Jerry Linenger conducted an EVA with Vladimir Tsibliyev as part of International Space Station Phase 1. They floated together above Gibraltar. Today the symbolism has new meaning: humanity is starting to think of stepping out of Earth orbit, space travel's new Gibraltar, and perhaps obtaining a new olympian view, a close-up look at Olympus Mons on Mars. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology chronicles the 154 EVAs conducted from March 1965 to April 1997. It is intended to make clear the crucial role played by EVA in the history of spaceflight, as well as to chronicle the large body of EVA "lessons learned." Russia and the U.S. define EVA differently. Russian cosmonauts are said to perform EVA any time they are in vacuum in a space suit. A U.S. astronaut must have at least his head outside his spacecraft before he is said to perform an EVA. The difference is based in differing spacecraft design philoso- phies. Russian and Soviet spacecraft have always had a specialized airlock through which the EVA cosmonaut egressed, leaving the main habitable volume of the spacecraft pressurized. The U.S. Gemini and Apollo vehicles, on the other hand, depressurized their entire habitable volume for egress. In this document, we apply the Russian definition to Russian EVAS, and the U.S. definition to U.S. EVAS. Thus, for example, Gemini 4 Command Pilot James McDivitt does not share the honor of being first American spacewalker with Ed White, even though he was suited and in vacuum when White stepped out into space. Non-EVA spaceflights are listed in the chronology to provide context and to display the large num- ber of flights in which EVA played a role. This approach also makes apparent significant EVA gaps, for example, the U.S. gap between 1985 and 1991 following the Challenger accident. This NASA History Monograph is an edited extract from an extensive EVA Chronology and Reference Book being produced by the EVA Project Office, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. The larger work will be published as part of the NASA Formal Series in 1998. The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance rendered by Max Ary, Ashot Bakunts, Gert-Jan Bartelds, Frank Cepollina, Andrew Chaikin, Phillip Clark, Richard Fullerton, Steven Glenn, Linda Godwin, Jennifer Green, Greg Harris, Clifford Hess, Jeffrey Hoffman, David Homan, Steven Hopkins, Nicholas Johnson, Eric Jones, Neville Kidger, Joseph Kosmo, Alexei Lebedev, Mark Lee, James LeBlanc, Dmitri Leshchenskii, Jerry Linenger, Igor Lissov, James McBarron, Clay McCullough, Joseph McMann, Story Musgrave, Dennis Newkirk, James Oberg, Joel Powell, Lee Saegesser, Andy Salmon, Glen Swanson, Joseph Tatarewicz, Kathy Thornton, Chris Vandenberg, Charles Vick, Bert Vis, David Woods, Mike Wright, John Young, and Keith Zimmerman. Special thanks to Laurie Buchanan, John Charles, Janet Kovacevich, Joseph Loftus, Sue McDonald, Martha Munies, Colleen Rapp, and Jerry Ross. Any errors remain the responsibility of the authors.

Portree, David S. F.; Trevino, Robert C.

1997-01-01

109

Glovebox plug for glove changing  

DOEpatents

A plug for use in plugging a glove opening of a glovebox when the glove is eplaced. An inflated inner tube which is retained between flat plates mounted on a threaded rod is compressed in order to expand its diameter to equal that of the inside of the glove opening.

Carlson, David O. (Tesuque, NM); Shalkowski, Jr., Edward (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01

110

EVA Radio DRATS 2011 Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Fall of 2011, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) participated in the Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) field experiments held near Flagstaff, Arizona. The objective of the DRATS outing is to provide analog mission testing of candidate technologies for space exploration, especially those technologies applicable to human exploration of extra- terrestrial rocky bodies. These activities are performed at locations with similarities to extra-terrestrial conditions. This report describes the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Dual-Band Radio Communication System which was demonstrated during the 2011 outing. The EVA radio system is designed to transport both voice and telemetry data through a mobile ad hoc wireless network and employs a dual-band radio configuration. Some key characteristics of this system include: 1. Dual-band radio configuration. 2. Intelligent switching between two different capability wireless networks. 3. Self-healing network. 4. Simultaneous data and voice communication.

Swank, Aaron J.; Bakula, Casey J.

2012-01-01

111

Glove perforation during plastic surgery.  

PubMed

Intraoperative perforation of surgical gloves is common. Nine hundred and forty surgical gloves were tested after 100 consecutive plastic surgical operations, each involving a surgeon, a variable number of assistants and a scrub nurse. In the first 52 operations, single gloves were used and 21.5% of the staff were found to have a perforated glove. In the second 48 operations, double gloves were used by all members of the surgical team and the number with perforations (of both inner and outer gloves) was reduced to 9%. Most perforations occurred on the dorsum of the hand and fingers and on the thumb tip, especially in the non-dominant hand. The risk of acquiring AIDS due to glove perforation is low but the consequences of such an event could be lethal. PMID:2765743

Cole, R P; Gault, D T

1989-07-01

112

Permeation of Comite through protective gloves.  

PubMed

The goal of the study was to assess how protective disposable (Safeskin) and chemical protective (Sol-Vex) nitrile gloves were against Comite emulsifiable concentrate formulation containing propargite (PROP) as active pesticidal ingredient, because there were no explicit recommendations for the gloves that should be worn for hand protection. The glove material was exposed in ASTM-type I-PTC-600 permeation cells at 30.0+/-0.5 degrees C, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry used for PROP analysis. Aqueous solutions of Comite at 40.4 mg/mL permeated both Safeskin and Sol-Vex nitrile by 8h. Safeskin showed a mean PROP mass permeated of 176+/-27 microg after 8h compared with a mean mass permeated for Sol-Vex of 3.17+/-4.08 microg. Thus, Sol-Vex was about 56 times more protective than Safeskin for an 8-h exposure. However, the kinetics of the permeation revealed that Safeskin can be worn for at least 200 min before disposal. When undiluted Comite challenged both types of nitrile, much faster permeation was observed. Safeskin gloves showed two steady state periods. The first had lag times (t(l)) values of about 1h, although normalized breakthrough times (t(b)) were < 10 min. The second steady state rate (P(s)) was on average four times the rate of the first period, and the second steady state period t(l) was about three times as long as that of the first steady state period, and about the same t(l) as for the aqueous solution. Sol-Vex gloves exposed continuously to undiluted Comite permeated above the normalized breakthrough threshold beyond 2.7h. A risk assessment revealed that the PROP skin permeation rate of 7.1 ng cm(-2)h(-1) was much slower than the first steady state Safeskin glove P(s) of 62,000 ng cm(-2)h(-1). Infrared analysis showed that the glove surfaces were not degraded by the Comite challenge. The chemically protective Sol-Vex gloves protected adequately against undiluted formulation for about 2.7h, whereas they provided protection for nearly 8h when the formulation was diluted with water to the highest concentration for field application. In contrast, the disposable Safeskin gloves did not protect at all for the undiluted formulation, but did for 200 min when the formulation was diluted with water to the highest concentration for spraying. PMID:16713085

Zainal, Hanaa; Que Hee, Shane S

2006-09-01

113

One hundred US EVAs: a perspective on spacewalks.  

PubMed

In the 36 years between June 1965 and February 2001, the US human space flight program has conducted 100 spacewalks, or extravehicular activities (EVAs), as NASA officially calls them. EVA occurs when astronauts wearing spacesuits travel outside their protective spacecraft to perform tasks in the space vacuum environment. US EVA started with pioneering feasibility tests during the Gemini Program. The Apollo Program required sending astronauts to the moon and performing EVA to explore the lunar surface. EVA supported scientific mission objectives of the Skylab program, but may be best remembered for repairing launch damage to the vehicle and thus saving the program. EVA capability on Shuttle was initially planned to be a kit that could be flown at will, and was primarily intended for coping with vehicle return emergencies. The Skylab emergency and the pivotal role of EVA in salvaging that program quickly promoted Shuttle EVA to an essential element for achieving mission objectives, including retrieving satellites and developing techniques to assemble and maintain the International Space Station (ISS). Now, EVA is supporting assembly of ISS. This paper highlights development of US EVA capability within the context of the overarching mission objectives of the US human space flight program. PMID:12583391

Wilde, Richard C; McBarron, James W; Manatt, Scott A; McMann, Harold J; Fullerton, Richard K

2002-01-01

114

One hundred US EVAs: A perspective on spacewalks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the 36 years between June 1965 and February 2001, the US human space flight program has conducted 100 spacewalks, or extravehicular activities (EVAs), as NASA officially calls them. EVA occurs when astronauts wearing spacesuits travel outside their protective spacecraft to perform tasks in the space vacuum environment. US EVA started with pioneering feasibility tests during the Gemini Program. The Apollo Program required sending astronauts to the moon and performing EVA to explore the lunar surface. EVA supported scientific mission objectives of the Skylab program, but may be best remembered for repairing launch damage to the vehicle and thus saving the program. EVA capability on Shuttle was initially planned to be a kit that could be flown at will, and was primarily intended for coping with vehicle return emergencies. The Skylab emergency and the pivotal role of EVA in salvaging that program quickly promoted Shuttle EVA to an essential element for achieving mission objectives, including retrieving satellites and developing techniques to assemble and maintain the International Space Station (ISS). Now, EVA is supporting assembly of ISS. This paper highlights development of US EVA capability within the context of the overarching mission objectives of the US human space flight program.

Wilde, Richard C.; McBarron, James W.; Manatt, Scott A.; McMann, Harold J.; Fullerton, Richard K.

2002-07-01

115

Refinement of Optimal Work Envelope for Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Suit Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Work Envelope study is to determine and revise the work envelope defined in NSTS 07700 "System Description and Design Data - Extravehicular Activities" [1], arising from an action item as a result of the Shoulder Injury Tiger Team findings. The aim of this study is to determine a common work envelope that will encompass a majority of the crew population while minimizing the possibility of shoulder and upper arm injuries. There will be approximately two phases of testing: arm sweep analysis to be performed in the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF), and torso lean testing to be performed on the Precision Air Bearing Facility (PABF). NSTS 07700 defines the preferred work envelope arm reach in terms of maximum reach, and defines the preferred work envelope torso flexibility of a crewmember to be a net 45 degree backwards lean [1]. This test served two functions: to investigate the validity of the standard discussed in NSTS 07700, and to provide recommendations to update this standard if necessary.

Jaramillo, Marcos A.; Angermiller, Bonnie L.; Morency, Richard M.; Rajululu, Sudhakar L.

2008-01-01

116

The ESA-Facility MATROSHKA: A human phantom for dose measurements occurring in men being exposed during an Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA).  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Matroshka facility basically consists of the upper part of a body phantom, com- posed of various tissue substitutes simulating the human body with respect to size, shape, position, mass density and nuclear interactions. At the site of the organs of interest, spaces are provided at the surface and in different depths inside the phan- tom to accommodate active and passive dosimeter packages for measurements of any radiation type. The phantom is mounted on a base structure containing the facility electronics and surrounded by a Carbon Fiber container providing structural support and fixation of the phantom and providing shielding thickness comparable to the EVA suit. The container and the base structure build up a sealed compartment. The objective of the proposed facility is to determine the empirical relations between measurable absorbed doses and the required tissue absorbed doses in a realistic hu- man phantom exposed to the concrete radiation field to be monitored. The radiation field during extravehicular activities (EVA) is that of the free space environment mod- ified only by the space suit. Since EVAs will form a substantial fraction of the work- schedule in the space station scenario, such measurements have highest priority. Once the ratios for the tissue absorbed doses and surface absorbed doses are known for a given radiation field around the human body, these values may be used in future expo- sures to determine the required tissue absorbed doses from measurements of surface absorbed doses, only. This technical presentation will describe the design of the MATROSHKA facility which is expected to be launched late 2003.

Reitz, G.

117

EVA - Don't Leave Earth Without It  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Modern manned space programs come in two categories: those that need Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and those that will need EVA. This paper discusses major milestones in the Shuttle Program where EVA was used to save payloads, enhance on-orbit capabilities, and build structures in order to ensure success of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) missions. In conjunction, the Extravehicular Mobility Unit s (EMU) design, and hence, its capabilities evolved as its mission evolved. It is the intent that lessons can be drawn from these case studies so that EVA compatibility is designed into future vehicles and payloads.

Cupples, J. Scott; Smith, Stephen A.

2011-01-01

118

Eva Physiology, Systems, and Performance (EPSP) Project Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Extravehicular activity (EVA) is any activity performed by astronauts outside their space vehicle or habitat. EVA may be performed on orbit, such as outside the Space Shuttle or the International Space Station, or on a planetary surface such as Mars or on the moon. Astronauts wear a pressurized suit that provides environmental protection, mobility, life support, and communications while they work in the harsh conditions of a microgravity environment. Exploration missions to the moon and Mars may last many days and will include many types of EVAs; exploration, science, construction and maintenance. The effectiveness and success of these EVA-filled missions is dependent on the ability to perform tasks efficiently. The EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance (EPSP) project will conduct a number of studies to understand human performance during EVA, from a molecular level to full-scale equipment and suit design aspects, with the aim of developing safe and efficient systems for Exploration missions and the Constellation Program. The EPSP project will 1) develop Exploration Mission EVA suit requirements for metabolic and thermal loading, optional center of gravity location, biomedical sensors, hydration, nutrition, and human biomedical interactions; 2) develop validated EVA prebreathe protocols that meet medical, vehicle, and habitat constraints while minimizing crew time and thus increasing EVA work efficiency; and 3) define exploration decompression sickness (DCS) risks, policy, and mission success statistics and develop a DCS risk definition report.

Gernhardt, Michael L.

2007-01-01

119

Underwater EVA training for the STS 41-G crewmembers Sullivan and Leestma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Underwater EVA training for the STS 41-G mission specialists Kathryn Sullivan and David Leestma. Sullivan and Leestma train on structures in the weightless environment training facility (WETF) for work during an extravehicular activity (EVA).

1984-01-01

120

Underwater EVA training in the WETF with astronaut Bruce McCandless  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) training in the weightless environment training facility (WETF) with astronaut Bruce McCandless. McCandless, using a one-G version of the manned maneuvering unit (MMU), is simulating an EVA.

1983-01-01

121

NASA Research Announcement Phase 2 Final Report for the Development of a Power Assisted Space Suit Glove.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The main goal of this program was to develop an unobtrusive power-assisted EVA glove metacarpalphalangeal (MCP) joint that could provide the crew member with as close to nude body performance as possible, and to demonstrate the technology feasibility of p...

B. Sorenson D. Cadogan R. Lingo R. Sanner

1997-01-01

122

Astronaut Carl Walz during EVA in Discovery's payload bay  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Carl E. Walz reaches for equipment from the provisional stowage assembly (PSA) in Discvoery's cargo bay during a lengthy period of extravehicular activity (EVA). The hatch to Discovery's airlock is open nearby. Sun glare is evident above the orbiter. The picture was taken with a 35mm camera by astronaut James H. Newman, who shared EVA duties with Walz.

1993-01-01

123

Exploration EVA Purge Flow Assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An advanced future spacesuit will require properly sized suit and helmet purge flow rates in order to sustain a crew member with a failed Portable Life Support System (PLSS) during an Extravehicular Activity (EVA). A computational fluid dynamics evaluation was performed to estimate the helmet purge flow rate required to washout carbon dioxide and to prevent the condensing ("fogging") of water vapor on the helmet visor. An additional investigation predicted the suit purge flow rate required to provide sufficient convective cooling to keep the crew member comfortable. This paper summarizes the results of these evaluations.

Navarro, Moses; Conger, Bruce; Campbell, Colin

2011-01-01

124

Exploration EVA Purge Flow Assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An advanced future spacesuit will require properly sized suit and helmet purge flow rates in order to sustain a crew member with a failed Portable Life Support System (PLSS) during an Extravehicular Activity (EVA). A computational fluid dynamics evaluation was performed to estimate the helmet purge flow rate required to washout carbon dioxide and to prevent the condensing ("fogging") of water vapor on the helmet visor. An additional investigation predicted the suit purge flow rate required to provide sufficient convective cooling to keep the crew member comfortable. This paper summarizes the results of these evaluations.

Navarro, Moses; Conger, Bruce

2010-01-01

125

Emergency vehicle alert system (EVAS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Emergency Vehicle Alert System (EVAS) program is sponsored by the NASA/MSFC Technology Utilization (TU) office. The program was conceived to support the needs of hearing impaired drivers. The objective of the program is to develop a low-cost, small device which can be located in a personal vehicle and warn the driver, via a visual means, of the approach of an emergency vehicle. Many different technologies might be developed for this purpose and each has its own advantages and drawbacks. The requirements for an acoustic detection system, appear to be pretty stringent and may not allow the development of a reliable, low-cost device in the near future. The problems include variations in the sirens between various types of emergency vehicles, distortions due to wind and surrounding objects, competing background noise, sophisticated signal processing requirements, and omni-directional coverage requirements. Another approach is to use a Radio Frequency (RF) signal between the Emergency Vehicle (EV) and the Personal Vehicle (PV). This approach requires a transmitter on each EV and a receiver in each PV, however it is virtually assured that a system can be developed which works. With this approach, the real technology issue is how to make a system work as inexpensively as possible. This report gives a brief summary of the EVAS program from its inception and concentrates on describing the activities that occurred during Phase 4. References 1-3 describe activities under Phases 1-3. In the fourth phase of the program, the major effort to be expended was in development of the microcontroller system for the PV, refinement of some system elements and packaging for demonstration purposes. An EVAS system was developed and demonstrated which used standard spread spectrum modems with minor modifications.

Reed, Bill; Crump, Roger; Harper, Warren; Myneni, Krishna

1995-01-01

126

A human factors analysis of EVA time requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human Factors Engineering (HFE), also known as Ergonomics, is a discipline whose goal is to engineer a safer, more efficient interface between humans and machines. HFE makes use of a wide range of tools and techniques to fulfill this goal. One of these tools is known as motion and time study, a technique used to develop time standards for given tasks. A human factors motion and time study was initiated with the goal of developing a database of EVA task times and a method of utilizing the database to predict how long an ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) should take. Initial development relied on the EVA activities performed during the STS-61 mission (Hubble repair). The first step of the analysis was to become familiar with EVAs and with the previous studies and documents produced on EVAs. After reviewing these documents, an initial set of task primitives and task time modifiers was developed. Videotaped footage of STS-61 EVAs were analyzed using these primitives and task time modifiers. Data for two entire EVA missions and portions of several others, each with two EVA astronauts, was collected for analysis. Feedback from the analysis of the data will be used to further refine the primitives and task time modifiers used. Analysis of variance techniques for categorical data will be used to determine which factors may, individually or by interactions, effect the primitive times and how much of an effect they have.

Pate, D. W.

1996-01-01

127

Development of an EVA systems cost model. Volume 3: EVA systems cost model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The EVA systems cost model presented is based on proposed EVA equipment for the space shuttle program. General information on EVA crewman requirements in a weightless environment and an EVA capabilities overview are provided.

1975-01-01

128

Creating a Lunar EVA Work Envelope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A work envelope has been defined for weightless Extravehicular Activity (EVA) based on the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), but there is no equivalent for planetary operations. The weightless work envelope is essential for planning all EVA tasks because it determines the location of removable parts, making sure they are within reach and visibility of the suited crew member. In addition, using the envelope positions the structural hard points for foot restraints that allow placing both hands on the job and provides a load path for reacting forces. EVA operations are always constrained by time. Tasks are carefully planned to ensure the crew has enough breathing oxygen, cooling water, and battery power. Planning first involves computers using a virtual work envelope to model tasks, next suited crew members in a simulated environment refine the tasks. For weightless operations, this process is well developed, but planetary EVA is different and no work envelope has been defined. The primary difference between weightless and planetary work envelopes is gravity. It influences anthropometry, horizontal and vertical mobility, and reaction load paths and introduces effort into doing "overhead" work. Additionally, the use of spacesuits other than the EMU, and their impacts on range of motion, must be taken into account. This paper presents the analysis leading to a concept for a planetary EVA work envelope with emphasis on lunar operations. There is some urgency in creating this concept because NASA has begun building and testing development hardware for the lunar surface, including rovers, habitats and cargo off-loading equipment. Just as with microgravity operations, a lunar EVA work envelope is needed to guide designers in the formative stages of the program with the objective of avoiding difficult and costly rework.

Griffin, Brand N.; Howard, Robert; Rajulu, Sudhakar; Smitherman, David

2009-01-01

129

Robot hands and extravehicular activity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Extravehicular activity (EVA) is crucial to the success of both current and future space operations. As space operations have evolved in complexity so has the demand placed on the EVA crewman. In addition, some NASA requirements for human capabilities at remote or hazardous sites were identified. One of the keys to performing useful EVA tasks is the ability to manipulate objects accurately, quickly and without early or excessive fatigue. The current suit employs a glove which enables the crewman to perform grasping tasks, use tools, turn switches, and perform other tasks for short periods of time. However, the glove's bulk and resistance to motion ultimately causes fatigue. Due to this limitation it may not be possible to meet the productivity requirements that will be placed on the EVA crewman of the future with the current or developmental Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) hardware. In addition, this hardware will not meet the requirements for remote or hazardous operations. In an effort to develop ways for improving crew productivity, a contract was awarded to develop a prototype anthromorphic robotic hand (ARH) for use with an extravehicular space suit. The first step in this program was to perform a a design study which investigated the basic technology required for the development of an ARH to enhance crew performance and productivity. The design study phase of the contract and some additional development work is summarized.

Marcus, Beth

1987-01-01

130

Space Station Human Factors Research Review. Volume 1: EVA Research and Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is presented of extravehicular activity (EVA) research and development activities at Ames. The majority of the program was devoted to presentations by the three contractors working in parallel on the EVA System Phase A Study, focusing on Implications for Man-Systems Design. Overhead visuals are included for a mission results summary, space station EVA requirements and interface accommodations summary, human productivity study cross-task coordination, and advanced EVAS Phase A study implications for man-systems design. Articles are also included on subsea approach to work systems development and advanced EVA system design requirements.

Cohen, Marc M. (editor); Vykukal, H. C. (editor)

1988-01-01

131

Efficacy and tolerability of ClO2-generating gloves.  

PubMed

The transmission of pathogenic microorganisms by the hands of workers continues to be a problem in the medical field and the food industry. Compliance with hand hygiene is often poor, and gloves may be contaminated after being donned and may transmit microorganisms. A novel, patented technology allows materials to be impregnated with microspheres that, when activated by light or moisture, generate ClO2 at sustained rates to produce a disinfecting microatmosphere. Gloves that were seeded with bacteria and then exposed to light were able to reduce the numbers of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella serotype Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes by 1-3 logs within 20 min, both on the gloves and on the hands of wearers. The gloves look and feel like their standard counterparts and were well tolerated in the Draize test. This technology holds promise for reducing cross-contamination and the transmission of pathogens in the medical and food handling environments. PMID:14999631

Barza, Michael

2004-03-15

132

Frequency of glove perforation and the protective effect of double gloves in gynecological surgery.  

PubMed

The purposes of this prospective study were to verify the frequency of glove perforation during gynecological operations and to evaluate the efficacy of double gloving in preventing damage to the inner glove. From May 2000 to May 2001, three house staff and 12 residents were asked to place their used gloves in bags labeled with the following information: procedure performed, presence of a recognized glove perforation, and role in operating team (surgeon, first or second assistant, and instrumentalist). All glove sets were tested using the method of water pression. Damaged gloves were excluded from that analysis. In all, 35 and 51 operations were utilized with single and double gloves, respectively. There were 240 single gloves and 792 double gloves tested. Perforation occurred in 10.4% of the single gloves and 9.8% of the outer double gloves. There were no cases of perforation in the inner double gloves. In cases of operating time that lasted more than 2 h, 56% of the surgeries that used single gloves had perforation vs 58.5% of the double gloves. The first assistant had the major risk for glove perforation with the use of single or double gloves. The indicator finger of the non-dominant hand was the major risk for perforation. In conclusion, we recommend double gloving in all gynecological surgery to reduce the risk of contracting blood-borne diseases. PMID:12768294

Murta, Eddie F C; Silva, Cléber S; Júnior, Odilon R A

2003-06-01

133

Astronaut Michael Foale on RMS arm during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut C. Michael Foale (red stripe), mission specialist, on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm prepares to grab SPARTAN 204 as astronaut Bernard A. Harris Jr., payload commander, looks on during the STS-63 extravehicular activity (EVA).

1995-01-01

134

Astronaut S. David Griggs waves to Orbiter during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut S. David Griggs waves from the cargo bay into the flight deck during his extravehicular activity (EVA). The Earth's horizon appears both in the background of the scene and in the reflection in Grigg's helmet visor.

1985-01-01

135

Astronaut Edgar Mitchell looks at traverse map during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, Apollo 14 lunar module pilot, moves across the lunar surface as he looks over a traverse map during extravehicular activity (EVA). Lunar dust can be seen clinging to the boots and legs of the space suit.

1971-01-01

136

Astronaut Ronald Evans photographed during transearth coast EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Ronald E. Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 17 spacecraft's transearth coast. During his EVA Command Module pilot Evans retrieved film cassettes from the Lunar Sounder, Mapping Camera, and Panoramic Camera. The cylindrical object at Evans left side is the mapping camera cassette. The total time for the transearth EVA was one hour seven minutes 19 seconds, starting at ground elapsed time of 257:25 (2:28 p.m.) amd ending at ground elapsed time of 258:42 (3:35 p.m.) on Sunday, December 17, 1972.

1972-01-01

137

Astronaut Ronald Evans photographed during transearth coast EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Ronald E. Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 17 spacecraft's transearth coast. During his EVA Command Module pilot Evans retrieved film cassettes from the Lunar Sounder, Mapping Camera, and Panoramic Camera. The total time for the transearth EVA was one hour seven minutes 19 seconds, starting at ground elapsed time of 257:25 (2:28 p.m.) amd ending at ground elapsed time of 258:42 (3:35 p.m.) on Sunday, December 17, 1972.

1972-01-01

138

Astronaut Alfred Worden floats in space outside spacecraft during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot of the Apollo 15 mission, floats in space outside of the spacecraft during his transearth extravehicular activity (EVA). This picture was taken from a frame of motion picture film exposed by the 16mm Maurer camera mounted on the hatch of the Command Module. During his EVA Worden made on inspection of the Service Module's Scientific Instrument Module (SIM) bay and retrieved the film cassettes from the Panoramic Camera and Mapping Camera. The EVA occurred when the spacecraft was homeward bound approximately 171,000 nautical miles from Earth.

1971-01-01

139

Extravehicular Activity Asteroid Exploration and Sample Collection Capability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) is challenged with primary mission objectives of demonstrating deep space Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and tools, and obtaining asteroid samples to return to Earth for further study. Although the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) is used for the EVAs, it has limited mobility which increases fatigue and decreases the crews' capability to perform EVA tasks. Furthermore, previous Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) spacewalks have benefited from EVA interfaces which have been designed and manufactured on Earth. Rigid structurally mounted handrails, and tools with customized interfaces and restraints optimize EVA performance. For ARCM, some vehicle interfaces and tools can leverage heritage designs and experience. However, when the crew ventures onto an asteroid capture bag to explore the asteroid and collect rock samples, EVA complexity increases due to the uncertainty of the asteroid properties. The variability of rock size, shape and composition, as well as bunching of the fabric bag will complicate EVA translation, tool restraint and body stabilization. The unknown asteroid hardness and brittleness will complicate tool use. The rock surface will introduce added safety concerns for cut gloves and debris control. Feasible solutions to meet ARCM EVA objectives were identified using experience gained during Apollo, Shuttle, and ISS EVAs, terrestrial mountaineering practices, NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 16 mission, and during Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory testing in the MACES suit. The proposed concept utilizes expandable booms and integrated features of the asteroid capture bag to position and restrain the crew at the asteroid worksite. These methods enable the capability to perform both finesse, and high load tasks necessary to collect samples for scientific characterization of the asteroid. This paper will explore the design trade space and options that were examined for EVA, the overall concept for the EVAs including translation paths and body restraint methods, potential tools used to extract the samples, design implications for the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) for EVA, the results of early development testing of potential EVA tasks, and extensibility of the EVA architecture to NASA's exploration missions.

Scoville, Zebulon; Sipila, Stephanie; Bowie, Jonathan

2014-01-01

140

EVA Design, Verification, and On-Orbit Operations Support Using Worksite Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The International Space Station (ISS) design is a very large and complex orbiting structure with thousands of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) worksites. These worksites are used to assemble and maintain the ISS. The challenge facing EVA designers was how to design, verify, and operationally support such a large number of worksites within cost and schedule. This has been solved through the practical use of computer aided design (CAD) graphical techniques that have been developed and used with a high degree of success over the past decade. The EVA design process allows analysts to work concurrently with hardware designers so that EVA equipment can be incorporated and structures configured to allow for EVA access and manipulation. Compliance with EVA requirements is strictly enforced during the design process. These techniques and procedures, coupled with neutral buoyancy underwater testing, have proven most valuable in the development, verification, and on-orbit support of planned or contingency EVA worksites.

Hagale, Thomas J.; Price, Larry R.

2000-01-01

141

Rheology, morphology and estimation of interfacial tension of LDPE\\/EVA and HDPE\\/EVA blends  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rheological characteristics and morphology of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) \\/ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE)\\/EVA blends were compared. Morphological examinations clearly reveal a two-phase morphology in which the LDPE\\/EVA blends have smaller dispersed domain size than HDPE\\/EVA Furthermore, LDPE\\/EVA shows a finely interconnected morphology at 50wt% of EVA while HDPE\\/EVA exhibits a coarse co-continuous morphology at the same

H. A. a Khonakdar; S.H.b c Jafari; A. b Yavari; A. b Asadinezhad; U. c Wagenknecht

2005-01-01

142

Modular dexterous robot for glove box applications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Many industrial processes today require the use of glove boxes - environmentally sealed chambers designed to allow access by human workers through ports fitted with protective gloves. A new technology for the automation of complex material-handling functi...

E. W. Walker R. E. Igou J. P. Karlen K. A. Kowalski P. H. Eismann

1994-01-01

143

Development of rubber gloves by radiation vulcanization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The processes of radiation vulcanization and production of protective rubber gloves for radioactive contamination are described. A newly developed sensitizing system consisting of 5 phr 2-ethylhexyl acrylate and 1 phr carbon tetrachloride was used to vulcanize natural rubber latex at 12 kGy. Transparent and soft gloves were obtained from the radiation vulcanized latex by a coagulant dipping process. The mechanical properties of the gloves meet Japanese Industrial Standard specification for protective gloves. Combustion analysis of the gloves revealed that the amount of evolved sulfur dioxide and remaining ashes are less than those from commercially available rubber gloves. A trial usage of the gloves at a nuclear power plant showed that the gloves were easy to use for delicate work without undergoing fatigue.

