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Sample records for activity gene expression

  1. Correspondence between Resting-State Activity and Brain Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Zhong; Belgard, T Grant; Mao, Deng; Chen, Leslie; Berto, Stefano; Preuss, Todd M; Lu, Hanzhang; Geschwind, Daniel H; Konopka, Genevieve

    2015-11-18

    The relationship between functional brain activity and gene expression has not been fully explored in the human brain. Here, we identify significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and functional activity by comparing fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) from two independent human fMRI resting-state datasets to regional cortical gene expression from a newly generated RNA-seq dataset and two additional gene expression datasets to obtain robust and reproducible correlations. We find significantly more genes correlated with fALFF than expected by chance and identify specific genes correlated with the imaging signals in multiple expression datasets in the default mode network. Together, these data support a population-level relationship between regional steady-state brain gene expression and resting-state brain activity. PMID:26590343

  2. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael N.; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  3. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  4. Adaptation of muscle gene expression to changes in contractile activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Babij, P.; Thomason, D. B.; Wong, T. S.; Morrison, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the existing literature regarding the effects of different types of physical activities on the gene expression of adult skeletal muscles leads us to conclude that each type of exercise training program has, as a result, a different phenotype, which means that there are multiple mechanisms, each producing a unique phenotype. A portion of the facts which support this position is presented and interpreted here. [Abstract translated from the original French by NASA].

  5. Dynamic multiphosphorylation passwords for activity-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Deisseroth, Karl; Tsien, Richard W

    2002-04-11

    Synapse-to-nucleus signaling leading to CREB-mediated transcription is important for neuronal plasticity. Nuclear CREB phosphorylation at Ser133 allows convergence of multiple kinase pathways driven by neuronal activity and links them to transcriptional activation. But, can various pathways share a common effector mechanism (phosphorylating Ser133) while generating distinct patterns of gene expression? We review three Neuron articles that highlight novel ways Ca(2+) signals can trigger multiple phosphorylation events working in combination to control CREB and its interaction with coactivator molecules. PMID:11970860

  6. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Teodorov, E.; Ferrari, M.F.R.; Fior-Chadi, D.R.; Camarini, R.; Felício, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc) or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg) and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05) because a lower percentage of U69593 group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05) and lactating female rats (P < 0.01), with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in female

  7. ARMADA: Using motif activity dynamics to infer gene regulatory networks from gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Pemberton-Ross, Peter J; Pachkov, Mikhail; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of gene expression data remains one of the most promising avenues toward reconstructing genome-wide gene regulatory networks. However, the large dimensionality of the problem prohibits the fitting of explicit dynamical models of gene regulatory networks, whereas machine learning methods for dimensionality reduction such as clustering or principal component analysis typically fail to provide mechanistic interpretations of the reduced descriptions. To address this, we recently developed a general methodology called motif activity response analysis (MARA) that, by modeling gene expression patterns in terms of the activities of concrete regulators, accomplishes dramatic dimensionality reduction while retaining mechanistic biological interpretations of its predictions (Balwierz, 2014). Here we extend MARA by presenting ARMADA, which models the activity dynamics of regulators across a time course, and infers the causal interactions between the regulators that drive the dynamics of their activities across time. We have implemented ARMADA as part of our ISMARA webserver, ismara.unibas.ch, allowing any researcher to automatically apply it to any gene expression time course. To illustrate the method, we apply ARMADA to a time course of human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with TNF. Remarkably, ARMADA is able to reproduce the complex observed motif activity dynamics using a relatively small set of interactions between the key regulators in this system. In addition, we show that ARMADA successfully infers many of the key regulatory interactions known to drive this inflammatory response and discuss several novel interactions that ARMADA predicts. In combination with ISMARA, ARMADA provides a powerful approach to generating plausible hypotheses for the key interactions between regulators that control gene expression in any system for which time course measurements are available. PMID:26164700

  8. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Amador, Ariadna; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kameneka, Theodore M; Solt, Laura A; Burris, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression. PMID:26963516

  9. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Ariadna; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kameneka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression. PMID:26963516

  10. Sex determines the expression level of one third of the actively expressed genes in bovine blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Alvarez, P; Rizos, D; Rath, D; Lonergan, P; Gutierrez-Adan, A

    2010-02-23

    Although genetically identical for autosomal Chrs (Chr), male and female preimplantation embryos could display sex-specific transcriptional regulation. To illustrate sex-specific differences at the mRNA level, we compared gene-expression patterns between male and female blastocysts by DNA microarray comparison of nine groups of 60 bovine in vitro-produced blastocysts of each sex. Almost one-third of the transcripts detected showed sexual dimorphism (2,921 transcripts; false-discovery rate, P < 0.05), suggesting that in the absence of hormonal influences, the sex Chrs impose an extensive transcriptional regulation upon autosomal genes. Six genes were analyzed by qPCR in in vivo-derived embryos, which displayed similar sexual dimorphism. Ontology analysis suggested a higher global transcriptional level in females and a more active protein metabolism in males. A gene homolog to an X-linked gene involved in network interactions during spliceosome assembly was found in the Y-Chr. Most of the X-linked-expressed transcripts (88.5%) were up-regulated in females, but most of them (70%) exhibited fold-changes lower than 1.6, suggesting that X-Chr inactivation is partially achieved at the blastocyst stage. Almost half of the transcripts up-regulated in female embryos exhibiting more than 1.6-fold change were present in the X-Chr and eight of them were selected to determine a putative paternal imprinting by gene expression comparison with parthenogenetic embryos. Five (BEX, CAPN6, BEX2, SRPX2, and UBE2A) exhibited a higher expression in females than in parthenotes, suggesting that they are predominantly expressed by the paternal inherited X-Chr and that imprinting may increase the transcriptional skew caused by double X-Chr dosage. PMID:20133684

  11. Sex determines the expression level of one third of the actively expressed genes in bovine blastocysts

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo-Alvarez, P.; Rizos, D.; Rath, D.; Lonergan, P.; Gutierrez-Adan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Although genetically identical for autosomal Chrs (Chr), male and female preimplantation embryos could display sex-specific transcriptional regulation. To illustrate sex-specific differences at the mRNA level, we compared gene-expression patterns between male and female blastocysts by DNA microarray comparison of nine groups of 60 bovine in vitro-produced blastocysts of each sex. Almost one-third of the transcripts detected showed sexual dimorphism (2,921 transcripts; false-discovery rate, P < 0.05), suggesting that in the absence of hormonal influences, the sex Chrs impose an extensive transcriptional regulation upon autosomal genes. Six genes were analyzed by qPCR in in vivo-derived embryos, which displayed similar sexual dimorphism. Ontology analysis suggested a higher global transcriptional level in females and a more active protein metabolism in males. A gene homolog to an X-linked gene involved in network interactions during spliceosome assembly was found in the Y-Chr. Most of the X-linked-expressed transcripts (88.5%) were up-regulated in females, but most of them (70%) exhibited fold-changes lower than 1.6, suggesting that X-Chr inactivation is partially achieved at the blastocyst stage. Almost half of the transcripts up-regulated in female embryos exhibiting more than 1.6-fold change were present in the X-Chr and eight of them were selected to determine a putative paternal imprinting by gene expression comparison with parthenogenetic embryos. Five (BEX, CAPN6, BEX2, SRPX2, and UBE2A) exhibited a higher expression in females than in parthenotes, suggesting that they are predominantly expressed by the paternal inherited X-Chr and that imprinting may increase the transcriptional skew caused by double X-Chr dosage. PMID:20133684

  12. IRF1 marks activated genes in SLE and can induce target gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Shi, Lihua; Song, Li; Ephrem, Elshaddai; Petri, Michelle; Sullivan, Kathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective IRF1 both mediates responses to type I interferons and the induction of interferons. It has been implicated in murine lupus models as a critical mediator of inflammation. A previous study of chromatin modifications in SLE patient monocytes implicated IRF1 as associated with increased histone acetylation in SLE patients. This study directly investigated IRF1 binding sites on chromatin using ChIP-seq. Methods Nine female SLE patients and seven female controls were examined. Monocytes were purified from peripheral blood and subjected to library preparation using a validated antibody to IRF1. The effect of IRF1 on target gene expression was confirmed using an overexpression system in cell lines and co-immunoprecipitation was used to define protein interactions. Results IRF1 binding around transcribed regions was increased in SLE patient monocytes but histone modifications at potential IRF1 binding sites without detectable IRF1 binding were also increased. IRF1 overexpression was sufficient to drive transcription of target genes. IRF1 overexpression was also able to alter histone modifications at a focus set of target genes and the use of an IRF1 inhibitor decreased both expression and histone modifications at target genes. IRF1 was found to interact with a select set of histone modifying enzymes and other transcription factors. Conclusions IRF1 is an important signaling protein in the interferon pathway. IRF1 not only activates gene expression as a transcription factor but may perpetuate disease by leading to a dysregulated epigenome. PMID:25418955

  13. Inhibiting activator protein-1 activity alters cocaine-induced gene expression and potentiates sensitization.

    PubMed

    Paletzki, R F; Myakishev, M V; Polesskaya, O; Orosz, A; Hyman, S E; Vinson, C

    2008-04-01

    We have expressed A-FOS, an inhibitor of activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding, in adult mouse striatal neurons. We observed normal behavior including locomotion and exploratory activities. Following a single injection of cocaine, locomotion increased similarly in both the A-FOS expressing and littermate controls. However, following repeated injections of cocaine, the A-FOS expressing mice showed increased locomotion relative to littermate controls, an increase that persisted following a week of withdrawal and subsequent cocaine administration. These results indicate that AP-1 suppresses this behavioral response to cocaine. We analyzed mRNA from the striatum before and 4 and 24 h after a single cocaine injection in both A-FOS and control striata using Affymetrix microarrays (430 2.0 Array) to identify genes mis-regulated by A-FOS that may mediate the increased locomotor sensitization to cocaine. A-FOS expression did not change gene expression in the basal state or 4 h following cocaine treatment relative to controls. However, 24 h after an acute cocaine treatment, 84 genes were identified that were differentially expressed between the A-FOS and control mice. Fifty-six genes are down-regulated while 28 genes are up-regulated including previously identified candidates for addiction including brain-derived neurotrophic factor and period homolog 1. Using a random sample of identified genes, quantitative PCR was used to verify the microarray studies. The chromosomal location of these 84 genes was compared with human genome scans of addiction to identify potential genes in humans that are involved in addiction. PMID:18355967

  14. Regulation of gene expression in ovarian cancer cells by luteinizing hormone receptor expression and activation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since a substantial percentage of ovarian cancers express gonadotropin receptors and are responsive to the relatively high concentrations of pituitary gonadotropins during the postmenopausal years, it has been suggested that receptor activation may contribute to the etiology and/or progression of the neoplasm. The goal of the present study was to develop a cell model to determine the impact of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor (LHR) expression and LH-mediated LHR activation on gene expression and thus obtain insights into the mechanism of gonadotropin action on ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) carcinoma cells. Methods The human ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV-3, was stably transfected to express functional LHR and incubated with LH for various periods of time (0-20 hours). Transcriptomic profiling was performed on these cells to identify LHR expression/activation-dependent changes in gene expression levels and pathways by microarray and qRT-PCR analyses. Results Through comparative analysis on the LHR-transfected SKOV-3 cells exposed to LH, we observed the differential expression of 1,783 genes in response to LH treatment, among which five significant families were enriched, including those of growth factors, translation regulators, transporters, G-protein coupled receptors, and ligand-dependent nuclear receptors. The most highly induced early and intermediate responses were found to occupy a network impacting transcriptional regulation, cell growth, apoptosis, and multiple signaling transductions, giving indications of LH-induced apoptosis and cell growth inhibition through the significant changes in, for example, tumor necrosis factor, Jun and many others, supportive of the observed cell growth reduction in in vitro assays. However, other observations, e.g. the substantial up-regulation of the genes encoding the endothelin-1 subtype A receptor, stromal cell-derived factor 1, and insulin-like growth factor II, all of which are potential therapeutic

  15. Differentially expressed genes in embryonic cardiac tissues of mice lacking Folr1 gene activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huiping; Cabrera, Robert M; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Bozinov, Daniel; Wang, Deli; Schwartz, Robert J; Finnell, Richard H

    2007-01-01

    Background Heart anomalies are the most frequently observed among all human congenital defects. As with the situation for neural tube defects (NTDs), it has been demonstrated that women who use multivitamins containing folic acid peri-conceptionally have a reduced risk for delivering offspring with conotruncal heart defects [1-3]. Cellular folate transport is mediated by a receptor or binding protein and by an anionic transporter protein system. Defective function of the Folr1 (also known as Folbp1; homologue of human FRα) gene in mice results in inadequate transport, accumulation, or metabolism of folate during cardiovascular morphogenesis. Results We have observed cardiovascular abnormalities including outflow tract and aortic arch arterial defects in genetically compromised Folr1 knockout mice. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the failure to complete development of outflow tract and aortic arch arteries in the Folr1 knockout mouse model, we examined tissue-specific gene expression difference between Folr1 nullizygous embryos and morphologically normal heterozygous embryos during early cardiac development (14-somite stage), heart tube looping (28-somite stage), and outflow track septation (38-somite stage). Microarray analysis was performed as a primary screening, followed by investigation using quantitative real-time PCR assays. Gene ontology analysis highlighted the following ontology groups: cell migration, cell motility and localization of cells, structural constituent of cytoskeleton, cell-cell adhesion, oxidoreductase, protein folding and mRNA processing. This study provided preliminary data and suggested potential candidate genes for further description and investigation. Conclusion The results suggested that Folr1 gene ablation and abnormal folate homeostasis altered gene expression in developing heart and conotruncal tissues. These changes affected normal cytoskeleton structures, cell migration and motility as well as cellular

  16. mef2 activity levels differentially affect gene expression during Drosophila muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Elgar, Stuart J.; Han, Jun; Taylor, Michael V.

    2008-01-01

    Cell differentiation is controlled by key transcription factors, and a major question is how they orchestrate cell-type-specific genetic programs. Muscle differentiation is a well studied paradigm in which the conserved Mef2 transcription factor plays a pivotal role. Recent genomic studies have identified a large number of mef2-regulated target genes with distinct temporal expression profiles during Drosophila myogenesis. However, the question remains as to how a single transcription factor can control such diverse patterns of gene expression. In this study we used a strategy combining genomics and developmental genetics to address this issue in vivo during Drosophila muscle development. We found that groups of mef2-regulated genes respond differently to changes in mef2 activity levels: some require higher levels for their expression than others. Furthermore, this differential requirement correlates with when the gene is first expressed during the muscle differentiation program. Genes that require higher levels are activated later. These results implicate mef2 in the temporal regulation of muscle gene expression, and, consistent with this, we show that changes in mef2 activity levels can alter the start of gene expression in a predictable manner. Together these results indicate that Mef2 is not an all-or-none regulator; rather, its action is more subtle, and levels of its activity are important in the differential expression of muscle genes. This suggests a route by which mef2 can orchestrate the muscle differentiation program and contribute to the stringent regulation of gene expression during myogenesis. PMID:18198273

  17. Polyphenols from Chilean Propolis and Pinocembrin Reduce MMP-9 Gene Expression and Activity in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Nicolás; Cuevas, Alejandro; Cavalcante, Marcela F.; Dörr, Felipe A.; Saavedra, Kathleen; Zambrano, Tomás; Abdalla, Dulcineia S. P.; Salazar, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols from diverse sources have shown anti-inflammatory activity. In the context of atherosclerosis, macrophages play important roles including matrix metalloproteinases synthesis involved in degradation of matrix extracellular components affecting the atherosclerotic plaque stability. We prepared a propolis extract and pinocembrin in ethanol solution. Propolis extract was chemically characterized using LC-MS. The effect of treatments on gene expression and proteolytic activity was measured in vitro using murine macrophages activated with LPS. Cellular toxicity associated with both treatments and the vehicle was determined using MTT and apoptosis/necrosis detection assays. MMP-9 gene expression and proteolytic activity were measured using qPCR and zymography, respectively. Thirty-two compounds were identified in the propolis extract, including pinocembrin among its major components. Treatment with either ethanolic extract of propolis or pinocembrin inhibits MMP-9 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, an inhibitory effect was observed in proteolytic activity. However, the effect showed by ethanolic extract of propolis was higher than the effect of pinocembrin, suggesting that MMP-9 inhibition results from a joint contribution between the components of the extract. These data suggest a potential role of polyphenols from Chilean propolis in the control of extracellular matrix degradation in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27119082

  18. Differential gene expression in high- and low-active inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Michelle; Moore-Harrison, Trudy; Hamilton, Alicia T; Ceaser, Tyrone; Kochan, Kelli J; Riggs, Penny K; Lightfoot, J Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Numerous candidate genes have been suggested in the recent literature with proposed roles in regulation of voluntary physical activity, with little evidence of these genes' functional roles. This study compared the haplotype structure and expression profile in skeletal muscle and brain of inherently high- (C57L/J) and low- (C3H/HeJ) active mice. Expression of nine candidate genes [Actn2, Actn3, Casq1, Drd2, Lepr, Mc4r, Mstn, Papss2, and Glut4 (a.k.a. Slc2a4)] was evaluated via RT-qPCR. SNPs were observed in regions of Actn2, Casq1, Drd2, Lepr, and Papss2; however, no SNPs were located in coding sequences or associated with any known regulatory sequences. In mice exposed to a running wheel, Casq1 (P = 0.0003) and Mstn (P = 0.002) transcript levels in the soleus were higher in the low-active mice. However, when these genes were evaluated in naïve animals, differential expression was not observed, demonstrating a training effect. Among naïve mice, no genes in either tissue exhibited differential expression between strains. Considering that no obvious SNP mechanisms were determined or differential expression was observed, our results indicate that genomic structural variation or gene expression data alone is not adequate to establish any of these genes' candidacy or causality in relation to regulation of physical activity. PMID:24551844

  19. An optogenetic gene expression system with rapid activation and deactivation kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Motta-Mena, Laura B.; Reade, Anna; Mallory, Michael J.; Glantz, Spencer; Weiner, Orion D.; Lynch, Kristen W.; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetic gene expression systems can control transcription with spatial and temporal detail unequaled with traditional inducible promoter systems. However, current eukaryotic light-gated transcription systems are limited by toxicity, dynamic range, or slow activation/deactivation. Here we present an optogenetic gene expression system that addresses these shortcomings and demonstrate its broad utility. Our approach utilizes an engineered version of EL222, a bacterial Light-Oxygen-Voltage (LOV) protein that binds DNA when illuminated with blue light. The system has a large (>100-fold) dynamic range of protein expression, rapid activation (< 10 s) and deactivation kinetics (< 50 s), and a highly linear response to light. With this system, we achieve light-gated transcription in several mammalian cell lines and intact zebrafish embryos with minimal basal gene activation and toxicity. Our approach provides a powerful new tool for optogenetic control of gene expression in space and time. PMID:24413462

  20. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  1. Bifidobacterium bifidum actively changes the gene expression profile induced by Lactobacillus acidophilus in murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Gudrun; Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen Fink, Lisbeth; Jarmer, Hanne; Nøhr Nielsen, Birgit; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal regulatory role in activation of both the innate as well as the adaptive immune system by responding to environmental microorganisms. We have previously shown that Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a strong production of the pro-inflammatory and Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12 in DC, whereas bifidobacteria do not induce IL-12 but inhibit the IL-12 production induced by lactobacilli. In the present study, genome-wide microarrays were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of murine DC stimulated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium bifidum Z9. L. acidophilus NCFM strongly induced expression of interferon (IFN)-beta, other virus defence genes, and cytokine and chemokine genes related to the innate and the adaptive immune response. By contrast, B. bifidum Z9 up-regulated genes encoding cytokines and chemokines related to the innate immune response. Moreover, B. bifidum Z9 inhibited the expression of the Th1-promoting genes induced by L. acidophilus NCFM and had an additive effect on genes of the innate immune response and Th2 skewing genes. The gene encoding Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a transcription factor regulating the activation of JNK, was one of the few genes only induced by B. bifidum Z9. Neutralization of IFN-beta abrogated L. acidophilus NCFM-induced expression of Th1-skewing genes, and blocking of the JNK pathway completely inhibited the expression of IFN-beta. Our results indicate that B. bifidum Z9 actively inhibits the expression of genes related to the adaptive immune system in murine dendritic cells and that JPD2 via blocking of IFN-beta plays a central role in this regulatory mechanism. PMID:20548777

  2. The rolB gene activates the expression of genes encoding microRNA processing machinery.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, Victor P; Veremeichik, Galina N; Shkryl, Yuri N

    2015-04-01

    The rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes renders cells more tolerant of environmental stresses and increases their defense potential. However, these effects, coupled with the developmental abnormalities caused by rolB, have not yet been explained. In rolB-transformed Arabidopsis thaliana cells, we detected a 2.2 to 7-fold increase in the expression of genes encoding core and accessory proteins (DCL1, SE, HYL1, AGO1, TGH, DDL, HEN1, AGO4 and RDR2) of the microRNA processing machinery. However, the rolB gene did not affect the expression of DCL2, DCL3 and HST. The diverse and complex effects of rolB on transformed plant cells may be attributable to changes caused by this gene in particular RNA silencing pathways. PMID:25491479

  3. Process and genes for expression and overexpression of active [FeFe] hydrogenases

    DOEpatents

    Seibert, Michael; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Posewitz, Matthew C; Smolinski, Sharon L

    2014-09-16

    A process for expression of active [FeFe]-hydrogenase in a host organism that does not contain either the structural gene(s) for [FeFe]-hydrogenases and/or homologues for the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HyG, comprising: cloning the structural hydrogenase gene(s) and/or the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HydG from an organisms that contains these genes into expression plasmids; transferring the plasmids into an organism that lacks a native [FeFe]-hydrogenase or that has a disrupted [FeFe]-hydrogenase and culturing it aerobically; and inducing anaerobiosis to provide [FeFe] hydrogenase biosynthesis and H?2#191 production.

  4. BRAIN NETWORKS. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-06-12

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  5. Characterization of gene expression and activated signaling pathways in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Park, Minhee; Kim, Minhyung; Hwang, Daehee; Park, Misun; Kim, Won Kyu; Kim, Sang Kyum; Shin, Jihye; Park, Eun Sung; Kang, Chang Moo; Paik, Young-Ki; Kim, Hoguen

    2014-04-01

    Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm is an uncommon pancreatic tumor with distinct clinicopathologic features. Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms are characterized by mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1. However, little is known about the gene and microRNA expression profiles of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. Thus, we sought to characterize solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm-specific gene expression and identify the signaling pathways activated in these tumors. Comparisons of gene expression in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm to pancreatic ductal carcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, and non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues identified solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm-specific mRNA and microRNA profiles. By analyzing 1686 (1119 upregulated and 567 downregulated) genes differentially expressed in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm, we found that the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, and androgen receptor signaling pathways, as well as genes involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition, are activated in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. We validated these results experimentally by assessing the expression of β-catenin, WIF-1, GLI2, androgen receptor, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related markers with western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our analysis also revealed 17 microRNAs, especially the miR-200 family and miR-192/215, closely associated with the upregulated genes associated with the three pathways activated in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm and epithelial mesenchymal transition. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm tumorigenesis and its characteristic less epithelial cell differentiation than the other common pancreatic tumors. PMID:24072181

  6. Exercise and gene expression: physiological regulation of the human genome through physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Frank W; Chakravarthy, Manu V; Spangenburg, Espen E

    2002-01-01

    The current human genome was moulded and refined through generations of time. We propose that the basic framework for physiologic gene regulation was selected during an era of obligatory physical activity, as the survival of our Late Palaeolithic (50 000–10 000 BC) ancestors depended on hunting and gathering. A sedentary lifestyle in such an environment probably meant elimination of that individual organism. The phenotype of the present day Homo sapiens genome is much different from that of our ancient ancestors, primarily as a consequence of expressing evolutionarily programmed Late Palaeolithic genes in an environment that is predominantly sedentary. In this sense, our current genome is maladapted, resulting in abnormal gene expression, which in turn frequently manifests itself as clinically overt disease. We speculate that some of these genes still play a role in survival by causing premature death from chronic diseases produced by physical inactivity. We also contend that the current scientific evidence supports the notion that disruptions in cellular homeostasis are diminished in magnitude in physically active individuals compared with sedentary individuals due to the natural selection of gene expression that supports the physically active lifestyle displayed by our ancestors. We speculate that genes evolved with the expectation of requiring a certain threshold of physical activity for normal physiologic gene expression, and thus habitual exercise in sedentary cultures restores perturbed homeostatic mechanisms towards the normal physiological range of the Palaeolithic Homo sapiens. This hypothesis allows us to ask the question of whether normal physiological values change as a result of becoming sedentary. In summary, in sedentary cultures, daily physical activity normalizes gene expression towards patterns established to maintain the survival in the Late Palaeolithic era. PMID:12205177

  7. Encoding four gene expression programs in the activation dynamics of a single transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders S; O'Shea, Erin K

    2016-04-01

    Cellular signaling response pathways often exhibit a bow-tie topology [1,2]: multiple upstream stress signals converge on a single shared transcription factor, which is thought to induce different downstream gene expression programs (Figure 1A). However, if several different signals activate the same transcription factor, can each signal then induce a specific gene expression response? A growing body of literature supports a temporal coding theory where information about environmental signals can be encoded, at least partially, in the temporal dynamics of the shared transcription factor [1,2]. For example, in the case of the budding yeast transcription factor Msn2, different stresses induce distinct Msn2 activation dynamics: Msn2 shows pulsatile nuclear activation with dose-dependent frequency under glucose limitation, but sustained nuclear activation with dose-dependent amplitude under oxidative stress [3]. These dynamic patterns can then lead to differential gene expression responses [3-5], but it is not known how much specificity can be obtained. Thus, a major question of this temporal coding theory is how many gene response programs or cellular functions can be robustly encoded by dynamic control of a single transcription factor. Here we provide the first direct evidence that, simply by regulating the activation dynamics of a single transcription factor, it is possible to preferentially induce four distinct gene expression programs. PMID:27046808

  8. Requirement for metabolic activation of acetylaminofluorene to induce multidrug gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gant, T W; Schrenk, D; Silverman, J A; Thorgeirsson, S S

    1994-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that several xenobiotics can induce multidrug (mdr) gene expression in cultures of primary isolated hepatocytes. One of the best of these xenobiotic inducers in rat hepatocytes is 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), which induces mdr expression by an enhancement of mdr gene transcription. In all species studied to date, AAF is extensively and variously metabolized. In this study we have sought to determine if AAF per se or a metabolite is responsible for mediating the increase in mdr gene transcription and expression. This study demonstrates that AAF per se is not active, but that the effect of AAF we have observed on mdr gene transcription and expression in the rat is due to the formation of a reactive metabolite(s). Our data indicate that this reactive metabolite is probably N-acetoxy-2-aminofluorene or the sulfate ester of N-hydroxy-AAF. The requirement for the formation of one of these metabolites may explain the differences in species response to AAF, in terms of mdr gene expression, that we have observed. We hypothesize that the mechanism by which mdr gene transcription is increased in response to AAF involves a covalent interaction between a reactive metabolite and an mdr gene regulatory protein. Our current work is concerned with the exploration of this hypothesis. PMID:7889850

  9. SNORD116 and SNORD115 change expression of multiple genes and modify each other's activity.

    PubMed

    Falaleeva, Marina; Surface, Justin; Shen, Manli; de la Grange, Pierre; Stamm, Stefan

    2015-11-10

    The loss of two gene clusters encoding small nucleolar RNAs, SNORD115 and SNORD116 contribute to Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), the most common syndromic form of obesity in humans. SNORD115 and SNORD116 are considered to be orphan C/D box snoRNAs (SNORDs) as they do not target rRNAs or snRNAs. SNORD115 exhibits sequence complementarity towards the serotonin receptor 2C, but SNORD116 shows no extended complementarities to known RNAs. To identify molecular targets, we performed genome-wide array analysis after overexpressing SNORD115 and SNORD116 in HEK 293T cells, either alone or together. We found that SNORD116 changes the expression of over 200 genes. SNORD116 mainly changed mRNA expression levels. Surprisingly, we found that SNORD115 changes SNORD116's influence on gene expression. In similar experiments, we compared gene expression in post-mortem hypothalamus between individuals with PWS and aged-matched controls. The synopsis of these experiments resulted in 23 genes whose expression levels were influenced by SNORD116. Together our results indicate that SNORD115 and SNORD116 influence expression levels of multiple genes and modify each other activity. PMID:26220404

  10. Gene expression profiling in Ishikawa cells: A fingerprint for estrogen active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Boehme, Kathleen; Simon, Stephanie

    2009-04-01

    Several anthropogenous and naturally occurring substances, referred to as estrogen active compounds (EACs), are able to interfere with hormone and in particular estrogen receptor signaling. EACs can either cause adverse health effects in humans and wildlife populations or have beneficial effects on estrogen-dependent diseases. The aim of this study was to examine global gene expression profiles in estrogen receptor (ER)-proficient Ishikawa plus and ER-deficient Ishikawa minus endometrial cancer cells treated with selected well-known EACs (Diethylstilbestrol, Genistein, Zearalenone, Resveratrol, Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT). We also investigated the effect of the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) on the expression patterns caused by these compounds. Transcript levels were quantified 24 h after compound treatment using Illumina BeadChip Arrays. We identified 87 genes with similar expression changes in response to all EAC treatments in Ishikawa plus. ICI lowered the magnitude or reversed the expression of these genes, indicating ER dependent regulation. Apart from estrogenic gene regulation, Bisphenol A, o,p'-DDT, Zearalenone, Genistein and Resveratrol displayed similarities to ICI in their expression patterns, suggesting mixed estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties. In particular, the predominant antiestrogenic expression response of Resveratrol could be clearly distinguished from the other test compounds, indicating a distinct mechanism of action. Divergent gene expression patterns of the phytoestrogens, as well as weaker estrogenic gene expression regulation determined for the anthropogenous chemicals Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT, warrants a careful assessment of potential detrimental and/or beneficial effects of EACs. The characteristic expression fingerprints and the identified subset of putative marker genes can be used for screening chemicals with an unknown mode of action and for predicting their potential to exert endocrine disrupting effects.

  11. Isolation and Identification of Genes Activating Uas2-Dependent Adh2 Expression in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Donoviel, M. S.; Young, E. T.

    1996-01-01

    Two cis-acting elements have been identified that act synergistically to regulate expression of the glucose-repressed alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) gene. UAS1 is bound by the trans-activator Adr1p. UAS2 is thought to be the binding site for an unidentified regulatory protein. A genetic selection based on a UAS2-dependent ADH2 reporter was devised to isolate genes capable of activating UAS2-dependent transcription. One set of UAS2-dependent genes contained SPT6/CRE2/SSN20. Multicopy SPT6 caused improper expression of chromosomal ADH2. A second set of UAS2-dependent clones contained a previously uncharacterized open reading frame designated MEU1 (Multicopy Enhancer of UAS2). A frame shift mutation in MEU1 abolished its ability to activate UAS2-dependent gene expression. Multicopy MEU1 expression suppressed the constitutive ADH2 expression caused by cre2-1. Disruption of MEU1 reduced endogenous ADH2 expression about twofold but had no effect on cell viability or growth. No homologues of MEU1 were identified by low-stringency Southern hybridization of yeast genomic DNA, and no significant homologues were found in the sequence data bases. A MEU1/β-gal fusion protein was not localized to a particular region of the cell. MEU1 is linked to PPR1 on chromosome XII. PMID:8807288

  12. Functional mapping of a trans-activating gene required for expression of a baculovirus delayed-early gene.

    PubMed Central

    Guarino, L A; Summers, M D

    1986-01-01

    The temporal regulation of an early gene of the baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus was examined. We constructed a plasmid (plasmid 39CAT) in which the bacterial gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was placed under the control of the promoter for the gene for a A. californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus 39,000-dalton protein (39K). A transient expression assay of plasmid 39CAT revealed that the 39K gene was expressed in infected cells but not in uninfected cells, indicating that the 39K gene should be classified as a delayed-early gene. The 39K promoter also efficiently directed the synthesis of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase when the plasmid was cotransfected with viral DNA which had been restricted with several restriction enzymes. To map the location of the gene(s) required for the synthesis of 39K, plasmid 39CAT was cotransfected with purified restriction fragments of A. californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA. Fragments which mapped between 90.7 and 100.8 map units induced plasmid 39CAT. Plasmid pEcoRI-B, containing EcoRI fragment B (90 to 100 map units), activated plasmid 39CAT. Functional mapping of plasmid pEcoRI-B indicated that the essential region was located between 95.0 and 97.5 map units. The 5' end of this gene was mapped, and the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was inserted under the control of its promoter. Transient assay experiments indicated that the trans-acting regulatory gene was expressed in uninfected cells and is therefore an immediate-early gene. This gene was named IE-1. Images PMID:3944847

  13. Redox-activated expression of the cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase gene in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Hérouart, D; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1993-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs; superoxide: superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) play a key role in protection against oxygen radicals, and SOD gene expression is highly induced during environmental stress. To determine the conditions of SOD induction, the promoter of the cytosolic copper/zinc SOD (Cu/ZnSODcyt) gene was isolated in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Oxidative stress is likely to alter the cellular redox in favor of the oxidized status. Surprisingly, the expression of the Cu/ZnSODcyt gene is induced by sulfhydryl antioxidants such as reduced glutathione, cysteine, and dithiothreitol, whereas the oxidized forms of glutathione and cysteine have no effect. It is therefore possible that reduced glutathione directly acts as an antioxidant and simultaneously activates the Cu/ZnSODcyt gene during oxidative stress. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8464930

  14. Conserved Overlapping Gene Arrangement, Restricted Expression, and Biochemical Activities of DNA Polymerase ν (POLN)*

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Kei-ichi; Tomida, Junya; Reh, Shelley; Swanhart, Lisa M.; Takata, Minoru; Hukriede, Neil A.; Wood, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase ν (POLN) is one of 16 DNA polymerases encoded in vertebrate genomes. It is important to determine its gene expression patterns, biological roles, and biochemical activities. By quantitative analysis of mRNA expression, we found that POLN from the zebrafish Danio rerio is expressed predominantly in testis. POLN is not detectably expressed in zebrafish embryos or in mouse embryonic stem cells. Consistent with this, injection of POLN-specific morpholino antisense oligonucleotides did not interfere with zebrafish embryonic development. Analysis of transcripts revealed that vertebrate POLN has an unusual gene expression arrangement, sharing a first exon with HAUS3, the gene encoding augmin-like complex subunit 3. HAUS3 is broadly expressed in embryonic and adult tissues, in contrast to POLN. Differential expression of POLN and HAUS3 appears to arise by alternate splicing of transcripts in mammalian cells and zebrafish. When POLN was ectopically overexpressed in human cells, it specifically coimmunoprecipitated with the homologous recombination factors BRCA1 and FANCJ, but not with previously suggested interaction partners (HELQ and members of the Fanconi anemia core complex). Purified zebrafish POLN protein is capable of thymine glycol bypass and strand displacement, with activity dependent on a basic amino acid residue known to stabilize the primer-template. These properties are conserved with the human enzyme. Although the physiological function of pol ν remains to be clarified, this study uncovers distinctive aspects of its expression control and evolutionarily conserved properties of this DNA polymerase. PMID:26269593

  15. Krüppel-like Factor 4 activates HBG gene expression in primary erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Inderdeep S.; Alam, Md M.; Choudhary, Pankaj K.; Pace, Betty S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The SP1/Krüppel-like Factor (SP1/KLF) family of transcription factors plays a role in diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation and control of gene transcription. The discovery of KLF1 (EKLF), a key regulator of HBB (β-globin) gene expression, expanded our understanding of the role of KLFs in erythropoiesis. In this study, we investigated a mechanism of HBG (γ-globin) regulation by KLF4. siRNA-mediated gene silencing and enforced expression of KLF4 in K562 cells substantiated the ability of KLF4 to positively regulate endogenous HBG gene transcription. The physiological significance of this finding was confirmed in primary erythroid cells, where KLF4 knockdown at day 11 significantly attenuated HBG mRNA levels and enforced expression at day 28 stimulated the silenced HBG genes. In vitro binding characterization using the γ-CACCC and β-CACCC probes demonstrated KLF4 preferentially binds the endogenous γ-CACCC, while CREB binding protein (CREBBP) binding was not selective. Co-immunoprecipitation studies confirmed protein-protein interaction between KLF4 and CREBBP. Furthermore, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed co-localization of both factors in the γ-CACCC region. Subsequent luciferase reporter studies demonstrated that KLF4 trans-activated HBG promoter activity and that CREBBP enforced expression resulted in gene repression. Our data supports a model of antagonistic interaction of KLF4/CREBBP trans-factors in HBG regulation. PMID:21539536

  16. Intraarticular expression of biologically active interleukin 1-receptor-antagonist protein by ex vivo gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Bandara, G; Mueller, G M; Galea-Lauri, J; Tindal, M H; Georgescu, H I; Suchanek, M K; Hung, G L; Glorioso, J C; Robbins, P D; Evans, C H

    1993-01-01

    Gene therapy offers a radical different approach to the treatment of arthritis. Here we have demonstrated that two marker genes (lacZ and neo) and cDNA coding for a potentially therapeutic protein (human interleukin 1-receptor-antagonist protein; IRAP or IL-1ra) can be delivered, by ex vivo techniques, to the synovial lining of joints; intraarticular expression of IRAP inhibited intraarticular responses to interleukin 1. To achieve this, lapine synoviocytes were first transduced in culture by retroviral infection. The genetically modified synovial cells were then transplanted by intraarticular injection into the knee joints of rabbits, where they efficiently colonized the synovium. Assay of joint lavages confirmed the in vivo expression of biologically active human IRAP. With allografted cells, IRAP expression was lost by 12 days after transfer. In contrast, autografted synoviocytes continued to express IRAP for approximately 5 weeks. Knee joints expressing human IRAP were protected from the leukocytosis that otherwise follows the intraarticular injection of recombinant human interleukin 1 beta. Thus, we report the intraarticular expression and activity of a potentially therapeutic protein by gene-transfer technology; these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of treating arthritis and other joint disorders with gene therapy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8248169

  17. Gene expression and activity of cartilage degrading glycosidases in human rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pásztói, Mária; Nagy, György; Géher, Pál; Lakatos, Tamás; Tóth, Kálmán; Wellinger, Károly; Pócza, Péter; György, Bence; Holub, Marianna C; Kittel, Ágnes; Pálóczy, Krisztina; Mazán, Mercédesz; Nyirkos, Péter; Falus, András; Buzas, Edit I

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Similar to matrix metalloproteinases, glycosidases also play a major role in cartilage degradation. Carbohydrate cleavage products, generated by these latter enzymes, are released from degrading cartilage during arthritis. Some of the cleavage products (such as hyaluronate oligosaccharides) have been shown to bind to Toll-like receptors and provide endogenous danger signals, while others (like N-acetyl glucosamine) are reported to have chondroprotective functions. In the current study for the first time we systematically investigated the expression of glycosidases within the joints. Methods Expressions of β-D-hexosaminidase, β-D-glucuronidase, hyaluronidase, sperm adhesion molecule 1 and klotho genes were measured in synovial fibroblasts and synovial membrane samples of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis by real-time PCR. β-D-Glucuronidase, β-D-glucosaminidase and β-D-galactosaminidase activities were characterized using chromogenic or fluorogenic substrates. Synovial fibroblast-derived microvesicles were also tested for glycosidase activity. Results According to our data, β-D-hexosaminidase, β-D-glucuronidase, hyaluronidase, and klotho are expressed in the synovial membrane. Hexosaminidase is the major glycosidase expressed within the joints, and it is primarily produced by synovial fibroblasts. HexA subunit gene, one of the two genes encoding for the alpha or the beta chains of hexosaminidase, was characterized by the strongest gene expression. It was followed by the expression of HexB subunit gene and the β-D-glucuronidase gene, while the expression of hyaluronidase-1 gene and the klotho gene was rather low in both synovial fibroblasts and synovial membrane samples. Tumor growth factor-β1 profoundly downregulated glycosidase expression in both rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis derived synovial fibroblasts. In addition, expression of cartilage-degrading glycosidases was moderately downregulated by proinflammatory

  18. Xenobiotics shape the physiology and gene expression of the active human gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Corinne Ferrier; Haiser, Henry Joseph; Turnbaugh, Peter James

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The human gut contains trillions of microorganisms that influence our health by metabolizing xenobiotics, including host-targeted drugs and antibiotics. Recent efforts have characterized the diversity of this host-associated community, but it remains unclear which microorganisms are active and what perturbations influence this activity. Here, we combine flow cytometry, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and metatranscriptomics to demonstrate that the gut contains a distinctive set of active microorganisms, primarily Firmicutes. Short-term exposure to a panel of xenobiotics significantly affected the physiology, structure, and gene expression of this active gut microbiome. Xenobiotic-responsive genes were found across multiple bacterial phyla, encoding antibiotic resistance, drug metabolism, and stress response pathways. These results demonstrate the power of moving beyond surveys of microbial diversity to better understand metabolic activity, highlight the unintended consequences of xenobiotics, and suggest that attempts at personalized medicine should consider inter-individual variations in the active human gut microbiome. PMID:23332745

  19. Integrating Circadian Activity and Gene Expression Profiles to Predict Chronotoxicity of Drosophila suzukii Response to Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Hamby, Kelly A.; Kwok, Rosanna S.; Zalom, Frank G.; Chiu, Joanna C.

    2013-01-01

    Native to Southeast Asia, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) is a recent invader that infests intact ripe and ripening fruit, leading to significant crop losses in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. Since current D. suzukii management strategies rely heavily on insecticide usage and insecticide detoxification gene expression is under circadian regulation in the closely related Drosophila melanogaster, we set out to determine if integrative analysis of daily activity patterns and detoxification gene expression can predict chronotoxicity of D. suzukii to insecticides. Locomotor assays were performed under conditions that approximate a typical summer or winter day in Watsonville, California, where D. suzukii was first detected in North America. As expected, daily activity patterns of D. suzukii appeared quite different between ‘summer’ and ‘winter’ conditions due to differences in photoperiod and temperature. In the ‘summer’, D. suzukii assumed a more bimodal activity pattern, with maximum activity occurring at dawn and dusk. In the ‘winter’, activity was unimodal and restricted to the warmest part of the circadian cycle. Expression analysis of six detoxification genes and acute contact bioassays were performed at multiple circadian times, but only in conditions approximating Watsonville summer, the cropping season, when most insecticide applications occur. Five of the genes tested exhibited rhythmic expression, with the majority showing peak expression at dawn (ZT0, 6am). We observed significant differences in the chronotoxicity of D. suzukii towards malathion, with highest susceptibility at ZT0 (6am), corresponding to peak expression of cytochrome P450s that may be involved in bioactivation of malathion. High activity levels were not found to correlate with high insecticide susceptibility as initially hypothesized. Chronobiology and chronotoxicity of D. suzukii provide valuable insights for monitoring and control efforts, because insect activity as well as

  20. FLUCONAZOLE-INDUCED HEPATIC CYTOCHROME P450 GENE EXPRESSION AND ENZYMATIC ACTIVITIES IN RATS AND MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of the triazole antifungal agent fluconazole on the expression of hepatic cytochrome P450 (Cyp) genes and the activities of Cyp enzymes in male Sprague-Dawley rats and male CD-1 mice. Alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (AROD) methods w...

  1. Gene expression analysis during acute hepatitis C virus infection associates dendritic cell activation with viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Aintzane; Riezu-Boj, Jose-Ignacio; Larrea, Esther; Villanueva, Lorea; Lasarte, Juan Jose; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Fisicaro, Paola; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Missale, Gabriele; Ferrari, Carlo; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Prieto, Jesús; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Viral clearance during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the induction of potent antiviral T-cell responses. Since dendritic cells (DC) are essential in the activation of primary T-cell responses, gene expression was analyzed in DC from patients during acute HCV infection. By using microarrays, gene expression was compared in resting and activated peripheral blood plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid (mDC) DC from acute HCV resolving patients (AR) and from patients who become chronically infected (ANR), as well as in healthy individuals (CTRL) and chronically-infected patients (CHR). For pDC, a high number of upregulated genes was found in AR patients, irrespective of DC stimulation. However, for mDC, most evident differences were detected after DC stimulation, again corresponding to upregulated genes in AR patients. Divergent behavior of ANR was also observed when analyzing DC from CTRL and CHR, with ANR patients clustering again apart from these groups. These differences corresponded to metabolism-associated genes and genes belonging to pathways relevant for DC activation and cytokine responses. Thus, upregulation of relevant genes in DC during acute HCV infection may determine viral clearance, suggesting that dysfunctional DC may be responsible for the lack of efficient T-cell responses which lead to chronic HCV infection. PMID:26447929

  2. Activated macrophages for treating skin ulceration: gene expression in human monocytes after hypo-osmotic shock

    PubMed Central

    FRENKEL, O; SHANI, E; BEN-BASSAT, I; BROK-SIMONI, F; ROZENFELD-GRANOT, G; KAJAKARO, G; RECHAVI, G; AMARIGLIO, N; SHINAR, E; DANON, D

    2002-01-01

    Macrophages play a major role in almost all stages of the complex process of wound healing. It has been previously shown that the incorporation of a hypo-osmotic shock step, in the process of monocyte-concentrate preparation from a blood unit, induces monocyte/macrophage activation. As the macrophages are produced using a unique, closed and sterile system, they are suitable for local application on ulcers in elderly and paraplegic patients. Enhanced phagocytosis by the activated cells, as well as increased secretion of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, were detected in a recent study which are in accord with the very encouraging clinical results. In the present study, we used DNA microarrays to analyse the differential gene expressions of the hypo-osmotic shock-activated monocytes/macrophages and compare them to non-treated cells. Of the genes that exhibited differences of expression in the activated cell population, 94% (68/72) displayed increased activity. The mRNA levels of 43/68 of these genes (63%) were found to be 1·5-fold or higher (1·5–7·98) in the activated macrophages cell population as compared to the non-treated cells. Only four genes were found to have lower mRNA levels in the activated cells, with ratios of expression of 0·62–0·8, which may suggest that the changes are insignificant. A significant number of the genes that showed increased levels of expression is known to be directly involved in macrophage function and wound healing. This may correlate with the increased secretion of different cytokines by the activated macrophages depicted previously. Other groups of genes expressed are known to be involved in important pathways such as neuronal growth and function, developmental defects and cancer. The hypo-osmotic shock induces a gene expression profile of cytokines and receptors in the activated cells. These may evoke potential abilities to produce a variety of protein products needed in the wound healing process and may bring to light

  3. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Thomas, Russell S.; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Corton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher’s algorithm (p-value ≤ 10-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  4. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium.

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Thomas, Russell S; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D; Corton, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher's algorithm (p-value ≤ 10(-4))) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  5. Trans-activation of human immunodeficiency virus gene expression is mediated by nuclear events

    SciTech Connect

    Hauber, J.; Perkins, A.; Heimer, E.P.; Cullen, B.R.

    1987-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus encodes a gene product termed tat that is able to activate viral gene expression when present in trans. The mechanism of action of the tat gene product appears to be bimodal, resulting in both an increase in the steady-state level of viral mRNA and the enhanced translation of that RNA. In this report, the authors have examined the mechanism by which tat elevates viral mRNA levels. Data are presented demonstrating that tat acts by increasing the rate of viral transcription, rather than by modulating the stability of viral mRNA. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to show that tat is predominantly localized in the nucleus of expressing cells, a location consistent with a role in the regulation of viral transcription. These results suggest that tat could play a role in human immunodeficiency virus replication essentially similar to that proposed for the trans-acting nuclear gene products described for several other virus species.

  6. Synergistic and antagonistic interplay between myostatin gene expression and physical activity levels on gene expression patterns in triceps Brachii muscles of C57/BL6 mice.

    PubMed

    Caetano-Anollés, Kelsey; Mishra, Sanjibita; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    Levels of myostatin expression and physical activity have both been associated with transcriptome dysregulation and skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The transcriptome of triceps brachii muscles from male C57/BL6 mice corresponding to two genotypes (wild-type and myostatin-reduced) under two conditions (high and low physical activity) was characterized using RNA-Seq. Synergistic and antagonistic interaction and ortholog modes of action of myostatin genotype and activity level on genes and gene pathways in this skeletal muscle were uncovered; 1,836, 238, and 399 genes exhibited significant (FDR-adjusted P-value < 0.005) activity-by-genotype interaction, genotype and activity effects, respectively. The most common differentially expressed profiles were (i) inactive myostatin-reduced relative to active and inactive wild-type, (ii) inactive myostatin-reduced and active wild-type, and (iii) inactive myostatin-reduced and inactive wild-type. Several remarkable genes and gene pathways were identified. The expression profile of nascent polypeptide-associated complex alpha subunit (Naca) supports a synergistic interaction between activity level and myostatin genotype, while Gremlin 2 (Grem2) displayed an antagonistic interaction. Comparison between activity levels revealed expression changes in genes encoding for structural proteins important for muscle function (including troponin, tropomyosin and myoglobin) and for fatty acid metabolism (some linked to diabetes and obesity, DNA-repair, stem cell renewal, and various forms of cancer). Conversely, comparison between genotype groups revealed changes in genes associated with G1-to-S-phase transition of the cell cycle of myoblasts and the expression of Grem2 proteins that modulate the cleavage of the myostatin propeptide. A number of myostatin-feedback regulated gene products that are primarily regulatory were uncovered, including microRNA impacting central functions and Piezo proteins that make cationic current

  7. Synergistic and Antagonistic Interplay between Myostatin Gene Expression and Physical Activity Levels on Gene Expression Patterns in Triceps Brachii Muscles of C57/BL6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Kelsey; Mishra, Sanjibita; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Levels of myostatin expression and physical activity have both been associated with transcriptome dysregulation and skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The transcriptome of triceps brachii muscles from male C57/BL6 mice corresponding to two genotypes (wild-type and myostatin-reduced) under two conditions (high and low physical activity) was characterized using RNA-Seq. Synergistic and antagonistic interaction and ortholog modes of action of myostatin genotype and activity level on genes and gene pathways in this skeletal muscle were uncovered; 1,836, 238, and 399 genes exhibited significant (FDR-adjusted P-value < 0.005) activity-by-genotype interaction, genotype and activity effects, respectively. The most common differentially expressed profiles were (i) inactive myostatin-reduced relative to active and inactive wild-type, (ii) inactive myostatin-reduced and active wild-type, and (iii) inactive myostatin-reduced and inactive wild-type. Several remarkable genes and gene pathways were identified. The expression profile of nascent polypeptide-associated complex alpha subunit (Naca) supports a synergistic interaction between activity level and myostatin genotype, while Gremlin 2 (Grem2) displayed an antagonistic interaction. Comparison between activity levels revealed expression changes in genes encoding for structural proteins important for muscle function (including troponin, tropomyosin and myoglobin) and for fatty acid metabolism (some linked to diabetes and obesity, DNA-repair, stem cell renewal, and various forms of cancer). Conversely, comparison between genotype groups revealed changes in genes associated with G1-to-S-phase transition of the cell cycle of myoblasts and the expression of Grem2 proteins that modulate the cleavage of the myostatin propeptide. A number of myostatin-feedback regulated gene products that are primarily regulatory were uncovered, including microRNA impacting central functions and Piezo proteins that make cationic current

  8. Maternal age effects on myometrial expression of contractile proteins, uterine gene expression, and contractile activity during labor in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Elmes, Matthew; Szyszka, Alexandra; Pauliat, Caroline; Clifford, Bethan; Daniel, Zoe; Cheng, Zhangrui; Wathes, Claire; McMullen, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Advanced maternal age of first time pregnant mothers is associated with prolonged and dysfunctional labor and significant risk of emergency cesarean section. We investigated the influence of maternal age on myometrial contractility, expression of contractile associated proteins (CAPs), and global gene expression in the parturient uterus. Female Wistar rats either 8 (YOUNG n = 10) or 24 (OLDER n = 10) weeks old were fed laboratory chow, mated, and killed during parturition. Myometrial strips were dissected to determine contractile activity, cholesterol (CHOL) and triglycerides (TAG) content, protein expression of connexin-43 (GJA1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), and caveolin 1 (CAV-1). Maternal plasma concentrations of prostaglandins PGE2, PGF2α, and progesterone were determined by RIA. Global gene expression in uterine samples was compared using Affymetrix Genechip Gene 2.0 ST arrays and Ingenuity Pathway analysis (IPA). Spontaneous contractility in myometrium exhibited by YOUNG rats was threefold greater than OLDER animals (P < 0.027) but maternal age had no significant effect on myometrial CAP expression, lipid profiles, or pregnancy-related hormones. OLDER myometrium increased contractile activity in response to PGF2α, phenylephrine, and carbachol, a response absent in YOUNG rats (all P < 0.002). Microarray analysis identified that maternal age affected expression of genes related to immune and inflammatory responses, lipid transport and metabolism, steroid metabolism, tissue remodeling, and smooth muscle contraction. In conclusion YOUNG laboring rat myometrium seems primed to contract maximally, whereas activity is blunted in OLDER animals and requires stimulation to meet contractile potential. Further work investigating maternal age effects on myometrial function is required with focus on lipid metabolism and inflammatory pathways. PMID:25876907

  9. SATB1 packages densely-looped, transciptionally-active chromatinfor coordinated expression of cytokine genes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Shutao; Lee, Charles C.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2006-05-23

    SATB1 is an important regulator of nuclear architecture that anchors specialized DNA sequences onto its cage-like network and recruits chromatin remodeling/modifying factors to control gene transcription. We studied the role of SATB1 in regulating the coordinated expression of Il5, Il4, and Il13 from the 200kb cytokine gene cluster region of mouse chromosome 11 during T-helper 2 (Th2)-cell activation. We show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is rapidly induced to form a unique transcriptionally-active chromatin structure that includes the cytokine gene region. Chromatin is folded into numerous small loops all anchored by SATB1, is histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9/14, and associated with Th2-specific factors, GATA3, STAT6, c-Maf, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme Brg-1, and RNA polymerase II across the 200kb region. Before activation, the chromatin displays some of these features, such as association with GATA3 and STAT6, but these were insufficient for cytokine gene expression. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is not only required for chromatin folding into dense loops, but also for c-Maf induction and subsequently for Il4, Il5, and Il13 transcription. Our results show that SATB1 is an important determinant for chromatin architecture that constitutes a novel higher-order, transcriptionally-active chromatin structure upon Th2-cell activation.

  10. Association of differentially expressed genes with activation of mouse hepatic stellate cells by high-density cDNA mircoarray

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Yang, Li; Luo, Feng-Ming; Wu, Hong-Bin; Qu-Qiang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the gene expression profiles associated with activation of mouse hepatic stellate cell (HSC) and provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. METHODS: Mice HSCs were isolated from BALB/c mice by in situ perfusion of collagenase and pronase and single-step density Nycodenz gradient. Total RNA and mRNA of quiescent HSC and culture-activated HSC were extracted, quantified and reversely transcripted into cDNA. cDNAs from activated HSC were labeled with Cy5 and cDNAs from the quiescent HSC were labeled with Cy3, which were mixed with equal quantity, then hybridized with cDNA chips containing 4000 genes. Chips were washed, scanned and analyzed. Increased expression of 4 genes and decreased expression of one gene in activated HSC were confirmed by reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: A total of 835 differentially expressed genes were identified by cDNA chip between activated and quiescent HSC, and 465 genes were highly expressed in activated HSC. The differentially expressed genes included those involved in protein synthesis, cell-cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA damage response. CONCLUSION: Many genes implicated in intrahepatic inflammation, fibrosis and proliferation were up-regulated in activated HSC. cDNA microarray is an effective technique in screening for differentially expressed genes between two different situations of the HSC. Further analysis of the obtained genes will help understand the molecular mechanism of activation of HSC and hepatic fibrosis. PMID:15162533

  11. Regulation of Neuronal Gene Expression and Survival by Basal NMDA Receptor Activity: A Role for Histone Deacetylase 4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yelin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Modrusan, Zora

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal gene expression is modulated by activity via calcium-permeable receptors such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs). While gene expression changes downstream of evoked NMDAR activity have been well studied, much less is known about gene expression changes that occur under conditions of basal neuronal activity. In mouse dissociated hippocampal neuronal cultures, we found that a broad NMDAR antagonist, AP5, induced robust gene expression changes under basal activity, but subtype-specific antagonists did not. While some of the gene expression changes are also known to be downstream of stimulated NMDAR activity, others appear specific to basal NMDAR activity. The genes altered by AP5 treatment of basal cultures were enriched for pathways related to class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs), apoptosis, and synapse-related signaling. Specifically, AP5 altered the expression of all three class IIa HDACs that are highly expressed in the brain, HDAC4, HDAC5, and HDAC9, and also induced nuclear accumulation of HDAC4. HDAC4 knockdown abolished a subset of the gene expression changes induced by AP5, and led to neuronal death under long-term tetrodotoxin or AP5 treatment in rat hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. These data suggest that basal, but not evoked, NMDAR activity regulates gene expression in part through HDAC4, and, that HDAC4 has neuroprotective functions under conditions of low NMDAR activity. PMID:25392500

  12. Activity, Expression and Function of a Second Drosophila Protein Kinase a Catalytic Subunit Gene

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-01-01

    The DC2 gene was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DCO, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 did not affect the viability or phenotype of imaginal disc cells lacking DC0 activity or embryonic hatching of animals with reduced DC0 activity. Furthermore, transgenes expressing DC2 from a DC0 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. PMID:8601490

  13. MALT1 Protease Activity Controls the Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Keratinocytes upon Zymosan Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Anja; Grondona, Paula; Maier, Tabea; Brändle, Marc; Schönfeld, Caroline; Jäger, Günter; Kosnopfel, Corinna; Eberle, Franziska C; Schittek, Birgit; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Yazdi, Amir S; Hailfinger, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The protease activity of the paracaspase mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) plays an important role in antigen receptor-mediated lymphocyte activation by controlling the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB and is thus essential for the expression of inflammatory target genes. MALT1 is not only present in cells of the hematopoietic lineage, but is ubiquitously expressed. Here we report that stimulation with zymosan or Staphylococcus aureus induced MALT1 protease activity in human primary keratinocytes. Inhibition of the Src family of kinases or novel protein kinase C isoforms as well as silencing of CARMA2 or BCL10 interfered with activation of MALT1 protease. Silencing or inhibition of MALT1 protease strongly decreased the expression of important inflammatory genes such as TNFα, IL-17C, CXCL8 and HBD-2. MALT1-inhibited cells were unable to mount an antimicrobial response upon zymosan stimulation or phorbolester/ionomycin treatment, demonstrating a central role of MALT1 protease activity in keratinocyte immunity and suggesting MALT1 as a potential target in inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26767426

  14. Transcriptional Activation of Human Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Gene Expression by Multiple Coactivators

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xueyan; Benveniste, Etty N.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), a proteolytic enzyme for matrix proteins, chemokines and cytokines, is a major target in cancer and autoimmune diseases since it is aberrantly upregulated. To control MMP-9 expression in pathological conditions, it is necessary to understand the regulatory mechanisms of MMP-9 expression. MMP-9 gene expression is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level. In this study, we investigated the role of multiple coactivators in regulating MMP-9 transcription. We demonstrate that multiple transcriptional coactivators are involved in MMP-9 promoter activation, including CBP/p300, PCAF, CARM1 and GRIP1. Furthermore, enhancement of MMP-9 promoter activity requires the histone acetyltransferase activity of PCAF but not that of CBP/p300, and the methyltransferase activity of CARM1. More importantly, these coactivators are not only able to activate MMP-9 promoter activity independently, but also function in a synergistic manner. Significant synergy was observed among CARM1, p300 and GRIP1, which is dependent on the interaction of p300 and CARM1 with the AD1 and AD2 domains of GRIP1, respectively. This suggests the formation of a ternary coactivator complex on the MMP-9 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that these coactivators associate with the endogenous MMP-9 promoter, and that siRNA knockdown of expression of these coactivators reduces endogenous MMP-9 expression. Taken together, these studies demonstrate a new level of transcriptional regulation of MMP-9 expression by the cooperative action of coactivators. PMID:18790699

  15. Expression of Allene Oxide Synthase Determines Defense Gene Activation in Tomato1

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Sobhana; Sheldrick, Bay; Rothstein, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Allene oxide synthase (AOS; hydroperoxide dehydratase; EC 4.2.1.92) catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid from lipoxygenase-derived hydroperoxides of free fatty acids. Using the AOS cDNA from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), in which the role of jasmonic acid in wound-induced defense gene activation has been best described, we examined the kinetics of AOS induction in response to wounding and elicitors, in parallel with that of the wound-inducible PIN II (proteinase inhibitor II) gene. AOS was induced in leaves by wounding, systemin, 12-oxophytodienoic acid, and methyl jasmonate. The levels of AOS mRNA started declining by 4 h after induction, whereas the levels of PIN II mRNA continued to increase up to 20 h after induction. Salicylic acid inhibited AOS and PIN II expression, and the addition of 12-oxophytodienoic acid or methyl jasmonate did not prevent the inhibition of PIN II expression in the presence of salicylic acid. Ethylene induced the expression of AOS, but the presence of ethylene alone did not produce an optimal induction of PIN II. The addition of silver thiosulfate, an ethylene action inhibitor, prevented the wound-induced expression of both AOS and PIN II. Products of hydroperoxide lyase affected neither AOS nor PIN II, but induced expression of prosystemin. Based on these results, we propose an updated model for defense gene activation in tomato. PMID:10759530

  16. Mitochondrial-derived oxidants and quartz activation of chemokine gene expression.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, K E; Howard, B W; Carter, J M; Janssen, Y M; Mossman, B T; Isfort, R J

    2001-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) is a chemotactic cytokine which mediates neutrophil recruitment in the lung and other tissues. Pneumotoxic particles such as quartz increase MIP-2 expression in rat lung and rat alveolar type II epithelial cells. Deletion mutant analysis of the rat MIP-2 promoter demonstrated quartz-induction depended on a single NFkappaB consensus binding site. Quartz activation of NFkappaB and MIP-2 gene expression in RLE-6TN cells was inhibited by anti-oxidants suggesting the responses were dependent on oxidative stress. Consistent with anti-oxidant effects, quartz was demonstrated to increase RLE-6TN cell production of hydrogen peroxide. Rotenone treatment of RLE-6TN cells attenuated hydrogen peroxide production, NFkappaB activation and MIP-2 gene expression induced by quartz indicating that mitochondria-derived oxidants were contributing to these responses. Collectively, these findings indicate that quartz and crocidolite induction of MIP-2 gene expression in rat alveolar type II cells results from stimulation of an intracellular signaling pathway involving increased generation of hydrogen peroxide by mitochondria and subsequent activation of NFkappaB. PMID:11764986

  17. Trichomonas vaginalis Cysteine Proteinases: Iron Response in Gene Expression and Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Rossana; Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Puente-Rivera, Jonathan; Zamudio-Prieto, Olga; Ortega-López, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the iron response of Trichomonas vaginalis to gene family products such as the cysteine proteinases (CPs) involved in virulence properties. In particular, we examined the effect of iron on the gene expression regulation and function of cathepsin L-like and asparaginyl endopeptidase-like CPs as virulence factors. We addressed some important aspects about CPs genomic organization and we offer possible explanations to the fact that only few members of this large gene family are expressed at the RNA and protein levels and the way to control their proteolytic activity. We also summarized all known iron regulations of CPs at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels along with new insights into the possible epigenetic and miRNA processes. PMID:26090464

  18. Effect of pH and Temperature on Denitrification Gene Expression and Activity in Pseudomonas mandelii▿

    PubMed Central

    Saleh-Lakha, Saleema; Shannon, Kelly E.; Henderson, Sherri L.; Goyer, Claudia; Trevors, Jack T.; Zebarth, Bernie J.; Burton, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas mandelii liquid cultures were studied to determine the effect of pH and temperature on denitrification gene expression, which was quantified by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Denitrification was measured by the accumulation of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the headspace in the presence of acetylene. Levels of gene expression of nirS and cnorB at pH 5 were 539-fold and 6,190-fold lower, respectively, than the levels of gene expression for cells grown at pH 6, 7, and 8 between 4 h and 8 h. Cumulative denitrification levels were 28 μmol, 63 μmol, and 22 μmol at pH 6, 7, and 8, respectively, at 8 h, whereas negligible denitrification was measured at pH 5. P. mandelii cells grown at 20°C and 30°C exhibited 9-fold and 94-fold increases in levels of cnorB expression between 0 h and 2 h, respectively, and an average 17-fold increase in levels of nirS gene expression. In contrast, induction of cnorB and nirS gene expression for P. mandelii cells grown at 10°C did not occur in the first 4 h. Levels of cumulative denitrification at 10 h were 6.6 μmol for P. mandelii cells grown at 10°C and 20°C and 30 μmol for cells grown at 30°C. Overall, levels of cnorB and nirS expression were relatively insensitive to pH values over the range of pH 6 to 8 but were substantially reduced at pH 5, whereas gene expression was sensitive to temperature, with induction and time to achieve maximum gene expression delayed as the temperature decreased from 30°C. Low pH and temperature negatively affected denitrification activity. PMID:19376915

  19. Expression of essential B cell genes and immunoglobulin isotypes suggests active development and gene recombination during equine gestation.

