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1

Energy conservation study on Lamb-Weston potato processing plant, Hermiston, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of an energy study done at the Lamb-Weston potato processing plant in Hermiston, Oregon. The study includes all electrical energy using systems at the plant but does not address specifc modificiations to process equipment. The Hermiston plant receives raw potatoes and produces a mixture of pre-fried and frozen potato products, including french fries, breakfast products, and a dinner product. The plant contains all necessary equipment and processes to produce a finished product but does not have on-site, long-term cold storage. The Hermiston plant purchases electricity from the Umatilla Rural Electrical Association (REA) on two main services: a 12.7 KV, three phase service for the electric boiler, and a three phase, 480 volt service that provides electricity for all other functions in the main plant (the wheelturning load).

Not Available

1985-03-21

2

Paleoseismology of latest Pleistocene and Holocene fault activity in central Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Latest Pleistocene and Holocene fault activity in Oregon concentrates along four zones that splay northward from seismically active faults along the Central Nevada and Eastern California seismic zones. The Central Oregon fault zone is one of these zones, which splays northward from dextral faults of the Walker Lane, stretching across the flanks of several ranges in south-central Oregon along a

S. K. Pezzopane; R. J. II Weldon

1993-01-01

3

Active channel for Fanno Creek, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban runoff and shows characteristic flashy streamflow and poor water quality commonly associated with urban streams. This data set represents the active, wetted channel as derived from light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and aerial photographic imagery. The wetted channel boundary is equivalent to the extent of water observed during a 2-yr high flow event.

Sobieszczyk, Steven

2011-01-01

4

75 FR 33997 - Safety Zone; McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, Columbia River, Hermiston, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...USCG-2010-0504] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, Columbia River, Hermiston...read as follows: Sec. 165.T13-149 Safety Zone; McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, Columbia River,...

2010-06-16

5

Petrologic predictions regarding future eruptive activity at Mount Hood, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mount Hood, Oregon, represents a volcano that has a significant chance of erupting within the next few decades, but that has experienced no observed eruptions that provide direct geophysical or other constraints on eruption mechanisms and dynamics. In this case, petrological studies provide important insights into the potential nature of future eruptions, and these can be used to consider the geophysical and other signals that might accompany any renewed activity, and the timescales over which these might occur. In this contribution we present a summary of recent petrological work at Mount Hood and highlight data that provide insight into the likely nature of future eruptions. One of the most important features of Mount Hood lavas is the widespread evidence for magma mixing and mafic recharge. Andesites and low silica dacites from previous eruptive phases formed via mixing and hybridization between hotter ascending mafic magma and a long-lived crystal rich silicic magma or mush stored at shallow depths beneath the volcano. Mineral zoning studies show that mixing only occurs immediately prior to eruption, and we infer recharge of mafic magma into a shallow crustal magma storage zone is the predominant means by which eruptions of Mount Hood are initiated. Ascent of mafic magma and recharge would likely be accompanied by seismic, deformation and other detectable geophysical signals. Mineral barometry shows that amphiboles associated with shallow silicic magma formed at ~3-6 km, which we interpret to represent the depth of shallow silicic magma storage, and the depth at which recharge and mixing occurs. Amphiboles crystallized from mafic magma formed at ~10-16 km depth during magma ascent. Thus deeper earthquakes might accompany initial movement of mafic magma and more shallow seismic activity may occur during the convective overturn associated with recharge, mixing and final ascent of the hybridized magma. High-SiO2 melt inclusions in erupted lavas also contain low sulfur contents, thus mafic recharge and mixing should also be accompanied by the release of significant amounts of SO2 derived from mafic magma. Diffusion modeling based in mineral rim compositions suggests that the period between mafic recharge and eventual eruption and quenching is quite short - weeks to a few months at most, consistent with studies of other andesitic volcanoes. This provides an estimate of the potential time period that might elapse between detection of geophysical and other data indicative of recharge and mixing and magma reaching the surface.

Kent, A. J.; Koleszar, A. M.

2012-12-01

6

Seasonal Modulation of Earthquake Swarm Activity Near Maupin, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Between December 2006 and November 2011, the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) reported 464 earthquakes in a swarm about 60 km east-southeast of Mt. Hood near the town of Maupin, Oregon. Relocation of forty-five MD?2.5 earthquakes and regional moment tensor analysis of nine 3.3?Mw?3.9 earthquakes reveals a north-northwest trending, less than 1 km2 sized active fault patch on a 70° west dipping fault. At about 17 km depth, the swarm occurred at or close to the bottom of the seismogenic crust. The swarm's cumulative seismic moment release, equivalent to an Mw=4.4 earthquake, is not dominated by a single shock; it is rather mainly due to 20 MD?3.0 events, which occurred throughout the swarm. The swarm started at the southern end and, during the first 18 months of activity, migrated to the northwest at a rate of about 1-2 m/d until reaching its northern terminus. A 10° fault bend, inferred from locations and fault plane solutions, acted as geometrical barrier that temporarily halted event migration in mid-2007 before continuing north in early 2008. The slow event migration points to a pore pressure diffusion process suggesting the swarm onset was triggered by fluid inflow into the fault zone. At 17 km depth, triggering by meteoritic water seems unlikely for a normal crustal permeability. The double couple source mechanisms preclude a magmatic intrusion at the depth of the earthquakes. However, fluids (or gases) associated with a deeper, though undocumented, magma injection beneath the Cascade Mountains, could trigger seismicity in a pre-stressed region when they have migrated upward and reached the seismogenic crust. Superimposed on overall swarm evolution, we found a statistically significant annual seismicity variation, which is likely surface driven. The annual seismicity peak during spring (March-May) coincides with the maximum snow load on the near-by Cascades. The load corresponds to a surface pressure variation of about 6 kPa, which likely causes an annual peak-to-peak vertical displacement of about 1 cm at GPS sites in the Cascades and GPS signals that decay with increasing distance from the Cascades. Stress changes due to loading and unloading of snow pack in the Cascades can act in two ways to instantaneously enhance seismicity. For a strike-slip fault roughly parallel to the trend of the load and 10s of km away from it, normal stress decreases slightly leading to slight fault unclamping. The load also leads to simultaneous compression of fluid conduits at greater depth driving fluids rapidly upward into the swarm source region. The small, temporally variable stress changes on the order of a few kPa or less seem to be adequate to modulate seismicity by varying fault normal stresses and controlling fluid injection into a critically stressed fault zone. The swarm region has been quiet since February 2012 suggesting stresses on the fault have been nearly completely released.

Braunmiller, J.; Nabelek, J.; Trehu, A. M.

2012-12-01

7

Reconnaissance surveys of near-event seismic activity in the volcanoes of the Cascade Range, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveys of near-event seismic activity were made at two principal locations in the Cascade Range in Oregon during the summers\\u000a of 1969 and 1970.\\u000a \\u000a A tripartite array of ultrasensitive high frequency seismometers was deployed about 7.5 km north of the Mt. Hood summit with\\u000a one of the 1-km legs oriented broadside to the dormant volcano. Seismometers were emplaced over olivine

J. K. Westhusing

1973-01-01

8

Reconnaissance surveys of near-event seismic activity in the volcanoes of the Cascade Range, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveys of near-event seismic activity were made at two principal locations in the Cascade Range in Oregon during the summers of 1969 and 1970. A tripartite array of ultrasensitive high frequency seismometers was deployed about 7.5 km north of the Mt. Hood summit with one of the 1-km legs oriented broadside to the dormant volcano. Seismometers were emplaced over olivine

J. K. Westhusing

1973-01-01

9

Design, construction and characterization of a prompt gamma activation analysis facility at the Oregon State University TRIGA ® reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility has been designed, built, and characterized at the Oregon State University\\u000a TRIGA® reactor. This facility was designed for versatile multi-elemental analyses. The facility utilizes the leakage neutrons originating\\u000a from beam port #4 of the Oregon State University TRIGA® reactor. The neutrons are collimated through a series of lead and Boral® collimators, and filtered

Joshua A. Robinson; Michael R. Hartman; Steven R. Reese

2010-01-01

10

Environmental influences on children's physical activity and eating habits in a rural Oregon County.  