Makuuchi, K.; Yoshii, F.; Ishigaki, I.; Tsushima, K.; Mogi, M.; Saito, T.

144

21 CFR 878.4460 - Surgeon's glove.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4460 Surgeon's glove. (a) Identification. A surgeon's glove is a...

2013-04-01

145

ISS Update: Robonaut Glove Test (Part 2)  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Chris Ihrke, General Motors Lead Engineer for the Robo-Glove Project, about the Robonaut glove test. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson an...

146

DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW GLOVE FOR GLOVE BOXES WITH HIGH-LEVEL PERFORMANCES  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a joint technological program of COGEMA and MAPA to develop a new generation of glove for glove boxes. The mechanical strength of this glove is twice as high as the best characteristics of gloves available on the market. This new generation of product has both a higher level of performance and better ergonomics.

Blancher, J.; Poirier, J.M.

2003-02-27

147

Astronaut Ronald Evans is suited up for EVA training  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission, is assisted by technicians in suiting up for extravehicular activity (EVA) training in a water tank in bldg 5 at the Manned Spacecraft Center (49970); Evans participates in EVA training in a water tank in bldg 5 at the Manned Spacecraft Center. The structure in the picture simulates the Scientific Instrument Module (SIM) bay of the Apollo 17 Service Module (49971).

1972-01-01

148

Evolution of EVA capabilities for space station construction and maintenance: Soviet and American experience  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The evolution of both Soviet and American Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is discussed. A qualitative review evaluates each EVA with respect to risk, criticality, complexity, and duration. Graphics summarizing increase and rate of increase in productivity emphasize related advancements in the space suits, EVA tools, and equipment technology. Specifics that demonstrated ingenuity in accomplishing unplanned activities which required man's direct manipulation of large payloads and structures are presented. Accumulated EVA successes allow an effective, flexible, recommended approach for construction and maintenance of Space Station to be given in conclusion.

Kramer, Cathy D.

1989-01-01

149

Thermal and Mechanical Testing of Neoprene Gloves Used in a Space Shuttle Microgravity Glove Box Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Neoprene gloves are used in a Space Shuttle Microgravity Glove Box (MGBX) experiment. In 1999, significant corrosion was observed in the work area and on the outer surface of the left glove ring. Analysis of the corrosion products showed that they contained chlorine. The Neoprene gloves used in this glove box were obtained in 1995, with a recommended shelf life of 3 years. After storage of these gloves in a cabinet drawer until 1999, significant signs of corrosion were also observed in the drawer. Mechanical and thermal properties were determined on samples cut from the finger and sleeve areas of the "good" and "bad" gloves. This data showed significant aging of the left-hand glove, particularly in the sleeve area. Thermal analysis data by DSC and TGA was complimentary to tensile data in showing this aging. However, this test data did not pinpoint the cause of the left-hand glove aging, or of the corrosion products.

Wingard, Charles Doug; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

150

A Human Factors Analysis of EVA Time Requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human Factors Engineering (HFE) is a discipline whose goal is to engineer a safer, more efficient interface between humans and machines. HFE makes use of a wide range of tools and techniques to fulfill this goal. One of these tools is known as motion and time study, a technique used to develop time standards for given tasks. During the summer of 1995, a human factors motion and time study was initiated with the goals of developing a database of EVA task times and developing a method of utilizing the database to predict how long an EVA should take. Initial development relied on the EVA activities performed during the STS-61 (Hubble) mission. The first step of the study was to become familiar with EVA's, the previous task-time studies, and documents produced on EVA's. After reviewing these documents, an initial set of task primitives and task-time modifiers was developed. Data was collected from videotaped footage of two entire STS-61 EVA missions and portions of several others, each with two EVA astronauts. Feedback from the analysis of the data was used to further refine the primitives and modifiers used. The project was continued during the summer of 1996, during which data on human errors was also collected and analyzed. Additional data from the STS-71 mission was also collected. Analysis of variance techniques for categorical data was used to determine which factors may affect the primitive times and how much of an effect they have. Probability distributions for the various task were also generated. Further analysis of the modifiers and interactions is planned.

Pate, Dennis W.

1997-01-01

151

PUNCTURE TEST CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES  

SciTech Connect

An experiment was conducted to determine the puncture resistance of 15 gloves that are used or proposed for use in the Tritium Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS). These data will serve as a baseline for characterization and may be incorporated into the glove procurement specification. The testing was conducted in agreement with ASTM D120 and all of the gloves met or exceeded the minimum requirements. Butyl gloves exhibited puncture resistance nearly 2.5 times the minimum requirements at SRS while Polyurethane was nearly 7.5x the minimum.

Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

2012-02-29

152

Underwater EVA training in the WETF with astronaut Robert L. Stewart  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) training in the weightless environment training facility (WETF) with astronaut Robert L. Stewart. Stewart is simulating a planned EVA using the mobile foot restraint device and a one-G version of the Canadian-built remote manipulator system.

1983-01-01

153

Underwater EVA training for some of the crew of STS-9  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-9 contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) simulations are conducted in underwater in the weightless environment training facility (WETF) at JSC. Pictured are Astronauts John W. Young (top), crew commander, and Dr. Owen K. Garriott, one of two mission specialists. They are wearing the EVA mobility units (EMU) similar to those that would be used during a mission. A number of divers assist them.

1983-01-01

154

STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-110 mission specialist Lee M.E. Morin carries an affixed 35 mm camera to record work which is being performed on the International Space Station (ISS). Working with astronaut Jerry L. Ross (out of frame), the duo completed the structural attachment of the S0 (s-zero) truss, mating two large tripod legs of the 13 1/2 ton structure to the station's main laboratory during a 7-hour, 30-minute space walk. The STS-110 mission prepared the Station for future space walks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long S0 truss and preparing the Mobile Transporter. The S0 Truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver space walkers around the Station and marked the first time all space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

2002-01-01

155

Emergency Vehicle Alert System (EVAS).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Emergency Vehicle Alert System (EVAS) program is sponsored by the NASA/MSFC Technology Utilization (TU) office. The program was conceived to support the needs of hearing impaired drivers. The objective of the program is to develop a low-cost, small de...

B. Reed R. Crump W. Harper K. Myneni

1995-01-01

156

European EVA decompression sickness risks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the first manned flight of Hermes there will be a capability of performing EVA. The European EVA Space Suit will be an anthropomorphic system with an internal pressure of 500 hPa of pure oxygen. The pressure reduction from the Hermes cabin pressure of 1013 hPa will induce a risk for Decompression Sickness (DCS) for the EVA crewmember if no adequate protective procedures are implemented. Specific decompression procedures have to be developed. From a critical review of the literature and by using knowledge gained from research conducted in the past in the fields of diving and aerospace medicine safe protective procedures are proposed for the European EVA scenario. An R factor of 1.2 and a tissue half-time ( t1/2) of 360 minutes in a single-tissue model have been identified as appropriate operational values. On the basis of an acceptable risk level of approximately 1%, oxygen prebreathing times are proposed for (a) direct pressure reduction from 1013 hPa to a suit pressure of 500 hPa, and (b) staged decompression using a 700 hPa intermediate stage in the spacecraft cabin. In addition, factors which influence individual susceptibility to DCS are identified. Recommendations are also given in the areas of crew selection and medical monitoring requirements together with therapeutic measures that can be implemented in the Hermes scenario. A method for demonstration of the validity of proposed risks and procedures is proposed.

Vogt, Lorenz; Wenzel, Jürgen; Skoog, A. I.; Luck, S.; Svensson, Bengt

157

The Education of Eva Hoffman.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the autobiography of Eva Hoffman, "Lost in Translation: A Life in a New Language" (Dutton, 1989). Hoffman, whose family left Poland in the 1950s, offers a consciously bicultural view of the immigrant experience, in contrast to many autobiographies of those who forsake the old world for the new. (DM)

Proefriedt, William

1991-01-01

158

Glovebox plug for glove changing  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a plug for isolating the interior of a glovebox from the atmosphere when replacing a glove. It comprises: a rod having a circular cross-section which is threaded for a portion of its length starting at one end and which has a handle at the non-threaded end; a stop nut threaded onto the rod and located near the end of the threaded portion which is nearer the handle; a first circular flat plate having a diameter less than that of a glove opening of the glovebox and having a first guide ring attached to it, the plate being slidably mounted on the rod by means of a hole in the center of the plate; a bearing holder containing a thrust bearing, both slidably mounted on the rod between the stop nut and the first plate, where the bearing is in contact with the first plate; a second circular flat plate having a diameter less than that of the glovebox glove opening, having a second guide ring attached to it, and having a central hole and a threaded hub attached to the plate, a closure nut threaded onto the rod at the end of the rod opposite the handle and adjacent to the second plate, the first guide ring, which is a hollow cylinder having a diameter less than that of the plates, having a first end attached to the first plate, and having a length which defines the minimum spacing between the first plate and the second plate, where the central axis of the ring coincides with the rod and where the ring has a slot extending along its length parallel to its axis; the second guide ring.

Carlson, D.O.; Shalkowski, E.

1992-04-14

159

The effects of gloves on grip strength and three-point pinch.  

PubMed

No-glove, leather-glove, nitrile-glove, and vinyl-glove conditions were evaluated to determine their effects on grip strength and three-point pinch. Forty-one adult volunteers from a local university and local hospital participated in the two-day study. The order of testing was randomly assigned. A hydraulic hand dynamometer and a hydraulic pinch gauge were used to evaluate grip strength and three-point pinch with no glove and with each glove type. Grip strength and three-point pinch were tested on separate days. Grip strength test results showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) for no glove vs. leather glove, no glove vs. nitrile glove, no glove vs. vinyl glove, leather glove vs. nitrile glove, and leather glove vs. vinyl glove, but no statistically significant difference for nitrile glove vs. vinyl glove. Three-point pinch test results also showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) for no glove vs. leather glove, leather glove vs. nitrile glove, and leather glove vs. vinyl glove, but no statistically significant differences for no glove vs. nitrile glove, no glove vs. vinyl glove, and nitrile glove vs. vinyl glove. The results indicate that glove type may have clinical applications for occupational and physical therapists whose patients use gloves in the workplace. PMID:11762729

Rock, K M; Mikat, R P; Foster, C

2001-01-01

160

Rolling-Convolute Joint For Pressurized Glove  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rolling-convolute metacarpal/finger joint enhances mobility and flexibility of pressurized glove. Intended for use in space suit to increase dexterity and decrease wearer's fatigue. Also useful in diving suits and other pressurized protective garments. Two ring elements plus bladder constitute rolling-convolute joint balancing torques caused by internal pressurization of glove. Provides comfortable grasp of various pieces of equipment.

Kosmo, Joseph J.; Bassick, John W.

1994-01-01

161

Work Glove Industry Technical Assistance Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The diagnostic study was designed to identify those areas that offer the most potential for improving the competitive position of the U.S. work glove industry relative to foreign producers of work gloves, who are supplying a large and increasing volume of...

1983-01-01

162

Shoulder Injuries in US Astronauts Related to EVA Suit Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Introduction: For every one hour spent performing extravehicular activity (EVA) in space, astronauts in the US space program spend approximately six to ten hours training in the EVA spacesuit at NASA-Johnson Space Center's Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL). In 1997, NASA introduced the planar hard upper torso (HUT) EVA spacesuit which subsequently replaced the existing pivoted HUT. An extra joint in the pivoted shoulder allows increased mobility but also increased complexity. Over the next decade a number of astronauts developed shoulder problems requiring surgical intervention, many of whom performed EVA training in the NBL. This study investigated whether changing HUT designs led to shoulder injuries requiring surgical repair. Methods: US astronaut EVA training data and spacesuit design employed were analyzed from the NBL data. Shoulder surgery data was acquired from the medical record database, and causal mechanisms were obtained from personal interviews Analysis of the individual HUT designs was performed as it related to normal shoulder biomechanics. Results: To date, 23 US astronauts have required 25 shoulder surgeries. Approximately 48% (11/23) directly attributed their injury to training in the planar HUT, whereas none attributed their injury to training in the pivoted HUT. The planar HUT design limits shoulder abduction to 90 degrees compared to approximately 120 degrees in the pivoted HUT. The planar HUT also forces the shoulder into a forward flexed position requiring active retraction and extension to increase abduction beyond 90 degrees. Discussion: Multiple factors are associated with mechanisms leading to shoulder injury requiring surgical repair. Limitations to normal shoulder mechanics, suit fit, donning/doffing, body position, pre-existing injury, tool weight and configuration, age, in-suit activity, and HUT design have all been identified as potential sources of injury. Conclusion: Crewmembers with pre-existing or current shoulder injuries or certain anthropometric body types should conduct NBL EVA training in the pivoted HUT.

Scheuring, R. A.; McCulloch, P.; Van Baalen, Mary; Minard, Charles; Watson, Richard; Blatt, T.

2011-01-01

163

Medical, Psychophysiological, and Human Performance Problems During Extended EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this session, Session JP1, the discussion focuses on the following topics: New Developments in the Assessment of the Risk of Decompression Sickness in Null Gravity During Extravehicular Activity; The Dynamic of Physiological Reactions of Cosmonauts Under the Influence of Repeated EVA Workouts, The Russian Experience; Medical Emergencies in Space; The Evolution from 'Physiological Adequacy' to 'Physiological Tuning'; Five Zones of Symmetrical and Asymmetrical Conflicting Temperatures on the Human Body, Physiological Consequences; Human Performance and Subjective Perception in Nonuniform Thermal Conditions; The Hand as a Control System, Implications for Hand-Finger Dexterity During Extended EVA; and Understanding the Skill of Extravehicular Mass Handling.

1997-01-01

164

Electrostatic Discharge Issues in International Space Station Program EVAs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

EVA activity in the ISS program encounters several dangerous ESD conditions. The ISS program has been aggressive for many years to find ways to mitigate or to eliminate the associated risks. Investments have included: (1) Major mods to EVA tools, suit connectors & analytical tools (2) Floating Potential Measurement Unit (3) Plasma Contactor Units (4) Certification of new ISS flight attitudes (5) Teraflops of computation (6) Thousands of hours of work by scores of specialists (7) Monthly management attention at the highest program levels. The risks are now mitigated to a level that is orders of magnitude safer than prior operations

Bacon, John B.

2009-01-01

165

Comparison of positive pressure gloves on hand function in adults with burns.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of a standard, custom-made pressure glove vs The NewYork-Presbyterian Dexterity Glove (NYPDG) with silon application on the palmer surface on functional hand use of burn survivors. A standard, custom-made pressure glove and NYPDG were given to 18 participants in a randomized order. Subjects wore each glove for 7 to 10 days during all activities of daily living (ADL). Variables such as hand function, difficulty of fine and gross motor ADL, and participant glove preference were assessed with each glove condition. Data collection of the second glove took place 7 to 10 days later incorporating a quasiexperimental, repeated measure design. A crossover design was used to analyze the data. The NYPDG demonstrated significantly better results in all of the four outcome categories measured: time to complete the Jebsen, the Jebsen Likert scale, fine motor ADL, and gross motor ADL. This study demonstrated that functional tasks took less time to complete and were more easily performed when using the NYPDG. PMID:16679904

O'Brien, Kimberly A; Weinstock-Zlotnick, Gwen; Hunter, Hope; Yurt, Roger W

2006-01-01

166

An Experimental Investigation of Dextrous Robots Using EVA Tools and Interfaces  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This investigation of robot capabilities with extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment looks at how improvements in dexterity are enabling robots to perform tasks once thought to be beyond machines. The approach is qualitative, using the Robonaut system at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), performing task trials that offer a quick look at this system's high degree of dexterity and the demands of EVA. Specific EVA tools attempted include tether hooks, power torque tools, and rock scoops, as well as conventional tools like scissors, wire strippers, forceps, and wrenches. More complex EVA equipment was also studied, with more complete tasks that mix tools, EVA hand rails, tethers, tools boxes, PIP pins, and EVA electrical connectors. These task trials have been ongoing over an 18 month period, as the Robonaut system evolved to its current 43 degree of freedom (DOF) configuration, soon to expand to over 50. In each case, the number of teleoperators is reported, with rough numbers of attempts and their experience level, with a subjective difficulty rating assigned to each piece of EVA equipment and function. JSC' s Robonaut system was successful with all attempted EVA hardware, suggesting new options for human and robot teams working together in space.

Ambrose, Robert; Culbert, Christopher; Rehnmark, Frederik

2001-01-01

167

Astronaut Alan Bean with subpackages of the ALSEP during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, traverses with the two subpackages of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA). Bean deployed the ALSEP components 300 feet from the Lunar Module (LM). The LM and deployed erectable S-band antenna can be seen in the background.

1969-01-01

168

HOW TO USE EVA IN THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of EVA in the oil industry has lagged behind that in most other industries because the accounting information reported by oil and gas concerns does such a poor job of representing management's effectiveness in adding value for shareholders. The essence of the problem is that the exploration activities of oil companies create assets whose changes in value are

John L. McCormack; Jawanth Vytheeswaran

1998-01-01

169

The WPI space glove design project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) was one of four colleges and universities awarded NASA grants for student design and development of an improved glove for space suits. This paper traces the design, development and testing of the WPI prototype glove. Test results showed that the glove did not significantly limit hand and finger motion when pressurized at 8 psi, except in the spherical grip mode. This project demonstrated that problems originating from space technology provide excellent vehicles for student learning and can generate creative solutions.

Durgin, W. W.; Hoffman, A. H.; Ault, H. K.; Lutz, F. C.

1985-01-01

170

EVALUATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES FOR EFFECTIVE PERMEATION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

A research and development task was undertaken to determine the permeabilities of hydrogen and dry air through different polymeric glove materials that are used to maintain the integrity of glovebox secondary containment. Fifteen different glove samples were obtained from four different manufacturers and samples cut from these gloves were tested. The gloves included baseline butyl rubber, Viton{reg_sign}, Dupont{reg_sign} Hypalon{reg_sign}, polyurethane, as well as composite gloves. The testing indicated that all of the vendor's butyl rubber gloves and the Jung Viton{reg_sign} gloves performed comparably in both gases.

Korinko, P.

2012-02-29

171

A review of the materials and allergens in protective gloves.  

PubMed

The ingredients previously reported to cause protective glove allergy are presented and evaluated for strength of evidence. Allergens that have caused both delayed hypersensitivity and contact urticaria are considered for rubber, plastic, leather, and textile gloves. The current guidelines regarding glove manufacture are described. A list of materials confirmed by the industry to be used in glove production is presented together with a suggested series for investigating patients with delayed type hypersensitivity and contact urticaria secondary to glove use. PMID:19780770

Rose, Rebecca F; Lyons, Paul; Horne, Helen; Mark Wilkinson, S

2009-09-01

172

Evaluation of the flexibility of protective gloves.  

PubMed

Two mechanical methods have been developed for the characterization of the flexibility of protective gloves, a key factor affecting their degree of usefulness for workers. The principle of the first method is similar to the ASTM D 4032 standard relative to fabric stiffness and simulates the deformations encountered by gloves that are not tight fitted to the hand. The second method characterizes the flexibility of gloves that are worn tight fitted. Its validity was theoretically verified for elastomer materials. Both methods should prove themselves as valuable tools for protective glove manufacturers, allowing for the characterization of their existing products in terms of flexibility and the development of new ones better fitting workers' needs. PMID:18394327

Harrabi, Lotfi; Dolez, Patricia I; Vu-Khanh, Toan; Lara, Jaime

2008-01-01

173

A feasibility study of hand kinematics for EVA analysis using magnetic resonance imaging  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new method of analyzing the kinematics of joint motion is developed. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) offers several distinct advantages. Past methods of studying anatomic joint motion have usually centered on four approaches. These methods are x-ray projection, goniometric linkage analysis, sonic digitization, and landmark measurement of photogrammetry. Of these four, only x-ray is applicable for in vivo studies. The remaining three methods utilize other types of projections of inter-joint measurements, which can cause various types of error. MRI offers accuracy in measurement due to its tomographic nature (as opposed to projection) without the problems associated with x-ray dosage. Once the data acquisition of MR images was complete, the images were processed using a 3D volume rendering workstation. The metacarpalphalangeal (MCP) joint of the left index finger was selected and reconstructed into a three-dimensional graphic display. From the reconstructed volumetric images, measurements of the angles of movement of the applicable bones were obtained and processed by analyzing the screw motion of the MCP joint. Landmark positions were chosen at distinctive locations of the joint at fixed image threshold intensity levels to ensure repeatability. The primarily two dimensional planar motion of this joint was then studied using a method of constructing coordinate systems using three (or more) points. A transformation matrix based on a world coordinate system described the location and orientation of a local target coordinate system. Future research involving volume rendering of MRI data focusing on the internal kinematics of the hand's individual ligaments, cartilage, tendons, etc. will follow. Its findings will show the applicability of MRI to joint kinematics for gaining further knowledge of the hand-glove (power assisted) design for extravehicular activity (EVA).

Dickenson, Rueben D.; Lorenz, Christine H.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Main, John A.

1992-01-01

174

Gloves of Viton protect against hazardous chemicals  

SciTech Connect

In a chemical plant where monomers and intermediates for neoprene synthetic rubber and Kelvar aramid fiber are made, gloves were needed to provide effective protection against permeation by chemicals encountered in certain operations in the manufacturing process. In performance tests commissioned by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, gloves of Viton fluorelastomer offered six times the protection of other materials against toxic substances.

Not Available

1984-03-01

175

Polarization Processes of Nanocomposite Silicate-EVA and PP Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent works indicate that polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-vinylacetate (EVA) filled by nanosilicates may present low content of space charge and high electric strength. Investigations are being made to explain nanocomposite behaviour and characterize their electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. In this paper, the results of broad-band dielectric spectroscopy performed on EVA and PP filled by layered nanosized silicates are reported. Isochronal and isothermal curves of complex permittivity, as well as activation energies of the relaxation processes, are presented and discussed. Nanostructuration gives rise to substantial changes in the polarisation and dielectric loss behaviour. While the relaxation process of EVA, associated with glass transition of the material amorphous phase, results unchanged from base to nanostructured material, nanocomposites EVA and PP have shown the rise of a new process at higher temperatures respect to the typical host material processes, as well as a different distribution of relaxation processes. Changes in space charge accumulation in relation to the effectiveness of the purification process performed upon nanostructured materials are also reported: while the dispersion of the clean clays leads to a reduction of the space charge, especially at high fields, an unclean filler gives rise to significant homo-charge accumulation and interfacial polarisation phenomena.

Montanari, Gian Carlo; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Testa, Luigi; Motori, Antonio; Saccani, Andrea; Patuelli, Francesca

176

STS-41-G crew commander Crippen observes Preparations for Underwater EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-41-G crew commander Robert Crippen observes preparations for Underwater extravehicular activity (EVA). Crippen is at pool side in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) about to don his scuba gear.

1984-01-01

177

Astronaut David Scott on slope of Hadley Delta during Apollo 15 EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut David R. Scott in front of the Lunar Roving Vehicle during the Apollo 15 mission's third extravehicular activity (EVA-3). He is standing in the Hadley Delta. Note the footprints all around him.

1971-01-01

178

Exploration Architecture Options - ECLSS, TCS, EVA Implications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many options for exploration of space have been identified and evaluated since the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) was announced in 2004. The Augustine Commission evaluated human space flight for the Obama administration then the Human Exploration Framework Teams (HEFT and HEFT2) evaluated potential exploration missions and the infrastructure and technology needs for those missions. Lunar architectures have been identified and addressed by the Lunar Surface Systems team to establish options for how to get to, and then inhabit and explore, the moon. This paper will evaluate the options for exploration of space for the implications of architectures on the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLSS), Thermal Control (TCS), and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems.

Chambliss, Joe; Henninger, Don

2011-01-01

179

Exploration Architecture Options - ECLSS, EVA, TCS Implications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many options for exploration of space have been identified and evaluated since the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) was announced in 2004. Lunar architectures have been identified and addressed in the Lunar Surface Systems team to establish options for how to get to and then inhabit and explore the moon. The Augustine Commission evaluated human space flight for the Obama administration and identified many options for how to conduct human spaceflight in the future. This paper will evaluate the options for exploration of space for the implications of architectures on the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLSS), ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) and Thermal Control System (TCS) Systems. The advantages and disadvantages of each architecture and options are presented.

Chambliss, Joe; Henninger, Don; Lawrence, Carl

2010-01-01

180

Mission Specialist Tamara Jernigan During STRELA EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-96 mission, the second International Space Station (ISS) assembly and resupply flight, launched on May 27, 1999 aboard the Orbiter Discovery for an almost 10 day mission. The Shuttle's SPACEHAB double module carried internal and resupply cargo for station outfitting and the Russian cargo crane, STRELA, was carried aboard the shuttle in the integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC). In this STS-96 onboard photo of the first Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA), Mission Specialist Tamara Jernigan totes part of the Russian built crane. Jernigans' feet are anchored on a mobile foot restraint cornected to the Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) operated by Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa. The STS-96 flight was the first to perform docking with the ISS.

1999-01-01

181

Dynamics, control and sensor issues pertinent to robotic hands for the EVA retriever system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Basic dynamics, sensor, control, and related artificial intelligence issues pertinent to smart robotic hands for the Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever system are summarized and discussed. These smart hands are to be used as end effectors on arms attached to manned maneuvering units (MMU). The Retriever robotic systems comprised of MMU, arm and smart hands, are being developed to aid crewmen in the performance of routine EVA tasks including tool and object retrieval. The ultimate goal is to enhance the effectiveness of EVA crewmen.

Mclauchlan, Robert A.

1987-01-01

182

Astronauts Mitchell and Shepard during first Apollo 14 EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, operates the Active Seismic Experiment's thumper during the first Apollo 14 extravehicular activity (EVA-1) on the Moon. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, walks near deployed components of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) in the background. This photograph was taken by an automatic 16mm camera mounted on the Apollo lunar hand tool carrier aboard the Modularized Equipment Transporter (MET).

1971-01-01

183

Permeability of gloves used in nuclear medicine departments to [(99m)Tc]-pertechnetate and [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose: radiation protection considerations.  

PubMed

In order to evaluate the safety of the individual protection devices, the permeability of four different types of disposable gloves, commonly used in hospitals, was tested in relation to [(99m)Tc]-pertechnetate and to [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]-FDG). From these radiopharmaceutical solutions, a drop was deposited on the external surface of the glove which was opened and stretched with the external surface placed upward. The smear test technique permitted to evaluate the activity onto the inner surface of the glove at different times. The smear tests were measured in a well sodium iodide detector calibrated in efficiency for (99m)Tc and (18)F. The permeability was tested on ten samples of each type of gloves and was expressed as the ratio of the activity onto the inner surface at each time interval to the activity deposited on the external surface of the glove. For each type of gloves and for each sampling time, mean value, standard deviation and percentage coefficient of variation of permeability were evaluated. One type of gloves showed a low resistance to permeation of both radiopharmaceuticals, while another one only to pertechnetate. The other gloves were good performers. The results of this study suggest to test permeability for gloves used for handling radiopharmaceuticals, before their adoption in the clinical routine. This practice will provide a more careful service of radiation protection for nuclear medicine department staff. PMID:23419926

Ridone, S; Matheoud, R; Valzano, S; Di Martino, R; Vigna, L; Brambilla, M

2013-09-01

184

Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Architecture Trade Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability for Orion. The EVAs will involve a two-person crew for approximately four hours. Currently, two EVAs are planned with one contingency EVA in reserve. Providing this EVA capability is very challenging due to system level constraints and a new and unknown environment. The goal of the EVA architecture for ARCM is one that builds upon previously developed technologies and lessons learned, and that accomplishes the ARCM mission while providing a stepping stone to future missions and destinations. The primary system level constraints are to 1) minimize system mass and volume and 2) minimize the interfacing impacts to the baseline Orion design. In order to minimize the interfacing impacts and to not perturb the baseline Orion schedule, the concept of adding "kits" to the baseline system is proposed. These kits consist of: an EVA kit (converts LEA suit to EVA suit), EVA Servicing and Recharge Kit (provides suit consumables), the EVA Tools, Translation Aids & Sample Container Kit (the tools and mobility aids to complete the tasks), the EVA Communications Kit (interface between the EVA radio and the MPCV), and the Cabin Repress Kit (represses the MPCV between EVAs). This paper will focus on the trade space, analysis, and testing regarding the space suit (pressure garment and life support system). Historical approaches and lessons learned from all past EVA operations were researched. Previous and current, successfully operated EVA hardware and high technology readiness level (TRL) hardware were evaluated, and a trade study was conducted for all possible pressure garment and life support options. Testing and analysis was conducted and a recommended EVA system architecture was proposed. Pressure garment options that were considered for this mission include the currently in-use ISS EVA Mobility Unit (EMU), all variations of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES), and the Exploration Z-suit. For this mission, the pressure garment that was selected is the Modified ACES (MACES) with EVA enhancements. Life support options that were considered included short closed-loop umbilicals, long open-loop umbilicals, the currently in-use ISS EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS), and the currently in development Exploration PLSS. For this mission, the life support option that was selected is the Exploration PLSS. The greatest risk in the proposed architecture is viewed to be the comfort and mobility of the baseline MACES and the delicate balance between adding more mobility features while not compromising landing safety. Feasibility testing was accomplished in low fidelity analogs and in the JSC Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) to validate the concept before a final recommendation on the architecture was made. The proposed architecture was found to meet the mission constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the required suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the rest of the tools and equipment required to accomplish the mission. This work and further definition of the remaining kits will be conducted in government fiscal year 14.

Blanco, Raul A.; Bowie, Jonathan T.; Watson, Richard D.; Sipila, Stephanie A.

2014-01-01

185

Use of gloves among dentists in Sweden.  