    PubMed

    Tallmadge, Rebecca L; McLaughlin, Kristin; Secor, Erica; Ruano, Diana; Matychak, Mary Beth; Flaminio, M Julia B F

    2009-09-01

    Many features of the equine immune system develop during fetal life, yet the naïve or immature immune state of the neonate renders the foal uniquely susceptible to particular pathogens. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical experiments investigated the progressive expression of developmental B cell markers and immunoglobulins in lymphoid tissues from equine fetus, pre-suckle neonate, foal, and adult horses. Serum IgM, IgG isotype, and IgA concentrations were also quantified in pre-suckle foals and adult horses. The expression of essential B cell genes suggests active development and gene recombination during equine gestation, including immunoglobulin isotype switching. The corresponding production of IgM and IgG proteins is detectable in a limited scale at birth. Although the equine neonate humoral response seems competent, B cell activation factors derived from antigen presenting cells and T cells may control critical developmental regulation and immunoglobulin production during the initial months of life. PMID:19442687

  20. Circadian regulation of locomotor activity and skeletal muscle gene expression in the horse.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ann-Marie; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Duffy, Pat; Blake, Catriona M; Ben Attia, Sarra; Katz, Lisa M; Browne, John A; Gath, Vivian; McGivney, Beatrice A; Hill, Emmeline W; Murphy, Barbara A

    2010-11-01

    Circadian rhythms are innate 24-h cycles in behavioral and biochemical processes that permit physiological anticipation of daily environmental changes. Elucidating the relationship between activity rhythms and circadian patterns of gene expression may contribute to improved human and equine athletic performance. Six healthy, untrained mares were studied to determine whether locomotor activity behavior and skeletal muscle gene expression reflect endogenous circadian regulation. Activity was recorded for three consecutive 48-h periods: as a group at pasture (P), and individually stabled under a light-dark (LD) cycle and in constant darkness (DD). Halter-mounted Actiwatch-L data-loggers recorded light exposure and motor activity. Analysis of mean activity (average counts/min, activity bouts/day, average bout length) and cosinor parameters (acrophase, amplitude, mesor, goodness of fit) revealed a predominantly ultradian (8.9 ± 0.7 bouts/24 h) and weakly circadian pattern of activity in all three conditions (P, LD, DD). A more robust circadian pattern was observed during LD and DD. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the middle gluteal muscles every 4 h for 24 h under DD. One-way qRT-PCR results confirmed the circadian expression (P < 0.05) of six core clock genes (Arntl, Per1, Per2, Nr1d1, Nr1d2, Dbp) and the muscle-specific transcript, Myf6. Additional genes, Ucp3, Nrip1, and Vegfa, demonstrated P values approaching significance. These findings demonstrate circadian regulation of muscle function and imply that human management regimes may strengthen, or unmask, equine circadian behavioral outputs. As exercise synchronizes circadian rhythms, our findings provide a basis for future work determining peak times for training and competing horses, to reduce injury and to achieve optimal performance. PMID:20847133

  1. Activation and repression by oncogenic MYC shape tumour-specific gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Walz, Susanne; Lorenzin, Francesca; Morton, Jennifer; Wiese, Katrin E; von Eyss, Björn; Herold, Steffi; Rycak, Lukas; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Karim, Saadia; Bartkuhn, Marek; Roels, Frederik; Wüstefeld, Torsten; Fischer, Matthias; Teichmann, Martin; Zender, Lars; Wei, Chia-Lin; Sansom, Owen; Wolf, Elmar; Eilers, Martin

    2014-07-24

    In mammalian cells, the MYC oncoprotein binds to thousands of promoters. During mitogenic stimulation of primary lymphocytes, MYC promotes an increase in the expression of virtually all genes. In contrast, MYC-driven tumour cells differ from normal cells in the expression of specific sets of up- and downregulated genes that have considerable prognostic value. To understand this discrepancy, we studied the consequences of inducible expression and depletion of MYC in human cells and murine tumour models. Changes in MYC levels activate and repress specific sets of direct target genes that are characteristic of MYC-transformed tumour cells. Three factors account for this specificity. First, the magnitude of response parallels the change in occupancy by MYC at each promoter. Functionally distinct classes of target genes differ in the E-box sequence bound by MYC, suggesting that different cellular responses to physiological and oncogenic MYC levels are controlled by promoter affinity. Second, MYC both positively and negatively affects transcription initiation independent of its effect on transcriptional elongation. Third, complex formation with MIZ1 (also known as ZBTB17) mediates repression of multiple target genes by MYC and the ratio of MYC and MIZ1 bound to each promoter correlates with the direction of response. PMID:25043018

  2. Tumor-produced, active Interleukin-1 {beta} regulates gene expression in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, Jozsef; Fullar, Alexandra; Bitsche, Mario; Schartinger, Volker; Kovalszky, Ilona; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2011-09-10

    Recently we described a co-culture model of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts and SCC-25 lingual squamous carcinoma cells, which resulted in conversion of normal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), and in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of SCC-25 cells. We have found a constitutive high interleukin-1{beta} (IL1-{beta}) expression in SCC-25 cells in normal and in co-cultured conditions. In our hypothesis a constitutive IL1-{beta} expression in SCC-25 regulates gene expression in fibroblasts during co-culture. Co-cultures were performed between PDL fibroblasts and SCC-25 cells with and without dexamethasone (DEX) treatment; IL1-{beta} processing was investigated in SCC-25 cells, tumor cells and PDL fibroblasts were treated with IL1-{beta}. IL1-{beta} signaling was investigated by western blot and immunocytochemistry. IL1-{beta}-regulated genes were analyzed by real-time qPCR. SCC-25 cells produced 16 kD active IL1-{beta}, its receptor was upregulated in PDL fibroblasts during co-culture, which induced phosphorylation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1), and nuclear translocalization of NF{kappa}B{alpha}. Several genes, including interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2) were induced in CAFs during co-culture. The most enhanced induction was found for IL-6 and COX-2. Treatment of PDL fibroblasts with IL1-{beta} reproduced a time- and dose-dependent upregulation of IL1-receptor, IL-6 and COX-2. A further proof was achieved by DEX inhibition for IL1-{beta}-stimulated IL-6 and COX-2 gene expression. Constitutive expression of IL1-{beta} in the tumor cells leads to IL1-{beta}-stimulated gene expression changes in tumor-associated fibroblasts, which are involved in tumor progression. -- Graphical abstract: SCC-25 cells produce active, processed IL1-{beta}. PDL fibroblasts possess receptor for IL1-{beta}, and its expression is increased 4.56-times in the

  3. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  4. Porcine MHC classical class I genes are coordinately expressed in superantigen-activated mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kametani, Yoshie; Ohshima, Shino; Kita, Yuki F; Shimada, Shin; Kamiguchi, Hiroshi; Shiina, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Kulski, Jerzy K; Ando, Asako

    2012-08-15

    The expression of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classical class I genes is important for the adaptive immune response to target virus-infected cells and cancer cells. The up-regulation of the MHC is achieved by hormonal/cytokine signals including IFN-γ-inducible elements. The swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), the MHC class I region of pigs, consists of the duplicated classical class I genes, SLA-1, SLA-2 and SLA-3, but the molecular mechanisms involved in their up-regulation after T cell stimulation have not been fully elucidated. In order to better understand some of the putative regulatory mechanisms of SLA class I gene expression in activated T cells, we examined the coordinated expression of the SLA classical class I, IFN-γ and interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) genes in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of SLA homozygous Clawn miniature swine stimulated for 72 h with either IFN-γ or an enterotoxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus. This enterotoxin, toxic shock syndrome-1 (TSST-1), is known to act as a superantigen (sAG) to activate the T cells in various vertebrate species. We showed by using mAbs and flow cytometry that the CD4(+)CD25(+) cell number of swine PBMCs was also increased by TSST-1 and to a lesser degree by IFN-γ. Time course analyses of the expression of the IFN-γ, IRF-1 and the three classical class I genes, SLA-1, SLA-2, and SLA-3, in PBMCs by quantitative real-time PCR revealed a transitory response to TSST-1 or IFN-γ stimulation. The IFN-γ mRNA levels in the PBMCs were continuously up-regulated over the first 48 h by TSST-1 or IFN-γ. In contrast, SLA class I expression moderately increased at 24h and then decreased to a baseline level or less at 72 h of IFN-γ or TSST-1 stimulation. The three classical SLA class I genes showed similar expression kinetics, although SLA-3 mRNA level was consistently lower than those of SLA-1 and -2. The expression of IRF-1, a modulator of SLA expression, showed similar

  5. New rabies virus variants for monitoring and manipulating activity and gene expression in defined neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Mori, Takuma; Cetin, Ali H.; Marshel, James H.; Virgen, Beatriz; Callaway, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Glycoprotein-deleted (ΔG) rabies virus is a powerful tool for studies of neural circuit structure. Here we describe the development and demonstrate the utility of new resources that allow experiments directly investigating relationships between the structure and function of neural circuits. New methods and reagents allowed efficient production of twelve novel ΔG rabies variants from plasmid DNA. These new rabies viruses express useful neuroscience tools, including: the Ca++ indicator GCaMP3, for monitoring activity; Channelrhodopsin-2, for photoactivation; allatostatin receptor, for inactivation by ligand application; rtTA, ERT2CreERT2, or FLPo, for control of gene expression. These new tools allow neurons targeted based on their connectivity, to have their function assayed or their activity or gene expression manipulated. Combining these tools with in vivo imaging and optogenetic methods, and/or inducible gene expression in transgenic mice, will facilitate experiments investigating neural circuit development, plasticity, and function that have not been possible with existing reagents. PMID:21867879

  6. Genes required for rapid expression of nitrogenase activity in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Curatti, Leonardo; Brown, Carolyn S; Ludden, Paul W; Rubio, Luis M

    2005-05-01

    Rnf proteins are proposed to form membrane-protein complexes involved in the reduction of target proteins such as the transcriptional regulator SoxR or the dinitrogenase reductase component of nitrogenase. In this work, we investigate the role of rnf genes in the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii. We show that A. vinelandii has two clusters of rnf-like genes: rnf1, whose expression is nif-regulated, and rnf2, which is expressed independently of the nitrogen source in the medium. Deletion of each of these gene clusters produces a time delay in nitrogen-fixing capacity and, consequently, in diazotrophic growth. Deltarnf mutations cause two distinguishable effects on the nitrogenase system: (i), slower nifHDK gene expression and (ii), impairment of nitrogenase function. In these mutants, dinitrogenase reductase activity is lowered, whereas dinitrogenase activity remains essentially unaltered. Further analysis indicates that deltarnf mutants accumulate an inactive and iron-deficient form of NifH because they have lower rates of incorporation of [4Fe-4S] into NifH. Deltarnf mutations also cause a noticeable decrease in aconitase activity; however, they do not produce general oxidative stress or modification of Fe metabolism in A. vinelandii. Our results suggest the existence of a redox regulatory mechanism in A. vinelandii that controls the rate of expression and maturation of nitrogenase by the activity of the Rnf protein complexes. rnf1 plays a major and more specific role in this scheme, but the additive effects of mutations in rnf1 and rnf2 indicate the existence of functional complementation between the two homologous systems. PMID:15845763

  7. Chagas’ disease parasite-derived neurotrophic factor activates cholinergic gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Akpan, Nsikan; Caradonna, Kacey; Chuenkova, Marina V.; PereiraPerrin, Mercio

    2008-01-01

    A parasite-derived neurotrophic factor (PDNF) produced by the Chagas’ disease parasite Trypanosoma cruzi binds nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor TrkA, increasing receptor autophosphorylation, activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/Erk) pathways, and transcription factor CREB. The end-result is enhanced survival and neuritogenesis of various types of neurons. PDNF also enhances the expression and activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, a rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine and other catecholamine neurotransmitters. It remains unknown, however, if PDNF alters expression and metabolism of acetylcholine (ACh), a neurotransmitter thought to play a role in Chagas’ disease progression. Here we demonstrate that PDNF stimulates mRNA and protein expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), which are critical for synthesis and storage of ACh. Stimulation requires functional TrkA because it did not occur in cell mutants that lack the receptor and in TrkA-expressing wild-type cells treated with K252a, an inhibitor of TrkA kinase activity. It also requires TrkA-dependent PI3K and MAPK/Erk signaling pathways because PDNF stimulation of cholinergic transcripts is abolished by specific pharmacological inhibitors. Furthermore, the cholinergic actions of PDNF were reproduced by PDNF-expressing extracellular T. cruzi trypomastigotes at the start of host cell invasion. In contrast, host cells bearing intracellular T. cruzi showed decreased, rather than increased, cholinergic gene expression. These results suggest that T. cruzi invasion of the nervous system alters cholinergic gene expression and that could play a role in neuropathology, and/or lack thereof, in Chagas’ disease patients. PMID:18502403

  8. Chagas' disease parasite-derived neurotrophic factor activates cholinergic gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Akpan, Nsikan; Caradonna, Kacey; Chuenkova, Marina V; PereiraPerrin, Mercio

    2008-06-27

    A parasite-derived neurotrophic factor (PDNF) produced by the Chagas' disease parasite Trypanosoma cruzi binds nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor TrkA, increasing receptor autophosphorylation, and activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/Erk) pathways, and transcription factor CREB. The end-result is enhanced survival and neuritogenesis of various types of neurons. PDNF also enhances the expression and activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, a rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine and other catecholamine neurotransmitters. It remains unknown, however, if PDNF alters expression and metabolism of acetylcholine (ACh), a neurotransmitter thought to play a role in Chagas' disease progression. Here we demonstrate that PDNF stimulates mRNA and protein expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), which are critical for synthesis and storage of ACh. Stimulation requires functional TrkA because it did not occur in cell mutants that lack the receptor and in TrkA-expressing wild-type cells treated with K252a, an inhibitor of TrkA kinase activity. It also requires TrkA-dependent PI3K and MAPK/Erk signaling pathways because PDNF stimulation of cholinergic transcripts is abolished by specific pharmacological inhibitors. Furthermore, the cholinergic actions of PDNF were reproduced by PDNF-expressing extracellular T. cruzi trypomastigotes at the start of host cell invasion. In contrast, host cells bearing intracellular T. cruzi showed decreased, rather than increased, cholinergic gene expression. These results suggest that T. cruzi invasion of the nervous system alters cholinergic gene expression and that could play a role in neuropathology, and/or lack thereof, in Chagas' disease patients. PMID:18502403

  9. Assessing the role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa surface-active gene expression in hexadecane biodegradation in sand.

    PubMed

    Holden, P A; LaMontagne, M G; Bruce, A K; Miller, W G; Lindow, S E

    2002-05-01

    Low pollutant substrate bioavailability limits hydrocarbon biodegradation in soils. Bacterially produced surface-active compounds, such as rhamnolipid biosurfactant and the PA bioemulsifying protein produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, can improve bioavailability and biodegradation in liquid culture, but their production and roles in soils are unknown. In this study, we asked if the genes for surface-active compounds are expressed in unsaturated porous media contaminated with hexadecane. Furthermore, if expression does occur, is biodegradation enhanced? To detect expression of genes for surface-active compounds, we fused the gfp reporter gene either to the promoter region of pra, which encodes for the emulsifying PA protein, or to the promoter of the transcriptional activator rhlR. We assessed green fluorescent protein (GFP) production conferred by these gene fusions in P. aeruginosa PG201. GFP was produced in sand culture, indicating that the rhlR and pra genes are both transcribed in unsaturated porous media. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of liquid drops revealed that gfp expression was localized at the hexadecane-water interface. Wild-type PG201 and its mutants that are deficient in either PA protein, rhamnolipid synthesis, or both were studied to determine if the genetic potential to make surface-active compounds confers an advantage to P. aeruginosa biodegrading hexadecane in sand. Hexadecane depletion rates and carbon utilization efficiency in sand culture were the same for wild-type and mutant strains, i.e., whether PG201 was proficient or deficient in surfactant or emulsifier production. Environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed that colonization of sand grains was sparse, with cells in small monolayer clusters instead of multilayered biofilms. Our findings suggest that P. aeruginosa likely produces surface-active compounds in sand culture. However, the ability to produce surface-active compounds did not enhance biodegradation in sand culture

  10. Profiling Gene Expression Induced by Protease-Activated Receptor 2 (PAR2) Activation in Human Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suen, Jacky Y.; Gardiner, Brooke; Grimmond, Sean; Fairlie, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Protease-Activated Receptor-2 (PAR2) has been implicated through genetic knockout mice with cytokine regulation and arthritis development. Many studies have associated PAR2 with inflammatory conditions (arthritis, airways inflammation, IBD) and key events in tumor progression (angiogenesis, metastasis), but they have relied heavily on the use of single agonists to identify physiological roles for PAR2. However such probes are now known not to be highly selective for PAR2, and thus precisely what PAR2 does and what mechanisms of downstream regulation are truly affected remain obscure. Effects of PAR2 activation on gene expression in Human Embryonic Kidney cells (HEK293), a commonly studied cell line in PAR2 research, were investigated here by comparing 19,000 human genes for intersecting up- or down-regulation by both trypsin (an endogenous protease that activates PAR2) and a PAR2 activating hexapeptide (2f-LIGRLO-NH2). Among 2,500 human genes regulated similarly by both agonists, there were clear associations between PAR2 activation and cellular metabolism (1,000 genes), the cell cycle, the MAPK pathway, HDAC and sirtuin enzymes, inflammatory cytokines, and anti-complement function. PAR-2 activation up-regulated four genes more than 5 fold (DUSP6, WWOX, AREG, SERPINB2) and down-regulated another six genes more than 3 fold (TXNIP, RARG, ITGB4, CTSD, MSC and TM4SF15). Both PAR2 and PAR1 activation resulted in up-regulated expression of several genes (CD44, FOSL1, TNFRSF12A, RAB3A, COPEB, CORO1C, THBS1, SDC4) known to be important in cancer. This is the first widespread profiling of specific activation of PAR2 and provides a valuable platform for better understanding key mechanistic roles of PAR2 in human physiology. Results clearly support the development of both antagonists and agonists of human PAR2 as potential disease modifying therapeutic agents. PMID:21072196

  11. PRENATAL ALCOHOL EXPOSURE ALTERS STEADY-STATE AND ACTIVATED GENE EXPRESSION IN THE ADULT RAT BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Stepien, Katarzyna A.; Lussier, Alexandre A.; Neumann, Sarah M.; Pavlidis, Paul; Kobor, Michael S.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is associated with alterations in numerous physiological systems, including the stress and immune systems . We have previously shown that PAE increases the course and severity of arthritis in an adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model. While the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully known, changes in neural gene expression are emerging as important factors in the etiology of PAE effects. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HPC) play key roles in neuroimmune function, PAE-induced alterations to their transcriptome may underlie abnormal steady-state functions and responses to immune challenge. The current study examined brains from adult PAE and control females from our recent AA study to determine whether PAE causes long-term alterations in gene expression and whether these mediate the altered severity and course of arthritis in PAE females Methods Adult females from PAE, pair-fed [PF], and ad libitum-fed control [C]) groups were injected with either saline or complete Freund’s adjuvant. Animals were terminated at the peak of inflammation or during resolution (days 16 and 39 post-injection, respectively); cohorts of saline-injected PAE, PF and C females were terminated in parallel. Gene expression was analyzed in the PFC and HPC using whole genome mRNA expression microarrays. Results Significant changes in gene expression in both the PFC and HPC were found in PAE compared to controls in response to ethanol exposure alone (saline-injected females), including genes involved in neurodevelopment, apoptosis, and energy metabolism. Moreover, in response to inflammation (adjuvant-injected females), PAE animals showed unique expression patterns, while failing to exhibit the activation of genes and regulators involved in the immune response observed in control and pair-fed animals. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that PAE affects neuroimmune function at the level of gene expression

  12. Influence of redox-active compounds and PXR-activators on human MRP1 and MRP2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Hans Martin; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Zöller, Heike; Benz, Anke; Vorderstemann, Birgit; Webster, Jeanette I; Schrenk, Dieter

    2002-02-28

    In the present study, we investigated the inducibility of the drug conjugate transporter genes MRP1 and MRP2 by redox-active compounds such as tertiary butylated hydroquinone (tBHQ) and quercetin and by chemicals known to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR) such as rifampicin and clotrimazol and by the metalloid compound arsenite. The human MRP2 gene was found to be inducible in HepG2 cells by rifampicin, clotrimazol, arsenite and tBHQ. As MRP1 expression is extremely low in HepG2 cells, its inducibility was studied in MCF-7 cells. However, only tBHQ and quercetin acted as inducers, but not the other compounds investigated. Reporter gene assays demonstrated that proximal promoter regions of the genes contribute to the induction by tBHQ, quercetin (MRP1) and clotrimazol (MRP2). However, the deletion of binding sites supposed to mediate the induction process (a PXR-binding element-like sequence for the clotrimazol effect and an ARE (antioxidative response element) for the tBHQ/quercetin effect) did not result in a significant decrease in the induction factor indicating that other parts of the promoter are probably involved in the induction process. In summary, expression of both genes can be up-regulated by redox-active compounds, while the other compounds tested induced only MRP2 but not MRP1 expression. PMID:11836020

  13. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  14. Mapping Acute Systemic Effects of Inhaled Particulate Matter and Ozone: Multiorgan Gene Expression and Glucocorticoid Activity

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Errol M.; Vladisavljevic, Djordje; Mohottalage, Susantha; Kumarathasan, Prem; Vincent, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between air pollution and adverse effects that extend beyond respiratory and cardiovascular disease, including low birth weight, appendicitis, stroke, and neurological/neurobehavioural outcomes (e.g., neurodegenerative disease, cognitive decline, depression, and suicide). To gain insight into mechanisms underlying such effects, we mapped gene profiles in the lungs, heart, liver, kidney, spleen, cerebral hemisphere, and pituitary of male Fischer-344 rats immediately and 24h after a 4-h exposure by inhalation to particulate matter (0, 5, and 50mg/m3 EHC-93 urban particles) and ozone (0, 0.4, and 0.8 ppm). Pollutant exposure provoked differential expression of genes involved in a number of pathways, including antioxidant response, xenobiotic metabolism, inflammatory signalling, and endothelial dysfunction. The mRNA profiles, while exhibiting some interorgan and pollutant-specific differences, were remarkably similar across organs for a set of genes, including increased expression of redox/glucocorticoid-sensitive genes and decreased expression of inflammatory genes, suggesting a possible hormonal effect. Pollutant exposure increased plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and the glucocorticoid corticosterone, confirming activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and there was a corresponding increase in markers of glucocorticoid activity. Although effects were transient and presumably represent an adaptive response to acute exposure in these healthy animals, chronic activation and inappropriate regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis are associated with adverse neurobehavioral, metabolic, immune, developmental, and cardiovascular effects. The experimental data are consistent with epidemiological associations of air pollutants with extrapulmonary health outcomes and suggest a mechanism through which such health effects may be induced. PMID:23805001

  15. Ephrin-A5 Suppresses Neurotrophin Evoked Neuronal Motility, ERK Activation and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Christin; Anastasiadou, Sofia; Knöll, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    During brain development, growth cones respond to attractive and repulsive axon guidance cues. How growth cones integrate guidance instructions is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate a link between BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor), promoting axonal branching and ephrin-A5, mediating axonal repulsion via Eph receptor tyrosine kinase activation. BDNF enhanced growth cone filopodial dynamics and neurite branching of primary neurons. We show that ephrin-A5 antagonized this BDNF-evoked neuronal motility. BDNF increased ERK phosphorylation (P-ERK) and nuclear ERK entry. Ephrin-A5 suppressed BDNF-induced ERK activity and might sequester P-ERK in the cytoplasm. Neurotrophins are well established stimulators of a neuronal immediate early gene (IEG) response. This is confirmed in this study by e.g. c-fos, Egr1 and Arc upregulation upon BDNF application. This BDNF-evoked IEG response required the transcription factor SRF (serum response factor). Notably, ephrin-A5 suppressed a BDNF-evoked neuronal IEG response, suggesting a role of Eph receptors in modulating gene expression. In opposite to IEGs, long-term ephrin-A5 application induced cytoskeletal gene expression of tropomyosin and actinin. To uncover specific Eph receptors mediating ephrin-As impact on neurotrophin signaling, EphA7 deficient mice were analyzed. In EphA7 deficient neurons alterations in growth cone morphology were observed. However, ephrin-A5 still counteracted neurotrophin signaling suggesting that EphA7 is not required for ephrin and BDNF crosstalk. In sum, our data suggest an interaction of ephrin-As and neurotrophin signaling pathways converging at ERK signaling and nuclear gene activity. As ephrins are involved in development and function of many organs, such modulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and gene expression by Ephs might not be limited to the nervous system. PMID:22022520

  16. Novel reporter gene expression systems for monitoring activation of the Aspergillus nidulans HOG pathway.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kentaro; Yoshimi, Akira; Furukawa, Takako; Hoshi, Yukiko; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Sato, Natsuko; Fujioka, Tomonori; Mizutani, Osamu; Mizuno, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-07-01

    The Aspergillus nidulans high-osmolarity glycerol response (AnHOG) pathway is involved in osmoadaptation. We found that fludioxonil, a fungicide, causes improper activation of HogA mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in A. nidulans. Here we present novel reporter systems for monitoring activation of the AnHOG pathway. The promoter region of gfdB (glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), whose expression depends on the presence of HogA, was fused to a beta-glucuronidase uidA gene (GUS) to construct the reporter, which was introduced into A. nidulans wild type and hogADelta. Increased GUS activity was detected in the wild type only when it was treated with high osmolarity or fludioxonil, while reporter activity was scarcely stimulated in the hogADelta mutant. These results indicate that the reporter activity is controlled via HogA activation. Furthermore, we present possible applications of the reporter systems in screening new antifungal compounds. PMID:17617716

  17. Forest soil metagenome gene cluster involved in antifungal activity expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eu Jin; Lim, He Kyoung; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Choi, Gyung Ja; Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Myung Hwan; Chung, Young Ryun; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2008-02-01

    Using two forest soils, we previously constructed two fosmid libraries containing 113,700 members in total. The libraries were screened to select active antifungal clones using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a target fungus. One clone from the Yuseong pine tree rhizosphere soil library, pEAF66, showed S. cerevisiae growth inhibition. Despite an intensive effort, active chemicals were not isolated. DNA sequence analysis and transposon mutagenesis of pEAF66 revealed 39 open reading frames (ORFs) and indicated that eight ORFs, probably in one transcriptional unit, might be directly involved in the expression of antifungal activity in Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequences of eight ORFs were similar to those of the core genes encoding type II family polyketide synthases, such as the acyl carrier protein (ACP), ACP synthases, aminotransferase, and ACP reductase. The gene cluster involved in antifungal activity was similar in organization to the putative antibiotic production locus of Pseudomonas putida KT2440, although we could not select a similar active clone from the KT2440 genomic DNA library in E. coli. ORFs encoding ATP binding cassette transporters and membrane proteins were located at both ends of the antifungal gene cluster. Upstream ORFs encoding an IclR family response regulator and a LysR family response regulator were involved in the positive regulation of antifungal gene expression. Our results suggested the metagenomic approach as an alternative to search for novel antifungal antibiotics from unculturable soil bacteria. This is the first report of an antifungal gene cluster obtained from a soil metagenome using S. cerevisiae as a target fungus. PMID:18065615

  18. Leucocyte expression of genes implicated in the plasminogen activation cascade is modulated by yoghurt peptides.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Georgios; Politis, Ioannis

    2016-08-01

    The urokinase-plasminogen activator (u-PA), its receptor (u-PAR) and the inhibitors of u-PA (PAI-1 and PAI-2) provide a multi-molecular system in leucocytes that exerts pleiotropic functions influencing the development of inflammatory and immune responses. The objective of the present study was to examine the ability of water soluble extracts (WSE) obtained from traditional Greek yoghurt made from bovine or ovine milk to modulate the expression of u-PA, u-PAR, PAI-1 and PAI-2 in ovine monocytes and neutrophils. WSE were obtained from 8 commercial traditional type Greek yoghurts made from ovine or bovine milk. WSE upregulated the expression of all 4 u-PA related genes in monocytes but the upregulation was much higher in the PAI-1 (10-fold) than in u-PA and u-PAR (3-4 fold) thus, shifting the system towards inhibition. In line with this observation, WSE reduced total and membrane-bound u-PA activity in monocytes. In neutrophils, WSE caused small (50-60%) but significant (P < 0·05) reductions in expression of u-PAR and PAI-2 but had no effect on expression of u-PA, PAI-1 and on total cell-associated and membrane-bound u-PA activity. WSE from yoghurts made from bovine or ovine milk were essentially equally effective in affecting the u-PA system except for the u-PAR gene in ovine neutrophils that was affected (reduced) by the ovine and not the bovine WSE. In conclusion, peptides present in WSE modulated the expression of u-PA related genes but the effect was much more prominent in monocytes than in neutrophils. PMID:27600972

  19. The Light Wavelength Affects the Ontogeny of Clock Gene Expression and Activity Rhythms in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Di Rosa, Viviana; Frigato, Elena; López-Olmeda, José F.; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco J.; Bertolucci, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Light plays a key role in synchronizing rhythms and setting the phase of early development. However, to date, little is known about the impact of light wavelengths during the ontogeny of the molecular clock and the behavioural rhythmicity. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of light of different wavelengths (white, blue and red) on the onset of locomotor activity and clock gene (per1b, per2, clock1, bmal1 and dbp) expression rhythms. For this purpose, 4 groups of zebrafish embryo/larvae were raised from 0 to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) under the following lighting conditions: three groups maintained under light:dark (LD) cycles with white (full visible spectrum, LDW), blue (LDB), or red light (LDR), and one group raised under constant darkness (DD). The results showed that lighting conditions influenced activity rhythms. Larvae were arrhythmic under DD, while under LD cycles they developed wavelength-dependent daily activity rhythms which appeared earlier under LDB (4 dpf) than under LDW or LDR (5 dpf). The results also revealed that development and lighting conditions influenced clock gene expression. While clock1 rhythmic expression appeared in all lighting conditions at 7 dpf, per1b, per2 and dbp showed daily variations already at 3 dpf. Curiously, bmal1 showed consistent rhythmic expression from embryonic stage (0 dpf). Summarizing, the data revealed that daily rhythms appeared earlier in the larvae reared under LDB than in those reared under LDW and LDR. These results emphasize the importance of lighting conditions and wavelengths during early development for the ontogeny of daily rhythms of gene expression and how these rhythms are reflected on the behavioural rhythmicity of zebrafish larvae. PMID:26147202

  20. Forced expression of Hnf4a induces hepatic gene activation through directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yahoo, Neda; Pournasr, Behshad; Rostamzadeh, Jalal; Fathi, Fardin

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of unlimited self-renewal and have a diverse differentiation potential. These unique features make ES cells as an attractive source for developmental biology studies. Having the mature hepatocyte in the lab with functional activities is valuable in drug discovery studies. Overexpression of hepatocyte lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs) becomes a promising approach in pluripotent cell differentiation toward liver cells. Many studies generate transgenic ES cell lines to examine the effects of specific TFs overexpression in cell differentiation. In the present report, we have addressed whether a suspension or adherent model of differentiation is an appropriate way to study the role of Hnf4a overexpression. We generated ES cells that carried a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Hnf4a using lentiviral vectors. The transduced cells were subjected to induced Hnf4a overexpression through both spontaneous and directed differentiation methods. Gene expression analysis showed substantially increased expression of hepatic gene markers, particularly Ttr and endogenous Hnf4a, in transduced cells differentiated by the directed approach. These results demonstrated that forced expression of TFs during directed differentiation would be an appropriate way to study relevant gene activation and the effects of overexpression in the context of hepatic differentiation. PMID:27233607

  1. Activation of GATA4 gene expression at the early stage of cardiac specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, Ayse; Hamilton, Alison; Wang, Yingjian; Mach, Hymn; Lacroix, Natascha; Davis, Darryl; Chen, Jihong; LI, Qiao

    2014-03-01

    Currently, there are no effective treatments to directly repair damaged heart tissue after cardiac injury since existing therapies focus on rescuing or preserving reversibly damaged tissue. Cell-based therapies using cardiomyocytes generated from stem cells present a promising therapeutic approach to directly replace damaged myocardium with new healthy tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the commitment of stem cells into cardiomyocytes are not fully understood and will be critical to guide this new technology into the clinic. Since GATA4 is a critical regulator of cardiac differentiation, we examined the molecular basis underlying the early activation of GATA4 gene expression during cardiac differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Our studies demonstrate the direct involvement of histone acetylation and transcriptional coactivator p300 in the regulation of GATA4 gene expression. More importantly, we show that histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity is important for GATA4 gene expression with the use of curcumin, a HAT inhibitor. In addition, the widely used histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances both histone acetylation and cardiac specification.

  2. Daily rhythms of digestive enzyme activity and gene expression in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Mata-Sotres, José Antonio; Moyano, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Yúfera, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    In order to identify daily changes in digestive physiology in developing gilthead seabream larvae, the enzyme activity (trypsin, lipases and α-amylase) and gene expression (trypsinogen-try, chymotrypsinogen-ctrb, bile salt-activated lipase-cel1b, phospholipase A2-pla2 and α-amylase-amy2a) were measured during a 24h cycle in larvae reared under a 12h light/12h dark photoperiod. Larvae were sampled at 10, 18, 30 and 60days post-hatch. In each sampling day, larvae were sampled every 3h during a complete 24h cycle. The enzyme activity and gene expression exhibited a marked dependent behavior to the light/darkness cycle in all tested ages. The patterns of activity and expression of all tested enzymes were compared to the feeding pattern found in the same larvae, which showed a rhythmic feeding pattern with a strong light synchronization. In the four tested ages, the activities of trypsin, and to a lesser extent lipases and amylase, were related to feeding activity. Molecular expression of the pancreatic enzymes tended to increase during the night, probably as an anticipation of the forthcoming ingestion of food that will take place during the next light period. It follows that the enzymatic activities are being regulated at translational and/or post-translational level. The potential variability of enzyme secretion along the whole day is an important factor to take into account in future studies. A particularly striking consequence of the present results is the reliability of studies based in only one daily sample taken at the same hour of the day, as those focused to assess ontogeny of digestive enzymes. PMID:26987267

  3. Riproximin’s activity depends on gene expression and sensitizes PDAC cells to TRAIL

    PubMed Central

    Adwan, Hassan; Murtaja, Ahmed; Kadhim Al-Taee, Khamael; Pervaiz, Asim; Hielscher, Thomas; Berger, Martin R

    2014-01-01

    Riproximin (Rpx) is a type II ribosome inactivating protein, which was investigated for its activity in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in a panel of 17 human and rat PDAC cell lines and in rat pancreatic cancer liver metastasis. Cytotoxicity in response to Rpx was determined by MTT assay, apoptosis by flow cytometry and qRT-PCR for apoptosis related genes, and the modulation of the transcriptome was monitored by micro array analysis. The combination effect of Rpx and TRAIL was assessed by MTT assay. Rpx showed high but varying cytotoxicity in PDAC cells. Based on overall gene expression, the sensitivity of these cells was linked to genes involved in apoptosis. Furthermore, based on the affinity of Rpx for CEA, the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) genes was significantly related to Rpx’s cytotoxicity in cells with CEACAM gene expression. Exposure of Suit2–007 cells to Rpx induced the mRNA expression of members of signaling pathways initiating from most death receptors, and down modulation of TRAIL. Apoptosis was increased as shown by FACS analysis. Combination of Rpx with TRAIL resulted in a synergistic cytotoxic effect in human Suit2–007 and rat ASML cells, as evidenced by a 6-fold lower tumor cell survival than expected from an additive combination effect. Treatment of BDX rats bearing intra-portally implanted Suit2–007 cells showed a highly significant anticancer effect and indicated an application of Rpx against pancreatic cancer metastasis to the liver. These data favor further evaluation of Rpx as anticancer agent in PDAC. PMID:24918923

  4. Distinct Expression Levels of ALS, LIP, and SAP Genes in Candida tropicalis with Diverse Virulent Activities

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuanbao; Li, Wenge; Liu, Xiaoshu; Che, Jie; Wu, Yuan; Lu, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Candia tropicalis is an increasingly important human pathogen, causing nosocomial fungemia among patients with neutropenia or malignancy. However, limited research has been published concerning its pathogenicity. Based on the phenotypes of C. tropicalis in our previous study, we selected nine representative strains with different activities of virulence factors (adhesion, biofilm formation, secreted aspartic proteinases, and hemolysins), and one reference strain, ATCC750. The present study aimed to investigate the filamentation ability, the expression of virulence genes (ALST1-3, LIP1, LIP4, and SAPT1-4) and the cell damage of C. tropicalis strains with diverse virulences. C. tropicalis exhibited strain-dependent filamentation ability, which was positively correlated with biofilm formation. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that the ALST3 and SAPT3 genes had the highest expression in their corresponding genes for most C. tropicalis. The expressions of virulence genes, except ALST3 on polystyrene, were upregulated compared with growth in the planktonic and on human urinary bladder epithelial cell line (TCC-SUP) surface. Clustering analysis of virulence genes showed that isolates had a high biofilm forming ability on polystyrene formed a group. Lactate dehydrogenase assays showed that the cell damage induced by C. tropicalis markedly increased with longer infection time (24 and 48 h). Strain FXCT01, isolated from blood, caused the most serious cell damage; while ZRCT52, which had no filamentation ability, caused the least cell damage. Correlation analysis demonstrated significant correlation existed between adhesion on epithelial cells or the expression of ALST2-3 and cell damage. Overall, our results supported the view that adhesion and filamentation may play significant roles in the cell damage caused by C. tropicalis. PMID:27524980

  5. Distinct Expression Levels of ALS, LIP, and SAP Genes in Candida tropicalis with Diverse Virulent Activities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuanbao; Li, Wenge; Liu, Xiaoshu; Che, Jie; Wu, Yuan; Lu, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Candia tropicalis is an increasingly important human pathogen, causing nosocomial fungemia among patients with neutropenia or malignancy. However, limited research has been published concerning its pathogenicity. Based on the phenotypes of C. tropicalis in our previous study, we selected nine representative strains with different activities of virulence factors (adhesion, biofilm formation, secreted aspartic proteinases, and hemolysins), and one reference strain, ATCC750. The present study aimed to investigate the filamentation ability, the expression of virulence genes (ALST1-3, LIP1, LIP4, and SAPT1-4) and the cell damage of C. tropicalis strains with diverse virulences. C. tropicalis exhibited strain-dependent filamentation ability, which was positively correlated with biofilm formation. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that the ALST3 and SAPT3 genes had the highest expression in their corresponding genes for most C. tropicalis. The expressions of virulence genes, except ALST3 on polystyrene, were upregulated compared with growth in the planktonic and on human urinary bladder epithelial cell line (TCC-SUP) surface. Clustering analysis of virulence genes showed that isolates had a high biofilm forming ability on polystyrene formed a group. Lactate dehydrogenase assays showed that the cell damage induced by C. tropicalis markedly increased with longer infection time (24 and 48 h). Strain FXCT01, isolated from blood, caused the most serious cell damage; while ZRCT52, which had no filamentation ability, caused the least cell damage. Correlation analysis demonstrated significant correlation existed between adhesion on epithelial cells or the expression of ALST2-3 and cell damage. Overall, our results supported the view that adhesion and filamentation may play significant roles in the cell damage caused by C. tropicalis. PMID:27524980

  6. Fur activates expression of the 2-oxoglutarate oxidoreductase genes (oorDABC) in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Jeremy J; West, Abby L; Pich, Oscar Q; Carpenter, Beth M; Michel, Sarah; Merrell, D Scott

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen that colonizes the gastric mucosa of ∼50% of the world's population. Within this colonization niche, the bacteria encounter large fluctuations in nutrient availability. As such, it is critical that this organism regulate expression of key metabolic enzymes so that they are present when environmental conditions are optimal for growth. One such enzyme is the 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) oxidoreductase (OOR), which catalyzes the conversion of α-ketoglutarate to succinyl coenzyme A (succinyl-CoA) and CO(2). Previous studies from our group suggested that the genes that encode the OOR are activated by iron-bound Fur (Fe-Fur); microarray analysis showed that expression of oorD, oorA, and oorC was altered in a fur mutant strain of H. pylori. The goal of the present work was to more thoroughly characterize expression of the oorDABC genes in H. pylori as well as to define the role of Fe-Fur in this process. Here we show that these four genes are cotranscribed as an operon and that expression of the operon is decreased in a fur mutant strain. Transcriptional start site mapping and promoter analysis revealed the presence of a canonical extended -10 element but a poorly conserved -35 element upstream of the +1. Additionally, we identified a conserved Fur binding sequence ∼130 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site. Transcriptional analysis using promoter fusions revealed that this binding sequence was required for Fe-Fur-mediated activation. Finally, fluorescence anisotropy assays indicate that Fe-Fur specifically bound this Fur box with a relatively high affinity (dissociation constant [K(d)] = 200 nM). These findings provide novel insight into the genetic regulation of a key metabolic enzyme and add to our understanding of the diverse roles Fur plays in gene regulation in H. pylori. PMID:23002221

  7. Hyperglycemia induces iNOS gene expression and consequent nitrosative stress via JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Peixin; CAO, Yuanning; LI, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Objective Maternal diabetes adversely impacts embryonic development. We test the hypothesis that hyperglycemia-induced JNK1/2 activation mediates iNOS induction. Study Design Levels of iNOS mRNA and nitrosylated protein were determined in cultured C57BL/6J conceptuses exposed to hyperglycemia (300 mg/dl glucose) and C57BL/6J embryos exposed to streptozotocin-induced diabetes. iNOS-luciferase activity and endogenous reactive nitrogen species were determined in transfected PYS-2 (mouse teratocarcinoma) cells exposed to hyperglycemia (450 mg/dl glucose). Results Hyperglycemia increased iNOS mRNA and SP600125, a potent JNK1/2 inhibitor, abolished this effect. Hyperglycemia increased iNOS-luciferase activities and SP600125 blocked this effect. Diabetes increased iNOS mRNA and jnk2 gene deletion abrogated this effect. Correlated with iNOS gene induction, both hyperglycemia in vitro and diabetes in vivo enhanced the production of reactive nitrogen species and increased protein nitrosylation. jnk2 gene deletion blocked diabetes-induced protein nitrosylation. Conclusion JNK1/2 activation mediates hyperglycemia-induced iNOS gene expression and consequent nitrosative stress in diabetic embryopathy. PMID:20541731

  8. Differential gene expression of activating Fcγ receptor classifies active tuberculosis regardless of human immunodeficiency virus status or ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, J S; Loxton, A G; Haks, M C; Kassa, D; Ambrose, L; Lee, J-S; Ran, L; van Baarle, D; Maertzdorf, J; Howe, R; Mayanja-Kizza, H; Boom, W H; Thiel, B A; Crampin, A C; Hanekom, W; Ota, M O C; Dockrell, H; Walzl, G; Kaufmann, S H E; Ottenhoff, T H M

    2014-04-01

    New diagnostics and vaccines for tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed, but require an understanding of the requirements for protection from/susceptibility to TB. Previous studies have used unbiased approaches to determine gene signatures in single-site populations. The present study utilized a targeted approach, reverse transcriptase multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (RT-MLPA), to validate these genes in a multisite study. We analysed ex vivo whole blood RNA from a total of 523 participants across four sub-Saharan countries (Ethiopia, Malawi, South Africa, and The Gambia) with differences in TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status. We found a number of genes that were expressed at significantly lower levels in participants with active disease than in those with latent TB infection (LTBI), with restoration following successful TB treatment. The most consistent classifier of active disease was FCGR1A (high-affinity IgG Fc receptor 1 (CD64)), which was the only marker expressed at significantly higher levels in participants with active TB than in those with LTBI before treatment regardless of HIV status or genetic background. This is the first study to identify a biomarker for TB that is not affected by HIV status or geo-genetic differences. These data provide valuable clues for understanding TB pathogenesis, and also provide a proof-of-concept for the use of RT-MLPA in rapid and inexpensive validation of unbiased gene expression findings. PMID:24205913

  9. Six and Eya expression during human somitogenesis and MyoD gene family activation.

    PubMed

    Fougerousse, Françoise; Durand, Muriel; Lopez, Soledad; Suel, Laurence; Demignon, Josiane; Thornton, Charles; Ozaki, Hidenori; Kawakami, Kyoshi; Barbet, Patrick; Beckmann, Jacques S; Maire, Pascal

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the characterisation of the expression profile of several myogenic determination genes during human embryogenesis. The data were obtained from axial structures and limb buds of human embryos aged between 3 and 8 weeks of development. Using in situ hybridisation to detect Pax3 and MyoD gene family mRNAs, and immunochemistry to follow Six and Eya protein accumulation, we have been able to establish the chronology of accumulation of these gene products. As in mouse, the first transcripts detected in myotomes of 3 week-old embryos are Pax3 and Myf5, followed by the expression of myogenin. MyoD appears to be activated well after Myf5, myogenin and MRF4 in the early myotome, whereas, in limb bud muscles, the presence of all four of these mRNAs is concomitant from 6 weeks. Six1, Six4 and Six5 homeoproteins are detected later than Myf5 activation. These Six homeoproteins are first observed in the cytoplasm of myogenin expressing cells. At later stages of development, Six1 and Six5, but not Six4, are translocated into the nuclei of myogenic cells, concomitantly with MyHCemb expression. Eya1 and Eya2 proteins, potential Six cofactors, were also detected in myogenin positive cells, but their accumulation was delayed and was mainly cytoplasmic. These results preclude that early activation of Myf5, myogenin and MRF4 is under the control of Six and Eya proteins, while Six and Eya proteins would be involved in later steps of myogenic differentiation. PMID:12500905

  10. EPSPS variability, gene expression, and enzymatic activity in glyphosate-resistant biotypes of Digitaria insularis.

    PubMed

    Galeano, E; Barroso, A A M; Vasconcelos, T S; López-Rubio, A; Albrecht, A J P; Victoria Filho, R; Carrer, H

    2016-01-01

    Weed resistance to herbicides is a natural phenomenon that exerts selection on individuals in a population. In Brazil, glyphosate resistance was recently detected in Digitaria insularis. The objective of this study was to elucidate mechanisms of weed resistance in this plant, including genetic variability, allelism, amino acid substitutions, gene expression, and enzymatic activity levels. Most of these have not previously been studied in this species. D. insularis DNA sequences were used to analyze genetic variability. cDNA from resistant and susceptible plants was used to identify mutations, alleles, and 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) expression, using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In addition, EPSPS activity was measured. We found a decrease in genetic variability between populations related to glyphosate application. Substitutions from proline to threonine and tyrosine to cysteine led to a decrease in EPSPS affinity for the glyphosate. In addition, the EPSPS enzymatic activity was slightly higher in resistant plants, whereas EPSPS gene expression was almost identical in both biotypes, suggesting feedback regulation at different levels. To conclude, our results suggest new molecular mechanisms used by D. insularis to increase glyphosate resistance. PMID:27525929

  11. Model-Based Characterization of Inflammatory Gene Expression Patterns of Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ehlting, Christian; Thomas, Maria; Zanger, Ulrich M.; Sawodny, Oliver; Häussinger, Dieter; Bode, Johannes G.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are cells with remarkable plasticity. They integrate signals from their microenvironment leading to context-dependent polarization into classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, representing two extremes of a broad spectrum of divergent phenotypes. Thereby, macrophages deliver protective and pro-regenerative signals towards injured tissue but, depending on the eliciting damage, may also be responsible for the generation and aggravation of tissue injury. Although incompletely understood, there is emerging evidence that macrophage polarization is critical for these antagonistic roles. To identify activation-specific expression patterns of chemokines and cytokines that may confer these distinct effects a systems biology approach was applied. A comprehensive literature-based Boolean model was developed to describe the M1 (LPS-activated) and M2 (IL-4/13-activated) polarization types. The model was validated using high-throughput transcript expression data from murine bone marrow derived macrophages. By dynamic modeling of gene expression, the chronology of pathway activation and autocrine signaling was estimated. Our results provide a deepened understanding of the physiological balance leading to M1/M2 activation, indicating the relevance of co-regulatory signals at the level of Akt1 or Akt2 that may be important for directing macrophage polarization. PMID:27464342

  12. Model-Based Characterization of Inflammatory Gene Expression Patterns of Activated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rex, Julia; Albrecht, Ute; Ehlting, Christian; Thomas, Maria; Zanger, Ulrich M; Sawodny, Oliver; Häussinger, Dieter; Ederer, Michael; Feuer, Ronny; Bode, Johannes G

    2016-07-01

    Macrophages are cells with remarkable plasticity. They integrate signals from their microenvironment leading to context-dependent polarization into classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, representing two extremes of a broad spectrum of divergent phenotypes. Thereby, macrophages deliver protective and pro-regenerative signals towards injured tissue but, depending on the eliciting damage, may also be responsible for the generation and aggravation of tissue injury. Although incompletely understood, there is emerging evidence that macrophage polarization is critical for these antagonistic roles. To identify activation-specific expression patterns of chemokines and cytokines that may confer these distinct effects a systems biology approach was applied. A comprehensive literature-based Boolean model was developed to describe the M1 (LPS-activated) and M2 (IL-4/13-activated) polarization types. The model was validated using high-throughput transcript expression data from murine bone marrow derived macrophages. By dynamic modeling of gene expression, the chronology of pathway activation and autocrine signaling was estimated. Our results provide a deepened understanding of the physiological balance leading to M1/M2 activation, indicating the relevance of co-regulatory signals at the level of Akt1 or Akt2 that may be important for directing macrophage polarization. PMID:27464342

  13. Identification of a novel gene expressed in activated natural killer cells and T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, C.A.; Schall, R.P.; He, H.; Cairns, J.S. )

    1992-01-15

    The authors have isolated a cDNA clone from a human activated NK cell-derived cDNA library that identifies a transcript [NK4] that is selectively expressed in lymphocytes. The expression of this transcript is increased after activation of T cells by mitogens or activation of NK cells by IL-2 (lymphokine-activated killer cells). The transcript levels demonstrated by Northern blot analysis increase by 12 h after activation, remain high for at least 48 h, and require protein synthesis for expression. Southern blot analysis of B lymphoblastoid lines derived from 18 unrelated individuals reveal variable banding patterns suggestive of polymorphism within the NK4 gene. No homology was found between the sequence of the coding region of this transcript and any sequences in the GenBank data base. Sequence homology to the U1 small nuclear RNA was found within the 3[prime] untranslated region immediately upstream of the site of polyadenylation, suggesting a possible role for U1 in the polyadenylation process. Sequence analysis indicates the transcript would encode a protein having a mass of 27 kDa. The presence of a signal sequence and lack of a transmembrane region suggests that the protein is secreted. In addition, the protein contains an RGD sequence that may be involved in cellular adhesion. This transcript appears to encode a novel product common to the activation pathways of both NK cells and T cells. 50 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Innate immune activity conditions the effect of regulatory variants upon monocyte gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Benjamin P; Humburg, Peter; Makino, Seiko; Naranbhai, Vivek; Wong, Daniel; Lau, Evelyn; Jostins, Luke; Plant, Katharine; Andrews, Robert; McGee, Chris; Knight, Julian C

    2014-03-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTLs including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), coding variants altering enzyme and receptor function, an IFN-β cytokine network showing temporal specificity, and an interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) transcription factor-modulated network. Induced eQTL are significantly enriched for genome-wide association study loci, identifying context-specific associations to putative causal genes including CARD9, ATM, and IRF8. Thus, applying pathophysiologically relevant immune stimuli assists resolution of functional genetic variants. PMID:24604202

  15. Innate Immune Activity Conditions the Effect of Regulatory Variants upon Monocyte Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Naranbhai, Vivek; Wong, Daniel; Lau, Evelyn; Jostins, Luke; Plant, Katharine; Andrews, Robert; McGee, Chris; Knight, Julian C.

    2014-01-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTLs including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), coding variants altering enzyme and receptor function, an IFN-β cytokine network showing temporal specificity, and an interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) transcription factor–modulated network. Induced eQTL are significantly enriched for genome-wide association study loci, identifying context-specific associations to putative causal genes including CARD9, ATM, and IRF8. Thus, applying pathophysiologically relevant immune stimuli assists resolution of functional genetic variants. PMID:24604202

  16. A complete chitinolytic system in the atherinopsid pike silverside Chirostoma estor: gene expression and activities.

    PubMed

    Pohls, P; González-Dávalos, L; Mora, O; Shimada, A; Varela-Echavarria, A; Toledo-Cuevas, E M; Martínez-Palacios, C A

    2016-06-01

    The expression and digestive activity of pike silverside Chirostoma estor endogenous chitinases were analysed in samples from four life stages: whole eggs; larvae; juvenile intestine and hepatopancreas and adult intestine and hepatopancreas. A chitinase cDNA was cloned and partially sequenced (GenBank accession number: FJ785521). It was highly homologous to non-acidic chitinase sequences from other fish species, suggesting that it is a chitotriosidase. Quantitative PCR showed that this chitinase was expressed throughout the life span of C. estor, with maximum expression in the hepatopancreas of juveniles. Chitotriosidase and chitobiosidase activities were found at all life stages, along with a very high level of N-acetyl glucosaminidase (NAGase). The chitotriosidase activity could be encoded by the cloned complementary (c)DNA, although additional chitinase genes may be present. The chitotriosidase activity appeared to be transcriptionally regulated only at the juvenile stage. The expression and activity of chitinases tended to increase from the early to juvenile stages, suggesting that these variables are stimulated by chitin-rich live food. Nevertheless, the feeding of juvenile and adult fish with both live food and a balanced commercial diet seemed to provoke significant reductions in pancreatic NAGase secretion and/or synthesis in the gut. Moreover, all chitinase activities were lower in adults, probably reflecting a higher intake and use of the balanced diet. The observation of chitotriosidase and chitobiosidase activities together with a very high NAGase activity suggest the presence of a complete and compensatory chitinolytic chitinase system that enables this stomachless short-gut fish species to use chitin as an energy substrate. These novel findings suggest that dietary inclusions of chitin-rich ingredients or by-products might reduce the farming costs of C. estor without impairing performance. PMID:27161769

  17. Cysteine protease gene expression and proteolytic activity during senescence of Alstroemeria petals.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Carol; Leverentz, Michael K; Griffiths, Gareth; Thomas, Brian; Chanasut, Usawadee; Stead, Anthony D; Rogers, Hilary J

    2002-02-01

    The functional life of the flower is terminated by senescence and/or abscission. Multiple processes contribute to produce the visible signs of petal wilting and inrolling that typify senescence, but one of the most important is that of protein degradation and remobilization. This is mediated in many species through protein ubiquitination and the action of specific protease enzymes. This paper reports the changes in protein and protease activity during development and senescence of Alstroemeria flowers, a Liliaceous species that shows very little sensitivity to ethylene during senescence and which shows perianth abscission 8-10 d after flower opening. Partial cDNAs of ubiquitin (ALSUQ1) and a putative cysteine protease (ALSCYP1) were cloned from Alstroemeria using degenerate PCR primers and the expression pattern of these genes was determined semi-quantitatively by RT-PCR. While the levels of ALSUQ1 only fluctuated slightly during floral development and senescence, there was a dramatic increase in the expression of ALSCYP1 indicating that this gene may encode an important enzyme for the proteolytic process in this species. Three papain class cysteine protease enzymes showing different patterns of activity during flower development were identified on zymograms, one of which showed a similar expression pattern to the cysteine protease cDNA. PMID:11807127

  18. Activity, expression and function of a second Drosophila protein kinase a catalytic subunit gene

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-12-01

    The DC2 was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DC0, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. 62 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Calcium Influx and DREAM Protein Are Required For GnRH Gene Expression Pulse Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Gilles M.; Boockfor, Fredric R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence using GT1-7 cells indicates that GnRH pulsatility depends on exocytotic-release and gene transcription events. To determine whether calcium or DREAM may play a role in linking these processes, we used an L-type Ca2+-blocker (nimodipine) and found that not only GnRH gene expression (GnRH-GE) pulse activity was abolished but also that binding of proteins to OCT1BS-a (essential site for GnRH-GE pulses) was reduced. We further found that only EF-hand forms of DREAM were expressed in GT1-7 and that DREAM was part of the complex binding to OCT1BS-a. Finally, microinjection of DREAM antibody into cells abolished GnRH-GE pulses demonstrating its importance in pulsatility. These results reveal that calcium and DREAM may bridge cytoplasmic and nuclear events enabling temporal coordination of intermittent activity. Expression of DREAM in various cell types coupled with the universal role of calcium raise the possibility that these factors may play similar role in other secretory cells. PMID:17241740

  20. An AUTS2-Polycomb complex activates gene expression in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhonghua; Lee, Pedro; Stafford, James M; von Schimmelmann, Melanie; Schaefer, Anne; Reinberg, Danny

    2014-12-18

    Naturally occurring variations of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) comprise a core assembly of Polycomb group proteins and additional factors that include, surprisingly, autism susceptibility candidate 2 (AUTS2). Although AUTS2 is often disrupted in patients with neuronal disorders, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear. We investigated the role of AUTS2 as part of a previously identified PRC1 complex (PRC1-AUTS2), and in the context of neurodevelopment. In contrast to the canonical role of PRC1 in gene repression, PRC1-AUTS2 activates transcription. Biochemical studies demonstrate that the CK2 component of PRC1-AUTS2 neutralizes PRC1 repressive activity, whereas AUTS2-mediated recruitment of P300 leads to gene activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) demonstrated that AUTS2 regulates neuronal gene expression through promoter association. Conditional targeting of Auts2 in the mouse central nervous system (CNS) leads to various developmental defects. These findings reveal a natural means of subverting PRC1 activity, linking key epigenetic modulators with neuronal functions and diseases. PMID:25519132

  1. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase activity-responsive transcription factors: From hydroxylation to gene expression and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Ambreena; Aminova, Leila R; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2008-01-01

    Most homeostatic processes including gene transcription occur as a result of deviations in physiological tone that threatens the survival of the organism. A prototypical homeostatic stress response includes changes in gene expression following alterations in oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate levels. Each of these cofactors plays an important role in cellular metabolism. Accordingly, a family of enzymes known as the Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes are a group of dioxygenases that have evolved to sense changes in 2-oxoglutarate, oxygen and iron via changes in enzyme activity. Indeed, PHDs are a part of an established oxygen sensor system that regulates transcriptional regulation of hypoxia/stress-regulated genes and thus are an important component of events leading to cellular rescue from oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate deprivations. The ability of PHD activity to regulate homeostatic responses to oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate metabolism has led to the development of small molecule inhibitors of the PHDs as a strategy for activating or augmenting cellular stress responses. These small molecules are proving effective in preclinical models of stroke and Parkinson's disease. However the precise protective pathways engaged by PHD inhibition are only beginning to be defined. In the current review, we summarize the role of iron, 2-oxoglutarate and oxygen in the PHD catalyzed hydroxylation reaction and provide a brief discussion of some of the transcription factors that play an effective role in neuroprotection against oxidative stress as a result of changes in PHD activity. PMID:17981760

  2. A Homeodomain Transcription Factor Gene, PfMSX, Activates Expression of Pif Gene in the Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mi; He, Maoxian; Huang, Xiande; Wang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    We reported pearl oyster Pinctada fucata cDNA and genomic characterization of a new homeobox-containing protein, PfMSX. The PfMSX gene encodes a transcription factor that was localized to the nucleus. Analyses of PfMSX mRNA in tissues and developmental stages showed high expressions in mantle or D-shaped larvae. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) PfMSX binded to MSX consensus binding sites in the 5′ flanking region of the Pif promoter. In co-transfection experiment PfMSX transactivated reporter constructs containing Pif promoter sequences, and mutation of the MSX-binding sites attenuated transactivation. A knockdown experiment using PfMSX dsRNA showed decreased Pif mRNA and unregular crystallization of the nacreous layer using scanning electron microscopy. Our results suggested that PfMSX was a conserved homeodomain transcription factor gene, which can activate Pif gene expression through MSX binding site, and was then involved in the mineralization process in pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Our data provided important clues about mechanisms regulating biomineralization in pearl oyster. PMID:25099698

  3. NF-kB activation and its downstream target genes expression after heavy ions exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Schmitz, Claudia; Koch, Kristina; Feles, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    To enable long-term human space flight cellular radiation response to densely ionizing radiation needs to be better understood for developing appropriate countermeasures to mitigate acute effects and late radiation risks for the astronaut. The biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions (which constitute the most important radiation type in space) with high linear energy transfer (LET) for effecting DNA damage response pathways as a gateway to cell death or survival is of major concern not only for space missions but also for new regimes of tumor radiotherapy. In the current research study, the contribution of NF-κB in response to space-relevant radiation qualities was determined by a NF-κB reporter cell line (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo L2). The NF-κB dependent reporter gene expression (d2EGFP) after ionizing radiation (X-rays and heavy ions) exposure was evaluated by flow cytometry. Because of differences in the extent of NF-κB activation after X-irradiation and heavy ions exposure, it was expected that radiation quality (LET) might play an important role in the cellular radiation response. In addition, the biological effectiveness (RBE) of NF-κB activation and reduction of cellular survival was examined for heavy ions having a broad range of LET (˜0.3 - 9674 keV/µm). Furthermore, the effect of LET on NF-κB target gene expression was analyzed by real time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). In this study it was proven that NF-κB activation and NF-κB dependent gene expression comprises an early step in cellular radiation response. Taken together, this study clearly demonstrates that NF-κB activation and NF-κB-dependent gene expression by heavy ions are highest in the LET range of ˜50-200 keV/μupm. The up-regulated chemokines and cytokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL10, IL-8 and TNF) might be important for cell-cell communication among hit as well as unhit cells (bystander effect). The results obtained suggest the NF-κB pathway to be a

  4. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs)

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir’ and ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless’ varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  5. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs).

    PubMed

    Tang, Yujin; Wang, Ruipu; Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the 'Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir' and 'Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless' varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  6. Activation of human papillomavirus type 18 gene expression by herpes simplex virus type 1 viral transactivators and a phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Gius, D.; Laimins, L.A.

    1989-02-01

    Several viral trans-activators and a tumor promoter were examined for the ability to activate human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) gene expression. A plasmid containing the HPV-18 noncoding region placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene was cotransfected with different herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) genes into several cell lines. Both HSV-1 TIF and ICPO activated HPV-18 expression; however, activation by TIF was observed only in epithelial cells, while ICPO stimulated expression in a wide variety of cells. The element activated by both TIF and ICOP was mapped to a 229-base-pair fragment which also contains an HPV-18 epithelial cell-preferred enhancer. The inclusion of a papillomavirus E2 trans-activator with TIF and ICOP further increased HPV-18 expression. In contrast, the HSV-1 ICP4 and ICP27 genes, as well as the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tat genes, were found to have no effect on HPV-18 expression. In transient assays, the addition of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) also activated HPV-18 expression. The region of HPV-18 activated by TPA was localized to a sequence which is homologous to other TPA-responsive elements.