PubMed

PURPOSE. To identify environmental barriers and facilitators of children's physical activity and healthy eating in a rural county. DESIGN. Community-based participatory research using mixed methods, primarily qualitative. SETTING. A rural Oregon county. SUBJECTS. Ninety-five adults, 6 high school students, and 41 fifth-grade students. MEASURES. In-depth interviews, focus groups, Photovoice, and structured observations using the Physical Activity Resource Assessment, System for Observing Play and Leisure Activity, Community Food Security Assessment Toolkit, and School Food and Beverage Marketing Assessment Tool. ANALYSIS. Qualitative data were coded by investigators; observational data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The findings were triangulated to produce a composite of environmental barriers and assets. RESULTS. Limited recreational resources, street-related hazards, fear of strangers, inadequate physical education, and denial of recess hindered physical activity, whereas popularity of youth sports and proximity to natural areas promoted physical activity. Limited availability and high cost of healthy food, busy lifestyles, convenience stores near schools, few healthy meal choices at school, children's being permitted to bring snacks to school, candy used as incentives, and teachers' modeling unhealthy eating habits hindered healthy eating, whereas the agricultural setting and popularity of gardening promoted healthy eating. CONCLUSIONS. This study provides data on a neglected area of research, namely environmental determinants of rural childhood obesity, and points to the need for multifaceted and multilevel environmental change interventions. PMID:22040399

Findholt, Nancy E; Michael, Yvonne L; Jerofke, Linda J; Brogoitti, Victoria W

2011-01-01

11

Active tectonics of the northwestern tip of Walker Lane in southern Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use newly-acquired LiDAR topographic data to characterize the active tectonics of the Klamath Basin in southern Oregon. Three key tectonic domains present on the western edge of the North American plate, the Walker Lane Fault Zone (WLFZ), the northwestern Basin and Range extensional province (NWBR), and the Cascade arc, intersect in the region of the Klamath Basin. Right-oblique shear across the WLFZ accommodates ~15-30% of motion between the North America and Pacific plates in eastern California and western Nevada. Geologic data indicate that the WLFZ has been growing to the northwest since its inception after ~13 Ma. The northwestern tip of the WLFZ extends northwest through eastern California into southern Oregon where it intersects the Klamath Basin and Cascade arc. The Klamath Basin is a graben and marks the western-most extent of the Basin and Range extensional province at the latitude of the California-Oregon border. Due to the intersection between the WLFZ, the western margin of Basin and Range, and the Cascade arc, it is unclear whether the Klamath Basin opened in response to northwest propagation of the WLFZ or whether the WLFZ overprints a pre-existing arc-related graben on the edge of the Basin and Range. Faults in the Klamath Basin region fall into two groups. Group 1 faults bound the Klamath Graben, are north striking, and are marked by topographic escarpments with more than 600m local relief. Quaternary alluvial deposits bury the fault traces. Fault scarps mark the traces of Group 2 faults. Group 2 faults occur within the basin and include segments that strike north and northwest, creating a complex stair-step map pattern. A systematic overprinting of relatively more eastern faults by faults to the west characterizes the Group 2 faults. Moreover, Group 2 faults cut tilt blocks associated with Group 1 faults. Topographic relief across Group 2 faults is less than ~350m. Fault scarps in unconsolidated alluvium have as much as ~2 m of vertical and ~40 m of strike slip separation. Right-oblique slip active faulting in the graben center either (A) overprints tilt blocks formed due to earlier Basin and Range extension or (B) opened the Klamath Basin and is now localized along the basin axis. Regardless, these new data reveal a previously unrecognized seismic hazard. An earthquake sequence in 1993, the Klamath Falls earthquakes, consisted of two M6 events, neither of which ruptured to the surface. The longest continuous group 2 fault, which has a ~320m vertical separation, is ~25 km long. Earthquake scaling relationships and the length and size of the scarp on this fault indicate that at least one M7 event has occurred in the Klamath Falls area, larger than any historic earthquake.

Waldien, T.

2012-12-01

12

Mount Hood - History and Hazards of Oregon's Most Recently Active Volcano  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page describes the history and hazards related to the Mount Hood volcano in Oregon. Issues discussed include past eruptive behavior, past catastrophic events, hazardous areas and tephra hazards. Included are a block diagram of tectonic plates and a simplified volcano hazards zone map for the area around Mount Hood.

Gardner, Cynthia; Scott, William; Major, Jon; Pierson, Thomas

13

Braceros in Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 1942, the Braceros Program was forged when the United States entered a labor agreement with Mexico allowing male citizens to work as farm laborers throughout the United States. During this time, over 15,000 Mexican men came to Oregon, working on farms and forming small and distinct communities from 1942 to 1947. This remarkable collection brings together 102 photographs that document the Braceros activities, courtesy of the Oregon State University Libraries. These unique visual items were originally taken by Oregon State College Extension staff members as part of a larger effort to document the various groups working to alleviate the state's farm labor shortage. Visitors can browse through the photos at their leisure or look through the items by county. This is a unique and rare offering, and should be credited for highlighting an important period in American history.

14

Eighth year projects and activities of the Environmental Remote Sensing Applications Laboratory (ERSAL). [Oregon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Projects completed for the NASA Office of University Affairs include the application of remote sensing data in support of rehabilitation of wild fire damaged areas and the use of LANDSAT 3 return beam vidicon in forestry mapping applications. Continuing projects for that office include monitoring western Oregon timber clearcut; detecting and monitoring wheat disease; land use monitoring for tax assessment in Umatilla, Lake, and Morrow Counties; and the use of Oregon Air National Guard thermal infrared scanning data. Projects funded through other agencies include the remote sensing inventory of elk in the Blue Mountains; the estimation of burned agricultural acreage in the Willamette Valley; a resource inventory of Deschutes County; and hosting a LANDSAT digital workshop.

Lewis, A. J.; Isaacson, D. L.; Schrumpf, B. J. (principal investigators)

1980-01-01

15

Oregon Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the introduction to this fine collection, the curators note that "People create maps to indicate how to get from one place to another and, more broadly, to reconstruct as best as they are able the world around them." It's an important statement, and one that sets the tone for this digital collection created via a partnership between the University of Oregon Libraries and the Oregon State University Libraries. The exhibit focuses on maps dealing with the state's development, and visitors can browse a variety of road maps and other types of maps that document the state's geological makeup and political geography. The road maps afford visitors a unique look into the massive transformation of the roads throughout the state in the early 20th century, particularly during the 1910s. All told, there are over 110 maps in this collection, and the site is rounded out by a set of links to related resources.

16

Workforce: Oregon  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This fact sheet states that in 2006, a good education is no longer just a way for an individual to get ahead. It is also the best way a state can get ahead -- and therefore a real economic priority. A state must ensure that all of its citizens have access to a college education. In Oregon, a state recovering from the 2000-03 recession, the demand…

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

2006-01-01

17

Activity patterns of marbled murrelets in Douglas-fir old-growth forests of the Oregon Coast Range  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We monitored activity patterns of Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) on a near-dailyb asisu singa udio-visuasl urveys during three breeding seasons at five forest stands in the Oregon Coast Range. Three measures of activity were recorded: number of daily detections, number of daily vocalizations, and duration of daily activity. Each measure was highly variable within and among stands and years, and we recorded greater variability than has been previously reported for this species. The three measures of activity were strongly correlated within a day at each survey station, but correlative relationships at temporal and spatial scales greater than this were inconsistent. Activity varied greatly from one day to the next during all portions of the breeding season, and we did not identify any month when variability in activity was consistently higher or lower than any other month. Multivariate analyses revealed that weather and date variates explained little of the variability in daily activity. Given the extreme levels of variability in Marbled Murrelet activity and our lack of understanding as to which factors drive that variability, it is critical that conclusions about activity or behavior not be drawn from data sets not specifically designed to answer the questions of interest.

Jodice, Patrick G.; Collopy, M. W.

2000-01-01

18

Analysis of Sonic Velocity in an Active Gas Hydrate System, Hydrate Ridge, Offshore Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the best recognized and most intuitive influence of gas hydrate on its host sediment is the change in its mechanical and elastic properties. This is identified through an increase in acoustic velocity, which is partially responsible for one of the most distinct signatures of gas hydrate presence, the Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR). The unstable nature of gas hydrate makes the in situ recording of their properties by downhole logging the best way to identify and quantify its distribution. During ODP Leg 204 on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, acoustic logs were recorded in seven holes and vertical seismic profiles (VSP) were acquired successfully in four holes. These data, recorded within a wide range of frequency and scales provide a unique and extensive survey of the acoustic properties of a dynamic gas hydrate system. Because of the poorly consolidated nature of the Hydrate Ridge sediments, automatic picking of velocity was only partially successful and a complete post cruise reprocessing of the sonic waveforms was necessary to draw accurate compressional (Vp) and shear velocity (Vs) logs. Synthetic seismograms generated with the Vp and density logs allow to confirm the nature of the main reflectors identified in a 3-D seismic survey of Hydrate Ridge, such as the BSR and various faults underlying the southern Hydrate Ridge system. Despite the highly heterogeneous distribution of gas hydrate, the Vp logs and interval velocities calculated from the VSP clearly identify the presence of gas hydrate and the eventual presence of free gas directly underneath the hydrate stability zone or within the faults feeding the ridge system. We use various elastic models to try to estimate gas hydrate and free gas saturations from sonic velocity and from bulk moduli. The best agreement with independent estimates derived from resistivity logs and other methods indicate that gas hydrate interact with the host sediment through cementation, which contributes also to a significant energy loss in the recorded waveforms.

Guerin, G.; Goldberg, D.; Collett, T. S.