PubMed

This study among 191 public and private dentists in the Malmöhus County of southern Sweden showed that 77% of the community dentists (n = 167) and 54% of the private dentists (n = 24) used gloves regularly as infection precaution during extraction. For surgery these figures were 90% and 54% respectively. These were low figures considering the several general recommendations from both the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare and local community authorities to dental personnel to use gloves regularly during procedures with known risk of blood contact. The survey showed that 61% (n = 167) of the public dentists and 4% (n = 24) of the private dentists used gloves regularly during all patient treatment. High cost for gloves was no major obstacle for not using them regularly but rather discomfort and old habits (79% of the answers). 21% of the dentists had experienced local infections of their hands due to patient contact, puncture wounds being the most common cause. Most of the dentists using gloves had been influenced by the general HIV/AIDS discussion in news media (65%; n = 114). PMID:2255992

Hellgren, K

1990-01-01

186

Constructing Gloved wings for aerodynamic studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recently, two aircraft from the Dryden Flight Research Facility were used in the general study of natural laminar flow (NLF). The first, an F-14A aircraft on short-term loan from the Navy, was used to investigate transonic natural laminar flow. The second, an F-15A aircraft on long-term loan from the Air Force, was used to examine supersonic NLF. These tests were follow-on experiments to the NASA F-111 NLF experiment conducted in 1979. Both wings of the F-14A were gloved, in a two-phased experiment, with full-span(upper surface only) airfoil shapes constructed primarily of fiberglass, foam, and resin. A small section of the F-15A right wing was gloved in a similar manner. Each glove incorporated provisions for instrumentation to measure surface pressure distributions. The F-14A gloves also had provisions for instrumentation to measure boundary layer profiles, acoustic environments, and surface pitot pressures. Discussions of the techniques used to construct the gloves and to incorporate the required instrumentation are presented.

Bohn-Meyer, Marta R.

1988-01-01

187

Occult glove perforation during ophthalmic surgery.  

PubMed Central

We examined the latex surgical gloves used by 56 primary surgeons in 454 ophthalmic surgical procedures performed over a 7-month period. Of five techniques used to detect pinholes, air inflation with water submersion and compression was found to be the most sensitive, yielding a 6.80% prevalence in control glove pairs and a 21.8% prevalence in postoperative study glove pairs, for a 15.0% incidence of surgically induced perforations (P = 0.000459). The lowest postoperative perforation rate was 11.4% for cataract and intraocular lens surgery, and the highest was 41.7% for oculoplastic procedures. Factors that correlated significantly with the presence of glove perforations as determined by multiple logistic regression analysis were oculoplastic and pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus surgical procedures, surgeon's status as a fellow in training, operating time, and glove size. The thumb and index finger of the nondominant hand contained the largest numbers of pinholes. These data suggest strategies for reducing the risk of cross-infection during ophthalmic surgery.

Apt, L; Miller, K M

1992-01-01

188

Wearing the wrong size latex surgical gloves impairs manual dexterity.  

PubMed

Universal precautions mandate that health care workers wear gloves when dealing with patients, often in situations requiring a high level of technical skill. Although it seems obvious that wearing the wrong size gloves could impair or prolong tasks involving manual dexterity, the issue has not been formally studied. We tested the hypothesis that wearing the wrong size gloves impairs manual dexterity. We administered a grooved pegboard test to 20 healthy, paid, volunteer health care workers. The subjects performed the test with bare hands and while wearing their preferred size of latex surgical gloves, gloves that were a full size smaller, and gloves that were a full size larger. Each subject did three runs with each size glove and three runs with bare hands. The time necessary to insert pegs was measured with a stopwatch. Peg insertion time was not affected by wearing preferred size gloves (vs. bare-handed) but was increased 7-10% by gloves that were either too small or too large (both effects: P < 0.05 vs. preferred size; both P < 0.001 vs. bare-handed). The subjects reported that the too-small gloves limited hand motion or hurt their hands, whereas the too-large gloves were clumsy but comfortable. Health care workers should wear gloves that fit properly when doing tasks that require manual dexterity. If the preferred size is unavailable, wearing gloves that are too large seems the best alternative. PMID:20017056

Drabek, Tomas; Boucek, Charles D; Buffington, Charles W

2010-03-01

189

The main results of EVA medical support on the Mir Space Station  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to review the main results of medical support of 78 two-person extravehicular activities (EVAs) which have been conducted in the Mir Space Program. Thirty-six male crewmembers participated in these EVAs. Maximum length of a space walk was equal to 7h14min. The total duration of all space walks reached 717.1 man-hours. The maximum frequency of

V. P. Katuntsev; Yu. Yu. Osipov; A. S. Barer; N. K. Gnoevaya; G. G. Tarasenkov

2004-01-01

190

Method for forming a glove attachment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An attachment principally for the palm of an astronaut glove to enhance the gripping area of the palm without detracting from the flexibility and utility of the glove is presented. The attachment is a composite construction formed from a layer of silicone rubber having an outer surface with a friction configuration and another layer of silicone rubber in which a Nomex Aramid mesh fabric is embedded prior to curing. The method of construction involves the use of a mold with a friction configuration surface. A first layer of silicone rubber or sealant is disposed in the mold and allowed to set for an hour. A second layer of silicone rubber or sealant is layered over the first layer and leveled. A Nomex Aramid mesh fabric is embedded into the second layer and the composite is permitted to cure. When cured, a configured area of the composite construction is glued or stitched to the palm area of the glove.

Dawn, Frederic S. (inventor); Guy, Walter W. (inventor); Kosmo, Joseph (inventor); Drennan, Arthur P. (inventor); Tschirch, Richard P. (inventor)

1995-01-01

191

Evaluation of Glove Bag Containment in Asbestos Removal.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report examines the effectiveness of the glove bag control method to prevent asbestos emissions during the removal of asbestos-containing pipe lagging. Glove bags have been used for asbestos removal without supplemental engineering controls or respira...

B. A. Hollett P. A. Froehlich P. E. Caplan T. C. Cooper S. A. Shulman

1990-01-01

192

21 CFR 878.4470 - Surgeon's gloving cream.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4470 Surgeon's gloving cream. (a) Identification. Surgeon's gloving...

2013-04-01

193

STS-117 Astronauts Patrick Forrester and Steven Swanson During EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-117 astronauts and mission specialists Patrick Forrester and Steven Swanson (out of frame), participated in the second Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) as construction resumed on the International Space Station (ISS). Among other tasks, the two removed all of the launch locks holding the 10 foot wide solar alpha rotary joint in place and began the solar array retraction. The primary mission objective was the installment of the second and third starboard truss segments (S3 and S4).

2007-01-01

194

Human Space Exploration and Radiation Exposure from EVA: 1981-2011  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are several risks for any human space exploration endeavor. One such inevitable risk is exposure to the space radiation environment of which extra vehicular activity (EVA) demands more challenges due to limited amount of protection from space suit shielding. We recently compiled all EVA data comprising low-earth orbit (LEO) from Space Shuttle (STS) flights, International Space Station (ISS) expeditions, and Shuttle-Mir missions. Assessment of such radiation risk is very important, particularly for the anticipated long-term, deep-space human explorations in the near future. We present our assessment of anticipated radiation exposure and space radiation dose contribution to each crew member from a listing of 350 different EVA events resulting in more than 1000+ hrs of total EVA time. As of July 12, 2011, 197 astronauts have made spacewalks (out of 520 people who have gone into Earth orbit). Only 11 women have been on spacewalks.

Way, A. R.; Saganti, S. P.; Erickson, G. M.; Saganti, P. B.

2011-12-01

195

The micro conical system: Lessons learned from a successful EVA/robot-compatible mechanism  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Micro Conical System (MCS) is a three-part, multi-purpose mechanical interface system used for acquiring and manipulating masses on-orbit by either extravehicular activity (EVA) or telerobotic means. The three components of the system are the micro conical fitting (MCF), the EVA micro tool (EMCT), and the Robot Micro Conical Tool (RMCT). The MCS was developed and refined over a four-year period. This period culminated with the delivery of 358 Class 1 and Class 2 micro conical fittings for the International Space Station and with its first use in space to handle a 1272 kg (2800 lbm) Spartan satellite (11000 times greater than the MCF mass) during an EVA aboard STS-63 in February, 1995. The micro conical system is the first successful EVA/robot-compatible mechanism to be demonstrated in the external environment aboard the U.S. Space Shuttle.

Gittleman, Mark; Johnston, Alistair

1996-01-01

196

Ballast system for maintaining constant pressure in a glove box  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A ballast system for a glove box including a fixed platform on which is mounted an inflatable bag on top of which resides a cover and a weight. The variable gas volume of the inflatable bag communicates with that of the glove box via a valved tube. The weight and gas volume are selected to maintain a relatively constant pressure in the glove box despite variations in the glove box volume while avoiding the use of complicated valving apparatus.

Shlichta, Paul J. (Inventor)

1990-01-01

197

Ballast system for maintaining constant pressure in a glove box  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A ballast system is disclosed for a glove box including a fixed platform on which is mounted an inflatable bag on top of which resides a cover and a weight. The variable gas volume of the inflatable bag communicates with that of the glove box via a valved tube. The weight and the gas volume are selected to maintain a relatively constant pressure in the glove box despite variations in the glove box volume while avoiding the use of complicated valving apparatus.

Shlichta, Paul J. (inventor)

1989-01-01

198

NASA Research Announcement Phase 2 Final Report for the Development of a Power Assisted Space Suit Glove  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main goal of this program was to develop an unobtrusive power-assisted EVA glove metacarpalphalangeal (MCP) joint that could provide the crew member with as close to nude body performance as possible, and to demonstrate the technology feasibility of power assisted space suit components in general. The MCP joint was selected due to its being representative of other space suit joints, such as the shoulder, hip and carpometacarpal joint, that would also greatly benefit from this technology. In order to meet this objective, a development team of highly skilled and experienced personnel was assembled. The team consisted of two main entities. The first was comprised of ILC's experienced EVA space suit glove designers, who had the responsibility of designing and fabricating a low torque MCP joint which would be compatible with power assisted technology. The second part of the team consisted of space robotics experts from the University of Maryland's Space Systems Laboratory. This team took on the responsibility of designing and building the robotics aspects of the power-assist system. Both parties addressed final system integration responsibilities.

Lingo, Robert; Cadogan, Dave; Sanner, Rob; Sorenson, Beth

1997-01-01

199

21 CFR 800.20 - Patient examination gloves and surgeons' gloves; sample plans and test method for leakage defects...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...inspection level II in determining the sample size for any lot size. As shown in...Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number Defective...Examination Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number...

2012-04-01

200

21 CFR 800.20 - Patient examination gloves and surgeons' gloves; sample plans and test method for leakage defects...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...inspection level II in determining the sample size for any lot size. As shown in...Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number Defective...Examination Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number...

2011-04-01

201

21 CFR 800.20 - Patient examination gloves and surgeons' gloves; sample plans and test method for leakage defects...  

...inspection level II in determining the sample size for any lot size. As shown in...Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number Defective...Examination Gloves Lot Size Sample Sample Size Number Examined Number...

2014-04-01

202

Glove permeation by shale oil and coal tar extract  

SciTech Connect

The vapor penetration of shale oil and coal tar extract through protective gloves composed of either polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, vinyl, latex, neoprene, Buna-N, acrylonitrile, natural rubber, or nitrile rubber was tested and measured. We used flame ionization techniques to determine the permeation characteristics of the gloves. Neoprene, Buna-N, acrylonitrile and nitrile gloves offered the best protection against the vapors tested.

Nelson, G.O.; Carlson, G.J.; Buerer, A.L.

1980-02-14

203

Contact Dermatitis from Penetration of Rubber Gloves by Acrylic Monomer  

Microsoft Academic Search

An orthopaedic surgeon developed dermatitis from acrylic materials. The acrylic monomer was found to penetrate surgical rubber gloves readily. Cases of “rubber glove dermatitis” with negative patch tests may have a similar explanation. Laboratory tests suggest that monomer does not damage rubber sufficiently to allow bacteria to penetrate gloves, but it remains possible that this would happen under theatre conditions.

J. S. Pegum; F. A. Medhurst

1971-01-01

204

Durable Tactile Glove for Human or Robot Hand  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A glove containing force sensors has been built as a prototype of tactile sensor arrays to be worn on human hands and anthropomorphic robot hands. The force sensors of this glove are mounted inside, in protective pockets; as a result of this and other design features, the present glove is more durable than earlier models.

Butzer, Melissa; Diftler, Myron A.; Huber, Eric

2010-01-01

205

Combustion toxicity of fire retarded EVA  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Purser furnace has been used to investigate the combustion toxicity of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) with and without fire retardants, under different fire conditions. Steady state flaming combustion has been studied at equivalence ratios ? varying from 0.5 to 1.5 by driving the materials through the furnace at 750 °C. Yields of CO and CO2 for EVA containing 27% vinyl

T. Richard Hull; Rita E Quinn; Irene G Areri; David A Purser

2002-01-01

206

The Astronaut Glove Challenge: Big Innovation from a (Very) Small Team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many measurements were taken by test engineers from Hamilton Sundstrand, the prime contractor for the current EVA suit. Because the raw measurements needed to be converted to torques and combined into a final score, it was impossible to keep track of who was ahead in this phase. The final comfort and dexterity test was performed in a depressurized glove box to simulate real on-orbit conditions. Each competitor was required to exercise the glove through a defined set of finger, thumb, and wrist motions without any sign of abrasion or bruising of the competitor's hand. I learned a lot about arm fatigue! This was a pass-fail event, and both of the remaining competitors came through intact. After taking what seemed like an eternity to tally the final scores, the judges announced that I had won the competition. My glove was the only one to have achieved lower finger-bending torques than the Phase VI glove. Looking back, I see three sources of the success of this project that I believe also operate in other programs where small teams have broken new ground in aerospace technologies. These are awareness, failure, and trust. By remaining aware of the big picture, continuously asking myself, "Am I converging on a solution?" and "Am I converging fast enough?" I was able to see that my original design was not going to succeed, leading to the decision to start over. I was also aware that, had I lingered over this choice or taken time to analyze it, I would not have been ready on the first day of competition. Failure forced me to look outside conventional thinking and opened the door to innovation. Choosing to make incremental failures enabled me to rapidly climb the learning curve. Trusting my "gut" feelings-which are really an internalized accumulation of experiences-and my newly acquired skills allowed me to devise new technologies rapidly and complete both gloves just in time. Awareness, failure, and trust are intertwined: failure provides experiences that inform awareness and provide decision-making opportunities that build trust among team members and managers while opening minds to new pathways for development. All three are necessary for teams-large or small-to achieve big innovation.

Homer, Peter

2008-01-01

207

Latex glove use by food handlers: the case for nonlatex gloves.  

PubMed

There is increasing concern that continued exposure to latex products can predispose individuals, particularly those who are atopic (allergy prone), to latex allergy. Latex allergy as a serious hazard has been well documented in the health care industry. There are also well-documented cases of food handlers who have had allergic reactions after the use of latex gloves. The contamination of food with latex proteins by food handlers using latex gloves can also result in potentially severe allergic reactions in latex-allergic consumers. We review latex allergy and present the case for avoiding latex glove use by food handlers in the food and hospitality industries. Adopting the use of nonlatex gloves has benefits for workers, consumers, and the food industry. PMID:19044282

Ameratunga, Rohan; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Crooks, Christine; Simmons, Greg

2008-11-01

208

Maturing Pump Technology for EVA Applications in a Collaborative Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The transition from low earth orbit Extravehicular Activity (EVA) for construction and maintenance activities to planetary surface EVA on asteroids, moons, and, ultimately, Mars demands a new spacesuit system. NASA's development of that system has resulted in dramatically different pumping requirements from those in the current spacesuit system. Hamilton Sundstrand, Cascon, and NASA are collaborating to develop and mature a pump that will reliably meet those new requirements in space environments and within the design constraints imposed by spacesuit system integration. That collaboration, which began in the NASA purchase of a pump prototype for test evaluation, is now entering a new phase of development. A second generation pump reflecting the lessons learned in NASA's testing of the original prototype will be developed under Hamilton Sundstrand internal research funding and ultimately tested in an integrated Advanced Portable Life Support System (APLSS) in NASA laboratories at the Johnson Space Center. This partnership is providing benefit to both industry and NASA by supplying a custom component for EVA integrated testing at no cost to the government while providing test data for industry that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to duplicate in industry laboratories. This paper discusses the evolving collaborative process, component requirements and design development based on early NASA test experience, component stand alone test results, and near term plans for integrated testing at JSCs.

Hodgson, Edward; Dionne, Steven; Gervais, Edward; Anchondo, Ian

2012-01-01

209

21 CFR 800.20 - Patient examination gloves and surgeons' gloves; sample plans and test method for leakage defects...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and surgeons' gloves; sample plans and test method...as medical gloves) to reduce the risk of transmission...wear medical gloves to reduce the risk of transmission...from the test method and sample plans in paragraphs...a cylinder of another size may be used if it...

2010-04-01

210

21 CFR 800.20 - Patient examination gloves and surgeons' gloves; sample plans and test method for leakage defects...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and surgeons' gloves; sample plans and test method...as medical gloves) to reduce the risk of transmission...wear medical gloves to reduce the risk of transmission...from the test method and sample plans in paragraphs...a cylinder of another size may be used if it...

2009-04-01

211

Wearing ambidextrous vinyl gloves does not impair manual dexterity.  

PubMed

Universal precautions mandate that health care workers wear gloves to prevent the unintended spread of bloodborne pathogens. Gloves may affect manual dexterity, generally delaying task completion. Our previous study showed that wearing the wrong size latex surgical glove degraded manual dexterity. The use of non-sterile and non-latex gloves may limit certain risks and be more cost-effective. However, such gloves may produce different results. We hypothesized that ambidextrous vinyl examination gloves would degrade manual dexterity compared with bare hands. We studied 20 random subjects from a medical environment. Subjects performed a standard battery of Grooved Pegboard tasks while bare-handed, wearing ambidextrous non-sterile vinyl gloves that were their preferred size, a size too small, and a size too large. The order was randomized with a Latin Square design to minimize the effects of time, boredom, and fatigue on the subjects. Subjects were also invited to comment on the fit of different size gloves. Wearing vinyl gloves of both the preferred size and a size up or down failed to affect manual dexterity vs. bare hands on time to insert pegs, and pegs dropped during insertion or removal. In contrast, the time to remove pegs was reduced by wearing preferred size vinyl gloves compared with performing the task with bare hands (P<0.05). Subjects reported a generally poor fit in all sizes. Vinyl gloves that were too small caused significant hand discomfort. Vinyl gloves surprisingly do not degrade manual dexterity even when worn in ill-fitting sizes. Wearing a preferred size vinyl glove vs. bare hands may improve dexterity in selected tasks. Choosing a comfortable, large size seems the best strategy when the preferred size is unavailable. Thinner vinyl gloves may improve grip and may not degrade touch as much as latex surgical gloves and may thus represent a reasonable choice for selected tasks. PMID:23548060

Drabek, Tomas; Boucek, Charles D; Buffington, Charles W

2013-01-01

212

A Moving Robotic Hand System for Whole-Glove Permeation and Penetration: Captan and Nitrile Gloves  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to develop a robotic hand to test the influence of hand movement on the permeation\\/penetration of captan through disposable nitrile rubber gloves. An available robotic hand was modified to within one standard deviation of the anthropometric 50th percentile male hand. Permeation tests used a nylon inspection glove interposed between medium-size outer and inner nitrile

Robert Phalen; Shane Que Hee

2008-01-01

213

Soft Sleeve Between Glove Box And Instrument  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sleeve protects instrument from low frequency vibrations and helps maintain clean atmosphere for semiconductor analysis. Flexible sleeve joins glove box to specimen-introduction port of instrument chamber. Coupling made of brown nylon with inner layer of white rubber, attached to both areas with specially designed clamps. Thickness of sleeve material 0.01 in.

Lombardi, Frank

1993-01-01

214

Chemical Defense Flight Glove Ensemble Evaluation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Four chemical defense flight glove ensembles were evaluated for their effect on manual dexterity. Two- and three-layer combinations included in the study were: cotton liner/7 mil butyl/Nomex; cotton liner/12.5 mil epichlorohydron butyl/Nomex; Nomex/7 mil ...

J. Ross C. Ervin

1987-01-01

215

Overview of EVA PRA for TPS Repair for Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following the Columbia accident in 2003, NASA developed techniques to repair the Thermal Protection System (TPS) in the event of damage to the TPS as one of several actions to reduce the risk to future flights from ascent debris, micro-meteoroid and/or orbital debris (MMOD). Other actions to help reduce the risk include improved inspection techniques, reduced shedding of debris from the External Tank and ability to rescue the crew with a launch on need vehicle. For the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing Mission the crew rescue capability was limited by the inability to safe haven on the International Space Station (ISS), resulting in a greater reliance on the repair capability. Therefore it was desirable to have an idea of the risk associated with conducting a repair, where the repair would have to be conducted using an Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA). Previously, focused analyses had been conducted to quantify the risk associated with certain aspects of an EVA, for example the EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) or Space Suit; however, the analyses were somewhat limited in scope. A complete integrated model of an EVA which could quantify the risk associated with all of the major components of an EVA had never been done before. It was desired to have a complete integrated model to be able to assess the risks associated with an EVA to support the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) in making risk informed decisions. In the case of the HST Servicing Mission, this model was developed to assess specifically the risks associated with performing a TPS repair EVA. This paper provides an overview of the model that was developed to support the HST mission in the event of TPS damage. The HST Servicing Mission was successfully completed on May 24th 2009 with no critical TPS damage; therefore the model was not required for real-time mission support. However, it laid the foundation upon which future EVA quantitative risk assessments could be based.

Bigler, Mark; Duncan, Gary; Roeschel, Eduardo; Canga, Michael

2010-01-01

216

The rate of glove perforations in orthopaedic procedures: single versus double gloving. A prospective study.  

PubMed

Glove perforation during surgery has always been a matter of concern as it increases the infection rate and the risk of transmission of blood borne diseases. To determine the common causes, the site and the awareness of glove perforations in orthopaedic surgery, a prospective study was conducted to assess the rate of glove perforation during 130 consecutive orthopaedic operations. All gloves worn by the surgical team were assessed after the surgery using the water-loading test. A total of 1452 gloves were tested, and the rate of perforation was 3.58%. Most of these perforations (61.5%) were unnoticed. The main surgeons had the most perforations (76.9%), followed by first assistants (13.5%) and second assistants (9.6%). Most perforations occurred at the non-dominant hand. The commonest site of perforation was the index finger followed by the thumb. Shearing force with instruments accounted for 45% of the noticed perforations. Majority of these occurred during nailing procedures (33%) and internal fixation without the use of wires (19%). Our rate of glove perforation is similar to other series. Most of them went unnoticed and were mainly due to shearing injuries rather than perforation by sharps. Therefore, there is an increased risk of contamination and break in asepsis during surgery. PMID:17605178

Chan, K Y; Singh, V A; Oun, B H; To, B H Se

2006-12-01

217

Methyl methacrylate permeability of dental and industrial gloves.  

PubMed

Our study was undertaken to measure the amount and time it took for methyl methacrylate monomer (MMA) to permeate latex, vinyl and industrial neoprene gloves and to compare the results to obtain a rating of the permeability of each of the gloves studied to MMA. The monomer, permeated under static conditions, was measured using a spectrophotometer. Latex and vinyl clinical gloves became permeable to MMA in a very short amount of time. Neoprene industrial gloves remained impervious for 25 minutes. Dentists and dental technicians should be aware of the toxic effects of MMA and understand that clinical gloves do not afford protection from MMA. PMID:19722481

Thomas, Sebastian; Padmanabhan, T V

2009-01-01

218

Approaches to decompression safety support of EVA for orbital and interplanetary missions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper is devoted to the analysis of possible methods for decompression safety support of extravehicular activity (EVA) in order to ground the perspective approaches for solution of decompression sickness (DCS) problem in space missions of the near and distant future. Current DCS risk mitigation strategies reduce operational efficiency: preoxygenation extends the time required on preparation to EVA. The crewmembers often experience general and hand fatigue during long EVA due to the lack of flexibility of space suits enclosure operated at 30-40 kPa. To create the safe and comfortable working conditions for EVA crewmembers on the Lunar and Martian surfaces the main biomedical requirements to a planetary space suit have to include low mass of EVA system, high mobility and flexibility of space suit enclosure and reliable protection against DCS with a short or zero preoxygenation period. Reviewed here are the possibilities for the use of preoxygenation, hypobaric gas atmosphere in space cabin and/or planetary habitat, idea of substitution of nitrogen in normobaric gas atmosphere to another inert gas (helium and neon) as countermeasures against DCS in EVA crewmembers. Physiological aspects of the conception for space suit with high operating pressure are considered.

Katuntsev, Vladimir P.

2010-01-01

219

A feasibility study of hand kinematics for EVA analysis using magnetic resonance imaging  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new method for analyzing the kinematics of joint motion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The reconstruction of the metacarpalphalangeal joint of the left index finger into a 3D graphic display is shown. From the reconstructed volumetric images, measurements of the angles of movement of the applicable bones are obtained and processed by analyzing the screw motion of the joint. Landmark positions are chosen at distinctive locations of the joint at fixed image threshold intensity levels to ensure repeatability. The primarily 2D planar motion of this joint is then studied using a method of constructing coordinate systems using three or more points. A transformation matrix based on a world coordinate system describes the location and orientation of the local target coordinate system. The findings show the applicability of MRI to joint kinematics for gaining further knowledge of the hand-glove design for EVA.

Dickenson, Reuben D.; Lorenz, Christine H.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Main, John A.

1992-01-01

220

Enhanced Controlled Transdermal Delivery of Ambroxol from the EVA Matrix.  

PubMed

To avoid the systemic adverse effects that might occur after oral administration, transdermal delivery of ambroxol was studied as a method for maintaining proper blood levels for an extended period. Release of ambroxol according to concentration and temperature was determined, and permeation of drug through rat skin was studied using two chamber-diffusion cells. The solubility according to PEG 400 volume fraction was highest at 40% PEG 400. The rate of drug release from the EVA matrix increased with increased temperature and drug loading doses. A linear relationship existed between the release rate and the square root of loading rate. The activation energy (Ea) was measured from the slope of the plot of log P versus 1000/T and was found to be 10.71, 10.39, 10.33 and 9.87 kcal/mol for 2, 3, 4 and 5% loading dose from the EVA matrix, respectively. To increase the permeation rate of ambroxol across rat skin from the EVA matrix, various penetration enhancers such as fatty acids (saturated, unsaturated), propylene glycols, glycerides, pyrrolidones, and non-ionic surfactants were used. The enhancing effects of the incorporated enhancers on the skin permeation of ambroxol were evaluated using Franz diffusion cells fitted with intact excised rat skin at 37° using 40% PEG 400 solution as a receptor medium. Among the enhancers used, polyoxyethylene-2-oleyl ether increased the permeation rate by 4.25-fold. In conclusion, EVA matrix containing plasticizer and permeation enhancer could be developed for enhanced transdermal delivery of ambroxol. PMID:23325993

Cho, C W; Kim, D B; Cho, H W; Shin, S C

2012-03-01

221

Enhanced Controlled Transdermal Delivery of Ambroxol from the EVA Matrix  

PubMed Central

To avoid the systemic adverse effects that might occur after oral administration, transdermal delivery of ambroxol was studied as a method for maintaining proper blood levels for an extended period. Release of ambroxol according to concentration and temperature was determined, and permeation of drug through rat skin was studied using two chamber-diffusion cells. The solubility according to PEG 400 volume fraction was highest at 40% PEG 400. The rate of drug release from the EVA matrix increased with increased temperature and drug loading doses. A linear relationship existed between the release rate and the square root of loading rate. The activation energy (Ea) was measured from the slope of the plot of log P versus 1000/T and was found to be 10.71, 10.39, 10.33 and 9.87 kcal/mol for 2, 3, 4 and 5% loading dose from the EVA matrix, respectively. To increase the permeation rate of ambroxol across rat skin from the EVA matrix, various penetration enhancers such as fatty acids (saturated, unsaturated), propylene glycols, glycerides, pyrrolidones, and non-ionic surfactants were used. The enhancing effects of the incorporated enhancers on the skin permeation of ambroxol were evaluated using Franz diffusion cells fitted with intact excised rat skin at 37° using 40% PEG 400 solution as a receptor medium. Among the enhancers used, polyoxyethylene-2-oleyl ether increased the permeation rate by 4.25-fold. In conclusion, EVA matrix containing plasticizer and permeation enhancer could be developed for enhanced transdermal delivery of ambroxol.

Cho, C. W.; Kim, D. B.; Cho, H. W.; Shin, S. C.

2012-01-01

222

EVA Development and Verification Testing at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As an early step in the preparation for future Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), astronauts perform neutral buoyancy testing to develop and verify EVA hardware and operations. Neutral buoyancy demonstrations at NASA Johnson Space Center's Sonny Carter Training Facility to date have primarily evaluated assembly and maintenance tasks associated with several elements of the International Space Station (ISS). With the retirement of the Shuttle, completion of ISS assembly, and introduction of commercial players for human transportation to space, evaluations at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) will take on a new focus. Test objectives are selected for their criticality, lack of previous testing, or design changes that justify retesting. Assembly tasks investigated are performed using procedures developed by the flight hardware providers and the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD). Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) maintenance tasks are performed using a more systematic set of procedures, EVA Concept of Operations for the International Space Station (JSC-33408), also developed by the MOD. This paper describes the requirements and process for performing a neutral buoyancy test, including typical hardware and support equipment requirements, personnel and administrative resource requirements, examples of ISS systems and operations that are evaluated, and typical operational objectives that are evaluated.

Jairala, Juniper C.; Durkin, Robert; Marak, Ralph J.; Sipila, Stepahnie A.; Ney, Zane A.; Parazynski, Scott E.; Thomason, Arthur H.