  7. Gene Expression during the Generation and Activation of Mouse Neutrophils: Implication of Novel Functional and Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Jeffrey A.; Duffau, Pierre; Yasuda, Kei; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Rothamel, Katherine; Rifkin, Ian R.; Monach, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen), gene expression was determined in unstimulated (circulating) mouse neutrophils and three populations of neutrophils activated in vivo, with comparison among these populations and to other leukocytes. Activation conditions included serum-transfer arthritis (mediated by immune complexes), thioglycollate-induced peritonitis, and uric acid-induced peritonitis. Neutrophils expressed fewer genes than any other leukocyte population studied in ImmGen, and down-regulation of genes related to translation was particularly striking. However, genes with expression relatively specific to neutrophils were also identified, particularly three genes of unknown function: Stfa2l1, Mrgpr2a and Mrgpr2b. Comparison of genes up-regulated in activated neutrophils led to several novel findings: increased expression of genes related to synthesis and use of glutathione and of genes related to uptake and metabolism of modified lipoproteins, particularly in neutrophils elicited by thioglycollate; increased expression of genes for transcription factors in the Nr4a family, only in neutrophils elicited by serum-transfer arthritis; and increased expression of genes important in synthesis of prostaglandins and response to leukotrienes, particularly in neutrophils elicited by uric acid. Up-regulation of genes related to apoptosis, response to microbial products, NFkB family members and their regulators, and MHC class II expression was also seen, in agreement with previous studies. A regulatory model developed from the ImmGen data was used to infer regulatory genes involved in the changes in gene expression during neutrophil activation. Among 64, mostly novel, regulatory genes predicted to influence these changes in gene expression, Irf5 was shown to be important for optimal secretion of IL-10, IP-10, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNF-α by mouse neutrophils in vitro after stimulation through TLR9. This data-set and its analysis using the ImmGen regulatory

  8. Control of α-herpesvirus IE gene expression by HCF-1 coupled chromatin modification activities

    PubMed Central

    Kristie, Thomas M.; Liang, Yu; Vogel, Jodi L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The immediate early genes of the α-herpesviruses HSV and VZV are transcriptionally regulated by viral and cellular factors in a complex combinatorial manner. Despite this complexity and the apparent redundancy of activators, the expression of the viral IE genes is critically dependent upon the cellular transcriptional coactivator HCF-1. Although the role of HCF-1 had remained elusive, recent studies have demonstrated that the protein is a component of multiple chromatin modification complexes including the Set1/MLL1 histone H3K4 methyltransferases. Studies using model viral promoter-reporter systems as well as analyses of components recruited to the viral genome during the initiation of infection have elucidated the significance of HCF-1 chromatin modification complexes in contributing to the final state of modified histones assembled on the viral IE promoters. Strikingly, the absence of HCF-1 results in the accumulation of nucleosomes bearing repressive marks on the viral IE promoters and silencing of viral gene expression. PMID:19682612

  9. Miz-1 Activates Gene Expression via a Novel Consensus DNA Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Barrilleaux, Bonnie L.; Burow, Dana; Lockwood, Sarah H.; Yu, Abigail; Segal, David J.; Knoepfler, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Miz-1 can either activate or repress gene expression in concert with binding partners including the Myc oncoprotein. The genomic binding of Miz-1 includes both core promoters and more distal sites, but the preferred DNA binding motif of Miz-1 has been unclear. We used a high-throughput in vitro technique, Bind-n-Seq, to identify two Miz-1 consensus DNA binding motif sequences—ATCGGTAATC and ATCGAT (Mizm1 and Mizm2)—bound by full-length Miz-1 and its zinc finger domain, respectively. We validated these sequences directly as high affinity Miz-1 binding motifs. Competition assays using mutant probes indicated that the binding affinity of Miz-1 for Mizm1 and Mizm2 is highly sequence-specific. Miz-1 strongly activates gene expression through the motifs in a Myc-independent manner. MEME-ChIP analysis of Miz-1 ChIP-seq data in two different cell types reveals a long motif with a central core sequence highly similar to the Mizm1 motif identified by Bind-n-Seq, validating the in vivo relevance of the findings. Miz-1 ChIP-seq peaks containing the long motif are predominantly located outside of proximal promoter regions, in contrast to peaks without the motif, which are highly concentrated within 1.5 kb of the nearest transcription start site. Overall, our results indicate that Miz-1 may be directed in vivo to the novel motif sequences we have identified, where it can recruit its specific binding partners to control gene expression and ultimately regulate cell fate. PMID:24983942

  10. Simultaneous Pathway Activity Inference and Gene Expression Analysis Using RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Daniel J; Kolde, Raivo; Sooknah, Matthew; Graham, Daniel B; Sundberg, Thomas B; Latorre, Isabel J; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-05-25

    Reporter gene assays are a venerable tool for studying signaling pathways, but they lack the throughput and complexity necessary to contribute to a systems-level understanding of endogenous signaling networks. We present a parallel reporter assay, transcription factor activity sequencing (TF-seq), built on synthetic DNA enhancer elements, which enables parallel measurements in primary cells of the transcriptome and transcription factor activity from more than 40 signaling pathways. Using TF-seq in Myd88(-/-) macrophages, we captured dynamic pathway activity changes underpinning the global transcriptional changes of the innate immune response. We also applied TF-seq to investigate small molecule mechanisms of action and find a role for NF-κB activation and coordination of the STAT1 response in the macrophage reaction to the anti-inflammatory natural product halofuginone. Simultaneous TF-seq and global gene expression profiling represent an integrative approach for gaining mechanistic insight into pathway activity and transcriptional changes that result from genetic and small molecule perturbations. PMID:27211859

  11. Gene expression profile in the activation of subperitoneal fibroblasts reflects prognosis of patients with colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Mitsuru; Kojima, Motohiro; Higuchi, Youichi; Nishizawa, Yuji; Kobayashi, Akihiro; Ito, Masaaki; Saito, Norio; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2016-03-15

    Tumors can create a heterogenetic tumor microenvironment. We recently identified the pathologically unique cancer microenvironment formed by peritoneal invasion (CMPI), and revealed that subperitoneal fibroblasts (SPFs) within peritoneal tissue play a crucial role in tumor progression through their interaction with cancer cells. Therefore, the genes in SPFs altered by cancer stimulation may include some biologically important factors associated with patient prognosis. In this study, we aimed to identify new biomarkers using genes specifically upregulated in SPFs by cancer-cell-conditioned medium (CCCM) stimulation (SPFs CCCM response genes; SCR genes) in colon cancer (CC). We constructed two frameworks using SCR gene data: a publicly released microarray dataset, and validation cases with freshly frozen CC samples to identify genes related to short recurrence-free survival (RFS). In the first framework, we selected differentially expressed genes between the high and low SCR gene expression groups. In the second framework, genes significantly related to short RFS were selected by univariate analysis using all SCR genes, and multivariate analysis was performed to select robust genes associated with short RFS. We identified CTGF, CALD1, INHBA and TAGLN in the first framework, and PDLIM5, MAGI1, SPTBN1 and TAGLN in the second framework. Among these seven genes, high expression of three genes (CALD1, TAGLN and SPTBN1) showed a poor prognosis in our validation cases. In a public microarray dataset, SCR gene expression was associated with the expression of ECM component, EMT, and M2-macrophage associated genes, which was concordant with the pathological features of CMPI. Thus, we successfully identified new prognostic factors. PMID:26370611

  12. Basic Mechanisms of RNA Polymerase II Activity and Alteration of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Craig D.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II), and all RNA polymerases for that matter, may be understood as comprising two cycles. The first cycle relates to the basic mechanism of the transcription process wherein Pol II must select the appropriate nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate complementary to the DNA template, catalyze phosphodiester bond formation, and translocate to the next position on the DNA template. Performing this cycle in an iterative fashion allows the synthesis of RNA chains that can be over one million nucleotides in length in some larger eukaryotes. Overlaid upon this enzymatic cycle, transcription may be divided into another cycle of three phases: initiation, elongation, and termination. Each of these phases has a large number of associated transcription factors that function to promote or regulate the gene expression process. Complicating matters, each phase of the latter transcription cycle are coincident with cotranscriptional RNA processing events. Additionally, transcription takes place within a highly dynamic and regulated chromatin environment. This chromatin environment is radically impacted by active transcription and associated chromatin modifications and remodeling, while also functioning as a major platform for Pol II regulation. This review will focus on our basic knowledge of the Pol II transcription mechanism, and how altered Pol II activity impacts gene expression in vivo in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23022618

  13. Basic mechanisms of RNA polymerase II activity and alteration of gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2013-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II), and all RNA polymerases for that matter, may be understood as comprising two cycles. The first cycle relates to the basic mechanism of the transcription process wherein Pol II must select the appropriate nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate complementary to the DNA template, catalyze phosphodiester bond formation, and translocate to the next position on the DNA template. Performing this cycle in an iterative fashion allows the synthesis of RNA chains that can be over one million nucleotides in length in some larger eukaryotes. Overlaid upon this enzymatic cycle, transcription may be divided into another cycle of three phases: initiation, elongation, and termination. Each of these phases has a large number of associated transcription factors that function to promote or regulate the gene expression process. Complicating matters, each phase of the latter transcription cycle are coincident with cotranscriptional RNA processing events. Additionally, transcription takes place within a highly dynamic and regulated chromatin environment. This chromatin environment is radically impacted by active transcription and associated chromatin modifications and remodeling, while also functioning as a major platform for Pol II regulation. This review will focus on our basic knowledge of the Pol II transcription mechanism, and how altered Pol II activity impacts gene expression in vivo in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation. PMID:23022618

  14. Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase2. Gene structure, activity, and tissue-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, A K

    1994-05-20

    Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase2 (NQO2) gene, 1336 base pairs (bp) of the 5'-flanking region and 165 bp of the 3'-flanking region, have been sequenced. NQO2 gene is 20 kilobase pairs in length and have seven exons interrupted by six introns as compared to the previously cloned NQO1 gene which contains six exons. 187 bp of the first exon in the NQO2 gene are noncoding and are absent in the NQO1 gene. 92 bp of the second exon in the NQO2 gene corresponded to the first exon of the NQO1 gene and so on. The sizes and nucleotide sequences of exons 3-6 are highly conserved between NQO2 and NQO1 genes. The last exon in the NQO2 gene is 1603 bp shorter than the last exon of the NQO1 gene and encodes for 58 amino acids as compared to 101 amino acids encoded by the NQO1 gene. This makes NQO2 protein 43 amino acids shorter than the NQO1 protein. The high degree of conservation between NQO2 and NQO1 gene organization and sequence confirmed that NQO2 gene encodes for a second member of the NQO gene family in human. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the NQO2 gene revealed presence of four SP1 binding sites at positions -214, -170, -106, and -75, a single copy of the antioxidant response element (ARE) at nucleotide -936, and three copies of xenobiotic response element (XRE) at positions -708, -557, and -51. ARE and XRE elements have previously been found in the promoters of the NQO1 and glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit genes and mediate increases in their expression in response to polycyclic aromatic compounds, phenolic antioxidants, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), respectively. The NQO2 cDNA-derived protein in monkey kidney COS1 cells efficiently catalyzed nitroreduction of anti-tumor compound CB10-200, an analog of nitrophenylaziridine. Northern blot analysis indicates that NQO2 gene is expressed in human heart, brain, lung, liver, and skeletal muscle but does not express in placenta. In contrast, the NQO1 gene was expressed in

  15. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  16. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  17. Effects of different activity and inactivity paradigms on myosin heavy chain gene expression in striated muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Haddad, F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this mini-review is to summarize findings concerning the role that different models of muscular activity and inactivity play in altering gene expression of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) family of motor proteins in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscle. This was done in the context of examining parallel findings concerning the role that thyroid hormone (T(3), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) plays in MHC expression. Findings show that both cardiac and skeletal muscles of experimental animals are initially undifferentiated at birth and then undergo a marked level of growth and differentiation in attaining the adult MHC phenotype in a T(3)/activity level-dependent fashion. Cardiac MHC expression in small mammals is highly sensitive to thyroid deficiency, diabetes, energy deprivation, and hypertension; each of these interventions induces upregulation of the beta-MHC isoform, which functions to economize circulatory function in the face of altered energy demand. In skeletal muscle, hyperthyroidism, as well as interventions that unload or reduce the weight-bearing activity of the muscle, causes slow to fast MHC conversions. Fast to slow conversions, however, are seen under hypothyroidism or when the muscles either become chronically overloaded or subjected to intermittent loading as occurs during resistance training and endurance exercise. The regulation of MHC gene expression by T(3) or mechanical stimuli appears to be strongly regulated by transcriptional events, based on recent findings on transgenic models and animals transfected with promoter-reporter constructs. However, the mechanisms by which T(3) and mechanical stimuli exert their control on transcriptional processes appear to be different. Additional findings show that individual skeletal muscle fibers have the genetic machinery to express simultaneously all of the adult MHCs, e.g., slow type I and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb, in unique combinations under certain experimental conditions. This degree of

  18. Evolution of high cellulolytic activity in symbiotic Streptomyces through selection of expanded gene content and coordinated gene expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Book, Adam J.; Lewin, Gina R.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Doering, Drew T.; Suh, Steven; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Fox, Brian G.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2016-06-08

    In this study, the evolution of cellulose degradation was a defining event in the history of life. Without efficient decomposition and recycling, dead plant biomass would quickly accumulate and become inaccessible to terrestrial food webs and the global carbon cycle. On land, the primary drivers of plant biomass deconstruction are fungi and bacteria in the soil or associated with herbivorous eukaryotes. While the ecological importance of plant-decomposing microbes is well established, little is known about the distribution or evolution of cellulolytic activity in any bacterial genus. Here we show that in Streptomyces, a genus of Actinobacteria abundant in soil andmore » symbiotic niches, the ability to rapidly degrade cellulose is largely restricted to two clades of host-associated strains and is not a conserved characteristic of the Streptomyces genus or host-associated strains. Our comparative genomics identify that while plant biomass degrading genes (CAZy) are widespread in Streptomyces, key enzyme families are enriched in highly cellulolytic strains. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that cellulolytic strains express a suite of multi-domain CAZy enzymes that are coregulated by the CebR transcriptional regulator. Using targeted gene deletions, we verify the importance of a highly expressed cellulase (GH6 family cellobiohydrolase) and the CebR transcriptional repressor to the cellulolytic phenotype. Evolutionary analyses identify complex genomic modifications that drive plant biomass deconstruction in Streptomyces, including acquisition and selective retention of CAZy genes and transcriptional regulators. Our results suggest that host-associated niches have selected some symbiotic Streptomyces for increased cellulose degrading activity and that symbiotic bacteria are a rich biochemical and enzymatic resource for biotechnology.« less

  19. Evolution of High Cellulolytic Activity in Symbiotic Streptomyces through Selection of Expanded Gene Content and Coordinated Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Book, Adam J; Lewin, Gina R; McDonald, Bradon R; Takasuka, Taichi E; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Doering, Drew T; Suh, Steven; Raffa, Kenneth F; Fox, Brian G; Currie, Cameron R

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of cellulose degradation was a defining event in the history of life. Without efficient decomposition and recycling, dead plant biomass would quickly accumulate and become inaccessible to terrestrial food webs and the global carbon cycle. On land, the primary drivers of plant biomass deconstruction are fungi and bacteria in the soil or associated with herbivorous eukaryotes. While the ecological importance of plant-decomposing microbes is well established, little is known about the distribution or evolution of cellulolytic activity in any bacterial genus. Here we show that in Streptomyces, a genus of Actinobacteria abundant in soil and symbiotic niches, the ability to rapidly degrade cellulose is largely restricted to two clades of host-associated strains and is not a conserved characteristic of the Streptomyces genus or host-associated strains. Our comparative genomics identify that while plant biomass degrading genes (CAZy) are widespread in Streptomyces, key enzyme families are enriched in highly cellulolytic strains. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that cellulolytic strains express a suite of multi-domain CAZy enzymes that are coregulated by the CebR transcriptional regulator. Using targeted gene deletions, we verify the importance of a highly expressed cellulase (GH6 family cellobiohydrolase) and the CebR transcriptional repressor to the cellulolytic phenotype. Evolutionary analyses identify complex genomic modifications that drive plant biomass deconstruction in Streptomyces, including acquisition and selective retention of CAZy genes and transcriptional regulators. Our results suggest that host-associated niches have selected some symbiotic Streptomyces for increased cellulose degrading activity and that symbiotic bacteria are a rich biochemical and enzymatic resource for biotechnology. PMID:27276034

  20. Evolution of High Cellulolytic Activity in Symbiotic Streptomyces through Selection of Expanded Gene Content and Coordinated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Bradon R.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Doering, Drew T.; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Fox, Brian G.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of cellulose degradation was a defining event in the history of life. Without efficient decomposition and recycling, dead plant biomass would quickly accumulate and become inaccessible to terrestrial food webs and the global carbon cycle. On land, the primary drivers of plant biomass deconstruction are fungi and bacteria in the soil or associated with herbivorous eukaryotes. While the ecological importance of plant-decomposing microbes is well established, little is known about the distribution or evolution of cellulolytic activity in any bacterial genus. Here we show that in Streptomyces, a genus of Actinobacteria abundant in soil and symbiotic niches, the ability to rapidly degrade cellulose is largely restricted to two clades of host-associated strains and is not a conserved characteristic of the Streptomyces genus or host-associated strains. Our comparative genomics identify that while plant biomass degrading genes (CAZy) are widespread in Streptomyces, key enzyme families are enriched in highly cellulolytic strains. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that cellulolytic strains express a suite of multi-domain CAZy enzymes that are coregulated by the CebR transcriptional regulator. Using targeted gene deletions, we verify the importance of a highly expressed cellulase (GH6 family cellobiohydrolase) and the CebR transcriptional repressor to the cellulolytic phenotype. Evolutionary analyses identify complex genomic modifications that drive plant biomass deconstruction in Streptomyces, including acquisition and selective retention of CAZy genes and transcriptional regulators. Our results suggest that host-associated niches have selected some symbiotic Streptomyces for increased cellulose degrading activity and that symbiotic bacteria are a rich biochemical and enzymatic resource for biotechnology. PMID:27276034

  1. Intrinsic HER4/4ICD transcriptional activation domains are required for STAT5A activated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Han, Wen; Sfondouris, Mary E; Semmes, Eleanor C; Meyer, Alicia M; Jones, Frank E

    2016-10-30

    The epidermal growth factor receptor family member HER4 undergoes proteolytic processing at the cell surface to release the HER4 intracellular domain (4ICD) nuclear protein. Interestingly, 4ICD directly interacts with STAT5 and functions as an obligate STAT5 nuclear chaperone. Once in the nucleus 4ICD binds with STAT5 at STAT5 target genes, dramatically potentiating STAT5 transcriptional activation. These observations raise the possibility that 4ICD directly coactivates STAT5 gene expression. Using both yeast and mammalian transactivation reporter assays, we performed truncations of 4ICD fused to a GAL4 DNA binding domain and identified two independent 4ICD transactivation domains located between residues 1022 and 1090 (TAD1) and 1192 and 1225 (TAD2). The ability of the 4ICD DNA binding domain fusions to transactivate reporter gene expression required deletion of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase domain. In addition, we identified the 4ICD carboxyl terminal TVV residues, a PDZ domain binding motif (PDZ-DBM), as a potent transcriptional repressor. The transactivation activity of the HER4 carboxyl terminal domain lacking the tyrosine kinase (CTD) was significantly lower than similar EGFR or HER2 CTD. However, deletion of the HER4 CTD PDZ-DBM enhanced HER4 CTD transactivation to levels equivalent to the EGFR and HER2 CTDs. To determine if 4ICD TAD1 and TAD2 have a physiologically relevant role in STAT5 transactivation, we coexpressed 4ICD or 4ICD lacking TAD2 or both TAD1 and TAD2 with STAT5 in a luciferase reporter assay. Our results demonstrate that each 4ICD TAD contributes additively to STAT5A transactivation and the ability of STAT5A to transactivate the β-casein promoter requires the 4ICD TADs. Taken together, published data and our current results demonstrate that both 4ICD nuclear chaperone and intrinsic coactivation activities are essential for STAT5 regulated gene expression. PMID:27502417

  2. PPAR{alpha} gene expression is up-regulated by LXR and PXR activators in the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Jun; Satoh, Shin-ichi; Kita, Mariko; Nakahara, Mayuko; Hachimura, Satoshi; Miyata, Masaaki; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2008-07-11

    LXR, PXR, and PPAR{alpha} are members of a nuclear receptor family which regulate the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. Here, we show the administration of T0901317 stimulates PPAR{alpha} gene expression in the small intestine but not in the liver of both normal and FXR-null mice. The administration of LXR specific ligand GW3965, or PXR specific ligand PCN has the same effect, indicating that ligand-dependent activation of LXR and PXR, but not FXR, is responsible for the increased gene expression of PPAR{alpha} in the mouse small intestine.

  3. Intracellular calcium-release and protein kinase C-activation stimulate sonic hedgehog gene expression during gastric acid secretion

    PubMed Central

    El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Zavros, Yana; Tessier, Art; Waghray, Meghna; Lentz, Steve; Gumucio, Deborah; Todisco, Andrea; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hypochlorhydria during Helicobacter pylori infection inhibits gastric Shh expression. We investigated whether acid-secretory mechanisms regulate Shh gene expression through Ca2+i-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) or cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA)-activation. Method We blocked Hedgehog signaling by transgenically overexpressing a secreted form of the Hedgehog interacting protein-1 (sHip-1), a natural inhibitor of hedgehog ligands, which induced hypochlorhydria. Gadolinium, EGTA+BAPTA, PKC-overexpressing adenoviruses, and PKC-inhibitors were used to modulate Ca2+i-release, PKC-activity and Shh gene expression in primary gastric cell, organ, and AGS cell line cultures. PKA hyperactivity was induced in the H+/K+-β-cholera-toxin overexpressing mice (Ctox). Results Mice that expressed sHip-1 had lower levels of gastric acid (hypochlorhydria), reduced production of somatostatin, and increased gastrin gene expression. Hypochlorhydria in these mice repressed Shh gene expression, similar to the levels obtained with omeprazole treatment of wild-type mice. However, Shh expression was also repressed in the hyperchlorhydric Ctox model with elevated cAMP, suggesting that the regulation of Shh was not solely acid-dependent, but pertained to specific acid-stimulatory signaling pathways. Based on previous reports that Ca2+i-release also stimulates acid secretion in parietal cells, we showed that gadolinium-, thapsigargin- and carbachol-mediated release of Ca2+i induced Shh expression. Ca2+-chelation with BAPTA+EGTA reduced Shh expression. Overexpression of PKC-α, -β and -δ (but not PKC-ε) induced Shh gene expression. In addition, phorbol esters induced a Shh-regulated reporter gene. Conclusion Secretagogues that stimulate gastric acid secretion induce Shh gene expression through increased Ca2+i-release and PKC activation. Shh might be the ligand transducing changes in gastric acidity to the regulation of G-cell secretion of gastrin. PMID:20816837

  4. Expression of Aspergillus nidulans phy Gene in Nicotiana benthamiana Produces Active Phytase with Broad Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Tae-Kyun; Oh, Sung; Kim, Seongdae; Park, Jae Sung; Vinod, Nagarajan; Jang, Kyung Min; Kim, Sei Chang; Choi, Chang Won; Ko, Suk-Min; Jeong, Dong Kee; Udayakumar, Rajangam

    2014-01-01

    A full-length phytase gene (phy) of Aspergillus nidulans was amplified from the cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and it was introduced into a bacterial expression vector, pET-28a. The recombinant protein (rPhy-E, 56 kDa) was overexpressed in the insoluble fraction of Escherichia coli culture, purified by Ni-NTA resin under denaturing conditions and injected into rats as an immunogen. To express A. nidulans phytase in a plant, the full-length of phy was cloned into a plant expression binary vector, pPZP212. The resultant construct was tested for its transient expression by Agrobacterium-infiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Compared with a control, the agro-infiltrated leaf tissues showed the presence of phy mRNA and its high expression level in N. benthamiana. The recombinant phytase (rPhy-P, 62 kDa) was strongly reacted with the polyclonal antibody against the nonglycosylated rPhy-E. The rPhy-P showed glycosylation, two pH optima (pH 4.5 and pH 5.5), an optimum temperature at 45~55 °C, thermostability and broad substrate specificities. After deglycosylation by peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase-F), the rPhy-P significantly lost the phytase activity and retained 1/9 of the original activity after 10 min of incubation at 45 °C. Therefore, the deglycosylation caused a significant reduction in enzyme thermostability. In animal experiments, oral administration of the rPhy-P at 1500 U/kg body weight/day for seven days caused a significant reduction of phosphorus excretion by 16% in rat feces. Besides, the rPhy-P did not result in any toxicological changes and clinical signs. PMID:25192284

  5. YY1 Acts as a Transcriptional Activator of Hoxa5 Gene Expression in Mouse Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bérubé-Simard, Félix-Antoine; Prudhomme, Christelle; Jeannotte, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    The Hox gene family encodes homeodomain-containing transcriptional regulators that confer positional information to axial and paraxial tissues in the developing embryo. The dynamic Hox gene expression pattern requires mechanisms that differentially control Hox transcription in a precise spatio-temporal fashion. This implies an integrated regulation of neighbouring Hox genes achieved through the sharing and the selective use of defined enhancer sequences. The Hoxa5 gene plays a crucial role in lung and gut organogenesis. To position Hoxa5 in the regulatory hierarchy that drives organ morphogenesis, we searched for cis-acting regulatory sequences and associated trans-acting factors required for Hoxa5 expression in the developing lung and gut. Using mouse transgenesis, we identified two DNA regions included in a 1.5-kb XbaI-XbaI fragment located in the Hoxa4-Hoxa5 intergenic domain and known to control Hoxa4 organ expression. The multifunctional YY1 transcription factor binds the two regulatory sequences in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the mesenchymal deletion of the Yy1 gene function in mice results in a Hoxa5-like lung phenotype with decreased Hoxa5 and Hoxa4 gene expression. Thus, YY1 acts as a positive regulator of Hoxa5 expression in the developing lung and gut. Our data also support a role for YY1 in the coordinated expression of Hox genes for correct organogenesis. PMID:24705708

  6. KCNE gene expression is dependent on the proliferation and mode of activation of leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Laura; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Roig, Sara R.; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Manils, Joan; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels are tightly regulated during the immune system response. Leukocytes have a limited repertoire of Kv channels, whose physiological role is under intense investigation. A functional Kv channel is an oligomeric complex composed of pore-forming and ancillary subunits. The KCNE gene family is a novel group of modulatory Kv channel elements in leukocytes. Here, we characterized the gene expression of KCNEs (1–5) in leukocytes and investigated their regulation during leukocyte proliferation and mode of activation. Murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages, human Jurkat T-lymphocytes and human Raji B-cells were analyzed. KCNEs (1–5) are expressed in all leukocytes lineages. Most KCNE mRNAs show cell cycle-dependent regulation and are differentially regulated under specific insults. Our results further suggest a new and yet undefined physiological role for KCNE subunits in the immune system. Putative associations of these ancillary proteins with Kv channels would yield a wide variety of biophysically and pharmacologically distinct channels that fine-tune the immunological response. PMID:23327879

  7. Basal expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene is dependent on protein kinase A activity.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, R A; Matthews, R P; Idzerda, R L; McKnight, G S

    1995-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a Cl- channel that becomes activated after phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). We demonstrate that PKA also plays a crucial role in maintaining basal expression of the CFTR gene in the human colon carcinoma cell line T84. Inhibition of PKA activity by expression of a dominant-negative regulatory subunit or treatment with the PKA-selective inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89) caused a complete suppression of CFTR gene expression without affecting other constitutively active genes. Basal expression of a 2.2-kb region of the CFTR promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene (CFTR-luc) exhibited the same dependence on PKA. The ability of cAMP to induce CFTR over basal levels is cell-type specific. In T84 cells, both the endogenous CFTR gene and CFTR-luc exhibited only a modest inducibility (approximately 2-fold), whereas in the human choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3, CFTR-luc could be induced at least 4-fold. A variant cAMP-response element is present at position -48 to -41 in the CFTR promoter, and mutation of this sequence blocks basal expression. We conclude that cAMP, acting through PKA, is an essential regulator of basal CFTR gene expression and may mediate an induction of CFTR in responsive cell types. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7543684

  8. Gene Expression Patterns Associated with Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor (PPAR) Signaling in the Longissimus dorsi of Hanwoo (Korean Cattle)

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dajeong; Chai, Han-Ha; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Cho, Yong-Min; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Nam-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue deposited within muscle fibers, known as intramuscular fat (IMF or marbling), is a major determinant of meat quality and thereby affects its economic value. The biological mechanisms that determine IMF content are therefore of interest. In this study, 48 genes involved in the bovine peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway, which is involved in lipid metabolism, were investigated to identify candidate genes associated with IMF in the longissimus dorsi of Hanwoo (Korean cattle). Ten genes, retinoid X receptor alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), phospholipid transfer protein, stearoyl-CoA desaturase, nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group H member 3, fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3), carnitine palmitoyltransferase II, acyl-Coenzyme A dehydrogenase long chain (ACADL), acyl-Coenzyme A oxidase 2 branched chain, and fatty acid binding protein 4, showed significant effects with regard to IMF and were differentially expressed between the low- and high-marbled groups (p<0.05). Analysis of the gene co-expression network based on Pearson’s correlation coefficients identified 10 up-regulated genes in the high-marbled group that formed a major cluster. Among these genes, the PPARG-FABP4 gene pair exhibited the strongest correlation in the network. Glycerol kinase was found to play a role in mediating activation of the differentially expressed genes. We categorized the 10 significantly differentially expressed genes into the corresponding downstream pathways and investigated the direct interactive relationships among these genes. We suggest that fatty acid oxidation is the major downstream pathway affecting IMF content. The PPARG/RXRA complex triggers activation of target genes involved in fatty acid oxidation resulting in increased triglyceride formation by ATP production. Our findings highlight candidate genes associated with the IMF content of the loin muscle of Korean cattle and provide insight into the

  9. Patterns of global gene expression in rat skeletal muscle during unloading and low-intensity ambulatory activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, Lionel; Akunuri, Nagabhavani; Zhao, Po; Hoffman, Eric P.; Hamilton, Deborah G.; Hamilton, Marc T.

    2003-01-01

    Physical inactivity and unloading lead to diverse skeletal muscle alterations. Our goal was to identify the genes in skeletal muscle whose expression is most sensitive to periods of unloading/reduced physical activity and that may be involved in triggering initial responses before phenotypic changes are evident. The ability of short periods of physical activity/loading as an effective countermeasure against changes in gene expression mediated by inactivity was also tested. Affymetrix microarrays were used to compare mRNA levels in the soleus muscle under three experimental treatments (n = 20-29 rats each): 12-h hindlimb unloading (HU), 12-h HU followed by 4 h of intermittent low-intensity ambulatory and postural activity (4-h reloading), and control (with ambulatory and postural activity). Using a combination of criteria, we identified a small set of genes (approximately 1% of 8,738 genes on the array or 4% of significant expressed genes) with the most reproducible and largest responses to altered activity. Analysis revealed a coordinated regulation of transcription for a large number of key signaling proteins and transcription factors involved in protein synthesis/degradation and energy metabolism. Most (21 of 25) of the gene expression changes that were downregulated during HU returned at least to control levels during the reloading. In surprising contrast, 27 of 38 of the genes upregulated during HU remained significantly above control, but most showed trends toward reversal. This introduces a new concept that, in general, genes that are upregulated during unloading/inactivity will be more resistant to periodic reloading than those genes that are downregulated. This study reveals genes that are the most sensitive to loading/activity in rat skeletal muscle and indicates new targets that may initiate muscle alterations during inactivity.

  10. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-03-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses.

  11. Potato tuber cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase genes: Biochemical properties, activity, and expression during tuber dormancy progression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzymatic and biochemical properties of the proteins encoded by five potato cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX)-like genes functionally expressed in yeast and the effects of tuber dormancy progression on StCKX expression and cytokinin metabolism were examined in meristems isolated from field-g...

  12. Metabolic activity of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and gene expression during exposure to xylitol and sucrose.

    PubMed

    Decker, Eva-Maria; Klein, Christian; Schwindt, Dimitri; von Ohle, Christiane

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse Streptococcus mutans biofilms grown under different dietary conditions by using multifaceted methodological approaches to gain deeper insight into the cariogenic impact of carbohydrates. S. mutans biofilms were generated during a period of 24 h in the following media: Schaedler broth as a control medium containing endogenous glucose, Schaedler broth with an additional 5% sucrose, and Schaedler broth supplemented with 1% xylitol. The confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)-based analyses of the microbial vitality, respiratory activity (5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride, CTC) and production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) were performed separately in the inner, middle and outer biofilm layers. In addition to the microbiological sample testing, the glucose/sucrose consumption of the biofilm bacteria was quantified, and the expression of glucosyltransferases and other biofilm-associated genes was investigated. Xylitol exposure did not inhibit the viability of S. mutans biofilms, as monitored by the following experimental parameters: culture growth, vitality, CTC activity and EPS production. However, xylitol exposure caused a difference in gene expression compared to the control. GtfC was upregulated only in the presence of xylitol. Under xylitol exposure, gtfB was upregulated by a factor of 6, while under sucrose exposure, it was upregulated by a factor of three. Compared with glucose and xylitol, sucrose increased cell vitality in all biofilm layers. In all nutrient media, the intrinsic glucose was almost completely consumed by the cells of the S. mutans biofilm within 24 h. After 24 h of biofilm formation, the multiparametric measurements showed that xylitol in the presence of glucose caused predominantly genotypic differences but did not induce metabolic differences compared to the control. Thus, the availability of dietary carbohydrates in either a pure or combined form seems to affect the

  13. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) affects hormone receptor activity, steroidogenesis, and expression of endocrine-related genes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Du, Guizhen; Hu, Jialei; Huang, Hongyu; Qin, Yufeng; Han, Xiumei; Wu, Di; Song, Ling; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru

    2013-02-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a widespread and persistent chemical in the environment. We investigated the endocrine-disrupting effects of PFOS using a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays. Reporter gene assays were used to detect receptor-mediated (anti-)estrogenic, (anti-)androgenic, and (anti-)thyroid hormone activities. The effect of PFOS on steroidogenesis was assessed both at hormone levels in the supernatant and at expression levels of hormone-induced genes in the H295R cell. A zebrafish-based short-term screening method was developed to detect the effect of PFOS on endocrine function in vivo. The results indicate that PFOS can act as an estrogen receptor agonist and thyroid hormone receptor antagonist. Exposure to PFOS decreased supernatant testosterone (T), increased estradiol (E2) concentrations in H295R cell medium and altered the expression of several genes involved in steroidogenesis. In addition, PFOS increased early thyroid development gene (hhex and pax8) expression in a concentration-dependent manner, decreased steroidogenic enzyme gene (CYP17, CYP19a, CYP19b) expression, and changed the expression pattern of estrogen receptor production genes (esr1, esr2b) after 500 µg/L PFOS treatment in zebrafish embryos. These results indicate that PFOS has the ability to act as an endocrine disruptor both in vitro and in vivo by disrupting the function of nuclear hormone receptors, interfering with steroidogenesis, and altering the expression of endocrine-related genes in zebrafish embryo. PMID:23074026

  14. HMGN proteins modulate chromatin regulatory sites and gene expression during activation of naïve B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofei; Zhu, Iris; Deng, Tao; Furusawa, Takashi; Rochman, Mark; Vacchio, Melanie S.; Bosselut, Remy; Yamane, Arito; Casellas, Rafael; Landsman, David; Bustin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The activation of naïve B lymphocyte involves rapid and major changes in chromatin organization and gene expression; however, the complete repertoire of nuclear factors affecting these genomic changes is not known. We report that HMGN proteins, which bind to nucleosomes and affect chromatin structure and function, co-localize with, and maintain the intensity of DNase I hypersensitive sites genome wide, in resting but not in activated B cells. Transcription analyses of resting and activated B cells from wild-type and Hmgn−/− mice, show that loss of HMGNs dampens the magnitude of the transcriptional response and alters the pattern of gene expression during the course of B-cell activation; defense response genes are most affected at the onset of activation. Our study provides insights into the biological function of the ubiquitous HMGN chromatin binding proteins and into epigenetic processes that affect the fidelity of the transcriptional response during the activation of B cell lymphocytes. PMID:27112571

  15. Use of an Activated Beta-Catenin to Identify Wnt Pathway Target Genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, Including a Subset of Collagen Genes Expressed in Late Larval Development

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Belinda M.; Abete-Luzi, Patricia; Krause, Michael W.; Eisenmann, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays a fundamental role during metazoan development, where it regulates diverse processes, including cell fate specification, cell migration, and stem cell renewal. Activation of the beta-catenin−dependent/canonical Wnt pathway up-regulates expression of Wnt target genes to mediate a cellular response. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a canonical Wnt signaling pathway regulates several processes during larval development; however, few target genes of this pathway have been identified. To address this deficit, we used a novel approach of conditionally activated Wnt signaling during a defined stage of larval life by overexpressing an activated beta-catenin protein, then used microarray analysis to identify genes showing altered expression compared with control animals. We identified 166 differentially expressed genes, of which 104 were up-regulated. A subset of the up-regulated genes was shown to have altered expression in mutants with decreased or increased Wnt signaling; we consider these genes to be bona fide C. elegans Wnt pathway targets. Among these was a group of six genes, including the cuticular collagen genes, bli-1col-38, col-49, and col-71. These genes show a peak of expression in the mid L4 stage during normal development, suggesting a role in adult cuticle formation. Consistent with this finding, reduction of function for several of the genes causes phenotypes suggestive of defects in cuticle function or integrity. Therefore, this work has identified a large number of putative Wnt pathway target genes during larval life, including a small subset of Wnt-regulated collagen genes that may function in synthesis of the adult cuticle. PMID:24569038

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction induces SESN2 gene expression through Activating Transcription Factor 4.

    PubMed

    Garaeva, Alisa A; Kovaleva, Irina E; Chumakov, Peter M; Evstafieva, Alexandra G

    2016-01-01

    We found that inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes III (myxothiazol) and I (piericidin A) in some epithelial carcinoma cell lines induce transcription of the p53-responsive SESN2 gene that plays an important role in stress response and homeostatic regulation. However, the effect did not depend on p53 because i) there was no induction of p53 after the treatment with piericidin A; ii) after the treatment with myxothiazol the peak of SESN2 gene upregulation occurred as early as 5h, before the onset of p53 activation (13h); iii) a supplementation with uridine that abolishes the p53 activation in response to myxothiazol did not abrogate the induction of SESN2 transcripts; iv) in the p53 negative HCT116 p53 -/- cells SESN2 transcription could be also induced by myxothiazol. In response to the respiratory chain inhibitors we observed an induction of ATF4, the key transcription factor of the integrated stress response (ISR). We found that the induction of SESN2 transcripts could be prevented by the ISR inhibitory small molecule ISRIB. Also, by inhibiting or overexpressing ATF4 with specific shRNA or ATF4-expressing constructs, respectively, we have confirmed the role of ATF4 in the SESN2 gene upregulation induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. At a distance of 228 bp upstream from the SESN2 transcription start site we found a candidate sequence for the ATF4 binding site and confirmed its requirement for the induction of SESN2 in luciferase reporter experiments. We suggest that the upregulation of SESN2 by mitochondrial dysfunction provides a homeostatic feedback that attenuates biosynthetic processes during temporal losses of energy supply from mitochondria thereby assisting better adaptation and viability of cells in hostile environments. PMID:26771712

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1096 protein: gene cloning, protein expression, and peptidoglycan deacetylase activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many bacteria modulate and evade the immune defenses of their hosts through peptidoglycan (PG) deacetylation. The PG deacetylases from Streptococcus pneumonia, Listeria monocytogenes and Lactococcus lactis have been characterized. However, thus far, the PG deacetylase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been identified. Results In this study, we cloned the Rv1096 gene from the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain and expressed Rv1096 protein in both Escherichia coli and M. smegmatis. The results showed that the purified Rv1096 protein possessed metallo-dependent PG deacetylase activity, which increased in the presence of Co2+. The kinetic parameters of the PG deacetylase towards M. smegmatis PG as a substrate were as follows: Km, 0.910 ± 0.007 mM; Vmax, 0.514 ± 0.038 μMmin-1; and Kcat = 0.099 ± 0.007 (S-1). Additionally, the viability of M. smegmatis in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein was 109-fold higher than that of wild-type M. smegmatis after lysozyme treatment. Additionally, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein, M. smegmatis kept its regular shape, with an undamaged cell wall and smooth surface. These results indicate that Rv1096 caused deacetylation of cell wall PG, leading to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Conclusion We have determined that M. tuberculosis Rv1096 is a PG deacetylase. The PG deacetylase activity of Rv1096 contributed to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Our findings suggest that deacetylation of cell wall PG may be involved in evasion of host immune defenses by M. tuberculosis. PMID:24975018

  18. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  19. Fatty acid transport and activation and the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Angel; Fraisl, Peter; Arias-Barrau, Elsa; Dirusso, Concetta C; Singer, Diane; Sealls, Whitney; Black, Paul N

    2008-09-15

    These studies defined the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid transport, activation and trafficking using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and established the kinetic constants of fatty acid transport in an effort to define whether vectorial acylation represents a common mechanism in different cell types (3T3-L1 fibroblasts and adipocytes, Caco-2 and HepG2 cells and three endothelial cell lines (b-END3, HAEC, and HMEC)). As expected, fatty acid transport protein (FATP)1 and long-chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl)1 were the predominant isoforms expressed in adipocytes consistent with their roles in the transport and activation of exogenous fatty acids destined for storage in the form of triglycerides. In cells involved in fatty acid processing including Caco-2 (intestinal-like) and HepG2 (liver-like), FATP2 was the predominant isoform. The patterns of Acsl expression were distinct between these two cell types with Acsl3 and Acsl5 being predominant in Caco-2 cells and Acsl4 in HepG2 cells. In the endothelial lines, FATP1 and FATP4 were the most highly expressed isoforms; the expression patterns for the different Acsl isoforms were highly variable between the different endothelial cell lines. The transport of the fluorescent long-chain fatty acid C(1)-BODIPY-C(12) in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 adipocytes followed typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics; the apparent efficiency (k(cat)/K(T)) of this process increases over 2-fold (2.1 x 10(6)-4.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)) upon adipocyte differentiation. The V(max) values for fatty acid transport in Caco-2 and HepG2 cells were essentially the same, yet the efficiency was 55% higher in Caco-2 cells (2.3 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1) versus 1.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)). The kinetic parameters for fatty acid transport in three endothelial cell types demonstrated they were the least efficient cell types for this process giving V(max) values that were nearly 4-fold lower than those defined form 3T3-L1 adipocytes, Caco-2 cells and HepG2 cells. The

  20. Distinct promoter activation mechanisms modulate noise-driven HIV gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Arvind K.; Wong, Victor C.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections occur when the virus occupies a transcriptionally silent but reversible state, presenting a major obstacle to cure. There is experimental evidence that random fluctuations in gene expression, when coupled to the strong positive feedback encoded by the HIV genetic circuit, act as a ‘molecular switch’ controlling cell fate, i.e., viral replication versus latency. Here, we implemented a stochastic computational modeling approach to explore how different promoter activation mechanisms in the presence of positive feedback would affect noise-driven activation from latency. We modeled the HIV promoter as existing in one, two, or three states that are representative of increasingly complex mechanisms of promoter repression underlying latency. We demonstrate that two-state and three-state models are associated with greater variability in noisy activation behaviors, and we find that Fano factor (defined as variance over mean) proves to be a useful noise metric to compare variability across model structures and parameter values. Finally, we show how three-state promoter models can be used to qualitatively describe complex reactivation phenotypes in response to therapeutic perturbations that we observe experimentally. Ultimately, our analysis suggests that multi-state models more accurately reflect observed heterogeneous reactivation and may be better suited to evaluate how noise affects viral clearance. PMID:26666681

  1. Distinct promoter activation mechanisms modulate noise-driven HIV gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Arvind K; Wong, Victor C; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections occur when the virus occupies a transcriptionally silent but reversible state, presenting a major obstacle to cure. There is experimental evidence that random fluctuations in gene expression, when coupled to the strong positive feedback encoded by the HIV genetic circuit, act as a 'molecular switch' controlling cell fate, i.e., viral replication versus latency. Here, we implemented a stochastic computational modeling approach to explore how different promoter activation mechanisms in the presence of positive feedback would affect noise-driven activation from latency. We modeled the HIV promoter as existing in one, two, or three states that are representative of increasingly complex mechanisms of promoter repression underlying latency. We demonstrate that two-state and three-state models are associated with greater variability in noisy activation behaviors, and we find that Fano factor (defined as variance over mean) proves to be a useful noise metric to compare variability across model structures and parameter values. Finally, we show how three-state promoter models can be used to qualitatively describe complex reactivation phenotypes in response to therapeutic perturbations that we observe experimentally. Ultimately, our analysis suggests that multi-state models more accurately reflect observed heterogeneous reactivation and may be better suited to evaluate how noise affects viral clearance. PMID:26666681

  2. Distinct promoter activation mechanisms modulate noise-driven HIV gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavali, Arvind K.; Wong, Victor C.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-12-01

    Latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections occur when the virus occupies a transcriptionally silent but reversible state, presenting a major obstacle to cure. There is experimental evidence that random fluctuations in gene expression, when coupled to the strong positive feedback encoded by the HIV genetic circuit, act as a ‘molecular switch’ controlling cell fate, i.e., viral replication versus latency. Here, we implemented a stochastic computational modeling approach to explore how different promoter activation mechanisms in the presence of positive feedback would affect noise-driven activation from latency. We modeled the HIV promoter as existing in one, two, or three states that are representative of increasingly complex mechanisms of promoter repression underlying latency. We demonstrate that two-state and three-state models are associated with greater variability in noisy activation behaviors, and we find that Fano factor (defined as variance over mean) proves to be a useful noise metric to compare variability across model structures and parameter values. Finally, we show how three-state promoter models can be used to qualitatively describe complex reactivation phenotypes in response to therapeutic perturbations that we observe experimentally. Ultimately, our analysis suggests that multi-state models more accurately reflect observed heterogeneous reactivation and may be better suited to evaluate how noise affects viral clearance.

  3. Solar simulated irradiation modulates gene expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes in cultured human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Leccia, M T; Yaar, M; Allen, N; Gleason, M; Gilchrest, B A

    2001-08-01

    Exposure of skin to solar irradiation generates reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, membranes, mitochondria and proteins. To protect against such damage, skin cells have evolved antioxidant enzymes including glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), copper and zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD1), the mitochondrial manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD2), and catalase. This report examines the effect of a single low or moderate dose exposure to solar-simulating combined UVB and UVA irradiation on the gene expression and activities of these antioxidant enzymes in cultured normal human fibroblasts. We find that both doses initially decrease GSH-Px, SOD2 and catalase activities, but within 5 days after irradiation the activities of the enzymes return to pre-irradiation level (catalase) or are induced slightly (SOD1, GSH-Px) or substantially (SOD2) above the basal level. For SOD1, SOD2 and catalase, the higher dose also detectably modulates the mRNA level of these enzymes. Our results indicate that the effects of a single physiologic solar simulated irradiation dose persist for at least several days and suggest that skin cells prepare for subsequent exposure to damaging irradiation by upregulating this antioxidant defense system, in particular the mitochondrial SOD2. Our findings are consistent with the existence of a broad-based SOS-like response in irradiated human skin. PMID:11493316

  4. Gene expression in human lupus: bone marrow differentiates active from inactive patients and displays apoptosis and granulopoiesis signatures

    PubMed Central

    Nakou, Magdalene; Knowlton, Nicholas; Frank, Mark B.; Bertsias, George; Osban, Jeanette; Sandel, Clayton E.; Papadaki, Eleni; Raptopoulou, Amalia; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Kritikos, Heraklis; Tassiulas, Ioannis; Centola, Michael; Boumpas, Dimitrios T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The cells of the immune system originate from the bone marrow (BM), where many of them also mature. To better understand the aberrant immune response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we examined the BM in lupus patients using DNA microarrays and compared it to the peripheral blood (PB). Patients and Methods Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) from 20 SLE patients (11 with active disease and 9 with inactive disease) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 27 patients (16 active/ 11 inactive); BMMCs and PBMCs from 7 healthy individuals and 3 osteoarthritis patients served as controls. Samples were analyzed on genome-scale microarrays with 21,329 genes represented. Results We found 102 differentially expressed genes between patients’ and controls’ BMMCs (unpaired student t-test), involved in various biologic processes; 53 of them are involved in major networks including cell death, growth, signaling and proliferation. Comparative analysis between BM and PB of patients identified 88 genes differentially expressed; 61 out of 88 participate in cell growth and differentiation, cellular movement and morphology, immune response and other hematopoietic cell functions. Unsupervised clustering of highly expressed genes revealed two major SLE patient clusters (active and inactive) in BM, but not in PB. The upregulated genes in the bone marrow of active patients included genes involved in cell death and granulopoiesis. Conclusion Microarray analysis of the bone marrow differentiates active from inactive lupus patients and provides further evidence for the role of apoptosis and granulocytes in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:18975309

  5. [Intrinsic prokaryotic promoter activity of SUMO gene and its applications in the protein expression system of Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Qi, Yanhong; Zou, Zhurong; Zou, Huaying; Fan, Yunliu; Zhang, Chunyi

    2011-06-01

    Nowadays, SUMO fusion system is important for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli, yet a few aspects remain to be improved, including the efficacy for vector construction and protein solubility. In this study, we found the SUMO gene Smt3 (Sm) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae conferred an unexpected activity of constitutive prokaryotic promoter during its PCR cloning, and the gene coding regions of SUMOs in most species had a sigma70-dependent prokaryotic promoter embedded, through the prediction via the BPROM program developed by Softberry. By combining the characters of Sm promoter activity and the Stu I site (added at the 3'-terminal of Sm), and introducing a His-tag and a hyper-acidic solubility-enhancing tag, we further constructed a set of versatile vectors for gene cloning and expression on the basis of Sm'-LacZa fusion gene. Experimentally started from these vectors, several target genes were subcloned and expressed through blue-white screening and SDS-PAGE analysis. The results manifest a few of expectable advantages such as rapid vector construction, highly soluble protein expression and feasible co-expression of correlated proteins. Conclusively, our optimized SUMO fusion technology herein could confer a large potential in E. coli protein expression system, and the simultaneously established co-expression vector systems could also be very useful in studying the protein-protein interactions in vivo. PMID:22034825

  6. Six homeoproteins directly activate Myod expression in the gene regulatory networks that control early myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Relaix, Frédéric; Demignon, Josiane; Laclef, Christine; Pujol, Julien; Santolini, Marc; Niro, Claire; Lagha, Mounia; Rocancourt, Didier; Buckingham, Margaret; Maire, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    In mammals, several genetic pathways have been characterized that govern engagement of multipotent embryonic progenitors into the myogenic program through the control of the key myogenic regulatory gene Myod. Here we demonstrate the involvement of Six homeoproteins. We first targeted into a Pax3 allele a sequence encoding a negative form of Six4 that binds DNA but cannot interact with essential Eya co-factors. The resulting embryos present hypoplasic skeletal muscles and impaired Myod activation in the trunk in the absence of Myf5/Mrf4. At the axial level, we further show that Myod is still expressed in compound Six1/Six4:Pax3 but not in Six1/Six4:Myf5 triple mutant embryos, demonstrating that Six1/4 participates in the Pax3-Myod genetic pathway. Myod expression and head myogenesis is preserved in Six1/Six4:Myf5 triple mutant embryos, illustrating that upstream regulators of Myod in different embryonic territories are distinct. We show that Myod regulatory regions are directly controlled by Six proteins and that, in the absence of Six1 and Six4, Six2 can compensate. PMID:23637613

  7. Developmental Deltamethrin Exposure Causes Persistent Changes in Dopaminergic Gene Expression, Neurochemistry, and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Tiffany S.; Richardson, Jason R.; Cooper, Keith R.; White, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used insecticides that are considered to pose little risk to human health. However, there is an increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. We used the zebrafish model to test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to low doses of the pyrethroid deltamethrin results in persistent alterations in dopaminergic gene expression, neurochemistry, and locomotor activity. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25–0.50 μg/l), at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the embryonic period [3–72 h postfertilization (hpf)], after which transferred to fresh water until the larval stage (2-weeks postfertilization). Deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased transcript levels of the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor (drd1) and increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase at 72 hpf. The reduction in drd1 transcripts persisted to the larval stage and was associated with decreased D2 dopamine receptor transcripts. Larval fish, exposed developmentally to deltamethrin, had increased levels of homovanillic acid, a DA metabolite. Since the DA system is involved in locomotor activity, we measured the swim activity of larval fish following a transition to darkness. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin significantly increased larval swim activity which was attenuated by concomitant knockdown of the DA transporter. Acute exposure to methylphenidate, a DA transporter inhibitor, increased swim activity in control larva, while reducing swim activity in larva developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin causes locomotor deficits in larval zebrafish, which is likely mediated by dopaminergic dysfunction. This highlights the need to understand the persistent effects of low-dose neurotoxicant exposure during development. PMID:25912032

  8. Developmental Deltamethrin Exposure Causes Persistent Changes in Dopaminergic Gene Expression, Neurochemistry, and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kung, Tiffany S; Richardson, Jason R; Cooper, Keith R; White, Lori A

    2015-08-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used insecticides that are considered to pose little risk to human health. However, there is an increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. We used the zebrafish model to test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to low doses of the pyrethroid deltamethrin results in persistent alterations in dopaminergic gene expression, neurochemistry, and locomotor activity. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25-0.50 μg/l), at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the embryonic period [3-72 h postfertilization (hpf)], after which transferred to fresh water until the larval stage (2-weeks postfertilization). Deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased transcript levels of the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor (drd1) and increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase at 72 hpf. The reduction in drd1 transcripts persisted to the larval stage and was associated with decreased D2 dopamine receptor transcripts. Larval fish, exposed developmentally to deltamethrin, had increased levels of homovanillic acid, a DA metabolite. Since the DA system is involved in locomotor activity, we measured the swim activity of larval fish following a transition to darkness. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin significantly increased larval swim activity which was attenuated by concomitant knockdown of the DA transporter. Acute exposure to methylphenidate, a DA transporter inhibitor, increased swim activity in control larva, while reducing swim activity in larva developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin causes locomotor deficits in larval zebrafish, which is likely mediated by dopaminergic dysfunction. This highlights the need to understand the persistent effects of low-dose neurotoxicant exposure during development. PMID:25912032

  9. YANA – a software tool for analyzing flux modes, gene-expression and enzyme activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland; Musch, Patrick; von Kamp, Axel; Engels, Bernd; Schirmer, Heiner; Schuster, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background A number of algorithms for steady state analysis of metabolic networks have been developed over the years. Of these, Elementary Mode Analysis (EMA) has proven especially useful. Despite its low user-friendliness, METATOOL as a reliable high-performance implementation of the algorithm has been the instrument of choice up to now. As reported here, the analysis of metabolic networks has been improved by an editor and analyzer of metabolic flux modes. Analysis routines for expression levels and the most central, well connected metabolites and their metabolic connections are of particular interest. Results YANA features a platform-independent, dedicated toolbox for metabolic networks with a graphical user interface to calculate (integrating METATOOL), edit (including support for the SBML format), visualize, centralize, and compare elementary flux modes. Further, YANA calculates expected flux distributions for a given Elementary Mode (EM) activity pattern and vice versa. Moreover, a dissection algorithm, a centralization algorithm, and an average diameter routine can be used to simplify and analyze complex networks. Proteomics or gene expression data give a rough indication of some individual enzyme activities, whereas the complete flux distribution in the network is often not known. As such data are noisy, YANA features a fast evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the prediction of EM activities with minimum error, including alerts for inconsistent experimental data. We offer the possibility to include further known constraints (e.g. growth constraints) in the EA calculation process. The redox metabolism around glutathione reductase serves as an illustration example. All software and documentation are available for download at . Conclusion A graphical toolbox and an editor for METATOOL as well as a series of additional routines for metabolic network analyses constitute a new user-friendly software for such efforts. PMID:15929789

  10. Divergent pathways of gene expression are activated by the RAGE ligands S100b and AGE-BSA.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Jessica V; Mone, Manisha; Zhang, Jin; Weetall, Marla; Buxton, Frank P; Hughes, Thomas E

    2004-03-01

    Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) reportedly triggers a variety of proinflammatory responses. However, our previous work revealed that RAGE-binding AGEs free of endotoxin were incapable of inducing vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression. Thus, the objective of this study was to clarify the role of AGEs in cell activation through gene expression profiling using both in vitro and in vivo model systems. Endothelial cells treated with AGE-BSA, previously shown to bind RAGE with high affinity, did not show gene expression changes indicative of an inflammatory response. In contrast, the alternate RAGE ligand, S100b, triggered an increase in endothelial mRNA expression of a variety of immune-related genes. The effects of AGEs were studied in vivo using healthy mice exposed to two different treatment conditions: 1) intravenous injection of a single dose of model AGEs or 2) four intraperitoneal injections of model AGEs (once per day). In both cases, the liver was extracted for gene expression profiling. Both of the short-term AGE treatments resulted in a moderate increase in liver mRNA levels for genes involved in macrophage-based clearance/detoxification of foreign agents. Our findings using AGEs with strong RAGE-binding properties indicate that AGEs may not uniformly play a role in cellular activation. PMID:14988260

  11. GENE EXPRESSION NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Gene expression network" is the term used to describe the interplay, simple or complex, between two or more gene products in performing a specific cellular function. Although the delineation of such networks is complicated by the existence of multiple and subtle types of intera...

  12. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lianzhe; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Xupo; Zeng, Changying; Wei, Yunxie; Zhao, Hongliang; Peng, Ming; Hu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play central roles in plant developmental processes, hormone signaling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. However, no data are currently available about the MAPK family in cassava, an important tropical crop. Herein, 21 MeMAPK genes were identified from cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MeMAPKs could be classified into four subfamilies. Gene structure analysis demonstrated that the number of introns in MeMAPK genes ranged from 1 to 10, suggesting large variation among cassava MAPK genes. Conserved motif analysis indicated that all MeMAPKs had typical protein kinase domains. Transcriptomic analysis suggested that MeMAPK genes showed differential expression patterns in distinct tissues and in response to drought stress between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression analyses revealed that crucial pathways controlled by MeMAPK networks may be involved in the differential response to drought stress in different accessions of cassava. Expression of nine selected MAPK genes showed that these genes could comprehensively respond to osmotic, salt, cold, oxidative stressors, and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. These findings yield new insights into the transcriptional control of MAPK gene expression, provide an improved understanding of abiotic stress responses and signaling transduction in cassava, and lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of cassava cultivars. PMID:27625666

  13. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family in Cassava.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lianzhe; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Xupo; Zeng, Changying; Wei, Yunxie; Zhao, Hongliang; Peng, Ming; Hu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play central roles in plant developmental processes, hormone signaling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. However, no data are currently available about the MAPK family in cassava, an important tropical crop. Herein, 21 MeMAPK genes were identified from cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MeMAPKs could be classified into four subfamilies. Gene structure analysis demonstrated that the number of introns in MeMAPK genes ranged from 1 to 10, suggesting large variation among cassava MAPK genes. Conserved motif analysis indicated that all MeMAPKs had typical protein kinase domains. Transcriptomic analysis suggested that MeMAPK genes showed differential expression patterns in distinct tissues and in response to drought stress between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression analyses revealed that crucial pathways controlled by MeMAPK networks may be involved in the differential response to drought stress in different accessions of cassava. Expression of nine selected MAPK genes showed that these genes could comprehensively respond to osmotic, salt, cold, oxidative stressors, and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. These findings yield new insights into the transcriptional control of MAPK gene expression, provide an improved understanding of abiotic stress responses and signaling transduction in cassava, and lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of cassava cultivars. PMID:27625666

  14. Neuronal expression and regulation of CGRP promoter activity following viral gene transfer into cultured trigeminal ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Durham, Paul L; Dong, Penny X; Belasco, Kevin T; Kasperski, Jeffrey; Gierasch, William W; Edvinsson, Lars; Heistad, Donald D; Faraci, Frank M; Russo, Andrew F

    2004-01-30

    We have examined the regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) promoter activity in primary cultures of rat trigeminal ganglia neurons. A viral vector was used to circumvent the potential complication of examining only a small subpopulation of cells in the heterogeneous cultures. Infection with high titers of recombinant adenovirus containing 1.25 kb of the rat CGRP promoter linked to the beta-galactosidase reporter gene (AdCGRP-lacZ) yielded expression in about 50% of the CGRP-expressing neurons. The CGRP-lacZ reporter gene was preferentially expressed in neurons, with 91% co-expression with endogenous CGRP. In contrast, an adenoviral vector containing a CMV-lacZ reporter was predominantly expressed in non-neuronal cells, with only 29% co-expression with CGRP. We then asked whether the CGRP promoter in the viral vector could be regulated by serotonin receptor type 1 (5-HT(1)) agonists. Promoter activity was decreased two- to threefold by treatment with five 5-HT(1B/D) agonists, including the triptan drugs sumatriptan, eletriptan, and rizatriptan that are used for migraine treatment. As controls, CMV promoter activity was not affected, and 5-HT(1B/D) receptor antagonists blocked the repression caused by sumatriptan and eletriptan. Thus, adenoviral gene transfer can be used in trigeminal ganglia neurons for studying the mechanisms of triptan drug action on CGRP synthesis. PMID:14715155

  15. Enzyme activity and gene expression profiles of Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 during aerobic biodegradation of 1,2-dichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Pillay, Balakrishna; Olaniran, Ademola O

    2015-08-01

    Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 has been widely studied because of its ability to degrade halogenated compounds, especially 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), which is achieved through chromosomal as well as plasmid pAUX1 encoded 1,2-DCA degrading genes. This work described the gene expression and enzyme activity profiles as well as the intermediates formed during the 1,2-DCA degradation by this organism. A correlation between gene expression, enzyme activity and metabolic intermediates, after the induction of GJ10 grown culture with 1,2-DCA, was established at different time intervals. Haloalkane dehalogenase (dhlA) and haloacid dehalogenase (dhlB) were constitutively expressed while the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (max) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ald) was found to be inducible. The DhlA and DhlB activities were relatively higher compared to that of the inducible enzymes, Max and Ald. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to correlate gene expression profiles with enzyme activity and metabolite formation during 1,2-DCA degradation process in GJ10. Findings from this study may assist in fully understanding the mechanism of 1,2-DCA degradation by GJ10. It could also assist in the design and implementation of appropriate bioaugmentation strategies for complete removal of 1,2-DCA from contaminated environment. PMID:25957483

  16. Bortezomib and Arsenic Trioxide Activity on a Myelodysplastic Cell Line (P39): A Gene Expression Study

    PubMed Central

    Savlı, Hakan; Galimberti, Sara; Sünnetçi, Deniz; Canestraro, Martina; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Nagy, Balint; Raimondo, Francesco Di; Petrini, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to understand the molecular pathways affected by bortezomib and arsenic trioxide treatment on myelomonocytoid cell line P39. Materials and Methods: Oligonucleotide microarray platforms were used for gene expression and pathway analysis. Confirmation studies were performed using quantitative real time PCR. Results: Bortezomib treatment has shown upregulated DIABLO and NF-κBIB (a NF-κB inhibitor) and downregulated NF-κB1, NF-κB2, and BIRC1 gene expressions. Combination treatment of the two compounds showed gene expression deregulations in concordance by the results of single bortezomib treatment. Especially, P53 was a pathway more significantly modified and a gene network centralized around the beta estradiol gene. Beta estradiol, BRCA2, and FOXA1 genes were remarkable deregulations in our findings. Conclusion: Results support the suggestions about possible use of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). NF-κB was observed as an important modulator in leukemic transformation of MDS. PMID:25913414

  17. Regulated expression of the human cytomegalovirus pp65 gene: Octamer sequence in the promoter is required for activation by viral gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Depto, A.S.; Stenberg, R.M.

    1989-03-01

    To better understand the regulation of late gene expression in human cytomegalovirus (CMV)-infected cells, the authors examined expression of the gene that codes for the 65-kilodalton lower-matrix phosphoprotein (pp65). Analysis of RNA isolated at 72 h from cells infected with CMV Towne or ts66, a DNA-negative temperature-sensitive mutant, supported the fact that pp65 is expressed at low levels prior to viral DNA replication but maximally expressed after the initiation of viral DNA replication. To investigate promoter activation in a transient expression assay, the pp65 promoter was cloned into the indicator plasmid containing the gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Transfection of the promoter-CAT construct and subsequent superinfection with CMV resulted in activation of the promoter at early times after infection. Cotransfection with plasmids capable of expressing immediate-early (IE) proteins demonstrated that the promoter was activated by IE proteins and that both IE regions 1 and 2 were necessary. These studies suggest that interactions between IE proteins and this octamer sequence may be important for the regulation and expression of this CMV gene.

  18. Two antagonistic clock-regulated histidine kinases time the activation of circadian gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Gutu, Andrian; O’Shea, Erin K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The cyanobacterial circadian pacemaker consists of a three-protein clock – KaiA, KaiB and KaiC – that generates oscillations in the phosphorylation state of KaiC. Here we investigate how temporal information encoded in KaiC phosphorylation is transduced to RpaA, a transcription factor required for circadian gene expression. We show that phosphorylation of RpaA is regulated by two antagonistic histidine kinases, SasA and CikA, which are sequentially activated at distinct times by the Kai clock complex. SasA acts as a kinase toward RpaA, whereas CikA, previously implicated in clock input, acts as a phosphatase that dephosphorylates RpaA. CikA and SasA cooperate to generate an oscillation of RpaA activity that is distinct from that generated by either enzyme alone and offset from the rhythm of KaiC phosphorylation. Our observations reveal how circadian clocks can precisely control the timing of output pathways via the concerted action of two oppositely acting enzymes. PMID:23541768

  19. Modulatory effect of iron chelators on adenosine deaminase activity and gene expression in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Primon-Barros, Muriel; Rigo, Graziela Vargas; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; dos Santos, Odelta; Smiderle, Lisiane; Almeida, Silvana; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan that parasitises the urogenital human tract and causes trichomoniasis. During the infection, the acquisition of nutrients, such as iron and purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, is essential for the survival of the parasite. The enzymes for purinergic signalling, including adenosine deaminase (ADA), which degrades adenosine to inosine, have been characterised in T. vaginalis. In the evaluation of the ADA profile in different T. vaginalis isolates treated with different iron sources or with limited iron availability, a decrease in activity and an increase in ADA gene expression after iron limitation by 2,2-bipyridyl and ferrozine chelators were observed. This supported the hypothesis that iron can modulate the activity of the enzymes involved in purinergic signalling. Under bovine serum limitation conditions, no significant differences were observed. The results obtained in this study allow for the assessment of important aspects of ADA and contribute to a better understanding of the purinergic system in T. vaginalis and the role of iron in establishing infection and parasite survival. PMID:26517498

  20. Properties of a novel gene isolated from a Hodgkin's disease cell line that is expressed early during lymphoid cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.S.; Tredway, T.L.; Dizikes, G.J.; Nawrocki, J.F. Hines Veterans Administration Hospital, IL )

    1994-03-01

    The authors have isolated a novel 667-bp cDNA clone, designated epag, from a Hodgkin's-disease cell line-derived library that is expressed in association with T cell activation and which is not related to any known gene family. By using reverse transcription/PCR, the authors have demonstrated that epag mRNA is expressed as early as 1 h after stimulation of normal PBMCs with anti-CD3. The levels of mRNA peaked by 4 h, and no expression was detectable by 12 h postactivation or in resting cells incubated in culture without activation. Expression of epag was also detected in PMA- and PHA-stimulated, but not in nonstimulated Jurkat cells, and overall its expression in transformed cell lines of hemopoietic origin is highly restricted. Sequence analysis of multiple independent cDNA clones showed that epag expressed in the Hodgkin's-disease cell line L428 is identical to the gene expressed in normal activated PBMC. Epag expression was detected by reverse transcription/PCR in RNA preparations made from various normal nonlymphoid tissues. Computer analysis of the sequence identified an open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 13.2 kDa initiating at a CUG translational codon. In vitro translation and Western blot analysis with anti-peptide serum supported this analysis. The authors hypothesize that epag functions as an early signal that helps mediate the activation of T cells. 63 refs., 11 figs.