2004-12-01

19

Physical Education in Oregon Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a guide to other educators the physical education programs, activities, and goals and objectives in the Oregon public school system are presented in detailed form. Ideas for class organization, exercise activities, and a student-oriented teaching approach are given, and a discussion of athletic equipment, facilities, and resources is included.…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

20

Oregon Plant Atlas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oregon Plant Atlas is an excellent online mapping program from the Oregon Flora Project at Oregon State University and the Native Plant Society of Oregon. The program allows visitors to create customized plant distribution maps derived from more than "385,000 records representing 96% of Oregon's 4516 taxa." Atlas users may choose up to six taxa (e.g. species, subspecies) for each map and selected taxa will be displayed at the locations in Oregon where they have been observed or collected. The Atlas offers users a number of base map options including shaded relief, precipitation, ecoregion, and county line maps of Oregon. In addition, Atlas visitors can access detailed information about different specimens by selecting location symbols on the map. The site provides a Help section, and links to other aspects of the Oregon Flora Project as well.

21

Predation by Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) on Western toads (Bufo boreas) in Oregon, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Toads of the genus Bufo co-occur with true frogs (family Ranidae) throughout their North American ranges. Yet, Bufo are rarely reported as prey for ranid frogs, perhaps due to dermal toxins that afford them protection from some predators. We report field observations from four different localities demonstrating that Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) readily consume juvenile western toads (Bufo boreas) at breeding sites in Oregon. Unpalatability thought to deter predators of selected taxa and feeding mode may not protect juvenile stages of western toads from adult Oregon spotted frogs. Activity of juvenile western toads can elicit ambush behavior by Oregon spotted frog adults. Our review of published literature suggests that regular consumption of toadlets sets Oregon spotted frogs apart from most North American ranid frogs. Importance of the trophic context of juvenile western toads as a seasonally important resource to Oregon spotted frogs needs critical investigation.

Pearl, Christopher A.; Hayes, M. P.

2002-01-01

22

Fires Scorch Oregon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In southwestern Oregon, the Florence Fire (north) and the Sour Biscuit Fire (south) continue to burn virtually out of control. Numerous evacuation notices have been issued for residents in the area as the fires remain difficult to control due to the steep, rugged terrain of the Klamath Mountains. This false-color image from the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper was acquired on July 21, 2002. In the image, vegetation is green, burned areas are deep magenta, active fire is bright pink, and smoke is light blue. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

2002-01-01

23

Oregon Educational Technology Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 1997 Oregon Technology Plan sets a course for Oregon and its Department of Education in using technology to improve student learning, manage resources, and increase accountability. It supports the integration of instructional and administrative technology to help achieve the goals of Oregon's school improvement plan. The Goals of the…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

24

Historic and recent patterns in dissolved oxygen within the Yaquina Estuary (Oregon, USA): Importance of anthropogenic activities and oceanic conditions  

EPA Science Inventory

Spatial and temporal patterns of dissolved oxygen (DO) in Yaquina Estuary, Oregon (USA) are examined using historic and recent data. There was a significant increasing trend in DO in the upstream portion of the estuary during the years 1960?1985. Historically, minimum dry season ...

25

Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Report for Oregon: Worker Killed when Jacket Pocket Activated Machinery.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On February 23, 2006, a 63-year-old shift supervisor at a food-processing plant, working as a machine operator, was killed while operating a custom-built tote-dumping machine. The supervisor activated the tote dump to raise and tilt a large box (tote) of ...

2007-01-01

26

Oregon Health Go Local: A Retrospective Look.  

PubMed

MedlinePlus® Go Local is the National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health's Internet resource that allows individuals to find health services in their local communities. Oregon Health Go Local recently joined the network of active Go Local projects. This paper describes the planning and development of Oregon Health Go Local, with a discussion of the success and challenges of initiating such a project. Funding, marketing, volunteer coordination, data acquisition, and taxonomy are discussed. PMID:20640231

Ford, Emily; Hannon, Todd

2010-04-01

27

Groundwater Stewardship in Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Oregon State University site offers in-depth information on groundwater including: human impacts, protection, contamination, regulations, agencies, community action, and community stewardship. Although some information, such as how the geology of Oregon affects groundwater, is specific to that state much of the information is transferable to other locations.

Andrews, Gail

2001-12-14

28

Oregon: Biscuit Wildfire  

... strikes during a record-breaking heat wave, the Biscuit Fire became Oregon's largest wildfire of the past century. Between mid July and ... to suppress the Biscuit Fire was the most expensive fire fighting effort in Oregon's history, with more than 6,000 personnel assisting ...

2013-04-18

29

Oregon Early Options Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines current policies and practices in regard to Oregon high school student participation in college courses and programs. A total of 112 of Oregon's public and private high schools responded to a January 1998 mailed survey concerning early college options programs and policies. It was found that an estimated 6,660 students were…

Oregon Univ. System, Eugene. Office of Academic Affairs.

30

Lyme Disease in Oregon ?  

PubMed Central

The incidence of Lyme disease in Oregon is calculated from cases reported to the Oregon State Health Division. We reviewed the exposure history of reported cases of Lyme disease and performed field surveys for infected Ixodes pacificus ticks. The incidence of Lyme disease correlated with the distribution of infected I. pacificus ticks.

Doggett, J. Stone; Kohlhepp, Sue; Gresbrink, Robert; Metz, Paul; Gleaves, Curt; Gilbert, David

2008-01-01

31

Biological science in Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fishing is an important part of Oregon's culture. The Western Fisheries Research Center (WFRC) has been conducting research in Oregon for many years to provide information that can be used by managers to help keep fish and other parts of the ecosystem healthy. Below are examples of some of WFRC's studies.

Thorsteinson, Lyman

2005-01-01

32

Oregon State Parks and Recreation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What can you do in the great Oregon outdoors? From the world of Cannon Beach to the wild and rugged Snake River, the experiences are diverse, to say the least. The homepage features dramatic vistas, isolated lighthouses, and a whole range of wonderful images to entice visitors. In the Visit area, there is an interactive map of the state that will help plan any trip. Here visitors can select Activities and Facilities to look for specific amenities. Moving along, the Event Calendar area allows visitors to look for upcoming events at a specific park or by category. Policy folks will appreciate the About Us area, as it includes detailed information on the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department's budget, their annual report, information about upcoming initiatives, and construction projects.

33

South Oregon Coast Reinforcement.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to build a transmission line to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of Oregon. This FYI outlines the proposal, tells how one can learn more, and how one can share ideas and opinions. The project will reinforce Oregon`s south coast area and provide the necessary transmission for Nucor Corporation to build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend area. The proposed plant, which would use mostly recycled scrap metal, would produce rolled steel products. The plant would require a large amount of electrical power to run the furnace used in its steel-making process. In addition to the potential steel mill, electrical loads in the south Oregon coast area are expected to continue to grow.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1998-05-01

34

Oregon Freight Data Mart.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Increasing freight volumes are adding pressure to the Oregon transportation system. Monitoring the performance of the transportation system and freight movements is essential to guarantee the economic development of the region, the efficient allocation of...

M. Figliozzi

2010-01-01

35

Oregon Multicultural Archives Digital Collection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ethnic minorities in Oregon are the subject of this Oregon State University Library website and the collection "consists of images that document the lives and activities of ethnic minorities in Oregon." With its streamlined homepage, visitors can focus on the collection and how to search or browse through it. Visitors are also welcome to contribute information on any unidentified photographs, by clicking on "Contact Us", near the bottom of the homepage. In addition, visitors can also click on the "Browse" link to see every one of the 239 items in the collection. Those users with something more specific in mind should use the "Quick Links" drop down box in the top right hand corner of the homepage. Some of the subject areas that can be searched for are "African Americans", "Indians of North America", "Mexican Americans", "Political Parades and Rallies", and "Powwows". The "Indexes" available to search are organized into headings like "Photographer", "Subject" and "Geographic", and they can be found below the "Quick Links" drop down box.

36

Smoke from Oregon Fires  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At the Oregon-California state line, an immense wildfire that resulted from the combination of two separate blazes has now burned over 375,000 acres and is still growing. The Biscuit Fire, formerly the Florence Fire and the Sour Biscuit Fire, was sparked by lightning in the Klamath Mountains in Oregon and has burned over the state line into California. The columns of smoke billowing from the fire reach far south down the Pacific Coast.

Rhodes, Greg; Herring, David

2002-08-15

37

Fires Scorch Oregon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In southwest Oregon, the Biscuit Fire continues to grow. This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image from August 14, 2002, shows the burn scar associated with the enormous blaze. The visualization uses ASTER's 30-meter-resolution, short-wave infrared bands to minimize smoke contamination and enhance the burn scar, which appears purple amid green vegetation. Actively burning areas of the fire appear very light purple. More than 6,000 fire personnel are assigned to the Biscuit Fire, which was 390, 276 acres as of Friday morning, August 15, and only 26 percent contained. Among the resources threatened are thousands of homes, three nationally designated wild and scenic rivers, and habitat for several categories of plants and animals at risk of extinction. Firefighters currently have no estimate as to when the fire might be contained. Credit: This image was acquired on an expedited basis as part of NASA Wildfire Response Team activities. Image courtesy Mike Abrams, Simon Hook, and the ASTER team at EROS Data Center DAAC.