2012-01-01

223

EVA Robotic Assistant Project: Platform Attitude Prediction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Robotic Systems Technology Branch is currently working on the development of an EVA Robotic Assistant under the sponsorship of the Surface Systems Thrust of the NASA Cross Enterprise Technology Development Program (CETDP). This will be a mobile robot that can follow a field geologist during planetary surface exploration, carry his tools and the samples that he collects, and provide video coverage of his activity. Prior experiments have shown that for such a robot to be useful it must be able to follow the geologist at walking speed over any terrain of interest. Geologically interesting terrain tends to be rough rather than smooth. The commercial mobile robot that was recently purchased as an initial testbed for the EVA Robotic Assistant Project, an ATRV Jr., is capable of faster than walking speed outside but it has no suspension. Its wheels with inflated rubber tires are attached to axles that are connected directly to the robot body. Any angular motion of the robot produced by driving over rough terrain will directly affect the pointing of the on-board stereo cameras. The resulting image motion is expected to make tracking of the geologist more difficult. This will either require the tracker to search a larger part of the image to find the target from frame to frame or to search mechanically in pan and tilt whenever the image motion is large enough to put the target outside the image in the next frame. This project consists of the design and implementation of a Kalman filter that combines the output of the angular rate sensors and linear accelerometers on the robot to estimate the motion of the robot base. The motion of the stereo camera pair mounted on the robot that results from this motion as the robot drives over rough terrain is then straightforward to compute. The estimates may then be used, for example, to command the robot s on-board pan-tilt unit to compensate for the camera motion induced by the base movement. This has been accomplished in two ways: first, a standalone head stabilizer has been implemented and second, the estimates have been used to influence the search algorithm of the stereo tracking algorithm. Studies of the image motion of a tracked object indicate that the image motion of objects is suppressed while the robot crossing rough terrain. This work expands the range of speed and surface roughness over which the robot should be able to track and follow a field geologist and accept arm gesture commands from the geologist.

Nickels, Kevin M.

2003-01-01

224

Conhecimento da equipe de enfermagem acerca do uso de luvas no contexto hospitalar Nursing team knowledge in the use of latex gloves in the hospital context Conocimiento del equipo de enfermería en el uso de guantes de látex en el contexto hospitalario  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of gloves is unquestionable in the health care, although there is no consensus among professionals about the choice of sterilized or procedure gloves. The objective of this research was to evaluate the knowledge of nursing professionals regarding to the use of gloves considering different activities. This is a cross-sectional study, with exploratory and descriptive features, carried out in

Myrna Ribeiro

225

Methods for reducing energy dissipation in cosmetic gloves.  

PubMed

For cosmetic reasons, hand prostheses are provided with cosmetic gloves. Their pleasing appearance, however, is accompanied by poor mechanical behavior, resulting in a negative influence on prosthesis operation. Glove stiffness is high and nonlinear, and internal friction in the glove material causes energy dissipation (hysteresis). In this article, two methods for reducing hysteresis in cosmetic gloves are proposed, that may be applied independently or in combination. Glove modification. Altering the mechanical properties of the glove itself is the first method that is presented. It was found possible to reduce both stiffness and hysteresis about 50% by forming grooves into the inside of the glove. Together with the evaluation of this method, several properties of the cosmetic glove were determined. Motion optimization. Additionally, a second method for reducing hysteresis was developed. The amount of hysteresis is influenced by the way the glove is forced to deform. The prosthesis mechanism, determining this deformation, was designed for minimum hysteresis and maximum cosmesis. For the prosthesis-glove combination used in this study, thumb motion optimization reduced hysteresis by about 65%. PMID:9651892

Herder, J L; Cool, J C; Plettenburg, D H

1998-06-01

226

The durability of examination gloves used on intensive care units  

PubMed Central

Background The use of examination gloves is part of the standard precautions to prevent medical staff from transmission of infectious agents between patients. Gloves also protect the staff from infectious agents originating from patients. Adequate protection, however, depends on intact gloves. The risk of perforation of examination gloves is thought to correlate with duration of wearing, yet, only very few prospective studies have been performed on this issue. Methods A total number of 1500 consecutively used pairs of examination gloves of two different brands and materials (latex and nitrile) were collected over a period of two months on two ICU’s. Used gloves were examined for micro perforations using the “water-proof-test” according to EN 455–1. Cox-regression for both glove types was used to estimate optimal changing intervals. Results Only 26% of gloves were worn longer than 15 min. The total perforation rate was 10.3% with significant differences and deterioration of integrity of gloves between brands (p<0.001). Apart from the brand, “change of wound dressing” (p = 0.049) and “washing patients” (p = 0.001) were also significantly associated with an increased risk of perforation. Conclusion Medical gloves show marked differences in their durability that cannot be predicted based on the technical data routinely provided by the manufacturer. Based on the increase of micro perforations over time and the wearing behavior, recommendations for maximum wearing time of gloves should be given. Changing of gloves after 15 min could be a good compromise between feasibility and safety. HCWs should be aware of the benefits and limitations of medical gloves. To improve personal hygiene hand disinfection should be further encouraged.

2013-01-01

227

EVA/ORU model architecture using RAMCOST  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A parametrically driven simulation model is presented in order to provide a detailed insight into the effects of various input parameters in the life testing of a modular space suit. The RAMCOST model employed is a user-oriented simulation model for studying the life-cycle costs of designs under conditions of uncertainty. The results obtained from the EVA simulated model are used to assess various mission life testing parameters such as the number of joint motions per EVA cycle time, part availability, and number of inspection requirements. RAMCOST first simulates EVA completion for NASA application using a probabilistic like PERT network. With the mission time heuristically determined, RAMCOST then models different orbital replacement unit policies with special application to the astronaut's space suit functional designs.

Ntuen, Celestine A.; Park, Eui H.; Wang, Y. M.; Bretoi, R.

1990-01-01

228

Clinical evaluation of the bionic glove  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Clinical evaluation of the Bionic Glove, a prototype of a new functional electrical stimulation device designed to improve the function of the paralyzed hand after spinal cord injury.Patients: Twelve people with spinal cord injury at C5-C7 who had used the device 6 months or more.Setting: Measurements were made at the Institute “Dr Miroslav Zotovi?” in Belgrade as a part

Dejan Popovi?; Aleksandar Stojanovi?; Andjelka Pjanovi?; Slobodanka Radosavljevi?; Mirjana Popovi?; Stevan Jovi?; Dragan Vulovi?

1999-01-01

229

Biosensors for EVA: Muscle Oxygen and pH During Walking, Running and Simulated Reduced Gravity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI-funded project is looking to extend this methodology to examine activities which more appropriately represent EVA activities, such as walking and running and to better understand factors that determine the metabolic cost of exercise in both normal and lunar gravity. Our 4 year project specifically addresses risk: ExMC 4.18: Lack of adequate biomedical monitoring capability for Constellation EVA Suits and EPSP risk: Risk of compromised EVA performance and crew health due to inadequate EVA suit systems.

Lee, S. M. C.; Ellerby, G.; Scott, P.; Stroud, L.; Norcross, J.; Pesholov, B.; Zou, F.; Gernhardt, M.; Soller, B.

2009-01-01

230

INITIAL TREATMENT OF CLOSED METACARPAL FRACTURES: A controlled comparison of compression glove and splintage  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective clinical trial compared two forms of initial management for closed stable fractures of the shaft of the finger metacarpals. Patients were randomized to treatment with a compression glove and early mobilization (21 patients) or to immobilization in a plaster splint (21 patients).The mean loss of total active flexion (MP + PIP + DIP) in the second week after

P. J. McMAHON; D. A. WOODS; P. D. BURGE

1994-01-01

231

Efficiency of electrolyzed oxidizing water on reducing Listeria monocytogenes contamination on seafood processing gloves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Food processing gloves are typically used to prevent cross-contamination during food preparation. However, gloves can be contaminated with microorganisms and become a source of contamination. This study investigated the survival of Listeria monocytogenes on gloves and determined the efficacy of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water for reducing L. monocytogenes contamination on seafood processing gloves. Three types of reusable gloves (natural rubber

Chengchu Liu; Yi-Cheng Su

2006-01-01

232

Smart glove: hand master using magnetorheological fluid actuators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, a hand master using five miniature magneto-rheological (MR) actuators, which is called 'the smart glove', is introduced. This hand master is intended to display haptic feedback to the fingertip of the human user interacting with any virtual objects in virtual environment. For the smart glove, two effective approaches are proposed: (i) by using the MR actuator which can be considered as a passive actuator, the smart glove is made simple in structure, high in power, low in inertia, safe in interface and stable in haptic feedback, and (ii) with a novel flexible link mechanism designed for the position-force transmission between the fingertips and the actuators, the number of the actuator and the weight of the smart glove can be reduced. These features lead to the improvement in the manipulability and portability of the smart glove. The feasibility of the constructed smart glove is verified through basic performance evaluation.

Nam, Y. J.; Park, M. K.; Yamane, R.

2007-12-01

233

Does EVA beat earnings and cash flow in Japan?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of Economic Value Added (EVA), a metric that is increasingly used in Japan as a measure of corporate value. EVA is compared with several other valuation measures including cash flow, operating income, and profit after tax from the viewpoint of both levels and changes. Also two different forms of EVA

Chikashi Tsuji

2006-01-01

234

A new EVA\\/PET film separation recycling process  

Microsoft Academic Search

PET is the base material of laminating pouch film. The PET film surface coating layer with good low-temperature hot glue, the EE, EVA or EAA material. Just like the recycling of EVA and PET composite plastic film, how to achieve the separation of EVA and PET by technology and processes may be key of the plastic recycling. This paper describes

Junxia Zhang; Xifei Yang; Hailong Su; Xinting Wang

2010-01-01

235

Comparison Of Human Modelling Tools For Efficiency Of Prediction Of EVA Tasks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Construction of the International Space Station (ISS) will require extensive extravehicular activity (EVA, spacewalks), and estimates of the actual time needed continue to rise. As recently as September, 1996, the amount of time to be spent in EVA was believed to be about 400 hours, excluding spacewalks on the Russian segment. This estimate has recently risen to over 1100 hours, and it could go higher before assembly begins in the summer of 1998. These activities are extremely expensive and hazardous, so any design tools which help assure mission success and improve the efficiency of the astronaut in task completion can pay off in reduced design and EVA costs and increased astronaut safety. The tasks which astronauts can accomplish in EVA are limited by spacesuit mobility. They are therefore relatively simple, from an ergonomic standpoint, requiring gross movements rather than time motor skills. The actual tasks include driving bolts, mating and demating electric and fluid connectors, and actuating levers; the important characteristics to be considered in design improvement include the ability of the astronaut to see and reach the item to be manipulated and the clearance required to accomplish the manipulation. This makes the tasks amenable to simulation in a Computer-Assisted Design (CAD) environment. For EVA, the spacesuited astronaut must have his or her feet attached on a work platform called a foot restraint to obtain a purchase against which work forces may be actuated. An important component of the design is therefore the proper placement of foot restraints.

Dischinger, H. Charles, Jr.; Loughead, Tomas E.

1998-01-01

236

EVA tools and equipment reference book  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains a mixture of tools and equipment used throughout the space shuttle-based extravehicular activity (EVA) program. Promising items which have reached the prototype stage of development are also included, but should not be considered certified ready for flight. Each item is described with a photo, a written discussion, technical specifications, dimensional drawings, and points of contact for additional information. Numbers on the upper left-hand corner of each photo may be used to order specific pictures from NASA and contractor photo libraries. Points of contact were classified as either operational or technical. An operational contact is an engineer from JSC Mission Operations Directorate who is familiar with the basic function and on-orbit use of the tool. A technical contact would be the best source of detailed technical specifications and is typically the NASA subsystem manager. The technical information table for each item uses the following terms to describe the availability or status of each hardware item: Standard - Flown on every mission as standard manifest; Flight specific - Potentially available for flight, not flown every mission (flight certification cannot be guaranteed and recertification may be required); Reference only - Item no longer in active inventory or not recommended for future use, some items may be too application-specific for general use; and Developmental - In the prototype stage only and not yet available for flight. The current availability and certification of any flight-specific tool should be verified with the technical point of contact. Those tools built and fit checked for Hubble Space Telescope maintenance are program dedicated and are not available to other customers. Other customers may have identical tools built from the existing, already certified designs as an optional service.

Fullerton, R. K.

1993-01-01

237

A data glove with tactile feedback for FMRI of virtual reality experiments.  

PubMed

Virtual reality (VR) technology is increasingly recognized as a useful tool for the assessment and rehabilitation of neurologic and psychiatric disorders. The hope that VR can accurately mimic real-life events is also of great interest in basic neuroscience, to identify the brain activity that underlies complex behavior by combining VR with techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Toward these applications, in this study we designed and validated an fMRI-compatible data glove with a built-in vibratory stimulus device for tactile feedback during VR experiments. A simple VR-fMRI experiment was performed at 3.0 Tesla on four young healthy adults involving touching a virtual object with and without tactile feedback. The usefulness of the data glove was subsequently assessed using a series of questionnaires, behavioral performance, and the resulting activation images. Questionnaire scores indicated positive opinions with respect to the data glove, the tactile feedback, and the experimental paradigm. All subjects felt comfortable in the scanner during the VR experiment and were able to perform all aspects of the tasks successfully and with reasonable accuracy. In addition, activation maps showed the anticipated modulations in motor, somatosensory, and parietal cortex. These results support that tactile feedback enhances the realism of virtual hand-object interactions, and that the tactile data glove is suitable for use in other VR-fMRI research applications (e.g., VR physical therapy for stroke recovery). PMID:14583125

Ku, Jeonghun; Mraz, Richard; Baker, Nicole; Zakzanis, Konstantine K; Lee, Jang Han; Kim, In Y; Kim, Sun I; Graham, Simon J

2003-10-01

238

Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

Hartshom, Fletcher

2012-01-01

239

Optimal Capital Allocation Using RAROC And EVA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzes financial institutions' capital allocation decisions when their required equity capital depends on the risk of their projects chosen. We discuss the relevance of strict position limits against discretionary trading through the use of an optimal compensation function. We show that (under full information) the first-best investment decision can be delegated through an economic value added (EVA) compensation

Neal Stoughton; Josef Zechner

1999-01-01

240

STS-117 Astronauts John Olivas and Jim Reilly During EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-117 astronauts and mission specialists Jim Reilly (center frame), and John 'Danny' Olivas (bottom center), participated in the first Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) as construction resumed on the International Space Station (ISS). Among other tasks, the two connected power, data, and cooling cables between trusses 1 (S1) and 3 (S3), released the launch restraints from and deployed the four solar array blanket boxes on S4, and released the cinches and winches holding the photovoltaic radiator on S4. The primary mission objective was the installment of the second and third starboard truss segments (S3 and S4).

2007-01-01

241

Astronaut Thomas Mattingly performs EVA during Apollo 16 transearth coast  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, performs extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 16 transearth coast. mattingly is assisted by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. Mattingly inspected the SIM bay of the Service Module, and retrieved film from the Mapping and Panoramic cameras. Mattingly is wearing the helmet of Astronaut John W. Young, commander. The helmet's lunar extravehicular visor assembly helped protect Mattingly's eyes frmo the bright sun. This view is a frame from motion picture film exposed by a 16mm Maurer camera.

1972-01-01

242

Water Pump Development for the EVA PLSS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design, fabricate, and test a preflight prototype pump for use in the Extravehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump will accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting noncondensable gas without becoming "air locked." The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, sealless, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. Although the planned flight unit will use a sensorless motor with custom designed controller, the preflight prototype to be provided for this project incorporates Hall effect sensors, allowing an interface with a readily available commercial motor controller. This design approach reduced the cost of this project and gives NASA more flexibility in future PLSS laboratory testing. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES will simulate the vacuum environment in which the flight pump will operate. Testing will verify that the pump meets design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure rise, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, and restart capability. Pump testing is currently scheduled for March, 2009, after which the pump will be delivered to NASA for further testing.

Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Goldman, Jeff; Morris, Kim; Trevino, Luis

2009-01-01

243

Using the Space Glove to Teach Spatial Thinking  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The challenge of extending students' skills in spatial thinking to astronomical scales was the central focus of our K-8 curriculum development. When the project's lead teacher requested a curriculum that cumulatively built on each prior year's learning in a spiral fashion, I knew exactly what the school was asking for. Second and third graders began by noticing the cyclical patters that the sun, moon, and stars make in the sky. Fourth graders explored the phases of the moon by taking turns modeling and sketching them in their classroom and then comparing them to the real sky. Sixth !graders used real telescopes to observe a moving model of our solar system and walked a scale model of the planets' orbits. The curriculum is designed to expand students' capacity to visualize space in a hierarchical fashion that asks them to imagine themselves from a broader number of spatial perspectives through hands-on activities. The "situational awareness" Peter's story describes is a hallmark of high-performance engineering and innovation. Keeping in mind the potential outcomes of multiple paths of pursuit from multiple perspectives while keeping track of their relative merits and performance requirements is a demanding spatial task. What made it possible for Peter to transform the failure of his first glove into triumph was the mental space in which that failure provided exactly the information needed for a new breakthrough. In at least two cases, Peter could immediately "see" the full implications of what his hands were telling him. He tells the story of how putting his hands in a Phase VI astronaut glove instantly transformed his understanding of the glove challenge. Six months into his development, the failure of circumferentially wrapped cords to produce a sufficiently flexible glove again forced him to abandon his assumptions. His situational awareness was so clear and compelling it became a gut-level response. Peter's finely developed spatial skills enabled him to almost instinctively focus his full energy on a carefully constructed set of experiments. The finger's ability to sense pressure, force, and work gave him the immediate feedback required to solve this one central problem. Once properly understood, his failure quickly led to the magical "Aha!" moment of discovery; the rest is history. Just as children need opportunities to develop hands-on understanding, engineers need to explore new possibilities through incremental hands-on failure. High-performance innovation is all about learning to make maximum use of thinking spatially to direct this process. Peter Homer's glove also reminds us that efficient engineering decisions need to be made as close to the hardware as possible. Whether we're doing hands-on education or hands-on engineering, it is when we trust in our ability to "feel our way" through failure that we reach our highest potential.

Lord, Peter

2008-01-01

244

Modified EVA Encapsulant Formulations for Low Temperature Processing: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: We have developed several new ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) formulations modified on the basis of NREL patented EVA formulations [1]. The new formulations can be cured to a desired gel content of {approx}80% in the ambient at temperatures 20-30 C lower than the typical conditions in vacuum (i.e. {approx}150 C). Glass/glass laminates showed transmittance spectra that are essentially the same as that of EVA 15295P in the visible and NIR regions but higher in the UV region. Results of fluorescence analysis of the ambient-processed new EVA formulations showed the concentrations of the curing-generated {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carbonyl chromophores, which are responsible for the UV induced EVA discoloration and photodegradation, were considerably lower than that of EVA 15295P, therefore suggesting a better photochemical stability of new EVA formulations.

Mei, Z.; Pern, F. J.; Glick, S. H.

2001-10-01

245

Integrity of disposable nitrile exam gloves exposed to simulated movement.  

PubMed

Every year, millions of health care, first responder, and industry workers are exposed to chemical and biological hazards. Disposable nitrile gloves are a common choice as both a chemical and physical barrier to these hazards, especially as an alternative to natural latex gloves. However, glove selection is complicated by the availability of several types or formulations of nitrile gloves, such as low-modulus, medical grade, low filler, and cleanroom products. This study evaluated the influence of simulated movement on the physical integrity (i.e., holes) of different nitrile exam glove brands and types. Thirty glove products were evaluated out-of-box and after exposure to simulated whole-glove movement for 2 hr. In lieu of the traditional 1 L water-leak test, a modified water-leak test, standardized to detect a 0.15 ± 0.05 mm hole in different regions of the glove, was developed. A specialized air inflation method simulated bidirectional stretching and whole-glove movement. A worst-case scenario with maximum stretching was evaluated. On average, movement did not have a significant effect on glove integrity (chi-square; p=0.068). The average effect was less than 1% between no movement (1.5%) and movement (2.1%) exposures. However, there was significant variability in glove integrity between different glove types (p?0.05). Cleanroom gloves, on average, had the highest percentage of leaks, and 50% failed the water-leak test. Low-modulus and medical grade gloves had the lowest percentages of leaks, and no products failed the water-leak test. Variability in polymer formulation was suspected to account for the observed discrepancies, as well as the inability of the traditional 1 L water-leak test to detect holes in finger/thumb regions. Unexpectedly, greater than 80% of the glove defects were observed in the finger and thumb regions. It is recommended that existing water-leak tests be re-evaluated and standardized to account for product variability. PMID:21476169

Phalen, Robert N; Wong, Weng Kee

2011-05-01

246

Biomedical Support of U.S. Extravehicular Activity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The world's first extravehicular activity (EVA) was performed by A. A. Leonov on March 18, 1965 during the Russian Voskhod-2 mission. The first US EVA was executed by Gemini IV astronaut Ed White on June 3, 1965, with an umbilical tether that included communications and an oxygen supply. A hand-held maneuvering unit (HHMU) also was used to test maneuverability during the brief EVA; however the somewhat stiff umbilical limited controlled movement. That constraint, plus difficulty returning through the vehicle hatch, highlighted the need for increased thermal control and improved EVA ergonomics. Clearly, requirements for a useful EVA were interrelated with the vehicle design. The early Gemini EVAs generated requirements for suits providing micro-meteor protection, adequate visual field and eye protection from solar visual and infrared radiation, gloves optimized for dexterity while pressurized, and thermal systems capable of protecting the astronaut while rejecting metabolic heat during high workloads. Subsequent Gemini EVAs built upon this early experience and included development of a portable environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) and an astronaut maneuvering unit. The ECLSS provided a pressure vessel and controller with functional control over suit pressure, oxygen flow, carbon dioxide removal, humidity, and temperature control. Gemini EVA experience also identified the usefulness of underwater neutral buoyancy and altitude chamber task training, and the importance of developing reliable task timelines. Improved thermal management and carbon dioxide control also were required for high workload tasks. With the Apollo project, EVA activity was primarily on the lunar surface; and suit durability, integrated liquid cooling garments, and low suit operating pressures (3.75 pounds per square inch absolute [psia] or 25.8 kilopascal [kPa],) were required to facilitate longer EVAs with ambulation and significant physical workloads with average metabolic rates of 1000 BTU/hr and peaks of up to 2200 BTU/hr. Mobility was further augmented with the Lunar Roving Vehicle. The Apollo extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) was made up of over 15 components, ranging from a biomedical belt for capturing and transmitting biomedical data, urine and fecal containment systems, a liquid cooling garment, communications cap, a modular portable life support system (PLSS), a boot system, thermal overgloves, and a bubble helmet with eye protection. Apollo lunar astronauts performed successful EVAs on the lunar surface from a 5 psia (34.4 kPa) 100% oxygen environment in the Lunar Lander. A maximum of three EVAs were performed on any mission. For Skylab a modified A7LB suit, used for Apollo 15, was selected. The Skylab astronaut life support assembly (ALSA) provided umbilical support through the life support umbilical (LSU) and used open loop oxygen flow, rather than closed-loop as in Apollo missions. Thermal control was provided by liquid water circulated by spacecraft pumps and electrical power also was provided from the spacecraft via the umbilical. The cabin atmosphere of 5 psia (34.4 kPa), 70% oxygen, provided a normoxic atmosphere and because of the very low nitrogen partial pressures, no special protocols were required to protect against decompression sickness (DCS) as was the case with the Apollo spacecraft with a 5 psi, 100% oxygen environment.

Gernhardt, Michael L.; Dervay, J. P.; Gillis, D.; McMann, H. J.; Thomas, K. S.

2007-01-01

247

Development of Damp-Heat Resistant Self-Primed EVA and Non-EVA Encapsulant Formulations at NREL  

SciTech Connect

Self-primed ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and non-EVA (PMG) encapsulant formulations were developed that have greater resistance to damp heat exposure at 85 deg C and 85% relative humidity (RH) (in terms of adhesion strength to glass substrates) than a commonly used commercial EVA product. The self-primed EVA formulations were developed on the basis of high-performing glass priming formulations that have previously proven to significantly enhance the adhesion strength of unprimed and primed EVA films on glass substrates during damp heat exposure. The PMG encapsulant formulations were based on an ethylene-methylacrylate copolymer containing glycidyl methacrylate.

Pern, F. J.; Jorgensen, G. J.

2005-11-01

248

Anthropomorphic Robot Hand And Teaching Glove  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Robotic forearm-and-hand assembly manipulates objects by performing wrist and hand motions with nearly human grasping ability and dexterity. Imitates hand motions of human operator who controls robot in real time by programming via exoskeletal "teaching glove". Telemanipulator systems based on this robotic-hand concept useful where humanlike dexterity required. Underwater, high-radiation, vacuum, hot, cold, toxic, or inhospitable environments potential application sites. Particularly suited to assisting astronauts on space station in safely executing unexpected tasks requiring greater dexterity than standard gripper.

Engler, Charles D., Jr.

1991-01-01

249

Human-Centric Teaming in a Multi-Agent EVA Assembly Task  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Human Space Flight program depends heavily on spacewalks performed by pairs of suited human astronauts. These Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVAs) are severely restricted in both duration and scope by consumables and available manpower.An expanded multi-agent EVA team combining the information-gathering and problem-solving skills of human astronauts with the survivability and physical capabilities of highly dexterous space robots is proposed. A 1-g test featuring two NASA/DARPA Robonaut systems working side-by-side with a suited human subject is conducted to evaluate human-robot teaming strategies in the context of a simulated EVA assembly task based on the STS-61B ACCESS flight experiment.

Rehnmark, Fredrik; Currie, Nancy; Ambrose, Robert O.; Culbert, Christopher

2004-01-01

250

Hubble Space Telescope EVA Power Ratchet Tool redesign. [Abstract only  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Power Ratchet Tool (PRT) is a self contained, power-driven, 3/8 inch drive ratchet wrench which will be used by astronauts during Extravehicular Activities (EVA). This battery-powered tool is controlled by a dedicated electonic controller. The PRT was flown during the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Deployment Mission STS-31 to deploy the solar arrays if the automatic mechanisms failed. The PRT is currently intended for use during the first HST Servicing Mission STS-61 as a general purpose power tool. The PRT consists of three major components; the wrench, the controller, and the battery module. Fourteen discrete combinations of torque, turns, and speed may be programmed into the controller before the EVA. The crewmember selects the desired parameter profile by a switch mounted on the controller. The tool may also be used in the manual mode as a non-powered ratchet wrench. The power is provided by a silver-zinc battery module, which fits into the controller and is replaceable during an EVA. The original PRT did not meet the design specification of torque output and hours of operation. To increase efficiency and reliability the PRT underwent a redesign effort. The majority of this effort focused on the wrench. The original PRT drive train consisted of a low torque, high speed brushless DC motor, a face gear set, and a planocentric gear assembly. The total gear reduction was 300:1. The new PRT wrench consists of a low speed, high torque brushless DC motor, two planetary gear sets and a bevel gear set. The total gear reduction is now 75:1. A spline clutch has also been added to disengage the drive train in the manual mode. The design changes to the controller will consist of only those modifications necessary to accomodate the redesigned wrench. The battery design will be unaffected.

Richards, Paul W.; Park, Chan; Brown, Lee

1993-01-01

251

Study of roles of remote manipulator systems and EVA for shuttle mission support, volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Alternate extravehicular activity (EVA) and remote manipulator system (RMS) configurations were examined for their relative effectiveness in performing an array of representative shuttle and payload support tasks. Initially a comprehensive analysis was performed of payload and shuttle support missions required to be conducted exterior to a pressurized inclosure. A set of task selection criteria was established, and study tasks were identified. The EVA and RMS modes were evaluated according to their applicability for each task and task condition. The results are summarized in tabular form, showing the modes which are chosen as most effective or as feasible for each task/condition. Conclusions concerning the requirements and recommendations for each mode are presented.

Malone, T. B.; Micocci, A. J.

1974-01-01

252

STS-26 crewmembers participate in contingency EVA exercise in JSC's WETF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, mission specialists George D. Nelson and John M. Lounge, wearing extravehicular mobility units (EMUs), participate in latch-handling contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) exercise in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Nelson (right) looks on as Lounge manipulates equipment on payload bay door (PLBD) latch at sill longeron. Tracking and data relay satellite C (TDRS-C) mockup is visible in the payload bay (PLB) (background). SCUBA-equipped divers assist in the Earth-bound version of the contingency EVA. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

1988-01-01

253

STS-26 crewmembers participate in contingency EVA exercise in JSC's WETF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, mission specialists George D. Nelson and John M. Lounge, wearing extravehicular mobility units (EMUs), participate in contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) exercise in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Nelson works with EVA wrench as Lounge looks on. In the event of in-cabin remote control failure, the procedure Nelson is conducting would upright the tracking and data relay satellite C (TDRS-C) from its stowed position to its deployment position. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

1988-01-01

254

STS-26 MS Lounge during contingency EVA exercise in JSC's WETF Bldg 29  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge participates in contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) exercise in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Lounge works with airborne support equipment (ASE) on payload bay (PLB) sill longeron. Tracking and data relay satellite C (TDRS-C) mockup appears next to him. Since Lounge has achieved neutral buoyancy, he is tethered to the sill longeron as he would be during an actual EVA. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

1988-01-01

255

STS-31 MS McCandless dons EMU for JSC EVA underwater simulation in WETF pool  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-31 Mission Specialist (MS) Bruce McCandless II, wearing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) lower torso, pulls his head and arms through the EMU upper torso with the assistance of two technicians. McCandless is positioned on a platform at the poolside of JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Once fully suited in the EMU, McCandless will be lowered into the nearby pool via the platform. Underwater and in a neutrally buoyant state, McCandless will rehearse contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) procedures associated with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) payload. There are no EVAs planned for the flight aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103.

1989-01-01

256

STS-37 MS Apt tests CETA cart during EVA in OV-104's payload bay (PLB)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Jerome Apt, suited in extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), tests Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) electrical hand pedal cart during extravehicular activity (EVA) in Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, payload bay (PLB). Apt works his way along the CETA deployable track mounted on OV-104's PLB port side. The ascent particle monitor (APM) is visible on the starboard side in the foreground. In the background are the aft PLB bulkhead and the vertical tail and orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods. Crewmembers spent several hours evaluating means of performing future EVA chores, transporting tools and crewmembers, etc. on Space Station Freedom (SSF).

1991-01-01

257

Astronaut David Scott gives salute beside U.S. flag during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut David R. Scott, commander, gives a military salute while standing beside the deployed U.S. flag during the Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Hadley-Apennine landing site. The flag was deployed toward the end of EVA-2. The Lunar Module 'Falcon' is partially visible on the right. Hadley Delta in the background rises approximately 4,000 meters (about 13,124 feet) above the plain. The base of the mountain is approximately 5 kilometers (about 3 statute miles) away. This photograph was taken by Astronaut James B. Irwin, Lunar Module pilot.