  1. The Zinc Finger Transcription Factor ZXDC Activates CCL2 Gene Expression by Opposing BCL6-mediated Repression

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Jon E.; Fontes, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    The zinc finger X-linked duplicated (ZXD) family of transcription factors has been implicated in regulating transcription of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in antigen presenting cells; roles beyond this function are not yet known. The expression of one gene in this family, ZXD family zinc finger C (ZXDC), is enriched in myeloid lineages and therefore we hypothesized that ZXDC may regulate myeloid-specific gene expression. Here we demonstrate that ZXDC regulates genes involved in myeloid cell differentiation and inflammation. Overexpression of the larger isoform of ZXDC, ZXDC1, activates expression of monocyte-specific markers of differentiation and synergizes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (which causes differentiation) in the human leukemic monoblast cell line U937. To identify additional gene targets of ZXDC1, we performed gene expression profiling which revealed multiple inflammatory gene clusters regulated by ZXDC1. Using a combination of approaches we show that ZXDC1 activates transcription of a gene within one of the regulated clusters, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2; monocyte chemoattractant protein 1; MCP1) via a previously defined distal regulatory element. Further, ZXDC1-dependent up-regulation of the gene involves eviction of the transcriptional repressor B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6 (BCL6), a factor known to be important in resolving inflammatory responses, from this region of the promoter. Collectively, our data show that ZXDC1 is a regulator in the process of myeloid function and that ZXDC1 is responsible for Ccl2 gene de-repression by BCL6. PMID:23954399

  2. Differential Expression of Hepatic Genes of the Greater Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) between the Summer Active and Winter Torpid States

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yanhong; Wu, Yonghua; Sun, Keping; Wang, Hui; Jiang, Tinglei; Shi, Limin; Wang, Lei; Lin, Aiqing; Yue, Xinke; Li, Chenji; Chen, Tingting; Feng, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Hibernation is one type of torpor, a hypometabolic state in heterothermic mammals, which can be used as an energy-conservation strategy in response to harsh environments, e.g. limited food resource. The liver, in particular, plays a crucial role in adaptive metabolic adjustment during hibernation. Studies on ground squirrels and bears reveal that many genes involved in metabolism are differentially expressed during hibernation. Especially, the genes involved in carbohydrate catabolism are down-regulated during hibernation, while genes responsible for lipid β-oxidation are up-regulated. However, there is little transcriptional evidence to suggest physiological changes to the liver during hibernation in the greater horseshoe bat, a representative heterothermic bat. In this study, we explored the transcriptional changes in the livers of active and torpid greater horseshoe bats using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. A total of 1358 genes were identified as differentially expressed during torpor. In the functional analyses, differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in metabolic depression, shifts in the fuel utilization, immune function and response to stresses. Our findings provide a comprehensive evidence of differential gene expression in the livers of greater horseshoe bats during active and torpid states and highlight potential evidence for physiological adaptations that occur in the liver during hibernation. PMID:26698122

  3. Composition and expression of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes in the straw-degrading mushroom Volvariella volvacea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingzhi; Gui, Fu; Xie, Baogui; Deng, Youjin; Sun, Xianyun; Lin, Mengying; Tao, Yongxin; Li, Shaojie

    2013-01-01

    Volvariella volvacea is one of a few commercial cultivated mushrooms mainly using straw as carbon source. In this study, the genome of V. volcacea was sequenced and assembled. A total of 285 genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) in V. volvacea were identified and annotated. Among 15 fungi with sequenced genomes, V. volvacea ranks seventh in the number of genes encoding CAZymes. In addition, the composition of glycoside hydrolases in V. volcacea is dramatically different from other basidiomycetes: it is particularly rich in members of the glycoside hydrolase families GH10 (hemicellulose degradation) and GH43 (hemicellulose and pectin degradation), and the lyase families PL1, PL3 and PL4 (pectin degradation) but lacks families GH5b, GH11, GH26, GH62, GH93, GH115, GH105, GH9, GH53, GH32, GH74 and CE12. Analysis of genome-wide gene expression profiles of 3 strains using 3'-tag digital gene expression (DGE) reveals that 239 CAZyme genes were expressed even in potato destrose broth medium. Our data also showed that the formation of a heterokaryotic strain could dramatically increase the expression of a number of genes which were poorly expressed in its parental homokaryotic strains. PMID:23554925

  4. Regulation of Proteome Maintenance Gene Expression by Activators of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) is activated by a large number of xenobiotic and hypolipidemic compounds called peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC). One agonist of PPARa (WY-14,643) regulates responses in the mouse liver to chemic...

  5. PPARδ Agonism Activates Fatty Acid Oxidation via PGC-1α but Does Not Increase Mitochondrial Gene Expression and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Sandra; Nguyen-Tran, Van; Baré, Olivia; Huang, Xueming; Spiegelman, Bruce; Wu, Zhidan

    2009-01-01

    PPARδ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ) is a regulator of lipid metabolism and has been shown to induce fatty acid oxidation (FAO). PPARδ transgenic and knock-out mice indicate an involvement of PPARδ in regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative capacity; however, the precise mechanisms by which PPARδ regulates these pathways in skeletal muscle remain unclear. In this study, we determined the effect of selective PPARδ agonism with the synthetic ligand, GW501516, on FAO and mitochondrial gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that activation of PPARδ by GW501516 led to a robust increase in mRNA levels of key lipid metabolism genes. Mitochondrial gene expression and function were not induced under the same conditions. Additionally, the activation of Pdk4 transcription by PPARδ was coactivated by PGC-1α. PGC-1α, but not PGC-1β, was essential for full activation of Cpt-1b and Pdk4 gene expression via PPARδ agonism. Furthermore, the induction of FAO by PPARδ agonism was completely abolished in the absence of both PGC-1α and PGC-1β. Conversely, PGC-1α-driven FAO was independent of PPARδ. Neither GW501516 treatment nor knockdown of PPARδ affects PGC-1α-induced mitochondrial gene expression in primary myotubes. These results demonstrate that pharmacological activation of PPARδ induces FAO via PGC-1α. However, PPARδ agonism does not induce mitochondrial gene expression and function. PGC-1α-induced FAO and mitochondrial biogenesis appear to be independent of PPARδ. PMID:19435887

  6. Analysis of HSC activity and compensatory Hox gene expression profile in Hoxb cluster mutant fetal liver cells.

    PubMed

    Bijl, Janet; Thompson, Alexander; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Krosl, Jana; Grier, David G; Lawrence, H Jeffrey; Sauvageau, Guy

    2006-07-01

    Overexpression of Hoxb4 in bone marrow cells promotes expansion of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) populations in vivo and in vitro, indicating that this homeoprotein can activate the genetic program that determines self-renewal. However, this function cannot be solely attributed to Hoxb4 because Hoxb4(-/-) mice are viable and have an apparently normal HSC number. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that Hoxb4(-/-) c-Kit+ fetal liver cells expressed moderately higher levels of several Hoxb cluster genes than control cells, raising the possibility that normal HSC activity in Hoxb4(-/-) mice is due to a compensatory up-regulation of other Hoxb genes. In this study, we investigated the competitive repopulation potential of HSCs lacking Hoxb4 alone, or in conjunction with 8 other Hoxb genes. Our results show that Hoxb4(-/-) and Hoxb1-b9 (-/-) fetal liver cells retain full competitive repopulation potential and the ability to regenerate all myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Quantitative Hox gene expression profiling in purified c-Kit+ Hoxb1-b9(-/-) fetal liver cells revealed an interaction between the Hoxa, b, and c clusters with variation in expression levels of Hoxa4,-a11, and -c4.Together, these studies show a complex network of genetic interactions between several Hox genes in primitive hematopoietic cells and demonstrate that HSCs lacking up to 30% of the active Hox genes remain fully competent. PMID:16339407

  7. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  8. Changes in hepatic gene expression associated with the hypocholesterolaemic activity of royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Kamakura, Masaki; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2006-12-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) has various pharmacological actions, including hypolipidaemic, hypocholesterolaemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects, in experimental animals but the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here, we investigated changes in the expression of lipid metabolism-associated genes in the liver of RJ-treated mice by means of a DNA microarray technique to obtain clues to the mechanism of the hypocholesterolaemic action of RJ. We compared the hepatic gene expression profiles in three groups of mice fed a diet containing 5% RJ, a diet containing 5% RJ stored at 40 degrees C for 7 days (40-7d RJ) or a control diet which provided the same total energy as the other diets. RJ decreased gene expression of squalene epoxidase (SQLE), which is a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREB)-1, which may be a transcriptional factor of SQLE. It increased gene expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), which is involved in cholesterol incorporation in liver. Thus, the hypocholesterolaemic action of RJ appears to be associated with a decrease of SQLE and an increase of LDLR in mice. PMID:17331334

  9. SATB1 Packages Densely Looped, Transcriptionally Active Chromatin for Coordinated Expression of Cytokine Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SATB1 (special AT-rich sequence binding protein 1) organizes cell type–specific nuclear architecture by anchoring specialized DNA sequences and recruiting chromatin remodeling factors to control gene transcription. We studied the role of SATB1 in regulating the coordinated expression of Il5, Il4 and...

  10. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Chingyuan; Tizioto, Polyana C; Huang, Huan; Lee, Mi O K; Payne, Harold R; Lawhon, Sara D; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Taylor, Jeremy F; Womack, James E

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease. PMID:27409794

  11. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Chingyuan; Tizioto, Polyana C.; Huang, Huan; Lee, Mi O. K.; Payne, Harold R.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Womack, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease. PMID:27409794

  12. Identification of activity-dependent gene expression profiles reveals specific subsets of genes induced by different routes of Ca(2+) entry in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guangxin; Pan, Liangbin; Xing, Wanli; Zhang, Liang; Huang, Lihua; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Jianping; Cheng, Jing; Zhou, Yuxiang

    2007-07-01

    Neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription is a key feature of long-lasting synaptic strengthening associated with learning and memory, as well as activity-dependent neuroprotection. To comprehensively determine the molecular alterations, we carried out genome-wide microarray analysis in cultured rat cortical neurons treated with specific pharmacological agents, a model with alterations in neuronal activity, which were monitored by multi-site electrophysiological recordings. Of the approximately 27,000 genes, the expression of 248 genes was strongly changed in response to enhanced activity. These genes encompass a large number of members of distinct families, including synaptic vesicle proteins, ion channels, signal transduction molecules, synaptic growth regulators, and others. Two subsets of these genes were further confirmed to be specifically induced by Ca(2+) influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). In addition, those genes dynamically regulated by the enhanced activity were also elucidated, as well as those candidate genes associated with synaptic plasticity and neuroprotection. Our findings therefore would help define the molecular mechanisms that occur in response to neuronal activity and identify specific clusters of genes that contribute to activity-dependent and Ca(2+)-inducible modulation of brain development and function. PMID:17443680

  13. Novel approaches to gene expression analysis of active polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, James N; Dozmorov, Igor; Jiang, Kaiyu; Frank, Mark Barton; Szodoray, Peter; Alex, Philip; Centola, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) has a complex, poorly characterized pathophysiology. Modeling of transcriptosome behavior in pathologic specimens using microarrays allows molecular dissection of complex autoimmune diseases. However, conventional analyses rely on identifying statistically significant differences in gene expression distributions between patients and controls. Since the principal aspects of disease pathophysiology vary significantly among patients, these analyses are biased. Genes with highly variable expression, those most likely to regulate and affect pathologic processes, are excluded from selection, as their distribution among healthy and affected individuals may overlap significantly. Here we describe a novel method for analyzing microarray data that assesses statistically significant changes in gene behavior at the population level. This method was applied to expression profiles of peripheral blood leukocytes from a group of children with polyarticular JRA and healthy control subjects. Results from this method are compared with those from a conventional analysis of differential gene expression and shown to identify discrete subsets of functionally related genes relevant to disease pathophysiology. These results reveal the complex action of the innate and adaptive immune responses in patients and specifically underscore the role of IFN-γ in disease pathophysiology. Discriminant function analysis of data from a cohort of patients treated with conventional therapy identified additional subsets of functionally related genes; the results may predict treatment outcomes. While data from only 9 patients and 12 healthy controls was used, this preliminary investigation of the inflammatory genomics of JRA illustrates the significant potential of utilizing complementary sets of bioinformatics tools to maximize the clinical relevance of microarray data from patients with autoimmune disease, even in small cohorts. PMID:14979934

  14. Kaempferol stimulates gene expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor through activation of Sp1 in cultured hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Ayasa; Miyata, Shingo; Iwase, Masamori; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2016-01-01

    A high level of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is considered a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Because the hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR) is essential for clearing plasma LDL cholesterol, activation of LDLR is a promising therapeutic target for patients with atherosclerotic disease. Here we demonstrated how the flavonoid kaempferol stimulated the gene expression and activity of LDLR in HepG2 cells. The kaempferol-mediated stimulation of LDLR gene expression was completely inhibited by knockdown of Sp1 gene expression. Treatment of HepG2 cells with kaempferol stimulated the recruitment of Sp1 to the promoter region of the LDLR gene, as well as the phosphorylation of Sp1 on Thr-453 and Thr-739. Moreover, these kaempferol-mediated processes were inhibited in the presence of U0126, an ERK pathway inhibitor. These results suggest that kaempferol may increase the activity of Sp1 through stimulation of Sp1 phosphorylation by ERK1/2 and subsequent induction of LDLR expression and activity. PMID:27109240

  15. A spectrum of CodY activities drives metabolic reorganization and virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Waters, Nicholas R; Samuels, David J; Behera, Ranjan K; Livny, Jonathan; Rhee, Kyu Y; Sadykov, Marat R; Brinsmade, Shaun R

    2016-08-01

    The global regulator CodY controls the expression of dozens of metabolism and virulence genes in the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus in response to the availability of isoleucine, leucine and valine (ILV), and GTP. Using RNA-Seq transcriptional profiling and partial activity variants, we reveal that S. aureus CodY activity grades metabolic and virulence gene expression as a function of ILV availability, mediating metabolic reorganization and controlling virulence factor production in vitro. Strains lacking CodY regulatory activity produce a PIA-dependent biofilm, but development is restricted under conditions that confer partial CodY activity. CodY regulates the expression of thermonuclease (nuc) via the Sae two-component system, revealing cascading virulence regulation and factor production as CodY activity is reduced. Proteins that mediate the host-pathogen interaction and subvert the immune response are shut off at intermediate levels of CodY activity, while genes coding for enzymes and proteins that extract nutrients from tissue, that kill host cells, and that synthesize amino acids are among the last genes to be derepressed. We conclude that S. aureus uses CodY to limit host damage to only the most severe starvation conditions, providing insight into one potential mechanism by which S. aureus transitions from a commensal bacterium to an invasive pathogen. PMID:27116338

  16. Astragaloside IV inhibits NF- κ B activation and inflammatory gene expression in LPS-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Jian; Frei, Balz

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active constituents purified from the Chinese medicinal herb Astragalus membranaceus, in LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses in mice in vivo and examined possible underlying mechanisms. Mice were assigned to four groups: vehicle-treated control animals; AS-IV-treated animals (10 mg/kg b.w. AS-IV daily i.p. injection for 6 days); LPS-treated animals; and AS-IV plus LPS-treated animals. We found that AS-IV treatment significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases in serum levels of MCP-1 and TNF by 82% and 49%, respectively. AS-IV also inhibited LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory gene expression in different organs. Lung mRNA levels of cellular adhesion molecules, MCP-1, TNFα, IL-6, and TLR4 were significantly attenuated, and lung neutrophil infiltration and activation were strongly inhibited, as reflected by decreased myeloperoxidase content, when the mice were pretreated with AS-IV. Similar results were observed in heart, aorta, kidney, and liver. Furthermore, AS-IV significantly suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in lung and heart. In conclusion, our data provide new in vivo evidence that AS-IV effectively inhibits LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses by modulating NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. Our results suggest that AS-IV may be useful for the prevention or treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25960613

  17. Cisplatin induces neuronal activation and increases central AMPA and NMDA receptor subunit gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Holland, Ruby A; Leonard, John J; Kensey, Nicholas A; Hannikainen, Paavali A; De Jonghe, Bart C

    2014-09-01

    Although rats and mice do not vomit, these species are widely studied as models of energy balance and sickness behavior. Previous work has shown that rats exhibit similar neuroanatomical activation of brain and visceral afferent pathways following cisplatin chemotherapy compared to vomiting species. However, the neural response to cisplatin in mice is understudied. Here, food intake, body weight, and central c-Fos immunofluorescence were analyzed in the hindbrains of male C57BL/6 mice following IP saline or cisplatin (5mg/kg, and 20mg/kg doses). As glutamate receptor signaling is classically linked to inhibitory feeding pathways in the rodent, gene expression of selected α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunits were assessed in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC), parabrachial nucleus (PBN), amygdala, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). Our results show dose-dependent reductions in food intake and body weight following cisplatin treatment, as well as increases in cisplatin-induced c-Fos in the PBN and throughout the DVC. Quantitative PCR analysis shows cisplatin-induced increases in NMDA receptor subunit expression, particularly NR2B, in the DVC, PBN, BNST, and amygdala. In addition, upregulation of AMPA receptor subunits (GluA1 and/or GluA2) were observed in all regions examined except the amygdala. Taken together, these results suggest similar neural pathways mediating cisplatin effects in mice compared to other well-studied species, which are likely mediated by central upregulation of AMPA and NMDA receptors. PMID:24582677

  18. Gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of microarrays and next-generation biotechnologies, the use of gene expression data has become ubiquitous in biological research. One potential drawback of these data is that they are very rich in features or genes though cost considerations allow for the use of only relatively small sample sizes. A useful way of getting at biologically meaningful interpretations of the environmental or toxicological condition of interest would be to make inferences at the level of a priori defined biochemical pathways or networks of interacting genes or proteins that are known to perform certain biological functions. This chapter describes approaches taken in the literature to make such inferences at the biochemical pathway level. In addition this chapter describes approaches to create hypotheses on genes playing important roles in response to a treatment, using organism level gene coexpression or protein-protein interaction networks. Also, approaches to reverse engineer gene networks or methods that seek to identify novel interactions between genes are described. Given the relatively small sample numbers typically available, these reverse engineering approaches are generally useful in inferring interactions only among a relatively small or an order 10 number of genes. Finally, given the vast amounts of publicly available gene expression data from different sources, this chapter summarizes the important sources of these data and characteristics of these sources or databases. In line with the overall aims of this book of providing practical knowledge to a researcher interested in analyzing gene expression data from a network perspective, the chapter provides convenient publicly accessible tools for performing analyses described, and in addition describe three motivating examples taken from the published literature that illustrate some of the relevant analyses. PMID:23086841

  19. Transcriptional activation by EBV nuclear antigen 1 is essential for the expression of EBV's transforming genes

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Markus; Pich, Dagmar; Ruiss, Romana; Wang, Jindong; Sugden, Bill; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    EBV is a paradigm for human tumor viruses because, although it infects most people benignly, it also can cause a variety of cancers. Both in vivo and in vitro, EBV infects B lymphocytes in G0, induces them to become blasts, and can maintain their proliferation in cell culture or in vivo as tumors. How EBV succeeds in these contrasting cellular environments in expressing its genes that control the host has not been explained. We have genetically dissected the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) gene that is required for replication of the viral genome, to elucidate its possible role in the transcription of viral genes. Strikingly, EBNA1 is essential to drive transcription of EBV's transforming genes after infection of primary B lymphocytes. PMID:16966603

  20. A gene in the chromosomal region 3p21 with greatly reduced expression in lung cancer is similar to the gene for ubiquitin-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Kok, K; Hofstra, R; Pilz, A; van den Berg, A; Terpstra, P; Buys, C H; Carritt, B

    1993-01-01

    The chromosomal region 3p21 is thought to be the site of a lung tumor suppressor gene. We recently cloned a gene from this region that has greatly reduced expression in almost all lung tumor cell lines examined, in spite of being widely expressed in a variety of other tumor and nontumor cell types. We report here the sequence of this gene and show that it has significant homology to the genes encoding the ubiquitin-activating enzymes of three species, including humans. This suggests it is a second, autosomal member of this gene family in humans and may play a role in the ubiquitin conjugation pathway, which is of central importance in all eukaryotes. PMID:8327486

  1. Active suppression of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Latron, F; Jotterand-Bellomo, M; Maffei, A; Scarpellino, L; Bernard, M; Strominger, J L; Accolla, R S

    1988-01-01

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II genes is acquired very early in B-cell ontogeny and is maintained up to the B-cell blast stage. Terminal differentiation in plasma cells is, however, accompanied by a loss of class II gene expression. In B cells this gene system is under the control of several loci encoding transacting factors with activator function, one of which, the aIr-1 gene product, operates across species barriers. In this report human class II gene expression is shown to be extinguished in somatic cell hybrids between the human class II-positive B-cell line Raji and the mouse class II-negative plasmacytoma cell line P3-U1. Since all murine chromosomes are retained in these hybrids and no preferential segregation of a specific human chromosome is observed, the results are compatible with the presence of suppressor factors of mouse origin, operating across species barriers and inhibiting class II gene expression. Suppression seems to act at the level of transcription or accumulation of class II-specific mRNA, since no human, and very few murine, class II transcripts are detectable in the hybrids. Images PMID:3127829

  2. Kisspeptin Activates Ankrd 26 Gene Expression in Migrating Embryonic GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Tomoko; Lim, Wei Ling; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin, a newly discovered neuropeptide, regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Kisspeptins are a large RF-amide family of peptides. The kisspeptin coded by KiSS-1 gene is a 145-amino acid protein that is cleaved to C-terminal peptide kisspeptin-10. G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) has been identified as a kisspeptin receptor, and it is expressed in GnRH neurons and in a variety of cancer cells. In this study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) labeled GnRH cells with migratory properties, which express GPR54, served as a model to study the effects of kisspeptin on cell migration. We monitored EGFP–GnRH neuronal migration in brain slide culture of embryonic day 14 transgenic rat by live cell imaging system and studied the effects of kisspeptin-10 (1 nM) treatment for 36 h on GnRH migration. Furthermore, to determine kisspeptin-induced molecular pathways related with apoptosis and cytoskeletal changes during neuronal migration, we studied the expression levels of candidate genes in laser-captured EGFP–GnRH neurons by real-time PCR. We found that there was no change in the expression level of genes related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. The expression of ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein (ankrd) 26 in EGFP–GnRH neurons was upregulated by the exposure to kisspeptin. These studies suggest that ankrd 26 gene plays an unidentified role in regulating neuronal movement mediated by kisspeptin–GPR54 signaling, which could be a potential pathway to suppress cell migration. PMID:26973595

  3. Kisspeptin Activates Ankrd 26 Gene Expression in Migrating Embryonic GnRH Neurons.

    PubMed

    Soga, Tomoko; Lim, Wei Ling; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin, a newly discovered neuropeptide, regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Kisspeptins are a large RF-amide family of peptides. The kisspeptin coded by KiSS-1 gene is a 145-amino acid protein that is cleaved to C-terminal peptide kisspeptin-10. G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) has been identified as a kisspeptin receptor, and it is expressed in GnRH neurons and in a variety of cancer cells. In this study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) labeled GnRH cells with migratory properties, which express GPR54, served as a model to study the effects of kisspeptin on cell migration. We monitored EGFP-GnRH neuronal migration in brain slide culture of embryonic day 14 transgenic rat by live cell imaging system and studied the effects of kisspeptin-10 (1 nM) treatment for 36 h on GnRH migration. Furthermore, to determine kisspeptin-induced molecular pathways related with apoptosis and cytoskeletal changes during neuronal migration, we studied the expression levels of candidate genes in laser-captured EGFP-GnRH neurons by real-time PCR. We found that there was no change in the expression level of genes related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. The expression of ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein (ankrd) 26 in EGFP-GnRH neurons was upregulated by the exposure to kisspeptin. These studies suggest that ankrd 26 gene plays an unidentified role in regulating neuronal movement mediated by kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling, which could be a potential pathway to suppress cell migration. PMID:26973595

  4. PAK1 and CtBP1 Regulate the Coupling of Neuronal Activity to Muscle Chromatin and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean-Luc; Ravel-Chapuis, Aymeric; Valente, Carmen; Corda, Daniela; Méjat, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine receptor (AChR) expression in innervated muscle is limited to the synaptic region. Neuron-induced electrical activity participates in this compartmentalization by promoting the repression of AChR expression in the extrasynaptic regions. Here, we show that the corepressor CtBP1 (C-terminal binding protein 1) is present on the myogenin promoter together with repressive histone marks. shRNA-mediated downregulation of CtBP1 expression is sufficient to derepress myogenin and AChR expression in innervated muscle. Upon denervation, CtBP1 is displaced from the myogenin promoter and relocates to the cytoplasm, while repressive histone marks are replaced by activating ones concomitantly to the activation of myogenin expression. We also observed that upon denervation the p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) expression is upregulated, suggesting that phosphorylation by PAK1 may be involved in the relocation of CtBP1. Indeed, preventing CtBP1 Ser158 phosphorylation induces CtBP1 accumulation in the nuclei and abrogates the activation of myogenin and AChR expression. Altogether, these findings reveal a molecular mechanism to account for the coordinated control of chromatin modifications and muscle gene expression by presynaptic neurons via a PAK1/CtBP1 pathway. PMID:26416879

  5. PAK1 and CtBP1 Regulate the Coupling of Neuronal Activity to Muscle Chromatin and Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jean-Luc; Moncollin, Vincent; Ravel-Chapuis, Aymeric; Valente, Carmen; Corda, Daniela; Méjat, Alexandre; Schaeffer, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    Acetylcholine receptor (AChR) expression in innervated muscle is limited to the synaptic region. Neuron-induced electrical activity participates in this compartmentalization by promoting the repression of AChR expression in the extrasynaptic regions. Here, we show that the corepressor CtBP1 (C-terminal binding protein 1) is present on the myogenin promoter together with repressive histone marks. shRNA-mediated downregulation of CtBP1 expression is sufficient to derepress myogenin and AChR expression in innervated muscle. Upon denervation, CtBP1 is displaced from the myogenin promoter and relocates to the cytoplasm, while repressive histone marks are replaced by activating ones concomitantly to the activation of myogenin expression. We also observed that upon denervation the p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) expression is upregulated, suggesting that phosphorylation by PAK1 may be involved in the relocation of CtBP1. Indeed, preventing CtBP1 Ser158 phosphorylation induces CtBP1 accumulation in the nuclei and abrogates the activation of myogenin and AChR expression. Altogether, these findings reveal a molecular mechanism to account for the coordinated control of chromatin modifications and muscle gene expression by presynaptic neurons via a PAK1/CtBP1 pathway. PMID:26416879

  6. Identification of Potential Anticancer Activities of Novel Ganoderma lucidum Extracts Using Gene Expression and Pathway Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chi H J; Bishop, Karen S; Xu, Yuanye; Han, Dug Yeo; Murray, Pamela M; Marlow, Gareth J; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (lingzhi) has been used for the general promotion of health in Asia for many centuries. The common method of consumption is to boil lingzhi in water and then drink the liquid. In this study, we examined the potential anticancer activities of G. lucidum submerged in two commonly consumed forms of alcohol in East Asia: malt whiskey and rice wine. The anticancer effect of G. lucidum, using whiskey and rice wine-based extraction methods, has not been previously reported. The growth inhibition of G. lucidum whiskey and rice wine extracts on the prostate cancer cell lines, PC3 and DU145, was determined. Using Affymetrix gene expression assays, several biologically active pathways associated with the anticancer activities of G. lucidum extracts were identified. Using gene expression analysis (real-time polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]) and protein analysis (Western blotting), we confirmed the expression of key genes and their associated proteins that were initially identified with Affymetrix gene expression analysis. PMID:27006591

  7. Identification of Potential Anticancer Activities of Novel Ganoderma lucidum Extracts Using Gene Expression and Pathway Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chi H.J.; Bishop, Karen S.; Xu, Yuanye; Han, Dug Yeo; Murray, Pamela M.; Marlow, Gareth J.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2016-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (lingzhi) has been used for the general promotion of health in Asia for many centuries. The common method of consumption is to boil lingzhi in water and then drink the liquid. In this study, we examined the potential anticancer activities of G. lucidum submerged in two commonly consumed forms of alcohol in East Asia: malt whiskey and rice wine. The anticancer effect of G. lucidum, using whiskey and rice wine-based extraction methods, has not been previously reported. The growth inhibition of G. lucidum whiskey and rice wine extracts on the prostate cancer cell lines, PC3 and DU145, was determined. Using Affymetrix gene expression assays, several biologically active pathways associated with the anticancer activities of G. lucidum extracts were identified. Using gene expression analysis (real-time polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]) and protein analysis (Western blotting), we confirmed the expression of key genes and their associated proteins that were initially identified with Affymetrix gene expression analysis. PMID:27006591

  8. Application of Gene Expression Trajectories Initiated from ErbB Receptor Activation Highlights the Dynamics of Divergent Promoter Usage

    PubMed Central

    Carbajo, Daniel; Magi, Shigeyuki; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Arner, Erik; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Daub, Carsten O.; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Mar, Jessica C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how cells use complex transcriptional programs to alter their fate in response to specific stimuli is an important question in biology. For the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line, we applied gene expression trajectory models to identify the genes involved in driving cell fate transitions. We modified trajectory models to account for the scenario where cells were exposed to different stimuli, in this case epidermal growth factor and heregulin, to arrive at different cell fates, i.e. proliferation and differentiation respectively. Using genome-wide CAGE time series data collected from the FANTOM5 consortium, we identified the sets of promoters that were involved in the transition of MCF-7 cells to their specific fates versus those with expression changes that were generic to both stimuli. Of the 1,552 promoters identified, 1,091 had stimulus-specific expression while 461 promoters had generic expression profiles over the time course surveyed. Many of these stimulus-specific promoters mapped to key regulators of the ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinases) signaling pathway such as FHL2 (four and a half LIM domains 2). We observed that in general, generic promoters peaked in their expression early on in the time course, while stimulus-specific promoters tended to show activation of their expression at a later stage. The genes that mapped to stimulus-specific promoters were enriched for pathways that control focal adhesion, p53 signaling and MAPK signaling while generic promoters were enriched for cell death, transcription and the cell cycle. We identified 162 genes that were controlled by an alternative promoter during the time course where a subset of 37 genes had separate promoters that were classified as stimulus-specific and generic. The results of our study highlighted the degree of complexity involved in regulating a cell fate transition where multiple promoters mapping to the same gene can demonstrate quite divergent expression profiles. PMID

  9. Oxidant and enzymatic antioxidant status (gene expression and activity) in the brain of chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpour, Hossein; Khalaji-Pirbalouty, Valiallah; Nasiri, Leila; Mohebbi, Abdonnaser; Bahadoran, Shahab

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate oxidant and antioxidant status of the brain (hindbrain, midbrain, and forebrain) in chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension, the measurements of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, antioxidant capacity, enzymatic activity, and gene expression (for catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutases) were done. There were high lipid peroxidation/protein oxidation and low antioxidant capacity in the hindbrain of cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens compared to control ( P < 0.05). In the hypertensive chickens, superoxide dismutase activity was decreased (forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain), while catalase activity was increased (forebrain and midbrain) ( P < 0.05). Glutathione peroxidase activity did not change. Relative gene expression of catalase and superoxide dismutases (1 and 2) was downregulated, while glutathione peroxidase was upregulated in the brain of the cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens. Probably, these situations in the oxidant and antioxidant status of the brain especially hindbrain may change its function at cardiovascular center and sympathetic nervous system to exacerbate pulmonary hypertension.

  10. Characterization of the highly active fragment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter for recombinant protein expression in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chaomin; Zheng, Liesheng; Zhu, Jihong; Chen, Liguo; Ma, Aimin

    2015-03-01

    Developing efficient native promoters is important for improving recombinant protein expression by fungal genetic engineering. The promoter region of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene in Pleurotus ostreatus (Pogpd) was isolated and optimized by upstream truncation. The activities of these promoters with different lengths were further confirmed by fluorescence, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. A truncated Pogpd-P2 fragment (795 bp) drove enhanced green fluorescence protein (egfp) gene expression in P. ostreatus much more efficiently than full-length Pogpd-P1. Further truncating Pogpd-P2 to 603, 403 and 231 bp reduced the eGFP expression significantly. However, the 403-bp fragment between -356 bp and the start codon was the minimal but sufficient promoter element for eGFP expression. Compact native promoters for genetic engineering of P. ostreatus were successfully developed and validated in this study. This will broaden the preexisting repertoire of fungal promoters for biotechnology application. PMID:25743073

  11. Angelica Sinensis Polysaccharides Stimulated UDP-Sugar Synthase Genes through Promoting Gene Expression of IGF-1 and IGF1R in Chondrocytes: Promoting Anti-Osteoarthritic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yinxian; Li, Jing; Tan, Yang; Qin, Jun; Xie, Xianfei; Wang, Linlong; Mei, Qibing; Wang, Hui; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joints disease characterized by progressive degeneration of articular cartilage due to the loss of cartilage matrix. Previously, we found, for the first time, that an acidic glycan from Angelica Sinensis Polysaccharides (APSs), namely the APS-3c, could protect rat cartilage from OA due to promoting glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis in chondrocytes. In the present work, we tried to further the understanding of ASP-3c’s anti-OA activity. Methodology/Principal Findings Human primary chondrocytes were treated with APS-3c or/and recombinant human interleukin 1β (IL-1β). It turned out that APS-3c promoted synthesis of UDP-xylose and GAG, as well as the gene expression of UDP-sugar synthases (USSs), insulin like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), and attenuated the degenerative phenotypes, suppressed biosynthesis of UDP-sugars and GAG, and inhibited the gene expression of USSs, IGF1 and IGF1R induced by IL-1β. Then, we induced a rat OA model with papain, and found that APS-3c also stimulated GAG synthesis and gene expression of USSs, IGF1 and IGF1R in vivo. Additionally, recombinant human IGF1 and IGF1R inhibitor NP-AEW541 were applied to figure out the correlation between stimulated gene expression of USSs, IGF1 and IGF1R induced by APS-3c. It tuned out that the promoted GAG synthesis and USSs gene expression induced by APS-3c was mediated by the stimulated IGF1 and IGF1R gene expression, but not through directly activation of IGF1R signaling pathway. Conclusions/Significances We demonstrated for the first time that APS-3c presented anti-OA activity through stimulating IGF-1 and IGF1R gene expression, but not directly activating the IGF1R signaling pathway, which consequently promoted UDP-sugars and GAG synthesis due to up-regulating gene expression of USSs. Our findings presented a better understanding of APS-3c’s anti-OA activity and suggested that APS-3c could potentially be a novel therapeutic agent

  12. Effect of heme and vacuole deficiency on FRE1 gene expression and ferrireductase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Amillet, J M; Galiazzo, F; Labbe-Bois, R

    1996-03-15

    We have examined the effects of heme or vacuole deficiency on the kinetics of induction of cell surface ferrireductase activity and expression of the FRE1 gene encoding a component of ferrireductase, in response to iron or copper deprivation in S. cerevisiae. Heme deficiency caused a small decrease in the basal expression of FRE1, but did not impair its induction by Fe or Cu limitation. Thus, the absence of ferrireductase activity and its non-inducibility in heme-less cells is not due to the absence of FRE1 expression. Vacuole deficiency led to constitutively high ferrireductase activity slightly induced by Cu limitation, and to high levels of FRE1 expression further inducible by Fe or Cu deprivation. Thus, the vacuole might be a component of the iron signalling pathway. PMID:8935653

  13. Cytotoxicity against human leukemic cell lines, and the activity on the expression of resistance genes of flavonoids from Platanus orientalis.

    PubMed

    Mitrocotsa, D; Bosch, S; Mitaku, S; Dimas, C; Skaltsounis, A L; Harvala, C; Briand, G; Roussakis, C

    1999-01-01

    The cytotoxic activity of three flavonoids, belonging to the kaempherol series, was evaluated against 15 human leukemic cell lines. Flavonoids bearing acyl substituants, 2 and 3, were found to be the most active compounds. A further compound, 1, was examined for its ability to modulate the expression of MDR-1 and GST-pi resistance genes and compounds 2 and 3 for their effect on the uptake of [3H]-thymidine as a marker of DNA synthesis. PMID:10470152

  14. Activation of tumor suppressor p53 gene expression by magnetic thymine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Thomas, James L; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Jan, Jeng-Shiung; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2016-02-01

    Chitosan is a natural biodegradable polysaccharide that has been used to enhance gene delivery, owing to the ease with which chitosan nanoparticles enter the nucleus of cells. To study the effects of nuclear delivery of telomeric gene sequences, which contain thymine, we formed magnetic thymine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles (TIPs) by the precipitation of chitosan, mixed with thymine and magnetic nanoparticles (to aid in separations). The mean size of the TIPS was 116 ± 18 nm; the dissociation constant for thymine was 21.8 mg mL(-1). We then treated human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) with TIPs nanoparticles bearing bound thymine or a bound telomeric DNA sequence. The expression of the tumor suppressor p53 gene increased when TIPs were applied and decreased when telomere-bound TIPs were applied. PMID:26693943

  15. Isorhamnetin protects against oxidative stress by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Han, Jae Yun; Kim, Mi Gwang; Wi, Ji Eun; Kim, Young Woo; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Sang Chan; Shin, Sang Mi; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-15

    Isorhamentin is a 3′-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. However, the effects of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation and on the expressions of its downstream genes in hepatocytes have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isorhamnetin has the ability to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II antioxidant enzyme expression, and to determine the protective role of isorhamnetin on oxidative injury in hepatocytes. In HepG2 cells, isorhamnetin increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and consistently, increased antioxidant response element (ARE) reporter gene activity and the protein levels of hemeoxygenase (HO-1) and of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which resulted in intracellular GSH level increases. The specific role of Nrf2 in isorhamnetin-induced Nrf2 target gene expression was verified using an ARE-deletion mutant plasmid and Nrf2-knockout MEF cells. Deletion of the ARE in the promoter region of the sestrin2 gene, which is recently identified as the Nrf2 target gene by us, abolished the ability of isorhamnetin to increase luciferase activity. In addition, Nrf2 deficiency completely blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to induce HO-1 and GCL. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment blocked t-BHP-induced ROS production and reversed GSH depletion by t-BHP and consequently, due to reduced ROS levels, decreased t-BHP-induced cell death. In addition isorhamnetin increased ERK1/2, PKCδ and AMPK phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that Nrf2 deficiency blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to protect cells from injury induced by t-BHP. Taken together, our results demonstrate that isorhamnetin is efficacious in protecting hepatocytes against oxidative stress by Nrf2 activation and in inducing the expressions of its downstream genes. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation. • Isorhamnetin increased Nrf2

  16. HoxBlinc RNA recruits Set1/MLL complexes to activate Hox gene expression patterns and mesoderm lineage development

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Nao; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2015-01-01

    Summary Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1+ mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulating hoxb gene pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated KD or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb gene expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1+ precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1+ precursors and differentiation of Flk1+ cells into hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26725110

  17. Profiling of Volatile Compounds and Associated Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity during Fruit Development in Two Cucumber Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuxia; Zhang, Ranran; Hao, Lining; Chen, Weifeng; Cheng, Siqiong

    2015-01-01

    Changes in volatile content, as well as associated gene expression and enzyme activity in developing cucumber fruits were investigated in two Cucumis sativus L. lines (No. 26 and No. 14) that differ significantly in fruit flavor. Total volatile, six-carbon (C6) aldehyde, linolenic and linoleic acid content were higher during the early stages, whereas the nine-carbon (C9) aldehyde content was higher during the latter stages in both lines. Expression of C. sativus hydroperoxide lyase (CsHPL) mirrored 13-hydroperoxide lyase (13-HPL) enzyme activity in variety No. 26, whereas CsHPL expression was correlated with 9-hydroperoxide lyase (9-HPL) enzyme activity in cultivar No. 14. 13-HPL activity decreased significantly, while LOX (lipoxygenase) and 9-HPL activity increased along with fruit ripening in both lines, which accounted for the higher C6 and C9 aldehyde content at 0-6 day post anthesis (dpa) and 9-12 dpa, respectively. Volatile compounds from fruits at five developmental stages were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA), and heatmaps of volatile content, gene expression and enzyme activity were constructed. PMID:25799542

  18. Nuclear Neighborhoods and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Bodnar, Megan S.; Spector, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic nucleus is a highly compartmentalized and dynamic environment. Chromosome territories are arranged non-randomly within the nucleus and numerous studies have indicated that a gene’s position in the nucleus can impact its transcriptional activity. Here, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the influence of specific nuclear neighborhoods on gene expression or repression. Nuclear neighborhoods associated with transcriptional repression include the inner nuclear membrane/nuclear lamina and peri-nucleolar chromatin, whereas neighborhoods surrounding the nuclear pore complex, PML nuclear bodies, and nuclear speckles seem to be transcriptionally permissive. While nuclear position appears to play an important role in gene expression, it is likely to be only one piece of a flexible puzzle that incorporates numerous parameters. We are still at a very early, yet exciting stage in our journey toward deciphering the mechanism(s) that govern the permissiveness of gene expression/repression within different nuclear neighborhoods. PMID:19339170

  19. A novel synthetic activator of Nurr1 induces dopaminergic gene expression and protects against 6-hydroxydopamine neurotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Sean L; Safe, Stephen; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2015-10-21

    Degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with decreased expression of the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 (NR4A2), which is critical for both homeostasis and development of dopamine (DA) neurons. The synthetic, phytochemical-based compound, 1,1-bis (3'-indolyl)-1-(p-chlorophenyl) methane (C-DIM12) activates Nurr1 in cancer cells and prevents loss of dopaminergic neurons in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of PD in mice. In the present study, we examined the capacity of C-DIM12 to induce expression of Nurr1-regulated genes in two dopaminergic neuronal cell lines (N2A, N27) and to protect against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxicity. C-DIM12 induced expression of Nurr1-regulated genes that was abolished by Nurr1 knockdown. C-DIM12 increased expression of transfected human Nurr1, induced Nurr1 protein expression in primary dopaminergic neurons and enhanced neuronal survival from exposure to 6-OHDA. These data indicate that C-DIM12 stimulates neuroprotective expression Nurr1-regulated genes in DA neurons. PMID:26383113

  20. Low Oxygen Tension Enhances Expression of Myogenic Genes When Human Myoblasts Are Activated from G0 Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sellathurai, Jeeva; Nielsen, Joachim; Hejbøl, Eva Kildall; Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Most cell culture studies have been performed at atmospheric oxygen tension of 21%, however the physiological oxygen tension is much lower and is a factor that may affect skeletal muscle myoblasts. In this study we have compared activation of G0 arrested myoblasts in 21% O2 and in 1% O2 in order to see how oxygen tension affects activation and proliferation of human myoblasts. Materials and Methods Human myoblasts were isolated from skeletal muscle tissue and G0 arrested in vitro followed by reactivation at 21% O2 and 1% O2. The effect was assesses by Real-time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and western blot. Results and Conclusions We found an increase in proliferation rate of myoblasts when activated at a low oxygen tension (1% O2) compared to 21% O2. In addition, the gene expression studies showed up regulation of the myogenesis related genes PAX3, PAX7, MYOD, MYOG (myogenin), MET, NCAM, DES (desmin), MEF2A, MEF2C and CDH15 (M-cadherin), however, the fraction of DES and MYOD positive cells was not increased by low oxygen tension, indicating that 1% O2 may not have a functional effect on the myogenic response. Furthermore, the expression of genes involved in the TGFβ, Notch and Wnt signaling pathways were also up regulated in low oxygen tension. The differences in gene expression were most pronounced at day one after activation from G0-arrest, thus the initial activation of myoblasts seemed most sensitive to changes in oxygen tension. Protein expression of HES1 and β-catenin indicated that notch signaling may be induced in 21% O2, while the canonical Wnt signaling may be induced in 1% O2 during activation and proliferation of myoblasts. PMID:27442119

  1. Spaceflight and simulated microgravity cause a significant reduction of key gene expression in early T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Emily M; Yoshida, Miya C; Candelario, Tara Lynne T; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2015-03-15

    Healthy immune function depends on precise regulation of lymphocyte activation. During the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Apollo and Shuttle eras, multiple spaceflight studies showed depressed lymphocyte activity under microgravity (μg) conditions. Scientists on the ground use two models of simulated μg (sμg): 1) the rotating wall vessel (RWV) and 2) the random positioning machine (RPM), to study the effects of altered gravity on cell function before advancing research to the true μg when spaceflight opportunities become available on the International Space Station (ISS). The objective of this study is to compare the effects of true μg and sμg on the expression of key early T-cell activation genes in mouse splenocytes from spaceflight and ground animals. For the first time, we compared all three conditions of microgravity spaceflight, RPM, and RWV during immune gene activation of Il2, Il2rα, Ifnγ, and Tagap; moreover, we confirm two new early T-cell activation genes, Iigp1 and Slamf1. Gene expression for all samples was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results demonstrate significantly increased gene expression in activated ground samples with suppression of mouse immune function in spaceflight, RPM, and RWV samples. These findings indicate that sμg models provide an excellent test bed for scientists to develop baseline studies and augment true μg in spaceflight experiments. Ultimately, sμg and spaceflight studies in lymphocytes may provide insight into novel regulatory pathways, benefiting both future astronauts and those here on earth suffering from immune disorders. PMID:25568077

  2. Spaceflight and simulated microgravity cause a significant reduction of key gene expression in early T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Emily M.; Yoshida, Miya C.; Candelario, Tara Lynne T.

    2015-01-01

    Healthy immune function depends on precise regulation of lymphocyte activation. During the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Apollo and Shuttle eras, multiple spaceflight studies showed depressed lymphocyte activity under microgravity (μg) conditions. Scientists on the ground use two models of simulated μg (sμg): 1) the rotating wall vessel (RWV) and 2) the random positioning machine (RPM), to study the effects of altered gravity on cell function before advancing research to the true μg when spaceflight opportunities become available on the International Space Station (ISS). The objective of this study is to compare the effects of true μg and sμg on the expression of key early T-cell activation genes in mouse splenocytes from spaceflight and ground animals. For the first time, we compared all three conditions of microgravity spaceflight, RPM, and RWV during immune gene activation of Il2, Il2rα, Ifnγ, and Tagap; moreover, we confirm two new early T-cell activation genes, Iigp1 and Slamf1. Gene expression for all samples was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results demonstrate significantly increased gene expression in activated ground samples with suppression of mouse immune function in spaceflight, RPM, and RWV samples. These findings indicate that sμg models provide an excellent test bed for scientists to develop baseline studies and augment true μg in spaceflight experiments. Ultimately, sμg and spaceflight studies in lymphocytes may provide insight into novel regulatory pathways, benefiting both future astronauts and those here on earth suffering from immune disorders. PMID:25568077

  3. The cloning and expression of a gene encoding haemolytic activity from the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Evenden, A J; Gilpin, M L; Munn, C B

    1990-09-01

    A gene encoding haemolytic activity from Renibacterium salmoninarum (strain PPD) was cloned into Escherichia coli using the cosmid vector pHC79, and subsequently subcloned on a 1.6 kbp SAlI fragment into pBR328. Southern blot hybridisation revealed that a homologous sequence is found in other strains of R. salmoninarum. PMID:2276613

  4. Venom of Parasitoid Pteromalus puparum Impairs Host Humoral Antimicrobial Activity by Decreasing Host Cecropin and Lysozyme Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qi; Wang, Bei-Bei; Ye, Xin-Hai; Wang, Fei; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Insect host/parasitoid interactions are co-evolved systems in which host defenses are balanced by parasitoid mechanisms to disable or hide from host immune effectors. Here, we report that Pteromalus puparum venom impairs the antimicrobial activity of its host Pieris rapae. Inhibition zone results showed that bead injection induced the antimicrobial activity of the host hemolymph but that venom inhibited it. The cDNAs encoding cecropin and lysozyme were screened. Relative quantitative PCR results indicated that all of the microorganisms and bead injections up-regulated the transcript levels of the two genes but that venom down-regulated them. At 8 h post bead challenge, there was a peak in the transcript level of the cecropin gene, whereas the peak of lysozyme gene occurred at 24 h. The transcripts levels of the two genes were higher in the granulocytes and fat body than in other tissues. RNA interference decreased the transcript levels of the two genes and the antimicrobial activity of the pupal hemolymph. Venom injections similarly silenced the expression of the two genes during the first 8 h post-treatment in time- and dose-dependent manners, after which the silence effects abated. Additionally, recombinant cecropin and lysozyme had no significant effect on the emergence rate of pupae that were parasitized by P. puparum females. These findings suggest one mechanism of impairing host antimicrobial activity by parasitoid venom. PMID:26907346

  5. Venom of Parasitoid Pteromalus puparum Impairs Host Humoral Antimicrobial Activity by Decreasing Host Cecropin and Lysozyme Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qi; Wang, Bei-Bei; Ye, Xin-Hai; Wang, Fei; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-02-01

    Insect host/parasitoid interactions are co-evolved systems in which host defenses are balanced by parasitoid mechanisms to disable or hide from host immune effectors. Here, we report that Pteromalus puparum venom impairs the antimicrobial activity of its host Pieris rapae. Inhibition zone results showed that bead injection induced the antimicrobial activity of the host hemolymph but that venom inhibited it. The cDNAs encoding cecropin and lysozyme were screened. Relative quantitative PCR results indicated that all of the microorganisms and bead injections up-regulated the transcript levels of the two genes but that venom down-regulated them. At 8 h post bead challenge, there was a peak in the transcript level of the cecropin gene, whereas the peak of lysozyme gene occurred at 24 h. The transcripts levels of the two genes were higher in the granulocytes and fat body than in other tissues. RNA interference decreased the transcript levels of the two genes and the antimicrobial activity of the pupal hemolymph. Venom injections similarly silenced the expression of the two genes during the first 8 h post-treatment in time- and dose-dependent manners, after which the silence effects abated. Additionally, recombinant cecropin and lysozyme had no significant effect on the emergence rate of pupae that were parasitized by P. puparum females. These findings suggest one mechanism of impairing host antimicrobial activity by parasitoid venom. PMID:26907346

  6. Decreased gene expression activity as a result of a mutation in the calreticulin gene promoter in a family case of schizoaffective disorder.

    PubMed

    Farashi, S; Ohadi, M; Hosseinkhani, S; Darvish, H; Mirabzadeh, A

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating evidence of population association studies support the hypothesis that the high heritability of major psychiatric disorders is a combination of relatively common alleles of modest effect, and rare alleles some with relatively larger effects. We have previously reported low frequency mutations in the proximal promoter of the human calreticulin (CALR) gene that co-occur with the spectrum of major psychiatric disorders. One of those mutations at -205C>T (rs556992558) was detected in an isolate case of schizoaffective disorder. In the current study, the functional implication of mutation -205T is studied in the human neuronal cell lines LAN-5, BE(2)-C and HEK-293. In contrast with other mutations in the promoter region which increase gene expression activity, the -205T mutation significantly decreased gene expression in those cell lines in comparison with the wild-type -205C nucleotide (p < 0.000001, p < 0.0005, and p < 0.017, respectively). Treatment of the cell lines with the mood-stabilizing drug, valproic acid (VPA) resulted in differential gene expression activity in the mutant -205T versus the wild-type -205C construct. VPA increased gene expression activity in both constructs, while a significantly higher expression activity was observed in the mutant construct (p < 0.01), indicative of the creation of a positive effector binding site for VPA as a result of the -205T mutation. We conclude that deviation from normalcy in the level of CALR in either direction is associated with major psychiatric disorders. PMID:27275382

  7. Ethidium Bromide MIC Screening for Enhanced Efflux Pump Gene Expression or Efflux Activity in Staphylococcus aureus▿

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Diixa; Kosmidis, Christos; Seo, Susan M.; Kaatz, Glenn W.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance efflux pumps contribute to antimicrobial and biocide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. The detection of strains capable of efflux is time-consuming and labor-intensive using currently available techniques. A simple and inexpensive method to identify such strains is needed. Ethidium bromide is a substrate for all but one of the characterized S. aureus multidrug-resistant (MDR) efflux pumps (NorC), leading us to examine the utility of simple broth microtiter MIC determinations using this compound in identifying efflux-proficient strains. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR identified the increased expression of one or more MDR efflux pump genes in 151/309 clinical strains (49%). Ethidium bromide MIC testing was insensitive (48%) but specific (92%) in identifying strains with gene overexpression, but it was highly sensitive (95%) and specific (99%) in identifying strains capable of ethidium efflux. The increased expression of norA with or without other genes was most commonly associated with efflux, and in the majority of cases that efflux was inhibited by reserpine. Ethidium bromide MIC testing is a simple and straightforward method to identify effluxing strains and can provide accurate predictions of efflux prevalence in large strain sets in a short period of time. PMID:20855743

  8. The expression and activity of thioredoxin reductase 1 splice variants v1 and v2 regulate the expression of genes associated with differentiation and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Nalvarte, Ivan; Damdimopoulos, Anastasios E.; Rüegg, Joëlle; Spyrou, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian redox-active selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) is a main player in redox homoeostasis. It transfers electrons from NADPH to a large variety of substrates, particularly to those containing redox-active cysteines. Previously, we reported that the classical form of cytosolic TrxR1 (TXNRD1_v1), when overexpressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293), prompted the cells to undergo differentiation [Nalvarte et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 54510–54517]. In the present study, we show that several genes associated with differentiation and adhesion are differentially expressed in HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing TXNRD1_v1 compared with cells expressing its splice variant TXNRD1_v2. Overexpression of these two splice forms resulted in distinctive effects on various aspects of cellular functions including gene regulation patterns, alteration of growth rate, migration and morphology and susceptibility to selenium-induced toxicity. Furthermore, differentiation of the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) increased both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 expressions along with several of the identified genes associated with differentiation and adhesion. Selenium supplementation in the SH-SY5Y cells also induced a differentiated morphology and changed expression of the adhesion protein fibronectin 1 and the differentiation marker cadherin 11, as well as different temporal expression of the studied TXNRD1 variants. These data suggest that both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 have distinct roles in differentiation, possibly by altering the expression of the genes associated with differentiation, and further emphasize the importance in distinguishing each unique action of different TrxR1 splice forms, especially when studying the gene silencing or knockout of TrxR1. PMID:26464515

  9. The expression and activity of thioredoxin reductase 1 splice variants v1 and v2 regulate the expression of genes associated with differentiation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nalvarte, Ivan; Damdimopoulos, Anastasios E; Rüegg, Joëlle; Spyrou, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian redox-active selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) is a main player in redox homoeostasis. It transfers electrons from NADPH to a large variety of substrates, particularly to those containing redox-active cysteines. Previously, we reported that the classical form of cytosolic TrxR1 (TXNRD1_v1), when overexpressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293), prompted the cells to undergo differentiation [Nalvarte et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279: , 54510-54517]. In the present study, we show that several genes associated with differentiation and adhesion are differentially expressed in HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing TXNRD1_v1 compared with cells expressing its splice variant TXNRD1_v2. Overexpression of these two splice forms resulted in distinctive effects on various aspects of cellular functions including gene regulation patterns, alteration of growth rate, migration and morphology and susceptibility to selenium-induced toxicity. Furthermore, differentiation of the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) increased both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 expressions along with several of the identified genes associated with differentiation and adhesion. Selenium supplementation in the SH-SY5Y cells also induced a differentiated morphology and changed expression of the adhesion protein fibronectin 1 and the differentiation marker cadherin 11, as well as different temporal expression of the studied TXNRD1 variants. These data suggest that both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 have distinct roles in differentiation, possibly by altering the expression of the genes associated with differentiation, and further emphasize the importance in distinguishing each unique action of different TrxR1 splice forms, especially when studying the gene silencing or knockout of TrxR1. PMID:26464515

  10. Cyclic stretch induces cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in vascular endothelial cells via activation of nuclear factor kappa-{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haige; Hiroi, Toyoko; Hansen, Baranda S.; Rade, Jeffrey J.

    2009-11-27

    Vascular endothelial cells respond to biomechanical forces, such as cyclic stretch and shear stress, by altering gene expression. Since endothelial-derived prostanoids, such as prostacyclin and thromboxane A{sub 2}, are key mediators of endothelial function, we investigated the effects of cyclic stretch on the expression of genes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells controlling prostanoid synthesis: cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) and thromboxane A{sub 2} synthase (TXAS). COX-2 and TXAS mRNAs were upregulated by cyclic stretch for 24 h. In contrast, PGIS mRNA was decreased and stretch had no effect on COX-1 mRNA expression. We further show that stretch-induced upregulation of COX-2 is mediated by activation of the NF-{kappa}{beta} signaling pathway.