2002-01-01

38

Evaluation of Malolactic Bacteria Isolated from Oregon Wines †  

PubMed Central

Oregon is a cool wine-producing region where grapes characteristically contain high concentrations of organic acids. To reduce the natural acidity and increase the microbiological stability and flavor complexity of the wine, malolactic fermentation is encouraged. In this study, strains of Leuconostoc oenos indigenous to Oregon wines were evaluated for their suitability to conduct malolactic fermentation in Oregon wines. Tests determined the malolactic activity of the Oregon isolates in comparison with commercial strains ML-34, PSU-1, MLT-kli, and ens 44-40 under various temperature and pH conditions. Sensitivities to sulfur dioxide, ethanol, and fumaric acid also were determined. Two Oregon strains, Er-1a and Ey-2d, were selected for commercial winemaking tests because they had greater malolactic activity under conditions of low pH (3.0) and low temperature (15 and 8°C), respectively.

Henick-Kling, T.; Sandine, W. E.; Heatherbell, D. A.

1989-01-01

39

Exploring the Oregon Trail  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As we are studying the pioneer trek along the Oregon Trail, I want you to create a character and write a journal as if you were taking the journey. First, you should get a good idea of what the Oregon Trail was like. Read the personal accounts and experiences from actual pioneers at the websites below: "Jumping Off" "Power" "Hardships" "Camping" The following is a memoir from an actual pioneer (you will want to write your journal in this style). "Across the Plains in 1844" To help you get a ...

Miles, Ms.

2005-10-20

40

OREGON ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PROFILE  

EPA Science Inventory

In response to Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority and Low Income Populations, and in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, this project will profile the state of Oregon to identify environmental justice communi...

41

Oregon State University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oregon State University (OSU) is located in Corvallis, a community of 53,000 people situated in the heart of the Willamette Valley between Portland and Eugene. Approximately 15,700 undergraduate and 3,400 graduate students, including 2,600 U.S. students of color and 950 international students, are currently enrolled at OSU across 11 academic…

Sanderson, Rebecca A.; Ketcham, Patricia L.

2009-01-01

42

The Oregon Walkabout  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Too often American schools aim to satisfy the self-actualizing and higher-level needs in Maslow's hierarchy, while ignoring survival and security needs. The new State curriculum seeks to correct that deficit. To graduate, an Oregon student in the Class of 1978 will be expected to demonstrate the competencies to function effectively on the job, as…

Parnell, Dale

1974-01-01

43

Fires Scorch Oregon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In southwestern Oregon, the Florence Fire (north) and the Sour Biscuit Fire (south) continued to burn virtually out of control on July 21, 2002. Numerous evacuation notices have been issued for residents in the area as the fires remain difficult to control due to the steep, rugged terrain of the Klamath Mountains. This image is from the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

2002-01-01

44

DIAMOND PEAK WILDERNESS, OREGON.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

No metallic mineral resources were identified during a mineral survey of the Diamond Peak Wilderness in Oregon. Cinder cones within the wilderness contain substantial cinder resources, but similar deposits that are more accessible occur outside the wilderness. The area could have geothermal resources, but available data are insufficient to evaluate their potential. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas of the High Cascades outside the wilderness, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the several Cascade wilderness could be made.

Sherrod, David, R.; Moyle, Phillip, R.

1984-01-01

45

Mount Hood, Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource about Mt. Hood, a stratovolcano in the Cascade Range, features links to all aspects of the volcano, including its geographic setting, and geologic and eruptive history. Mount Hood, Oregon's highest peak, forms a prominent backdrop to the state's largest city, Portland. Links labeled 'Special Items of Interest' include information about volcanic highlights and features, and points of interest. Other links lead to maps, graphics, images, publications, reports, and other items of interest involving this volcano and others.

46

Oregon and offshore oil  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1964-65, oil companies drilled 8 exploratory wells on the continental shelf off Oregon. Only traces of petroleum were found, with one well producing 60,000 cu ft of natural gas per day. But now, more-accurate surveying techniques could lead to more precise siting of areas for exploration. The thick sediments located off the Columbia River's mouth and near Newport and

J. M. Stander; B. H. Echols

1978-01-01

47

Cascade Mtns. Oregon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ground near one of the long-dormant Three Sisters volcanoes in the Cascade Mountains of west-central Oregon has risen approximately 10centimeters in a 10-by-20-km parcel since 1996, meaning that magma or underground lava is slowly flowing into the area, according to a research team from the U.S. Geological Survey. The Three Sisters area -- which contains five volcanoes -- is only about 170 miles from Mount St. Helens, which erupted in 1980. Both are part of the Cascades Range, a line of 27volcanoes stretching from British Columbia in Canada to northern California. This perspective view was created by draping a simulated natural color ASTER image over digital topography from the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset.

This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

Size: 20 x 25 km (12 x 15 miles) Location: 44.1 deg. North lat., 122.1 deg. West long. Orientation: View towards Southeast Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3. Original Data Resolution: 15 m Date Acquired: Various

2002-01-01

48

40 CFR 81.338 - Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County Union County Wallowa County Wheeler County AQCR 192 Northwest Oregon Intrastate...County Union County Wallowa County Wheeler County AQCR 192 Northwest Oregon Intrastate...County Union County Wallowa County Wheeler County AQCR 192Northwest Oregon...

2009-07-01

49

40 CFR 81.338 - Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County Union County Wallowa County Wheeler County AQCR 192 Northwest Oregon Intrastate...County Union County Wallowa County Wheeler County AQCR 192 Northwest Oregon Intrastate...County Union County Wallowa County Wheeler County AQCR 192Northwest Oregon...

2010-07-01

50

OR State Profile. Oregon: Oregon State Assessment System (OSAS)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides information about Oregon State Assessment System. Its purpose is to assess proficiency in the Essential Skills for the purpose of earning a regular or modified high school diploma. Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills is also used for federal accountability purposes under No Child Left Behind. [For the main report, "State…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

51

THE UMPQUA RIVER IN WESTERN OREGON  

Microsoft Academic Search

AST}ACT.--From 1981-90, the osprey population along the Umpqua River between Roseburg and Reedsport, Oregon increased by 153% (17% annual rate). The first observed decrease in the population occurred in 1991 when one previously occupied breeding territory became vacant. Management activ- ities on USDI Bureau of Land Management administered lands within the study area between 1981-88 consisted of the installation of

JOSEPH W. WITT

52

Geology Fieldnotes: Oregon Caves National Monument  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Oregon Caves National Monument is an active marble cave created by natural forces over hundreds of thousands of years in one of the world's most diverse geologic realms. Features of the site include park geology information, maps, photographs, related links, and visitor information. The park geology section discusses the cave's development and geologic history, its formations, and its development as a National Monument. The maps section includes an area map of the National Monument.

53

OLALLIE ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Olallie Roadless Area, Oregon, is devoid of mines and mineral prospects, and a mineral-resource evaluation of the area did not identify any mineral-resource potential. There is no evidence that fossil fuels are present in the roadless area. Nearby areas in Clackamas, Marion, Jefferson, and Wasco Counties are characterized by higher-than-normal heat flow and by numerous thermal springs, some of which have been partly developed. this may indicate that the region has some, as yet undefined, potential for the development of geothermal energy. Lack of thermal springs or other evidence of localized geothermal anomalies within the roadless area may be the result of masking by young, nonconductive rock units and by the flooding out and dilution of rising thermal waters by cool meteoric water.

Walker, George, W.; Neumann, Terry, R.

1984-01-01

54

Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.  

SciTech Connect

Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

1997-10-01

55

Coaching Specialization: The Oregon Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The University of Oregon has developed a coaching specialization program that allows students to train for prospective coaching assignments without obtaining a teaching certification. Background information on the status of coaching certification is offered. (DF)

Sisley, Becky

1984-01-01

56

Petroleum potential of Oregon and Washington  

SciTech Connect

The states of Oregon and Washington border the Pacific Ocean within an area of diverse topography, climate, and vegetation with altitudes ranging from sea level to more than 8,000 ft. The Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks are quasi-eugeosynclinal but badly indurated and/or metamorphosed, implying that almost all the pre-Tertiary rocks were unfavorable for oil and gas except some 700 mi{sup 2} of outcropping Mesozoic rocks exposed through windows in the overlying volcanics along the SW extension of the Blue and the Klamath mountains, accordingly. A profound angular and erosional unconformity separates the Tertiary sediments and volcanics from the older rocks. During Late Mesozoic and Tertiary time, uplift accompanied by erosion caused the removal of large areas of metamorphosed sediments and the development of pre-Miocene surface of large relief. Crustal movements of Late Miocene age produced NW-SE folds in Washington, and NS folds in the Coast range of Oregon. Some of the exploration methods (excluding wildcat drilling) were inconvenient. Seismic and gravity methods are impeded, the first by glacial till, basalt flows, sills, and dikes, and the second by laccoliths. Although the region is not the best place for hustling, drilling activity for development of potential oil and gas ushered 78% success rate in Oregon, and Shell and Exxon earned significant bonus bids in Washington.