1971-01-01

258

Risk Reduction and Measures of Injury for EVA Associated Upper Extremity Medical Issues: Extended Vent Tube Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) training sessions, a large amount of moisture accumulates in the EVA gloves. The glove design restricts the extension of the EVA suit s ventilation/cooling system to the hand. Subungual redness and fingernail pain develops for many astronauts following their NBL training sessions with subsequent oncholysis occurring over succeeding weeks. Various attempts have been made to reduce or avoid this problem. The causal role of moisture has yet to be defined. Methods: To determine the contribution that moisture plays in the injury to the fingers and fingernails during EVA training operations in NBL, the current Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), with a Portable Life Support System (PLSS) was configured with a ventilation tube that extended down a single arm of the crewmember during the test and compared with the unventilated contralateral arm; with the ventilated hand serving as the experimental condition (E) and the opposite arm as the control (C). A cross-over design was used with opposite handedness for the vent tube on a subsequent NBL training run. Moisture content measures were conducted at six points on each hand with three types of moisture meters. A questionnaire was administered to determine subjective thermal hand discomfort, skin moisture perception, and hand and nail discomfort. Photographs and video were recorded. Measures were applied to six astronauts pre- and post-run in the NBL. Results: The consistent trends in relative hydration ratios at the dorsum, from 3.34 for C to 2.11 for E, and first ring finger joint locations, from 2.46 for C to 1.96 for E, indicated the extended vent tube promoted skin drying. The experimental treatment appeared to be more effective on the left hand versus the right hand, implying an interaction with hand anthropometry and glove fit. Video analyses differentiated fine and gross motor training tasks during runs and will be discussed. Conclusions: This potential countermeasure was effective in reducing the risks of hand and nail discomfort symptoms from moderate to low in two of six subjects. Improved design in the ventilation pattern of such a countermeasure is expected to improve the countermeasure s efficiency.

Jones, Jeffrey A.; Hoffman, Ronald B.; Harvey, C. M.; Bowen, C. K.; Hudy, C. E.; Gernhardt, M. L.

2007-01-01

259

The Use of Latex Gloves in the School Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1987, when the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the use of universal precautions in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the demand for medical gloves dramatically increased. Unfortunately, the manufacturing techniques for the most widely-used gloves--natural rubber latex--also changed, in order to expedite production.…

Purcell, Cathy Koeppen

2006-01-01

260

Diagnostic Study of the U.S. Work Glove Industry.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study undertaken by the work Glove Manufacturers Association (WGMA) was designed to meet the following objectives: (1) to develop a detailed profile of the U.S. work glove industry and its problems; (2) to identify the areas where possible opportuniti...

1980-01-01

261

Haptic Glove Technology: Skill Development through Video Game Play  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces a recently developed haptic glove system and describes how the participants used a video game that was purposely designed to train them in skills that are needed for the efficient use of the haptic glove. Assessed skills included speed, efficiency, embodied skill, and engagement. The findings and implications for future…

Bargerhuff, Mary Ellen; Cowan, Heidi; Oliveira, Francisco; Quek, Francis; Fang, Bing

2010-01-01

262

A System for Cooling inside a Glove Box  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An easy, efficient, reliable, and low-cost method of constructing a cooling system using a simple circulating pump is described. The system is employed in conjunction with an inert atmosphere glove box to achieve the synthesis of air- and moisture-sensitive compounds inside the glove box at controlled, low temperatures without contaminating the…

Sanz, Martial

2010-01-01

263

Construct-a-Glove. Science by Design Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is one of four books in the Science-by-Design Series created by TERC and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). It offers high school students a challenging, hands-on opportunity to compare the function and design of many types of handwear from a hockey mitt to a surgical glove, and design and test a glove to their own…

Pulis, Lee

264

9. VIEW, LOOKING WEST, OF GLOVE BOXES ASSOCIATED WITH THE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. VIEW, LOOKING WEST, OF GLOVE BOXES ASSOCIATED WITH THE ANION EXCHANGE PROCESS IN ROOM 149. THE GLOVE BOXES ON THE LEFT CONTAIN MIXER STIRRERS THAT AID IN THE DISSOLUTION PROCESS THAT OCCURRED PRIOR TO ANION EXCHANGE. (6/20/60) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

265

Design options for improving protective gloves for industrial assembly work.  

PubMed

The study investigated the effects of wearing two new designs of cotton glove on several hand performance capabilities and compared them against the effects of barehanded, single-layered and double cotton glove conditions when working with hand tools (screwdriver and pliers). The new glove designs were based on the findings of subjective hand discomfort assessments for this type of work and aimed to match the glove thickness to the localised pressure and sensitivity in different areas of the hand as well as to provide adequate dexterity for fine manipulative tasks. The results showed that the first prototype glove and the barehanded condition were comparable and provided better dexterity and higher handgrip strength than double thickness gloves. The results support the hypothesis that selective thickness in different areas of the hand could be applied by glove manufacturers to improve the glove design, so that it can protect the hands from the environment and at the same time allow optimal hand performance capabilities. PMID:24636726

Dianat, Iman; Haslegrave, Christine M; Stedmon, Alex W

2014-07-01

266

Advanced extravehicular activity systems requirements definition study. Phase 2: Extravehicular activity at a lunar base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The focus is on Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems requirements definition for an advanced space mission: remote-from-main base EVA on the Moon. The lunar environment, biomedical considerations, appropriate hardware design criteria, hardware and interface requirements, and key technical issues for advanced lunar EVA were examined. Six remote EVA scenarios (three nominal operations and three contingency situations) were developed in considerable detail.

Neal, Valerie; Shields, Nicholas, Jr.; Carr, Gerald P.; Pogue, William; Schmitt, Harrison H.; Schulze, Arthur E.

1988-01-01

267

Fingertip communication: A tactile communication device for a glove  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tactile communication is possible using a phenomenon known as a tactile illusion (TI). Illusion of movement on the skin is produced through fixed vibrating points (actuators) using parameters including vibration on- and off-time, number of vibrations, and intervibrating point time delays. Multiple actuators (solenoids) can produce the TI of movement between actuators that are sequentially activated to produce the illusion of motion on the skin. This illusion of movement can be made to form alphanumerics perceived on the fingertip that will allow for an alternate method of communication to auditory or visual receptive communications. A thimble is designed using piezoelectric bimorphs (piezo) or microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to produce alphanumerics in the glove of a flight or space suit and on control surfaces, for immediate feedback communications. Solenoid devices have been made and tested and background research has been completed to aid in the design and production of piezo and MEMS fingertip devices. .

Gonzales, Gilbert R.; Gust, Gary R.; Hughes, Kenneth E.

2000-01-01

268

The 757 NLF glove flight test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A major concern in the application of a laminar flow wing design to commercial transports is whether laminar flow can be sustained in the presence of the noise environment due to wing mounted turbofan engines. To investigate this issue, a flight test program was conducted using the Boeing 757 flight research airplane with a portion of the wing modified to obtain natural laminar flow. The flight test had two primary objectives. The first was to measure the noise levels on the upper and lower surface of the wing for a range of flight conditions. The second was to investigate the effect of engine noise on laminar boundary layer transition. The noise field on the wing and transition location on the glove were then measured as a function of the engine power setting at a given flight condition. The transition and noise measurement on the glove show that there is no apparent effect of engine noise on the upper surface transition location. On the lower surface, the transition location moved forward 2 to 3 percent chord. A boundary layer stability analysis to the flight data showed that cross flow disturbances were the dominant cause of transition at most flight conditions.

Runyan, L. Jim; Bielak, G. W.; Behbehani, R. A.; Chen, A. W.; Rozendaal, Roger A.

1987-01-01

269

TEJAS - TELEROBOTICS/EVA JOINT ANALYSIS SYSTEM VERSION 1.0  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objective of space telerobotics as a research discipline is the augmentation and/or support of extravehicular activity (EVA) with telerobotic activity; this allows increased emplacement of on-orbit assets while providing for their "in situ" management. Development of the requisite telerobot work system requires a well-understood correspondence between EVA and telerobotics that to date has been only partially established. The Telerobotics/EVA Joint Analysis Systems (TEJAS) hypermedia information system uses object-oriented programming to bridge the gap between crew-EVA and telerobotics activities. TEJAS Version 1.0 contains twenty HyperCard stacks that use a visual, customizable interface of icon buttons, pop-up menus, and relational commands to store, link, and standardize related information about the primitives, technologies, tasks, assumptions, and open issues involved in space telerobot or crew EVA tasks. These stacks are meant to be interactive and can be used with any database system running on a Macintosh, including spreadsheets, relational databases, word-processed documents, and hypermedia utilities. The software provides a means for managing volumes of data and for communicating complex ideas, relationships, and processes inherent to task planning. The stack system contains 3MB of data and utilities to aid referencing, discussion, communication, and analysis within the EVA and telerobotics communities. The six baseline analysis stacks (EVATasks, EVAAssume, EVAIssues, TeleTasks, TeleAssume, and TeleIssues) work interactively to manage and relate basic information which you enter about the crew-EVA and telerobot tasks you wish to analyze in depth. Analysis stacks draw on information in the Reference stacks as part of a rapid point-and-click utility for building scripts of specific task primitives or for any EVA or telerobotics task. Any or all of these stacks can be completely incorporated within other hypermedia applications, or they can be referenced as is, without requiring data to be transferred into any other database. TEJAS is simple to use and requires no formal training. Some knowledge of HyperCard is helpful, but not essential. All Help cards printed in the TEJAS User's Guide are part of the TEJAS Help Stack and are available from a pop-up menu any time you are using TEJAS. Specific stacks created in TEJAS can be exchanged between groups, divisions, companies, or centers for complete communication of fundamental information that forms the basis for further analyses. TEJAS runs on any Apple Macintosh personal computer with at least one megabyte of RAM, a hard disk, and HyperCard 1.21, or later version. TEJAS is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. HyperCard and Macintosh are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.

Drews, M. L.

1994-01-01

270

STS-31 Crew Training: Firefighting, Food Tasting, EVA Prep and Post  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle crew is shown lighting a pond of gasoline and then performing firefighting tasks. The crew is also shown tasting food including lemonade, chicken casserole, and tortillas, and performing extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment checkouts in the CCT middeck and airlock.

1990-01-01

271

Space shuttle EVA/IVA support equipment requirements study. Volume 1: Final summary report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was conducted to determine the support equipment requirements for space shuttle intravehicular and extravehicular activities. The subjects investigated are; (1) EVA/IVA task identification and analysis,. (2) primary life support system, (3) emergency life support system, (4) pressure suit assembly, (5) restraints, (6) work site provision, (7) emergency internal vehicular emergencies, and (8) vehicular interfaces.

1973-01-01

272

Astronaut Alan Bean deploys ALSEP during first Apollo 12 EVA on moon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Apollo 12 lunar module pilot, deploys components of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the moon. The photo was made by Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Apollo 12 commander, using a 70mm handheld Haselblad camera modified for lunar surface usage.

1969-01-01

273

Astronaut William S. McArthur in training for contingency EVA in WETF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut William S. McArthur, mission specialist, participates in training for contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-58 mission. He is wearing the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) minus his helmet. For simulation purposes, McArthur was about to be submerged to a point of neutral buoyancy in the JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF).

1993-01-01

274

Underwater EVA training in the WETF with astronauts Nelson and van Hoften  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) training in the weightless environment training facility (WETF) with astronauts George Nelson and James van Hoften. They are using tools to assemble material in the facility while surrounded by divers (428895); View of George Nelson in full extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) floating inside the space shuttle payload bay mockup with a diver behind him (42896).

1983-01-01

275

Underwater EVA training in the WETF with astronauts Nelson and van Hoften  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) training in the weightless environment training facility (WETF) with astronauts George Nelson and James van Hoften. View of astronaut in full extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) floating inside the space shuttle payload bay mockup with a diver behind him (42898); view of astronaut in foot restraint device floating above payload bay mockup with divers (42899).

1983-01-01

276

Underwater views of STS-11 crewman Robert L. Stewart during EVA training  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Underwater views of STS-11 crewman Robert L. Stewart during extravehicular activity (EVA) training in the cargo bay in the weightless environment training facility (WETF) in bldg 27. Stewart busies himself with donning and doffing of the manned maneuvering unit (MMU) in a mockup of the Shuttle's cargo bay.

1983-01-01

277

Astronaut David Scott using Apollo Lunar Surface Drill during second EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut David R. Scott, Apollo 15 commander, is seen using the Apollo Lunar Surface Drill during the second lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) in this color reproduction taken from a transmission made by the RCA color television camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. This transmission was the fourth made during the mission.

1971-01-01

278

Astronaut David Scott on slope of Hadley Delta during Apollo 15 EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut David R. Scott, mission commander, performs a task at the Lunar Roving Vehicle parked on the edge of Hadley Rille during the first Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA-1). This photograph was taken by Astronaut James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, from the flank of St. George Crater. The view is looking north along the rille.

1971-01-01

279

Extravehicular activity at geosynchronous earth orbit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The basic contract to define the system requirements to support the Advanced Extravehicular Activity (EVA) has three phases: EVA in geosynchronous Earth orbit; EVA in lunar base operations; and EVA in manned Mars surface exploration. The three key areas to be addressed in each phase are: environmental/biomedical requirements; crew and mission requirements; and hardware requirements. The structure of the technical tasks closely follows the structure of the Advanced EVA studies for the Space Station completed in 1986.

Shields, Nicholas, Jr.; Schulze, Arthur E.; Carr, Gerald P.; Pogue, William

1988-01-01

280

Nanorobots for Mars EVA Repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current t rends in technology indicate that nanometer- scale de vices will be feasible within two de cades. It is likely that NASA will attempt a manned Mars mission within the next few decades. Manned Mars activities will be relatively labor-intensive, presenting significant risk of damage to the Marssuit. We ha ve investigated two possible architectures for nanotechnology applied to

Benjamin Chui; Lea Kissner

281

EVA Communications Avionics and Informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Glenn Research Center is investigating and developing technologies for communications, avionics, and information systems that will significantly enhance extra vehicular activity capabilities to support the Vision for Space Exploration. Several of the ongoing research and development efforts are described within this presentation including system requirements formulation, technology development efforts, trade studies, and operational concept demonstrations.

Carek, David Andrew

2005-01-01

282

A smart virtual glove for the hand telerehabilitation.  

PubMed

Hand rehabilitation, following stroke or hand surgery, is repetitive and long duration and can be facilitated with the assistance of complex, heavy and cumbersome haptic gloves based on sensors. The present paper describes a virtual glove, software based, which tracks hand movements by using images collected from webcams and numerical analysis. Finger forces are calculated from the deformations impressed to some objects (of known elastic coefficient) grasped by the patient hand. The presented system is notable for simplicity, generality and low cost. Implementation and results of the proposed virtual glove will be the objects of a future paper. PMID:17112497

Placidi, Giuseppe

2007-08-01

283

Electrical treeing in EVA-Boehmite and EVA-Montmorillonite nanocomposites  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present experimental work focuses on the growth of electrical treeing inside different Ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) nanocomposites containing Bohemite (an aluminum oxide hydroxide) and Montmorillonite (a phyllosilicate clay mineral) nanoparticles. Bohemite and Montmorillonite particles have different aspect ratios: the first one has a nanometric cube-like symmetry, while the latter has a typical layered structure. The results evidence that the growth

F. Guastavino; A. Dardano; G. C. Montanari; L. Testa; F. Bellucci

2009-01-01

284

Motion Generation for Glove Puppet Show with Procedural Animation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traditional Taiwanese glove puppet show is a unique form of performing art. In this work, we aim to use the aid of computer animation technologies to preserve this cultural heritage and create innovative ways of performance. By observing the demonstration of a puppet master, we analyze the characteristics of how a hand puppet is manipulated and design animation procedures mimicking the motion of a glove puppet. These procedures are implemented on a real-time animation platform for procedural animation. Through the system, we allow a user to perform glove puppet animation with high-level inputs. We hope that, with the help of this system, not only the art of manipulating a glove puppet can be systematically documented, but the entry barrier for learning it can also be greatly reduced.

Lin, Chih-Chung; Hou, Gee-Chin; Li, Tsai-Yen

285

Permeation of Multifunctional Acrylates through Selected Protective Glove Materials.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In support of the Premanufacture Notification (PMN) program of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Toxic Substances, the resistance of three glove materials to permeation by multifunctional acrylate compounds was evaluated through a program fo...

E. P. Renard R. Goydan T. Stolki

1992-01-01

286

PERMEATION OF MULTIFUNCTIONAL ACRYLATES THROUGH SELECTED PROTECTIVE GLOVE MATERIALS  

EPA Science Inventory

In support of the Premanufacture Notification (PMN) program of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Toxic Substances, the resistance of three glove materials to permeation by multifunctional acrylate compounds was evaluated through a program for the Office of Research ...

287

Corrosion-resistant linings for glove box enclosures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Los Alamos National Laboratory, in cooperation with private industry, has developed and implemented the use of corrosion resistant sheet linings for glove box enclosures used in the recovery of plutonium from processing residues. Processes for aqueous plu...

S. M. Dinehart

1991-01-01

288

21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER TORQUE WRENCH FOR ASSEMBLY AND REPAIR OF BOTH. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

289

Comparison of Human Modeling Tools for Efficiency of Prediction of EVA Tasks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Design of ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) interfaces for International Space Station is important to successful assembly. This is highlighted by the recent rise in the estimate of time required for EVA during the assembly to 900 hours. The traditional method of evaluating EVA design is examination of mockups in neutral buoyancy testing. While effective, this is costly. Any tools for streamlining this process have positive cost and schedule implications for Station design. The human modelling software package Jack has been shown to be a useful tool in computer-aided design of space hardware requiring actuation in EVA. The package has been used to aid in the design of flight hardware for a Station Assembly Mission; evaluation was based on comparison of the computer simulations with neutral buoyancy simulations. When used to predict the feasibility of tasks, the software was found to be effective for reach and visibility evaluation. Some limitations have been encountered in prediction of work clearances. Another human simulator is currently being evaluated using the same hardware and comparisons to the same Neutral Buoyancy simulations. Preliminary results for ERGO, which is derived from robotics software, indicate similar strengths and weaknesses.

Dischinger, H. Charles, Jr.; Loughead, Tomas E.

1998-01-01

290

Get a grip on navigating surgical glove choices.  

PubMed

The wide range of surgical gloves available can make choosing the correct products for staff a difficult process. Add in other factors such as performance, allergy considerations, user preferences and cost, and making the right choice can get complicated. Fortunately, there are ways to simplify the process. Here are essential factors to consider when selecting surgical gloves so that you meet the criteria that are important to everyone involved. PMID:20034179

Ballard, Raylene M

2009-11-01

291

Polarization Processes of Nanocomposite Silicate-EVA and PP Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent works indicate that polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-vinylacetate (EVA) filled by nanosilicates may present low content of space charge and high electric strength. Investigations are being made to explain nanocomposite behaviour and characterize their electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. In this paper, the results of broad-band dielectric spectroscopy performed on EVA and PP filled by layered nanosized silicates are reported.

Gian Carlo Montanari; Fabrizio Palmieri; Luigi Testa; Antonio Motori; Andrea Saccani; Francesca Patuelli

2006-01-01

292

Study of factors influencing telecom operator's economic value added (EVA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on data from 14 famous telecom operators, this study investigates factors influencing telecom operator's economic value added (EVA), thus reveal the mechanism and relationships between telecom operators' various capabilities and EVA. Factor analysis and Structural equation modeling (SEM) are used as the main analysis tools. Results show that Profitability capacity, Management capacity, and Risk Resist capacity are the three

Zheng Li; Shoulian Tang

2011-01-01

293

STS-117 Astronauts John Olivas and Jim Reilly During EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-117 astronauts and mission specialists Jim Reilly (out of frame), and John 'Danny' Olivas (partially obscured, center), participated in the first Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) as construction resumed on the International Space Station (ISS). Among other tasks, the two connected power, data, and cooling cables between trusses 1 (S1) and 3 (S3), released the launch restraints from and deployed the four solar array blanket boxes on S4, and released the cinches and winches holding the photovoltaic radiator on S4. The primary mission objective was the installment of the second and third starboard truss segments (S3 and S4). The horizon of Earth and a crescent moon are visible on the right.

2007-01-01

294

An air bearing fan for EVA suit ventilation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The portable life-support system (PLSS) ventilation requirements are outlined, along with the application of a high-speed axial fan technology for extravehicular-activity (EVA) space-suit ventilation. Focus is placed on a mechanical design employing high-speed gas bearings, permanent magnet rotor, and current-fed chopper/inverter electronics. The operational characteristics of the fan unit and its applicability for use in a pure-oxygen environment are discussed. It delivers a nominal 0.17 cu m/min at 1.24 kPa pressure rise using 13.8 w of input power. It is shown that the overall selection of materials for all major component meets the NASA requirements.

Murry, Roger P.

1990-01-01

295

Assessment of skin exposure to N,N-dimethylformamide and methyl ethylketone through chemical protective gloves and decontamination of gloves for reuse purposes.  

PubMed

N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and methyl ethylketone (MEK) are the hazardous chemicals commonly used in the synthetic leather industries. Although chemical protective gloves provide adequate skin exposure protection to workers in these industries, there is currently no clear guideline or understanding with regard to the use duration of these gloves. In this study, the permeation of DMF/MEK mixture through neoprene gloves and the desorption of chemicals from contaminated gloves were conducted using the ASTM F739 cell. The acceptable use duration time of the gloves against DMF/MEK permeation was estimated by assuming a critical body burden of chemical exposure as a result of dermal absorption. In a re-exposure cycle of 5 days, decontamination of the gloves by aeration at 25°C was found to be inadequate in a reduction of breakthrough time as compared to a new unexposed glove. However, decontamination of the gloves by heating at 70 or 100°C showed that the protective coefficient of the exposed gloves had similar levels of resistance to DMF/MEK as that of new gloves. Implications of this study include an understanding of the use duration of neoprene gloves and proper decontamination of chemical protective gloves for reuse. PMID:21194731

Chao, Keh-Ping; Wang, Ping; Chen, Chen-Peng; Tang, Ping-Yu

2011-02-15

296

Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified EVA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) has been investigated over a range of times, temperatures, stretching, irradiation doses and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) levels. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) and stretched (100% elongation) sample shrinks to a maximum level when kept at 453K temperature for 60 s. The heat shrinkage of samples irradiated with radiation doses of 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy increases sharply with increasing stretching in the initial stage. Amnesia rating decreases with increasing radiation dose and TMPTMA level as well as gel content. The high radiation dose and TMPTMA level lower the heat shrinkage due to the chain scission. The effect of temperature at which extension is carried out on heat shrinkage is marginal. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) EVA tubes of different dimensions expanded in a laboratory grade tube expander show similar behaviour at 453K and 60 s. The X-ray and DSC studies reveal that the crystallinity increases on stretching due to orientation of chains and it decreases to a considerable extent on heat shrinking. The theoretical and experimental values of heat shrinkage for tubes and rectangular strips are in good accord, when the radiation dose is 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%.

Datta, Sujit K.; Chaki, T. K.; Tikku, V. K.; Pradhan, N. K.; Bhowmick, A. K.

1997-10-01

297

EVA Hazards due to TPS Inspection and Repair  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tile inspection and repair activities have implicit hazards associated with them. When an Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) crewmember and associated hardware are added into the equation, additional hazards are introduced. Potential hazards to the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), the Orbiter or the crew member themselves are created. In order to accurately assess the risk of performing a TPS inspection or repair, an accurate evaluation of potential hazards and how adequately these hazards are controlled is essential. The EMU could become damaged due to sharp edges, protrusions, thermal extremes, molten metal or impact with the Orbiter. Tools, tethers and the presence of a crew member in the vicinity of the Orbiter Thermal Protection System (TPS) pose hazards to the Orbiter. Hazards such as additional tile or Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) damage from a loose tool, safety tethers, crewmember or arm impact are introduced. Additionally, there are hazards to the crew which should be addressed. Crew hazards include laser injury, electrical shock, inability to return to the airlock for EMU failures or Orbiter rapid safing scenarios, as well as the potential inadvertent release of a crew member from the arm/boom. The aforementioned hazards are controlled in various ways. Generally, these controls are addressed operationally versus by design, as the majority of the interfaces are to the Orbiter and the Orbiter design did not originally account for tile repair. The Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS), for instance, was originally designed to deploy experiments, and therefore has insufficient design controls for retention of the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS). Although multiple methods to repair the Orbiter TPS exist, the majority of the hazards are applicable no matter which specific repair method is being performed. TPS Inspection performed via EVA also presents some of the same hazards. Therefore, the hazards common to all TPS inspection or repair methods will be addressed.

Stewart, Christine E.

2007-01-01

298

Adhesion Strength Study of EVA Encapsulants on Glass Substrates  

SciTech Connect

An extensive peel-test study was conducted to investigate the various factors that may affect the adhesion strength of photovoltaic module encapsulants, primarily ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA), on glass substrates of various laminates based on a common configuration of glass/encapsulant/backfoil. The results show that"pure" or"absolute" adhesion strength of EVA-to-glass was very difficult to obtain because of tensile deformation of the soft, semi-elastic EVA layer upon pulling. A mechanically"strong enough" backing foil on the EVA was critical to achieving the"apparent" adhesion strength. Peel test method with a 90-degree-pull yielded similar results to a 180-degree-pull. The 90-degree-pull method better revealed the four stages of delamination failure of the EVA/backfoil layers. The adhesion strength is affected by a number of factors, which include EVA type, formulation, backfoil type and manufacturing source, glass type, and surface priming treatment on the glass surface or on the backfoil. Effects of the glass-cleaning method and surface texture are not obvious. Direct priming treatments used in the work did not improve, or even worsened, the adhesion. Aging of EVA by storage over~5 years reduced notably the adhesion strength. Lower adhesion strengths were observed for the blank (unformulated) EVA and non-EVA copolymers, such as poly(ethylene-co-methacrylate) (PEMA) or poly(ethylene-co-butylacrylate) (PEBA). Their adhesion strengths increased if the copolymers were cross-linked. Transparent fluoropolymer superstrates such as TefzelTM and DureflexTM films used for thin-film PV modules showed low adhesion strengths to the EVA at a level of~2 N/mm.

Pern, F. J.; Glick, S. H.

2003-05-01

299

Glove port technique for transanal endoscopic microsurgery.  

PubMed

Introduction. Despite initial enthusiasm, the use of transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) is still quite limited at present because of the expense of highly specialized equipment and the complexity of the learning curve. Furthermore, some authors report a relevant, although temporary, effect on anorectal function because of the considerable anal dilatation which can even produce a rupture of the internal anal sphincter. The "glove TEM" proposes itself as an alternative to traditional TEM that could settle these problems. Materials and Methods. The technique is accurately described together with the necessary equipment to perform it. Between 2011 and 2012, we operated eight patients with this technique for rectal adenomas or early carcinomas achieving R0 resection in all cases and reporting no early or late complications during the first five months of followup. Discussion. This technique offers multiple advantages compared to the original TEM. (i) It allows the use of all available laparoscopic instruments. (ii) It gives a great manoeuvrability of the instruments in contrast to rigid rectoscope systems. (iii) Given the limited length of the device, it permits to operate on tumors closer to the dentate line. (iv) It is less traumatic to the anal sphincter. It is definitively much cheaper. Conclusions. We believe that this new technique is easy to perform, cost-effective, and less traumatic to the anal sphincter compared to traditional TEM. PMID:22701788

Alessandro, Carrara; Daniela, Mangiola; Michele, Motter; Andrea, Tirone; Gianmarco, Ghezzi; Massimo, Silvestri; Orazio, Zappalà; Fabio, Gasperetti; Giuseppe, Tirone

2012-01-01

300

First flight test results of the Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue (SAFER) propulsion unit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) is a small, self-contained, propulsive-backpack system that provides free-flying mobility for an astronaut engaged in a space walk, also known as extravehicular activity (EVA.) SAFER contains no redundant systems and is intended for contingency use only. In essence, it is a small, simplified version of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) last flown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1985. The operational SAFER unit will only be used to return an adrift EVA astronaut to the spacecraft. Currently, if an EVA crew member inadvertently becomes separated from the Space Shuttle, the Orbiter will maneuver to within the crew member's reach envelope, allowing the astronaut to regain contact with the Orbiter. However, with the advent of operations aboard the Russian MIR Space Station and the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle will not be available to effect a timely rescue. Under these conditions, a SAFER unit would be worn by each EVA crew member. Flight test of the pre-production model of SAFER occurred in September 1994. The crew of Space Shuttle Mission STS-64 flew a 6.9 hour test flight which included performance, flying qualities, systems, and operational utility evaluations. We found that the unit offers adequate propellant and control authority to stabilize and enable the return of a tumbling/separating crew member. With certain modifications, production model of SAFER can provide self-rescue capability to a separated crew member. This paper will present the program background, explain the flight test results and provide some insight into the complex operations of flight test in space.

Meade, Carl J.

1995-01-01

301

Contamination of Critical Surfaces from NVR Glove Residues Via Dry Handling and Solvent Cleaning  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gloves are often used to prevent the contamination of critical surfaces during handling. The type of glove chosen for use should be the glove that produces the least amount of non-volatile residue (NVR). This paper covers the analysis of polyethylene, nitrile, latex, vinyl, and polyurethane gloves using the contact transfer and gravimetric determination methods covered in the NASA GSFC work instruction Gravimetric Determination and Contact Transfer of Non-volatile Residue (NVR) in Cleanroom Glove Samples, 541-WI-5330.1.21 and in the ASTM Standard E-1731M-95, Standard Test Method for Gravimetric Determination of Non-Volatile Residue from Cleanroom Gloves. The tests performed focus on contamination of critical surfaces at the molecular level. The study found that for the most part, all of the gloves performed equally well in the contact transfer testing. However, the polyethylene gloves performed the best in the gravimetric determination testing, and therefore should be used whenever solvent contact is a possibility. The nitrile gloves may be used as a substitute for latex gloves when latex sensitivity is an issue. The use of vinyl gloves should be avoided, especially if solvent contact is a possibility. A glove database will be established by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Code 541 to compile the results from future testing of new gloves and different glove lots.

Sovinski, Marjorie F.