  11. Conditionally Stabilized dCas9 Activator for Controlling Gene Expression in Human Cell Reprogramming and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Balboa, Diego; Weltner, Jere; Eurola, Solja; Trokovic, Ras; Wartiovaara, Kirmo; Otonkoski, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Summary CRISPR/Cas9 protein fused to transactivation domains can be used to control gene expression in human cells. In this study, we demonstrate that a dCas9 fusion with repeats of VP16 activator domains can efficiently activate human genes involved in pluripotency in various cell types. This activator in combination with guide RNAs targeted to the OCT4 promoter can be used to completely replace transgenic OCT4 in human cell reprogramming. Furthermore, we generated a chemically controllable dCas9 activator version by fusion with the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) destabilization domain. Finally, we show that the destabilized dCas9 activator can be used to control human pluripotent stem cell differentiation into endodermal lineages. PMID:26352799

  12. Pyrroloquinoline quinone increases the expression and activity of Sirt1 and -3 genes in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Meruvu, Sunitha; Bedi, Yudhishtar Singh; Chau, Jason; Arguelles, Andrix; Rucker, Robert; Choudhury, Mahua

    2015-09-01

    Sirtuin (Sirt) 1 and Sirt 3 are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ((+))-dependent protein deacetylases that are important to a number of mitochondrial-related functions; thus, identification of sirtuin activators is important. Herein, we hypothesize that pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) can act as a Sirt1/Sirt3 activator. In HepG2 cell cultures, PQQ increased the expression of Sirt1 and Sirt3 gene, protein, and activity levels (P < .05). We also observed a significant increase in nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase gene expression (as early as 18 hours) and increased NAD(+) activity at 24 hours. In addition, targets of Sirt1 and Sirt3 (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and 2, and mitochondrial transcription factor A) were increased at 48 hours. This is the first report that demonstrates PQQ as an activator of Sirt1 and Sirt3 expression and activity, making it an attractive therapeutic agent for the treatment of metabolic diseases and for healthy aging. Based on our study and the available data in vivo, PQQ has the potential to serve as a therapeutic nutraceutical, when enhancing mitochondrial function. PMID:26275361

  13. Arginine kinase: differentiation of gene expression and protein activity in the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haichuan; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Lee; Lin, Qin; Liu, Nannan

    2009-02-01

    Arginine kinase (AK), a primary enzyme in cell metabolism and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-consuming processes, plays an important role in cellular energy metabolism and maintaining constant ATP levels in invertebrate cells. In order to identify genes that are differentially expressed between larvae and adults, queens and workers, and female alates (winged) and queens (wingless), AK cDNA was obtained from the red imported fire ant. The cDNA sequence of the gene has open reading frames of 1065 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 355 amino acid residues that includes the substrate recognition region, the signature sequence pattern of ATP:guanidino kinases, and an "actinin-type" actin binding domain. Northern blot analysis and protein activity analysis demonstrated that the expression of the AK gene and its protein activity were developmentally, caste specifically, and tissue specifically regulated in red imported fire ants with a descending order of worker> alate (winged adult) female> alate (winged adult) male> larvae> worker pupae approximately alate pupae. These results suggest a different demand for energy-consumption and production in the different castes of the red imported fire ant, which may be linked to their different missions and physiological activities in the colonies. The highest level of the AK gene expression and activity was identified in head tissue of both female alates and workers and thorax tissue of workers, followed by thorax tissue of female alates and abdomen tissue of male alates, suggesting the main tissues or cells in these body parts, such as brain, neurons and muscles, which have been identified as the major tissues and/or cells that display high and variable rates of energy turnover in other organisms, play a key role in energy production and its utilization in the fire ant. In contrast, in the male alate, the highest AK expression and activity were found in the abdomen, suggesting that here energy demand may relate to sperm formation

  14. Functional characterization of neural-restrictive silencer element in mouse pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hideki; Tominaga, Aiko; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamada, Katsushi; Miyata, Atsuro

    2014-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is predominantly localized in the nervous system, but the underlying mechanism in its neuron-specific expression remains unclear. In addition to two neural-restrictive silencer-like element (NRSLE1 and 2), as reported previously, we have identified the third element in -1,601 to -1,581 bp from the translational initiation site of mouse PACAP gene and termed it as NRSLE3, of which, the sequence and location were highly conserved among mouse, rat, and human PACAP genes. In luciferase reporter assay, the deletion or site-directed mutagenesis of NRSLE3 in the reporter gene construct, driven by heterologous SV40 promoter, cancelled the repression of luciferase activity in non-neuronal Swiss-3T3 cells. Furthermore, its promoter activity was significantly repressed in Swiss-3T3 cells, but not in neuronal-differentiated PC12 cells. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) with nuclear extracts of Swiss-3T3 cells demonstrated a specific complex with NRSLE3 probe that exhibited the same migration with the neural-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) probe of rat type II sodium channel gene. During neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells, the increment of PACAP mRNA exhibited the correlation with that of REST4 mRNA, which is a neuron-specific variant form of neural-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF). In undifferentiated PC12 cells, trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which indirectly inhibits NRSF-mediated gene silencing, increased PACAP mRNA level and attenuated the repression of promoter activity of 5' flanking region of mouse PACAP gene containing NRSLEs. These suggest that the NRSE-NRSF system implicates in the regulatory mechanism of neuron-specific expression of PACAP gene. PMID:24939248

  15. Design and characterization of a dual-mode promoter with activation and repression capability for tuning gene expression in yeast.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Mostafizur; McMillen, David R

    2014-08-01

    Modularity in controlling gene expression artificially is becoming an essential aspect of synthetic biology. Artificial transcriptional control of gene expression is one of the most well-developed methods for the design of novel synthetic regulatory networks. Such networks are intended to help understand natural cellular phenomena and to enable new biotechnological applications. Promoter sequence manipulation with cis-regulatory elements is a key approach to control gene expression transcriptionally. Here, we have designed a promoter that can be both activated and repressed, as a contribution to the library of synthetic biological 'parts'. Starting with the minimal cytochrome C (minCYC) promoter in yeast, we incorporated five steroid hormone responsive elements (SHREs) and one lac operator site, respectively, upstream and downstream of the TATA box. This allows activation through the testosterone-responsive androgen receptor, and repression through the LacI repressor. Exposure to varying concentrations of testosterone (to vary activation) and IPTG (to vary repression) demonstrated the ability to tune the promoter's output curve over a wide range. By integrating activating and repressing signals, the promoter permits a useful form of signal integration, and we are optimistic that it will serve as a component in future regulatory networks, including feedback controllers. PMID:25056312

  16. Gene expression and proteomic analysis of shoot apical meristem transition from dormancy to activation in Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huimin; Cao, Dechang; Chen, Yanmei; Wei, Dongmei; Wang, Yanwei; Stevenson, Rebecca Ann; Zhu, Yingfang; Lin, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to annual plants, in perennial plants, the shoot apical meristem (SAM) can undergo seasonal transitions between dormancy and activity; understanding this transition is crucial for understanding growth in perennial plants. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of SAM development in trees. Here, light and transmission electron microscopy revealed that evident changes in starch granules, lipid bodies, and cell walls thickness of the SAM in C. lanceolata during the transition from dormancy to activation. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis showed that levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) increased and levels of abscisic acid (ABA) decreased from dormant to active stage. Examination of 20 genes and 132 differentially expressed proteins revealed that the expression of genes and proteins potentially involved in cell division and expansion significantly increased in the active stage, whereas those related to the abscisic acid insensitive 3(ABI3), the cytoskeleton and energy metabolism decreased in the dormant stage. These findings provide new insights into the complex mechanism of gene and protein expression and their relation to cytological and physiological changes of SAM in this coniferous species. PMID:26832850

  17. Gene expression and proteomic analysis of shoot apical meristem transition from dormancy to activation in Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huimin; Cao, Dechang; Chen, Yanmei; Wei, Dongmei; Wang, Yanwei; Stevenson, Rebecca Ann; Zhu, Yingfang; Lin, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to annual plants, in perennial plants, the shoot apical meristem (SAM) can undergo seasonal transitions between dormancy and activity; understanding this transition is crucial for understanding growth in perennial plants. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of SAM development in trees. Here, light and transmission electron microscopy revealed that evident changes in starch granules, lipid bodies, and cell walls thickness of the SAM in C. lanceolata during the transition from dormancy to activation. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis showed that levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) increased and levels of abscisic acid (ABA) decreased from dormant to active stage. Examination of 20 genes and 132 differentially expressed proteins revealed that the expression of genes and proteins potentially involved in cell division and expansion significantly increased in the active stage, whereas those related to the abscisic acid insensitive 3(ABI3), the cytoskeleton and energy metabolism decreased in the dormant stage. These findings provide new insights into the complex mechanism of gene and protein expression and their relation to cytological and physiological changes of SAM in this coniferous species. PMID:26832850

  18. TMPRSS4 upregulates uPA gene expression through JNK signaling activation to induce cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Min, Hye-Jin; Lee, Yunhee; Zhao, Xue-Feng; Park, Young-Kyu; Lee, Myung Kyu; Lee, Jung Weon; Kim, Semi

    2014-02-01

    TMPRSS4 is a novel type II transmembrane serine protease that is highly expressed in pancreatic, thyroid, colon, and other cancer tissues. Previously, we demonstrated that TMPRSS4 mediates tumor cell invasion, migration, and metastasis. However, the mechanisms by which TMPRSS4 contributes to invasion are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrated that TMPRSS4 induced the transcription of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) gene through activating the transcription factors Sp1, Sp3, and AP-1 in mainly a JNK-dependent manner and that the induction of uPA was required for TMPRSS4-mediated cancer cell invasion and signaling events. In addition, the uPA receptor was involved in TMPRSS4-induced signaling activation and subsequent uPA expression probably through its association with TMPRSS4 on the cell surface. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that uPA expression was significantly correlated with TMPRSS4 expression in human lung and prostate cancers. These observations suggest that TMPRSS4 is an important regulator of uPA gene expression; the upregulation of uPA by TMPRSS4 contributes to invasion and may represent a novel mechanism for the control of invasion. PMID:23978400

  19. Inflammatory Gene Expression Upon TGF-β1-Induced p38 Activation in Primary Dupuytren's Disease Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bujak, Maro; Ratkaj, Ivana; Markova-Car, Elitza; Jurišić, Davor; Horvatić, Anita; Vučinić, Srđan; Lerga, Jonatan; Baus-Lončar, Mirela; Pavelić, Krešimir; Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Inflammation is an underlying mechanism behind fibrotic processes and differentiation of cells into myofibroblasts. Presented study therefore provides new data on activation of autoimmune and inflammatory immune response genes that accompany activation of p38 and cell differentiation in primary cells derived from Dupuytren's disease (DD) patients. Methods: Primary non-Dupuytren's disease cells (ND) were isolated from macroscopically unaffected palmar fascia adjacent to diseased tissue obtained from patients diagnosed with the last stage of DD and cultured in vitro. Gene expression, collagen gel contraction assay and analysis of secreted proteins were performed in ND cells treated with TGF-β1 and/or inhibitor of p38 phosphorylation. Results: During differentiation of ND fibroblasts, increased expression of immune response genes PAI-1, TIMP-1, CCL11, and IL-6 was found. These changes were accompanied by increased cell contractility and activation of p38 and its target kinase MK2. Inhibition of p38 phosphorylation reversed these processes in vitro. Conclusions: TGF-β1 induced p38 phosphorylation in ND cells grown from macroscopically unaffected palmar fascia adjacent to diseased tissue from DD patients. This was accompanied by activation of the cytokine genes CCL-11 and IL-6 and secretion of extracellular matrix regulatory proteins PAI-1 and TIMP-1. A combined approach directed toward inflammation and p38 MAPK-mediated processes in DD might be considered for improving management of DD patients and prevention of recurrence. PMID:26697433

  20. Molecular Characterization and Expression Analysis of the Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Delta (PPARδ) Gene before and after Exercise in Horse

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Shin, Sangsu; Park, Jeong-Woong; Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Nam-Young; Lee, Woon-Kyu; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Song, Ki-Duk; Cho, Byung-Wook

    2015-01-01

    While athletic abilities such as speed, endurance and recovery are important in the horse, genes related to these abilities have not been extensively investigated. Here, we characterized the horse peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ) gene and analyzed the expression of PPARδ during exercise. PPARδ is a known regulator of β-oxidation, muscle fiber transformation, and running endurance. Through evolutionary analysis using the synonymous and non-synonymous mutation ratio, it was revealed that positive selection occurred in the horse PPARδ gene. Two important domains related to nuclear hormone receptors, C4 zinc finger and ligand binding domain, were also found to be conserved well in horse PPARδ. Horse PPARδ was expressed ubiquitously in many tissues, but the expression level was various depending on the tissues. In the skeletal muscle, PPARδ increased about 2.5 folds after 30 min of exercise. Unlike in muscle, the increase of PPARδ expression was observed at 60 min but not 30 min of exercise in leukocytes. This finding might be useful for testing the endurance of horse using blood samples. Conclusively, the horse PPARδ gene is evolutionarily conserved well and can be used as a biomarker of endurance in horse. PMID:25924962

  1. Polymorphisms in human dopamine D2 receptor gene affect gene expression, splicing, and neuronal activity during working memory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Bertolino, Alessandro; Fazio, Leonardo; Blasi, Giuseppe; Rampino, Antonio; Romano, Raffaella; Lee, Mei-Ling T; Xiao, Tao; Papp, Audrey; Wang, Danxin; Sadée, Wolfgang

    2007-12-18

    Subcortical dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) signaling is implicated in cognitive processes and brain disorders, but the effect of DRD2 variants remains ambiguous. We measured allelic mRNA expression in postmortem human striatum and prefrontal cortex and then performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) scans of the DRD2 locus. A previously uncharacterized promoter SNP (rs12364283) located in a conserved suppressor region was associated with enhanced DRD2 expression, whereas previously studied DRD2 variants failed to affect expression. Moreover, two frequent intronic SNPs (rs2283265 and rs1076560) decreased expression of DRD2 short splice variant (expressed mainly presynaptically) relative to DRD2 long (postsynaptic), a finding reproduced in vitro by using minigene constructs. Being in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other, both intronic SNPs (but not rs12364283) were also associated with greater activity of striatum and prefrontal cortex measured with fMRI during working memory and with reduced performance in working memory and attentional control tasks in healthy humans. Our results identify regulatory DRD2 polymorphisms that modify mRNA expression and splicing and working memory pathways. PMID:18077373

  2. Cadmium exposure activates the ERK signaling pathway leading to altered osteoblast gene expression and apoptotic death in Saos-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Arbon, Kate S.; Christensen, Cody M.; Harvey, Wendy A.; Heggland, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports of cadmium in electronic waste and jewelry have increased public awareness regarding this toxic metal. Human exposure to cadmium is associated with the development of osteoporosis. We previously reported cadmium induces apoptosis in human tumor-derived Saos-2 osteoblasts. In this study, we examine the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and protein kinase C (PKC) pathways in cadmium-induced apoptosis and altered osteoblast gene expression. Saos-2 osteoblasts were cultured in the presence or absence of 10 μM CdCl2 for 2–72 hours. We detected significant ERK activation in response to CdCl2 and pretreatment with the ERK inhibitor PD98059 attenuated cadmium-induced apoptosis. However, PKCα activation was not observed after exposure to CdCl2 and pretreatment with the PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C, was unable to rescue cells from cadmium-induced apoptosis. Gene expression studies were conducted using qPCR. Cells exposed to CdCl2 exhibited a significant decrease in the bone-forming genes osteopontin (OPN) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. In contrast, SOST, whose protein product inhibits bone formation, significantly increased in response to CdCl2. Pretreatment with PD98059 had a recovery effect on cadmium-induced changes in gene expression. This research demonstrates cadmium can directly inhibit osteoblasts via ERK signaling pathway and identifies SOST as a target for cadmium-induced osteotoxicity. PMID:22019892

  3. Sialic Acid-Mediated Gene Expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Role of NanR as a Transcriptional Activator of the nan Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Ahmed, Hifza

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the transcriptomic response of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid [Neu5Ac]). Transcriptome comparison of wild-type D39 grown in M17 medium with and without sialic acid revealed the elevated expression of various genes and operons, including the nan gene cluster (nan operon I and nanA gene). Our microarray analysis and promoter-lacZ fusion studies showed that the transcriptional regulator NanR acts as a transcriptional activator of nan operon I and the nanA gene in the presence of sialic acid. The putative regulatory site of NanR in the promoter region of nan operon I is predicted and confirmed by promoter truncation experiments. Furthermore, the role of CcpA in the regulation of the nan gene cluster is demonstrated through microarray analysis and promoter-lacZ fusion studies, suggesting that in the presence of sialic acid and glucose, CcpA represses the expression of nan operon I while the expression of the nanA gene is CcpA independent. PMID:25724955

  4. Changes in trehalose content, enzyme activity and gene expression related to trehalose metabolism in Flammulina velutipes under heat shock.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Hui; Shang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Jian-Yu; Tan, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Trehalose plays important roles in the protection of organisms against adverse environmental conditions. The growth and development of Flammulina velutipes is regulated and controlled under complex external conditions. This study investigated the effect of heat stress on trehalose metabolism in mycelia and fruiting bodies. The activities of enzymes involved in trehalose metabolism, the transcriptional levels of the corresponding genes and the trehalose content in the mycelia of Flammulina velutipes strain Dan3 under relatively high temperatures were investigated. The mycelia and fruiting bodies of a strain cultivated in a factory were collected at different stages to examine the trehalose content and expression levels of various genes. The results showed that intracellular trehalose significantly accumulated in the mycelia in response to 37 °C heat shock. Heat shock significantly stimulated the activities of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase and trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase, thereby promoting the accumulation of trehalose for the first 2-6 h. The activity of neutral trehalase also decreased during this period. In addition, changes in the activities of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and neutral trehalase paralleled changes in the expression levels of the regulatory genes. As for the trehalose phosphorylase, the degradation of trehalose was stronger than its synthesis under heat stress. Heat shock can induce a stress response in the mycelia through the regulation of genes related to trehalose metabolism and the subsequent promotion and control of the transcription and translation of enzymes. The analysis of the trehalose and gene expression levels in the cultivated strain suggests that a substantial amount of trehalose had accumulated in the mycelia prior to induction of the primordia, and the fruiting bodies could possibly utilize degraded trehalose that translocated from the mycelia to maintain their growth. PMID:27312340

  5. Diindolylmethane, a naturally occurring compound, induces CYP3A4 and MDR1 gene expression by activating human PXR

    PubMed Central

    Pondugula, Satyanarayana R.; Flannery, Patrick C.; Abbott, Kodye L.; Coleman, Elaine S.; Mani, Sridhar; Samuel, Temesgen; Xie, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Activation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR)-regulated expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) plays an important role in mediating adverse drug interactions. Given the common use of natural products as part of adjunct human health behavior, there is a growing concern about natural products for their potential to induce undesired drug interactions through the activation of hPXR-regulated CYP3A4 and MDR1. Here, we studied whether 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), a natural health supplement, could induce hPXR-mediated regulation of CYP3A4 and MDR1 in human hepatocytes and intestinal cells. DIM, at its physiologically relevant concentrations, not only induced hPXR transactivation of CYP3A4 promoter activity but also induced gene expression of CYP3A4 and MDR1. DIM decreased intracellular accumulation of MDR1 substrate rhodamine 123, suggesting that DIM induces the functional expression of MDR1. Pharmacologic inhibition or genetic knockdown of hPXR resulted in attenuation of DIM induced CYP3A4 and MDR1 gene expression, suggesting that DIM induces CYP3A4 and MDR1 in an hPXR-dependent manner. Together, these results support our conclusion that DIM induces hPXR-regulated CYP3A4 and MDR1 gene expression. The inductive effects of DIM on CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression caution the use of DIM in conjunction with other medications metabolized and transported via CYP3A4 and MDR1, respectively. PMID:25542144

  6. Analysis of the tumorigenic potential of common marmoset lymphoblastoid cells expressing a constitutively activated c-myc gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hotchin, N. A.; Wedderburn, N.; Roberts, I.; Thomas, J. A.; Bungey, J. A.; Naylor, B.; Crawford, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    The respective roles of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and c-myc in the pathogenesis of endemic Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) are unclear. In order to help resolve the question whether constitutive expression of the c-myc gene in an EBV-immortalised B cell is sufficient to induce a tumorigenic phenotype, B cells from a common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) were immortalised with EBV, transfected with a constitutively activated c-myc gene and inoculated into the host animals. Despite the cell line transfected with c-myc displaying enhanced growth characteristics, in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that this was not sufficient to induce a tumorigenic phenotype. This supports our previous findings with EBV-immortalised human B cells transfected with an activated c-myc gene (Hotchin et al., 1990). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8388232

  7. Gene-specific alterations of hepatic nuclear receptor regulated gene expression by ligand activation or hepatocyte-selective knockout inhibition of RXRα signaling during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kosters, Astrid; Tian, Feng; Wan, Yvonne Yu-Jie; Karpen, Saul J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammation leads to transcriptional downregulation of many hepatic genes, particulary those activated by RXRα-heterodimers. Inflammation-mediated reduction of nuclear RXRα levels is a main factor in reduced nuclear receptor (NR)–regulated hepatic gene expression, eventually leading to cholestasis and liver damage. Aim To investigate roles for RXRα in hepatic gene expression during inflammation, using two complementary mouse models: ligand–activation of RXRα, and in mice expressing hepatocyte-specific expression of RXRα missing its DNA-binding-domain (DBD; hs-RxrαΔex4−/−) Methods To activate RXRα, mice were gavage-fed with LG268 or vehicle for 5 days. To inhibit RXRα function, hs-RxrαΔex4−/− were used. All mice were IP-injected with LPS or saline for 16 hrs prior to analysis of hepatic RNA, protein and NR-DNA binding. Results LG268-treatment attenuated the LPS-mediated reductions of several RXRα-regulated genes, coinciding with maintained RXRα occupancy in both Bsep and Ostβ promoters. Lacking full hepatocyte-RXRα function (hs-RxrαΔex4−/− mice) led to enhancement of LPS-mediated changes in gene expression, but surprisingly, maintenance of RNA levels of some RXRα-regulated genes. Investigations revealed that Hs-Rxrα−/− hepatocytes expressed an internally-truncated, ~44 kDa, RXRα-form. DNA-binding capacity of NR-heterodimers was equivalent in wt and hs-RxrαΔex4−/− livers, but reduced by LPS in both. ChIP-QPCR revealed reduced RXRα occupancy to the Bsep RXRα:FXR site was reduced, but not absent, in hs-RxrαΔex4−/− livers. Conclusions There are differential regulatory roles for hepatic RXRα, both in basal and inflammatory states, suggesting new and complex multi-domain roles for RXRα in regulating hepatic gene expression. Moreover, there is an unexpected non-obligate role for the DBD of RXRα. PMID:22098603

  8. Cystatin D locates in the nucleus at sites of active transcription and modulates gene and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Mayorga, Gemma; Alvarez-Díaz, Silvia; Valle, Noelia; De Las Rivas, Javier; Mendes, Marta; Barderas, Rodrigo; Canals, Francesc; Tapia, Olga; Casal, J Ignacio; Lafarga, Miguel; Muñoz, Alberto

    2015-10-30

    Cystatin D is an inhibitor of lysosomal and secreted cysteine proteases. Strikingly, cystatin D has been found to inhibit proliferation, migration, and invasion of colon carcinoma cells indicating tumor suppressor activity that is unrelated to protease inhibition. Here, we demonstrate that a proportion of cystatin D locates within the cell nucleus at specific transcriptionally active chromatin sites. Consistently, transcriptomic analysis show that cystatin D alters gene expression, including that of genes encoding transcription factors such as RUNX1, RUNX2, and MEF2C in HCT116 cells. In concordance with transcriptomic data, quantitative proteomic analysis identified 292 proteins differentially expressed in cystatin D-expressing cells involved in cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, and RNA synthesis and processing. Furthermore, using cytokine arrays we found that cystatin D reduces the secretion of several protumor cytokines such as fibroblast growth factor-4, CX3CL1/fractalkine, neurotrophin 4 oncostatin-M, pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL18, and transforming growth factor B3. These results support an unanticipated role of cystatin D in the cell nucleus, controlling the transcription of specific genes involved in crucial cellular functions, which may mediate its protective action in colon cancer. PMID:26364852

  9. Protein palmitoylation activate zygotic gene expression during the maternal-to-zygotic transition.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhaoxia; Chen, Xueran; Li, Xian; He, Kun; Ji, Shufang; Shi, Wei; Hao, Aijun

    2016-06-24

    Upon fertilization, maternal factors direct development and trigger zygotic genome activation at the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT). However, the factors that activate the zygotic program in vertebrates are not well defined. Here, we found that protein palmitoylation played an important role in acquiring transcriptional competency and orchestrating the clearance of the maternal program in zebrafish. After inhibition of protein palmitoylation, zebrafish embryos developed normally before the Mid-Blastula Transition (MBT); however, they did not initiate epiboly. Moreover, our results showed that protein palmitoylation is required to initiate the zygotic developmental program and induce clearance of the maternal program by activating miR-430 expression. PMID:27235108

  10. Stress gene (hsp70) sequences and quantitative expression in Milnesium tardigradum (Tardigrada) during active and cryptobiotic stages.

    PubMed

    Schill, Ralph O; Steinbrück, Günther H B; Köhler, Heinz-R

    2004-04-01

    The eutardigrade Milnesium tardigradum can undergo cryptobiosis, i.e. entry into a reversible ametabolic stage induced by dehydration, cooling and, probably, osmotic and anoxic stress. For the first time in tardigrades, we described partial sequences of three heat-shock protein (hsp70 family) genes and examined gene expression on the way from an active to a cryptobiotic and back to an active stage again. Results showed different patterns of gene expression in the hsp70 isoforms. All three isoforms seem to be true heat-shock proteins since transcription could be clearly enhanced by temperature elevation. Isoform 1 and, at a lower level, isoform 3 do not seem to have a specific function for cryptobiosis. By contrast, transcription of isoform 2 is significantly induced in the transitional stage between the active and the cryptobiotic stage, resulting in a comparatively high mRNA copy number also during cryptobiosis. This pattern of induction implies that isoform 2 is the most relevant hsp70 gene for M. tardigradum individuals entering the cryptobiotic stage. PMID:15073193

  11. Partial Sleep Restriction Activates Immune Response-Related Gene Expression Pathways: Experimental and Epidemiological Studies in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rantanen, Ville; Kronholm, Erkki; Surakka, Ida; van Leeuwen, Wessel M. A.; Lehto, Maili; Matikainen, Sampsa; Ripatti, Samuli; Härmä, Mikko; Sallinen, Mikael; Salomaa, Veikko; Jauhiainen, Matti; Alenius, Harri; Paunio, Tiina; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that short or insufficient sleep is associated with increased risk for metabolic diseases and mortality. To elucidate mechanisms behind this connection, we aimed to identify genes and pathways affected by experimentally induced, partial sleep restriction and to verify their connection to insufficient sleep at population level. The experimental design simulated sleep restriction during a working week: sleep of healthy men (N = 9) was restricted to 4 h/night for five nights. The control subjects (N = 4) spent 8 h/night in bed. Leukocyte RNA expression was analyzed at baseline, after sleep restriction, and after recovery using whole genome microarrays complemented with pathway and transcription factor analysis. Expression levels of the ten most up-regulated and ten most down-regulated transcripts were correlated with subjective assessment of insufficient sleep in a population cohort (N = 472). Experimental sleep restriction altered the expression of 117 genes. Eight of the 25 most up-regulated transcripts were related to immune function. Accordingly, fifteen of the 25 most up-regulated Gene Ontology pathways were also related to immune function, including those for B cell activation, interleukin 8 production, and NF-κB signaling (P<0.005). Of the ten most up-regulated genes, expression of STX16 correlated negatively with self-reported insufficient sleep in a population sample, while three other genes showed tendency for positive correlation. Of the ten most down-regulated genes, TBX21 and LGR6 correlated negatively and TGFBR3 positively with insufficient sleep. Partial sleep restriction affects the regulation of signaling pathways related to the immune system. Some of these changes appear to be long-lasting and may at least partly explain how prolonged sleep restriction can contribute to inflammation-associated pathological states, such as cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24194869

  12. Silver nanoparticles induce pro-inflammatory gene expression and inflammasome activation in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Murphy, A; Casey, A; Byrne, G; Chambers, G; Howe, O

    2016-10-01

    A complete cytotoxic profile of exposure to silver (AgNP) nanoparticles investigating their biological effects on the innate immune response of circulating white blood cells is required to form a complete understanding of the risk posed. This was explored by measuring AgNP-stimulated gene expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in THP-1 monocytes. A further study, on human monocytes extracted from a cohort of blood samples, was carried out to compare with the AgNP immune response in THP-1 cells along with the detection of pro-IL-1β which is a key mediator of the inflammasome complex. The aims of the study were to clearly demonstrate that AgNP can significantly up-regulate pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α in both THP-1 cells and primary blood monocytes thus indicating a rapid response to AgNP in circulation. Furthermore, a role for the inflammasome in AgNP response was indicated by pro-IL-1β cleavage and release. These results highlight the potential inflammatory effects of AgNP exposure and the responses evoked should be considered with respect to the potential harm that exposure may cause. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26968431

  13. Lin28A Binds Active Promoters and Recruits Tet1 to Regulate Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yaxue; Yao, Bing; Shin, Jaehoon; Lin, Li; Kim, Namshik; Song, Qifeng; Liu, Shuang; Su, Yijing; Guo, Junjie U; Huang, Luoxiu; Wan, Jun; Wu, Hao; Qian, Jiang; Cheng, Xiaodong; Zhu, Heng; Ming, Guo-li; Jin, Peng; Song, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Lin28, a well-known RNA-binding protein, regulates diverse cellular properties. All physiological functions of Lin28A characterized so far have been attributed to its repression of let-7 miRNA biogenesis or modulation of mRNA translational efficiency. Here we show that Lin28A directly binds to a consensus DNA sequence in vitro and in mouse embryonic stem cells in vivo. ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reveal enrichment of Lin28A binding around transcription start sites and a positive correlation between its genomic occupancy and expression of many associated genes. Mechanistically, Lin28A recruits 5-methylcytosine-dioxygenase Tet1 to genomic binding sites to orchestrate 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine dynamics. Either Lin28A or Tet1 knockdown leads to dysregulated DNA methylation and expression of common target genes. These results reveal a surprising role for Lin28A in transcriptional regulation via epigenetic DNA modifications and have implications for understanding mechanisms underlying versatile functions of Lin28A in mammalian systems. PMID:26711009

  14. Live-cell Imaging of Pol II Promoter Activity to Monitor Gene expression with RNA IMAGEtag reporters

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ilchung; Ray, Judhajeet; Gupta, Vinayak; Ilgu, Muslum; Beasley, Jonathan; Bendickson, Lee; Mehanovic, Samir; Kraus, George A.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2014-04-20

    We describe a ribonucleic acid (RNA) reporter system for live-cell imaging of gene expression to detect changes in polymerase II activity on individual promoters in individual cells. The reporters use strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags) that can be expressed from a promoter of choice. For imaging, the cells are incubated with their ligands that are separately conjugated with one of the FRET pair, Cy3 and Cy5. The IMAGEtags were expressed in yeast from the GAL1, ADH1 or ACT1 promoters. Transcription from all three promoters was imaged in live cells and transcriptional increases from the GAL1 promoter were observed with time after adding galactose. Expression of the IMAGEtags did not affect cell proliferation or endogenous gene expression. Advantages of this method are that no foreign proteins are produced in the cells that could be toxic or otherwise influence the cellular response as they accumulate, the IMAGEtags are short lived and oxygen is not required to generate their signals. The IMAGEtag RNA reporter system provides a means of tracking changes in transcriptional activity in live cells and in real time.

  15. Regulation of nap Gene Expression and Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase Activity in the Phototrophic Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM158

    PubMed Central

    Gavira, Mónica; Roldán, M. Dolores; Castillo, Francisco; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial periplasmic nitrate reductases (Nap) can play different physiological roles and are expressed under different conditions depending on the organism. Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM158 has a Nap system, encoded by the napKEFDABC gene cluster, but nitrite formed is not further reduced because this strain lacks nitrite reductase. Nap activity increases in the presence of nitrate and oxygen but is unaffected by ammonium. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blots demonstrated that the napKEFDABC genes constitute an operon transcribed as a single 5.5-kb product. Northern blots and nap-lacZ fusions revealed that nap expression is threefold higher under aerobic conditions but is regulated by neither nitrate nor ammonium, although it is weakly induced by nitrite. On the other hand, nitrate but not nitrite causes a rapid enzyme activation, explaining the higher Nap activity found in nitrate-grown cells. Translational nap′-′lacZ fusions reveal that the napK and napD genes are not efficiently translated, probably due to mRNA secondary structures occluding the translation initiation sites of these genes. Neither butyrate nor caproate increases nap expression, although cells growing phototrophically on these reduced substrates show a very high Nap activity in vivo (nitrite accumulation is sevenfold higher than in medium with malate). Phototrophic growth on butyrate or caproate medium is severely reduced in the NapA− mutants. Taken together, these results indicate that nitrate reduction in R. sphaeroides is mainly regulated at the level of enzyme activity by both nitrate and electron supply and confirm that the Nap system is involved in redox balancing using nitrate as an ancillary oxidant to dissipate excess reductant. PMID:11872721

  16. Transient gene expression control: effects of transfected DNA stability and trans-activation by viral early proteins.

    PubMed

    Alwine, J C

    1985-05-01

    The effects of trans-acting factors and transfected DNA stability on promoter activity were examined with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) transient expression analysis. With cotransfection into CV-1P and HeLa cells, simian virus 40 T antigen, adenovirus E1a, and herpes-virus IE proteins were compared for their ability to trans-activate a variety of eucaryotic promoters constructed into CAT plasmids. T antigen and the IE protein were promiscuous activators of all the promoters tested [the simian virus 40 late promoter, the adenovirus E3 promoter, the alpha 2(I) collagen promoter, and the promoter of the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat]. Conversely the E1a protein was specific, activating only the adenovirus E3 promoter and suppressing the basal activity of the other promoters. This specificity of activation by E1a contrasted with the high activity generated by all of the promoter-CAT plasmids when transfected into 293 cells, which endogenously produce E1a protein. Examination of transfected 293 cells determined that they stabilized much greater amounts of plasmid DNA than any other cells tested (CV-1P, COS, NIH-3T3, KB). Thus the high activity of nonadenovirus promoter-CAT plasmids in 293 cells results from the cumulative effect of basal promoter activity from a very large number of gene copies, not from E1a activation. This conclusion was supported by similar transfection analysis of KB cell lines which endogenously produce E1a protein. These cells stabilize plasmid DNA at a level comparable to that of CV-1P cells and, in agreement with the CV-1P cotransfection results, did not activate a nonadenovirus promoter-CAT plasmid. These results indicate that the stability of plasmid DNA must be considered when transient gene expression is being compared between cell lines. The use of relative plasmid copy numbers for the standardization of transient expression results is discussed. PMID:2987671

  17. Transient gene expression control: effects of transfected DNA stability and trans-activation by viral early proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Alwine, J C

    1985-01-01

    The effects of trans-acting factors and transfected DNA stability on promoter activity were examined with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) transient expression analysis. With cotransfection into CV-1P and HeLa cells, simian virus 40 T antigen, adenovirus E1a, and herpes-virus IE proteins were compared for their ability to trans-activate a variety of eucaryotic promoters constructed into CAT plasmids. T antigen and the IE protein were promiscuous activators of all the promoters tested [the simian virus 40 late promoter, the adenovirus E3 promoter, the alpha 2(I) collagen promoter, and the promoter of the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat]. Conversely the E1a protein was specific, activating only the adenovirus E3 promoter and suppressing the basal activity of the other promoters. This specificity of activation by E1a contrasted with the high activity generated by all of the promoter-CAT plasmids when transfected into 293 cells, which endogenously produce E1a protein. Examination of transfected 293 cells determined that they stabilized much greater amounts of plasmid DNA than any other cells tested (CV-1P, COS, NIH-3T3, KB). Thus the high activity of nonadenovirus promoter-CAT plasmids in 293 cells results from the cumulative effect of basal promoter activity from a very large number of gene copies, not from E1a activation. This conclusion was supported by similar transfection analysis of KB cell lines which endogenously produce E1a protein. These cells stabilize plasmid DNA at a level comparable to that of CV-1P cells and, in agreement with the CV-1P cotransfection results, did not activate a nonadenovirus promoter-CAT plasmid. These results indicate that the stability of plasmid DNA must be considered when transient gene expression is being compared between cell lines. The use of relative plasmid copy numbers for the standardization of transient expression results is discussed. Images PMID:2987671

  18. Identification of lipase encoding genes from Antarctic seawater bacteria using degenerate primers: expression of a cold-active lipase with high specific activity.

    PubMed

    Parra, Loreto P; Espina, Giannina; Devia, Javier; Salazar, Oriana; Andrews, Barbara; Asenjo, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    Cold-active enzymes are valuable catalysts showing high activity at low and moderate temperatures and low thermostability. Among cold-active enzymes, lipases offer a great potential in detergent, cosmetic, biofuel and food or feed industries. In this paper we describe the identification of novel lipase coding genes and the expression of a lipase with high activity at low temperatures. The genomic DNA from Antarctic seawater bacteria showing lipolytic activity at 4°C was used to amplify five DNA fragments that partially encode novel lipases using specifically designed COnsensus-DEgenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primers (CODEHOP). All the fragments were found to have a high identity with an α/β-hydrolase domain-containing protein identified by the sequencing of the complete genome of Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400. The complete sequence of one of the lipase-coding gene fragments, lipE13, was obtained by genome walking. Considering that the other fragments had a high identity to the putative lipase from S. frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the complete lipase genes were amplified using oligonucleotide primers designed based on the 5' and 3' regions of the coding sequence of the related protein. This strategy allowed the amplification of 3 lipase-encoding genes of which one was expressed in the periplasm using the Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+) expression system. The recombinant protein was obtained with activity toward p-nitrophenyl caproate showing a high specific activity between 15 and 25°C. PMID:25435506

  19. Cooperative activation of human papillomavirus type 8 gene expression by the E2 protein and the cellular coactivator p300.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas; Ritzkowsky, Andreas; Steger, Gertrud

    2002-11-01

    The E2 proteins of papillomaviruses (PV) bind to the coactivator CBP/p300 as do many other transcription factors, but the precise role of CBP/p300 in E2-specific functions is not yet understood. We show that the E2 protein of human PV type 8 (HPV8) directly binds to p300. Activation of HPV8 gene expression by low amounts of HPV8 E2 was stimulated up to sevenfold by coexpression of p300. The interaction between E2 and p300 may play a role in differentiation-dependent activation of PV gene expression, since we can show that the expression level of p300 increases during keratinocyte differentiation. Surprisingly, sequence-specific binding of E2 to its recognition sites within the regulatory region of HPV8 is not necessary for this cooperation, indicating that E2 can be recruited to the promoter via protein-protein interaction. HPV8 E2 binds via its N-terminal activation domain (AD), its C-terminal DNA binding domain (DBD), and its internal hinge region to p300 in vitro. Transient-transfection assays revealed that the AD is necessary and sufficient for cooperative activation with p300. However, we provide evidence that the interaction of the hinge and the DBD of HPV8 E2 with p300 may contribute. Our data suggest an important role of p300 in regulation of HPV8 gene expression and reveal a new mechanism by which E2 may be recruited to a promoter to activate transcription without sequence specific DNA binding. PMID:12368347

  20. Regulation of vitellogenin gene expression in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans: short sequences required for activation of the vit-2 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    MacMorris, M; Broverman, S; Greenspoon, S; Lea, K; Madej, C; Blumenthal, T; Spieth, J

    1992-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans vitellogenin genes are subject to sex-, stage-, and tissue-specific regulation: they are expressed solely in the adult hermaphrodite intestine. Comparative sequence analysis of the DNA immediately upstream of these genes revealed the presence of two repeated heptameric elements, vit promoter element 1 (VPE1) and VPE2. VPE1 has the consensus sequence TGTCAAT, while VPE2, CTGATAA, shares the recognition sequence of the GATA family of transcription factors. We report here a functional analysis of the VPEs within the 5'-flanking region of the vit-2 gene using stable transgenic lines. The 247 upstream bp containing the VPEs was sufficient for high-level, regulated expression. Furthermore, none of the four deletion mutations or eight point mutations tested resulted in expression of the reporter gene in larvae, males, or inappropriate hermaphrodite tissues. Mutation of the VPE1 closest to the TATA box inactivated the promoter, in spite of the fact that four additional close matches to the VPE1 consensus sequence are present within the 5'-flanking 200 bp. Each of these upstream VPE1-like sequences could be mutated without loss of high-level transgene expression, suggesting that if these VPE1 sequences play a role in regulating vit-2, their effects are more subtle. A site-directed mutation in the overlapping VPE1 and VPE2 at -98 was sufficient to inactivate the promoter, indicating that one or both of these VPEs must be present for activation of vit-2 transcription. Similarly, a small perturbation of the VPE2 at -150 resulted in reduction of fp155 expression, while a more extensive mutation in this element eliminated expression. On the other hand, deletion of this VPE2 and all upstream DNA still permitted correctly regulated expression, although at a very low level, suggesting that this VPE2 performs an important role in activation of vit-2 expression but may not be absolutely required. The results, taken together, demonstrate that both VPE1 and

  1. Regulation of vitellogenin gene expression in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans: short sequences required for activation of the vit-2 promoter.

    PubMed

    MacMorris, M; Broverman, S; Greenspoon, S; Lea, K; Madej, C; Blumenthal, T; Spieth, J

    1992-04-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans vitellogenin genes are subject to sex-, stage-, and tissue-specific regulation: they are expressed solely in the adult hermaphrodite intestine. Comparative sequence analysis of the DNA immediately upstream of these genes revealed the presence of two repeated heptameric elements, vit promoter element 1 (VPE1) and VPE2. VPE1 has the consensus sequence TGTCAAT, while VPE2, CTGATAA, shares the recognition sequence of the GATA family of transcription factors. We report here a functional analysis of the VPEs within the 5'-flanking region of the vit-2 gene using stable transgenic lines. The 247 upstream bp containing the VPEs was sufficient for high-level, regulated expression. Furthermore, none of the four deletion mutations or eight point mutations tested resulted in expression of the reporter gene in larvae, males, or inappropriate hermaphrodite tissues. Mutation of the VPE1 closest to the TATA box inactivated the promoter, in spite of the fact that four additional close matches to the VPE1 consensus sequence are present within the 5'-flanking 200 bp. Each of these upstream VPE1-like sequences could be mutated without loss of high-level transgene expression, suggesting that if these VPE1 sequences play a role in regulating vit-2, their effects are more subtle. A site-directed mutation in the overlapping VPE1 and VPE2 at -98 was sufficient to inactivate the promoter, indicating that one or both of these VPEs must be present for activation of vit-2 transcription. Similarly, a small perturbation of the VPE2 at -150 resulted in reduction of fp155 expression, while a more extensive mutation in this element eliminated expression. On the other hand, deletion of this VPE2 and all upstream DNA still permitted correctly regulated expression, although at a very low level, suggesting that this VPE2 performs an important role in activation of vit-2 expression but may not be absolutely required. The results, taken together, demonstrate that both VPE1 and

  2. Blue light-mediated transcriptional activation and repression of gene expression in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Premkumar; Devarajan, Kavya; Chua, Tze Kwang; Zhang, Hanzhong; Gunawan, Erry; Poh, Chueh Loo

    2016-08-19

    Light-regulated modules offer unprecedented new ways to control cellular behavior in precise spatial and temporal resolution. The availability of such tools may dramatically accelerate the progression of synthetic biology applications. Nonetheless, current optogenetic toolbox of prokaryotes has potential issues such as lack of rapid and switchable control, less portable, low dynamic expression and limited parts. To address these shortcomings, we have engineered a novel bidirectional promoter system for Escherichia coli that can be induced or repressed rapidly and reversibly using the blue light dependent DNA-binding protein EL222. We demonstrated that by modulating the dosage of light pulses or intensity we could control the level of gene expression precisely. We show that both light-inducible and repressible system can function in parallel with high spatial precision in a single cell and can be switched stably between ON- and OFF-states by repetitive pulses of blue light. In addition, the light-inducible and repressible expression kinetics were quantitatively analysed using a mathematical model. We further apply the system, for the first time, to optogenetically synchronize two receiver cells performing different logic behaviors over time using blue light as a molecular clock signal. Overall, our modular approach layers a transformative platform for next-generation light-controllable synthetic biology systems in prokaryotes. PMID:27353329

  3. HoxBlinc RNA Recruits Set1/MLL Complexes to Activate Hox Gene Expression Patterns and Mesoderm Lineage Development.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Naohiro; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1(+) mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulation of hoxb pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated knockdown or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1(+) precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1(+) precursors and differentiation of Flk1(+) cells into hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26725110

  4. A Calcium-dependent switch in a CREST-BRG1 complex regulates activity-dependent gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zilong; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent gene expression plays an important role in mediating the effects of sensory experience on nervous system development and function. While several activity-dependent transcription factors have been identified, the mechanism by which calcium signaling converts a promoter from a silenced to an active state is not well understood. Here we show that a CREST-BRG1 complex plays a critical role in regulating promoter activation by orchestrating a calcium-dependent release of a repressor complex, and a recruitment of an activator complex. In resting neurons, transcription of the c-fos promoter is inhibited by BRG1-dependent recruitment of a phospho-Rb-HDAC repressor complex. Upon calcium influx, Rb becomes dephosphorylated at Serine 795 by Calcineurin, which leads to release of the repressor complex. At the same time there is increased recruitment of CBP to the promoter by a CREST-dependent mechanism, which leads to transcriptional activation. The CREST-BRG1 also binds to the NR2B promoter and activity-dependent induction of NR2B expression involves a release of HDAC1 and recruitment of CBP, suggesting that this mechanism may be generally involved in regulating calcium-dependent transcription of neuronal genes. PMID:19081374

  5. TAP1, a yeast gene that activates the expression of a tRNA gene with a defective internal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Di Segni, G; McConaughy, B L; Shapiro, R A; Aldrich, T L; Hall, B D

    1993-01-01

    We developed a genetic selection system based on nonsense suppression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify mutations in proteins involved in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase III. A SUP4 tRNA(Tyr) internal promoter mutation (A53T61) that was unable to suppress ochre mutations in vivo and was incapable of binding TFIIIC in vitro was used as the target for selection of trans-acting compensatory mutations. We identified two such mutations in the same gene, which we named TAP1 (for transcription activation protein). The level of the SUP4A53T61 transcript was threefold higher in the tap1-1 mutant than in the wild type. The tap1-1 mutant strain was also temperature sensitive for growth. The thermosensitive character cosegregated with the restorer of suppression activity, as shown by meiotic linkage analysis and coreversion of the two traits. At 1 to 2 h after a shift to the restrictive temperature, RNA synthesis was strongly inhibited in the tap1-1 mutant, preceding any effect upon protein synthesis or growth. A marked decrease in tRNA and 5S rRNA synthesis was seen, and shortly after that, rRNA synthesis was inhibited. By complementation of the ts- growth defect, we cloned the wild-type TAP1 gene. It is essential for yeast growth. We show in the accompanying report (T. L. Aldrich, G. Di Segni, B. L. McConaughy, N. J. Keen, S. Whelen, and B. D. Hall, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:3434-3444, 1993) that TAP1 is identical to RAT1, a yeast gene implicated in poly(A)+ RNA export and that the TAP1/RAT1 gene product has extensive sequence similarity to the protein encoded by another yeast gene (variously named DST2, KEM1, RAR5, SEP1, or XRN1) having exonuclease and DNA strand transfer activity (reviewed by Kearsey and Kipling [Trends Cell Biol. 1:110-112, 1991]). Images PMID:8497259

  6. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leu3 protein activates expression of GDH1, a key gene in nitrogen assimilation.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Y; Cooper, T G; Kohlhaw, G B

    1995-01-01

    The Leu3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be a transcriptional regulator of genes encoding enzymes of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Leu3 binds to upstream activating sequences (UASLEU) found in the promoters of LEU1, LEU2, LEU4, ILV2, and ILV5. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that activation by Leu3 requires the presence of alpha-isopropylmalate. In at least one case (LEU2), Leu3 actually represses basal-level transcription when alpha-isopropylmalate is absent. Following identification of a UASLEU-homologous sequence in the promoter of GDH1, the gene encoding NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, we demonstrate that Leu3 specifically interacts with this UASLEU element. We then show that Leu3 is required for full activation of the GDH1 gene. First, the expression of a GDH1-lacZ fusion gene is three- to sixfold lower in a strain lacking the LEU3 gene than in an isogenic LEU3+ strain. Expression is restored to near-normal levels when the leu3 deletion cells are transformed with a LEU3-bearing plasmid. Second, a significant decrease in GDH1-lacZ expression is also seen when the UASLEU of the GDH1-lacZ construct is made nonfunctional by mutation. Third, the steady-state level of GDH1 mRNA decreases about threefold in leu3 null cells. The decrease in GDH1 expression in leu3 null cells is reflected in a diminished specific activity of NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. We also demonstrate that the level of GDH1-lacZ expression correlates with the cells' ability to generate alpha-isopropylmalate and is lowest in cells unable to produce alpha-isopropylmalate. We conclude that GDH1, which plays an important role in the assimilation of ammonia in yeast cells, is, in part, activated by a Leu3-alpha-isopropylmalate complex. This conclusion suggests that Leu3 participates in transcriptional regulation beyond the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways. PMID:7799961

  7. Constitutive androstane receptor activation by 2,4,6-triphenyldioxane-1,3 suppresses the expression of the gluconeogenic genes.

    PubMed

    Kachaylo, Ekaterina M; Yarushkin, Andrei A; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O

    2012-03-15

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) has a central role in detoxification processes, regulating the expression of a set of genes involved in metabolism. The dual role of NR1I3 as both a xenosensor and as a regulator of endogenous energy metabolism has recently been accepted. Here, we investigated the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of the glucose metabolising genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) by the cis isomer of 2,4,6-triphenyldioxane-1,3 (cisTPD), a highly effective NR1I3 activator in rat liver. It was shown that expression of the gluconeogenic genes PEPCK and G6Pase was repressed by cisTPD treatment under fasting conditions. Western-blot analysis demonstrated a clear reduction in the intensity of PEPCK and G6Pase immunobands from the livers of cisTPD-treated animals relative to bands from the livers of control animals. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that cisTPD prevents the binding of FOXO1 to the insulin response sequences in the PEPCK and G6Pase gene promoters in rat liver. Moreover, cisTPD-activated NR1I3 inhibited NR2A1 (HNF-4) transactivation by competing with NR2A1 for binding to the NR2A1-binding element (DR1-site) in the gluconeogenic gene promoters. Thus, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the cisTPD-activated NR1I3 participates in the regulation of the gluconeogenic genes PEPCK and G6Pase. PMID:22296760

  8. Methanobactin from Methylocystis sp. Strain SB2 Affects Gene Expression and Methane Monooxygenase Activity in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    PubMed Central

    Farhan Ul-Haque, Muhammad; Kalidass, Bhagyalakshmi; Vorobev, Alexey; Baral, Bipin S.; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2015-01-01

    Methanotrophs can express a cytoplasmic (soluble) methane monooxygenase (sMMO) or membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Expression of these MMOs is strongly regulated by the availability of copper. Many methanotrophs have been found to synthesize a novel compound, methanobactin (Mb), that is responsible for the uptake of copper, and methanobactin produced by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b plays a key role in controlling expression of MMO genes in this strain. As all known forms of methanobactin are structurally similar, it was hypothesized that methanobactin from one methanotroph may alter gene expression in another. When Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was grown in the presence of 1 μM CuCl2, expression of mmoX, encoding a subunit of the hydroxylase component of sMMO, was very low. mmoX expression increased, however, when methanobactin from Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 (SB2-Mb) was added, as did whole-cell sMMO activity, but there was no significant change in the amount of copper associated with M. trichosporium OB3b. If M. trichosporium OB3b was grown in the absence of CuCl2, the mmoX expression level was high but decreased by several orders of magnitude if copper prebound to SB2-Mb (Cu-SB2-Mb) was added, and biomass-associated copper was increased. Exposure of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b to SB2-Mb had no effect on expression of mbnA, encoding the polypeptide precursor of methanobactin in either the presence or absence of CuCl2. mbnA expression, however, was reduced when Cu-SB2-Mb was added in both the absence and presence of CuCl2. These data suggest that methanobactin acts as a general signaling molecule in methanotrophs and that methanobactin “piracy” may be commonplace. PMID:25616801

  9. Methanobactin from Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 affects gene expression and methane monooxygenase activity in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed

    Farhan Ul-Haque, Muhammad; Kalidass, Bhagyalakshmi; Vorobev, Alexey; Baral, Bipin S; DiSpirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D

    2015-04-01

    Methanotrophs can express a cytoplasmic (soluble) methane monooxygenase (sMMO) or membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Expression of these MMOs is strongly regulated by the availability of copper. Many methanotrophs have been found to synthesize a novel compound, methanobactin (Mb), that is responsible for the uptake of copper, and methanobactin produced by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b plays a key role in controlling expression of MMO genes in this strain. As all known forms of methanobactin are structurally similar, it was hypothesized that methanobactin from one methanotroph may alter gene expression in another. When Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was grown in the presence of 1 μM CuCl2, expression of mmoX, encoding a subunit of the hydroxylase component of sMMO, was very low. mmoX expression increased, however, when methanobactin from Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 (SB2-Mb) was added, as did whole-cell sMMO activity, but there was no significant change in the amount of copper associated with M. trichosporium OB3b. If M. trichosporium OB3b was grown in the absence of CuCl2, the mmoX expression level was high but decreased by several orders of magnitude if copper prebound to SB2-Mb (Cu-SB2-Mb) was added, and biomass-associated copper was increased. Exposure of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b to SB2-Mb had no effect on expression of mbnA, encoding the polypeptide precursor of methanobactin in either the presence or absence of CuCl2. mbnA expression, however, was reduced when Cu-SB2-Mb was added in both the absence and presence of CuCl2. These data suggest that methanobactin acts as a general signaling molecule in methanotrophs and that methanobactin "piracy" may be commonplace. PMID:25616801

  10. Expression patterns and promoter activity of the cold-regulated gene ci21A of potato.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, A; Salamini, F; Gebhardt, C

    1997-01-01

    Storage of potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers at 4 degrees C is associated with the accumulation of several transcripts. DNA sequence analysis of cDNA clone CI21, which corresponds to one of the cold-induced transcripts, revealed high homology to transcripts of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and wild potato (Solanum chacoense) induced by ripening and water stress. Two homologous, nonallelic genes, ci21A and ci21B, were isolated and sequenced. Northern blot analysis showed that CI21 transcripts were present at the highest levels in cold-stored tubers, at lower levels in stems and roots, and at the lowest levels in leaves and tubers stored at room temperature. Treatment with abscisic acid, heat, and a high concentration of salt had no marked effect on CI21 transcript levels in tubers and leaves. Drought was the only stress treatment that induced CI21 transcripts in leaves, but it did not do so in tubers. Western blot analysis detected CI21 protein only in tubers. Chimeric gene constructs between the putative ci21A promoter region and the uidA reporter gene were tested in transgenic potato plants for induction of beta-glucuronidase activity by low temperature. A 2-fold increase of beta-glucuronidase activity in response to tuber storage at 4 degrees C was observed for fragments between 380 and 2000 bp of the ci21A promoter region. PMID:9046587

  11. Antifungal Activity of Eucalyptus Oil against Rice Blast Fungi and the Possible Mechanism of Gene Expression Pattern.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Jun; Li, Fu-Rong; Huang, Li-Jie; Yang, Zhi-Rong; Yuan, Shu; Bai, Lin-Han

    2016-01-01

    Eucalyptus oil possesses a wide spectrum of biological activity, including anti-microbial, fungicidal, herbicidal, acaricidal and nematicidal properties. We studied anti-fungal activities of the leaf oil extracted from Eucalyptus. grandis × E. urophylla. Eleven plant pathogenic fungi were tested based on the mycelium growth rates with negative control. The results showed that Eucalyptus oil has broad-spectrum inhibitory effects toward these fungi. Remarkable morphological and structural alterations of hypha have been observed for Magnaporthe grisea after the treatment. The mRNA genome array of M. grisea was used to detect genes that were differentially expressed in the test strains treated by the Eucalyptus oil than the normal strains. The results showed 1919 genes were significantly affected, among which 1109 were down-regulated and 810 were up-regulated (p < 0.05, absolute fold change >2). According to gene ontology annotation analysis, these differentially expressed genes may cause abnormal structures and physiological function disorders, which may reduce the fungus growth. These results show the oil has potential for use in the biological control of plant disease as a green biopesticide. PMID:27187335

  12. Selective expression of a dominant-negative type Iα PKA regulatory subunit in striatal medium spiny neurons impairs gene expression and leads to reduced feeding and locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linghai; Gilbert, Merle L; Zheng, Ruimao; McKnight, G Stanley

    2014-04-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) mediate many of the physiological effects of dopamine, including the regulation of feeding and motor behaviors. Dopaminergic inputs from the midbrain modulate MSN excitability through pathways that involve cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA), but the physiological role of specific PKA isoforms in MSN neurons remains poorly understood. One of the major PKA regulatory (R) subunit isoforms expressed in MSNs is RIIβ, which localizes the PKA holoenzyme primarily to dendrites by interaction with AKAP5 and other scaffolding proteins. However, RI (RIα and RIβ) subunits are also expressed in MSNs and the RI holoenzyme has a weaker affinity for most scaffolding proteins and tends to localize in the cell body. We generated mice with selective expression of a dominant-negative RI subunit (RIαB) in striatal MSNs and show that this dominant-negative RIαB localizes to the cytoplasm and specifically inhibits type I PKA activity in the striatum. These mice are normal at birth; however, soon after weaning they exhibit growth retardation and the adult mice are hypophagic, lean, and resistant to high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia and obesity. The RIαB-expressing mice also exhibit decreased locomotor activity and decreased dopamine-regulated CREB phosphorylation and c-fos gene expression in the striatum. Our results demonstrate a critical role for cytoplasmic RI-PKA holoenzyme in gene regulation and the overall physiological function of MSNs. PMID:24695708

  13. Metallothionein gene expression is regulated by serum factors and activators of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Imbra, R J; Karin, M

    1987-01-01

    The exact physiological role of metallothionein (MT) is not clear. It has been suggested that these low-molecular-weight, highly inducible, heavy-metal-binding proteins serve in the regulation of intracellular Zn metabolism. Among the Zn-requiring systems are several enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. Therefore, during periods of active DNA synthesis there is likely to be an increased demand for Zn, which could be met by elevated MT synthesis. For that reason, we examined whether stimulation of cellular proliferation leads to increased expression of MT. We report here that treatment of cultured mammalian cells with serum growth factors and activators of protein kinase C, all of which are known to have growth stimulatory activity, led to induction of MT mRNA. One of the required steps in the signal transduction pathways triggered by these agents, ending in MT induction, appears to be the activation of protein kinase C. Images PMID:3600629

  14. The regulation of gene expression in transformed maize aleurone and endosperm protoplasts. Analysis of promoter activity, intron enhancement, and mRNA untranslated regions on expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, D R; Young, T E

    1994-01-01

    Gene expression in the aleurone and endosperm is highly regulated during both seed development and germination. Studies of alpha-amylase expression in the aleurone of barley (Hordeum vulgare) have generated the current paradigm for hormonal control of gene expression in germinating cereal grain. Gene expression studies in both the aleurone and endosperm tissues of maize (Zea mays) seed have been hampered because of a lack of an efficient transformation system. We report here the rapid isolation of protoplasts from maize aleurone and endosperm tissue, their transformation using polyethylene glycol or electroporation, and the regulation of gene expression in these cells. Adh1 promoter activity was reduced relative to the 35S promoter in aleurone and endosperm protoplasts compared to Black Mexican Sweet suspension cells in which it was nearly as strong as the 35S promoter. Intron-mediated stimulation of expression was substantially higher in transformed aleurone or endosperm protoplasts than in cell-suspension culture protoplasts, and the data suggest that the effect of an intron may be affected by cell type. To examine cytoplasmic regulation, the 5' and 3' untranslated regions from a barley alpha-amylase were fused to the firefly luciferase-coding region, and their effect on translation and mRNA stability was examined following the delivery of in vitro synthesized mRNA to aleurone and endosperm protoplasts. The alpha-amylase untranslated regions regulated translational efficiency in a tissue-specific manner, increasing translation in aleurone or endosperm protoplasts but not in maize or carrot cell-suspension protoplasts, in animal cells, or in in vitro translation lysates. PMID:7824660

  15. HUMAN PARAOXONASE-1 (PON1): GENE STRUCTURE AND EXPRESSION, PROMISCUOUS ACTIVITIES AND MULTIPLE PHYSIOLOGICAL ROLES

    PubMed Central

    Mackness, Mike; Mackness, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Human PON1 is a HDL-associated lipolactonase capable of preventing LDL and cell membrane oxidation and is therefore considered to be atheroprotective. PON1 contributes to the antioxidative function of HDL and reductions in HDL-PON1 activity, prevalent in a wide variety of diseases with an inflammatory component, is believed to lead to dysfunctional HDL which can promote inflammation and atherosclerosis. However, PON1 is multifunctional and may contribute to other HDL functions such as in innate immunity, preventing infection by quorum sensing gram negative bacteria by destroying acyl lactone mediators of quorum sensing, and putative new roles in cancer development and the promotion of healthy ageing. In this review we explore the physiological roles of PON1 in disease development, as well as PON1 gene and protein structure, promiscuous activities and the roles of SNPs and ethnicity in determining PON1 activity. PMID:25965560

  16. Kamebakaurin inhibits the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and its target genes to confer antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke Si; Ma, Juan; Mi, Chunliu; Li, Jing; Lee, Jung Joon; Jin, Xuejun

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), a heterodimeric transcription factor that mediates the adaptation of tumor cells and tissues to the hypoxic microenvironment, has attracted considerable interest as a potential therapeutic target. Kamebakaurin is a diterpenoid compound isolated from Isodon excia (Maxin.) Hara, which has been used for anti-inflammatory activities. However, its antitumor activity along with molecular mechanism has not been reported. Kamebakaurin showed potent inhibitory activity against HIF-1 activation induced by hypoxia or CoCl2 in various human cancer cell lines. This compound significantly decreased the hypoxia-induced accumulation of HIF-1α protein, whereas it did not affect the expression of topoisomerase-I (Topo-I). Further analysis revealed that kamebakaurin inhibited HIF-1α protein synthesis, without affecting the expression level of HIF-1α mRNA or degradation of HIF-1α protein. Furthermore, kamebakaurin prevented hypoxia-induced expression of HIF-1 target genes for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and erythropoietin (EPO). However, kamebakaurin caused cell growth inhibition via cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in tumor cells. In vivo studies, we further confirmed the inhibitory effect of kamebakaurin on the expression of HIF-1α proteins, leading to growth inhibition of HCT116 cells in a xenograft tumor model. These results show that kamebakaurin is an effective inhibitor of HIF-1 and provide new perspectives into its anticancer activity. PMID:26781327

  17. Profiling gene expression to distinguish the likely active diazotrophs from a sea of genetic potential in marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S M; Jenkins, B D

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) cycling microbial communities in marine sediments are extremely diverse, and it is unknown whether this diversity reflects extensive functional redundancy. Sedimentary denitrifiers remove significant amounts of N from the coastal ocean and diazotrophs are typically regarded as inconsequential. Recently, N fixation has been shown to be a potentially important source of N in estuarine and continental shelf sediments. Analysis of expressed genes for nitrite reductase (nirS) and a nitrogenase subunit (nifH) was used to identify the likely active denitrifiers and nitrogen fixers in surface sediments from different seasons in Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, USA). The overall diversity of diazotrophs expressing nifH decreased along the estuarine gradient from the estuarine head to an offshore continental shelf site. Two groups of sequences related to anaerobic sulphur/iron reducers and sulphate reducers dominated libraries of expressed nifH genes. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) data shows the highest abundance of both groups at a mid bay site, and the highest nifH expression at the head of the estuary, regardless of season. Several potential environmental factors, including water temperature, oxygen concentration and metal contamination, may influence the abundance and nifH expression of these two bacterial groups. PMID:24447468

  18. Curcumin down-regulates AR gene expression and activation in prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keiichiro; Yasunaga, Yutaka; Segawa, Takehiko; Ko, Daejin; Moul, Judd W; Srivastava, Shiv; Rhim, Johng S

    2002-10-01

    Curcumin, traditionally used as a seasoning spice in Indian cuisine, has been reported to decrease the proliferation potential of prostate cancer cells, by a mechanism that is not fully understood. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of curcumin in cell growth, activation of signal transduction, and transforming activities of both androgen-dependent and independent cell lines. Prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and PC-3, were treated with curcumin and its effects were further analyzed on signal transduction and expression of androgen receptor (AR) and AR-related cofactors using transient transfection assay and Western blotting. Our results show that curcumin down-regulates transactivation and expression of AR, activator protein-1 (AP-1), nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), and CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein)-binding protein (CBP). Curcumin also inhibited the transforming activities of both cell lines as evidenced by the reduced colony forming ability in soft agar. The results obtained here demonstrate that curcumin has a potential therapeutic effect on prostate cancer cells through down-regulation of AR and AR-related cofactors (AP-1, NF-kappaB and CBP). PMID:12239622

  19. Resveratrol post-transcriptionally regulates pro-inflammatory gene expression via regulation of KSRP RNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Franziska; Art, Julia; Henke, Jenny; Schrick, Katharina; Besche, Verena; Bros, Matthias; Li, Huige; Siuda, Daniel; Handler, Norbert; Bauer, Florian; Erker, Thomas; Behnke, Felix; Mönch, Bettina; Härdle, Lorena; Hoffmann, Markus; Chen, Ching-Yi; Förstermann, Ulrich; Dirsch, Verena M; Werz, Oliver; Kleinert, Hartmut; Pautz, Andrea

    2014-11-10

    Resveratrol shows beneficial effects in inflammation-based diseases like cancer, cardiovascular and chronic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory resveratrol effects deserve more attention. In human epithelial DLD-1 and monocytic Mono Mac 6 cells resveratrol decreased the expression of iNOS, IL-8 and TNF-α by reducing mRNA stability without inhibition of the promoter activity. Shown by pharmacological and siRNA-mediated inhibition, the observed effects are SIRT1-independent. Target-fishing and drug responsive target stability experiments showed selective binding of resveratrol to the RNA-binding protein KSRP, a central post-transcriptional regulator of pro-inflammatory gene expression. Knockdown of KSRP expression prevented resveratrol-induced mRNA destabilization in human and murine cells. Resveratrol did not change KSRP expression, but immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that resveratrol reduces the p38 MAPK-related inhibitory KSRP threonine phosphorylation, without blocking p38 MAPK activation or activity. Mutation of the p38 MAPK target site in KSRP blocked the resveratrol effect on pro-inflammatory gene expression. In addition, resveratrol incubation enhanced KSRP-exosome interaction, which is important for mRNA degradation. Finally, resveratrol incubation enhanced its intra-cellular binding to the IL-8, iNOS and TNF-α mRNA. Therefore, modulation of KSRP mRNA binding activity and, thereby, enhancement of mRNA degradation seems to be the common denominator of many anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol. PMID:25352548

  20. Cystatin B-deficient mice have increased expression of apoptosis and glial activation genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieuallen, Kimberly; Pennacchio, Len A.; Park, Morgan; Myers, Richard M.; Lennon, Gregory G.

    2001-07-05

    Loss-of-function mutations in the cystatin B (Cstb) gene cause a neurological disorder known as Unverricht Lundborg disease (EPM1) in human patients. Mice that lack Cstb provide a mammalian model for EPM1 by displaying progressive ataxia and myoclonic seizures. We analyzed RNAs from brains of Cstb-deficient mice by using modified differential display, oligonucleotide microarray hybridization and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to examine the molecular consequences of the lack of Cstb. We identified seven genes that have consistently increased transcript levels in neurological tissues from the knockout mice. These genes are cathepsin S, C1q B-chain of complement (C1qB), beta-2-microglobulin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap), apolipoprotein D, fibronectin 1 and metallothionein II, which are expected to be involved in increased proteolysis, apoptosis and glial activation. The molecular changes in Cstb-deficient mice are consistent with the pathology found in the mouse model and may provide clues towards the identification of therapeutic points of intervention for EPM1 patients.