Billo, S.M. (King Saul Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia))

1990-06-01

57

EVALUATING ECONOMIC INCENTIVE PROGRAMS: A WATERSHED-BASED TMDL PROGRAM IN OREGON  

EPA Science Inventory

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has been actively working to develop effluent trading opportunities since 1997. With prior EPA funding, Oregon DEQ developed a draft version of a manual titled "Resource Guide to Watershed-Based Trading". This manual outlined...

58

Three Sisters, Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Earlier this month, the US Geological Survey (USGS) released a report stating that USGS scientists have detected a slight uplift of the ground surface over a broad area centered 5 kilometers west of South Sister volcano in the Three Sisters region of the central Oregon Cascade Range. This uplift was detected using a relatively new technique, Satellite Radar Interferometry (InSAR). InSAR uses satellite data to make radar images of the Earth's surface and then compares images from the same location acquired at different times to detect minor (a few centimeters) changes in the ground elevation. This page comes from the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory Website, and it contains links to the May 8 press release, current hazards report (spring 2001), geologic descriptions of the Three Sisters volcanoes, color interferograms, site photographs, earthquake maps, an overview of InSAR, daily seismicity measurements, and much more. The USGS's Cascade Volcano Observatory has been featured previously in our reports (see the September 23, 1994 Scout Report for Science & Engineering), but the Three Sisters research is particularly timely.

2001-01-01

59

SALMON SPAWNING & REARING HABITAT IN OREGON  

EPA Science Inventory

Spawning & rearing, rearing only, and essential habitat identified by Oregon Dept. Fish & Wildlife for chum, coho, fall chinook, and spring chinook salmon in Oregon. Each of the species workspaces contains coverages specific to individual USGS hydrologic cataloging unit; each co...

60

Teenage Suicide in Oregon 1983-1985.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the 3-year period from 1983 through 1985, 80 Oregon teenagers intentionally took their own lives, making suicide second only to accidents as the leading cause of death among Oregon teenagers. Data on suicides committed by individuals between the ages of 10 and 19 were retrieved from death certificates on file with the Oregon Health Division…

Oregon State Dept. of Human Resources, Portland.

61

COPE Coastal ocean probe experiment Northern Oregon Coast 14-16 September 1995: Test Operations Report summary of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory activities  

SciTech Connect

Operations involving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) assets associated with a field experiment named COPE (Coastal Ocean Probe Experiment) are described. The lead organization responsible for the planning and conduct of COPE is NOAA/ETL headquartered in Boulder, Colorado. This experiment was conducted off the coast of Northern Oregon during September-October 1995. The primary measurements involve radars and other imaging microwave sensors imaging surface effects associated with natural internal waves which are abundant off the Oregon coast in the late summer and early fall. In-water, surface, and above- water environmental sensors were fielded by ETL and their contractors on the FLIP platform moored 13 miles offshore and elsewhere to characterize the environmental conditions and help interpret various features in the imagery. LLNL`s Imaging and Detection Program has taken advantage of this unique site and suite of ground-truth measurements to collect radar image data over a three-day period (14-16 September 1995) with our Airborne Experimental Test Bed (AETB) and its X-band, HH-polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as a piggyback to the primary COPE data collection. This report documents test operations during this three-day data collection involving the AETB/SAR from a LLNL perspective. A total of 42 SAR images were collected at grazing angles of 8{degrees}, 20{degrees}, and 45{degrees}. From all indications during data collection, data quality appears good for about 75 percent of the passes. Strong internal waves were observed each day in calm to light wind conditions. ETL`s hillside dual-polarization X-band and Ka-band real aperture radars recorded data simultaneous with the AETB SAR. The presence of other airborne platforms and low cloud cover limited the AETB aircraft`s ability to operate at low altitude. Limited sea-truth data was collected onboard FLIP.

Mantrom, D.D.; Miller, M.G.

1995-10-01

62

Volcano Hazards in the Three Sisters Region, Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three Sisters is one of three potentially active volcanic centers that lie close to rapidly growing communities and resort areas in Central Oregon. Two types of volcanoes exist in the Three Sisters region and each poses distinct hazards to people and prop...

W. E. Scott R. M. Iverson S. P. Schilling B. J. Fisher

1999-01-01

63

An update of Quaternary faults of central and eastern Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is the online version of a CD-ROM publication. We have updated the eastern portion of our previous active fault map of Oregon (Pezzopane, Nakata, and Weldon, 1992) as a contribution to the larger USGS effort to produce digital maps of active faults in the Pacific Northwest region. The 1992 fault map has seen wide distribution and has been reproduced in essentially all subsequent compilations of active faults of Oregon. The new map provides a substantial update of known active or suspected active faults east of the Cascades. Improvements in the new map include (1) many newly recognized active faults, (2) a linked ArcInfo map and reference database, (3) more precise locations for previously recognized faults on shaded relief quadrangles generated from USGS 30-m digital elevations models (DEM), (4) more uniform coverage resulting in more consistent grouping of the ages of active faults, and (5) a new category of 'possibly' active faults that share characteristics with known active faults, but have not been studied adequately to assess their activity. The distribution of active faults has not changed substantially from the original Pezzopane, Nakata and Weldon map. Most faults occur in the south-central Basin and Range tectonic province that is located in the backarc portion of the Cascadia subduction margin. These faults occur in zones consisting of numerous short faults with similar rates, ages, and styles of movement. Many active faults strongly correlate with the most active volcanic centers of Oregon, including Newberry Craters and Crater Lake.

Weldon, Ray J., II; Fletcher, D. K.; Weldon, E. M.; Scharer, K. M.; McCrory, P. A.

2002-01-01

64

OREGON ONSITE EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

This study was initiated to develop useful design and performance data on alternative onsite wastewater treatment and disposal systems which would permit the use of non-sewered technological solutions to residents of rural and suburban areas of the State of Oregon and the rest of...

65

Progress Report to the Agricultural Research Foundation Oregon Wheat Commission PROJECT: The Oregon Wheat Quality Evaluation Program PRINCIPLE INVESTIGATOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

$39,500 ABSTRACT: The overall goal of the OSU Wheat Quality Evaluation Program (OWQEP) is to provide high quality fundamental and applied research and service with respect to wheat quality. OWQEP activities underpin the quality improvement efforts of the OSU wheat breeding program, and the Oregon wheat industry. To date the OWQEP has provided a number of high impact outcomes. 1

Andrew S. Ross; C. James Peterson; Craig F. Morris; USDA ARS

66

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF ON-SITE ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR TNT AND RDX IN GROUND WATER  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field demonstration was conducted to assess the performance of eight commercially-available and emerging colorimetric, immunoassay, and biosensor on-site analytical methods for explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in ground water and leachate at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon and U.S. Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Washington, Superfund sites. Ground water samples were analyzed by each of the on-site

Harry Craig; George Ferguson; Anne W. Kusterbeck; L. Shriver-Lake; Thomas Jenkins

2009-01-01

67

Lee v. State of Oregon.  

PubMed

HELD: Oregon's Death with Dignity Act, Measure 16, which legalizes physician-assisted suicide for certain terminally ill persons, violates the equal protection clause of the fourteenth amendment to the United States Constitution. Measure 16 fails to withstand even the lowest level of judicial scrutiny because the disparate treatment afforded the class of terminally ill persons does not further any legitimate state interest. PMID:8934861

Devlin, M M

1996-01-01

68

Dinosaur Remains Found in Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Two amateur paleontologists kept their eyes to the ground in Oregon on one of their recent hikes and discovered what are believed to be the first remains of a marine reptile called the plesiosaur to be unearthed in the Pacific Northwest. This radio broadcast reports on the discovery and what it could mean to the understanding of dinosaurs in the area. The clip is 5 minutes and 6 seconds in length.

69

University of Oregon Archives Photographs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How might one choose to celebrate the University of Oregon? It might be done via song, working paper, or proclamation. Of course one might also look over this digital collection of photographs from the University of Oregon Libraries. On this page, visitors can look over items that celebrate the school's athletics, professors, presidents, and other aspects of college life. First-time users can look over the thematic areas that include Buildings, Cinema, and Commencement. Interestingly, the Cinema area includes press photographs from the film, "Animal House,â which was filmed on campus. This same area contains stills from the coming of age college tale, "Ed's Co-Ed,â which is a minor classic in the genre. Users also have access to the "Oregon Daily Emerald,â which contains full-text versions of this popular monthly from September 2005 to the present. As an alternative to browsing, a full-text search can be performed to look for items of particular interest.

2011-10-09

70

Newberry Volcano—Central Oregon's Sleeping Giant  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hidden in plain sight, Oregon's massive Newberry Volcano is the largest volcano in the Cascades volcanic arc and covers an area the size of Rhode Island. Unlike familiar cone-shaped Cascades volcanoes, Newberry was built into the shape of a broad shield by repeated eruptions over 400,000 years. About 75,000 years ago a major explosion and collapse event created a large volcanic depression (caldera) at its summit. Newberry last erupted about 1,300 years ago, and present-day hot springs and geologically young lava flows indicate that it could reawaken at any time. Because of its proximity to nearby communities, frequency and size of past eruptions, and geologic youthfulness, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are working to better understand volcanic activity at Newberry and closely monitor the volcano for signs of unrest.

Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Stovall, Wendy K.; Ramsey, David W.; Ewert, John W.; Jensen, Robert A.

2011-01-01

71

Oregon State University: It's in the Blood!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website from the Valley Library at Oregon State University is subtitled: A Documentary History of Linus Pauling, Hemoglobin and Sickle Cell Anemia. The site is part of a series of Valley Library websites that focus on different aspects of chemist Linus Pauling's notable career. The site is composed of three main sections. The first section narrates "the story of Linus Pauling's research into the nature of human blood. The second, and most impressive, "provides access to more than three hundred primary source documents and images, including letter, manuscripts, diary entries, photographs, audio-visual materials, and published papers." The final section is yet to be completed, but will offer daily accounts of Pauling's activities between 1940 and 1949. The website also includes a hyperlinked Chronological List of Documents on the site, a sizeable bibliography, and links to a few websites concerned with sickle cell anemia and hemoglobin.

72

Impacts of multispecies parasitism on juvenile Oregon coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We are studying the impacts of parasites on threatened stocks of Oregon coastal coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). In our previous studies, we have found high infections of digeneans and myxozoans in coho salmon parr from the lower main stem of West Fork Smith River (WFSR), Oregon. In contrast parr from tributaries of this river, and outmigrating smolts, harbor considerably less parasites. Thus, we have hypothesized that heavy parasite burdens in parr from this river are associated with poor overwintering survival. The objective of the current study was to ascertain the possible effects these parasites have on smolt fitness. We captured parr from the lower main stem and tributaries of WFSR and held them in the laboratory to evaluate performance endpoints of smolts with varying degrees of infection by three digeneans (Nanophyetus salmincola, Apophallus sp., and neascus) and one myxozoan (Myxobolus insidiosus). The parameters we assessed were weight, fork length, growth, swimming stamina, and gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity. We repeated our study on the subsequent year class and with hatchery reared coho salmon experimentally infected with N. salmincola. The most significant associations between parasites and these performance or fitness endpoints were observed in the heavily infected groups from both years. We found that all parasite species, except neascus, were negatively associated with fish fitness. This was corroborated for N. salmincola causing reduced growth with our experimental infection study. Parasites were most negatively associated with growth and size, and these parameters likely influenced the secondary findings with swimming stamina and ATPase activity levels.

Ferguson, Jayde A.; Romer, Jeremy; Sifneos, Jean C.; Madsen, Lisa; Schreck, Carl B.; Glynn, Michael; Kent, Michael L.

2011-01-01

73

Endangered Plants in Oregon and Washington.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a partial list of the 132 Oregon and Washington plants which have been proposed for federal protection under the Endangered Species Act. Suggestions for student/citizen involvement in preserving these species and a description of a videotape about rare/endangered species of the Willamette Valley (Oregon) are included. (DH)

Love, Rhoda M.

1985-01-01

74

Oregon Migrant Health Project, 1971 Annual Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In its 9th year of providing migrant health services through a U.S. Public Health Service Continuing Migrant Health Act grant, this Oregon Migrant Health Project annual report is concerned with (1) the health services provided during the 1970-71 harvest season through a contractual arrangement between the Oregon State Health Division and 10 county…

Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

75

Oregon Migrant Health Project, 1970 Annual Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 1970 annual report on the Oregon Migrant Health Project discusses health services for migrant agricultural workers and their families (approximately 30,000 individuals) who worked and lived temporarily in various Oregon counties. As noted, some 9,000 of the 30,000 migrants were estimated to be in need of some type of medical service. Thus, the…

Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

76

Tensleep Reservoir, Oregon Basin Field, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oregon Basin field in northwestern Wyoming is about 9 mi long and is composed of a north dome and south dome. Since its discovery in 1927, over 122 million bbl of oil have been produced from the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone at Oregon Basin. Geologists and engineers worked together to describe the reservoir and accumulate data that would aid in

J. T. Morgan; F. S. Cordiner; A. R. Livingston

1978-01-01

77

Oregon Community College 2001-2002 Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides numerous tables and graphs illustrating information regarding Oregon community colleges. The four sections of this 2001/2002 Oregon Community College Profile provide information on: (1) students; (2) faculty and staff; (3) finances; and (4) programs and services. The information regarding the student section summarizes…

Oregon Dept. of Community Colleges and Workforce Development, Salem.

78

Oregon University System Fact Book 2013  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is the last Fact Book published under the auspices of the Oregon University System. The introduction includes a mission statement, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education,…

Oregon University System, 2014

2014-01-01

79

The Oregon Career and Technical Education Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oregon educators, policymakers, and business people are working together to increase the number and quality of Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs in secondary and postsecondary institutions. CTE is an integral component of Oregon's education and workforce development system and prepares students for careers in areas ranging from the…

Klein, Steven; Richards, Amanda

2008-01-01

80

Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Oregon, 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Oregon for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Oregon showed a clear trend of gains in reading and math at the basic-and-above, proficient-and-above, and advanced levels for all major racial/ethnic subgroups, low-income…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

81

Oregon State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Oregon State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Oregon. The profile is a result of a survey of NRC licensees in Oregon. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Oregon.

Not Available

1980-12-01

82

Oregon's Toxic Household Products Law.  

PubMed

In 1991, Oregon became the first state in the U.S. to require the addition of an aversive agent to ethylene glycol-containing antifreeze and methanol-containing windshield wiper fluid. This new law, entitled "Toxic Household Products (THP) Act," was designed to reduce pediatric and animal poisonings from accidental ingestion of these two potentially lethal consumer automotive products. While not the stated intention of the law, addition of aversive agents to consumer automotive products could also reduce adult poisonings associated with intentional (suicides or alcoholics ingesting methanol-containing windshield wiper fluid) or accidental exposures. This law went into effect April 30, 1995, following settlement of a lawsuit brought by the Chemical Manufacturing Specialties Association (CSMA), a trade group representing the five largest manufacturers of ethylene glycol-based antifreeze in the U.S. This paper discusses the major policy issues that arose following the passage of Oregon's THP Act. Major provisions of the law are provided along with a discussion of CSMA's opposition to the Act's implementation. A description of the eventual settlement that was reached with CSMA as well as the major components of Oregon Health Division's (OHD) enforcement program are also highlighted. Data are presented for 1987 through 1998 on the number of exposures and severity of effects for pediatric cases (children < 6 years old) following exposure to both of these potentially lethal automotive products. However, because of the low incidence of exposures each year, these data are insufficient to draw any conclusions on the impact of the THP Act. PMID:11021047

Neumann, C M; Giffin, S; Hall, R; Henderson, M; Buhler, D R

2000-01-01

83

Oregon Museum of Science and Industry: Engineer It  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Oregon Museum of Science and Industry offers this website called Engineer It. The website complements an exhibit which lets you "use the same steps as an engineer to design boats, build bridges, windmills, and airplanes and then test their performance in water tanks, shake tables, and wind tunnels." The website offers activities and online games relating to wind, water, and structural engineering. Also available are links to other fun websites and an article on What is an Engineer.

84

Urban carbon dioxide in Portland, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ambient concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are reported for the Portland, Oregon (USA) metropolitan region since late July, 2009. Three stationary locations were established: a downtown location on the campus of Portland State University; a residential site in southeast Portland; and a rural station on Sauvie Island, located ~30km northwest of Portland in the Columbia River Gorge. Continuous measurements of CO2 at the sites average 400-410ppm and show considerable variability due to CO2 sources, sinks and meteorological drivers of ventilation. Within this variability, a marked 20-30ppm diurnal cycle is observed due to photosynthetic activity and variations in the planetary boundary layer. In-city CO2 concentrations are on average enhanced by 5-6ppm over the Sauvie Island site during upgorge wind conditions, a difference which is greatest in the afternoon. Measurements of the 13C/12C ratio of CO2 in downtown Portland are significantly depleted in 13C relative to 12C compared with background air and suggest that regional CO2 is dominated by petroleum sources (70-80%). High degrees of relationship between CO2 variability and primary air pollutants CO and NO (r2=0.70 to 0.80), measured by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality at the Southeast Portland location, corroborate this finding and illustrate the importance of traffic emissions on elevated ambient CO2 concentrations. In addition to CO2 at the fixed sites, measurements of street-level CO2 concentrations were obtained using a mobile instrument mounted in a bike trailer. Results from these field data show relatively homogenous CO2 concentrations throughout residential Portland neighborhoods with significant enhancements in CO2 on busy roadways or near areas of traffic congestion.

Bostrom, G. A.; Brooks, M.; Rice, A. L.

2010-12-01

85

Oregon State University Herbarium: Vascular Plants Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Representing the collections of the Oregon State University Herbarium, the Vascular Plants database "provides access to all known vascular plant holotypes (ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms) and isotypes..." all within three herbaria housed at Oregon State University, University of Oregon, and Willamette University. Although the Herbarium collections have a "strong emphasis on the state of Oregon and the Pacific Northwest" their scope is worldwide. The database search engine provides ten fields with pull-down menus including Genus, Species, Authority, County, and more. Furthermore, "searches can be conducted by both basionyms (the original published name) and current names (i.e., the most recent annotation of the type specimen)." Searchers can retrieve from 10 to 5,000 Records/Page. This site is also reviewed in the February 20, 2004 _NSDL Life Sciences Report_.