2004-01-01

302

CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

A task was undertaken to characterize glovebox gloves that are currently used in the facilities at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as some experimental and advanced compound gloves that have been proposed for use. Gloves from four manufacturers were tested for permeation in hydrogen and air, thermal stability, tensile properties, puncture resistance and dynamic mechanical response. The gloves were compared to each other within the type and also to the butyl rubber glove that is widely used at the SRS. The permeation testing demonstrated that the butyl compounds from three of the vendors behaved similarly and exhibited hydrogen permeabilities of .52‐.84 x10{sup ‐7} cc H{sub 2}*cm / (cm{sup 2}*atm). The Viton? glove performed at the lower edge of this bound, while the more advanced composite gloves exhibited permeabilities greater than a factor of two compared to butyl. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the amount of material lost under slightly aggressive conditions. Glove losses are important since they can affect the life of glovebox stripper systems. During testing at 90, 120, and 150?C, the samples lost most of the mass in the initial 60 minutes of thermal exposure and as expected increasing the temperature increased the mass loss and shortened the time to achieve a steady state loss. The ranking from worst to best was Jung butyl‐Hypalon? with 12.9 %, Piercan Hypalon? with 11.4 %, and Jung butyl‐Viton? with 5.2% mass loss all at approximately 140?C. The smallest mass losses were experienced by the Jung Viton? and the Piercan polyurethane. Tensile properties were measured using a standard dog bone style test. The butyl rubber exhibited tensile strengths of 11‐15 MPa and elongations or 660‐843%. Gloves made from other compounds exhibited lower tensile strengths (5 MPa Viton) to much higher tensile strengths (49 MPa Urethane) with a comparable range of elongation. The puncture resistance of the gloves was measured in agreement with an ASTM standard. The Butyl gloves exhibited puncture resistance from 183 ? 296 lbs/in for samples of 0.020 ? 0.038? thick. Finally, the glass transition temperature and the elastic and viscoelastic properties as a function of temperature up to maximum use temperature were determined for each glove material using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. The glass transition temperatures of the gloves were ‐60?C for butyl, ‐30?C for polyurethane, ‐ 16?C Hypalon?, ‐16?C for Viton?, and ‐24?C for polyurethane‐Hypalon?. The glass transition was too complex for the butyl‐Hypalon? and butyl‐Viton? composite gloves to be characterized by a single glass transition temperature. All of the glass transition temperatures exceed the vendor projected use temperatures.

Korinko, P.

2013-01-24

303

MIL-C-38999 electrical connector applicability tests for on-orbit EVA satellite servicing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

MIL-C-38999 electrical connectors were tested for their applicability to the on-orbit EVA satellite servicing environment. The investigation provided a methodical approach to the evaluation of the human-machine interface of these connectors. The physical characteristics of thirty-five MIL-C-38999 connectors were tested in two simulated space environments, the NASA Johnson Space Center Weightless Environment Training Facility and an evacuated glovebox which incorporated the Extravehicular Maneuvering Unit series 3000 gloves. Physical characteristics of the connectors were documented, including operating torque and work profiles. STS crewmembers tested a select group of connectors in two WETF test and subjectively ranked the G&H PMM Wing-Tab connectors as most applicable to the on-orbit servicing environment. WETF performance times indicated that the G&H PMM Wing-Tab connector had the fastest operating time. The evacuated glovebox participants ranked the G&H 64600 Wing-Tab and the G&H PMM Wing-Tab connectors as those most applicable to the on-orbit servicing environment. During the evacuated glovebox tests, the G&H 64600 Wing-Tab connector had the fastest operating time.

Griffin, Thomas J.; Lewis, Ruthan

1989-01-01

304

Application of EVA guidelines and design criteria. Volume 1: EVA selection/systems design considerations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Parameters that require consideration by the planners and designers when planning for man to perform functions outside the vehicle are presented in terms of the impact the extravehicular crewmen and major EV equipment items have on the mission, vehicle, and payload. Summary data on man's performance capabilities in the weightless space environment are also provided. The performance data are based on orbital and transearth EVA from previous space flight programs and earthbound simulations, such as water immersion and zero-g aircraft.

Brown, N. E.

1973-01-01

305

Understanding Skill in EVA Mass Handling. Volume 4; An Integrated Methodology for Evaluating Space Suit Mobility and Stability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The empirical investigation of extravehicular activity (EVA) mass handling conducted on NASA's Precision Air-Bearing Floor led to a Phase I SBIR from JSC. The purpose of the SBIR was to design an innovative system for evaluating space suit mobility and stability in conditions that simulate EVA on the surface of the Moon or Mars. The approach we used to satisfy the Phase I objectives was based on a structured methodology for the development of human-systems technology. Accordingly the project was broken down into a number of tasks and subtasks. In sequence, the major tasks were: 1) Identify missions and tasks that will involve EVA and resulting mobility requirements in the near and long term; 2) Assess possible methods for evaluating mobility of space suits during field-based EVA tests; 3) Identify requirements for behavioral evaluation by interacting with NASA stakeholders;.4) Identify necessary and sufficient technology for implementation of a mobility evaluation system; and 5) Prioritize and select technology solutions. The work conducted in these tasks is described in this final volume of the series on EVA mass handling. While prior volumes in the series focus on novel data-analytic techniques, this volume addresses technology that is necessary for minimally intrusive data collection and near-real-time data analysis and display.

McDonald, P. Vernon; Newman, Dava

1999-01-01

306

STS-26 crewmembers participate in contingency EVA exercise in JSC's WETF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, mission specialists George D. Nelson and John M. Lounge, wearing extravehicular mobility units (EMUs), participate in contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) exercise in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Overall view of WETF underwater activity shows Nelson (foreground) working with EVA wrench as Lounge looks on and SCUBA-equipped divers monitor procedures. A mockup of the tracking and data relay satellite C (TDRS-C) appears behind astronauts in payload bay (PLB). In the event of in-cabin remote control failure, the procedure Nelson is conducting would upright the tracking and data relay satellite C (TDRS-C) from its stowed position to its deployment position. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

1988-01-01

307

STS-26 mission specialists participate in EVA simulation in JSC's WETF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, mission specialists George D. Nelson (left) and John M. Lounge, wearing extravehicular mobility units (EMUs), participate in a contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Nelson, neutrally buoyant (floating), watches as Lounge, assisted by SCUBA divers, enters payload bay (PLB) mockup through airlock hatch. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

1988-01-01

308

STS-26 MS Lounge prepares for contingency EVA exercises in JSC's WETF Bldg 29  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), stands on a poolside platform while technicians check EMU helmet interface at neck ring. SCUBA-equipped divers, already in pool, look on. Lounge dons EMU prior to a contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 where he will achieve neutral buoyancy. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

1988-01-01

309

STS-26 MS Lounge prepares for contingency EVA exercises in JSC's WETF Bldg 29  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), stands on a poolside platform while technicians ready his communications carrier assembly (CCA). SCUBA divers already in the pool look on. Lounge dons EMU prior to a contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 where he will achieve neutral buoyancy. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

1988-01-01

310

STS-39 MS McMonagle dons EMU for underwater EVA simulation in JSC's WETF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technicians assist STS-39 Mission Specialist (MS) Donald R. McMonagle in straightening the sleeves of his extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). McMonagle is standing on a platform which will be lowered into a nearby 25 ft deep pool for an underwater simulation of contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) procedures. He is scheduled to be a crewmember aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, in the spring of 1991.

1990-01-01

311

View of rim of South Ray crater on traverse up Stone Mountain during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A view of the rim of South Ray crater photographed with a 500mm lens from Station no.4 -- the highest point on the traverse up Stone Mountain -- during the second Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-2) at the Descartes landing site. South Ray crater was a 'fresh' source of angular ejecta in the Lunar Module-Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package area and for samples at Station No.8.

1972-01-01

312

Astronaut David Wolf participates in training for contingency EVA in WETF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut David A. Wolf participates in training for contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-58 mission. The mission specialist was about to be submerged ito a point of neutral buoyancy in the JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). In this view, Wolf is displaying the flexibility of his training version of the Shuttle extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) by lifting his arms above his head (31701); Wolf waves to the camera before he is submerged in the WETF (31702).

1993-01-01

313

Astronaut David Scott on slope of Hadley Delta during Apollo 15 EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut David R. Scott, mission commander, standing on the slope of Hadley Delta, uses a 70mm camera during Apollo 15 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. He is some 10.5 miles (or 17.5 kilometers) from the base of the Apennine Mountains seen in the background. Scott carries tongs in his left hand. The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) or Rover is in the background. This view is looking east.

1971-01-01

314

Astronaut John Young replaces tools in Lunar Roving Vehicle during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, replaces tools in the Apollo lunar hand tool carrier at the aft end of the Lunar Roving Vehicle during the second Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-2) at the Descartes landing site. This photograph was taken by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. Smoky Mountain, with the large Ravine crater on its flank, is in the left background. This view is looking northeast.

1972-01-01

315

Standardized Test Methodology for Measuring Pressure Suit Glove Performance and Demonstration Units.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report reflects the effort of a two-phase task for developing a standardized test methodology for comparing pressure gloves and for analyzing current pressure glove performance requirements to determine performance specifications required for an enha...

D. Cadogan L. Jackson R. Lingo D. Wilson

1994-01-01

316

Design and evaluation of a low-cost instrumented glove for hand function assessment  

PubMed Central

Background The evaluation of hand function impairment following a neurological disorder (stroke and cervical spinal cord injury) requires sensitive, reliable and clinically meaningful assessment tools. Clinical performance measures of hand function mainly focus on the accomplishment of activities of daily living (ADL), typically rather complex tasks assessed by a gross ordinal rating; while the motor performance (i.e. kinematics) is less detailed. The goal of this study was to develop a low-cost instrumented glove to capture details in grasping, feasible for the assessment of hand function in clinical practice and rehabilitation settings. Methods Different sensor types were tested for output signal stability over time by measuring the signal drift of their step responses. A system that converted sensor output voltages into angles based on pre-measured curves was implemented. Furthermore, the voltage supply of each sensor signal conditioning circuit was increased to enhance the sensor resolution. The repeatability of finger bending trajectories, recorded during the performance of three ADL-based tasks, was established using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Moreover, the accuracy of the glove was evaluated by determining the agreement between angles measured with the embedded sensors and angles measured by traditional goniometry. In addition, the feasibility of the glove was tested in four patients with a pathological hand function caused by a cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI). Results A sensor type that displayed a stable output signal over time was identified, and a high sensor resolution of 0.5° was obtained. The evaluation of the glove's reliability yielded high ICC values (0.84 to 0.92) with an accuracy error of about ± 5°. Feasibility testing revealed that the glove was sensitive to distinguish different levels of hand function impairment in cSCI patients. Conclusions The device satisfied the desired system requirements in terms of low cost, stable sensor signal over time, full finger-flexion range of motion tracking and capability to monitor all three joints of one finger. The developed rapid calibration system for easy use (high feasibility) and excellent psychometric properties (i.e. reliability and validity) qualify the device for the assessment of hand function in clinical practice and rehabilitation settings.

2012-01-01

317

Mechanisms to improve the mechanical performance of surgical gloves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of gloves as a barrier to cross infection in the medical industry has increased substantially due to the heightened awareness of viral transmission, especially the human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B virus. The glove must allow for tactile sensation, comfort and long use times, while providing equally critical mechanical performance. The majority of surgical gloves are made of natural rubber latex which do not give a critical level of cut-resistance or puncture-resistance. Natural rubber latex gloves are also known to cause latex allergy with hypersensitivity reactions ranging from mild skin rashes to more severe bronchial asthma, anaphylactic reactions, and even death. It has been postulated natural rubber latex (NRL) proteins cause these allergic reactions. The research that has been conducted comprises two approaches that have been explored for improving the cut-resistance of surgical gloves. The first method involves an integral fiber-latex structure that possesses the combination of high reversible extensibility, barrier performance and retention of tactile sense. Improvement in mechanical properties in excess of 85% has been achieved as well as an improvement in cut-resistance. The second method involves the incorporation of a low concentration of ultra high molecular weight (UHMW) polyacrylamide. Although the initial premise for using a UHMW polymer was that it would bridge the latex compound particulates to improve strength, an entirely different mechanism for the enhancement of strength was explored through a parallel investigation of the release of proteins from cured natural rubber. However, no mechanism was conclusively identified. To address the allergy aspects of NRL, a thorough examination of the release of naturally-occurring latex proteins from cured natural rubber latex glove material was conducted in order to identify mechanisms for eliminating and/or reducing the potential allergens. The initial study examined the release of loaded proteins from cured NR and NR that contained PA in the initial latex compound and the results showed the likelihood of binding between proteins and PA.

Watkins, Michelle Hoyt

1997-11-01

318

Anthropomorphic teleoperation: Controlling remote manipulators with the DataGlove  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A two phase effort was conducted to assess the capabilities and limitations of the DataGlove, a lightweight glove input device that can output signals in real-time based on hand shape, orientation, and movement. The first phase was a period for system integration, checkout, and familiarization in a virtual environment. The second phase was a formal experiment using the DataGlove as input device to control the protoflight manipulator arm (PFMA) - a large telerobotic arm with an 8-ft reach. The first phase was used to explore and understand how the DataGlove functions in a virtual environment, build a virtual PFMA, and consider and select a reasonable teleoperation control methodology. Twelve volunteers (six males and six females) participated in a 2 x 3 (x 2) full-factorial formal experiment using the DataGlove to control the PFMA in a simple retraction, slewing, and insertion task. Two within-subjects variables, time delay (0, 1, and 2 seconds) and PFMA wrist flexibility (rigid/flexible), were manipulated. Gender served as a blocking variable. A main effect of time delay was found for slewing and total task times. Correlations among questionnaire responses, and between questionnaire responses and session mean scores and gender were computed. The experimental data were also compared with data collected in another study that used a six degree-of-freedom handcontroller to control the PFMA in the same task. It was concluded that the DataGlove is a legitimate teleoperations input device that provides a natural, intuitive user interface. From an operational point of view, it compares favorably with other 'standard' telerobotic input devices and should be considered in future trades in teleoperation systems' designs.

Hale, J. P., II

1992-01-01

319

New monitoring by thermogravimetry for radiation degradation of EVA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The radiation ageing of ethylene vinyl-acetate copolymer (EVA) as the jacket of cable applied in nuclear power plant was carried out by gamma rays irradiation, and the degradation was monitored by a thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). The EVA decomposition rate in air by the isothermal at 400 °C decreased with increase of dose and also with decrease of the dose rate. The behavior of EVA jacket of cable indicated that the decomposition rate at 400 °C was reduced with increase of oxidation. The elongation at break by tensile test for the radiation aged EVA was closely related to the decomposition rate at 400 °C; therefore, the TGA might be applied for a diagnostic technique of the cable degradation.

Boguski, J.; Przybytniak, G.; ?yczko, K.

2014-07-01

320

Development of an EVA systems cost model. Volume 2: Shuttle orbiter crew and equipment translation concepts and EVA workstation concept development and integration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

EVA crewman/equipment translational concepts are developed for a shuttle orbiter payload application. Also considered are EVA workstation systems to meet orbiter and payload requirements for integration of workstations into candidate orbiter payload worksites.

1975-01-01

321

A novel method of assessing the effectiveness of protective gloves--results from a pilot study.  

PubMed

We have devised a novel method for evaluating the effectiveness of protective gloves and have undertaken a small study to assess this approach. Three types of glove were tested in a standardised simulation test with a permethrin-based pesticide. Prewashed cotton gloves were used to collect the samples. One was worn over the protective glove on one hand to measure the potential deposition of pesticide on the hands had the gloves not been worn. A second was placed under the protective glove on the opposite hand to measure the actual deposition of permethrin on the hands when the gloves were worn. This regime was reversed half way through each test in an attempt to prevent bias. Measurable inner glove contamination occurred on 25 out of 30 occasions. Geometric mean protection factors were calculated from the ratio of outer and inner sampling glove contamination, with average protection factors of 470, 200 and 96 being obtained for the two nitrile and PVC gloves, respectively. The PVC gloves were the least effective in preventing inner glove contamination, probably because the glove was thick and fairly inflexible, causing more pesticide to enter the glove around the cuff. Although the tasks were standardised, variability occurred due to worker behaviour and equipment failure. The spray pump failed on five occasions, resulting in higher levels of inner glove contamination and a geometric mean protection factor of 32. On the occasions when the pump worked correctly, the level of protection provided by the gloves rose dramatically with mean protection factors of 220 and 450 being obtained for workers categorised as "messy" and "tidy", respectively. PMID:11182427

Creely, K S; Cherrie, J W

2001-03-01

322

EVA: GPS-based extended velocity and acceleration determination  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, a new GPS carrier phase-based velocity and acceleration determination method is presented that extends the effective\\u000a range of previous techniques. The method is named ‘EVA’, and may find applications in fields such as airborne gravimetry when\\u000a rough terrain or water bodies make difficult or impractical to set up nearby GPS reference receivers. The EVA method is similar

Dagoberto Salazar; Manuel Hernandez-Pajares; Jose Miguel Juan-Zornoza; Jaume Sanz-Subirana; Angela Aragon-Angel

2011-01-01

323

Radiation graft copolymer of acrylic acid onto EVA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structure of the radiation graft copolymer of acrylic acid onto EVA has been studied by infrared spectroscopy and XPS. It was found that along with the main peal C1m there is a photoelectron peak at 288.5eV attributed to --OH group in XPS spectra and the content of its area in XPS increases with increasing of grafting degree of EVA.

J. T. Che; W. X. Zhang

1993-01-01

324

Abrasion Testing of Candidate Outer Layer Fabrics for Lunar EVA Space Suits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the Apollo program, the space suit outer layer fabrics were badly abraded after just a few Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots, which penetrated the outer layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than eight hours of surface operations. Current plans for the Constellation Space Suit Element require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on the Lunar surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last forty years and improve upon the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo program. A test methodology has been developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division for establishing comparative abrasion wear characteristics between various candidate space suit outer layer fabrics. The abrasion test method incorporates a large rotary drum tumbler with rocks and loose lunar simulant material to induce abrasion in fabric test cylinder elements, representative of what might occur during long term planetary surface EVAs. Preliminary materials screening activities were conducted to determine the degree of wear on representative space suit outer layer materials and the corresponding dust permeation encountered between subsequent sub -layers of thermal protective materials when exposed to a simulated worst case eight hour EVA. The test method was used to provide a preliminary evaluation of four candidate outer layer fabrics for future planetary surface space suit applications. This Paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details the methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, and shares the results and conclusions of the testing.

Mitchell, Kathryn C.

2010-01-01

325

Moments applied in the manual assembly of space structures - Ease biomechanics results from STS-61B. [Experimental Assembly of Structures in EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements of the level and pattern of moments applied in the manual assembly of a space structure were made in extravehicular activity (EVA) and neutral buoyancy simulation (NBS). The Experimental Assembly of Structures in EVA program included the repeated assembly of a 3.6 m tetrahedral truss structure in EVA on STS-61B after extensive neutral buoyancy crew training. The flight and training structures were of equivalent mass and geometry to allow a direct correlation between EVA and NBS performance. A stereo photographic motion camera system was used to reconstruct in three dimensions rotational movements of structural beams during assembly. Moments applied in these manual handling tasks were calculated on the basis of the reconstructed movements taking into account effects of inertia, drag and virtual mass. Applied moments of 2.0 Nm were typical for beam rotations in EVA. Corresponding applied moments in NBS were typically up to five times greater. Moments were applied as impulses separated by several seconds of coasting in both EVA and NBS. Decelerating impulses were only infrequently observed in NBS.

Cousins, D.; Akin, D. L.

1989-01-01

326

Eva Nogales: Introduction to Electron Microscopy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lecture from the iBioSeminars project is presented by Eva Nogales Molecular Cell Biology Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and it covers Visualizing Biological Structure Using Electron Microscopy: From Molecules to Cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) offers the possibility of visualizing biological structures at resolution well beyond that of light microscopy. Whether you are interested in the ultrastructure of cells and organelles, or in the detailed molecular structure of biological macromolecules, different modalities of TEM can generally be applied to your system of interest. The lecture reviews the physical principles underlying image formation by the interaction of electrons with matter, introduces you to basic and advanced instruments and to sample preparation techniques. Using a number of biological examples from work in the Nogales lab, the lecture then describes the capabilities of the TEM methodology. Special emphasis is placed on the image processing methods used to obtain three-dimensional information from TEM data. The video runs 46:55 and can be downloaded in a number of formats: QuickTime, MP4, M4V, and PPT. The video can also be streamed through YouTube or iTunes U.

Nogales, Eva

2013-07-10

327

Efficiency of electrolyzed oxidizing water on reducing Listeria monocytogenes contamination on seafood processing gloves.  

PubMed

Food processing gloves are typically used to prevent cross-contamination during food preparation. However, gloves can be contaminated with microorganisms and become a source of contamination. This study investigated the survival of Listeria monocytogenes on gloves and determined the efficacy of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water for reducing L. monocytogenes contamination on seafood processing gloves. Three types of reusable gloves (natural rubber latex, natural latex, and nitrile) and two types of disposable gloves (latex and nitrile) were cut into small pieces (4 x 4 cm(2)) and inoculated with 5-strain L. monocytogenes cocktail (5.1 x 10(7) CFU/cm(2)) with and without shrimp meat residue attached to surfaces. L. monocytogenes did not survive well on clean reusable gloves and its populations decreased rapidly to non-detectable levels within 30 min at room temperature. However, high levels of Listeria cells were recovered from clean disposable gloves after 30 min of inoculation. Presence of shrimp meat residue on gloves enhanced the survival of L. monocytogenes. Cells of L. monocytogenes were detected on both reusable and disposal gloves even after 2 h at room temperature. Soaking inoculated gloves in EO water at room temperature for 5 min completely eliminated L. monocytogenes on clean gloves (>4.46 log CFU/cm(2) reductions) and significantly (p<0.05) reduced the contamination on soil-containing gloves when compared with tap water treatment. EO water could be used as a sanitizer to reduce L. monocytogenes contamination on gloves and reduce the possibility of transferring L. monocytogenes from gloves to RTE seafoods. PMID:16690154

Liu, Chengchu; Su, Yi-Cheng

2006-07-15

328

14. VIEW OF THE OUTSIDE OF A GLOVE BOX THAT ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. VIEW OF THE OUTSIDE OF A GLOVE BOX THAT CONTAINS ELECTROREFINING EQUIPMENT. ELECTROREFINING WAS ONE OF THE PROCESSES USED TO PURIFY PLUTONIUM THAT DID NOT MEET PURITY SPECIFICATIONS. (10/25/66) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

329

The Galvactivator: A glove that senses and communicates skin conductivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The galvactivator is a glove-like wearable device that senses the wearer's skin conductivity and maps its values to a bright LED display, making the skin conductivity level visible. Increases in skin conductivity tend to be good indicators of physiological arousal --- causing the galvactivator display to glow brightly. The new form factor of this sensor frees the wearer from the

Rosalind W. Picard; Jocelyn Scheirer

2001-01-01

330

Modelling of RTF Glove-Box And Stripper System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The glove box-stripper system for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) has been modelled to calculate the steady-state levels of various gas species such as N2, 02, T2, H20, T20, and CT4 that might be expected to be present. These calculations are inten...

1986-01-01

331

PERMEATION OF MULTIFUNCTIONAL ACRYLATES THROUGH SELECTED PROTECTIVE GLOVE MATERIALS  

Microsoft Academic Search

In support of the Premanufacture Notification (PMN) program of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Toxic Substances, the resistance of three glove materials to permeation by multifunctional acrylate compounds was evaluated through a program for the Office of Research and Development. Several recent PMN submissions relate to multifunctional acrylates and essentially no permeation data are available for this class of

Esperanza Piano Renard; Rosemary Goydan; Thomas Stolki

1992-01-01

332

18. DETAILED VIEW OF A GLOVE BOX DAMAGED IN A ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. DETAILED VIEW OF A GLOVE BOX DAMAGED IN A FIRE THAT OCCURRED ON MAY 11, 1969. THE FIRE OCCURRED FROM THE SPONTANEOUS IGNITION OF A BRIQUETTE OF SCRAP PLUTONIUM ALLOY METAL. (5/18/69) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

333

2. VIEW OF THE GLOVE BOX WHERE, ON SEPTEMBER 11, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. VIEW OF THE GLOVE BOX WHERE, ON SEPTEMBER 11, 1957, A FIRE STARTED. THE FIRE SPREAD TO THE REST OF THE BUILDING, RESULTING IN THE TRANSFER OF PLUTONIUM FOUNDRY, FABRICATION, AND ASSEMBLY OPERATIONS TO BUILDING 776/777. (9/16/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

334

Experimental set-up and sensory glove interface for microsurgery.  

PubMed

One of the most fundamental prerequisites for successful microsurgery is thoughtful and adequate training. A combination of knowledge, technical skill, and decision making directly influences the surgical outcome. This study aims to analyse microsurgical hand coordinations quantitatively and to study the utility of a sensory glove interface in identifying the hand coordination patterns during microsurgery. A sensory glove interface used to measure the angular flexion-extension movements of the major interphalangeal joints of the hand, the grasp pressure, and the relative hand movements has been developed. Experiments of two suturing techniques were conducted with five experienced microsurgeons, and microsurgery practice was examined. The custom sensory glove interface required both signal conditioning and amplification which was directly interfaced with a custom-designed LABView software code. The sensory glove interface was calibrated using regression techniques and the set-up was validated using the Bland-Altman correlation technique. The hand coordination patterns were analysed using principal-component analysis. Pareto plots showing the contribution of the principal components were analysed. The contributions of the first two sensory data components have also been compared with hand coordination studies. The temporal variations provided new insights into the underlying synergetic mechanisms and in particular the relation between different suture techniques on grasp pressure. PMID:18335721

Amirouche, F; Martin, J R; Gonzalez, M; Fergusson, L

2008-01-01

335

High expansion foam fire control system for gloved boxes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of hazardous materials in gloved boxes has resulted in a need for rapid fire detection and extinguishment within the\\u000a enclosures. Inert atmospheres and reduced atmospheres have been tested but have not yielded the degree of reliability required.\\u000a An automatic high expansion foam system, which has given satisfactory results, is described by the authors.

C. L. Lindeken; R. D. Taylor

1965-01-01

336

8. VIEW OF GLOVE BOXES USED IN THE ANION EXCHANGE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. VIEW OF GLOVE BOXES USED IN THE ANION EXCHANGE PROCESS. THE ANION EXCHANGE PROCESS PURIFIED AND CONCENTRATED PLUTONIUM-BEARING NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS TO MAKE THEM ACCEPTABLE AS FEED FOR CONVERSION TO METAL. (6/20/60) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

337

Evaluation of an instrumented glove for hand-movement acquisition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract—Quantitative assessment of digit range of motion (ROM) is often needed for monitoring effectiveness of rehabili- tative treatments and assessing patients’ functional impairment. The objective of this research was to investigate the feasibility ofusing the Humanware Humanglove, a 20-position sensors glove, to measure fingers’ ROM, with particular regard to mea- surement repeatability. With this aim, we performed a series of

Laura Dipietro; Angelo M. Sabatini; Paolo Dario

2003-01-01

338

1. PEAVEY GLOVE ELEVATOR, SUPERIOR, WI 1887; WORKHOUSE (NO. 1 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. PEAVEY GLOVE ELEVATOR, SUPERIOR, WI 1887; WORKHOUSE (NO. 1 HOUSE) WOOD FRAME CONSTRUCTION. VIEW FROM NORTHERN PACIFIC TRAIN BED, LOOKING APPROXIMATELY SOUTHEAST; NO. 2 HOUSE IN CENTER; NO. 3 HOUSE ON EXTREME RIGHT. - Peavey Globe Elevator, No. 1 House, West Gate Basin & Howard's Bay, east side of slip, Superior, Douglas County, WI

339

2. PEAVEY GLOVE ELEVATOR, WORKHOUSE (NO. 1 HOUSE) WOOD FRAME ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. PEAVEY GLOVE ELEVATOR, WORKHOUSE (NO. 1 HOUSE) WOOD FRAME CONSTRUCTION, SHIPLOADER SIDE. WEST WALL. MARINE LEG ADDED SOME TIME BETWEEN 1907-1919. METAL PASSENGER ELEVATOR SHAFT ADDED IN EARLY 1970S. - Peavey Globe Elevator, No. 1 House, West Gate Basin & Howard's Bay, east side of slip, Superior, Douglas County, WI

340

EVA Assembly of Large Space Structure Neutral Buoyancy, Zero-Gravity Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

EVA Assembly of Large Space Structure Neutral Buoyancy, Zero-Gravity Simulation: NASA-LaRC Nestable Columns and Joints. The film depicts an extravehicular activity (EVA) that involved the assembly of six 'space-weight' columns into a regular tetrahedral cell by a team of two 'space'-suited test subjects. This cell represents the fundamental 'element' of a tetrahedral truss structure. The tests were conducted under simulated zero-gravity conditions, achieved by neutral buoyancy in water. The cell was assembled on an 'outrigger' assembly aid off the side of a mockup of the Shuttle Orbiter cargo bay. Both manual and simulated remote manipulator system (RMS) modes were evaluated. The simulated RMS was used only to transfer stowed hardware from the cargo bay to the work sites. Articulation limits of the pressure suit and zero gravity could be accommodated by work stations with foot restraints. The results of this study have confirmed that astronaut EVA assembly of large, erectable space structur is well within man's capabilities. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070031008. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

1979-01-01

341

Minimizing EVA Airlock Time and Depress Gas Losses  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the need and solution for minimizing EVA airlock time and depress gas losses using a new method that minimizes EVA out-the-door time for a suited astronaut and reclaims most of the airlock depress gas. This method consists of one or more related concepts that use an evacuated reservoir tank to store and reclaim the airlock depress gas. The evacuated tank can be an inflatable tank, a spent fuel tank from a lunar lander descent stage, or a backup airlock. During EVA airlock operations, the airlock and reservoir would be equalized at some low pressure, and through proper selection of reservoir size, most of the depress gas would be stored in the reservoir for later reclamation. The benefit of this method is directly applicable to long duration lunar and Mars missions that require multiple EVA missions (up to 100, two-person lunar EVAs) and conservation of consumables, including depress pump power and depress gas. The current ISS airlock gas reclamation method requires approximately 45 minutes of the astronaut s time in the airlock and 1 KW in electrical power. The proposed method would decrease the astronaut s time in the airlock because the depress gas is being temporarily stored in a reservoir tank for later recovery. Once the EVA crew is conducting the EVA, the volume in the reservoir would be pumped back to the cabin at a slow rate. Various trades were conducted to optimize this method, which include time to equalize the airlock with the evacuated reservoir versus reservoir size, pump power to reclaim depress gas versus time allotted, inflatable reservoir pros and cons (weight, volume, complexity), and feasibility of spent lunar nitrogen and oxygen tanks as reservoirs.