  1. Molecular characterization of the constitutive expression of the plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase gene in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoqing; McIntyre, Thomas M; Zimmerman, Guy A; Prescott, Stephen M; Stafforini, Diana M

    2003-01-01

    Plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) is a phospholipase that inactivates platelet-activating factor (PAF) and PAF-like lipids to generate products with little or no biological activity. The levels of circulating PAF-AH correlate with several disease syndromes. We previously reported that mediators of inflammation regulate the expression of the human PAF-AH gene at the transcriptional level. In the present paper, we characterize the constitutive expression of plasma PAF-AH using the mouse gene as a model system, and we report comparative results obtained using human and mouse promoter constructs. We first cloned, sequenced and analysed the promoter region of the murine plasma PAF-AH (mPAF-AH) gene and found that this gene lacks a canonical TATA box. We demonstrated that the cis -elements required for basal transcription are localized within the -316 to -68 bp region. In vitro band-shift and supershift assays showed that Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors from RAW264.7 and J774A.1 macrophage nuclear extracts bound strongly to a distal GC-rich site within -278/-243 [specificity protein (Sp-A)] and to a proximal TC-rich motif within -150/-114 (Sp-B). In addition, we observed weak binding to a GA-rich site within -110/-82 (Sp-C). The regions containing Sp-B and Sp-C are highly conserved between the human and mouse genes. Forced expression of Sp1 or Sp3 in Sp-lacking Drosophila SL2 cells induced markedly the activity of the exogenous mPAF-AH promoter in a dose-dependent manner, and this induction was dependent on the presence of intact Sp-A and Sp-B. Interestingly, we found that the Sp1- and Sp3-associated DNA-binding activities increased during the maturation of primary human monocytes into macrophages in cell culture. These results demonstrate that Sp1 and Sp3 are key factors that contribute to the basal, constitutive transcription of the plasma PAF-AH gene in macrophages. PMID:12854969

  2. Micronuclei in Cord Blood Lymphocytes and Associations with Biomarkers of Exposure to Carcinogens and Hormonally Active Factors, Gene Polymorphisms, and Gene Expression: The NewGeneris Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Domenico Franco; Agramunt, Silvia; Anna, Lívia; Besselink, Harrie; Botsivali, Maria; Brady, Nigel J.; Ceppi, Marcello; Chatzi, Leda; Chen, Bowang; Decordier, Ilse; Farmer, Peter B.; Fleming, Sarah; Fontana, Vincenzo; Försti, Asta; Fthenou, Eleni; Gallo, Fabio; Georgiadis, Panagiotis; Gmuender, Hans; Godschalk, Roger W.; Granum, Berit; Hardie, Laura J.; Hemminki, Kari; Hochstenbach, Kevin; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kovács, Katalin; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Løvik, Martinus; Nielsen, Jeanette K; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Pedersen, Marie; Rydberg, Per; Schoket, Bernadette; Segerbäck, Dan; Singh, Rajinder; Sunyer, Jordi; Törnqvist, Margareta; van Loveren, Henk; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Vande Loock, Kim; von Stedingk, Hans; Wright, John; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; van Delft, Joost H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Leukemia incidence has increased in recent decades among European children, suggesting that early-life environmental exposures play an important role in disease development. Objectives: We investigated the hypothesis that childhood susceptibility may increase as a result of in utero exposure to carcinogens and hormonally acting factors. Using cord blood samples from the NewGeneris cohort, we examined associations between a range of biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and hormonally acting factors with micronuclei (MN) frequency as a proxy measure of cancer risk. Associations with gene expression and genotype were also explored. Methods: DNA and protein adducts, gene expression profiles, circulating hormonally acting factors, and GWAS (genome-wide association study) data were investigated in relation to genomic damage measured by MN frequency in lymphocytes from 623 newborns enrolled between 2006 and 2010 across Europe. Results: Malondialdehyde DNA adducts (M1dG) were associated with increased MN frequency in binucleated lymphocytes (MNBN), and exposure to androgenic, estrogenic, and dioxin-like compounds was associated with MN frequency in mononucleated lymphocytes (MNMONO), although no monotonic exposure–outcome relationship was observed. Lower frequencies of MNBN were associated with a 1-unit increase expression of PDCD11, LATS2, TRIM13, CD28, SMC1A, IL7R, and NIPBL genes. Gene expression was significantly higher in association with the highest versus lowest category of bulky and M1dG–DNA adducts for five and six genes, respectively. Gene expression levels were significantly lower for 11 genes in association with the highest versus lowest category of plasma AR CALUX® (chemically activated luciferase expression for androgens) (8 genes), ERα CALUX® (for estrogens) (2 genes), and DR CALUX® (for dioxins). Several SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) on chromosome 11 near FOLH1 significantly modified associations between androgen activity and MNBN

  3. Coal-burning endemic fluorosis is associated with reduced activity in antioxidative enzymes and Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Cui, Kang-ping; Xu, Yuan-yuan; Gao, Yan-ling; Zhao, Jing; Li, Da-sheng; Li, Xiao-lei; Huang, Hou-jin

    2014-02-01

    To study the effect of fluorine on the oxidative stress in coal-burning fluorosis, we investigated the environmental characteristics of coal-burning endemic fluorosis combined with fluorine content surveillance in air, water, food, briquette, and clay binder samples from Bijie region, Guizhou Province, southwest of China. The activities of antioxidant enzymes including copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and level of lipid peroxidation such as malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in serum samples obtained from subjects residing in the Bijie region. Expression of the Cu/Zn-SOD gene was assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results showed that people suffering from endemic fluorosis (the high and low exposure groups) had much higher MDA level. Their antioxidant enzyme activities and Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression levels were lower when compared to healthy people (the control group). Fluorosis can decrease the activities of antioxidant enzymes, which was associated with exposure level of fluorine. Down-regulation of Cu/Zn-SOD expression may play an important role in the aggravation of oxidative stress in endemic fluorosis. PMID:23567976

  4. Dietary selenium and prolonged exercise alter gene expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes in equine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    White, S H; Johnson, S E; Bobel, J M; Warren, L K

    2016-07-01

    Untrained Thoroughbred horses (6 mares and 6 geldings; 11 yr [SE 1] and 565 kg [SE 11]) were used to evaluate antioxidant gene expression and enzyme activity in blood and skeletal muscle in response to prolonged exercise after receiving 2 levels of dietary selenium for 36 d: 0.1 (CON; = 6) or 0.3 mg/kg DM (SEL; = 6). Horses were individually fed 1.6% BW coastal bermudagrass hay, 0.4% BW whole oats, and a mineral/vitamin premix containing no Se. Sodium selenite was added to achieve either 0.1 or 0.3 mg Se/kg DM in the total diet. On d 35, horses underwent 2 h of submaximal exercise in a free-stall exerciser. Blood samples were obtained before (d 0) and after 34 d of Se supplementation and on d 35 to 36 immediately after exercise and at 6 and 24 h after exercise. Biopsies of the middle gluteal muscle were obtained on d 0, before exercise on d 34, and at 6 and 24 h after exercise. Supplementation with Se above the NRC requirement (SEL) increased serum Se ( = 0.011) and muscle thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity ( = 0.051) but had no effect on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in plasma, red blood cell (RBC) lysate, or muscle in horses at rest. Serum creatine kinase activity increased ( < 0.0001) in response to prolonged exercise but was not affected by dietary treatment. Serum lipid hydroperoxides were affected by treatment ( = 0.052) and were higher ( = 0.012) in horses receiving CON than SEL immediately following exercise. Muscle expression of was unchanged at 6 h but increased ( = 0.005) 2.8-fold 24 h after exercise, whereas muscle TrxR activity remained unchanged. Glutathione peroxidase activity increased in plasma (P < 0.0001) and decreased in RBC lysate ( = 0.010) after prolonged exercise. A Se treatment × time interaction was observed for RBC GPx activity (P = 0.048). Muscle and expression and GPx activity did not change during the 24-h period after exercise. Level of dietary Se had no overall effect on expression of , , , , , , or in muscle following

  5. Effect of temperature and water activity on gene expression and aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus on almond medium.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Antonia; Solfrizzo, Michele; Epifani, Filomena; Panzarini, Giuseppe; Perrone, Giancarlo

    2016-01-18

    Almonds are among the commodities at risk of aflatoxin contamination by Aspergillus flavus. Temperature and water activity are the two key determinants in pre and post-harvest environments influencing both the rate of fungal spoilage and aflatoxin production. Varying the combination of these parameters can completely inhibit or fully activate the biosynthesis of aflatoxin, so it is fundamental to know which combinations can control or be conducive to aflatoxin contamination. Little information is available about the influence of these parameters on aflatoxin production on almonds. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of different combinations of temperature (20 °C, 28 °C, and 37 °C) and water activity (0.90, 0.93, 0.96, 0.99 aw) on growth, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) production and expression of the two regulatory genes, aflR and aflS, and two structural genes, aflD and aflO, of the aflatoxin biosynthetic cluster in A. flavus grown on an almond medium solidified with agar. Maximum accumulation of fungal biomass and AFB1 production was obtained at 28 °C and 0.96 aw; no fungal growth and AFB1 production were observed at 20 °C at the driest tested conditions (0.90 and 0.93 aw). At 20° and 37 °C AFB1 production was 70-90% lower or completely suppressed, depending on aw. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR showed that the two regulatory genes (aflR and aflS) were highly expressed at maximum (28 °C) and minimum (20 °C and 37 °C) AFB1 production. Conversely the two structural genes (aflD and aflO) were highly expressed only at maximum AFB1 production (28 °C and 0.96-0.99 aw). It seems that temperature acts as a key factor influencing aflatoxin production which is strictly correlated to the induction of expression of structural biosynthesis genes (aflD and aflO), but not to that of aflatoxin regulatory genes (aflR and aflS), whose functional products are most likely subordinated to other regulatory processes acting at post-translational level

  6. Gene expression during memory formation.

    PubMed

    Igaz, Lionel Muller; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Vianna, Monica M R; Izquierdo, Ivan; Medina, Jorge H

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, neuroscientists have provided many clues that point out the involvement of de novo gene expression during the formation of long-lasting forms of memory. However, information regarding the transcriptional response networks involved in memory formation has been scarce and fragmented. With the advent of genome-based technologies, combined with more classical approaches (i.e., pharmacology and biochemistry), it is now feasible to address those relevant questions--which gene products are modulated, and when that processes are necessary for the proper storage of memories--with unprecedented resolution and scale. Using one-trial inhibitory (passive) avoidance training of rats, one of the most studied tasks so far, we found two time windows of sensitivity to transcriptional and translational inhibitors infused into the hippocampus: around the time of training and 3-6 h after training. Remarkably, these periods perfectly overlap with the involvement of hippocampal cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) signaling pathways in memory consolidation. Given the complexity of transcriptional responses in the brain, particularly those related to processing of behavioral information, it was clearly necessary to address this issue with a multi-variable, parallel-oriented approach. We used cDNA arrays to screen for candidate inhibitory avoidance learning-related genes and analyze the dynamic pattern of gene expression that emerges during memory consolidation. These include genes involved in intracellular kinase networks, synaptic function, DNA-binding and chromatin modification, transcriptional activation and repression, translation, membrane receptors, and oncogenes, among others. Our findings suggest that differential and orchestrated hippocampal gene expression is necessary in both early and late periods of long-term memory consolidation. Additionally, this kind of studies may lead to the identification and characterization of genes that are relevant for the pathogenesis

  7. Scc2 regulates gene expression by recruiting cohesin to the chromosome as a transcriptional activator during yeast meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiqiang; Jin, Hui; Liu, Xiuwen; Hampton, Kristin; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2011-01-01

    To tether sister chromatids, a protein-loading complex, including Scc2, recruits cohesin to the chromosome at discrete loci. Cohesin facilitates the formation of a higher-order chromosome structure that could also influence gene expression. How cohesin directly regulates transcription remains to be further elucidated. We report that in budding yeast Scc2 is required for sister-chromatid cohesion during meiosis for two reasons. First, Scc2 is required for activating the expression of REC8, which encodes a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit; second, Scc2 is necessary for recruiting meiotic cohesin to the chromosome to generate sister-chromatid cohesion. Using a heterologous reporter assay, we have found that Scc2 increases the activity of its target promoters by recruiting cohesin to establish an upstream cohesin-associated region in a position-dependent manner. Rec8-associated meiotic cohesin is required for the full activation of the REC8 promoter, revealing that cohesin has a positive feedback on transcriptional regulation. Finally, we provide evidence that chromosomal binding of cohesin is sufficient for target-gene activation during meiosis. Our data support a noncanonical role for cohesin as a transcriptional activator during cell differentiation. PMID:21508318

  8. Quantitative perturbation-based analysis of gene expression predicts enhancer activity in early Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Sayal, Rupinder; Dresch, Jacqueline M; Pushel, Irina; Taylor, Benjamin R; Arnosti, David N

    2016-01-01

    Enhancers constitute one of the major components of regulatory machinery of metazoans. Although several genome-wide studies have focused on finding and locating enhancers in the genomes, the fundamental principles governing their internal architecture and cis-regulatory grammar remain elusive. Here, we describe an extensive, quantitative perturbation analysis targeting the dorsal-ventral patterning gene regulatory network (GRN) controlled by Drosophila NF-κB homolog Dorsal. To understand transcription factor interactions on enhancers, we employed an ensemble of mathematical models, testing effects of cooperativity, repression, and factor potency. Models trained on the dataset correctly predict activity of evolutionarily divergent regulatory regions, providing insights into spatial relationships between repressor and activator binding sites. Importantly, the collective predictions of sets of models were effective at novel enhancer identification and characterization. Our study demonstrates how experimental dataset and modeling can be effectively combined to provide quantitative insights into cis-regulatory information on a genome-wide scale. PMID:27152947

  9. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  10. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males' subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  11. Gene Expression and Antiviral Activity of Interleukin-35 in Response to Influenza A Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhu, Shengli; Xu, Gang; Feng, Jian; Han, Tao; Zhao, Fanpeng; She, Ying-Long; Liu, Shi; Ye, Linbai; Zhu, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin-35 (IL-35) is a newly described member of the IL-12 family. It has been reported to inhibit inflammation and autoimmune inflammatory disease and can increase apoptotic sensitivity. Little is known about the role of IL-35 during viral infection. Herein, high levels of IL-35 were found in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and throat swabs from patients with seasonal influenza A virus (IAV) relative to healthy individuals. IAV infection of human lung epithelial and primary cells increased levels of IL-35 mRNA and protein. Further studies demonstrated that IAV-induced IL-35 transcription is regulated by NF-κB. IL-35 expression was significantly suppressed by selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric-oxide synthase, indicating their involvement in IL-35 expression. Interestingly, IL-35 production may have suppressed IAV RNA replication and viral protein synthesis via induction of type I and III interferons (IFN), leading to activation of downstream IFN effectors, including double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase, 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, and myxovirus resistance protein. IL-35 exhibited extensive antiviral activity against the hepatitis B virus, enterovirus 71, and vesicular stomatitis virus. Our results demonstrate that IL-35 is a novel IAV-inducible cytokine, and its production elicits antiviral activity. PMID:27307042

  12. The N Terminus and C Terminus of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP4 Cooperate To Activate Viral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Lauren M.; Lester, Jonathan T.; Sivrich, Frances L.

    2012-01-01

    Infected cell polypeptide 4 (ICP4) activates transcription from most viral promoters. Two transactivation domains, one N-terminal and one C terminal, are largely responsible for the activation functions of ICP4. A mutant ICP4 molecule lacking the C-terminal activation domain (n208) efficiently activates many early genes, whereas late genes are poorly activated, and virus growth is severely impaired. The regions within the N terminus of ICP4 (amino acids 1 to 210) that contribute to activation were investigated by analysis of deletion mutants in the presence or absence of the C-terminal activation domain. The mutants were assessed for their abilities to support viral replication and to regulate gene expression. Several deletions in regions conserved in other alphaherpesviruses resulted in impaired activation and viral growth, without affecting DNA binding. The single small deletion that had the greatest effect on activation in the absence of the C terminus corresponded to a highly conserved stretch of amino acids between 81 and 96, rendering the molecule nonfunctional. However, when the C terminus was present, the same deletion had a minimal effect on activity. The amino terminus of ICP4 was predicted to be relatively disordered compared to the DNA-binding domain and the C-terminal 500 amino acids. Moreover, the amino terminus appears to be in a relatively extended conformation as determined by the hydrodynamic properties of several mutants. The data support a model where the amino terminus is an extended and possibly flexible region of the protein, allowing it to efficiently interact with multiple transcription factors at a distance from where it is bound to DNA, thereby enabling ICP4 to function as a general activator of polymerase II transcription. The C terminus of ICP4 can compensate for some of the mutations in the N terminus, suggesting that it either specifies redundant interactions or enables the amino terminus to function more efficiently. PMID:22496239

  13. Mucosal candidiasis elicits NF-κB activation, proinflammatory gene expression and localized neutrophilia in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gratacap, Remi L; Rawls, John F; Wheeler, Robert T

    2013-09-01

    The epithelium performs a balancing act at the interface between an animal and its environment to enable both pathogen killing and tolerance of commensal microorganisms. Candida albicans is a clinically important human commensal that colonizes all human mucosal surfaces, yet is largely prevented from causing mucosal infections in immunocompetent individuals. Despite the importance of understanding host-pathogen interactions at the epithelium, no immunocompetent vertebrate model has been used to visualize these dynamics non-invasively. Here we demonstrate important similarities between swimbladder candidiasis in the transparent zebrafish and mucosal infection at the mammalian epithelium. Specifically, in the zebrafish swimmbladder infection model, we show dimorphic fungal growth, both localized and tissue-wide epithelial NF-κB activation, induction of NF-κB -dependent proinflammatory genes, and strong neutrophilia. Consistent with density-dependence models of host response based primarily on tissue culture experiments, we show that only high-level infection provokes widespread activation of NF-κB in epithelial cells and induction of proinflammatory genes. Similar to what has been found using in vitro mammalian models, we find that epithelial NF-κB activation can occur at a distance from the immediate site of contact with epithelial cells. Taking advantage of the ability to non-invasively image infection and host signaling at high resolution, we also report that epithelial NF-κB activation is diminished when phagocytes control the infection. This is the first system to model host response to mucosal infection in the juvenile zebrafish, and offers unique opportunities to investigate the tripartite interactions of C. albicans, epithelium and immune cells in an intact host. PMID:23720235

  14. Expression of multiple tfb genes in different Halobacterium salinarum strains and interaction of TFB with transcriptional activator GvpE.

    PubMed

    Bleiholder, Anne; Frommherz, Regina; Teufel, Katharina; Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2012-04-01

    Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 contains multiple TBP and TFB proteins required for the recruitment of RNA polymerase for transcription initiation. The presence and the expression of genes encoding TFB were investigated in the two Hbt. salinarum strains NRC-1 and PHH1 and the mutant strain PHH4. The plasmid-encoded tfbC and tfbE genes of NRC-1 were lacking in PHH1 and PHH4. The 5'-end of the tfbF transcript was determined and contained a 5'-untranslated region of 39 nucleotides able to form a stem-loop structure. The expression of these tfb genes was studied in cultures growing at 15, 37°C and under heat shock conditions. Cold temperatures reduced growth and except for tfbF also the amounts of all tfb transcripts. However, the formation of gas vesicles increased in PHH1 and NRC-1. Heat shock reduced growth of PHH1 and NRC-1, but PHH4 was not affected. A 100-fold increase in tfbA and tfbB mRNA was observed in PHH1 and PHH4, whereas NRC-1 reduced the amounts of these transcripts and increased the expression of tfbG. All TFB proteins tested were able to interact with the transcription activator GvpE involved in gas vesicle formation that thus is able to recruit TFB to the gvp promoter. PMID:21969032

  15. rRNA Gene Expression of Abundant and Rare Activated-Sludge Microorganisms and Growth Rate Induced Micropollutant Removal.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Regnery, Julia; Li, Dong; Jones, Zackary L; Holloway, Ryan W; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-06-21

    The role of abundant and rare taxa in modulating the performance of wastewater-treatment systems is a critical component of making better predictions for enhanced functions such as micropollutant biotransformation. In this study, we compared 16S rRNA genes (rDNA) and rRNA gene expression of taxa in an activated-sludge-treatment plant (sequencing batch membrane bioreactor) at two solids retention times (SRTs): 20 and 5 days. These two SRTs were used to influence the rates of micropollutant biotransformation and nutrient removal. Our results show that rare taxa (<1%) have disproportionally high ratios of rRNA to rDNA, an indication of higher protein synthesis, compared to abundant taxa (≥1%) and suggests that rare taxa likely play an unrecognized role in bioreactor performance. There were also significant differences in community-wide rRNA expression signatures at 20-day SRT: anaerobic-oxic-anoxic periods were the primary driver of rRNA similarity. These results indicate differential expression of rRNA at high SRTs, which may further explain why high SRTs promote higher rates of micropollutant biotransformation. An analysis of micropollutant-associated degradation genes via metagenomics and direct measurements of a suite of micropollutants and nutrients further corroborates the loss of enhanced functions at 5-day SRT operation. This work advances our knowledge of the underlying ecosystem properties and dynamics of abundant and rare organisms associated with enhanced functions in engineered systems. PMID:27196630

  16. Titania nanotube delivery fetal bovine serum for enhancing MC3T3-E1 activity and osteogenic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Zhang, Xinming; Li, Zhaoyang; Liu, Yunde; Yang, Xianjin

    2015-11-01

    Titania nanotube (TNT) delivery of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was conducted on titanium (Ti) to enhance bone tissue repair. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) showed FBS increased the tube wall thickness and decreased the tube diameter. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared further confirmed that FBS completely covered the TNT and changed the surface composition. Water contact angle tests showed TNT/FBS possessed hydrophilic properties. Compared to original Ti, the TNT/FBS group had more attached osteoblasts after 2h and enhanced filopodia growth at 0.5h. Significantly, more osteoblasts were also observed on TNT/FBS after 7d culturing. FBS was released steadily from TNT; about 70% of FBS had been released at 3d and 90% at 5d, as shown by the bicinchoninic acid method. TNT/FBS also enhanced subsequent osteoblast differentiation and gene expression; the quantum real-time polymerase chain reaction test showed that TNT/FBS up-regulated alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin gene expression at 7d and 14d. Therefore, TNT/FBS delivered sustained in situ nutrition and enhanced osteoblast activity and osteogenic gene expression. PMID:26249612

  17. Epstein-Barr virus induces cellular transcription factors to allow active expression of EBER genes by RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Felton-Edkins, Zoë A; Kondrashov, Alexander; Karali, Dimitra; Fairley, Jennifer A; Dawson, Christopher W; Arrand, John R; Young, Lawrence S; White, Robert J

    2006-11-10

    The EBER genes of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are transcribed by RNA polymerase (pol) III to produce untranslated RNAs that are implicated in oncogenesis. These EBER transcripts are the most highly expressed viral gene products in EBV-transformed cells. We have identified changes to the cellular transcription machinery that may contribute to the high levels of EBER RNA. These include phosphorylation of ATF2, which interacts with EBER promoters. A second is induction of TFIIIC, a pol III-specific factor that activates EBER genes; all five subunits of TFIIIC are overexpressed in EBV-positive cells. In addition, EBV induces BDP1, a subunit of the pol III-specific factor TFIIIB. Although BDP1 is the only TFIIIB subunit induced by EBV, its induction is sufficient to stimulate EBER expression in vivo, implying a limiting function. The elevated levels of BDP1 and TFIIIC in EBV-positive cells stimulate production of tRNA, 7SL, and 5S rRNA. Abnormally high expression of these cellular pol III products may contribute to the ability of EBV to enhance growth potential. PMID:16956891

  18. Gene Express Inc.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Colette F

    2006-07-01

    Gene Express, Inc. is a technology-licensing company and provider of Standardized Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (StaRT-PCR) services. Designed by and for clinical researchers involved in pharmaceutical, biomarker and molecular diagnostic product development, StaRT-PCR is a unique quantitative and standardized multigene expression measurement platform. StaRT-PCR meets all of the performance characteristics defined by the US FDA as required to support regulatory submissions [101,102] , and by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) as necessary to support diagnostic testing [1] . A standardized mixture of internal standards (SMIS), manufactured in bulk, provides integrated quality control wherein each native template target gene is measured relative to a competitive template internal standard. Bulk production enables the compilation of a comprehensive standardized database from across multiple experiments, across collaborating laboratories and across the entire clinical development lifecycle of a given compound or diagnostic product. For the first time, all these data are able to be directly compared. Access to such a database can dramatically shorten the time from investigational new drug (IND) to new drug application (NDA), or save time and money by hastening a substantiated 'no-go' decision. High-throughput StaRT-PCR is conducted at the company's automated Standardized Expression Measurement (SEM) Center. Currently optimized for detection on a microcapillary electrophoretic platform, StaRT-PCR products also may be analyzed on microarray, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) platforms. SEM Center services deliver standardized genomic data--data that will accelerate the application of pharmacogenomic technology to new drug and diagnostic test development and facilitate personalized medicine. PMID:16886903

  19. Cyclical strain modulates metalloprotease and matrix gene expression in human tenocytes via activation of TGFβ☆

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Eleanor R.; Jones, Gavin C.; Legerlotz, Kirsten; Riley, Graham P.

    2013-01-01

    Tendinopathies are a range of diseases characterised by degeneration and chronic tendon pain and represent a significant cause of morbidity. Relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms; however onset is often associated with physical activity. A number of molecular changes have been documented in tendinopathy such as a decrease in overall collagen content, increased extracellular matrix turnover and protease activity. Metalloproteinases are involved in the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix and expression is regulated by mechanical strain. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of strain upon matrix turnover by measuring metalloproteinase and matrix gene expression and to elucidate the mechanism of action. Primary Human Achilles tenocytes were seeded in type I rat tail collagen gels in a Flexcell™ tissue train system and subjected to 5% cyclic uniaxial strain at 1 Hz for 48 h. TGFβ1 and TGFβRI inhibitor were added to selected cultures. RNA was measured using qRT-PCR and TGFβ protein levels were determined using a cell based luciferase assay. We observed that mechanical strain regulated the mRNA levels of multiple protease and matrix genes anabolically, and this regulation mirrored that seen with TGFβ stimulation alone. We have also demonstrated that the inhibition of the TGFβ signalling pathway abrogated the strain induced changes in mRNA and that TGFβ activation, rather than gene expression, was increased with mechanical strain. We concluded that TGFβ activation plays an important role in mechanotransduction. Targeting this pathway may have its place in the treatment of tendinopathy. PMID:23830915

  20. Human adipocytes are highly sensitive to intermittent hypoxia induced NF-kappaB activity and subsequent inflammatory gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Cormac T.; Kent, Brian D.; Crinion, Sophie J.; McNicholas, Walter T.; Ryan, Silke

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Intermittent hypoxia (IH) leads to NF-κB activation in human primary adipocytes. • Adipocytes bear higher pro-inflammatory potential than other human primary cells. • IH leads to upregulation of multiple pro-inflammatory genes in human adipocytes. - Abstract: Introduction: Intermittent hypoxia (IH)-induced activation of pro-inflammatory pathways is a major contributing factor to the cardiovascular pathophysiology associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Obesity is commonly associated with OSA although it remains unknown whether adipose tissue is a major source of inflammatory mediators in response to IH. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that IH leads to augmented inflammatory responses in human adipocytes when compared to cells of non-adipocyte lineages. Methods and results: Human primary subcutaneous and visceral adipocytes, human primary microvascular pulmonary endothelial cells (HUMEC-L) and human primary small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) were exposed to 0, 6 or 12 cycles of IH or stimulated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. IH led to a robust increase in NF-κB DNA-binding activity in adipocytes compared with normoxic controls regardless of whether the source of adipocytes was visceral or subcutaneous. Notably, the NF-κB response of adipocytes to both IH and TNF-α was significantly greater than that in HUMEC-L and SAEC. Western blotting confirmed enhanced nuclear translocation of p65 in adipocytes in response to IH, accompanied by phosphorylation of I-κB. Parallel to p65 activation, we observed a significant increase in secretion of the adipokines interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6 and TNF-α with IH in adipocytes accompanied by significant upregulation of mRNA expression. PCR-array suggested profound influence of IH on pro-inflammatory gene expression in adipocytes. Conclusion: Human adipocytes demonstrate strong sensitivity to inflammatory gene expression in response to acute IH and hence, adipose tissue may be a key

  1. The transcriptional regulator SsuR activates expression of the Corynebacterium glutamicum sulphonate utilization genes in the absence of sulphate.

    PubMed

    Koch, Daniel J; Rückert, Christian; Albersmeier, Andreas; Hüser, Andrea T; Tauch, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2005-10-01

    In a recent study, the putative regulatory gene cg0012 was shown to belong to the regulon of McbR, a global transcriptional regulator of sulphur metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032. A deletion of cg0012, now designated ssuR (sulphonate sulphur utilization regulator), led to the mutant strain C. glutamicum DK100, which was shown to be blocked in the utilization of sulphonates as sulphur sources. According to DNA microarray hybridizations, transcription of the ssu and seu genes, encoding the sulphonate utilization system of C. glutamicum, was considerably decreased in C. glutamicum DK100 when compared with the wild-type strain. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified SsuR protein demonstrated that the upstream regions of ssuI, seuABC, ssuD2 and ssuD1CBA contain SsuR binding sites. A nucleotide sequence alignment of the four DNA fragments containing the SsuR binding sites revealed a common 21 bp motif consisting of T-, GC- and A-rich domains. Mapping of the transcriptional start sites in front of ssuI, seuABC, ssuD2 and ssuD1CBA indicated that the SsuR binding sites are located directly upstream of identified promoter sequences and that the ssu genes are expressed by leaderless transcripts. Binding of the SsuR protein to its operator was shown to be diminished in vitro by the effector substance sulphate and its direct assimilation products adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate, sulphite and sulphide. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments verified that the expression of the ssu and seu genes was also repressed in vivo by the presence of sulphate or sulphite. Therefore, the regulatory protein SsuR activates the expression of the ssu and seu genes in C. glutamicum in the absence of the preferred sulphur source sulphate. PMID:16194234

  2. Effects of methyl mercury on the activity and gene expression of mouse Langerhans islets and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Faheem; Bahadar, Haji; Niaz, Kamal; Baeeri, Maryam; Rahimifard, Mahban; Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Ghasemi-Niri, Seyedeh Farnaz; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a well-known heavy metal and causes various toxic effects. It is abundantly present in fish in the form of methyl mercury (MeHg). Also, various other forms of mercury can enter human body either from environment like inhalation or through dental amalgams. The present study was designed to assess MeHg induced toxicity in mouse plasma and pancreatic islets with respect to insulin secretion, oxidative balance, glucose tolerance, gene expression, caspases 3 and 9 activities. MeHg was dissolved in tap water and administered at doses 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg/day, for 4 weeks. In mice, MeHg significantly caused increase in plasma insulin as well as C-peptides. Glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia are main consequences of our study that correlate with the gene expression changes of glucose homeostasis as well. MeHg caused increase lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner in plasma as well as pancreatic islets. In addition, total thiol molecules and ferrous reducing antioxidant power in MeHg treated group was decreased in plasma as well as pancreatic islets. Caspases 3 and 9 activities of pancreatic islets were upregulated in MeHg exposed animals. Reactive oxygen species were extremely high in pancreatic islets of MeHg treated groups. MeHg disrupted gluconeogenesis/glycogenolysis pathways and insulin secretory functions of islets by targeting GDH, GLUT2 and GCK genes of pancreatic islets. In conclusion, the current study revealed that insulin pathways, oxidative balance and glucose metabolism encoded genetic makeup are susceptible to MeHg toxicity and the subsequent oxidative stress and alternations in gene expression could lead toward functional abnormalities in other organs. PMID:27178136

  3. Systems Biophysics of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Jose M.G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a process central to any form of life. It involves multiple temporal and functional scales that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the coordinated regulation of multiple genes in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. This diversity in scales poses fundamental challenges to the use of traditional approaches to fully understand even the simplest gene expression systems. Recent advances in computational systems biophysics have provided promising avenues to reliably integrate the molecular detail of biophysical process into the system behavior. Here, we review recent advances in the description of gene regulation as a system of biophysical processes that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the combinatorial assembly of nucleoprotein complexes. There is now basic mechanistic understanding on how promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including precision and flexibility of the transcriptional responses. PMID:23790365

  4. Effects of temperature - heavy metal interactions, antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ergün, N; Özçubukçu, S; Kolukirik, M; Temizkan, Ö

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the effect of heat and chromium (Cr) heavy metal interactions on wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Ç-1252 and Gun91) was investigated by measuring total chlorophyll and carotenoid levels, catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) antioxidant enzyme activities, and MYB73, ERF1 and TaSRG gene expression. Examination of pigment levels demonstrated a decrease in total chlorophyll in both species of wheat under combined heat and heavy metal stress, while the carotenoid levels showed a slight increase. APX activity increased in both species in response to heavy metal stress, but the increase in APX activity in the Gun91 seedlings was higher than that in the Ç-1252 seedlings. CAT activity increased in Gun91 seedlings but decreased in Ç-1252 seedlings. These results showed that Gun91 seedling had higher resistance to Cr and Cr + heat stresses than the Ç-1252 seedling. The quantitative molecular analyses implied that the higher resistance was related to the overexpression of TaMYB73, TaERF1 and TaSRG transcription factors. The increase in the expression levels of these transcription factors was profound under combined Cr and heat stress. This study suggests that TaMYB73, TaERF1 and TaSRG transcription factors regulate Cr and heat stress responsive genes in wheat. PMID:25475983

  5. Activation of the c-fos gene in prodynorphin- and proenkephalin-expressing cells of nucleus tractus solitarius after seizures.

    PubMed

    Kanter, R K; Erickson, J T; Millhorn, D E

    1994-10-01

    We performed studies to determine the anatomical regions and chemical phenotypes of neurons within the rat medulla oblongata activated by pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures. Activated cells were identified by their expression of the c-fos gene, detected by in situ hybridization for c-fos mRNA and immunocytochemistry for Fos protein. Activated cells were located predominantly in nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), with c-fos mRNA appearing within 20 min after seizures (peak at 1-2 h), followed by Fos immunoreactivity visible at 1 h (peak at 2-4 h). Neither nonspecific noxious stimulation by intraperitoneal injection of saline nor brief exposure to hypoxic or hypercapnic gas mixtures to stimulate chemoreceptors reproduced this pattern of labeling. Prodynorphin or proenkephalin mRNA, detected by in situ hybridization, was colocalized with Fos immunoreactivity in many NTS cells. Thus, seizures activate neuronal pathways in the medulla oblongata which express genes for endogenous opioids. Potential long-term effects of seizures are suggested by the in situ hybridization finding that NTS prodynorphin mRNA increased 24 h after seizures compared to control levels. PMID:7957742

  6. Novel recombinant human lactoferrin: differential activation of oxidative stress related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kruzel, Marian L; Actor, Jeffrey K; Zimecki, Michał; Wise, Jasen; Płoszaj, Paulina; Mirza, Shaper; Kruzel, Mark; Hwang, Shen-An; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-12-01

    Lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein found in high concentrations in mammalian exocrine secretions, is an important component of the host defense system. It is also a major protein of the secondary granules of neutrophils from which is released upon activation. Due to its potential clinical utility, recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) has been produced in various eukaryotic expression systems; however, none of these are fully compatible with humans. Most of the biopharmaceuticals approved by the FDA for use in humans are produced in mammalian expression systems. The Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) have become the system of choice for proteins that require post-translational modifications, such as glycoproteins. The aim of this study was to scale-up expression and purification of rhLF in a CHO expression system, verify its glycan primary structure, and assess its biological properties in cell culture models. A stable CHO cell line producing >200mg/L of rhLF was developed and established. rhLF was purified by a single-step cation-exchange chromatography procedure. The highly homogenous rhLF has a molecular weight of approximately 80 kDa. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis revealed N-linked, partially sialylated glycans at two glycosylation sites, typical for human milk LF. This novel rhLF showed a protective effect against oxidative stress in a similar manner to its natural counterpart. In addition, rhLF revealed a modulatory effect on cellular redox via upregulation of key antioxidant enzymes. These data imply that the CHO-derived rhLF is fully compatible with the native molecule, thus it has promise for human therapeutic applications. PMID:24070904

  7. A Minimal Nitrogen Fixation Gene Cluster from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78 Enables Expression of Active Nitrogenase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dehua; Liu, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Jianbo; Hong, Yuanyuan; Li, Pengfei; Chen, Sanfeng; Dixon, Ray; Li, Jilun

    2013-01-01

    Most biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, an enzyme complex comprising two component proteins that contains three different metalloclusters. Diazotrophs contain a common core of nitrogen fixation nif genes that encode the structural subunits of the enzyme and components required to synthesize the metalloclusters. However, the complement of nif genes required to enable diazotrophic growth varies significantly amongst nitrogen fixing bacteria and archaea. In this study, we identified a minimal nif gene cluster consisting of nine nif genes in the genome of Paenibacillus sp. WLY78, a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe isolated from the rhizosphere of bamboo. We demonstrate that the nif genes in this organism are organized as an operon comprising nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV and that the nif cluster is under the control of a σ70 (σA)-dependent promoter located upstream of nifB. To investigate genetic requirements for diazotrophy, we transferred the Paenibacillus nif cluster to Escherichia coli. The minimal nif gene cluster enables synthesis of catalytically active nitrogenase in this host, when expressed either from the native nifB promoter or from the T7 promoter. Deletion analysis indicates that in addition to the core nif genes, hesA plays an important role in nitrogen fixation and is responsive to the availability of molybdenum. Whereas nif transcription in Paenibacillus is regulated in response to nitrogen availability and by the external oxygen concentration, transcription from the nifB promoter is constitutive in E. coli, indicating that negative regulation of nif transcription is bypassed in the heterologous host. This study demonstrates the potential for engineering nitrogen fixation in a non-nitrogen fixing organism with a minimum set of nine nif genes. PMID:24146630

  8. Transcription Factor ZBED6 Mediates IGF2 Gene Expression by Regulating Promoter Activity and DNA Methylation in Myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Liang-Zhi; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Li, Ming-Xun; Sun, Yu-Jia; Li, Cong-Jun; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were upregulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels were negatively associated with the methylation status in beef cattle (P < 0.05). A luciferase assay for the IGF2 intron 3 and P3 promoter showed that the mutant-type 439 A-SNP-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the wild-type 439 G-SNP-pGL3 construct (P < 0.05). An over-expression assay revealed that ZBED6 regulate IGF2 expression and promote myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, knockdown of ZBED6 led to IGF2 expression change in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that ZBED6 inhibits IGF2 activity and expression via a G to A transition disrupts the interaction. Thus, we propose that ZBED6 plays a critical role in myogenic differentiation.

  9. The Histone Demethylase KDM5 Activates Gene Expression by Recognizing Chromatin Context through Its PHD Reader Motif.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingyin; Secombe, Julie

    2015-12-15

    KDM5 family proteins are critically important transcriptional regulators whose physiological functions in the context of a whole animal remain largely unknown. Using genome-wide gene expression and binding analyses in Drosophila adults, we demonstrate that KDM5 (Lid) is a direct regulator of genes required for mitochondrial structure and function. Significantly, this occurs independently of KDM5's well-described JmjC domain-encoded histone demethylase activity. Instead, it requires the PHD motif of KDM5 that binds to histone H3 that is di- or trimethylated on lysine 4 (H3K4me2/3). Genome-wide, KDM5 binding overlaps with the active chromatin mark H3K4me3, and a fly strain specifically lacking H3K4me2/3 binding shows defective KDM5 promoter recruitment and gene activation. KDM5 therefore plays a central role in regulating mitochondrial function by utilizing its ability to recognize specific chromatin contexts. Importantly, KDM5-mediated regulation of mitochondrial activity is likely to be key in human diseases caused by dysfunction of this family of proteins. PMID:26673323

  10. Gene expression in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jansen, R; Penninx, B W J H; Madar, V; Xia, K; Milaneschi, Y; Hottenga, J J; Hammerschlag, A R; Beekman, A; van der Wee, N; Smit, J H; Brooks, A I; Tischfield, J; Posthuma, D; Schoevers, R; van Grootheest, G; Willemsen, G; de Geus, E J; Boomsma, D I; Wright, F A; Zou, F; Sun, W; Sullivan, P F

    2016-03-01

    The search for genetic variants underlying major depressive disorder (MDD) has not yet provided firm leads to its underlying molecular biology. A complementary approach is to study gene expression in relation to MDD. We measured gene expression in peripheral blood from 1848 subjects from The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Subjects were divided into current MDD (N=882), remitted MDD (N=635) and control (N=331) groups. MDD status and gene expression were measured again 2 years later in 414 subjects. The strongest gene expression differences were between the current MDD and control groups (129 genes at false-discovery rate, FDR<0.1). Gene expression differences across MDD status were largely unrelated to antidepressant use, inflammatory status and blood cell counts. Genes associated with MDD were enriched for interleukin-6 (IL-6)-signaling and natural killer (NK) cell pathways. We identified 13 gene expression clusters with specific clusters enriched for genes involved in NK cell activation (downregulated in current MDD, FDR=5.8 × 10(-5)) and IL-6 pathways (upregulated in current MDD, FDR=3.2 × 10(-3)). Longitudinal analyses largely confirmed results observed in the cross-sectional data. Comparisons of gene expression results to the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) MDD genome-wide association study results revealed overlap with DVL3. In conclusion, multiple gene expression associations with MDD were identified and suggest a measurable impact of current MDD state on gene expression. Identified genes and gene clusters are enriched with immune pathways previously associated with the etiology of MDD, in line with the immune suppression and immune activation hypothesis of MDD. PMID:26008736

  11. Activation of c-fos gene expression by a kinase-deficient epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, E R; Korf, G M; Christensen, T A; Connolly, D C; Getz, M J; Maihle, N J

    1994-01-01

    The intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to be responsible for many of the pleiotropic intracellular effects resulting from ligand stimulation [W.S. Chen, C.S. Lazar, M. Poenie, R.Y. Tsien, G.N. Gill, and M.G. Rosenfeld, Nature (London) 328:820-823, 1987; A.M. Honegger, D. Szapary, A. Schmidt, R. Lyall, E. Van Obberghen, T.J. Dull, A. Ulrich, and J. Schlessinger, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:4568-4571, 1987]. Recently, however, it has been shown that addition of ligand to cells expressing kinase-defective EGFR mutants can result in the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (R. Campos-González and J.R. Glenney, Jr., J. Biol. Chem. 267:14535-14538, 1992; E. Selva, D.L. Raden, and R.J. Davis, J. Biol. Chem. 268:2250-2254, 1993), as well as stimulation of DNA synthesis (K.J. Coker, J.V. Staros, and C.A. Guyer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:6967-6971, 1994). Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase has been shown to phosphorylate the transcription factor p62TCF in vitro, leading to enhanced ternary complex formation between p62TCF, p67SRF, and the c-fos serum response element (SRE) [H. Gille, A.D. Sharrocks, and P.E. Shaw, Nature (London) 358:414-417, 1992]. On the basis of these observations, we have investigated the possibility that the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity of the EGFR may not be necessary for transcriptional activation mediated via p62TCF. Here, we demonstrate that a kinase-defective EGFR mutant can signal ligand-induced expression of c-fos protein and that a significant component of this induction appears to be mediated at the transcriptional level. Investigation of transcriptional activation mediated by the c-fos SRE shows that this response is impaired by mutations in the SRE which eliminate binding of p62(TCF). These data indicate that information inherent in the structure of the EGFR can be accessed by ligand stimulation independent of the receptor's catalytic kinase function

  12. Expression and regulation of genes encoding lignocellulose-degrading activity in the genus Phanerochaete.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Master, Emma R

    2012-04-01

    As white-rot basidiomycetes, Phanerochaete species are critical to the cycling of carbon sequestered as woody biomass, and are predicted to encode many enzymes that can be harnessed to promote the conversion of lignocellulose to sugars for fermentation to fuels and chemicals. Advances in genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic technologies have enabled detailed analyses of different Phanerochaete species and have revealed numerous enzyme families required for lignocellulose utilization, as well as insight into the regulation of corresponding genes. Recent studies of Phanerochaete are also exemplified by molecular analyses following cultivation on different wood preparations, and show substrate-dependent responses that were difficult to predict using model compounds or isolated plant polysaccharides. The aim of this mini-review is to synthesize results from studies that have applied recent advances in molecular tools to evaluate the expression and regulation of proteins that contribute to lignocellulose conversion in Phanerochaete species. The identification of proteins with as yet unknown function are also highlighted and noted as important targets for future investigation of white-rot decay. PMID:22391967

  13. An In Vivo Selection Identifies Listeria monocytogenes Genes Required to Sense the Intracellular Environment and Activate Virulence Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an environmental saprophyte and facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen with a well-defined life-cycle that involves escape from a phagosome, rapid cytosolic growth, and ActA-dependent cell-to-cell spread, all of which are dependent on the master transcriptional regulator PrfA. The environmental cues that lead to temporal and spatial control of L. monocytogenes virulence gene expression are poorly understood. In this study, we took advantage of the robust up-regulation of ActA that occurs intracellularly and expressed Cre recombinase from the actA promoter and 5’ untranslated region in a strain in which loxP sites flanked essential genes, so that activation of actA led to bacterial death. Upon screening for transposon mutants that survived intracellularly, six genes were identified as necessary for ActA expression. Strikingly, most of the genes, including gshF, spxA1, yjbH, and ohrA, are predicted to play important roles in bacterial redox regulation. The mutants identified in the genetic selection fell into three broad categories: (1) those that failed to reach the cytosolic compartment; (2) mutants that entered the cytosol, but failed to activate the master virulence regulator PrfA; and (3) mutants that entered the cytosol and activated transcription of actA, but failed to synthesize it. The identification of mutants defective in vacuolar escape suggests that up-regulation of ActA occurs in the host cytosol and not the vacuole. Moreover, these results provide evidence for two non-redundant cytosolic cues; the first results in allosteric activation of PrfA via increased glutathione levels and transcriptional activation of actA while the second results in translational activation of actA and requires yjbH. Although the precise host cues have not yet been identified, we suggest that intracellular redox stress occurs as a consequence of both host and pathogen remodeling their metabolism upon infection. PMID:27414028

  14. An In Vivo Selection Identifies Listeria monocytogenes Genes Required to Sense the Intracellular Environment and Activate Virulence Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Reniere, Michelle L; Whiteley, Aaron T; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an environmental saprophyte and facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen with a well-defined life-cycle that involves escape from a phagosome, rapid cytosolic growth, and ActA-dependent cell-to-cell spread, all of which are dependent on the master transcriptional regulator PrfA. The environmental cues that lead to temporal and spatial control of L. monocytogenes virulence gene expression are poorly understood. In this study, we took advantage of the robust up-regulation of ActA that occurs intracellularly and expressed Cre recombinase from the actA promoter and 5' untranslated region in a strain in which loxP sites flanked essential genes, so that activation of actA led to bacterial death. Upon screening for transposon mutants that survived intracellularly, six genes were identified as necessary for ActA expression. Strikingly, most of the genes, including gshF, spxA1, yjbH, and ohrA, are predicted to play important roles in bacterial redox regulation. The mutants identified in the genetic selection fell into three broad categories: (1) those that failed to reach the cytosolic compartment; (2) mutants that entered the cytosol, but failed to activate the master virulence regulator PrfA; and (3) mutants that entered the cytosol and activated transcription of actA, but failed to synthesize it. The identification of mutants defective in vacuolar escape suggests that up-regulation of ActA occurs in the host cytosol and not the vacuole. Moreover, these results provide evidence for two non-redundant cytosolic cues; the first results in allosteric activation of PrfA via increased glutathione levels and transcriptional activation of actA while the second results in translational activation of actA and requires yjbH. Although the precise host cues have not yet been identified, we suggest that intracellular redox stress occurs as a consequence of both host and pathogen remodeling their metabolism upon infection. PMID:27414028

  15. Clobetasol and Halcinonide Act as Smoothened Agonists to Promote Myelin Gene Expression and RxRγ Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    De Nardis, Velia; Di Giandomenico, Daniele; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Scardapane, Marco; Poma, Anna; Ragnini-Wilson, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    One of the causes of permanent disability in chronic multiple sclerosis patients is the inability of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) to terminate their maturation program at lesions. To identify key regulators of myelin gene expression acting at the last stages of OPC maturation we developed a drug repositioning strategy based on the mouse immortalized oligodendrocyte (OL) cell line Oli-neu brought to the premyelination stage by stably expressing a key factor regulating the last stages of OL maturation. The Prestwick Chemical Library® of 1,200 FDA-approved compound(s) was repositioned at three dosages based on the induction of Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) expression. Drug hits were further validated using dosage-dependent reproducibility tests and biochemical assays. The glucocorticoid class of compounds was the most highly represented and we found that they can be divided in three groups according to their efficacy on MBP up-regulation. Since target identification is crucial before bringing compounds to the clinic, we searched for common targets of the primary screen hits based on their known chemical-target interactomes, and the pathways predicted by top ranking compounds were validated using specific inhibitors. Two of the top ranking compounds, Halcinonide and Clobetasol, act as Smoothened (Smo) agonists to up-regulate myelin gene expression in the Oli-neuM cell line. Further, RxRγ activation is required for MBP expression upon Halcinonide and Clobetasol treatment. These data indicate Clobetasol and Halcinonide as potential promyelinating drugs and also provide a mechanistic understanding of their mode of action in the pathway leading to myelination in OPCs. Furthermore, our classification of glucocorticoids with respect to MBP expression provides important novel insights into their effects in the CNS and a rational criteria for their choice in combinatorial therapies in de-myelinating diseases. PMID:26658258

  16. Immediate early gene expression reveals interactions between social and nicotine rewards on brain activity in adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Bastle, Ryan M; Peartree, Natalie A; Goenaga, Julianna; Hatch, Kayla N; Henricks, Angela; Scott, Samantha; Hood, Lauren E; Neisewander, Janet L

    2016-10-15

    Smoking initiation predominantly occurs during adolescence, often in the presence of peers. Therefore, understanding the neural mechanisms underlying the rewarding effects of nicotine and social stimuli is vital. Using the conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure, we measured immediate early gene (IEG) expression in animals following exposure either to a reward-conditioned environment or to the unconditioned stimuli (US). Adolescent, male rats were assigned to the following CPP US conditions: (1) Saline+Isolated, (2) Nicotine+Isolated, (3) Saline+Social, or (4) Nicotine+Social. For Experiment 1, brain tissue was collected 90min following the CPP expression test and processed for Fos immunohistochemistry. We found that rats conditioned with nicotine with or without a social partner exhibited CPP; however, we found no group differences in Fos expression in any brain region analyzed, with the exception of the nucleus accumbens core that exhibited a social-induced attenuation in Fos expression. For Experiment 2, brain tissue was collected 90min following US exposure during the last conditioning session. We found social reward-induced increases in IEG expression in striatal and amydalar subregions. In contrast, nicotine reduced IEG expression in prefrontal and striatal subregions. Reward interactions were also found in the dorsolateral striatum, basolateral amygdala, and ventral tegmental area where nicotine alone attenuated IEG expression and social reward reversed this effect. These results suggest that in general social rewards enhance, whereas nicotine attenuates, activation of mesocorticolimbic regions; however, the rewards given together interact to enhance activation in some regions. The findings contribute to knowledge of how a social environment influences nicotine effects. PMID:27435419

  17. Weight gain and inflammation regulate aromatase expression in male adipose tissue, as evidenced by reporter gene activity.

    PubMed

    Polari, L; Yatkin, E; Martínez Chacón, M G; Ahotupa, M; Smeds, A; Strauss, L; Zhang, F; Poutanen, M; Saarinen, N; Mäkelä, S I

    2015-09-01

    Obesity and white adipose tissue (WAT) inflammation are associated with enhanced aromatization in women, but little is known about the regulation of aromatase (CYP19A1) gene expression in male WAT. We investigated the impact of weight gain and WAT inflammation on the regulation of CYP19A1 in males, by utilizing the hARO-Luc aromatase reporter mouse model containing a >100-kb 5'-region of the human CYP19A1 gene. We show that hARO-Luc reporter activity is enhanced in WAT of mice with increased adiposity and inflammation. Dexamethasone and TNFα, as well as forskolin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, upregulate hARO-Luc activity, suggesting the involvement of promoters I.4 and I.3/II. Furthermore, we show that diet enriched with antioxidative plant polyphenols attenuates WAT inflammation and hARO-Luc activity in obese males. In conclusion, our data suggest that obesity-associated WAT inflammation leads to increased peripheral CYP19A1 expression in males, and that polyphenol-enriched diet may have the potential to attenuate excessive aromatization in WAT of obese men. PMID:26054748

  18. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 regulates microRNA gene expression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds Approximately 1,000 microRNAs (miRs) are present in the human genome; however, little is known about the regulation of miR transcription. Because miR levels are deregulated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 is constitutively activated in CLL, we sought to determine whether STAT3 affects the transcription of miR genes in CLL cells. Methods We used publically available data from the ENCODE project to identify putative STAT3 binding sites in the promoters of miR genes. Then we transfected CLL cells with STAT3-shRNA or with an empty vector, and to determine which miRs are differentially expressed, we used a miR microarray approach followed by validation of the microarray results for 6 miRs using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results We identified putative STAT3 binding sites in 160 promoter regions of 200 miRs, including miR-21, miR-29, and miR-155, whose levels have been reported to be upregulated in CLL. Levels of 72 miRs were downregulated (n = 63) or upregulated (n = 9). qRT-PCR confirmed the array data in 5 of 6 miRs. Conclusions The presence of activated STAT3 has a profound effect on miR expression in CLL cells. PMID:23725032

  19. Telomere 1 (POT1) gene expression and its association with telomerase activity in colorectal tumor samples with different pathological features.

    PubMed

    Izgi, Ahu; Gunal, Armagan; Yalcin, Serap; Gunduz, Ufuk

    2014-09-01

    The ends of chromosoms, telomeres are bound with a number of proteins which protect and stabilize telomeres against degredation, end to end fusion and aberrant recombinations. Telomeric DNA is bound of two groups of proteins, which are double-stranded telomeric DNA bindings proteins, and single stranded telomeric binding proteins. Among telomere binding proteins, protections of telomere 1 protein is a single stranded telomere binding proteins and suggested to be a significant player for telomere elongation and has an association with an enzyme called as telomerase which is an intrinsic reverse transcriptase. Telomerase synthesizes hexameric telomeric repeats onto the chromosomes thereby compansating telomere loss in immortal cells, such as tumor cells, whereas telomeres are shorthened with each division in normal cells. PCR-based TRAP (telomeric repeat amplification protocol) assay is a very sensitive assay for the detection of enzymatic activity of telomerase even if a few numbers of cancerous cells are available. The association between telomerase activity and hPOT1 expression in colorectal cancer is still unclear. Protein extraction was performed from specimens of matched normal and colorectal cancer specimens. Protein concentrations were determined by Bradford assay. Optimized protein concentrations were used for TRAP Assay. TRAP products were seperated by vertical gel electrophoresis on 12.5% polyacrylamide gels and visualized by silver staining. Gene expression of hPOT1 was determined by qPCR analysis. The results demonstrated that all tumor tissues were telomerase positive whereas all corresponding normal tissue was telomerase negative. Among clinicopathological findings, telomerase activity was found to be associated with stage, histology, localization, distant metastasis and lymph node metastasis of tumor in the current study. Although all of the clinicopathological findings differed in the expression of hPOT1 compared to normal tissues, they did not

  20. Activation of PPARgamma is required for curcumin to induce apoptosis and to inhibit the expression of extracellular matrix genes in hepatic stellate cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shizhong; Chen, Anping

    2004-11-15

    During liver fibrogenesis, quiescent HSC (hepatic stellate cells) become active, a transformation that is associated with enhanced cell proliferation and overproduction of ECM (extracellular matrix). Inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis are potential strategies to block the activation of HSC for the prevention and treatment of liver fibrosis. Levels of PPARgamma (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) are dramatically diminished in parallel with HSC activation. Stimulation of PPARgamma by its agonists inhibits HSC activation in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated recently that curcumin, the yellow pigment in curry, inhibited HSC activation in vitro, reducing cell proliferation, inducing apoptosis and inhibiting ECM gene expression. Further studies indicated that curcumin induced the gene expression of PPARgamma and stimulated its activity in activated HSC in vitro, which was required for curcumin to inhibit HSC proliferation. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the roles of PPARgamma activation in the induction of apoptosis and suppression of ECM gene expression by curcumin in activated HSC, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that blocking PPARgamma activation abrogated the effects of curcumin on the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of the expression of ECM genes in activated HSC in vitro. Further experiments demonstrated that curcumin suppressed the gene expression of TGF-beta (transforming growth factor-beta) receptors and interrupted the TGF-beta signalling pathway in activated HSC, which was mediated by PPARgamma activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that curcumin stimulated PPARgamma activity in activated HSC in vitro, which was required for curcumin to reduce cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and suppress ECM gene expression. These results provide novel insight into the mechanisms responsible for the inhibition of HSC activation by curcumin. The characteristics

  1. Enhancing DPYSL3 gene expression via a promoter-targeted small activating RNA approach suppresses cancer cell motility and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changlin; Jiang, Wencong; Hu, Qingting; Li, Long-cheng; Dong, Liang; Chen, Ruibao; Zhang, Yinghong; Tang, Yuzhe; Thrasher, J. Brantley; Liu, Chang-Bai; Li, Benyi

    2016-01-01

    To explore a novel strategy in suppressing tumor metastasis, we took the advantage of a recent RNA activation (RNAa) theory and used small double-strand RNA molecules, termed as small activating RNAs (saRNA) that are complimentary to target gene promoter, to enhance transcription of metastasis suppressor gene. The target gene in this study is Dihydro-pyrimidinase-like 3 (DPYSL3, protein name CRMP4), which was identified as a metastatic suppressor in prostate cancers. There are two transcriptional variants of DPYSL3 gene in human genome, of which the variant 2 is the dominant transcript (DPYSL3v2, CRMP4a) but is also significantly down-regulated in primary prostate cancers. A total of 8 saRNAs for DPYSL3v1 and 14 saRNAs for DPYSL3v2 were tested in multiple prostate cancer cell lines. While none of the saRNAs significantly altered DPYSL3v1 expression, 4 saRNAs showed a strong enhancing effect on DPYSL3v2 expression, resulting in reduced cell mobility in vitro. To achieve a prostate cancer-specific delivery for in vivo testing, we conjugated the most potent saV2-9 RNA molecule with the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeting aptamer A10-3.2. The conjugates successful increased DPYSL3v2 gene expression in PSMA-positive but not PSMA-negative prostate cancer cells. In nude mice bearing orthotopic xenograft of prostate cancer, a 10-day consecutive treatment with the saV2-9 conjugates significantly suppress distal metastasis compared to the control saRNAs. Analysis of xenograft tissues revealed that DPYSL3v2 expression was largely increased in saV2-9 conjugate-treated group compared to the control group. In conclusion, DPYSL3v2 promoter-targeted saRNA molecules might be used as an adjunctive therapy to suppress prostate cancer metastasis. PMID:27014974

  2. Phytol directly activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) and regulates gene expression involved in lipid metabolism in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kato, Sota; Egawa, Kahori; Ebisu, Shogo; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Fushiki, Tohru; Kawada, Teruo . E-mail: fat@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-11-18

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is one of the indispensable transcription factors for regulating lipid metabolism in various tissues. In our screening for natural compounds that activate PPAR using luciferase assays, a branched-carbon-chain alcohol (a component of chlorophylls), phytol, has been identified as a PPAR{alpha}-specific activator. Phytol induced the increase in PPAR{alpha}-dependent luciferase activity and the degree of in vitro binding of a coactivator, SRC-1, to GST-PPAR{alpha}. Moreover, the addition of phytol upregulated the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes at both mRNA and protein levels in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes. These findings indicate that phytol is functional as a PPAR{alpha} ligand and that it stimulates the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes in intact cells. Because PPAR{alpha} activation enhances circulating lipid clearance, phytol may be important in managing abnormalities in lipid metabolism.

  3. Quantitative perturbation-based analysis of gene expression predicts enhancer activity in early Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Sayal, Rupinder; Dresch, Jacqueline M; Pushel, Irina; Taylor, Benjamin R; Arnosti, David N

    2016-01-01

    Enhancers constitute one of the major components of regulatory machinery of metazoans. Although several genome-wide studies have focused on finding and locating enhancers in the genomes, the fundamental principles governing their internal architecture and cis-regulatory grammar remain elusive. Here, we describe an extensive, quantitative perturbation analysis targeting the dorsal-ventral patterning gene regulatory network (GRN) controlled by Drosophila NF-κB homolog Dorsal. To understand transcription factor interactions on enhancers, we employed an ensemble of mathematical models, testing effects of cooperativity, repression, and factor potency. Models trained on the dataset correctly predict activity of evolutionarily divergent regulatory regions, providing insights into spatial relationships between repressor and activator binding sites. Importantly, the collective predictions of sets of models were effective at novel enhancer identification and characterization. Our study demonstrates how experimental dataset and modeling can be effectively combined to provide quantitative insights into cis-regulatory information on a genome-wide scale. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08445.001 PMID:27152947

  4. The Effect of Cadmium on COX-1 and COX-2 Gene, Protein Expression, and Enzymatic Activity in THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Olszowski, Tomasz; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Korbecki, Jan; Kurzawski, Mateusz; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cadmium in concentrations relevant to those detected in human serum on cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression at mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels in THP-1 macrophages. Macrophages were incubated with various cadmium chloride (CdCl2) solutions for 48 h at final concentrations of 5 nM, 20 nM, 200 nM, and 2 μM CdCl2. The mRNA expression and protein levels of COXs were analyzed with RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and stable metabolite of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) concentrations in culture media were determined using ELISA method. Our study demonstrates that cadmium at the highest tested concentrations modulates COX-1 and COX-2 at mRNA level in THP-1 macrophages; however, the lower tested cadmium concentrations appear to inhibit COX-1 protein expression. PGE2 and TXB2 production is not altered by all tested Cd concentrations; however, the significant stimulation of PGE2 and TXB2 production is observed when macrophages are exposed to both cadmium and COX-2 selective inhibitor, NS-398. The stimulatory effect of cadmium on COXs at mRNA level is not reflected at protein and enzymatic activity levels, suggesting the existence of some posttranscriptional, translational, and posttranslational events that result in silencing of those genes' expression. PMID:25645360

  5. High hydrostatic pressure activates gene expression that leads to ethanol production enhancement in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae distillery strain

    PubMed Central

    Bravim, Fernanda; Lippman, Soyeon I.; da Silva, Lucas F.; Souza, Diego T.; Fernandes, A. Alberto R.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Broach, James R.

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is a stress that exerts broad effects on microorganisms with characteristics similar to those of common environmental stresses. In this study, we aimed to identify genetic mechanisms that can enhance alcoholic fermentation of wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from Brazilian spirit fermentation vats. Accordingly, we performed a time course microarray analysis on a S. cerevisiae strain submitted to mild sublethal pressure treatment of 50 MPa for 30 min at room temperature, followed by incubation for 5, 10 and 15 min without pressure treatment. The obtained transcriptional profiles demonstrate the importance of post-pressurisation period on the activation of several genes related to cell recovery and stress tolerance. Based on these results, we over-expressed genes strongly induced by HHP in the same wild yeast strain and identified genes, particularly SYM1, whose over-expression results in enhanced ethanol production and stress tolerance upon fermentation. The present study validates the use of HHP as a biotechnological tool for the fermentative industries. PMID:22915193

  6. PPARδ expression is influenced by muscle activity and induces slow muscle properties in adult rat muscles after somatic gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lunde, Ida G; Ekmark, Merete; Rana, Zaheer A; Buonanno, Andres; Gundersen, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    The effects of exercise on skeletal muscle are mediated by a coupling between muscle electrical activity and gene expression. Several activity correlates, such as intracellular Ca2+, hypoxia and metabolites like free fatty acids (FFAs), might initiate signalling pathways regulating fibre-type-specific genes. FFAs can be sensed by lipid-dependent transcription factors of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family. We found that the mRNA for the predominant muscle isoform, PPARδ, was three-fold higher in the slow/oxidative soleus compared to the fast/glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. In histological sections of the soleus, the most oxidative fibres display the highest levels of PPARδ protein. When the soleus muscle was stimulated electrically by a pattern mimicking fast/glycolytic IIb motor units, the mRNA level of PPARδ was reduced to less than half within 24 h. In the EDL, a three-fold increase was observed after slow type I-like electrical stimulation. When a constitutively active form of PPARδ was overexpressed for 14 days in normally active adult fibres after somatic gene transfer, the number of I/IIa hybrids in the EDL more than tripled, IIa fibres increased from 14% to 25%, and IIb fibres decreased from 55% to 45%. The level of succinate dehydrogenase activity increased and size decreased, also when compared to normal fibres of the same type. Thus PPARδ can change myosin heavy chain, oxidative enzymes and size locally in muscle cells in the absence of general exercise. Previous studies on PPARδ in muscle have been performed in transgenic animals where the transgene has been present during muscle development. Our data suggest that PPARδ can mediate activity effects acutely in pre-existing adult fibres, and thus is an important link in excitation–transcription coupling. PMID:17463039

  7. Serial analysis of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Velculescu, V E; Zhang, L; Vogelstein, B; Kinzler, K W

    1995-10-20

    The characteristics of an organism are determined by the genes expressed within it. A method was developed, called serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), that allows the quantitative and simultaneous analysis of a large number of transcripts. To demonstrate this strategy, short diagnostic sequence tags were isolated from pancreas, concatenated, and cloned. Manual sequencing of 1000 tags revealed a gene expression pattern characteristic of pancreatic function. New pancreatic transcripts corresponding to novel tags were identified. SAGE should provide a broadly applicable means for the quantitative cataloging and comparison of expressed genes in a variety of normal, developmental, and disease states. PMID:7570003

  8. Molecular cloning, expression profiling and trans-activation property studies of a DREB2-like gene from chrysanthemum (Dendranthema vestitum).