86

Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor during the year ending June 30, 1979, is summarized. Environmental and radiation protection data related to reactor operation and effluents are included. (ERA citation 05:000957)

T. V. Anderson A. G. Johnson S. L. Bennett J. C. Ringle

1979-01-01

87

Timber Resource Statistics for Central Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This publication summarizes the results of the third inventory of the timber resources of nine counties in central Oregon: Crook, Deschutes, Gilliam, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Sherman, Wasco, and Wheeler. This block of nine counties is one of 10 such bloc...

J. M. Berger

1968-01-01

88

Timber Resource Statistics for Eastern Oregon, 1999.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for eastern Oregon, which includes Baker, Crook, Deschutes, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, Wasco, and Wheeler Counties. Data were...

D. L. Azuma P. A. Dunham B. A. Hiserote C. F. Veneklase

2004-01-01

89

Oregon Salt Marshes: How Blue are They?  

EPA Science Inventory

Two important ecosystem services of wetlands are carbon sequestration and filtration of nutrients and particulates. We quantified the carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates in salt marshes at 135 plots distributed across eight estuaries located in Oregon, USA. Net carbon and ...

90

Post-High School Pursuits of Oregon's Highest Achieving Graduates, Class of 1979 and Post-High School Plans of Oregon's High School Class of 1980.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied the top 10 percent of the 1979 high school graduating seniors in Oregon. Reported patterns relating to post-high school activities, colleges attended, scholastic aptitude, post-high school plans, high school achievement, and greatest influence on post-high school plans. (RC)

Pizzo, J. Richard

1980-01-01

91

Organizing for Digitization at Oregon State University: A Case Study and Comparison with ARL Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a case study of how Oregon State University Libraries (OSUL) organized to accomplish digitization activities. Digitization activities are broken down into six major categories: management, copyright, digital imaging, metadata, hardware/software/web design, and selection. The OSUL departments responsible for tasks within each…

Boock, Michael

2008-01-01

92

Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

1989-09-01

93

1. General view of Oregon Electric Railway, view looking north ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. General view of Oregon Electric Railway, view looking north at Hedges Creek trestle. - Oregon Electric Railroad, Hedges Creek Trestle, Garden Home to Wilsonville Segment, Milepost 38.7, Garden Home, Washington County, OR

94

Developing an Oregon Access Management Best Practices Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Report reviews an Oregon research effort to develop an Oregon Access Management Best Practices Manual. In particular, this research effort develops a resource to help transportation professionals quantify safety and operational effects of various acc...

K. K. Dixon L. Brown R. Layton X. Yi

2013-01-01

95

75 FR 13252 - Oregon Coast Provincial Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Stimulus, Secure Rural Schools, BLM Update, Budget, Timber Sale Plan, Oregon Dunes Designated Routes, Rural Job Creation, 30-mile OHV Loop, Expansion of Oregon Dunes and Salmon River Estuary. [[Page 13253

2010-03-19

96

FIELD AND LABORATORY OPERATIONS REPORT FOR THE OREGON WETLANDS STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

The Oregon Wetlands Study (OWS) was designed to provide detailed characterizations of natural, created, and restored freshwater wetlands which is located in the urban environment of Portland, Oregon. his document discusses training the elementary, middle and high school teachers ...

97

Corrosion prevention of Oregon's reinforced coastal bridges  

SciTech Connect

The Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) maintains more than 120 coastal bridges; many are reinforced concrete structures over 15 m (50 ft) in length. Twelve of these bridges are historic structures. Oregon DOT is concerned about the ongoing deterioration of these bridges, rising maintenance and repair costs, and the need to protect Oregon’s large investment in coastal bridges. Over 80,000 m2 (850,000 ft2) of coastal bridge surface have been repaired and protected from further chloride-induced corrosion damage by using conductive coating anodes. Most of the anode area is thermal-sprayed (TS) Zn. Other anode materials include TS Ti, Zn-hydrogel, and conductive carbon paint. TS Zn anodes are estimated to have a service life exceeding 25 years but exhibit increasing anode polarization with age. Catalyzed TS Ti anodes develop no significant anode polarization and have exhibited stable long-term performance over 8 years of service. Galvanic Zn-hydrogel anodes produce a stable protection current with no evidence of aging effects over 6 years of service. The conductive carbon paint anode operates at a low anode current density and consumption rate with a low rate of acidification at the anode-concrete interface, which has contributed to a stable protection current over 17 years of service.

Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cryer. C.B (Oregon Dept. of Transportation, Salem, OR); Gallardo, M. L. (Oregon Dept. of Transportation, Salem, OR)

2004-06-01

98

Virtual Oregon: seamless access to distributed environmental information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Virtual Oregon is a new data coordination center established at Oregon State University (OSU) in order to: (1) archive environmental and other place-based data on Oregon and associated areas; (2) make those data accessible to a broad spectrum of agencies and individuals via innovative web interfaces; (3) identify key data sets that are not yet available and encourage their collection

Dylan Keon; Cherri M. Pancake; Dawn J. Wright

2002-01-01

99

Oregon geology - parent of the soil, foundation for the vine  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This presentation describes USGS geologic mapping in western Oregon, geologic map products, a thumbnail sketch of geologic history, a discussion of new mapping in progress in northwest Oregon, a tour of northwest Oregon geologic units, their relation to new American Viticultural Areas, and online sources of information.

Wells, Ray

2006-01-01

100

Lowering the Age of Identification: Oregon's Design and Preliminary Results.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This newsletter article describes early identification of children who have hearing impairments in Oregon. Oregon was selected to demonstrate a model system for early identification that had been developed in Utah. A new birth certificate was designed, which enabled the Oregon Health Division to screen for risk factors for hearing loss. A…

Josephson, Jean Attridge; Moore, William

1993-01-01

101

CY 73, Herbicide Use on the Siskiyou, Siuslaw, and Umpqua National Forests in Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The action involves the use of herbicides to reduce the volume of native vegetation where it hampers forest management activities in Oregon and California. Wildlife populations may increase as a result of the herbicide use. There is no proven instance on ...

1972-01-01

102

Fish Use of Intermittent Watercourses Draining Agricultural Lands in the Upper Willamette River Valley, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historically, the upper Willamette River valley in western Oregon was characterized by seasonal floods and large expansions of its stream network. During the past century, human activities have altered or eliminated many intermittent stream and floodplain habitats in the valley. As a result, the remaining intermittent streams and ditches, referred to as watercourses, may still provide habitat that is critical

Randall Colvin; Guillermo R. Giannico; Judith Li; Kathryn L. Boyer; William J. Gerth

2009-01-01

103

Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse: Fourth Annual Report. July 1, 1990-June 30, 1991.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report on the activities of the Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse during the time period between July 1, 1990, and June 30, 1991, begins with a summary of data on challenges against library materials reported to the clearinghouse during this time period. Details about each challenge reported by public libraries and school library…

Oregon State Library, Salem. Library Development Services.

104

Reading, Grade 8. Oregon Statewide Assessment, 1985.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the spring of 1985, the Oregon Department of Education conducted an assessment of eighth graders' skills in writing, reading, and mathematics. The state reading test consisted of two parts: the first designed to measure students' inferential and evaluative reading comprehension and selected study skills, the second designed to measure students'…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

105

Geothermal Research, Oregon Cascades: Final Technical Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on ...

G. R. Priest G. L. Black

1988-01-01

106

Oregon and Northern California Coastal Reconnaissance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Coastal reconnaissance during April and early May, 1970, in Oregon and northern California had the main objective of studyng marine erosional attack resulting from contrasts above and below the water table. Retreat of sea cliffs in the zone of aeration ab...

R. J. Russell

1970-01-01

107

Journalism at a Distance: The Oregon Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the distance education experience of the University of Oregon's School of Journalism and Communication during 1995. Describes the practical side of the process, and also discusses the political, economic, bureaucratic, and pedagogical implications of adopting and using a new educational technology. (SR)

Reis, Raul; Stavitsky, Alan G.; Gleason, Tim; Ryan, William

2000-01-01

108

40 CFR 81.425 - Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.425 Oregon. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land manager Crater Lake NP 160,290 57-121 USDA-NPS Diamond Peak Wild 36,637 88-577 USDA-FS Eagle Cap Wild...

2013-07-01

109

27 CFR 9.229 - Elkton Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Provisional Edition 1990; (2) Old Blue Quadrangle, Oregon-Douglas Co., Provisional...a straight line, crossing onto the Old Blue map, to the eastern-most intersection...with the R7W/R6W common line on Bell Ridge, along the section 1 east boundary...