Trevino, Luis A.; Lafuse, Sharon A.

2008-01-01

342

The warning glove - Development and evaluation of a multimodal action-specific warning prototype.  

PubMed

This paper has two objectives: first, to introduce the concept of multimodal action-specific warnings and its prototypic realization in the form of a warning glove and second, to present the main findings of a user study that was conducted to test the warning glove against a conventional warning system. Regarding the first goal, the combination of multimodality and action-specificity was implemented by attaching electronic actuators on a right-handed glove for transmitting visual, auditory and tactile feedback. For the second objective, a user study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the warning glove is capable of obtaining faster responses and to determine the perceptions of the users regarding the appropriateness of the warning glove. The results confirmed the assumption of faster response times and participants perceived the warning glove to be 'fairly appropriate'. These results warrant further development of this multimodal action-specific warning glove. PMID:24119868

Schmuntzsch, Ulrike; Sturm, Christine; Roetting, Matthias

2014-09-01

343

Use of double gloving to reduce surgical personnel's risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens: an integrative review.  

PubMed

Surgical team members are known to have a higher incidence of percutaneous injuries compared with other health care workers, which increases surgical personnel's risk both of exposure to bloodborne pathogens and acquiring bloodborne illnesses. The purpose of this integrative review was to determine whether double gloving reduces the surgical team member's risk of percutaneous injury when compared with single gloving. Factors addressed are double gloving versus single gloving, use of an indicator glove system, optimum levels of protection, and policies and procedures to facilitate compliance with double gloving. Evidence supports the use of double gloving and double gloving with an indicator glove system to decrease the risk of percutaneous injury and therefore is an effective barrier to bloodborne pathogen exposure. Perioperative managers and educators should develop educational methods to support double-gloving compliance; monitor and conduct periodic audits to evaluate compliance; and review and revise quality improvement strategies as necessary to protect surgical employees from percutaneous injuries. PMID:24266931

Childs, Tammy

2013-12-01

344

Pegasus Rocket Wing and PHYSX Glove Undergoes Stress Loads Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Pegasus Hypersonic Experiment (PHYSX) Project's Pegasus rocket wing with attached PHYSX glove rests after load-tests at Scaled Composites, Inc., in Mojave, California, in January 1997. Technicians slowly filled water bags beneath the wing, to create the pressure, or 'wing-loading,' required to determine whether the wing could withstand its design limit for stress. The wing sits in a wooden triangular frame which serves as the test-rig, mounted to the floor atop the waterbags. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia, is the manufacturer of the Pegasus vehicle, while Vandenberg Air Force Base served as a pre-launch assembly facility for the launch that included the PHYSX experiment. NASA used data from Pegasus launches to obtain considerable data on aerodynamics. By conducting experiments in a piggyback mode on Pegasus, some critical and secondary design and development issues were addressed at hypersonic speeds. The vehicle was also used to develop hypersonic flight instrumentation and test techniques. NASA's B-52 carrier-launch vehicle was used to get the Pegasus airborne during six launches from 1990 to 1994. Thereafter, an Orbital Sciences L-1011 aircraft launched the Pegasus. The Pegasus launch vehicle itself has a 400- to 600-pound payload capacity in a 61-cubic-foot payload space at the front of the vehicle. The vehicle is capable of placing a payload into low earth orbit. This vehicle is 49 feet long and 50 inches in diameter. It has a wing span of 22 feet. (There is also a Pegasus XL vehicle that was introduced in 1994. Dryden has never launched one of these vehicles, but they have greater thrust and are 56 feet long.)

1997-01-01

345

Evaluation of an Anthropometric Human Body Model for Simulated EVA Task Assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the more mission-critical tasks performed in space is extravehicular activity (EVA) which requires the astronaut to be external to the station or spacecraft, and subsequently at risk from the many threats posed by space. These threats include, but are not limited to: no significant atmosphere, harmful electromagnetic radiation, micrometeoroids, and space debris. To protect the astronaut from this environment, a special EVA suit is worn which is designed to maintain a sustainable atmosphere (at 1/3 atmosphere) and provide protection against the hazards of space. While the EVA suit serves these functions well, it does impose limitations on the astronaut as a consequence of the safety it provides. Since the astronaut is in a virtual vacuum, any atmospheric pressure inside the suit serves to pressurize the suit and restricts mobility of flexible joints (such as fabric). Although some of the EVA suit joints are fixed, rotary-style joints, most of the mobility is achieved by the simple flexibility of the fabric. There are multiple layers of fabric, each of which serves a special purpose in the safety of the astronaut. These multiple layers add to the restriction of motion the astronaut experiences in the space environment. Ground-based testing is implemented to evaluate the capability of EVA-suited astronauts to perform the various tasks in space. In addition to the restriction of motion imposed by the EVA suit, most EVA activity is performed in a micro-gravity (weight less) environment. To simulate weightlessness EVA-suited testing is performed in a neutral buoyancy simulator (NBS). The NBS is composed of a large container of water (pool) in which a weightless environment can be simulated. A subject is normally buoyant in the pressurized suit; however he/she can be made neutrally buoyant with the addition of weights. In addition, most objects the astronaut must interface with in the NBS sink in water and flotation must be added to render them "weightless". The implementation of NBS testing has proven to invaluable in the assessment of EVA activities performed with the Orbiter and is considered to be a key step in the construction of the International Space Station (ISS). While the NBS testing is extremely valuable, it does require considerable overhead to maintain and operate. It has been estimated that the cost of utilizing the facility is approximately $10,000 per day. Therefore it is important to maximize the utility of NBS testing for optimal results. One important aspect to consider in any human/worksite interface is the considerable wealth of anthropometric and ergonomic data available. A subset of this information specific to EVA activity is available in NASA standard 3000. The difficulty in implementing this data is that most of the anthropometric information is represented in a two-dimensional format. This poses some limitations in complete evaluation of the astronaut's capabilities in a three-dimensional environment. Advances in computer hardware and software have provided for three-dimensional design and implementation of hardware with the advance of computer aided design (CAD) software. There are a number of CAD products available and most companies and agencies have adopted CAD as a fundamental aspect of the design process. Another factor which supports the use of CAD is the implementation of computer aided manufacturing (CAM) software and hardware which provides for rapid prototyping and decreases the time to product in the design process. It is probable that most hardware to be accessed by astronauts in EVA or IVA (intravehicular activity) has been designed by a CAD system, and is therefore represented in three-dimensional space for evaluation. Because of the implementation of CAD systems and the movement towards early prototyping, a need has arisen in industry and government for tools which facilitate the evaluation of ergonomic consideration in a three-dimensional environment where the hardware has been designed by the CAD tools. One such product is Jack which was developed by the University

Etter, Brad

1996-01-01

346

Decompression Sickness During Simulated Extravehicular Activity: Ambulation vs. Non-Ambulation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Extravehicular activity (EVA) is required from the International Space Station on a regular basis. Because of the weightless environment during EVA, physical activity is performed using mostly upper-body movements since the lower body is anchored for stab...

J. T. Webb, D. P. Beckstrand, A. A. Pilmanis, U. I. Balldin

2005-01-01

347

Transport of a solvent mixture across two glove materials when applied in a paint matrix.  

PubMed

The transport of mixed paint solvents through natural rubber latex (4 mil) and nitrile rubber (5 mil) gloves was evaluated after spray application of the paint formulation directly on the glove surface. Glove materials and thicknesses were those selected by the majority of spray painters in the local automobile repair industry. A flat panel containing glove specimens mounted in multiple permeation cells permitted evaporation of solvents from the applied paint and incorporated a solid sorbent receiving medium for measuring glove membrane transport. The panel was sprayed in a paint booth to simulate use conditions. Charcoal cloth under the glove adsorbed transported solvents, which were quantified by gas chromatography. For each solvent component, results were expressed as mass transported through the glove relative to the mass applied, per unit area, during 30 min after spray application. The paint formulation contained ketones, acetates, and aromatics. Natural rubber latex allowed 6-10 times the transport of solvents relative to nitrile rubber for all eight solvent components: methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, styrene, ethyl benzene, xylene isomers, and 2-heptanone. m-Xylene showed the largest difference in transport between the two glove materials. This solvent also had the highest transport for each material. The results indicate that nitrile rubber gloves offer somewhat greater chemical resistance to all eight solvents studied compared with natural rubber latex gloves, regardless of the chemical properties of the individual solvent components. However, it must be emphasized that neither of the glove materials, in the thicknesses used in this study, provide adequate protection when exposed by direct spray painting. Simulation of realistic spray conditions may offer a source of useful information on the performance of chemical protective gloves because it accounts for solvent evaporation and the effect of paint polymerization after application on glove transport. PMID:22434453

Tran, Jackelin Q; Ceballos, Diana M; Dills, Russell L; Yost, Michael G; Morgan, Michael S

2012-07-01

348

Sensory substitution for space gloves and for space robots  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sensory substitution systems for space applications are described. Physical sensors replace missing human receptors and feed information to the interpretive centers of a different sense. The brain is plastic enough so that, with training, the subject localizes the input as if it were received through the missing receptors. Astronauts have difficulty feeling objects through space suit gloves because of their thickness and because of the 4.3 psi pressure difference. Miniature force sensors on the glove palm drive an electrotactile belt around the waist, thus augmenting the missing tactile sensation. A proposed teleoperator system with telepresence for a space robot would incorporate teleproprioception and a force sensor/electrotactile belt sensory substitution system for teletouch.

Bach-Y-rita, P.; Webster, J. G.; Tompkins, W. J.; Crabb, T.

1987-01-01

349

F-16XL Ship #2 Laminar Flow Glove mounting  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's two-seat F-16XL research aircraft is shown in the modification hangar at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, during installation of a titanium 'glove' on the upper surface of its modified left wing. The aircraft subsequently carried out a 13-month-long, 45-flight research program which investigated drawing off a small part of the boundary-layer air in order to provide laminar--or smooth--flow over a major portion of a wing flying at supersonic speeds. A turbo-compressor in the aircraft's fuselage provided suction to draw air through more than 10 million tiny laser-drilled holes in the glove via a manifold system employing 20 valves. Data obtained during the program could assist designers of future aircraft in developing a more efficient high-speed civil transport.

1995-01-01

350

Application of glove box robotics to hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a semi-automated system for handling, characterizing, processing, sorting, and repackaging hazardous wastes containing tritium. The system combines an IBM developed gantry robot with a special glove box enclosure designed to protect the operators and minimize the potential release of tritium to the atmosphere. All hazardous waste handling and processing will be performed remotely using the robot in a telerobotic mode for one-of-a-kind functions and in an autonomous mode for repetitive type operations. The system will initially be used in conjunction with a portable gas system designed to capture any gaseous phase tritium released into the glove box. This paper presents the objectives of this program, provides background related to LLNL`s robotics and waste handling program, describes the major system components, outlines system operation, and discusses current status and plans.

Dennison, D.K.; Hurd, R.L.; Merrill, R.D.; Reitz, T.C.

1995-02-01

351

Astronauts Carl Meade and Mark Lee test SAFER during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Backdropped against the darkness of space some 130 nautical miles above Earth, astronaut Mark C. Lee (red stripe on EVA suit) tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. Astronaut Carl J. Meade, tethered to Discovery, at bottom center, got his turn later using the new SAFER hardware. The scen was captured with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera operated by a fellow crew member in the shirt-sleeve environment of the Space Shuttle Discovery's cabin. Part of the hardware for the Lidar-In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) is in left foreground.

1994-01-01

352

Chemical Resistance of Disposable Nitrile Gloves Exposed to Simulated Movement  

PubMed Central

Large discrepancies between laboratory permeation testing and field exposures have been reported, with indications that hand movement could account for a portion of these differences. This study evaluated the influence of simulated movement on chemical permeation of 30 different disposable nitrile glove products. Products were investigated out-of-box and with exposure to simulated whole-glove movement. Permeation testing was conducted using ethanol as a surrogate test chemical. A previously designed pneumatic system was used to simulate hand movement. No movement and movement tests were matched-paired to control for environmental conditions, as were statistical analyses. Permeation data were collected for a 30-min exposure period or until a breakthrough time (BT) and steady-state permeation rate (SSPR) could be determined. A third parameter, area under the curve at 30 min (AUC-30), was used to estimate potential worker exposure. With movement, a significant decrease in BT (p ? 0.05), ranging from 6–33%, was observed for 28 products. The average decrease in BT was 18% (p ? 0.001). With movement, a significant increase in SSPR (p ? 0.05), ranging from 1–78%, was observed with 25 products. The average increase in SSPR was 18% (p ? 0.001). Significant increases in AUC-30 (p ? 0.05), ranging from 23–277%, were also observed for all products where it could be calculated. On average, there was a 58% increase (p ? 0.001). The overall effect of movement on permeation through disposable nitrile gloves was significant. Simulated movement significantly shortened the BT, increased the SSPR, and increased the cumulative 30-min exposure up to three times. Product variability also accounted for large differences, up to 40 times, in permeation and cumulative exposure. Glove selection must take these factors into account. It cannot be assumed that all products will perform in a similar manner.

Phalen, Robert N.; Wong, Weng Kee

2012-01-01

353

Design of a Power-Assisted Spacesuit Glove Actuator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the details of the design and implementation of an electromechanical power-assisted spacesuit glove actuator. The project was a joint effort by the University of Maryland's Space Systems Laboratory and ILC Dover, Inc., and involved innovative approaches to power augmentation and compact actuator packaging. The first actuator built validated several basic design concepts, and the second demonstrated improved performance and met many of the goals for flight qualification of the technology.

Howard, Russell D.

2000-01-01

354

Gloved hand as applicator of antiseptic to operation sites.  

PubMed

A 95% ethanol solution containing 0-5% chlorhexidine digluconate caused a significantly greater mean reduction in skin bacteria (99-9% plus or minus 0-024) when rubbed by a gloved hand on to the skin of one hand for two minutes than when applied to the same area for the same time with the traditional gauze applicator for operation sites (90-7% plus or minus 2-12). The latter reduction, however, was greater than that reported in five previous experiments in which application of the same solution for the same time to two hands gave mean reductions varying from 79% to 84%. An aqueous solution and a 70% alcoholic solution of chlorhexidine also gave significantly greater reduction (and alcoholic povidone iodine almost significantly greater reduction) when applied by a gloved hand than on gauze. It is inferred that the effectiveness of skin disinfection depends both on the antiseptic used and on the manner of application, and varies with the amount of friction used in applying the antiseptic. Further studies on disinfection of the surgeon's hands with 0-5% chlorhexidine in 95% alcohol rubbed on and allowed to dry have supported its value and acceptability; the mean bacterial counts of washings from gloves of surgeons after operations were lower after the use of this method than after other preoperative preparations of the hands. PMID:49746

Lowbury, E J; Lilly, H A

1975-07-26

355

Eva: an evaluation tool for comparing descriptors in content-based image retrieval tasks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents Eva, a tool for evaluating image descriptors for content-based image retrieval. Eva integrates the most common stages of an image retrieval process and provides functionalities to facilitate the comparison of image descriptors in the context of content-based image retrieval. Eva supports the management of image descriptors and image collections and creates a standardized environment to run comparative

Otávio Augusto Bizetto Penatti; Ricardo da Silva Torres

2010-01-01

356

PMMA-N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles for fabrication of antibacterial natural rubber latex gloves.  

PubMed

This paper presents one-pot synthesis of N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) stabilized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) latex particles via the miniemulsion polymerization technique. From (1)H NMR, synthesized TMC contains 52% degree of quaternization. Compared to native biopolymer chitosan, TMC possesses permanently positive charges as well as provides greater antibacterial activity. Combining properties of PMMA and TMC, PMMA-TMC latex nanoparticles (hydrodynamic size ?282nm) could be used in place of inorganic lubricating powder in fabrication of latex gloves at pH ?7. After immersing sulphur prevulcanized natural rubber (SPNR) film into 3wt% of PMMA-TMC latex at pH 7, significant amount of nanoparticles uniformly deposited onto SPNR film was observed under SEM. A number of nanoparticles present on film surface would increase surface roughness of the rubber film and potentially inhibit the bacterial (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) growth, which would be useful for fabrication of special gloves with antibacterial property. PMID:24815393

Arpornwichanop, Thanida; Polpanich, Duangporn; Thiramanas, Raweewan; Suteewong, Teeraporn; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan

2014-08-30

357

Adhesion Strength Study of EVA Encapsulants on Glass Substrates  

Microsoft Academic Search

An extensive peel-test study was conducted to investigate the various factors that may affect the adhesion strength of photovoltaic module encapsulants, primarily ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA), on glass substrates of various laminates based on a common configuration of glass\\/encapsulant\\/backfoil. The results show that\\

F. J. Pern; S. H. Glick

2003-01-01

358

Ordering Chaos: Eva Miller--Multnomah County Library, Portland, OR  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eva Miller has a knack for creating order out of disorder. She single-handedly brought Oregon's virtual reference service, Answerland, live in just under 90 days, says Rivkah Sass, now director of the Omaha Public Library. Miller created its web site, designed the graphics, developed marketing materials, and recruited and trained librarians--all…

Library Journal, 2004

2004-01-01

359

Astronaut Mark Lee test SAFER system during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Backdropped against the blue and white Earth, 130 nautical miles below, astronaut Mark C. Lee test the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. The scen was captured with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera with a 30mm lens attached.

1994-01-01

360

Astronaut Mark Lee floats free of tether during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Backdropped against a massive wall of white clouds 130 nautical miles below, astronaut Mark C. Lee floats freely as he tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. The image was exposed with a 35mm camera from the shirt-sleeve environment of the Space Shuttle Discovery.

1994-01-01

361

Astronaut Mark Lee floats free of tether during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Mark C. Lee tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system 130 nautical miles above Earth. The forward cargo bay is reflected in Lee's helmet visor in the 35mm frame, exposed through the Space Shuttle Discovery's aft flight deck windows. Part of the hardware for the LIDAR-in-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) is in center foreground.

1994-01-01

362

The rheology of recycled EVA\\/LDPE modified bitumen  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes linear viscoelasticity, at low and intermediate temperatures, and the flow behaviour, at high temperatures, of polymer modified bitumen (PMB) containing 5 and 9 wt% recycled EVA\\/LDPE. The relationship between flow behaviour and microstructure of the modified bitumen was also considered, by comparison of experiments carried out in capillary and rotational rheometers and photomicrographs taken using a microscopy system

Moisés García-Morales; Pedro Partal; Francisco J. Navarro; Francisco Martínez-Boza; Malcolm R. Mackley; Críspulo Gallegos

2004-01-01

363

A comparative analysis of glove permeation resistance to paint stripping formulations.  

PubMed

Although there is a wide variety of work gloves available to users of commercial paint stripping products, there are no published studies examining which type of gloves provide the best protection. To address this need, a multiphase study was undertaken to evaluate how several types of gloves resist multichemical-based paint stripping formulations. Due to the wide range of commercial paint stripping formulations available, seven categories of surrogate paint stripper formulations were created to evaluate glove performance initially. Twenty different glove types were identified for initial evaluation. Degradation resistance screening was carried out for each glove style and paint stripping formulation. Screening results were used to identify those glove styles least affected by the surrogate paint strippers. Those gloves were then evaluated for their resistance to permeation using continuous contact testing based on ASTM Test Method F 739. Glove styles showing extensive permeation with early breakthrough were then evaluated to see how they performed with only intermittent contact with the surrogate paint strippers using a modified form of ASTM Test Method F 1383. These results were used to select glove styles to be tested using commercially available paint stripping products. Gloves made of plastic laminate and butyl rubber were the most effective against the majority of paint strippers. More glove styles resisted permeation by N-methylpyrrolidone and dibasic ester-based paint strippers than conventional solvent products such as methylene chloride, methanol, isopropanol, acetone, and toluene. The study also found that decreased contact time caused relatively little change in permeation resistance and that the surrogate paint stripper data did not always accurately predict resistance to the commercial paint stripper formulations. PMID:11843429

Stull, Jeffrey O; Thomas, Richard W; James, Lawrence E

2002-01-01

364

Testing of gloves for permeability to UV-curable acrylate coatings  

SciTech Connect

The handling of UV-curable acrylate formulations used in the coating of optical fiber requires protective measures to prevent contact dermatitis and/or allergic dermatitis. To characterize the permeability of various glove materials to a UV-curable acrylate coating, a study was undertaken using a modification of a standard ASTM permeability test, which demonstrated that nitrile rubber gloves provided the best protection of those glove materials tested.

Huggins, R.; Levy, N.; Pruitt, P.M.

1987-07-01

365

Occupational exposure to asbestos fibers resulting from use of asbestos gloves  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the magnitude of fiber emission from asbestos gloves, 10 pairs were compared in an isolation chamber during simulation of a sterilization procedure; 176 air samples were collected. Means of time weighted average (TWA) concentrations ranged from 0.95 to 11.74 fibers (>5?µm)\\/cm of air. Well-worn\\/clean gloves emitted significantly more fibers than did brand-new gloves, but fiber emission decreased with

BEHZAD S. SAMIMI; ANNA M. WILLIAMS

1981-01-01

366

The Rutgers Master II-new design force-feedback glove  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Rutgers Master II-ND glove is a haptic interface designed for dextrous interactions with virtual environments. The glove provides force feedback up to 16 N each to the thumb, index, middle, and ring fingertips. It uses custom pneumatic actuators arranged in a direct-drive configuration in the palm. Unlike commercial haptic gloves, the direct-drive actuators make unnecessary cables and pulleys, resulting

Mourad Bouzit; Grigore Burdea; George Popescu; Rares Boian

2002-01-01

367

STS-118 Astronaut Williams and Expedition 15 Engineer Anderson Perform EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 Astronaut Dave Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, participated in the fourth and final session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). During the 5 hour space walk, Williams and Expedition 15 engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame) installed the External Wireless Instrumentation System Antenna, attached a stand for the shuttle robotic arm extension boom, and retrieved the two Materials International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) for return to Earth. MISSE collects information on how different materials weather in the environment of space.

2007-01-01

368

STS-26 MS Lounge prepares for contingency EVA exercises in JSC's WETF Bldg 29  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), stands on a poolside platform while technicians adjust EMU upper torso sleeve and prepare to join EMU upper and lower torsos at the waist ring. The communications carrier assembly dangles from the EMU neck ring. SCUBA-equipped divers, already in pool, look on. Lounge dons EMU prior to a contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 where he will achieve neutral buoyancy. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

1988-01-01

369

STS-87 Mission Specialist Doi with EVA coordinator Laws participates in the CEIT for his mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi , Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, participates in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Glenda Laws, the extravehicular activity (EVA) coordinator, Johnson Space Center, stands behind Dr. Doi. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-87 will be the fourth United States Microgravity Payload and flight of the Spartan-201 deployable satellite. During the mission, Dr. Doi will be the first Japanese astronaut to perform a spacewalk. STS- 87 is scheduled for a Nov. 19 liftoff from KSC.

1997-01-01

370

Astronaut John Young looks over a boulder at Station no. 13 during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, looks over a large boulder at Station No. 13 during the third Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. This was the site of the permanently shadowed soil sample which was taken from a hole extending under overhanging rock. Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, took this photograph. Concerning Young's reaching under the big rock, Duke remarked: 'You do that in west Texas and you get a rattlesnake!'

1972-01-01

371

Custom Unit Pump Development for the EVA PLSS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design and test a pre-flight prototype pump for use in the Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump must accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting non-condensable gas without becoming air locked. The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, seal-less, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES verified that the pump meets the design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure drop, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, gas ingestion, and restart capability under both ambient and vacuum conditions. The pump operated at 40 to 240 lbm/hr flow rate, 35 to 100 oF pump temperature, and 5 to 10 psid pressure rise. Power consumption of the pump controller at the nominal operating point in both ambient and vacuum conditions was 9.5 W, which was less than the 12 W predicted. Gas ingestion capabilities were tested by injecting 100 cc of air into the fluid line; the pump operated normally throughout this test.

Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Little, Frank; Oinuma, Ryoji; Larsen, Ben; Goldman, Jeff; Reinis, Filip; Trevino, Luis

2010-01-01

372

Permeation of hair dye ingredients, p-phenylenediamine and aminophenol isomers, through protective gloves.  

PubMed

Skin irritation and contact allergies are skin disorders common to hairdressers. The predominant oxidative hair dye components, such as p-phenylenediamine (PPD) and aminophenol isomers, can cause contact dermatitis. Use of protective gloves can prevent dermal contact with skin irritants. This study investigates the permeation behaviors of p-aminophenol (PAP), m-aminophenol (MAP), o-aminophenol (OAP) and PPD in single and mixed challenge solutions with disposable natural rubber latex (NRL) gloves, disposable polyvinylchloride (PVC) gloves and neoprene (NP) gloves. The challenge solutions were 4% PPD (w/v), 3% OAP (w/v), 2% PAP (w/v) and 2% MAP (w/v) in ethanol or 12% hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cocktail solutions of the four chemicals were also tested. An American Society for Testing and Materials type permeation cell, ethanol liquid collection and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection of samples taken from the collection medium every 10 min facilitated determination of breakthrough times (BTs), cumulative permeated masses and steady-state permeation rates (SSPRs). Experiments were 4 h long for the NRL and PVC gloves and 8 h for NP gloves. No chemicals tested broke through the NP gloves when exposed for 8 h. In the ethanol solution, PPD and OAP started breaking through the PVC gloves at 40 min. The SSPRs of PVC gloves were higher than those for NRL gloves in all challenge conditions for both single chemicals and mixtures. No tested chemicals in hydrogen peroxide solutions permeated the gloves during the 4-h tests. The chemical composition of the challenge solution was a main effecter of BTs and SSPRs for the NRL glove. For disposable PVC gloves, the main factors of BTs were molecular size [molar volume (MV)] and polarity (logK(ow)), and the primary factors of SSPRs were concentration, MV and logK(ow). In conclusion, disposable NRL gloves and disposable PVC gloves should not be used repeatedly for handling the hair dye products. Hydrogen peroxide did not accelerate chemical breakthrough. The compositions of the challenge solutions and physical and chemical properties (MV and logK(ow)) affected permeation behaviors for different gloves. PMID:19279162

Lee, Hsiao-Shu; Lin, Yu-Wen

2009-04-01

373

US space flight experience. Physical exertion and metabolic demand of extravehicular activity: Past, present, and future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review of physical exertion and metabolic demands of extravehicular activity (EVA) on U.S. astronauts is given. Information is given on EVA during Gemini, Apollo and Skylab missions. It is noted that nominal EVA's should not be overstressful from a cardiovascular standpoint; that manual-intensive EVA's such as are planned for the construction phase of the Space Station can and will be demanding from a muscular standpoint, primarily for the upper extremities; that off-nominal unplanned EVA's can be physically demanding both from an endurance and from a muscular standpoint; and that crewmembers should be physically prepared and capable of performing these EVA's at any time during the mission.

Moore, Thomas P.

1989-01-01

374

Evaluation of cardiac rhythm disturbances during extravehicular activity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study represents the first systematic evaluation of dysrhythmias before, during, and after spaceflight including extravehicular activity (EVA). The data, based on 7 Shuttle crew members, revealed a nonsignificant decrease in ventricular and supraventricular ectopy during EVA, suggesting that the incidence of dysrhythmias is no greater during EVA than with any other phase of a mission or preflight.

Rossum, A. C.; Wood, M. L.; Bishop, S. L.; Deblock, H.; Charles, J. B.

1997-01-01

375

Crew/Robot Coordinated Planetary EVA Operations at a Lunar Base Analog Site  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Under the direction of NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program, robots and space suited subjects from several NASA centers recently completed a very successful demonstration of coordinated activities indicative of base camp operations on the lunar surface. For these activities, NASA chose a site near Meteor Crater, Arizona close to where Apollo Astronauts previously trained. The main scenario demonstrated crew returning from a planetary EVA (extra-vehicular activity) to a temporary base camp and entering a pressurized rover compartment while robots performed tasks in preparation for the next EVA. Scenario tasks included: rover operations under direct human control and autonomous modes, crew ingress and egress activities, autonomous robotic payload removal and stowage operations under both local control and remote control from Houston, and autonomous robotic navigation and inspection. In addition to the main scenario, participants had an opportunity to explore additional robotic operations: hill climbing, maneuvering heaving loads, gathering geo-logical samples, drilling, and tether operations. In this analog environment, the suited subjects and robots experienced high levels of dust, rough terrain, and harsh lighting.

Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Bluethmann, W. J.; Delgado, F. J.; Herrera, E.; Kosmo, J. J.; Janoiko, B. A.; Wilcox, B. H.; Townsend, J. A.; Matthews, J. B.; Fong, T. W.; Bualat, M. G.; Lee, S. Y.; Dorsey, J. T.; Doggett, W. R.

2007-01-01

376

Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission Four (HST SM4) EVA Challenges for Safe Execution of STS-125  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In May of 2009, the world-renowned Hubble Space Telescope (HST) received a suite of new instruments and a refurbished bus to enable science for many years to come. The restoration was conducted on-orbit by four space-walkers on five carefully scripted Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) days. Assuring the safety of the space-walkers and their crew-mates required careful attention to tool development, detailed procedures for every activity and many rehearsals with engineers and crew to ensure that everything worked together. Additionally, evolution of EVA requirements since the last servicing mission in 2002, and the broad scope of the mission demanded a much higher degree of safety participation in hardware design and risk acceptance than for previous servicing missions.

Dedalis, Robert P.; Hill, William H.; Rice, Karin Bergh; Cooter, Ann M.

2010-01-01

377

Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity Through Apollo  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Monitoring crew health during manned space missions has always been an important factor to ensure that the astronauts can complete the missions successfully and within safe physiological limits. The necessity of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to complete EVA tasks exceeded the life support capabilities for cooling and humidity control and crewmembers (CMs) ended the EVAs fatigued and overworked. This paper discusses the importance of real-time monitoring of metabolic rate during EVA, and provides a historical look at energy expenditure during EVA through the Apollo program.

Paul, Heather L.