    PubMed

    Liu, Liqing; Zhu, Kai; Yang, Yanfang; Wu, Jian; Chen, Fadi; Yu, Deyue

    2008-03-01

    Dehydration responsive element binding (DREB) proteins are important transcription factors in plant stress response and signal transduction. In this study, a DREB homolog gene, DvDREB2A, was isolated from chrysanthemum (Dendranthema vestitum) by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) methods. It contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,471 bp encoding 366 amino acid residues and was classified as a DREB2 subfamily member based on multiple sequence alignment. The predicted protein sequence contained a typical AP2/EREBP DNA-binding domain near the N-terminal region. In yeast one-hybrid analysis DvDREB2A protein was specifically bound to DRE elements (core sequence, A/GCCGAC) and activated the expression of the reporter HIS3 and LacZ. Transient expression experiment suggested that DvDREB2A protein was localized to the nucleus of onion epidermis cells. Quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) experiments showed that expression level of DvDREB2A was significantly affected by heat, low temperature, drought, abscisic acid (ABA) and high salinity treatments. These results indicated that the DvDREB2A gene is a new member of the DREB transcription factors, which may play an important role in providing tolerance to environmental stresses. PMID:18224275

  9. Calcitonin gene-related peptide promotes the expression of osteoblastic genes and activates the WNT signal transduction pathway in bone marrow stromal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RI; YUAN, ZHI; LIU, JIERONG; LIU, JIAN

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to induce osteoblastic differentiation and alkaline phosphatase activity in bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs). However, it has remained elusive whether this effect is mediated by CGRP receptors directly or whether other signaling pathways are involved. The present study assessed the possible involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the activation of CGRP signaling during the differentiation of BMSCs. First, the differentiation of BMSCs was induced in vitro and the expression of CGRP receptors was examined by western blot analysis. The effects of exogenous CGRP and LiCl, a stimulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, on the osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs were assessed; furthermore, the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was assessed using quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. The results revealed that CGRP receptors were expressed throughout the differentiation of BMSCs, at days 7 and 14. Incubation with CGRP and LiCl led to the upregulation of the expression of osteoblastic genes associated with the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, including the mRNA of c-myc, cyclin D1, Lef1, Tcf7 and β-catenin as well as β-catenin protein. However, the upregulation of these genes and β-catenin protein was inhibited by CGRP receptor antagonist or secreted frizzled-related protein, an antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The results of the present study therefore suggested that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be involved in CGRP- and LiCl-promoted osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs. PMID:27082317

  10. Calcitonin gene-related peptide promotes the expression of osteoblastic genes and activates the WNT signal transduction pathway in bone marrow stromal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ri; Yuan, Zhi; Liu, Jierong; Liu, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to induce osteoblastic differentiation and alkaline phosphatase activity in bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs). However, it has remained elusive whether this effect is mediated by CGRP receptors directly or whether other signaling pathways are involved. The present study assessed the possible involvement of the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway in the activation of CGRP signaling during the differentiation of BMSCs. First, the differentiation of BMSCs was induced in vitro and the expression of CGRP receptors was examined by western blot analysis. The effects of exogenous CGRP and LiCl, a stimulator of the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway, on the osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs were assessed; furthermore, the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway was assessed using quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. The results revealed that CGRP receptors were expressed throughout the differentiation of BMSCs, at days 7 and 14. Incubation with CGRP and LiCl led to the upregulation of the expression of osteoblastic genes associated with the Wnt/β‑catenin pathway, including the mRNA of c‑myc, cyclin D1, Lef1, Tcf7 and β‑catenin as well as β‑catenin protein. However, the upregulation of these genes and β‑catenin protein was inhibited by CGRP receptor antagonist or secreted frizzled‑related protein, an antagonist of the Wnt/β‑catenin pathway. The results of the present study therefore suggested that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be involved in CGRP‑ and LiCl-promoted osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs. PMID:27082317

  11. A library of synthetic transcription activator-like effector-activated promoters for coordinated orthogonal gene expression in plants

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Kathleen; Schäfer, Petra; Weber, Ernst; Grützner, Ramona; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Tissier, Alain

    2015-01-01

    A library of synthetic promoters containing the binding site of a single designer transcription activator-like effector (dTALE) was constructed. The promoters contain a constant sequence, consisting of an 18-base long dTALE-binding site and a TATA box, flanked by degenerate sequences of 49 bases downstream and 19 bases upstream. Forty-three of these promoters were sequenced and tested in transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana using a GUS reporter gene. The strength of expression of the promoters ranged from around 5% to almost 100% of the viral 35S promoter activity. We then demonstrated the utility of these promoters for metabolic engineering by transiently expressing three genes for the production of a plant diterpenoid in N. benthamiana. The simplicity of the promoter structure shows great promise for the development of genetic circuits, with wide potential applications in plant synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. PMID:25846505

  12. Jasmonic Acid Modulates the Physio-Biochemical Attributes, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Gene Expression in Glycine max under Nickel Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sirhindi, Geetika; Mir, Mudaser Ahmad; Abd-Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    In present study, we evaluated the effects of Jasmonic acid (JA) on physio-biochemical attributes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and gene expression in soybean (Glycine max L.) plants subjected to nickel (Ni) stress. Ni stress decreases the shoot and root length and chlorophyll content by 37.23, 38.31, and 39.21%, respectively, over the control. However, application of JA was found to improve the chlorophyll content and length of shoot and root of Ni-fed seedlings. Plants supplemented with JA restores the chlorophyll fluorescence, which was disturbed by Ni stress. The present study demonstrated increase in proline, glycinebetaine, total protein, and total soluble sugar (TSS) by 33.09, 51.26, 22.58, and 49.15%, respectively, under Ni toxicity over the control. Addition of JA to Ni stressed plants further enhanced the above parameters. Ni stress increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by 68.49%, lipid peroxidation (MDA) by 50.57% and NADPH oxidase by 50.92% over the control. Supplementation of JA minimizes the accumulation of H2O2, MDA, and NADPH oxidase, which helps in stabilization of biomolecules. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) increases by 40.04, 28.22, 48.53, and 56.79%, respectively, over the control in Ni treated seedlings and further enhancement in the antioxidant activity was observed by the application of JA. Ni treated soybean seedlings showed increase in expression of Fe-SOD by 77.62, CAT by 15.25, POD by 58.33, and APX by 80.58% over the control. Nevertheless, application of JA further enhanced the expression of the above genes in the present study. Our results signified that Ni stress caused negative impacts on soybean seedlings, but, co-application of JA facilitate the seedlings to combat the detrimental effects of Ni through enhanced osmolytes, activity of antioxidant enzymes and gene expression. PMID:27242811

  13. Jasmonic Acid Modulates the Physio-Biochemical Attributes, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Gene Expression in Glycine max under Nickel Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sirhindi, Geetika; Mir, Mudaser Ahmad; Abd-Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    In present study, we evaluated the effects of Jasmonic acid (JA) on physio-biochemical attributes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and gene expression in soybean (Glycine max L.) plants subjected to nickel (Ni) stress. Ni stress decreases the shoot and root length and chlorophyll content by 37.23, 38.31, and 39.21%, respectively, over the control. However, application of JA was found to improve the chlorophyll content and length of shoot and root of Ni-fed seedlings. Plants supplemented with JA restores the chlorophyll fluorescence, which was disturbed by Ni stress. The present study demonstrated increase in proline, glycinebetaine, total protein, and total soluble sugar (TSS) by 33.09, 51.26, 22.58, and 49.15%, respectively, under Ni toxicity over the control. Addition of JA to Ni stressed plants further enhanced the above parameters. Ni stress increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by 68.49%, lipid peroxidation (MDA) by 50.57% and NADPH oxidase by 50.92% over the control. Supplementation of JA minimizes the accumulation of H2O2, MDA, and NADPH oxidase, which helps in stabilization of biomolecules. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) increases by 40.04, 28.22, 48.53, and 56.79%, respectively, over the control in Ni treated seedlings and further enhancement in the antioxidant activity was observed by the application of JA. Ni treated soybean seedlings showed increase in expression of Fe-SOD by 77.62, CAT by 15.25, POD by 58.33, and APX by 80.58% over the control. Nevertheless, application of JA further enhanced the expression of the above genes in the present study. Our results signified that Ni stress caused negative impacts on soybean seedlings, but, co-application of JA facilitate the seedlings to combat the detrimental effects of Ni through enhanced osmolytes, activity of antioxidant enzymes and gene expression. PMID:27242811

  14. Biologically active A-chain of the plant toxin ricin expressed from a synthetic gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shire, D; Bourrié, B J; Carillon, C; Derocq, J M; Dousset, P; Dumont, X; Jansen, F K; Kaghad, M; Legoux, R; Lelong, P

    1990-09-14

    To assess the biological activity and pharmacokinetic properties of nonglycosylated ricin A-chain (RA), we have obtained the polypeptide following expression of a synthetic 842-bp RA gene in Escherichia coli. Expression of the gene was carried out using the phage T5 PN25 promoter fused to the E. coli lac operator. The RA polypeptide was synthesized in a completely soluble form and was purified in one step by immunoabsorption. It was shown to be as cytotoxic for a human cell line as both native RA and chemically deglycosylated native RA. Reconstituted whole ricin and an immunotoxin containing the recombinant RA were also biologically active. Immunotoxins made with recombinant and deglycosylated RA had similar clearance rates in vivo showing, after a short period of rapid elimination, stabilities far higher than that of an immunotoxin made with native RA. Our results show that the complete elimination of sugar side chains from the RA is not sufficient to entirely eradicate the rapid initial in vivo clearance of RA-based biologicals. PMID:2227433

  15. Expression of Efflux Pumps and Fatty Acid Activator One Genes in Azole Resistant Candida Glabrata Isolated From Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Farahyar, Shirin; Zaini, Farideh; Kordbacheh, Parivash; Rezaie, Sassan; Falahati, Mehraban; Safara, Mahin; Raoofian, Reza; Hatami, Kamran; Mohebbi, Masoumeh; Heidari, Mansour

    2016-07-01

    Acquired azole resistance in opportunistic fungi causes severe clinical problems in immunosuppressed individuals. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms of azole resistance in clinical isolates of Candida glabrata. Six unmatched strains were obtained from an epidemiological survey of candidiasis in immunocompromised hosts that included azole and amphotericin B susceptible and azole resistant clinical isolates. Candida glabrata CBS 138 was used as reference strain. Antifungal susceptibility testing of clinical isolates was evaluated using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technology, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and sequencing were employed for identification of potential genes involved in azole resistance. Candida glabrata Candida drug resistance 1 (CgCDR1) and Candida glabrata Candida drug resistance 2 (CgCDR2) genes, which encode for multidrug transporters, were found to be upregulated in azole-resistant isolates (≥2-fold). Fatty acid activator 1 (FAA1) gene, belonging to Acyl-CoA synthetases, showed expression in resistant isolates ≥2-fold that of the susceptible isolates and the reference strain. This study revealed overexpression of the CgCDR1, CgCDR2, and FAA1 genes affecting biological pathways, small hydrophobic compounds transport, and lipid metabolism in the resistant clinical C.glabrata isolates. PMID:27424018

  16. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating

  17. Activation of endocrine-related gene expression in placental choriocarcinoma cell lines following DNA methylation knock-down.

    PubMed

    Hogg, K; Robinson, W P; Beristain, A G

    2014-07-01

    Increasingly, placental DNA methylation is assessed as a factor in pregnancy-related complications, yet the transcriptional impact of such findings is not always clear. Using a proliferative in vitro placental model, the effect of DNA methylation loss on gene activation was evaluated at a number of genes selected for being differentially methylated in pre-eclampsia-associated placentae in vivo. We aimed to determine whether reduced DNA methylation at specific loci was associated with transcriptional changes at the corresponding gene, thus providing mechanistic underpinnings for previous clinical findings and to assess the degree of transcriptional response amongst our candidate genes. BeWo and JEG3 choriocarcinoma cells were exposed to 1 μM 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) or vehicle control for 48 h, and re-plated and cultured for a further 72 h in normal media before cells were harvested for RNA and DNA. Bisulphite pyrosequencing confirmed that DNA methylation was reduced by ∼30-50% points at the selected loci studied in both cell lines. Gene activation, measured by qRT-PCR, was highly variable and transcript specific, indicating differential sensitivity to DNA methylation. Most notably, loss of DNA methylation at the leptin (LEP) promoter corresponded to a 200-fold and 40-fold increase in LEP expression in BeWo and JEG3 cells, respectively (P < 0.01). Transcripts of steroidogenic pathway enzymes CYP11A1 and HSD3B1 were up-regulated ∼40-fold in response to 5-Aza-CdR exposure in BeWo cells (P < 0.01). Other transcripts, including aromatase (CYP19), HSD11B2, inhibin (INHBA) and glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) were more moderately, although significantly, affected by loss of associated DNA methylation. These data present a mixed effect of DNA methylation changes at selected loci supporting cautionary interpretation of DNA methylation results in the absence of functional data. PMID:24623739

  18. Expression of Human NSAID Activated Gene 1 in Mice Leads to Altered Mammary Gland Differentiation and Impaired Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Binder, April K.; Kosak, Justin P.; Janhardhan, Kyathanahalli S.; Moser, Glenda; Eling, Thomas E.; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing human non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug activated gene 1 (NAG-1) have less adipose tissue, improved insulin sensitivity, lower insulin levels and are resistant to dietary induced obesity. The hNAG-1 expressing mice are more metabolically active with a higher energy expenditure. This study investigates female reproduction in the hNAG-1 transgenic mice and finds the female mice are fertile but have reduced pup survival after birth. Examination of the mammary glands in these mice suggests that hNAG-1 expressing mice have altered mammary epithelial development during pregnancy, including reduced occupancy of the fat pad and increased apoptosis via TUNEL positive cells on lactation day 2. Pups nursing from hNAG-1 expressing dams have reduced milk spots compared to pups nursing from WT dams. When CD-1 pups were cross-fostered with hNAG-1 or WT dams; reduced milk volume was observed in pups nursing from hNAG-1 dams compared to pups nursing from WT dams in a lactation challenge study. Milk was isolated from WT and hNAG-1 dams, and the milk was found to have secreted NAG-1 protein (approximately 25 ng/mL) from hNAG-1 dams. The WT dams had no detectable hNAG-1 in the milk. A decrease in non-esterified free fatty acids in the milk of hNAG-1 dams was observed. Altered milk composition suggests that the pups were receiving inadequate nutrients during perinatal development. To examine this hypothesis serum was isolated from pups and clinical chemistry points were measured. Male and female pups nursing from hNAG-1 dams had reduced serum triglyceride concentrations. Microarray analysis revealed that genes involved in lipid metabolism are differentially expressed in hNAG-1 mammary glands. Furthermore, the expression of Cidea/CIDEA that has been shown to regulate milk lipid secretion in the mammary gland was reduced in hNAG-1 mammary glands. This study suggests that expression of hNAG-1 in mice leads to impaired lactation and reduces pup survival due to

  19. Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 p30II alters cellular gene expression to selectively enhance signaling pathways that activate T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amrithraj M; Hiraragi, Hajime; Shen, Lei; Feuer, Gerold; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen; Lairmore, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II, which are incompletely defined in the virus life cycle or HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Proviral clones of the virus with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. Exogenous expression of p30II differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and represses tax/rex RNA nuclear export. Results Herein, we further characterized the role of p30II in regulation of cellular gene expression, using stable p30II expression system employing lentiviral vectors to test cellular gene expression with Affymetrix U133A arrays, representing ~33,000 human genes. Reporter assays in Jurkat T cells and RT-PCR in Jurkat and primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes were used to confirm selected gene expression patterns. Our data reveals alterations of interrelated pathways of cell proliferation, T-cell signaling, apoptosis and cell cycle in p30II expressing Jurkat T cells. In all categories, p30II appeared to be an overall repressor of cellular gene expression, while selectively increasing the expression of certain key regulatory genes. Conclusions We are the first to demonstrate that p30II, while repressing the expression of many genes, selectively activates key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Collectively, our data suggests that this complex retrovirus, associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, relies upon accessory gene products to modify cellular environment to promote clonal expansion of the virus genome and thus maintain proviral loads in vivo. PMID:15560845

  20. In Vivo Biochemical and Gene Expression Analyses of the Antioxidant Activities and Hypocholesterolaemic Properties of Tamarindus indica Fruit Pulp Extract

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chor Yin; Mat Junit, Sarni; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Abdul Aziz, Azlina

    2013-01-01

    Background Tamarindus indica (T. indica) is a medicinal plant with many biological activities including anti-diabetic, hypolipidaemic and anti-bacterial activities. A recent study demonstrated the hypolipidaemic effect of T. indica fruit pulp in hamsters. However, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects have not been fully elucidated. Hence, the aims of this study were to evaluate the antioxidant activities and potential hypocholesterolaemic properties of T. indica, using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Methodology/Principal Findings The in vitro study demonstrated that T. indica fruit pulp had significant amount of phenolic (244.9±10.1 mg GAE/extract) and flavonoid (93.9±2.6 mg RE/g extract) content and possessed antioxidant activities. In the in vivo study, hamsters fed with high-cholesterol diet for ten weeks showed elevated serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL-C and LDL-C levels. Administration of T. indica fruit pulp to hypercholesterolaemic hamsters significantly lowered serum triglyceride, total cholesterol and LDL-C levels but had no effect on the HDL-C level. The lipid-lowering effect was accompanied with significant increase in the expression of Apo A1, Abcg5 and LDL receptor genes and significant decrease in the expression of HMG-CoA reductase and Mtp genes. Administration of T. indica fruit pulp to hypercholesterolaemic hamsters also protected against oxidative damage by increasing hepatic antioxidant enzymes, antioxidant activities and preventing hepatic lipid peroxidation. Conclusion/Significance It is postulated that tamarind fruit pulp exerts its hypocholesterolaemic effect by increasing cholesterol efflux, enhancing LDL-C uptake and clearance, suppressing triglyceride accumulation and inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis. T. indica fruit pulp has potential antioxidative effects and is potentially protective against diet-induced hypercholesterolaemia. PMID:23894592

  1. Gene expression profiling in developing human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Mei, Pinchao; Lou, Rong; Zhang, Michael Q; Wu, Guanyun; Qiang, Boqin; Zhang, Zhengguo; Shen, Yan

    2002-10-15

    The gene expression profile of developing human hippocampus is of particular interest and importance to neurobiologists devoted to development of the human brain and related diseases. To gain further molecular insight into the developmental and functional characteristics, we analyzed the expression profile of active genes in developing human hippocampus. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were selected by sequencing randomly selected clones from an original 3'-directed cDNA library of 150-day human fetal hippocampus, and a digital expression profile of 946 known genes that could be divided into 16 categories was generated. We also used for comparison 14 other expression profiles of related human neural cells/tissues, including human adult hippocampus. To yield more confidence regarding differential expression, a method was applied to attach normalized expression data to genes with a low false-positive rate (<0.05). Finally, hierarchical cluster analysis was used to exhibit related gene expression patterns. Our results are in accordance with anatomical and physiological observations made during the developmental process of the human hippocampus. Furthermore, some novel findings appeared to be unique to our results. The abundant expression of genes for cell surface components and disease-related genes drew our attention. Twenty-four genes are significantly different from adult, and 13 genes might be developing hippocampus-specific candidate genes, including wnt2b and some Alzheimer's disease-related genes. Our results could provide useful information on the ontogeny, development, and function of cells in the human hippocampus at the molecular level and underscore the utility of large-scale, parallel gene expression analyses in the study of complex biological phenomena. PMID:12271469

  2. Activation of p53 gene expression in premalignant lesions during head and neck tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Shin, D M; Kim, J; Ro, J Y; Hittelman, J; Roth, J A; Hong, W K; Hittelman, W N

    1994-01-15

    With the goal of identifying a potential intermediate biomarker in the multistep process of head and neck cancer development, we conducted immunohistochemical analyses for p53 expression in 33 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas whose tissue sections contained adjacent normal epithelium, hyperplastic, and/or dysplastic lesions. Fifteen of 33 (45%) squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck expressed p53, but none of four normal control patients (cancer-free nonsmokers) expressed detectable p53 in oral mucosa specimens. To determine when p53 expression is initiated during head and neck tumorigenesis, we examined the normal and premalignant lesions adjacent to the tumors. Five of 24 (21%) samples of normal epithelium adjacent to tumors, 7 of 24 (29%) samples of hyperplasia, and 9 of 20 (45%) samples of dysplasia expressed p53. Quantitative image analysis demonstrated not only a gradual increase in the amount of p53 expression as tissue abnormalities progressed but also a topological change in expression. Whereas p53 expression, when present, was limited to the basal layer in normal epithelium adjacent to tumor, the expression of p53 expanded into the parabasal and superficial layers in hyperplasia and dysplasia. We conclude that p53 expression can be altered in very early phases of head and neck tumorigenesis. Thus, it may be an excellent candidate for risk assessment and may serve as an intermediate biomarker in chemoprevention trials. PMID:8275461

  3. Proline-induced changes in acetylcholinesterase activity and gene expression in zebrafish brain: reversal by antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Savio, L E B; Vuaden, F C; Kist, L W; Pereira, T C; Rosemberg, D B; Bogo, M R; Bonan, C D; Wyse, A T S

    2013-10-10

    Hyperprolinemia is an inherited disorder of proline metabolism and hyperprolinemic patients can present neurological manifestations, such as seizures, cognitive dysfunctions, and schizoaffective disorders. However, the mechanisms related to these symptoms are still unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the in vivo and in vitro effects of proline on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and gene expression in the zebrafish brain. For the in vivo studies, animals were exposed at two proline concentrations (1.5 and 3.0mM) during 1h or 7 days (short- or long-term treatments, respectively). For the in vitro assays, different proline concentrations (ranging from 3.0 to 1000 μM) were tested. Long-term proline exposures significantly increased AChE activity for both treated groups when compared to the control (34% and 39%). Moreover, the proline-induced increase on AChE activity was completely reverted by acute administration of antipsychotic drugs (haloperidol and sulpiride), as well as the changes induced in ache expression. When assessed in vitro, proline did not promote significant changes in AChE activity. Altogether, these data indicate that the enzyme responsible for the control of acetylcholine levels might be altered after proline exposure in the adult zebrafish. These findings contribute for better understanding of the pathophysiology of hyperprolinemia and might reinforce the use of the zebrafish as a complementary vertebrate model for studying inborn errors of amino acid metabolism. PMID:23867765

  4. Improvement of cellulase activity in Trichoderma reesei by heterologous expression of a beta-glucosidase gene from Penicillium decumbens.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Zhang, Jun; Zou, Gen; Wang, Chengshu; Zhou, Zhihua

    2011-09-10

    Trichoderma reesei is a well-known cellulase producer and widely applied in enzyme industry. To increase its ability to efficiently decompose cellulose, the beta-glucosidase activity of its enzyme cocktail needs to be enhanced. In this study, a beta-glucosidase I coding sequence from Penicillium decumbens was ligated with the cellobiohydrolase I (cbh1) promoter of T. reesei and introduced into the genome of T. reesei strain Rut-C30 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. In comparison to that from the parent strain, the beta-glucosidase activity of the enzyme complexes from two selected transformants increased 6- to 8-fold and their filter paper activity (FPAs) was enhanced by 30% on average. The transformant's saccharifying ability towards pretreated cornstalk was also significantly enhanced. To further confirm the effect of heterologous beta-glucosidase on the cellulase activity of T. reesei, the heterologously expressed pBGL1 was purified and added to the enzyme complex produced by T. reesei Rut-C30. Supplementation of the Rut-C30 enzyme complex with pBGL1 brought about 80% increase of glucose yield during the saccharification of pretreated cornstalk. Our results indicated that the heterologous expression of a beta-glucosidase gene in T. reesei might produce balanced cellulase preparation. PMID:22112562

  5. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  6. Physicochemical properties of starches and expression and activity of starch biosynthesis-related genes in sweet potatoes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yung C; Wang, Shu Y; Gao, Huan Y; Nguyen, Khiem M; Nguyen, Chinh H; Shih, Ming C; Lin, Kuan H

    2016-05-15

    The functional properties of starches from six sweet potato varieties containing various starch components and structures were studied in an attempt to identify starch sources for industrial uses. Tainan 18 (TNN18) with high-amylose (AM) starch exhibited high setback and breakdown viscosities, high water solubility at 85°C but low swelling volume at 65°C, and high hardness and adhesiveness; in contrast, the low-AM starch of Tainung 31 (TNG31) had opposite characteristics. Seven genes related to starch biosynthesis were tested, and GBSS, SS, SBEII, ISA, and AGPase were highly expressed in TNN18 and TNG31; however, transcript levels in DBE and SBE were extremely low. GBSS and SS activity reflected the abundance of GBSS and SS mRNA in TNG31 and TNN18, and expression of AGPase, GBSS, SS, and SBE in TNN18 substantially increased content of AM. The expression and activity of DBE had a significant effect on TNG31 with increased AP content. PMID:26776008

  7. Cytokine gene expression and activation of NF-{kappa}B in aniline-induced splenic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Kannan, Subburaj; Li Hui; Firoze Khan, M. . E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu

    2005-02-15

    Exposure to aniline results in selective toxicity to the spleen, leading to a variety of sarcomas on chronic exposure in rats, and fibrosis appears to be an important initiating preneoplastic lesion of the spleen. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which aniline leads to fibrogenic response is not well understood. Previously, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload and induction of oxidative stress in the spleen. We hypothesized that aniline-induced oxidative stress in the spleen causes transcriptional up-regulation of fibrogenic cytokines via activation of redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). To test this hypothesis, male SD rats were treated with 0.5 mmol/kg/day aniline hydrochloride via drinking water for 30 days. Cytokine mRNAs were measured by real-time quantitative PCR, while cytokine release was determined in the supernatants of the cultured splenocytes using specific ELISAs. IL-1{alpha}, IL-6, and TNF-{alpha} mRNA levels showed 6.9-, 2.9-, and 2.6-fold increases, respectively, in the spleens of aniline-treated rats in comparison to the controls. The increases in mRNA levels were associated with enhanced secretion of these cytokines in the splenocyte culture supernatants. NF-{kappa}B p65 level in the nuclear extracts of cultured splenocytes of aniline-treated rats showed a 2-fold increase in comparison to the controls as quantitated by NF-{kappa}B p65-specific ELISA. The binding activity of NF-{kappa}B, determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), also showed an increase in NF-{kappa}B binding in the nuclear extracts of the splenocytes from aniline-treated rats. The specificity of NF-{kappa}B binding was further confirmed by supershift assays. The results indicate that aniline exposure causes enhanced expression of IL-1{alpha}, IL-6, and TNF-{alpha}, both at mRNA and protein levels, suggesting their role in splenic fibrosis. Also, the increased NF-{kappa}B binding activity suggests

  8. Elicitor- and A23187-induced expression of WCK-1, a gene encoding mitogen-activated protein kinase in wheat.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, D

    1999-08-01

    Wheat cultured cells were used to study the role of Ca2+ in regulating protein kinases during the induction of defense-related genes by fungal elicitor treatments. Manipulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentrations by treatment with calcium ionophore A23187 in the presence of high extracellular Ca2+ resulted in the induction of mRNA expression of WCK-1, a gene encoding mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The induction of WCK-1 mRNA by A23187 did not occur when extracellular Ca2+ was chelated by 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). The WCK-1 mRNA was also induced by Typhula ishikariensis-derived elicitors, suggesting a possible involvement of WCK-1 in the plant defense response against pathogens. BAPTA and a calcium channel blocker, La3+, inhibited the elicitor-induced expression of the WCK-1 mRNA. A recombinant fusion protein of WCK-1 (GST-WCK-1) autophosphorylated at the Tyr residue and exhibited an autophosphorylation-dependent protein kinase activity towards myelin basic protein. Alteration of Tyr-196 in the conserved 'TEY' motif in GST-WCK-1 to Phe by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the autophosphorylation. The GST-WCK-1 protein was activated by elicitor-treated wheat cell extracts but not by the control extract. These results suggest that fungal elicitors activate WCK-1, a specific MAP kinase in wheat. Furthermore, the results suggest a possible involvement of Ca2+ in enhancing the MAP kinase signaling cascade in plants by controlling the levels of the MAP kinase transcripts. PMID:10527417

  9. Drug-Metabolizing Activity, Protein and Gene Expression of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases Are Significantly Altered in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Linlin; Zhou, Juan; Shi, Jian; Peng, Xiao-juan; Qi, Xiao-xiao; Wang, Ying; Li, Fang-yuan; Zhou, Fu-Yuan; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhong-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), the most important enzymes in body detoxification and homeostasis maintaining, govern the glucuronidation reaction of various endogenous and environmental carcinogens. The metabolic function of UGTs can be severely influenced by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the fifth prevalent and third malignant cancer worldwide. Particularly in China, HBV-positive HCC account for approximately 80% of HCC patients. But rare papers addressed the alteration on the metabolism of UGTs specific substrates, translational and transcriptional activity of UGTs in HBV-positive HCC patients. In present study, we choose the main UGT isoforms, UGT1As, UGT1A1, UGT1A9, UGT1A4 and UGT2B7, to determine the alterations of metabolic activity, protein and gene expression of UGTs in HBV-positive HCC. The corresponding specific substrates such as genistein, SN-38, tamoxifen, propofol and zidovudine were utilized respectively in UGTs metabolic activity determination. Furthermore, the plausible mechanism responsible for UGTs alterations was addressed by analyzing the protein and gene expressions in tumor and the adjacent normal tissues in HBV-positive HCC. The results revealed that in the tumor human liver microsomes (HLMs), either Vmax (maximum reaction rate, Rmax for UGT1A1) or the clearance rates (Vmax/Km, Clint) of UGT1A, UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 were significant lower than those of in the adjacent normal HLMs. Subsequently, the relative protein and gene expressions of these isoforms were notably decreased in most of tumor tissues comparing with the adjacent normal tissues. More interestingly, in tumor tissues, the metabolic activity reduction ratio of each UGT isoform was closely related to its protein reduction ratio, indicating that decreasing protein level would contribute to the reduced metabolic function of UGTs in HBV-positive HCC. In summary, our study firstly determined the alteration of UGT function in HBV-positive HCC patients, which would

  10. Drug-Metabolizing Activity, Protein and Gene Expression of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases Are Significantly Altered in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Linlin; Zhou, Juan; Shi, Jian; Peng, Xiao-juan; Qi, Xiao-xiao; Wang, Ying; Li, Fang-Yuan; Zhou, Fu-Yuan; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhong-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), the most important enzymes in body detoxification and homeostasis maintaining, govern the glucuronidation reaction of various endogenous and environmental carcinogens. The metabolic function of UGTs can be severely influenced by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the fifth prevalent and third malignant cancer worldwide. Particularly in China, HBV-positive HCC account for approximately 80% of HCC patients. But rare papers addressed the alteration on the metabolism of UGTs specific substrates, translational and transcriptional activity of UGTs in HBV-positive HCC patients. In present study, we choose the main UGT isoforms, UGT1As, UGT1A1, UGT1A9, UGT1A4 and UGT2B7, to determine the alterations of metabolic activity, protein and gene expression of UGTs in HBV-positive HCC. The corresponding specific substrates such as genistein, SN-38, tamoxifen, propofol and zidovudine were utilized respectively in UGTs metabolic activity determination. Furthermore, the plausible mechanism responsible for UGTs alterations was addressed by analyzing the protein and gene expressions in tumor and the adjacent normal tissues in HBV-positive HCC. The results revealed that in the tumor human liver microsomes (HLMs), either V(max) (maximum reaction rate, R(max) for UGT1A1) or the clearance rates (V(max)/K(m), Clint) of UGT1A, UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 were significant lower than those of in the adjacent normal HLMs. Subsequently, the relative protein and gene expressions of these isoforms were notably decreased in most of tumor tissues comparing with the adjacent normal tissues. More interestingly, in tumor tissues, the metabolic activity reduction ratio of each UGT isoform was closely related to its protein reduction ratio, indicating that decreasing protein level would contribute to the reduced metabolic function of UGTs in HBV-positive HCC. In summary, our study firstly determined the alteration of UGT function in HBV-positive HCC patients, which

  11. Niemann-Pick C1 like 1 gene expression is down-regulated by LXR activators in the intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Duval, Caroline; Touche, Veronique; Tailleux, Anne; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Fievet, Catherine; Clavey, Veronique; Staels, Bart . E-mail: Bart.Staels@pasteur-lille.fr; Lestavel, Sophie

    2006-02-24

    Niemann-Pick C1 like 1 (NPC1L1) is a protein critical for intestinal cholesterol absorption. The nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) and liver X receptors (LXR{alpha} and LXR{beta}) are major regulators of cholesterol homeostasis and their activation results in a reduced absorption of intestinal cholesterol. The goal of this study was to define the role of PPAR{alpha} and LXR nuclear receptors in the regulation of NPC1L1 gene expression. We show that LXR activators down-regulate NPC1L1 mRNA levels in the human enterocyte cell line Caco-2/TC7, whereas PPAR{alpha} ligands have no effect. Furthermore, NPC1L1 mRNA levels are decreased in vivo, in duodenum of mice treated with the LXR agonist T0901317. In conclusion, the present study identifies NPC1L1 as a novel LXR target gene further supporting a crucial role of LXR in intestinal cholesterol homeostasis.

  12. Chromate alters root system architecture and activates expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trujillo, Miguel; Méndez-Bravo, Alfonso; Ortiz-Castro, Randy; Hernández-Madrigal, Fátima; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; Long, Terri A; Cervantes, Carlos; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; López-Bucio, José

    2014-09-01

    Soil contamination by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI) or chromate] due to anthropogenic activities has become an increasingly important environmental problem. To date few studies have been performed to elucidate the signaling networks involved on adaptive responses to (CrVI) toxicity in plants. In this work, we report that depending upon its concentration, Cr(VI) alters in different ways the architecture of the root system in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Low concentrations of Cr (20-40 µM) promoted primary root growth, while concentrations higher than 60 µM Cr repressed growth and increased formation of root hairs, lateral root primordia and adventitious roots. We analyzed global gene expression changes in seedlings grown in media supplied with 20 or 140 µM Cr. The level of 731 transcripts was significantly modified in response to Cr treatment with only five genes common to both Cr concentrations. Interestingly, 23 genes related to iron (Fe) acquisition were up-regulated including IRT1, YSL2, FRO5, BHLH100, BHLH101 and BHLH039 and the master controllers of Fe deficiency responses PYE and BTS were specifically activated in pericycle cells. It was also found that increasing concentration of Cr in the plant correlated with a decrease in Fe content, but increased both acidification of the rhizosphere and activity of the ferric chelate reductase. Supply of Fe to Cr-treated Arabidopsis allowed primary root to resume growth and alleviated toxicity symptoms, indicating that Fe nutrition is a major target of Cr stress in plants. Our results show that low Cr levels are beneficial to plants and that toxic Cr concentrations activate a low-Fe rescue system. PMID:24928490

  13. Hepatic expression of inflammatory genes and microRNAs in pigs with high "cholesteryl ester transfer protein" (CETP) activity.

    PubMed

    Cirera, Susanna; Tørsleff, Benedicte C Juul; Ritz, Christian; Fredholm, Merete; Heegaard, Peter M H; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Human obesity and obesity-related diseases (ORD) are growing health problems worldwide and represent a major public health challenge. Most of these diseases are complex conditions, influenced by many genes (including microRNAs) and environmental factors. Many metabolic perturbations are associated with obesity; e.g., low levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) are high risk factors of cardiovascular events. A number of genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors have been shown to contribute to the lowering of HDL-cholesterol. One of these factors is cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) promoting the redistribution of cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, and phospholipids between plasma proteins. Moreover, obesity and ORD are often linked with chronic low-grade inflammation leading to insulin resistance and endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to detect differences in the hepatic expression of genes involved in low-grade inflammation and of obesity- and cholesterol-related microRNAs in two mixed breed populations of pigs (Yorkshire-Göttingen minipig, YM and Duroc-Göttingen minipig, DM) including males and females, with extreme phenotypes for CETP activity levels (designated as CETP-high and CETP-low, respectively). Furthermore, breed and gender differences were also investigated. We found significant difference (P < 0.05) in hepatic expression levels of several mRNAs and microRNAs between the CETP-high and -low groups (C5, IL1RN, IL18, and miR-223-5p); between the two mixed breeds (IL1RAP and miR-140-5p); and between gender (APOA1, IL1RN, and FBLN1). Furthermore, when taking breed into account we show that the transcriptional levels of TNF, miR20a, miR33b, and miR130a differed between the two CETP groups. We conclude that increased CETP activity is accompanied by a modest differential hepatic expression of several microRNAs and inflammatory-related genes. Furthermore, our study demonstrates that when modeling the analysis

  14. Ortho-aminoazotoluene activates mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) and increases expression of mCAR target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanina, Mariya A.; Pakharukova, Mariya Y.; Kurinna, Svitlana M.; Dong, Bingning; Hernandez, Juan P.; Moore, David D.; Merkulova, Tatyana I.

    2011-08-15

    2'-3-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (ortho-aminoazotoluene, OAT) is an azo dye and a rodent carcinogen that has been evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible (class 2B) human carcinogen. Its mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the role of the xenobiotic receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) as a mediator of the effects of OAT. We found that OAT increases mouse CAR (mCAR) transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is specific because another closely related azo dye, 3'-methyl-4-dimethyl-aminoazobenzene (3'MeDAB), did not activate mCAR. Real-time Q-PCR analysis in wild-type C57BL/6 mice revealed that OAT induces the hepatic mRNA expression of the following CAR target genes: Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Mrp4, Mrp2 and c-Myc. CAR-null (Car{sup -/-}) mice showed no increased expression of these genes following OAT treatment, demonstrating that CAR is required for their OAT dependent induction. The OAT-induced CAR-dependent increase of Cyp2b10 and c-Myc expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry analysis of wild-type and Car{sup -/-} livers showed that OAT did not acutely induce hepatocyte proliferation, but at much later time points showed an unexpected CAR-dependent proliferative response. These studies demonstrate that mCAR is an OAT xenosensor, and indicate that at least some of the biological effects of this compound are mediated by this nuclear receptor. - Highlights: > The azo dye and mouse carcinogen OAT is a very effective mCAR activator. > OAT increases mCAR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. > OAT CAR-dependently increases the expression of a specific subset of CAR target genes. > OAT induces an unexpectedly deferred, but CAR-dependent hepatocyte proliferation.

  15. Role of Accessory Proteins of HTLV-1 in Viral Replication, T Cell Activation, and Cellular Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amithraj; Lairmore, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), and initiates a variety of immune mediated disorders. The viral genome encodes common structural and enzymatic proteins characteristic of all retroviruses and utilizes alternative splicing and alternate codon usage to make several regulatory and accessory proteins encoded in the pX region (pX ORF I to IV). Recent studies indicate that the accessory proteins p12I, p27I, p13II, and p30II, encoded by pX ORF I and II, contribute to viral replication and the ability of the virus to maintain typical in vivo expression levels. Proviral clones that are mutated in either pX ORF I or II, while fully competent in cell culture, are severely limited in their replicative capacity in a rabbit model. These HTLV-1 accessory proteins are critical for establishment of viral infectivity, enhance T- lymphocyte activation and potentially alter gene transcription and mitochondrial function. HTLV-1 pX ORF I expression is critical to the viral infectivity in resting primary lymphocytes suggesting a role for the calcineurin-binding protein p12I in lymphocyte activation. The endoplasmic reticulum and cis-Golgi localizing p12I activates NFAT, a key T cell transcription factor, through calcium-mediated signaling pathways and may lower the threshold of lymphocyte activation via the JAK/STAT pathway. In contrast p30II localizes to the nucleus and represses viral promoter activity, but may regulate cellular gene expression through p300/CBP or related co-activators of transcription. The mitochondrial localizing p13II induces morphologic changes in the organelle and may influence energy metabolism infected cells. Future studies of the molecular details HTLV-1 “accessory” proteins interactions will provide important new directions for investigations of HTLV-1 and related viruses associated with lymphoproliferative diseases. Thus, the accessory proteins of HTLV-1, once thought to be dispensable for

  16. Gene Expression in Oligodendroglial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Elisabeth J.; Haylock, Brian; Husband, David; du Plessis, Daniel; Sibson, D. Ross; Warnke, Peter C.; Walker, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss are more likely to be chemosensitive and have longer survival than those with intact 1p/19q, but not all respond to chemotherapy, warranting investigation of the biological basis of chemosensitivity. Methods: Gene expression profiling was performed using amplified antisense RNA from 28 oligodendroglial tumors treated with chemotherapy (26 serial stereotactic biopsy, 2 resection). Expression of differentially expressed genes was validated by real-time PCR. Results: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clustering of multiple samples from the same case in 14/17 cases and identified subgroups associated with tumor grade and 1p/19q status. 176 genes were differentially expressed, 164 being associated with 1p/19q loss (86% not on 1p or 19q). 94 genes differed between responders and non-responders to chemotherapy; 12 were not associated with 1p/19q loss. Significant differential expression was confirmed in 11/13 selected genes. Novel genes associated with response to therapy included SSBP2, GFRA1, FAP and RASD1. IQGAP1, INA, TGIF1, NR2F2 and MYCBP were differentially expressed in oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss. Conclusion: Gene expression profiling using serial stereotactic biopsies indicated greater homogeneity within tumors than between tumors. Genes associated with 1p/19q status or response were identified warranting further elucidation of their role in oligodendroglial tumors. PMID:20966545

  17. HSP70 Promoter-Driven Activation of Gene Expression for Immunotherapy Using Gold Nanorods and Near Infrared Light

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Helen A.; Kim, Yoo-Shin; O’Neill, Brian E.; Shi, Zheng-Zheng; Serda, Rita E.

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of the cytokine milieu is one approach for vaccine development. However, therapy with pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-12, is limited in practice due to adverse systemic effects. Spatially-restricted gene expression circumvents this problem by enabling localized amplification. Intracellular co-delivery of gold nanorods (AuNR) and a heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) promoter-driven expression vector enables gene expression in response to near infrared (NIR) light. AuNRs absorb the light, convert it into heat and thereby stimulate photothermal expression of the cytokine. As proof-of-concept, human HeLa and murine B16 cancer cells were transfected with a HSP70-Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) plasmid and polyethylenimine (PEI)-conjugated AuNRs. Exposure to either 42 °C heat-shock or NIR light induced significant expression of the reporter gene. In vivo NIR driven expression of the reporter gene was confirmed at 6 and 24 h in mice bearing B16 melanoma tumors using in vivo imaging and flow-cytometric analysis. Overall, we demonstrate a novel opportunity for site-directed, heat-inducible expression of a gene based upon the NIR-absorbing properties of AuNRs and a HSP70 promoter-driven expression vector. PMID:25328682

  18. HSP70 promoter-driven activation of gene expression for immunotherapy using gold nanorods and near infrared light.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Helen A; Kim, Yoo-Shin; O'Neill, Brian E; Shi, Zheng-Zheng; Serda, Rita E

    2014-03-25

    Modulation of the cytokine milieu is one approach for vaccine development. However, therapy with pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-12, is limited in practice due to adverse systemic effects. Spatially-restricted gene expression circumvents this problem by enabling localized amplification. Intracellular co-delivery of gold nanorods (AuNR) and a heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) promoter-driven expression vector enables gene expression in response to near infrared (NIR) light. AuNRs absorb the light, convert it into heat and thereby stimulate photothermal expression of the cytokine. As proof-of-concept, human HeLa and murine B16 cancer cells were transfected with a HSP70-Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) plasmid and polyethylenimine (PEI)-conjugated AuNRs. Exposure to either 42 °C heat-shock or NIR light induced significant expression of the reporter gene. In vivo NIR driven expression of the reporter gene was confirmed at 6 and 24 h in mice bearing B16 melanoma tumors using in vivo imaging and flow-cytometric analysis. Overall, we demonstrate a novel opportunity for site-directed, heat-inducible expression of a gene based upon the NIR-absorbing properties of AuNRs and a HSP70 promoter-driven expression vector. PMID:25328682

  19. Long-chain fatty acids regulate liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase I gene (L-CPT I) expression through a peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Louet, J F; Chatelain, F; Decaux, J F; Park, E A; Kohl, C; Pineau, T; Girard, J; Pegorier, J P

    2001-01-01

    Liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (L-CPT I) catalyses the transfer of long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) for translocation across the mitochondrial membrane. Expression of the L-CPT I gene is induced by LCFAs as well as by lipid-lowering compounds such as clofibrate. Previous studies have suggested that the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is a common mediator of the transcriptional effects of LCFA and clofibrate. We found that free LCFAs rather than acyl-CoA esters are the signal metabolites responsible for the stimulation of L-CPT I gene expression. Using primary culture of hepatocytes we found that LCFAs failed to stimulate L-CPT I gene expression both in wild-type and PPARalpha-null mice. These results suggest that the PPARalpha-knockout mouse does not represent a suitable model for the regulation of L-CPT I gene expression by LCFAs in the liver. Finally, we determined that clofibrate stimulates L-CPT I through a classical direct repeat 1 (DR1) motif in the promoter of the L-CPT I gene while LCFAs induce L-CPT I via elements in the first intron of the gene. Our results demonstrate that LCFAs can regulate gene expression through PPARalpha-independent pathways and suggest that the regulation of gene expression by dietary lipids is more complex than previously proposed. PMID:11171094

  20. Global gene expression changes of in vitro stimulated human transformed germinal centre B cells as surrogate for oncogenic pathway activation in individual aggressive B cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are a group of lymphomas derived from germinal centre B cells which display a heterogeneous pattern of oncogenic pathway activation. We postulate that specific immune response associated signalling, affecting gene transcription networks, may be associated with the activation of different oncogenic pathways in aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Methodology The B cell receptor (BCR), CD40, B-cell activating factor (BAFF)-receptors and Interleukin (IL) 21 receptor and Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) were stimulated in human transformed germinal centre B cells by treatment with anti IgM F(ab)2-fragments, CD40L, BAFF, IL21 and LPS respectively. The changes in gene expression following the activation of Jak/STAT, NF-кB, MAPK, Ca2+ and PI3K signalling triggered by these stimuli was assessed using microarray analysis. The expression of top 100 genes which had a change in gene expression following stimulation was investigated in gene expression profiles of patients with Aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Results αIgM stimulation led to the largest number of changes in gene expression, affecting overall 6596 genes. While CD40L stimulation changed the expression of 1194 genes and IL21 stimulation affected 902 genes, only 283 and 129 genes were modulated by lipopolysaccharide or BAFF receptor stimulation, respectively. Interestingly, genes associated with a Burkitt-like phenotype, such as MYC, BCL6 or LEF1, were affected by αIgM. Unique and shared gene expression was delineated. NHL-patients were sorted according to their similarity in the expression of TOP100 affected genes to stimulated transformed germinal centre B cells The αIgM gene module discriminated individual DLBCL in a similar manner to CD40L or IL21 gene modules. DLBCLs with low module activation often carry chromosomal MYC aberrations. DLBCLs with high module activation show strong expression of genes involved in cell-cell communication, immune responses

  1. Cloning and expression analysis of recombination activating genes (RAG1/2) in red snapper (Lutjanus sanguineus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, X L; Lu, Y S; Jian, J C; Wu, Z H

    2012-04-01

    Recombination activating genes (RAG1 and RAG2), involved in the V(D)J recombination of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes play a crucial role in the adaptive immune response in vertebrates. The expression of these genes was required for the proper development and maturity of lymphocytes so that they can be used as useful markers to evaluate the development of lymphoid organ. In this paper, the cDNA of RAG1 and RAG2 in red snapper, Lutjanus sanguineus were cloned by homological cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) methods. Results showed the full length of RAG1 cDNA was 3944 bp, containing a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 200 bp, a 3'-UTR of 561 bp and an open reading frame of 3183 bp encoding 1060 amino acids. Three important structural motifs, a RING/U-box domain, a RING/FYVE/PHD-type domain and a RAG Nonamer-binding domain were detected in the deduced amino acid sequence of RAG1 by InterProScan analysis. The full length of RAG2 cDNA was 2200 bp, consisting of a 141 bp 5'-UTR, a 457 bp 3'-UTR and an open reading frame of 1602 bp encoding 533 amino acids. Two important structural motifs, a Galactose oxidase/kelch, beta-propeller domain and a kelch-type beta-propeller domain were detected in the deduced amino acid sequence of RAG2 by InterProScan analysis. BLAST analysis revealed that the RAG1 and RAG2 in red snapper shared a high homology with other known RAG1 and RAG2 genes, while the greatest degree of identity was observed with Hippoglossus hippoglossus RAG1 at 82% and Takifugu rubripes RAG2 at 87%, respectively. The differential expressions of RAG1 and RAG2 in various tissues of red snapper were analyzed by fluorescent quantitative real-time PCR. The overall expression pattern of the two genes was quite similar. In healthy red snappers, the RAGs transcripts were mainly detected in thymus, following head kidney, spleen, intestine, liver and brain. After vaccinated with inactivated Vibrio alginolyticus 48 h later, the RAGs m

  2. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions. PMID:26966245

  3. Expression of cry1Ab gene from a novel Bacillus thuringiensis strain SY49-1 active on pest insects.

    PubMed

    Azizoglu, Ugur; Ayvaz, Abdurrahman; Yılmaz, Semih; Karabörklü, Salih; Temizgul, Rıdvan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the cry1Ab gene of previously characterized and Lepidoptera-, Diptera-, and Coleoptera-active Bacillus thuringiensis SY49-1 strain was cloned, expressed and individually tested on Ephestia kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae. pET-cry1Ab plasmids were constructed by ligating the cry1Ab into pET28a (+) expression vector. Constructed plasmids were transferred to an Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain rendered competent with CaCl2. Isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside was used to induce the expression of cry1Ab in E. coli BL21(DE3), and consequently, ∼130kDa of Cry1Ab was obtained. Bioassay results indicated that recombinant Cry1Ab at a dose of 1000μgg(-1) caused 40% and 64% mortality on P. interpunctella and E. kuehniella larvae, respectively. However, the mortality rates of Bt SY49-1 strains' spore-crystal mixture at the same dose were observed to be 70% on P. interpunctella and 90% on E. kuehniella larvae. The results indicated that cry1Ab may be considered as a good candidate in transgenic crop production and as an alternative biocontrol agent in controlling stored product moths. PMID:27143037

  4. Systematic Expression Profiling Analysis Identifies Specific MicroRNA-Gene Interactions that May Differentiate between Active and Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin; Huang, Kai-Yao; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second most common cause of death from infectious diseases. About 90% of those infected are asymptomatic—the so-called latent TB infections (LTBI), with a 10% lifetime chance of progressing to active TB. To further understand the molecular pathogenesis of TB, several molecular studies have attempted to compare the expression profiles between healthy controls and active TB or LTBI patients. However, the results vary due to diverse genetic backgrounds and study designs and the inherent complexity of the disease process. Thus, developing a sensitive and efficient method for the detection of LTBI is both crucial and challenging. For the present study, we performed a systematic analysis of the gene and microRNA profiles of healthy individuals versus those affected with TB or LTBI. Combined with a series of in silico analysis utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and published literature data, we have uncovered several microRNA-gene interactions that specifically target both the blood and lungs. Some of these molecular interactions are novel and may serve as potential biomarkers of TB and LTBI, facilitating the development for a more sensitive, efficient, and cost-effective diagnostic assay for TB and LTBI for the Taiwanese population. PMID:25276827

  5. Ortho-Aminoazotoluene activates mouse Constitutive Androstane Receptor (mCAR) and increases expression of mCAR target genes

    PubMed Central

    Smetanina, Mariya A.; Pakharukova, Mariya Y.; Kurinna, Svitlana M.; Dong, Bingning; Hernandez, Juan P.; Moore, David D.; Merkulova, Tatyana I.

    2011-01-01

    2'-3-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (ortho-aminoazotoluene, OAT) is an azo dye and a rodent carcinogen that has been evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible (class 2B) human carcinogen. Its mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the role of the xenobiotic receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) as a mediator of the effects of OAT. We found that OAT increases mouse CAR (mCAR) transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is specific because another closely related azo dye, 3'-methyl-4-dimethyl-aminoazobenzene (3'MeDAB), did not activate mCAR. Real-time Q-PCR analysis in wild-type C57BL/6 mice revealed that OAT induces the hepatic mRNA expression of the following CAR target genes: Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Mrp4, Mrp2 and c-Myc. CAR-null (Car−/−) mice showed no increased expression of these genes following OAT treatment, demonstrating that CAR is required for their OAT dependent induction. The OAT-induced CAR-dependent increase of Cyp2b10 and c-Myc expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry analysis of wild-type and Car−/− livers showed that OAT did not acutely induce hepatocyte proliferation, but at much later time points showed an unexpected CAR-dependent proliferative response. These studies demonstrate that mCAR is an OAT xenosensor, and indicate that at least some of the biological effects of this compound are mediated by this nuclear receptor. PMID:21672546

  6. Differential expression and regulation of anti-hypertrophic genes Npr1 and Npr2 during β-adrenergic receptor activation-induced hypertrophic growth in rats.

    PubMed

    Manivasagam, Senthamizharasi; Subramanian, Vimala; Tumala, Anusha; Vellaichamy, Elangovan

    2016-09-15

    We sought to determine the effect of chronic activation of β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) on the left ventricular (LV) expression profile of Npr1 and Npr2 (coding for NPR-A and NPR-B, respectively) genes, and the functional activity of these receptors in adult Wistar rat hearts. The Npr1 gene expression was markedly reduced (3.5-fold), while the Npr2 gene expression was up regulated (4-fold) in Isoproterenol (ISO)-treated heart as compared with controls. A gradual reduction in NPR-A protein (3-fold), cGMP levels (75%) and a steady increased expression of NPR-B protein (4-fold), were noticed in ISO hearts. Further, in-vitro membranes assay shows that NPR-A dependent guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity was down-regulated (2-fold), whereas NPR-B dependent GC activity was increased (5-fold) in ISO treated hearts. Atenolol treatment normalized the altered expression of Npr1 and Npr2 genes. In conclusion, the chronic β-AR activation differentially regulates Npr1 and Npr2 genes in the heart. Npr1 down regulation is positively associated with the development of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in ISO rats. PMID:27283501

  7. Astrocyte activation in the anterior cingulate cortex and altered glutamatergic gene expression during paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Spinal astrocyte activation contributes to the pathogenesis of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain (PINP) in animal models. We examined glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; an astrocyte marker) immunoreactivity and gene expression of GFAP, glutamate transporters and receptor subunits by real time PCR in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) at 7 days post first administration of paclitaxel, a time point when mice had developed thermal hyperalgesia. The ACC, an area in the brain involved in pain perception and modulation, was chosen because changes in this area might contribute to the pathophysiology of PINP. GFAP transcripts levels were elevated by more than fivefold and GFAP immunoreactivity increased in the ACC of paclitaxel-treated mice. The 6 glutamate transporters (GLAST, GLT-1 EAAC1, EAAT4, VGLUT-1 and VGLUT-2) quantified were not significantly altered by paclitaxel treatment. Of the 12 ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits transcripts analysed 6 (GLuA1, GLuA3, GLuK2, GLuK3, GLuK5 and GLuN1) were significantly up-regulated, whereas GLuA2, GLuK1, GLuK4, GLuN2A and GLuN2B were not significantly altered and GLuA4 was lowly expressed. Amongst the 8 metabotropic receptor subunits analysed only mGLuR8 was significantly elevated. In conclusion, during PINP there is astrocyte activation, with no change in glutamate transporter expression and differential up-regulation of glutamate receptor subunits in the ACC. Thus, targeting astrocyte activation and the glutamatergic system might be another therapeutic avenue for management of PINP. PMID:26528412

  8. The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase complex mediates glucose regulation of gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tian; Bendrioua, Loubna; Carmena, David; García-Salcedo, Raúl; Dahl, Peter; Carling, David; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here we expressed hetero-trimeric mammalian AMPK complexes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking all five genes encoding yeast AMPK/SNF1 components. Certain mammalian complexes complemented the growth defect of the yeast mutant on non-fermentable carbon sources. Phosphorylation of the AMPK α1-subunit was glucose-regulated, albeit not by the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase, which performs this function on yeast AMPK/SNF1. AMPK could take over SNF1 function in glucose derepression. While indirectly acting anti-diabetic drugs had no effect on AMPK in yeast, compound 991 stimulated α1-subunit phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a remarkable functional conservation of AMPK and that glucose regulation of AMPK may not be mediated by regulatory features of a specific phosphatase. PMID:24815694

  9. Arginine induces GH gene expression by activating NOS/NO signaling in rat isolated hemi-pituitaries

    PubMed Central

    Olinto, S.C.F.; Adrião, M.G.; Castro-Barbosa, T.; Goulart-Silva, F.; Nunes, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    The amino acid arginine (Arg) is a recognized secretagogue of growth hormone (GH), and has been shown to induce GH gene expression. Arg is the natural precursor of nitric oxide (NO), which is known to mediate many of the effects of Arg, such as GH secretion. Arg was also shown to increase calcium influx in pituitary cells, which might contribute to its effects on GH secretion. Although the mechanisms involved in the effects of Arg on GH secretion are well established, little is known about them regarding the control of GH gene expression. We investigated whether the NO pathway and/or calcium are involved in the effects of Arg on GH gene expression in rat isolated pituitaries. To this end, pituitaries from approximately 170 male Wistar rats (∼250 g) were removed, divided into two halves, pooled (three hemi-pituitaries) and incubated or not with Arg, as well as with different pharmacological agents. Arg (71 mM), the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 1 and 0.1 mM) and a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) analogue (8-Br-cGMP, 1 mM) increased GH mRNA expression 60 min later. The NO acceptor hemoglobin (0.3 µM) blunted the effect of SNP, and the combined treatment with Arg and L-NAME (an NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 55 mM) abolished the stimulatory effect of Arg on GH gene expression. The calcium channel inhibitor nifedipine (3 µM) also abolished Arg-induced GH gene expression. The present study shows that Arg directly induces GH gene expression in hemi-pituitaries isolated from rats, excluding interference from somatostatinergic neurons, which are supposed to be inhibited by Arg. Moreover, the data demonstrate that the NOS/NO signaling pathway and calcium mediate the Arg effects on GH gene expression. PMID:22641416

  10. [Effects of light intensity on associated enzyme activity and gene expression during callus formation of Vitis vinifera].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Yang, Guowei; Wu, Yueyan; Rao, Huiyun; Li, Xuefu; Li, Meiqin; Qian, Pingxian

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the best light intensity for callus induction and maintenance in Vitis vinifera and explored the mechanism of grape callus browning. Tender stem segments of grape cultivar "gold finger" were used to study the effects of different light intensities (0, 500, 1 000, 1 500, 2 000, 2 500, 3 000 and 4 000 Lx) on the induction rate, browning rate and associated enzyme activity and gene expression during Vitis vinifera callus formation. The callus induction rate under 0, 500, 1 000 and 1 500 Lx was more than 92%, significantly higher than in other treatments (P < 0.05). A lower browning rate and better callus growth were also observed during subculture under 1 000 and 1 500 Lx treatments. We found that chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and coumaric acid contents were correlated with the browning rate of callus, among which chlorogenic acid content was positively correlated with the browning rate (P < 0.05). Peroxidase (POD) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities were negatively correlated with the browning rate of callus (P < 0.01). The POD, PPO and phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL) expression levels were positively correlated with the browning rate at P < 0.05 or P < 0.01. An appropriate light intensity for the tissue culture of Vitis vinifera was 1 000-1 500 Lx, higher or lower light intensities significantly impaired normal callus growth. PMID:26762043

  11. Expression of a Tandemly Arrayed Plectasin Gene from Pseudoplectania nigrella in Pichia pastoris and its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jin; Li, Yan; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; Zheng, Ping; Mao, Xiangbing; Yu, Jie; He, Jun

    2016-03-28

    In recent years, various naturally occurring defence peptides such as plectasin have attracted considerable research interest because they could serve as alternatives to antibiotics. However, the production of plectasin from natural microorganisms is still not commercially feasible because of its low expression levels and weak stability. A tandemly arrayed plectasin gene (1,002 bp) from Pseudoplectania nigrella was generated using the isoschizomer construction method, and was inserted into the pPICZαA vector and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The selected P. pastoris strain yielded 143 μg/ml recombinant plectasin (Ple) under the control of the methanol-inducible alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter. Ple was estimated by SDS-PAGE to be 41 kDa. In vitro studies have shown that Ple efficiently inhibited the growth of several gram-positive bacteria such as Streptococcus suis and Staphylococcus aureus. S. suis is the most sensitive bacterial species to Ple, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 4 μg/ml. Importantly, Ple exhibited resistance to pepsin but it was quite sensitive to trypsin and maintained antimicrobial activity over a wide pH range (pH 2.0 to 10.0). P. pastoris offers an attractive system for the cost-effective production of Ple. The antimicrobial activity of Ple suggested that it could be a potential alternative to antibiotics against S. suis and S. aureus infections. PMID:26643963

  12. Effects of ethylene and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) on gene expression and activity profile of alpha-1,4-glucan-phosphorylase during banana ripening.

    PubMed

    Mainardi, Janaina Aparecida; Purgatto, Eduardo; Vieira, Adair; Bastos, Walter Arato; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana; Oliveira do Nascimento, João Roberto; Lajolo, Franco Maria

    2006-09-20

    Starch phosphorylases are enzymes that can use starch as substrate, and they are supposed to act in both in starch synthesis and degradation. This paper reports the effects of ethylene and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) on the degradation of starch and phosphorylase activity and gene expression. The results indicate that phosphorylase activity is induced during ripening and that it is associated with the onset of starch degradation. The regulation of banana phosphorylase activity is mainly dependent on gene expression, and the absence of ethylene perception by 1-MCP had a positive effect. However, this effect can be precluded by increased levels of ethylene, both autocatalytic and exogenous. PMID:16968096

  13. Transcriptional regulation of secretin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, J; Rindi, G; Lopez, M J; Upchurch, B H; Leiter, A B

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the gene encoding the hormone secretin is restricted to a specific enteroendocrine cell type and to beta-cells in developing pancreatic islets. To characterize regulatory elements in the secretin gene responsible for its expression in secretin-producing cells, we used a series of reporter genes for transient expression assays in transfection studies carried out in secretin-producing islet cell lines. Analysis of the transcriptional activity of deletion mutants identified a positive cis regulatory domain between 174 and 53 base pairs upstream from the transcriptional initiation site which was required for secretin gene expression in secretin-producing HIT insulinoma cells. Within this enhancer were sequences resembling two binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1, as well as a consensus sequence for binding to helix-loop-helix proteins. Analysis of these three elements by site-directed mutagenesis suggests that each is important for full transcriptional activity. The role of proximal enhancer sequences in directing secretin gene expression to appropriate tissues is further supported by studies in transgenic mice revealing that 1.6 kilobases of the secretin gene 5' flanking sequence were sufficient to direct the expression of either human growth hormone or simian virus 40 large T-antigen reporter genes to all major secretin-producing tissues. PMID:8774991

  14. HIV-1-negative female sex workers sustain high cervical IFNɛ, low immune activation, and low expression of HIV-1-required host genes.

    PubMed

    Abdulhaqq, S A; Zorrilla, C; Kang, G; Yin, X; Tamayo, V; Seaton, K E; Joseph, J; Garced, S; Tomaras, G D; Linn, K A; Foulkes, A S; Azzoni, L; VerMilyea, M; Coutifaris, C; Kossenkov, A V; Showe, L; Kraiselburd, E N; Li, Q; Montaner, L J

    2016-07-01

    Sex workers practicing in high HIV endemic areas have been extensively targeted to test anti-HIV prophylactic strategies. We hypothesize that in women with high levels of genital exposure to semen changes in cervico-vaginal mucosal and/or systemic immune activation will contribute to a decreased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. To address this question, we assessed sexual activity and immune activation status (in peripheral blood), as well as cellular infiltrates and gene expression in ectocervical mucosa biopsies in female sex workers (FSWs; n=50), as compared with control women (CG; n=32). FSWs had low-to-absent HIV-1-specific immune responses with significantly lower CD38 expression on circulating CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cells (both: P<0.001) together with lower cervical gene expression of genes associated with leukocyte homing and chemotaxis. FSWs also had increased levels of interferon-ɛ (IFNɛ) gene and protein expression in the cervical epithelium together with reduced expression of genes associated with HIV-1 integration and replication. A correlative relationship between semen exposure and elevated type-1 IFN expression in FSWs was also established. Overall, our data suggest that long-term condomless sex work can result in multiple changes within the cervico-vaginal compartment that would contribute to sustaining a lower susceptibility for HIV-1 infection in the absence of HIV-specific responses. PMID:26555708

  15. HIV-1 Negative Female Sex Workers Sustain High Cervical IFNε, Low Immune Activation and Low Expression of HIV-1 Required Host Genes

    PubMed Central

    Abdulhaqq, Shaheed A.; Zorrilla, Carmen; Kang, Guobin; Yin, Xiangfan; Tamayo, Vivian; Seaton, Kelly E.; Joseph, Jocelin; Garced, Sheyla; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Linn, Kristin A.; Foulkes, Andrea S.; Azzoni, Livio; VerMilyea, Matthew; Coutifaris, Christos; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Showe, Louise; Kraiselburd, Edmundo N.; Li, Qingsheng; Montaner, Luis J.

    2015-01-01

    Sex workers within high HIV endemic areas are often a target population where anti-HIV prophylactic strategies are tested. We hypothesize that in women with high levels of genital exposure to semen changes in cervicovaginal mucosal and/or systemic immune activation will contribute to a decreased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. To address this question, we assessed sexual activity, immune activation status (in peripheral blood), as well as cellular infiltrates and gene expression in ectocervical mucosa biopsies in female sex workers [FSW] (n=50), as compared to control women [CG] (n=32). FSW had low to absent HIV-1 specific immune responses with significantly lower CD38 expression on circulating CD4+ or CD8+ T-Cells (both: p<0.001) together with lower cervical gene expression of genes associated with leukocyte homing and chemotaxis. FSW also had increased levels of Interferon-ε gene and protein expression in the cervical epithelium together with reduced expression of genes associated with HIV-1 integration and replication. A correlative relationship between semen exposure and elevated type-1 IFN expression in FSW was also established. Overall, our data suggest that long-term condomless sex work can result in multiple changes within the cervicovaginal compartment that would contribute to sustaining a lower susceptibility for HIV-1 infection in absence of HIV-specific responses. PMID:26555708

  16. Regulation of human hepatic hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase gene expression by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hai-Lin; Strom, Stephen C; Cai, Hongbo; Falany, Charles N; Kocarek, Thomas A; Runge-Morris, Melissa

    2005-04-01

    Human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase or (HUMAN)SULT2A1 catalyzes the sulfonation of procarcinogen xenobiotics, hydroxysteroids, and bile acids and plays a dynamic role in hepatic cholesterol homeostasis. The treatment of primary cultured human hepatocytes with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-activating concentration of ciprofibrate (10(-) (4) M) increased (HUMAN)SULT2A1 mRNA, immunoreactive protein, and enzymatic activity levels by approximately 2-fold. By contrast, expression of (RAT)SULT2A3, the rat counterpart to (HUMAN)SULT2A1, was induced by treatment of primary hepatocyte cultures with an activator of the pregnane X receptor, but not PPARalpha. In HepG2 cells, transient transfection analyses of luciferase reporter constructs containing upstream regions of the (HUMAN)SULT2A1 gene implicated a candidate peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) at nucleotides (nt) -5949 to -5929 relative to the transcription start site. Site-directed mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay studies confirmed that this distal PPRE (dPPRE), a direct repeat nuclear receptor motif containing one intervening nt, represented a functional PPRE. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that the (HUMAN)SULT2A1 dPPRE was also a functional element in the context of the human genome. These data support a major role for the PPARalpha transcription factor in the regulation of hepatic (HUMAN)SULT2A1. Results also indicate that important species differences govern the transactivation of SULT2A gene transcription by nuclear receptors. PMID:15635043

  17. Distinct structural domains of caveolin-1 independently regulate Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ microdomain-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Parekh, Anant B

    2015-04-01

    In eukaryotic cells, calcium entry across the cell surface activates nuclear gene expression, a process critically important for cell growth and differentiation, learning, and memory and immune cell functions. In immune cells, calcium entry occurs through store-operated Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels, comprised of STIM1 and Orai1 proteins. Local calcium entry through CRAC channels activates expression of c-fos- and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-dependent genes. Although c-fos and NFAT often interact to activate gene expression synergistically, they can be activated independently of one another to regulate distinct genes. This raises the question of how one transcription factor can be activated and not the other when both are stimulated by the same trigger. Here, we show that the lipid raft scaffolding protein caveolin-1 interacts with the STIM1-Orai1 complex to increase channel activity. Phosphorylation of tyrosine 14 on caveolin-1 regulates CRAC channel-evoked c-fos activation without impacting the NFAT pathway or Orai1 activity. Our results reveal that structurally distinct domains of caveolin-1 selectively regulate the ability of local calcium to activate distinct transcription factors. More generally, our findings reveal that modular regulation by a scaffolding protein provides a simple, yet effective, mechanism to tunnel a local signal down a specific pathway. PMID:25645930

  18. The Effect of Progestins on Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Activity and Gene Expression in Human Primary Amnion and Chorion Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Terrence K; Feng, Liping; Nazzal, Matthew; Grotegut, Chad A; Buhimschi, Irina A; Murtha, Amy P

    2015-01-01

    Background Current treatment modalities for preventing preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) are limited, but progestins may play a role. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) enhances matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) gene expression and activity in fetal membranes, contributing to membrane weakening and rupture. We previously demonstrated that progestins attenuate TNFα-induced MMP-9 activity in a cytotrophoblast cell line. However, whether they have a similar effect in primary amnion and chorion cells of fetal membranes is unknown. In this study we evaluated the effect of progestins on basal and TNFα-induced MMP-9 activity and gene expression in primary chorion and amnion cells harvested from the fetal membranes of term non-laboring patients. Methods Primary amnion and chorion cells were isolated from fetal membranes obtained from term uncomplicated non-laboring patients following elective cesarean delivery (n=11). Confluent primary amnion and chorion cell cultures were both pretreated with vehicle (control), progesterone (P4), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17P) or medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) at 10-6 M concentration for 6 h followed by stimulation with TNFα at 10 ng/mL for an additional 24 h. Cell cultures pretreated with the vehicle only served as the unstimulated control and the vehicle stimulated with TNFα served as the stimulated control. Both controls were assigned a value of 100 units. Cell culture medium was harvested for MMP-9 enzymatic activity quantification using gelatin zymography. Total RNA was extracted for quantifying MMP-9 gene expression using RT-qPCR. Basal MMP-9 activity and gene expression data were normalized to the unstimulated control. TNFα-stimulated MMP-9 activity and gene expression were normalized to the stimulated control. The primary outcome was the effect of progestins on TNFα-induced MMP-9 enzymatic activity in term human primary amnion and chorion cells in vitro. Secondary outcomes included the effect of

  19. Assessment of Tumor Heterogeneity, as Evidenced by Gene Expression Profiles, Pathway Activation, and Gene Copy Number, in Patients with Multifocal Invasive Lobular Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Nadine; Advani, Pooja P.; Serie, Daniel J.; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J.; Necela, Brian M.; Axenfeld, Bianca C.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Feathers, Ryan W.; Carr, Jennifer M.; Crook, Julia E.; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.; Perez, Edith A.; Thompson, E. Aubrey

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) comprises approximately ~10–20% of breast cancers. In general, multifocal/multicentric (MF/MC) breast cancer has been associated with an increased rate of regional lymph node metastases. Tumor heterogeneity between foci represents a largely unstudied source of genomic variation in those rare patients with MF/MC ILC. Methods We characterized gene expression and copy number in 2 or more foci from 11 patients with MF/MC ILC (all ER+, HER2-) and adjacent normal tissue. RNA and DNA were extracted from 3x1.5mm cores from all foci. Gene expression (730 genes) and copy number (80 genes) were measured using Nanostring PanCancer and Cancer CNV panels. Linear mixed models were employed to compare expression in tumor versus normal samples from the same patient, and to assess heterogeneity (variability) in expression among multiple ILC within an individual. Results 35 and 34 genes were upregulated (FC>2) and down-regulated (FC<0.5) respectively in ILC tumor relative to adjacent normal tissue, q<0.05. 9/34 down-regulated genes (FIGF, RELN, PROM1, SFRP1, MMP7, NTRK2, LAMB3, SPRY2, KIT) had changes larger than CDH1, a hallmark of ILC. Copy number changes in these patients were relatively few but consistent across foci within each patient. Amplification of three genes (CCND1, FADD, ORAOV1) at 11q13.3 was present in 2/11 patients in both foci. We observed significant evidence of within-patient between-foci variability (heterogeneity) in gene expression for 466 genes (p<0.05 with FDR 8%), including CDH1, FIGF, RELN, SFRP1, MMP7, NTRK2, LAMB3, SPRY2 and KIT. Conclusions There was substantial variation in gene expression between ILC foci within patients, including known markers of ILC, suggesting an additional level of complexity that should be addressed. PMID:27078887

  20. Gene expression in periodontal tissues following treatment

    PubMed Central

    Beikler, Thomas; Peters, Ulrike; Prior, Karola; Eisenacher, Martin; Flemmig, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    Background In periodontitis, treatment aimed at controlling the periodontal biofilm infection results in a resolution of the clinical and histological signs of inflammation. Although the cell types found in periodontal tissues following treatment have been well described, information on gene expression is limited to few candidate genes. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the expression profiles of immune and inflammatory genes in periodontal tissues from sites with severe chronic periodontitis following periodontal therapy in order to identify genes involved in tissue homeostasis. Gingival biopsies from 12 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were taken six to eight weeks following non-surgical periodontal therapy, and from 11 healthy controls. As internal standard, RNA of an immortalized human keratinocyte line (HaCaT) was used. Total RNA was subjected to gene expression profiling using a commercially available microarray system focusing on inflammation-related genes. Post-hoc confirmation of selected genes was done by Realtime-PCR. Results Out of the 136 genes analyzed, the 5% most strongly expressed genes compared to healthy controls were Interleukin-12A (IL-12A), Versican (CSPG-2), Matrixmetalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), Down syndrome critical region protein-1 (DSCR-1), Macrophage inflammatory protein-2β (Cxcl-3), Inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (BIRC-1), Cluster of differentiation antigen 38 (CD38), Regulator of G-protein signalling-1 (RGS-1), and Finkel-Biskis-Jinkins murine osteosarcoma virus oncogene (C-FOS); the 5% least strongly expressed genes were Receptor-interacting Serine/Threonine Kinase-2 (RIP-2), Complement component 3 (C3), Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (COX-2), Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Endothelin-1 (EDN-1), Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2), Matrix-metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14), and Interferon regulating factor-7 (IRF-7). Conclusion Gene expression profiles found in periodontal tissues following therapy

  1. Ultraviolet Radiation-Elicited Enhancement of Isoflavonoid Accumulation, Biosynthetic Gene Expression, and Antioxidant Activity in Astragalus membranaceus Hairy Root Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Gu, Cheng-Bo; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2015-09-23

    In this work, Astragalus membranaceus hairy root cultures (AMHRCs) were exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C) for promoting isoflavonoid accumulation. The optimum enhancement for isoflavonoid production was achieved in 34-day-old AMHRCs elicited by 86.4 kJ/m(2) of UV-B. The resulting isoflavonoid yield was 533.54 ± 13.61 μg/g dry weight (DW), which was 2.29-fold higher relative to control (232.93 ± 3.08 μg/g DW). UV-B up-regulated the transcriptional expressions of all investigated genes involved in isoflavonoid biosynthetic pathway. PAL and C4H were found to be two potential key genes that controlled isoflavonoid biosynthesis. Moreover, a significant increase was noted in antioxidant activity of extracts from UV-B-elicited AMHRCs (IC50 values = 0.85 and 1.08 mg/mL) in comparison with control (1.38 and 1.71 mg/mL). Overall, this study offered a feasible elicitation strategy to enhance isoflavonoid accumulation in AMHRCs and also provided a basis for metabolic engineering of isoflavonoid biosynthesis in the future. PMID:26370303

  2. A cytotoxic nonstructural protein, NS1, of human parvovirus B19 induces activation of interleukin-6 gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, S; Tanaka, N; Tada, K; Nose, M; Nakamura, M; Muraoka, O; Hirano, T; Sugamura, K

    1996-01-01

    We examined the biological function of a nonstructural regulatory protein, NS1, of human parvovirus B19. Because of the cytotoxic activity of NS1, human hematopoietic cell lines, K562, Raji, and THP-1, were established as transfectants which produce the viral NS1 protein upon induction by using bacterial lactose repressor/operator system. NS1 was significantly produced in the three transfectant cells in an inducer dose- and time-dependent manner. Surprisingly, these three transfectants secreted an inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6), in response to induction. However, no production of other related cytokines, IL-1beta, IL-8, or tumor necrosis factor alpha, was seen. Moreover, NS1-primed IL-6 induction was transiently demonstrated in primary human endothelial cells. Analysis with luciferase reporter plasmids carrying IL-6 promoter mutant fragments demonstrated that NS1 effect is mediated by a NF-kappaB binding site in the IL-6 promoter region, strongly implying that NS1 functions as a trans-acting transcriptional activator on the IL-6 promoter. Our novel finding, IL-6 induction by NS1, supports the possible relationship between parvovirus B19 infection and polyclonal activation of B cells in rheumatoid arthritis and indicates that NS1 protein may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of some B19-associated diseases by modulating the expression of host cellular genes. PMID:8970971

  3. Changes in neuronal activity and gene expression in guinea-pig auditory brainstem after unilateral partial hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Dong, S; Mulders, W H A M; Rodger, J; Robertson, D

    2009-03-31

    Spontaneous neural hyperactivity in the central auditory pathway is often associated with deafness, the most common form of which is partial hearing loss. We quantified both peripheral hearing loss and spontaneous activity in single neurons of the contralateral inferior colliculus in a guinea-pig model 1 week after a unilateral partial deafness induced by cochlear mechanical lesion. We also measured mRNA levels of candidate genes in the same animals using quantitative real-time PCR. Spontaneous hyperactivity was most marked in the frequency region of the peripheral hearing loss. Expression of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), GABA-A receptor subunit alpha-1 (GABRA1), and potassium channel subfamily K member 15 (KCNK15) was decreased ipsilaterally in the cochlear nucleus and bilaterally in the inferior colliculus. A member of RAB family of small GTPase (RAB3A) was decreased in both ipsilateral cochlear nucleus and contralateral inferior colliculus. RAB3 GTPase activating protein subunit 1 (RAB3GAP1) and glycine receptor subunit alpha-1 (GLRA1) were reduced ipsilaterally in the cochlear nucleus only. These results suggest that a decrease in inhibitory neurotransmission and an increase in membrane excitability may contribute to elevated neuronal spontaneous activity in the auditory brainstem following unilateral partial hearing loss. PMID:19356697

  4. Sodium-pump gene-expression, protein abundance and enzyme activity in isolated nephron segments of the aging rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Pnina; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Popovtzer, Mordecai M

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with alteration in renal tubular functions, including sodium handling and concentrating ability. Na-K-ATPase plays a key role in driving tubular transport, and we hypothesized that decreased concentrating ability of the aging kidney is due in part to downregulation of Na-K-ATPase. In this study, we evaluated Na and K balance, aldosterone levels, and Na-K-ATPase gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in aging rat kidney. Na-K-ATPase activity (assayed microfluorometrically), mRNA (RT-PCR), and protein abundance (immunoblotting) were quantitated in the following isolated nephron segments: PCT, PST, MTAL, DCT, and CCD from 2, 8, 15, and 24 month-old-rats. In the course of aging, creatinine clearance decreased from 0.48 ± 0.02 mL/min/100 g BW to 0.28 ± 0.06 (P < 0.001) and aldosterone decreased from 23.6 ± 0.8 ng/dL to 13.2 ± 0.6 (P < 0.001). Serum Na+ and K+ increased by 4.0% and 22.5%, respectively. Na-K-ATPase activity, mRNA, and protein abundance of the α1 subunit displayed similar trends in all assayed segments; increasing in PCT and PST; decreasing in MTAL and DCT; increasing in CCD: in PCT they increased by 40%, 75%, and 250%, respectively; while in PST they increased by 80%, 50%, and 100%, respectively (P < 0.001). In MTAL they declined by 36%, 24%, and 34%, respectively, and in DCT by 38%, 59%, and 60%, respectively (P < 0.001). They were higher in CCD by 110%, 115%, and 246%, respectively (P < 0.001). Rats maintained Na/K balance; however with a steady state elevated serum K+. These results reveal quantitative changes in axial distribution of Na-K-ATPase at the level of gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in the nephrons of aging animals and may explain, in part, the pathophysiology of the senescent kidney. PMID:26056060

  5. Matrilin-3 activates the expression of osteoarthritis-associated genes in primary human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Andreas R; Klinger, Gabriele; Paul-Klausch, Brigitte; Kühn, Gertrud; Renno, Joerg H; Wagener, Raimund; Paulsson, Mats; Schmidt, Joachim; Malchau, Gebhart; Wielckens, Klaus

    2009-11-19

    Here, we tested the matrilin-3-dependent induction of osteoarthritis-associated genes in primary human chondrocytes. Matrilin stimulation leads to the induction of MMP1, MMP3, MMP13, COX-2, iNOS, IL-1beta, TNFalpha, IL-6 and IL-8. Furthermore, we show the participation of ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5 in the in vitro degradation of matrilin-3. We provide evidence for a matrilin-3-dependent feed-forward mechanism of matrix degradation, whereby proteolytically-released matrilin-3 induces pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as ADAMTS4 and -5 indirectly via IL-1beta. ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5, in turn, cleave matrilin-3 and may release more matrilin-3 from the matrix, which could lead to further release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteases in cartilage. PMID:19840795

  6. Monosaccharide absorption activity of Arabidopsis roots depends on expression profiles of transporter genes under high salinity conditions.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kohji; Kanai, Motoki; Osakabe, Yuriko; Ohiraki, Haruka; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2011-12-16

    Plant roots are able to absorb sugars from the rhizosphere but also release sugars and other metabolites that are critical for growth and environmental signaling. Reabsorption of released sugar molecules could help reduce the loss of photosynthetically fixed carbon through the roots. Although biochemical analyses have revealed monosaccharide uptake mechanisms in roots, the transporters that are involved in this process have not yet been fully characterized. In the present study we demonstrate that Arabidopsis STP1 and STP13 play important roles in roots during the absorption of monosaccharides from the rhizosphere. Among 14 STP transporter genes, we found that STP1 had the highest transcript level and that STP1 was a major contributor for monosaccharide uptake under normal conditions. In contrast, STP13 was found to be induced by abiotic stress, with low expression under normal conditions. We analyzed the role of STP13 in roots under high salinity conditions where membranes of the epidermal cells were damaged, and we detected an increase in the amount of STP13-dependent glucose uptake. Furthermore, the amount of glucose efflux from stp13 mutants was higher than that from wild type plants under high salinity conditions. These results indicate that STP13 can reabsorb the monosaccharides that are released by damaged cells under high salinity conditions. Overall, our data indicate that sugar uptake capacity in Arabidopsis roots changes in response to environmental stresses and that this activity is dependent on the expression pattern of sugar transporters. PMID:22041897

  7. Glycolytic enzyme activities and gene expression in Cicer arietinum exposed to water-deficit stress.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Suruchi M; Taxak, Pooja Choudhary; Jain, Pradeep K; Saini, Raman; Srinivasan, R

    2014-08-01

    The specific activities and transcript levels of glycolytic enzymes were examined in shoots of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) cultivars, Pusa362 (drought tolerant) and SBD377 (drought sensitive), subjected to water-deficit stress 30 days after sowing. Water-deficit stress resulted in decrease in relative water content, chlorophyll content, plant dry weight, and NADP/NADPH ratio and increase in NAD/NADH ratio in both the cultivars. A successive decline in the specific activities of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (aldolase), 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK), and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NADP-GAPDH) and elevation in the specific activities of phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM) and triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) was observed in both the cultivars under stress as compared to their respective control plants. The specific activities of hexokinase, fructose-6-phosphate kinase (PFK), and NAD-GAPDH were least affected. The transcript levels of PGK and NADP-GAPDH decreased and that of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), PGM, and PFK increased in response to water-deficit stress while water-deficit stress had no effect on the steady-state transcript levels of hexokinase, aldolase, TPI, and NAD-GAPDH. The results suggest that under water-deficit stress, the activities and transcript levels of most of the glycolytic enzymes are not significantly affected, except the increased activity and transcript level of PGM and decreased activities and transcript levels of PGK and NADP-GAPDH. Further, the glycolytic enzymes do not show much variation between the tolerant and sensitive cultivars under water deficit. PMID:25008554

  8. Rapid Screening Method for Mycobactericidal Activity of Chemical Germicides That Uses Mycobacterium terrae Expressing a Green Fluorescent Protein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zafer, Ahmed A.; Taylor, Yvonne E.; Sattar, Syed A.

    2001-01-01

    The slow growth of mycobacteria in conventional culture methods impedes the testing of chemicals for mycobactericidal activity. An assay based on expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) by mycobacteria was developed as a rapid alternative. Plasmid pBEN, containing the gene encoding a red-shifted, high-intensity GFP mutant, was incorporated into Mycobacterium terrae (ATCC 15755), and GFP expression was observed by epifluorescence microscopy. Mycobactericidal activity was assessed by separately exposing a suspension of M. terrae(pBEN) to several dilutions of test germicides based on 7.5% hydrogen peroxide, 2.4% alkaline glutaraldehyde, 10% acid glutaraldehyde, and 15.5% of a phenolic agent for contact times ranging from 10 to 20 min (22°C), followed by culture of the exposed cells in broth (Middlebrook 7H9) and measurement of fluorescence every 24 h. When the fluorescence was to be compared with CFU, the samples were plated on Middlebrook 7H11 agar and incubated for 4 weeks. No increase in fluorescence or CFU occurred in cultures in which the cells had been inactivated by the germicide concentrations tested. Where the test bacterium was exposed to ineffective levels of the germicides, fluorescence increased after a lag period of 1 to 7 days, corresponding to the level of bacterial inactivation. In untreated controls, fluorescence increased rapidly to reach a peak in 2 to 4 days. A good Pearson correlation coefficient (r ≥0.85) was observed between the intensity of fluorescence and the number of CFU. The GFP-based fluorescence assay reduced the turnaround time in the screening of chemical germicides for mycobactericidal activity to ≤7 days. PMID:11229916

  9. An Activator of Transcription Regulates Phage TP901-1 Late Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Brøndsted, Lone; Pedersen, Margit; Hammer, Karin

    2001-01-01

    A promoter active in the late phase of the lytic cycle of lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 has been identified. The promoter is tightly regulated and requires the product of the phage TP901-1 orf29 for activity. A deletion analysis of the late promoter region showed that a fragment as small as 99 bp contains both the promoter and the region necessary for activation by ORF29. The transcriptional start site of the promoter was identified by primer extension to position 13073 on the TP901-1 genome, thus located 87 bp downstream of orf29 in a 580-bp intergenic region between orf29 and orf30. Furthermore, the region located −85 to −61 bp upstream of the start site was shown to be necessary for promoter activity. During infection, the transcript arising from the late promoter is fully induced at 40 min postinfection, and our results suggest that a certain level of ORF29 must be reached in order to activate transcription of the promoter. Several lactococcal bacteriophages encode ORF29 homologous proteins, indicating that late transcription may be controlled by a similar mechanism in these phages. With the identification of this novel regulator, our results suggest that within the P335 group of lactococcal phages at least two regulatory systems controlling transcription in the late stage of infection exist. PMID:11722916

  10. Crocidolite activates NF-kappa B and MIP-2 gene expression in rat alveolar epithelial cells. Role of mitochondrial-derived oxidants.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, K E; Carter, J M; Howard, B W; Hassenbein, D; Janssen, Y M; Mossman, B T

    1998-10-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) is a transcription factor that regulates expression of several genes coding for inflammatory and immunoregulatory proteins including the neutrophil chemotactic cytokine MIP-2. In previous studies we found that crocidolite asbestos activates the nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B as well as MIP-2 gene expression in rat alveolar type II cells. Here we report that both crocidolite-induced NF-kappa B activation of MIP-2 gene expression can be attenuated by the antioxidant tetramethylthiourea, suggesting the dependence of these responses on oxidative stress. Crocidolite exposure of RLE-TN cells also increased production of H2O2, a response that was inhibited by the mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitor thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA). TTFA treatment of RLE-6TN cells also inhibited crocidolite-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B and MIP-2 gene expression. These results indicate crocidolite exposure of rat alveolar type II cells results in increased production of mitochondrial-derived hydrogen peroxide and that mitochondrial-derived oxidants contribute to crocidolite activation of NF-kappa B and increases in MIP-2 gene expression. PMID:9788893

  11. Identification and expression profiling analysis of calmodulin-binding transcription activator genes in maize (Zea mays L.) under abiotic and biotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Runqing; Lu, Caixia; Sun, Tao; Peng, Tingting; Han, Xiaohua; Qi, Jianshuang; Yan, Shufeng; Tie, Shuanggui

    2015-01-01

    The calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTA) play critical roles in plant growth and responses to environmental stimuli. However, how CAMTAs function in responses to abiotic and biotic stresses in maize (Zea mays L.) is largely unknown. In this study, we first identified all the CAMTA homologous genes in the whole genome of maize. The results showed that nine ZmCAMTA genes showed highly diversified gene structures and tissue-specific expression patterns. Many ZmCAMTA genes displayed high expression levels in the roots. We then surveyed the distribution of stress-related cis-regulatory elements in the −1.5 kb promoter regions of ZmCAMTA genes. Notably, a large number of stress-related elements present in the promoter regions of some ZmCAMTA genes, indicating a genetic basis of stress expression regulation of these genes. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to test the expression of ZmCAMTA genes under several abiotic stresses (drought, salt, and cold), various stress-related hormones [abscisic acid, auxin, salicylic acid (SA), and jasmonic acid] and biotic stress [rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) infection]. Furthermore, the expression pattern of ZmCAMTA genes under RBSDV infection was analyzed to investigate their potential roles in responses of different maize cultivated varieties to RBSDV. The expression of most ZmCAMTA genes responded to both abiotic and biotic stresses. The data will help us to understand the roles of CAMTA-mediated Ca2+ signaling in maize tolerance to environmental stresses. PMID:26284092

  12. Characterization of cultivar differences in beta-1,3 glucanase gene expression, glucanase activity and fruit pulp softening rates during fruit ripening in three naturally occurring banana cultivars.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Roy, Sujit; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2009-11-01

    beta-1,3 glucanase (E.C.3.2.1.39) is the key enzyme involved in the hydrolytic cleavage of 1,3 beta-D glucosidic linkages in beta-1,3 glucans. This work describes a comparative analysis of expression patterns of beta-1,3 glucanase gene in relation to changes in fruit pulp softening rates in three banana cultivars, Rasthali (AAB), Kanthali (AB), and Monthan (ABB). Analysis of transcript and protein levels of beta-1,3 glucanase gene during ripening revealed differential timing in expression of the gene which correlated well with the variation in enzymatic activity of glucanase and fruit pulp softening rates in the three cultivars. Exogenously applied ethylene strongly induced beta-1,3 glucanase expression during the early ripening days in Rasthali, while the expression of the gene was marginally stimulated following ethylene treatment in preclimacteric Kanthali fruit. Conversely, in Monthan, beta-1,3 glucanase expression was very low throughout the ripening stages, and ethylene treatment did not induce the expression of the gene in this cultivar. Analysis of glucanase activity using protein extracts from unripe and ripe fruit of Monthan with crude cell wall polysaccharide fractions (used as substrate) indicated that the natural substrate for glucanase remained almost unutilized in this cultivar due to low in vivo glucanase activity. Furthermore, the recombinant beta-1,3 glucanase protein, overexpressed in E. coli, showed requirement for substrates with contiguous beta-1,3 linkages for optimal activity. Overall, our results provide new information on the expression profile of beta-1,3 glucanase gene in connection with the pattern of changes in fruit firmness at the physiological and molecular levels during ripening in three banana cultivars. PMID:19697038

  13. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21-22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, displayed pronounced reduction in MYMV DNA accumulation. Thus, silencing of the TrAP gene, a suppressor of gene silencing, emerged as an effective strategy to control MYMV. PMID:26436122

  14. Activation of gene expression by metal-responsive signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Timothy K; Saydam, Nurten; Steiner, Florian; Schaffner, Walter; Freedman, Jonathan H

    2002-01-01

    Metallothioneins are small, cysteine-rich, metal-binding proteins that play important roles in maintaining intracellular metal homeostasis and in transition metal detoxification. MTF-1 (metal transcription factor-1) plays a central role in regulating the metal-inducible, transcriptional activation of metallothionein. Here we report that the phosphorylation of MTF-1 plays a critical role in the activation of MTF-1/metal-responsive element-mediated transcription. Inhibitor studies indicate that signal transduction cascades, including those mediated by protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase, and casein kinase II, are essential for zinc- and cadmium-inducible transcription. In addition, calcium signaling is also involved in regulating transcription. In contrast, cAMP-dependent protein kinase may not be directly involved in the metal response. Contrary to what has been reported for other transcription factors, the inhibition of transcriptional activation does not impair the binding of MTF-1 to DNA, suggesting that phosphorylation is not regulating DNA binding. Elevated phosphorylation of MTF-1 is observed under conditions of protein kinase C inhibition, suggesting that dephosphorylation of this transcription factor mediates its activation. PMID:12426137

  15. Gene expression homeostasis and chromosome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2014-01-01

    In rapidly growing populations of bacterial cells, including those of the model organism Escherichia coli, genes essential for growth - such as those involved in protein synthesis - are expressed at high levels; this is in contrast to many horizontally-acquired genes, which are maintained at low transcriptional levels.1 This balance in gene expression states between 2 distinct classes of genes is established by a galaxy of transcriptional regulators, including the so-called nucleoid associated proteins (NAP) that contribute to shaping the chromosome.2 Besides these active players in gene regulation, it is not too far-fetched to anticipate that genome organization in terms of how genes are arranged on the chromosome,3 which is the result of long-drawn transactions among genome rearrangement processes and selection, and the manner in which it is structured inside the cell, plays a role in establishing this balance. A recent study from our group has contributed to the literature investigating the interplay between global transcriptional regulators and genome organization in establishing gene expression homeostasis.4 In particular, we address a triangle of functional interactions among genome organization, gene expression homeostasis and horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25997086

  16. Superoxide dismutase activity and gene expression levels in Saudi women with recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    GHNEIM, HAZEM K.; AL-SHEIKH, YAZEED A.; ALSHEBLY, MASHAEL M.; ABOUL-SOUD, MOURAD A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant activities of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and SOD2, as well as the levels of the oxidant superoxide anion (SOA) and the micronutrients zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn), were assayed in plasma, whole blood and placental tissue of non-pregnant (NP), healthy pregnant (HP) women and recurrent miscarriage (RM) patients. The results showed that SOD1 and SOD2 activities and the levels of Zn, Cu and Mn in plasma and whole blood of HP women were slightly, but significantly lower, and even more significantly decreased in RM patients compared to those observed in NP women (P<0.05 and P<0.0001, respectively). Additionally, whereas plasma SOD1 and SOD2 activities and Zn, Cu and Mn levels were significantly lower in RM patients, those of whole blood and placental tissue were significantly lower when compared to HP women (P<0.001 and P<0.0001, respectively). Concurrently, there were consistent increases of equal magnitude and statistical significance in SOA levels in all the assayed samples as identified by a comparison between the subjects. The findings thus supported oxidative metabolism and excessive reactive oxygen species generation. The resultant oxidative stress, identified in whole blood and placental tissues of RM patients, may have been a primary cause of RM. Dietary supplementation of Zn, Cu and Mn may be beneficial to these patients pre- and post-conception. PMID:26821085

  17. Expression of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase II and sequential activation of 5' Hoxb genes in the mouse caudal hindbrain.

    PubMed

    Oosterveen, Tony; Meijlink, Frits; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2004-05-01

    The precise anterior boundaries of Hox expression domains are critical for correct antero-posterior (A-P) patterning of the vertebrate longitudinal axis. Retinoic acid (RA) signalling has been shown to play an important role in the specification of pre-otic rhombomere boundaries, and in the regulation of 3' Hox expression within this territory. In addition, we recently showed that RA signalling controls 5'Hoxb gene expression in the caudal hindbrain, which had not been discovered before. We show here that the expression domain of these 5'Hoxb genes undergoes a sequential, colinear rostral expansion between E9.5 and E11.5 in the caudal hindbrain, and that this differential expansion occurs just rostrally to the localisation of the transcripts for the RA biosynthetic enzyme Raldh2 in the cervical mesenchyme. PMID:15053971

  18. Impact of ovariohysterectomy and food intake on body composition, physical activity, and adipose gene expression in cats.

    PubMed

    Belsito, K R; Vester, B M; Keel, T; Graves, T K; Swanson, K S

    2009-02-01

    physical activity levels and several genes associated with lipid metabolism (decreased lipoprotein lipase), food intake (decreased leptin expression), and insulin insensitivity (increased interleukin-6). By identifying these changes, targets for nutritional intervention or lifestyle management have been identified that may curb the risk of obesity and related disorders in spayed cats. PMID:18997063

  19. Identification of Modulators of the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in a Mouse Liver Gene Expression Compendium

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Thomas, Russell S.; Applegate, Dawn; Rosen, Mitch; Abbott, Barbara; Lau, Christopher; Guo, Grace; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Klaassen, Curtis; Corton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is activated by therapeutic hypolipidemic drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals to regulate genes involved in lipid transport and catabolism. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents increases liver cancer incidence, whereas suppression of PPARα activity leads to hepatocellular steatosis. Analytical approaches were developed to identify biosets (i.e., gene expression differences between two conditions) in a genomic database in which PPARα activity was altered. A gene expression signature of 131 PPARα-dependent genes was built using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and PPARα-null mice after exposure to three structurally diverse PPARα activators (WY-14,643, fenofibrate and perfluorohexane sulfonate). A fold-change rank-based test (Running Fisher’s test (p-value ≤ 10-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the PPARα signature and a test set of 48 and 31 biosets positive or negative, respectively for PPARα activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 98%. The signature was then used to identify factors that activate or suppress PPARα in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression compendium of ~1850 biosets. In addition to the expected activation of PPARα by fibrate drugs, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and perfluorinated compounds, PPARα was activated by benzofuran, galactosamine, and TCDD and suppressed by hepatotoxins acetaminophen, lipopolysaccharide, silicon dioxide nanoparticles, and trovafloxacin. Additional factors that activate (fasting, caloric restriction) or suppress (infections) PPARα were also identified. This study 1) developed methods useful for future screening of environmental chemicals, 2) identified chemicals that activate or suppress PPARα, and 3) identified factors including diets and infections that modulate PPARα activity and would be hypothesized to affect chemical-induced PPAR

  20. Identification of modulators of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in a mouse liver gene expression compendium.

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Thomas, Russell S; Applegate, Dawn; Rosen, Mitch; Abbott, Barbara; Lau, Christopher; Guo, Grace; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Klaassen, Curtis; Corton, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is activated by therapeutic hypolipidemic drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals to regulate genes involved in lipid transport and catabolism. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents increases liver cancer incidence, whereas suppression of PPARα activity leads to hepatocellular steatosis. Analytical approaches were developed to identify biosets (i.e., gene expression differences between two conditions) in a genomic database in which PPARα activity was altered. A gene expression signature of 131 PPARα-dependent genes was built using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and PPARα-null mice after exposure to three structurally diverse PPARα activators (WY-14,643, fenofibrate and perfluorohexane sulfonate). A fold-change rank-based test (Running Fisher's test (p-value ≤ 10(-4))) was used to evaluate the similarity between the PPARα signature and a test set of 48 and 31 biosets positive or negative, respectively for PPARα activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 98%. The signature was then used to identify factors that activate or suppress PPARα in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression compendium of ~1850 biosets. In addition to the expected activation of PPARα by fibrate drugs, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and perfluorinated compounds, PPARα was activated by benzofuran, galactosamine, and TCDD and suppressed by hepatotoxins acetaminophen, lipopolysaccharide, silicon dioxide nanoparticles, and trovafloxacin. Additional factors that activate (fasting, caloric restriction) or suppress (infections) PPARα were also identified. This study 1) developed methods useful for future screening of environmental chemicals, 2) identified chemicals that activate or suppress PPARα, and 3) identified factors including diets and infections that modulate PPARα activity and would be hypothesized to affect chemical-induced PPAR

  1. Short-chain fructooligosaccharide regulates hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and farnesoid X receptor target gene expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Kamei, Asuka; Watanabe, Yuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Abe, Keiko

    2010-06-01

    Prebiotic short-chain fructooligosaccharide (scFOS) is known to have various beneficial effects in humans and animals. Using a nutrigenomic approach, we have previously identified marker genes for the intestinal immunomodulatory and lipid-lowering effects of scFOS. The present study aimed to predict novel physiological effects of scFOS through nutrigenomic analyses. DNA microarray analysis revealed that administration of scFOS changed the expression of the nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) target genes in the rat liver. Gene expression analysis provided some new interesting hypotheses, for instance, the possible improvement of bile secretion via FXR target genes, and regulation of amino acid metabolism and the urea cycle via PPARalpha and/or FXR target genes. Our findings clearly indicated that nutrigenomics may make it possible to screen for novel physiological effects of dietary ingredients. PMID:20465258

  2. Egg yolks inhibit activation of NF-κB and expression of its target genes in adipocytes after partial delipidation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiwen; Riedl, Ken M.; Cole, Rachel M.; Lehman, Christopher; Xu, Lu; Alder, Hansjuerg; Belury, Martha A.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana

    2015-01-01

    How composition of egg yolk (EY) influences NF-κB, a key transcription pathway in inflammation, remains unclear. We performed partial delipidation of EY that removed 20–30% of cholesterol and triglycerides. The resulting polar and non-polar fractions were termed EY-P and EY-NP. NF-κB activation in response to EY from different suppliers and their fractions was examined in 3T3-L1 adipocytes using a NF-κB response element reporter assay and by analyzing expression of 248 inflammatory genes. Although EY-P and EY contained similar level of vitamins, carotenoids, and fatty acids, only delipidated EY-P fraction suppressed NF-κB via down-regulation of toll like receptor-2 and up-regulation of inhibitory toll interacting protein (Tollip) and lymphocyte antigen 96 (Ly96). Our data suggest that anti-inflammatory activity of lutein and retinol were blunted by non-polar lipids in EY likely via crosstalk between SREBP and NF-κB pathways in adipocytes. Thus, moderate delipidation may improve their beneficial properties of regular eggs. PMID:25620076

  3. Expression of microRNA-34a in Alzheimer's disease brain targets genes linked to synaptic plasticity, energy metabolism, and resting state network activity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, S; Jun, S; Rellick, S; Quintana, D D; Cavendish, J Z; Simpkins, J W

    2016-09-01

    Polygenetic risk factors and reduced expression of many genes in late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) impedes identification of a target(s) for disease-modifying therapies. We identified a single microRNA, miR-34a that is over expressed in specific brain regions of AD patients as well as in the 3xTg-AD mouse model. Specifically, increased miR-34a expression in the temporal cortex region compared to age matched healthy control correlates with severity of AD pathology. miR-34a over expression in patient's tissue and forced expression in primary neuronal culture correlates with concurrent repression of its target genes involved in synaptic plasticity, oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis. The repression of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis related proteins correlates with reduced ATP production and glycolytic capacity, respectively. We also found that miR-34a overexpressed neurons secrete miR-34a containing exosomes that are taken up by neighboring neurons. Furthermore, miR-34a targets dozens of genes whose expressions are known to be correlated with synchronous activity in resting state functional networks. Our analysis of human genomic sequences from the tentative promoter of miR-34a gene shows the presence of NFκB, STAT1, c-Fos, CREB and p53 response elements. Together, our results raise the possibilities that pathophysiology-induced activation of specific transcription factor may lead to increased expression of miR-34a gene and miR-34a mediated concurrent repression of its target genes in neural networks may result in dysfunction of synaptic plasticity, energy metabolism, and resting state network activity. Thus, our results provide insights into polygenetic AD mechanisms and disclose miR-34a as a potential therapeutic target for AD. PMID:27235866

  4. Decreased sucrase and lactase activity in iron deficiency is accompanied by reduced gene expression and upregulation of the transcriptional repressor PDX-1.

    PubMed

    West, Adrian R; Oates, Phillip S

    2005-12-01

    Disaccharidases are important digestive enzymes whose activities can be reduced by iron deficiency. We hypothesise that this is due to reduced gene expression, either by impairment to enterocyte differentiation or by iron-sensitive mechanisms that regulate mRNA levels in enterocytes. Iron-deficient Wistar rats were generated by dietary means. The enzyme activities and kinetics of sucrase and lactase were tested as well as the activity of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP)-II because it is unrelated to carbohydrate digestion. mRNA levels of beta-actin, sucrase, lactase, and the associated transcription factors pancreatic duodenal homeobox (PDX)-1, caudal-related homeobox (CDX)-2, GATA-binding protein (GATA)-4, and hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1 were measured by real-time PCR. Spatial patterns of protein and gene expression were assessed by immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization, respectively. It was found that iron-deficient rats had significantly lower sucrase (19.5% lower) and lactase (56.8% lower) but not IAP-II activity than control rats. Kinetic properties of both enzymes remained unchanged from controls, suggesting a decrease in the quantity of enzyme present. Sucrase and lactase mRNA levels were reduced by 44.5% and 67.9%, respectively, by iron deficiency, suggesting that enzyme activity is controlled primarily by gene expression. Iron deficiency did not affect the pattern of protein and gene expression along the crypt to villus axis. Expression of PDX-1, a repressor of sucrase and lactase promoters, was 4.5-fold higher in iron deficiency, whereas CDX-2, GATA-4, and HNF-1 levels were not significantly different. These data suggest that decreases in sucrase and lactase activities result from a reduction in gene expression, following from increased levels of the transcriptional repressor PDX-1. PMID:16081762

  5. Regulation of platelet-activating factor receptor gene expression in vivo by endotoxin, platelet-activating factor and endogenous tumour necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Tan, X; Chang, H; Gonzalez-Crussi, F; Remick, D G; Hsueh, W

    1997-01-01

    A competitive PCR assay was developed to quantify platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor (PAF-R) transcripts in rat tissues using a synthetic RNA as a competitor. We found PAF-R mRNA constitutively expressed in the eight organs tested, with the ileum containing the highest concentration [(3.49+/-0.15) x 10(7) molecules/microg of RNA]. Significant but lower levels were also detected in the jejunum, spleen, lungs, kidneys, heart, stomach and liver. Furthermore we defined the regulatory role of inflammatory mediators in ileal PAF-R gene expression using a rat model of intestinal injury induced by PAF or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Injection of LPS or low-dose PAF resulted in a marked increase in ileal PAF-R mRNA within 30 min. The up-regulation on PAF-R elicited by PAF was biphasic, peaking first at 90 min, then again at 6 h. In contrast, LPS elicited a weak monophasic response. The second phase of PAF-R mRNA increase after PAF administration was completely abolished by WEB 2170, a PAF antagonist, and partially inhibited by antitumour necrosis factor (TNF) antibody. These observations indicate the involvement of endogenous PAF and TNF in this event. In conclusion, we found: (a) preferential PAF-R expression in the ileum, suggesting a role for PAF in intestinal inflammation; (b) induction of PAF-R expression in vivo by its own agonist; (c) a complex regulation of PAR-R gene expression in vivo involving a network of various pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:9065783

  6. Differential requirements for the activation domain and FOG-interaction surface of GATA-1 in megakaryocyte gene expression and development

    PubMed Central

    Muntean, Andrew G.; Crispino, John D.

    2005-01-01

    GATA1 is mutated in patients with 2 different disorders. First, individuals with a GATA1 mutation that blocks the interaction between GATA-1 and its cofactor Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1) suffer from dyserythropoietic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Second, children with Down syndrome who develop acute megakaryoblastic leukemia harbor mutations in GATA1 that lead to the exclusive expression of a shorter isoform named GATA-1s. To determine the effect of these patient-specific mutations on GATA-1 function, we first compared the gene expression profile between wild-type and GATA-1–deficient megakaryocytes. Next, we introduced either GATA-1s or a FOG-binding mutant (V205G) into GATA-1–deficient megakaryocytes and assessed the effect on differentiation and gene expression. Whereas GATA-1–deficient megakaryocytes failed to undergo terminal differentiation and proliferated excessively in vitro, GATA-1s–expressing cells displayed proplatelet formation and other features of terminal maturation, but continued to proliferate aberrantly. In contrast, megakaryocytes that expressed V205G GATA-1 exhibited reduced proliferation, but failed to undergo maturation. Examination of the expression of megakaryocyte-specific genes in the various rescued cells correlated with the observed phenotypic differences. These studies show that GATA-1 is required for both normal regulation of proliferation and terminal maturation of megakaryocytes, and further, that these functions can be uncoupled by mutations in GATA1. PMID:15860665

  7. Two hAT transposon genes were transferred from Brassicaceae to broomrapes and are actively expressed in some recipients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ting; Renner, Susanne S; Xu, Yuxing; Qin, Yan; Wu, Jianqiang; Sun, Guiling

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence is pointing to an important role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the evolution of higher plants. However, reports of HGTs of transposable elements (TEs) in plants are still scarce, and only one case is known of a class II transposon horizontally transferred between grasses. To investigate possible TE transfers in dicots, we performed transcriptome screening in the obligate root parasite Phelipanche aegyptiaca (Orobanchaceae), data-mining in the draft genome assemblies of four other Orobanchaceae, gene cloning, gene annotation in species with genomic information, and a molecular phylogenetic analysis. We discovered that the broomrape genera Phelipanche and Orobanche acquired two related nuclear genes (christened BO transposase genes), a new group of the hAT superfamily of class II transposons, from Asian Sisymbrieae or a closely related tribe of Brassicaceae, by HGT. The collinearity of the flanking genes, lack of a classic border structure, and low expression levels suggest that BO transposase genes cannot transpose in Brassicaceae, whereas they are highly expressed in P. aegyptiaca. PMID:27452947

  8. Two hAT transposon genes were transferred from Brassicaceae to broomrapes and are actively expressed in some recipients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ting; Renner, Susanne S.; Xu, Yuxing; Qin, Yan; Wu, Jianqiang; Sun, Guiling

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence is pointing to an important role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the evolution of higher plants. However, reports of HGTs of transposable elements (TEs) in plants are still scarce, and only one case is known of a class II transposon horizontally transferred between grasses. To investigate possible TE transfers in dicots, we performed transcriptome screening in the obligate root parasite Phelipanche aegyptiaca (Orobanchaceae), data-mining in the draft genome assemblies of four other Orobanchaceae, gene cloning, gene annotation in species with genomic information, and a molecular phylogenetic analysis. We discovered that the broomrape genera Phelipanche and Orobanche acquired two related nuclear genes (christened BO transposase genes), a new group of the hAT superfamily of class II transposons, from Asian Sisymbrieae or a closely related tribe of Brassicaceae, by HGT. The collinearity of the flanking genes, lack of a classic border structure, and low expression levels suggest that BO transposase genes cannot transpose in Brassicaceae, whereas they are highly expressed in P. aegyptiaca. PMID:27452947

  9. The cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated by Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Zuloaga, R.; Fuentes, E.N.; Molina, A.; Valdés, J.A.

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •IGF-1 induces the activation of CREB via IGF-1R/PI3K/PLC signaling pathway. •Calcium dependent signaling pathways regulate myostatin gene expression. •IGF-1 regulates myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription in skeletal myoblast. -- Abstract: Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP{sub 3}/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA–CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide derived from the digestive tract activates inflammatory gene expression and inhibits casein synthesis in the mammary glands of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Chang, Guangjun; Xu, Tianle; Xu, Lei; Guo, Junfei; Jin, Di; Shen, Xiangzhen

    2016-03-01

    To meet the nutrition requirements of lactation, dairy cows are usually fed a high concentrate diet (HC). However, high-grain feeding causes subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA), a metabolic disorder that causes milk protein depression. This study aimed to investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) released in the rumen on inflammatory gene expression and casein synthesis in mammary glands of lactating dairy cows fed a HC diet. We found that milk protein was significantly decreased in the HC group after 15 weeks of feeding. Overall, LPS concentrations in the rumen fluid, lacteal artery and vein were increased in the HC group. Transcriptome microarray was used to evaluate alterations in the signaling pathway in mammary glands. Signaling pathways involved in inflammatory responses were activated, whereas those involved in protein synthesis were inhibited in the HC group. mRNA expression involved in inflammatory responses, including that of TLR4, NF-кB and pro-inflammatory genes, was increased in the HC group, while αs1-casein (CSN1S1), β-casein (CSN2), mTOR and S6K gene expression were decreased. Moreover, protein expression was consistent with the corresponding gene expression. After feeding with an HC diet, LPS derived from the rumen increased inflammatory gene expression and inhibited casein synthesis in the mammary glands of lactating dairy cows fed a HC diet. PMID:26893357

  11. Lipopolysaccharide derived from the digestive tract activates inflammatory gene expression and inhibits casein synthesis in the mammary glands of lactating dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Chang, Guangjun; Xu, Tianle; Xu, Lei; Guo, Junfei; Jin, Di; Shen, Xiangzhen

    2016-01-01

    To meet the nutrition requirements of lactation, dairy cows are usually fed a high concentrate diet (HC). However, high-grain feeding causes subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA), a metabolic disorder that causes milk protein depression. This study aimed to investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) released in the rumen on inflammatory gene expression and casein synthesis in mammary glands of lactating dairy cows fed a HC diet. We found that milk protein was significantly decreased in the HC group after 15 weeks of feeding. Overall, LPS concentrations in the rumen fluid, lacteal artery and vein were increased in the HC group. Transcriptome microarray was used to evaluate alterations in the signaling pathway in mammary glands. Signaling pathways involved in inflammatory responses were activated, whereas those involved in protein synthesis were inhibited in the HC group. mRNA expression involved in inflammatory responses, including that of TLR4, NF-кB and pro-inflammatory genes, was increased in the HC group, while αs1-casein (CSN1S1), β-casein (CSN2), mTOR and S6K gene expression were decreased. Moreover, protein expression was consistent with the corresponding gene expression. After feeding with an HC diet, LPS derived from the rumen increased inflammatory gene expression and inhibited casein synthesis in the mammary glands of lactating dairy cows fed a HC diet. PMID:26893357

  12. Ability of xeno- and phytoestrogens to modulate expression of estrogen-sensitive genes in rat uterus: estrogenicity profiles and uterotropic activity.

    PubMed

    Diel, P; Schulz, T; Smolnikar, K; Strunck, E; Vollmer, G; Michna, H

    2000-05-01

    The function of the uterus is regulated by female sex steroids and it is, therefore, used as the classical target organ to detect estrogenic action. Uterine response to estrogens involves the activation of a large pattern of estrogen-sensitive genes. This fact offers the opportunity to analyze the estrogenic activity of xeno- and phytoestrogens, and the mechanisms of their molecular action by a correlation of the uterotropic activity and their ability to modulate the expression of estrogen-sensitive genes. We have analyzed the expression of androgen receptor (AR), progesterone receptor (PR), estrogen receptor (ER), clusterin (CLU), complement C3 (C3), and GAPDH mRNA in the rat uterus following oral administration of ethinylestradiol (EE), bisphenol A (BPA), o,p'-DDT (DDT), p-tert-octylphenol (OCT) and daidzein (DAI). A significant stimulation of the uterine wet weight could be observed after administration of all the substances. The activity of all analyzed compounds to stimulate uterine weight was low in comparison to EE. DDT has the highest activity to stimulate uterine weight whereas BPA and DAI turned out to be less potent. The analysis of gene expression revealed a very specific profile of molecular action in response to the different compounds which cannot be detected by judging the uterotropic response alone. A dose dependent analysis revealed that C3 mRNA is already modulated at doses where no uterotropic response was detectable. Although DAI and BPA were very weak stimulators of uterine growth, these substances were able to alter the expression of AR, ER and C3 very strongly. Based on these investigations the analyzed compounds can be subdivided into distinct classes: First, compounds which exhibit a similar gene expression fingerprint as EE (e.g. OCT); second, compounds exhibiting a significant uterotropic activity, but inducing a pattern of gene expression different from EE (e.g. DDT); and third, compounds like BPA and especially DAI which exhibit a very

  13. Global gene expression profiling in infants with acute respiratory syncytial virus broncholitis demonstrates systemic activation of interferon signaling networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pediatric lower respiratory tract infections and has a high impact on pediatric emergency department utilization. Variation in host response may influence the pathogenesis and disease severity. We evaluated global gene expression profiles to be...

  14. Cloning and expression of lipoxygenase genes and enzyme activity in ripening persimmon fruit in response to GA and ABA treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two genes of the lipoxygenase (LOX) family, DkLox1 and DkLox3 (GenBank accession No. JF436951 and JF436950), were cloned from persimmon fruit (Diospyros kaki L. ‘Fuping Jianshi’). Sequence analysis indicated that they belong to the 9-LOX sub-group. Heterologous expression of DkLox1 in E. coli produc...

  15. Control of RANKL Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoclasts are highly specialized cells capable of degrading mineralized tissue and form at different regions of bone to meet different physiological needs, such as mobilization of calcium, modeling of bone structure, and remodeling of bone matrix. Osteoclast production is elevated in a number of pathological conditions, many of which lead to loss of bone mass. Whether normal or pathological, osteoclastogenesis strictly depends upon support from accessory cells which supply cytokines required for osteoclast differentiation. Only one of these cytokines, receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL), is absolutely essential for osteoclast formation throughout life and is thus expressed by all cell types that support osteoclast differentiation. The central role of RANKL in bone resorption is highlighted by the fact that it is the basis for a new therapy to inhibit bone loss. This review will discuss mechanisms that control RANKL gene expression in different osteoclast-support cells and how the study of such mechanisms may lead to a better understanding of the cellular interactions that drive normal and pathological bone resorption. PMID:19716455

  16. Genome-scale functional analysis of the human genes modulating p53 activity by regulating MDM2 expression in a p53-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Min; Choi, Seung-Hyun; Yeom, Young Il; Min, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Il-Chul

    2016-09-16

    MDM2, a critical negative regulator of p53, is often overexpressed in leukemia, but few p53 mutations are found, suggesting that p53-independent MDM2 expression occurs due to alterations in MDM2 upstream regulators. In this study, a high MDM2 transcription level was observed (41.17%) regardless of p53 expression in patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Therefore, we performed genome-scale functional screening of the human genes modulating MDM2 expression in a p53-independent manner. We searched co-expression profiles of genes showing a positive or negative pattern with MDM2 expression in a DNA microarray database, selected1089 links, and composed a screening library of 368 genes. Using MDM2 P1 and P2 promoter-reporter systems, we screened clones regulating MDM2 transcriptions in a p53-independent manner by overexpression. Nine clones from the screening library showed enhanced MDM2 promoter activity and MDM2 expression in p53-deficient HCT116 cells. Among them, six clones, including NTRK2, GNA15, SFRS2, EIF5A, ELAVL1, and YWHAB mediated MAPK signaling for expressing MDM2. These results indicate that p53-independent upregulation of MDM2 by increasing selected clones may lead to oncogenesis in AML and that MDM2-modulating genes are novel potential targets for AML treatment. PMID:27524244

  17. CHEMICALLY ACTIVATED LUCIFASE GENE EXPRESSION (CALUX) CELL BIOASSAY ANALYSIS FOR THE ESTIMATION OF DIOXIN-LIKE ACTIVITIY: CRITICAL PARAMETERS OF THE CALUX PROCEDURE THAT IMPACT ASSAY RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chemically Activated Luciferase gene expression (CALUX) in vitro cell bioassay is an emerging bioanalytical tool that is increasingly being used for the screening and relative quantification of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. Since CALUX analyses provide a biological respo...

  18. DIFFERENTIAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION AD GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS ON EXPOSURE TO RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) AND VANADIUM

    EPA Science Inventory


    Differential transcription factor activation and gene expression profiles in human vascular endothelial cells on exposure to residual oil fly ash (ROFA) and vanadium.
    Srikanth S. Nadadur and Daniel L. Costa, US EPA, ORD, NHEERL (ETD, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch), Research ...

  19. Differential Gene Expression in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2014-01-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell–matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system. PMID:24985133

  20. Astragaloside IV Inhibits NF-κB Activation and Inflammatory Gene Expression in LPS-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Jian; Frei, Balz

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active constituents purified from the Chinese medicinal herb Astragalus membranaceus, in LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses in mice in vivo and examined possible underlying mechanisms. Mice were assigned to four groups: vehicle-treated control animals; AS-IV-treated animals (10 mg/kg b.w. AS-IV daily i.p. injection for 6 days); LPS-treated animals; and AS-IV plus LPS-treated animals. We found that AS-IV treatment significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases in serum levels of MCP-1 and TNF by 82% and 49%, respectively. AS-IV also inhibited LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory gene expression in different organs. Lung mRNA levels of cellular adhesion molecules, MCP-1, TNFα, IL-6, and TLR4 were significantly attenuated, and lung neutrophil infiltration and activation were strongly inhibited, as reflected by decreased myeloperoxidase content, when the mice were pretreated with AS-IV. Similar results were observed in heart, aorta, kidney, and liver. Furthermore, AS-IV significantly suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in lung and heart. In conclusion, our data provide new in vivo evidence that AS-IV effectively inhibits LPS-induced acute inflammatory responses by modulating NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. Our results suggest that AS-IV may be useful for the prevention or treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25960613

  1. The Epstein-Barr virus oncogene product, latent membrane protein 1, induces the downregulation of E-cadherin gene expression via activation of DNA methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chi-Neu; Tsai, Chia-Lung; Tse, Ka-Po; Chang, Hwan-You; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2002-07-23

    The latent membrane protein (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is expressed in EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which is notoriously metastatic. Although it is established that LMP1 represses E-cadherin expression and enhances the invasive ability of carcinoma cells, the mechanism underlying this repression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that LMP1 induces the expression and activity of the DNA methyltransferases 1, 3a, and 3b, using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme activity assay. This results in hypermethylation of the E-cadherin promoter and down-regulation of E-cadherin gene expression, as revealed by methylation-specific PCR, real-time reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting data. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5'-Aza-2'dC, restores E-cadherin promoter activity and protein expression in LMP1-expressing cells, which in turn blocks cell migration ability, as demonstrated by the Transwell cell migration assay. Our findings suggest that LMP1 down-regulates E-cadherin gene expression and induces cell migration activity by using cellular DNA methylation machinery. PMID:12110730

  2. Cloning, expression and characterization of a gene encoding mitogen activated protein kinase 2 (MPK2) from Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Arslanyolu, Muhittin; Yıldız, Mehmet Taha

    2014-08-01

    Environmental effects and mitogens determine cell phenotype in eukaryotes mainly through MAPK pathways. However, MAPK signaling pathways in T. thermophila have not been studied comprehensively. This study aims to express recombinant MPK2, a MAPK from T. thermophila, in E. coli to characterize its kinase activity. MPK2 was cloned by RT-PCR using degenerate oligonucleotide primers and RACE method. The full-length cDNA of the MPK2 gene is 1705bp that includes 1281bp ORF coding for a putative protein of 426 amino acids having a mass of 50.2kDa. The putative MPK2 protein contains all eleven conserved subdomains that are characteristics of serine/threonine protein kinases, and a TDY motif, which is a putative dual phosphorylation site common in Protista. MPK2 displays highest 48% overall identity to human ERK5 (MAPK7). The expression vector pGEX4T-1-MPK2 was constructed by inserting the coding region of MPK2 cDNA into pGEX4T-1 after introducing the nine point mutations, and then transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3). Autophosphorylation of 76kDa GST-MPK2 at tyrosine residues was confirmed not only by Western blot using anti-phosphotyrosine monoclonal antibody but also by in vitro kinase assay. GST-MPK2 was also able to phosphorylate the artificial substrate myelin basic protein. This study concludes that the free-living unicellular protist T. thermophila MPK2 has commonly conserved MAPK enzyme features, possibly involved in the regulation of cell survival responding to abiotic or biotic stressors, and the production and movement of haploid gametic nuclei between pairs during conjugation. PMID:24858074

  3. Roles for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, DUSP1, in feedback control of inflammatory gene expression and repression by dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Shah, Suharsh; King, Elizabeth M; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Newton, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Glucocorticoids act on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) to repress inflammatory gene expression. This is central to their anti-inflammatory effectiveness and rational improvements in therapeutic index depend on understanding the mechanism. Human pulmonary epithelial A549 cells were used to study the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), in the dexamethasone repression of 11 inflammatory genes induced, in a MAPK-dependent manner, by interleukin-1β (IL1B). Adenoviral over-expression of DUSP1 inactivated MAPK pathways and reduced expression of all 11 inflammatory genes. IL1B rapidly induced DUSP1 expression and RNA silencing revealed a transient role in feedback inhibition of MAPKs and inflammatory gene expression. With dexamethasone, which induced DUSP1 expression, plus IL1B (co-treatment), DUSP1 expression was further enhanced. At 1 h, this was responsible for the dexamethasone inhibition of IL1B-induced MAPK activation and CXCL1 and CXCL2 mRNA expression, with a similar trend for CSF2. Whereas, CCL20 mRNA was not repressed by dexamethasone at 1 h, repression of CCL2, CXCL3, IL6, and IL8 was unaffected, and PTGS2 repression was partially affected by DUSP1 knockdown. At later times, dexamethasone repression of MAPKs was unaffected by DUSP1 silencing. Likewise, 6 h post-IL1B, dexamethasone repression of all 11 mRNAs was essentially unaffected by DUSP1 knockdown. Qualitatively similar data were obtained for CSF2, CXCL1, IL6, and IL8 release. Thus, despite general roles in feedback inhibition, DUSP1 plays a transient, often partial, role in the dexamethasone-dependent repression of certain inflammatory genes. Therefore this also illustrates key roles for DUSP1-independent effectors in mediating glucocorticoid-dependent repression. PMID:24692548

  4. Neutrophil-Related Gene Expression And Low-Density Granulocytes Associated with Disease Activity and Response to Treatment in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Peter C.; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Xu, Lijing; Lim, Noha; Gao, Zhong; Asare, Adam L.; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H.; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert F.; Langford, Carol A.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.; St Clair, E. William; Tchao, Nadia K.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Phippard, Deborah J.; Merkel, Peter A.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Monach, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To discover biomarkers involved in the pathophysiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and determine if low-density granulocytes (LDGs) contribute to gene expression signatures in AAV. Methods The source of clinical data and linked biospecimens was a randomized controlled treatment trial in AAV. RNA-sequencing of whole blood from patients with AAV was performed during active disease at the baseline visit (BL) and during remission 6 months later (6M). Gene expression was compared between patients who met versus did not meet the primary trial outcome of clinical remission at 6M (responders vs. nonresponders). Measurement of neutrophil-related gene expression was confirmed in PBMCs to validate findings in whole blood. A negative selection strategy isolated LDGs from PBMC fractions. Results Differential expression between responders (n=77) and nonresponders (n=35) was detected in 2,346 transcripts at BL visit (p<0.05). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering demonstrated a cluster of granulocyte-related genes, including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3). A granulocyte multi-gene composite score was significantly higher in nonresponders than responders (p<0.01) and during active disease compared to remission (p<0.01). This signature strongly overlapped an LDG signature identified previously in lupus (FDRGSEA<0.01). Transcription of PR3 measured in PBMCs was associated with active disease and treatment response (p<0.01). LDGs isolated from patients with AAV spontaneously formed neutrophil extracellular traps containing PR3 and MPO. Conclusions In AAV an increased expression of a granulocyte gene signature is associated with disease activity and decreased response to treatment. The source of this signature is likely LDGs, a potentially pathogenic cell type in AAV. PMID:25891759

  5. ACE1, a copper-dependent transcription factor, activates expression of the yeast copper, zinc superoxide dismutase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gralla, E B; Thiele, D J; Silar, P; Valentine, J S

    1991-01-01

    Copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 gene product) (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) is a copper-containing enzyme that functions to prevent oxygen toxicity. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, copper levels exert some control over the level of SOD1 expression. We show that the ACE1 transcriptional activator protein, which is responsible for the induction of yeast metallothionein (CUP1) in response to copper, also controls the SOD1 response to copper. A single binding site for ACE1 is present in the SOD1 promoter region, as demonstrated by DNase I protection and methylation interference experiments, and is highly homologous to a high-affinity ACE1 binding site in the CUP1 promoter. The functional importance of this DNA-protein interaction is demonstrated by the facts that (i) copper induction of SOD1 mRNA does not occur in a strain lacking ACE1 and (ii) it does not occur in a strain containing a genetically engineered SOD1 promoter that lacks a functional ACE1 binding site. Images PMID:1924315

  6. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  7. Decreased systemic IGF-1 in response to calorie restriction modulates murine tumor cell growth, nuclear factor-κB activation, and inflammation-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alison E; Lashinger, Laura M; Otto, Glen; Nunez, Nomeli P; Hursting, Stephen D

    2013-12-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) prevents obesity and has potent anticancer effects associated with altered hormones and cytokines. We tested the hypothesis that CR inhibits MC38 mouse colon tumor cell growth through modulation of hormone-stimulated nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and protumorigenic gene expression. Female C57BL/6 mice were randomized (n = 30/group) to receive control diet or 30% CR diet. At 20 wk, 15 mice/group were killed for body composition analysis. At 21 wk, serum was obtained for hormone analysis. At 22 wk, mice were injected with MC38 cells; tumor growth was monitored for 24 d. Gene expression in excised tumors and MC38 cells was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR. In vitro MC38 NF-κB activation (by p65 ELISA and immunofluorescence) were measured in response to varying IGF-1 concentrations (1-400 ng/mL). Relative to controls, CR mice had decreased tumor volume, body weight, body fat, serum IGF-1, serum leptin, and serum insulin, and increased serum adiponectin (P < 0.05, each). Tumors from CR mice, versus controls, had downregulated inflammation- and/or cancer-related gene expression, including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-2, S100A9, and F4/80, and upregulated 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression. In MC38 cells in vitro, IGF-1 increased NF-κB activation and NF-κB downstream gene expression (P < 0.05, each). We conclude that CR, in association with reduced systemic IGF-1, modulates MC38 tumor growth, NF-κB activation, and inflammation-related gene expression. Thus, IGF-1 and/or NF-κB inhibition may pharmacologically mimic the anticancer effects of CR to break the obesity-colon cancer link. PMID:22778026

  8. Rat peptide methionine sulphoxide reductase: cloning of the cDNA, and down-regulation of gene expression and enzyme activity during aging.

    PubMed Central

    Petropoulos, I; Mary, J; Perichon, M; Friguet, B

    2001-01-01

    Peptide methionine sulphoxide reductase (PMSR, EC 1.8.4.6), the msrA or pmsR gene product, is a ubiquitous enzyme catalysing the reduction of methionine sulphoxide to methionine in proteins. Decreased expression and/or activity of the PMSR with age could explain, at least in part, the accumulation of oxidized protein observed upon aging. To test this hypothesis, the rat pmsR cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The recombinant protein was expressed, its catalytic activity checked with a synthetic substrate and polyclonal antibodies were raised against recombinant PMSR. The expression of the pmsR gene and protein as well as its catalytic activity were then analysed as a function of age in the rat brain and in two organs that express the most PMSR, liver and kidney. It appears that pmsR gene expression decreases with age in liver and kidney as early as 18 months, whereas protein level and protein activity are reduced in the three organs at the very end of the life of the rat (26 months). These results suggest that the down-regulation of PMSR can contribute to the accumulation of oxidized protein that has been associated with the aging process. PMID:11311146

  9. Control of gene expression in trypanosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Vanhamme, L; Pays, E

    1995-01-01

    Trypanosomes are protozoan agents of major parasitic diseases such as Chagas' disease in South America and sleeping sickness of humans and nagana disease of cattle in Africa. They are transmitted to mammalian hosts by specific insect vectors. Their life cycle consists of a succession of differentiation and growth phases requiring regulated gene expression to adapt to the changing extracellular environment. Typical of such stage-specific expression is that of the major surface antigens of Trypanosoma brucei, procyclin in the procyclic (insect) form and the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) in the bloodstream (mammalian) form. In trypanosomes, the regulation of gene expression is effected mainly at posttranscriptional levels, since primary transcription of most of the genes occurs in long polycistronic units and is constitutive. The transcripts are processed by transsplicing and polyadenylation under the influence of intergenic polypyrimidine tracts. These events show some developmental regulation. Untranslated sequences of the mRNAs seem to play a prominent role in the stage-specific control of individual gene expression, through a modulation of mRNA abundance. The VSG and procyclin transcription units exhibit particular features that are probably related to the need for a high level of expression. The promoters and RNA polymerase driving the expression of these units resemble those of the ribosomal genes. Their mutually exclusive expression is ensured by controls operating at several levels, including RNA elongation. Antigenic variation in the bloodstream is achieved through DNA rearrangements or alternative activation of the telomeric VSG gene expression sites. Recent discoveries, such as the existence of a novel nucleotide in telomeric DNA and the generation of point mutations in VSG genes, have shed new light on the mechanisms and consequences of antigenic variation. PMID:7603410

  10. Differences in Muscle and Adipose Tissue Gene Expression and Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in the Members of Physical Activity Discordant Twin Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Leskinen, Tuija; Rinnankoski-Tuikka, Rita; Rintala, Mirva; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Pöllänen, Eija; Alen, Markku; Sipilä, Sarianna; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kovanen, Vuokko; Rahkila, Paavo; Orešič, Matej; Kainulainen, Heikki; Kujala, Urho M.

    2010-01-01

    High physical activity/aerobic fitness predicts low morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to identify the most up-regulated gene sets related to long-term physical activity vs. inactivity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissues and to obtain further information about their link with cardio-metabolic risk factors. We studied ten same-sex twin pairs (age range 50–74 years) who had been discordant for leisure-time physical activity for 30 years. The examinations included biopsies from m. vastus lateralis and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. RNA was analyzed with the genome-wide Illumina Human WG-6 v3.0 Expression BeadChip. For pathway analysis we used Gene Set Enrichment Analysis utilizing active vs. inactive co-twin gene expression ratios. Our findings showed that among the physically active members of twin pairs, as compared to their inactive co-twins, gene expression in the muscle tissue samples was chronically up-regulated for the central pathways related to energy metabolism, including oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism and supportive metabolic pathways. Up-regulation of these pathways was associated in particular with aerobic fitness and high HDL cholesterol levels. In fat tissue we found physical activity-associated increases in the expression of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and branched-chain amino acid degradation gene sets both of which associated with decreased ‘high-risk’ ectopic body fat and plasma glucose levels. Consistent with other findings, plasma lipidomics analysis showed up-regulation of the triacylglycerols containing the polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our findings identified skeletal muscle and fat tissue pathways which are associated with the long-term physical activity and reduced cardio-metabolic disease risk, including increased aerobic fitness. In particular, improved skeletal muscle oxidative energy and lipid metabolism as well as changes in adipocyte function and redistribution of body fat are associated with

  11. Systems-level studies of glycosyltransferase