2011-01-01

378

Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity Through Apollo  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Monitoring crew health during manned space missions has always been an important factor to ensure that the astronauts can complete the missions successfully and within safe physiological limits. The necessity of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to complete EVA tasks exceeded the life support capabilities for cooling and humidity control and, as a result, crew members ended the EVAs fatigued and overworked. This paper discusses the importance of real-time monitoring of metabolic rate during EVAs, and provides a historical look at energy expenditure during EVAs through the Apollo Program.

Paul, Heather L.

2012-01-01

379

Gloves and socks syndrome caused by parvovirus B19 infection.  

PubMed

The papular purpuric gloves and socks syndrome (PPGSS) is an uncommon dermatosis with a typical purpuric exanthem limited to hands and feet; it occurs mainly in young adults. We report a case of a 19-year-old man with an acute febrile illness accompanied by purpuric and papular lesions located mostly on the dorsal areas of his hands and feet. Serologic analysis for parvovirus B19 yielded positive results. The diagnosis of PPGSS was made. The eruption cleared without therapy in 12 days with plantar and palmar desquamation. Parvovirus B19 and some other viral infections have been proven to be causative agents of this syndrome. PMID:17083899

Carlesimo, M; Palese, E; Mari, E; Panasiti, V; Picarelli, A; Rossi, A; Camplone, G

2006-01-01

380

Use of Magnetorheological fluid in a force feedback glove.  

PubMed

Magnetorheological fluid (MRF) is a smart material that has the property of changing its viscosity when exposed to a magnetic field. By placing this fluid into a sealed cylinder with an electromagnet piston as a core, a controllable resistance motion dampener can be created. A novel exoskeleton mechanical power transmission system was designed, utilizing rapid prototype parts, to transmit these resistive forces to the user's fingertips. A first iteration force feedback glove was developed and tested on human subjects for overall usability. The eventual goal of the system is to provide an alternative force producing system for exercises and rehabilitation. The entire system is lightweight, low power, and easily portable. PMID:17436869

Winter, Scott H; Bouzit, Mourad

2007-03-01

381

The short-term effect of gloving in combination with Traditional Thai Massage, heat, and stretching exercise to improve hand mobility in scleroderma patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic, multisystem connective tissue disorder characterized by autoimmune activation, microvascular endothelium damage, and excessive collagen proliferation. The most affected hand presents claw hand deformity and microvascular disease. Deformed hands can cause functional disability and decrease the quality of life. A daily home program can improve mobility of scleroderma patients. Objective: We sought to determine the effect of a daily home exercise program on hand mobility among scleroderma patients. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized control trial. Twenty-eight participants were divided into two groups, both of which received the same daily home treatment: Group 1 with gloves (n = 14) and Group 2 without gloves (n = 14). The 2-week daily home program combined traditional Thai massage (TTM) with stretching exercises and heat. Hand mobility was assessed using hand mobility in scleroderma (HAMIS). The study was conducted in patients who were already on vasodilator drugs. Results: Both groups showed a significant improvement in hand mobility after 2 weeks of daily home exercise program (P < 0.05). Wearing the glove, however, resulted in better thumb mobility. Conclusions: A daily home exercise program improved hand mobility among patients with scleroderma and wearing gloves may improve thumb mobility.

Vannajak, Kunavut; Boonprakob, Yodchai; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Ungpansattawong, Supunnee; Nanagara, Ratanavadee

2014-01-01

382

Selection and testing of a glove combination for use with the U.S. Coast Guard's chemical response suit.  

PubMed

A study was sponsored by the U.S. Coast Guard to select a glove system for its chemical response suit that could meet or exceed the chemical resistance performance of the suit's base material. Three different protective glove combinations were evaluated for their permeation resistance to 28 chemicals. The glove combinations were based on three materials--Viton, butyl rubber, and Silvershield. The test chemicals were selected for one of two reasons. First, no single glove material could be identified to be resistant against the chemical of interest, or second, no permeation test data were available for judging glove material performance for the specific chemical. As can be expected, the permeation resistance of the glove combinations greatly exceeded that of the single glove material components. The butyl rubber/Silvershield glove combination was found to provide permeation resistance greater than 1 hr for all but one of the chemicals tested. PMID:2382640

Stull, J O; Herring, B

1990-07-01

383

Testing of an Ammonia EVA Vent Tool for the International Space Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When components of the International Space Station ammonia External Active Thermal Control System are replaced on-orbit, they must be vented immediately after removal from the system. Venting ensures that the component is not hard packed with liquid and thus does not pose a hazard. An extravehicular activity (EVA) vent tool has been developed to perform this function. However, there were concerns that the tool could whip, posing a hazard to the EVA astronaut, or would freeze. The ammonia vent tool was recently tested in a thermal/vacuum chamber to demonstrate that it would operate safely and would not freeze during venting. During the test, ammonia mimicking the venting conditions for six different heat exchanger initial conditions was passed through representative test articles. In the present work, the model that was used to develop the ammonia state and flow for the test points is discussed and the test setup and operation is described. The qualitative whipping and freezing results of the test are discussed and vent plume pressure measurements are described and interpreted.

Ungar, Eugene K.; Stanewich, Brett J.; Wilhelm, Sheri Munekata

2000-01-01

384

Thermal Analysis of a Metallic Wing Glove for a Mach-8 Boundary-Layer Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A metallic 'glove' structure has been built and attached to the wing of the Pegasus(trademark) space booster. An experiment on the upper surface of the glove has been designed to help validate boundary-layer stability codes in a free-flight environment. Three-dimensional thermal analyses have been performed to ensure that the glove structure design would be within allowable temperature limits in the experiment test section of the upper skin of the glove. Temperature results obtained from the design-case analysis show a peak temperature at the leading edge of 490 F. For the upper surface of the glove, approximately 3 in. back from the leading edge, temperature calculations indicate transition occurs at approximately 45 sec into the flight profile. A worst-case heating analysis has also been performed to ensure that the glove structure would not have any detrimental effects on the primary objective of the Pegasus a launch. A peak temperature of 805 F has been calculated on the leading edge of the glove structure. The temperatures predicted from the design case are well within the temperature limits of the glove structure, and the worst-case heating analysis temperature results are acceptable for the mission objectives.

Gong, Leslie; Richards, W. Lance

1998-01-01

385

The bionic glove: An electrical stimulator garment that provides controlled grasp and hand opening in quadriplegia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This report describes the operation of the Bionic Glove, a new functional electrical stimulation (FES) device designed to improve the function of the paralyzed hand after spinal cord injury (SCI) or stroke.Design: Signals from a sensor in the glove detecting voluntary wrist movement are used to control FES of muscles either to produce hand-grasp or to open the hand.

Arthur Prochazka; Michel Gauthier; Marguerite Wieler; Zoltan Kenwell

1997-01-01

386

Evaluation of Two Negative-Air Glove Bag Techniques for Asbestos Removal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two “negative pressure,” modified glove bag containment techniques were independently evaluated at two separate study sites to assess the effectiveness of these techniques in controlling asbestos exposures to the environment and the worker. The Aero-Pipe Capsule® (APC) is a rigid, reinforced plastic glove box; a large plastic bag, sealed to the lower sides of the APC with an elastic band,

Phillip A. Froehlich

1993-01-01

387

Sensitivity tests on leaded glove material, EMRTC Report FR95-15: Final test report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Small-scale safety and characterization tests were performed on stored radioactive wastes. The materials tested were formed when leaded dry box gloves were exposed to nitric acid. The nitration products exhibited thermal and impact sensitivity which could lead to ignition of explosion. Water was used to separate the nitrated glove material into several fractions; only the insoluble fraction exhibited significant sensitivity

D. Olson; L. Davis; A. Block-Bolten

1995-01-01

388

Tritium stripping in a nitrogen glove box using palladium/zeolite and SAES St 198(trademark).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Glove box clean-up experiments were conducted in a nitrogen glove box using palladium deposited on zeolite (Pd/z) and a SAES St 198(trademark) getter as tritium stripping materials. Protium/deuterium samples spiked with tritium were released into a 620 li...

J. E. Klien J. R. Wermer

1995-01-01

389

How accurately does a simulation glove reflect function compared to rheumatoid arthritis sufferers?  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION This study assessed the ability of gloves to simulate rheumatoid arthritis of the hand. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Assessments were made in the dominant hand of 24 healthy volunteers with no glove, glove A (simulating stiffness only) and glove B (simulating stiffness and pain). Results were compared to data held on 23 rheumatoid arthritis patients. Sollerman score was used as a standardised measure of hand function and time taken to complete testing was recorded. Grip strength was also measured in volunteers. RESULTS Both gloves simulate a reduction in power and prolong time taken to complete Sollerman hand-function testing. The gloves are less able to simulate a matched reduction in function when compared to rheumatoid arthritis sufferers. Sollerman score is 9.7% less in rheumatoid arthritis hands than a healthy volunteer using the glove. CONCLUSIONS The glove could, therefore, be used to guide future design of tools and aides that accommodate for hand disorders. More work on the usefulness of such disease simulation in the design of tools for such patients is needed.

Hall, TC; Nixon, MF; Dias, JJ; Graham, T; Cook, S

2010-01-01

390

76 FR 6683 - Information Related to Risks and Benefits of Powdered Gloves; Request for Comments  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...that will inform health care providers and consumers of the risks associated with glove...statement advising health care providers and consumers of the risks presented by glove...that will inform health care providers and consumers of the risks associated with...

2011-02-07

391

Evaluation of aloe vera gel gloves in the treatment of dry skin associated with occupational exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: An examination glove that delivers aloe vera (AV) gel to the gloved hand was studied in 30 adult females with bilateral occupational dry skin with or without irritant contact dermatitis (with or without erythema, fissures, and excoriations). Methods: All participants were factory assembly-line workers with repeated superficial skin trauma who attributed their dry, irritated, emollient-dependent skin to a common

Dennis P. West; Ya Fen Zhu

2003-01-01

392

Surgical glove perforation among nurses in ophthalmic surgery: a case-control study.  

PubMed

Many of the ophthalmic surgical instruments are extremely fine and sharp. Due to the dim light environment required for ophthalmic surgical procedures, the passing of sharp instruments among surgeons and scrub nurses also poses a risk for glove perforations. A case-control study was performed to determine the number and site of perforations in the surgical gloves used by a group of scrub nurses during ophthalmic surgery. All six nurses working in an eye and refractive surgery centre in Hong Kong participated in the study. A total of 100 (50 pairs) used surgical gloves were collected following 50 ophthalmic surgeries. Fifty pairs of new surgical gloves were also collected. Every collected surgical glove underwent the water leak test. The surgical procedure perforation rate was 8%, and none of the perforations were detected by the scrub nurses. No perforations were found in any unused gloves. The findings indicate that glove perforations for scrub nurses during ophthalmic surgery do occur and mostly go unnoticed. Future studies should continue to explore factors contributing to surgical glove perforation. PMID:24713014

Shek, Karen Mei-Yan; Chau, Janita Pak-Chun

2014-04-01

393

Lead Contamination of Surgical Gloves by Contact with a Lead Hand  

PubMed Central

Background. “Lead hands” are frequently used to maintain hand and finger position in hand surgery. The malleability and strength of lead make it ideal for this purpose. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of lead transferred to a surgeon's glove during handling of a lead hand. Method. Sterile surgical gloves were wiped over the surface of a lead hand. The number of wipes was varied, the gloves were then sent to a trace elements laboratory, and the lead content transferred to each glove was determined. Results. The amount of lead transferred to each glove increased with increasing exposure to the lead hand. After twenty wipes, up to 2?mg of lead was transferred to the surgeon's glove. Covering the lead hand with a sterile drape markedly reduced the lead transferred to the surgeon's glove. Conclusion. Significant amount of lead is transferred on to the gloves after handling a lead hand. This risks wound contamination and a foreign body reaction. Covering the lead hand with a sterile drape may minimise the risk of surgical wound contamination.

Mehra, A.; Deakin, D. E.; Khan, A.; Sheehan, T. M. T.; Nightingale, P.; Deshmukh, S. C.

2011-01-01

394

Physiological and technological considerations for Mars mission extravehicular activity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The nature of the suit is a function of the needs of human physiology, the ambient environment outside the suit, and the type of activity to be accomplished while in the suit. The physiological requirements that must be provided for in the Martian Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suit will be reviewed. The influence of the Martian environment on the EVA suit and EVA capabilities is elaborated, and the Martian environment is compared with the lunar environment. The differences that may influence the EVA design are noted. The type, nature, and duration of activities to be done in transit to Mars and on the Martian surface will be evaluated and the impact of these activities on the requirements for EVA systems will be discussed. Furthermore, the interaction between Martian surface transportation systems and EVA systems will be covered. Finally, options other than EVA will be considered such as robotics, nonanthropometric suits, and vehicles with anthropometric extremities or robotic end effectors.

Waligora, James M.; Sedej, Melaine M.

1986-01-01

395

Computational Analysis of the G-III Laminar Flow Glove  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Under NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project, flight experiments are planned with the primary objective of demonstrating the Discrete Roughness Elements (DRE) technology for passive laminar flow control at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. In this paper, we present a preliminary computational assessment of the Gulfstream-III (G-III) aircraft wing-glove designed to attain natural laminar flow for the leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6deg. Analysis for a flight Mach number of 0.75 shows that it should be possible to achieve natural laminar flow for twice the transition Reynolds number ever achieved at this sweep angle. However, the wing-glove needs to be redesigned to effectively demonstrate passive laminar flow control using DREs. As a by-product of the computational assessment, effect of surface curvature on stationary crossflow disturbances is found to be strongly stabilizing for the current design, and it is suggested that convex surface curvature could be used as a control parameter for natural laminar flow design, provided transition occurs via stationary crossflow disturbances.

Malik, Mujeeb R.; Liao, Wei; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

2011-01-01

396

Characterization of a novel data glove based on textile integrated sensors.  

PubMed

The present work is about the realization and the characterization of a novel data glove able to detect hand kinematic configurations. The sensing glove has been realized by directly integrate sensors in the fabric used to manufacture the glove. Main specifications for the realized device are lightness, wearability and user comfort. As a fundamental requirement to address this purpose we have estimated the employment of a material which does not substantially change the mechanical properties of the fabric and maintains the wearability of the garment. To obtain this result, we have integrated sensor networks made by conductive elastomer into an elastic fabric used to manufacture the sensing glove. Electrically conductive elastomer composites show piezoresistive properties when a deformation is applied. Conductive elastomers materials can be applied to fabric or to other flexible substrate and they can be employed as strain sensors. To validate the realized device, a function that relates glove sensor values to hand motion has been realized and tested. PMID:17946119

Tognetti, Alessandro; Carbonaro, Nicola; Zupone, Giuseppe; De Rossi, Danilo

2006-01-01

397

Decontamination, Dismantling and Refurbishing of the PETRA Glove Box at the Tritium Laboratory, Karlsruhe  

SciTech Connect

The PETRA facility at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) has finished its useful life and the glove box and auxiliary systems are being refurbished. During the lifetime of PETRA the glove box became contaminated with a small amount of tritium but the source has not been positively identified. Removing large redundant components would be hazardous as this would require removing the glove box panels and thus exposing the inner surfaces to moist air which would release tritium. Over several months defined amounts of water have been introduced into the glove box daily which has liberated significant quantities of tritium which has subsequently been absorbed by the in-built tritium retention system. This technique has slowly reduced the tritium liberated at each step. The large components, such as a getter bed, catalyst bed and a permeator, have been detritiated as far as possible in-situ in readiness for disposal once it is safe to remove them from the glove box.

Caldwell-Nichols, C.J.; Glugla, M.; Doerr, L.; Berndt, U. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

2005-07-15

398

Electrical treeing in EVA-layered silicate nanocomposites  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work presents a preliminary research work about electrical treeing inception and growth in polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites. Different silicates were dispersed in an ethilene-vynil acetate (EVA) co-polymer matrix: unmodified and organically modified synthetic fluorohectorite, as well as organically modified natural montmorillonite, were considered. A microcomposite and two nanocomposite compounds were thus obtained and their behaviour under diverging electric field

F. Guastavino; G. Coletti; A. Dardano; G. C. Montanari; F. Deorsola; M. Di Lorenzo Del Casale

2005-01-01

399

Astronaut Carl Meade tests SAFER system during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Carl J. Meade tests the new Simplified Aid for Eva Rescue (SAFER) system 130 nautical miles above Earth. The scene was captured with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera with a 30mm lens attached. The hardware supporting the LIDAR-in-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) is in the lower right. A TV camera on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm records the space walk.

1994-01-01

400

Non-Venting Thermal and Humidity Control for EVA Suits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future EVA suits need processes and systems to control internal temperature and humidity without venting water to the environment. This paper describes an absorption-based cooling and dehumidification system as well as laboratory demonstrations of the key processes. There are two main components in the system: an evaporation cooling and dehumidification garment (ECDG) that removes both sensible heat and latent heat from the pressure garment, and an absorber radiator that absorbs moisture and rejects heat to space by thermal radiation. This paper discusses the overall design of both components, and presents recent data demonstrating their operation. We developed a design and fabrication approach to produce prototypical heat/water absorbing elements for the ECDG, and demonstrated by test that these elements could absorb heat and moisture at a high flux. Proof-of-concept tests showed that an ECDG prototype absorbs heat and moisture at a rate of 85 W/ft under conditions that simulate operation in an EVA suit. The heat absorption was primarily due to direct absorption of water vapor. It is possible to construct large, flexible, durable cooling patches that can be incorporated into a cooling garment with this system. The proof-of-concept test data was scaled to calculate area needed for full metabolic loads, thus showing that it is feasible to use this technology in an EVA suit. Full-scale, lightweight absorber/radiator modules have also been built and tested. They can reject heat at a flux of 33 W/ft while maintaining ECDG operation at conditions that will provide a cool and dry environment inside the EVA suit.

Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo; Bue, Grant

2011-01-01

401

UV aging and outdoor exposure correlation for EVA PV encapsulants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A widely cited approximation in the solar industry is that "one week of xenon arc weather-o-meter exposure is equivalent to one year of field exposure." This statement is a generalization of test data generated in the mid-1990s as part of the NREL managed PVMaT-3 project. This approximation was based entirely upon yellowing of first generation EVA-based encapsulants in two different accelerated test conditions, xenon arc and mirror accelerated outdoor aging. First generation EVA encapsulants were developed by STR under the JPL solar project (1975-1986) and exhibit yellowing (or browning) with exposure to UV and heat. This yellowing mechanism was understood and resolved with newer generation EVA encapsulation products introduced in late 1990s. Modules were manufactured at the end of the PVMaT-3 project that included both older and newer generation encapsulants. Those modules were on a two-axis tracker in Arizona from 1996 to 2012 and are now undergoing diagnostic tests. Older generation standard-cure encapsulant used in these modules exhibited severe browning over cells and the modules exhibit approximate power loss of about two percent per year. This same standard cure encapsulant material has been tested with updated xenon arc exposure methods and optical transmission tests to estimate the loss in power due only to browning and reduction in light transmission.

Reid, Charles G.; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Woods, Joseph T.

2013-09-01

402

Health and Safety Benefits of Small Pressurized Suitport Rovers as EVA Surface Support Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pressurized safe-haven providing SPE protection and decompression sickness (DCS) treatment capabilities within 20 mins at all times. Up to 50% reduction in time spent in EVA suits (vs. Unpressurized Rovers) for equal or greater Boots-on-Surface EVA exploration time. Reduces suit-induced trauma and provides improved options for nutrition, hydration, and waste-management. Time spent inside SPR during long translations may be spent performing resistive and cardiovascular exercise. Multiple shorter EVAs versus single 8 hr EVAs increases DCS safety and decreases prebreathe requirements. SPRs also offer many potential operational, engineering and exploration benefits not addressed here.

Gernhardt, Michael L.; Abercromby, Andrew F. J.

2008-01-01

403

Hospital-acquired malaria transmitted by contaminated gloves.  

PubMed

We describe two cases of malaria occurring in a malaria-free zone in two in-patients, two weeks after a case of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, acquired in Burkina Faso, had been admitted to the same ward. After reviewing the techniques used by nursing staff, we conclude that transmission probably occurred via gloves contaminated following manipulation of venous cannulae and drip lines of the patient with Burkina Faso-acquired malaria and which had not been discarded before manipulating the intravenous lines of the other two patients. Nosocomial transmission of unusual and potentially life-threatening infections should be taken into consideration in those settings where compliance with universal precautions is not rigorous. PMID:11170781

Piro, S; Sammud, M; Badi, S; Al Ssabi, L

2001-02-01

404

Development of a test method for protective gloves against nanoparticles in conditions simulating occupational use  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanoparticle manufacture and use are in full expansion. The associated risks of occupational exposure raise large concerns due to their potential toxicity. Even if they stand as a last resort in the traditional occupational Health & Safety (H&S) risk management strategy, personal protective equipment (PPE) against nanoparticles are an absolute need in the context of precautionary principle advocated by H&S organizations worldwide. However no standard test method is currently available for evaluating the efficiency of PPE against nanoparticles, in particular in the case of gloves. A project is thus underway to develop a test method for measuring nanoparticle penetration through protective gloves in conditions simulating glove-nanoparticle occupational interaction. The test setup includes an exposure and a sampling chamber separated by a circular glove sample. A system of cylinders is used to deform the sample while it is exposed to nanoparticles. The whole system is enclosed in a glove box to ensure the operator safety during assembly, dismounting and clean-up operations as well as during the tests. Appropriate nanoparticle detection techniques were also identified. Results are reported here for commercial 15nm TiO2 nanoparticles - powder and colloidal solutions in 1,2-propanediol, ethylene glycol and water - and four types of protective gloves: disposable nitrile and latex as well as unsupported neoprene and butyl rubber gloves. They show that mechanical deformations and contact with colloidal solution liquid carriers may affect glove materials. Preliminary results obtained with TiO2 powder indicate a possible penetration of nanoparticles through gloves following mechanical deformations.

Dolez, Patricia; Vinches, Ludwig; Wilkinson, Kevin; Plamondon, Philippe; Vu-Khanh, Toan

2011-07-01

405

Permeation of multifunctional acrylates through selected protective glove materials.  

PubMed

In support of the Premanufacture Notification (PMN) program of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Toxic Substances, the resistance of three glove materials to permeation by multifunctional acrylate compounds was evaluated through a program for the Office of Research and Development. Several recent PMN submissions relate to multifunctional acrylates and essentially no permeation data are available for this class of compounds. To better understand permeation behavior, tests were conducted with trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA), 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate (HDDA), and two mixtures of HDDA with 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA). Because of the low vapor pressure and low water solubility of these compounds, the tests were conducted by using ASTM Method F739-85 with a silicone rubber sheeting material as the collection medium. Tests were performed at 20 degrees C with butyl, natural, and nitrile rubber glove materials. None of the acrylate compounds nor mixtures was found to permeate the butyl or nitrile rubber under the test conditions. Permeation through the natural rubber was observed in tests with pure HDDA, a 50% HDDA/50% EHA mixture, and a 25% HDDA/75% EHA mixture. TMPTA permeation through the natural rubber was also detected, but only in one of the triplicate tests after the 360-480 min sampling interval. For pure HDDA, the breakthrough detection time was 30-60 min and the steady-state permeation rate was 0.92 micrograms/cm2-min. For the HDDA/EHA mixtures, permeation of both mixture components was detected during the same sampling interval in each test. The breakthrough detection time was 30-60 min for the 50/50 mixture and from 15-30 to 30-60 min for the 25/75 mixture.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1543127

Renard, E P; Goydan, R; Stolki, T

1992-02-01

406

In-Situ Leak Testing And Replacement Of Glovebox Isolator, Or Containment Unit Gloves  

DOEpatents

A test plug for in-situ testing a glove installed in a glovebox is provided that uses a top plate and a base plate, and a diametrically expandable sealing mechanism fitting between the two plates. The sealing mechanism engages the base plate to diametrically expand when the variable distance between the top plate and the bottom plate is reduced. An inlet valve included on the top plate is used to introducing a pressurized gas to the interior of the glove, and a pressure gauge located on the top plate is used to monitor the interior glove pressure.

Castro, Julio M. (Santa Fe, NM); Macdonald, John M. (Santa Fe, NM); Steckle, Jr., Warren P. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-11-02

407

Exploration Architecture Options - ECLSS, EVA, TCS Implications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many options for exploration of the Moon and Mars have been identified and evaluated since the Vision for Space Exploration VSE was announced in 2004. Lunar architectures have been identified and addressed in the Lunar Surface Systems team to establish options for how to get to and then inhabit and explore the moon. The Augustine Commission evaluated human space flight for the Obama administration and identified many options for how to conduct human spaceflight in the future. This paper will evaluate the options for exploration of the moon and Mars and those of the Augustine human spaceflight commission for the implications of each architecture on the Environmental Control and Life Support, ExtraVehicular Activity and Thermal Control systems. The advantages and disadvantages of each architecture and options are presented.

Chambliss, Joe; Henninger, Don; Lawrence, Carl

2009-01-01

408

Astronauts Carl Meade and Mark Lee test SAFER during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronauts Carl J. Meade and Mark C. Lee (red stripe on suit) test the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system some 130 nautical miles from Earth. The pair was actually performing an in-space rehearsal or demonstration of a contingency rescue using the never-before flown hardware. Meade, who here wears the small back-pack unit with its complementary chest-mounted control unit, and Lee, anchored to Discovery's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robot arm, took turns using the SAFER hardware during their shared space walk of September 16, 1994.

1994-01-01

409

Astronauts Meade and Lee test SAFER system during EVA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronauts Carl J. Meade and Mark C. Lee (red strip on suit) test the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system some 130 nautical miles above Earth. The pair was actually performing an in-space rehearsal or demonstration of a contingency rescue using the never-before flown hardware. Meade, who here wears the small back-pack unit with its complementary chest-mounted control unit, and Lee (anchored to the Space Shuttle Discovery's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robot arm) took turns using the SAFER hardware during their shared space walk.

1994-01-01

410

Human factors in space station architecture 2. EVA access facility: A comparative analysis of 4 concepts for on-orbit space suit servicing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four concepts for on-orbit spacesuit donning, doffing, servicing, check-out, egress and ingress are presented. These are: the Space Transportation System (STS) Type (shuttle system enlarged), the Transit Airlock (Shuttle Airlock with suit servicing removed from the pump-down chamber), the Suitport (a rear-entry suit mates to a port in the airlock wall), and the Crewlock (a small, individual, conformal airlock). Each of these four concepts is compared through a series of seven steps representing a typical Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) mission: (1) Predonning suit preparation; (2) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) preparation; (3) Suit Donning and Final Check; (4) Egress/Ingress; (5) Mid-EVA rest period; (6) Post-EVA Securing; (7) Non-Routine Maintenance. The different characteristics of each concept are articulated through this step-by-step approach. Recommendations concerning an approach for further evaluations of airlock geometry, anthropometrics, ergonomics, and functional efficiency are made. The key recommendation is that before any particular airlock can be designed, the full range of spacesuit servicing functions must be considered, including timelines that are most supportive of EVA human productivity.

Cohen, Marc M.; Bussolari, Steven

1987-01-01

411

Generic extravehicular (EVA) and telerobot task primitives for analysis, design, and integration. Version 1.0: Reference compilation for the EVA and telerobotics communities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results are described of an effort to establish commonality and standardization of generic crew extravehicular (crew-EVA) and telerobotic task analysis primitives used for the study of spaceborne operations. Although direct crew-EVA plans are the most visible output of spaceborne operations, significant ongoing efforts by a wide variety of projects and organizations also require tools for estimation of crew-EVA and telerobotic times. Task analysis tools provide estimates for input to technical and cost tradeoff studies. A workshop was convened to identify the issues and needs to establish a common language and syntax for task analysis primitives. In addition, the importance of such a syntax was shown to have precedence over the level to which such a syntax is applied. The syntax, lists of crew-EVA and telerobotic primitives, and the data base in diskette form are presented.

Smith, Jeffrey H.; Drews, Michael

1990-01-01

412

A study of relationship between mechanical properties and water treeing retardation in EVA blended XLPE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors report the relationship between the water tree retardation phenomena and the mechanical properties in ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) blended XLPE (cross-linked polyethylene). They also studied the electrical properties, such as the dissipation factor and the AC breakdown strength. It has been found that, by blending with EVA, growth of water trees in XLPE is retarded considerably and the

J.-H. Lee; M.-K. Han; K. S. Suh; Y.-H. Choi

1992-01-01

413

THE USE OF EARNED VALUE ANALYSIS (EVA) IN THE COST MANAGEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this article is to present and discuss the main factors involved in the use of Earned Value Analysis (EVA) in the cost management of civil construction projects. These factors include advantages and disadvantages, difficulties and benefits, problems and solutions and criteria and results based on the experience of a real case study in Brazil. EVA was applied

Jose Angelo Valle; Carlos Alberto; Pereira Soares

414

Pollution prevention benefits of non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves - 11000  

SciTech Connect

Radiation shielding is commonly used to protect the glovebox worker from unintentional direct and secondary radiation exposure, while working with plutonium-238 and plutonium-239. Shielding glovebox gloves are traditionally composed of lead-based materials, i.e., hazardous waste. This has prompted the development of new, non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves. No studies, however, have investigated the pollution prevention benefits of these new glovebox gloves. We examined both leaded and non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves. The nonhazardous substitutes are higher in cost, but this is offset by eliminating the costs associated with onsite waste handling of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) items. In the end, replacing lead with non-hazardous substitutes eliminates waste generation and future liability.

Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dodge, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-11

415

21 CFR 878.4480 - Absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon's glove.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4480 Absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon's glove. (a)...

2013-04-01

416

A method based on thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry for the forensic differentiation of latex gloves.  

PubMed

Latex gloves are quite frequently employed by felons, when committing crimes, if they want to avoid shedding fingerprints or biological traces. Less forensic aware crime committers, though, may discard the gloves at the crime scene or nearby. If found and properly analyzed, these items may therefore provide useful information to investigators. An analytical procedure of such items is proposed, using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. By these very straightforward and inexpensive techniques, without sample preparation, nearly all the considered samples could be discriminated. 99.5% of the possible pairs of latex gloves, indistinguishable by visual examination, were differentiated. The rather large degree of variability existing in latex gloves, even though they are mass produced, was shown, confirming that these items can be useful in comparisons between items related to the crime scene and those seized in the suspect's premises. PMID:19369015

Causin, Valerio; Marega, Carla; Marigo, Antonio; Carresi, Pietro; Della Guardia, Vittorio; Schiavone, Sergio

2009-07-01

417