2013-04-01

110

Metals Cluster Brief. Vocational Education in Oregon.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide sets forth minimum approval criteria for metals occupational clusters training programs in Oregon. The information in the guide is intended for use by district-level curriculum planners, teachers, regional coordinators, or state education department staff involved with new program development or revisions of existing programs. The guide…

Little, Ralph

111

Oregon Subduction Zone: Venting, Fauna, and Carbonates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transects of the submersible Alvin across rock outcrops in the Oregon subduction zone have furnished information on the structural and stratigraphic framework of this accretionary complex. Communities of clams and tube worms, and authigenic carbonate mineral precipitates, are associated with venting sites of cool fluids located on a fault-bend anticline at a water depth of 2036 meters. The distribution of

L. D. Kulm; E. Suess; J. C. Moore; B. Carson; B. T. Lewis; S. D. Ritger; D. C. Kadko; T. M. Thornburg; R. W. Embley; W. D. Rugh; G. J. Massoth; M. G. Langseth; G. R. Cochrane; R. L. Scamman

1986-01-01

112

Returning Home: The Oregon Transition Support Initiative.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the Oregon Transition Support Initiative, an ongoing research and implementation project that prevents recidivism by helping stakeholders help incarcerated youth return to their communities. Discusses the transition process as the working relationships that together accomplish the common goal of seeing that youth offenders learn the life…

Gilham, Cathy Ann; McArthur, Patrick

1999-01-01

113

Seaside, Oregon, Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of a pilot study to assess the risk from tsunamis for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon region will be presented. To determine the risk from tsunamis, it is first necessary to establish the hazard or probability that a tsunami of a particular magnitude will occur within a certain period of time. Tsunami inundation maps that provide 100-year and 500-year probabilistic

P. K. Dunbar; D. Dominey-Howes; J. Varner

2006-01-01

114

Comprehensive Health Plan for Lane County, Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A comprehensive health plan is presented for Lane County, located in western Oregon and bounded by the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Cascade Mountain Range on the east. Almost 70 percent of the population reside in the Eugene - Springfield metropolita...

1973-01-01

115

Foodservice Cluster Brief. [Vocational Education in Oregon.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide sets forth minimum approval criteria for vocational education food service training programs in Oregon. The information in the guide is intended for use by district-level curriculum planners, teachers, regional coordinators, or state education department staff involved with new program development or revisions of existing programs. The…

Goodwin, Pauline

116

Guiding RTI System Implementation: The Oregon Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author describes the factors that made their response to intervention (RTI) project in Oregon successful. Primarily, these include school-based factors such as the initial collective skill and knowledge in a district, the degree to which the foundations of a multi-tiered instructional model and data-based decision making are…

Putnam, David L., Jr.

2008-01-01

117

Oregon University System Fact Book 2012  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is produced every two years. The introduction includes a mission and vision statement, OUS Governance Change Move, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education, and Access and…

Oregon University System, 2013

2013-01-01

118

Oregon University System Fact Book 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is produced every two years. The introduction includes a mission and vision statement, OUS Governance Change Proposal, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education, and Access…

Oregon University System, 2011

2011-01-01

119

Oregon University System Fact Book 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is produced every two years. The introduction includes a mission and vision statement, strategic priorities, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education, OUS degree partnership…

Oregon University System, 2009

2009-01-01

120

Workplace Training Project, Eugene, Oregon. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Workplace Training Project began as a partnership between Lane Community College in Eugene, Oregon, and four area businesses. Their primary objective was to develop worksite-specific, learner-centered, competency-based workplace curricula in topics such as the following: basic math, fractions and measurement in the workplace, survival math for…

Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

121

Petroleum potential of north-central Oregon: an overview  

SciTech Connect

Except for a few erosional inliers, north-central Oregon is covered by a blanket of tertiary volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks which had a thick sequence of Cretaceous and Tertiary sedimentary rocks that have led previous investigators to draw negative conclusions regarding the petroleum potential of the region. Present in the prevolcanic sequence are all the prerequisites for petroleum generation and accumulation: source rocks, thermal maturity, reservoir rocks, seals, and traps. Organic-rich source rocks include marine mudstones of the Lower Cretaceous Mitchell Formation black shales and coals of the Paleocene-Eocene Herren Formation, and lacustrine shales and coals of the Eocene-Oligocene Clarno Formation. The Type II and III kerogens are thermally mature. Petroleum seeps and shows are further evidence that hydrocarbons have been generated. Potential reservoir rocks include proximal fan facies and turbidite sandstones of the Mitchell Formation, fluvial channel sandstones of the Herren Formation volcaniclastic sandstones and fractured flows and ignimbrites in the Clarno and John Day Formations, and scoriaceous and brecciated flows in the Columbia River Basalt. Tuffaceous claystones form excellent seals. Traps of several kinds are present including large untested domes and anticlines, abundant fault traps, and facies traps in the interfingering sand-shale sequences. Thus, despite abundant volcanic activity and periodically rejuvenated tectonic activity, north-central Oregon has the potential to yield large quantities of both oil and gas.

Fisk, L.H.

1987-08-01

122

Deep long-period earthquakes beneath Washington and Oregon volcanoes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Deep long-period (DLP) earthquakes are an enigmatic type of seismicity occurring near or beneath volcanoes. They are commonly associated with the presence of magma, and found in some cases to correlate with eruptive activity. To more thoroughly understand and characterize DLP occurrence near volcanoes in Washington and Oregon, we systematically searched the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) triggered earthquake catalog for DLPs occurring between 1980 (when PNSN began collecting digital data) and October 2009. Through our analysis we identified 60 DLPs beneath six Cascade volcanic centers. No DLPs were associated with volcanic activity, including the 1980-1986 and 2004-2008 eruptions at Mount St. Helens. More than half of the events occurred near Mount Baker, where the background flux of magmatic gases is greatest among Washington and Oregon volcanoes. The six volcanoes with DLPs (counts in parentheses) are Mount Baker (31), Glacier Peak (9), Mount Rainier (9), Mount St. Helens (9), Three Sisters (1), and Crater Lake (1). No DLPs were identified beneath Mount Adams, Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, or Newberry Volcano, although (except at Hood) that may be due in part to poorer network coverage. In cases where the DLPs do not occur directly beneath the volcanic edifice, the locations coincide with large structural faults that extend into the deep crust. Our observations suggest the occurrence of DLPs in these areas could represent fluid and/or magma transport along pre-existing tectonic structures in the middle crust. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

Nichols, M. L.; Malone, S. D.; Moran, S. C.; Thelen, W. A.; Vidale, J. E.

2011-01-01

123

Measurements of carbon dioxide in an Oregon metropolitan region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ambient concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) are reported for the Portland, Oregon (USA) metropolitan region for the late July through December, 2009 period. Three stationary locations were established: a downtown location on the campus of Portland State University; a residential site in southeast Portland; and a rural station on Sauvie Island, located ˜30 km northwest of Portland in the Columbia River Gorge. Continuous measurements of CO 2 at each site average 403-408 ppm and show considerable variability at each site (360-610 ppm) due to CO 2 sources, sinks and meteorological variability. Within this variability, a marked 20-30 ppm diurnal cycle is observed due to photosynthetic activity and variations in the planetary boundary layer. In-city CO 2 concentrations are on average enhanced by 5-6 ppm over the Sauvie Island site during upgorge wind conditions, a difference which is greatest in the afternoon. Measurements of the 13C/ 12C ratio of CO 2 in downtown Portland are significantly depleted in 13C relative to 12C compared with background air and suggest that regional CO 2 is dominated by petroleum sources (75-80%). High degrees of relationship between CO 2 variability and primary air pollutants CO and NO ( r2 = 0.80 and 0.77), measured by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality at the Southeast Portland location, corroborate this finding and illustrate the importance of traffic emissions on elevated ambient CO 2 concentrations.

Rice, Andrew; Bostrom, Gregory

2011-02-01

124

Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW\\/m² in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal

G. R. Priest; G. L. Black

1988-01-01

125

Resource Partitioning Among Woodpeckers in Northeastern Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eight species of woodpeckers coexist in conifer forests in northeastern Oregon: northern flicker (Colaptes auratus); yellow-bellied (Sphyrapicus varius) and Williamson's (S. thyroideus) sapsuckers; and pileated (Dryocopus pileatus), hairy (Picoides villosus), white-headed (P. albolarvatus), three-toed (P. tridactylus), and black-backed (P. arcticus) woodpeckers. Tree diameter was the most important factor considered in selection of nest trees by northern flickers, Williamson's sapsuckers, and

Evelyn L. Bull; Steven R. Peterson; Jack Ward Thomas

126

Oregon State University College of Atmospheric Sciences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Corvallis, Oregon, COAS is advancing the frontiers of knowledge of the ocean, atmosphere, and Earth system. COAS research explores the edge-the interfaces between ocean and atmosphere, ocean and ice, land and sea, land and air, and deep ocean and seafloor. Site includes information on faculty, student, current research, admissions, and much more. Education section includes lesson plans and information on the regional National Ocean Sciences Bowl competition.

127

Klamath-Blue Mountain lineament, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regional gravity data clearly show a zone of southwest-northeast lineations across Oregon that defines a major crustal lineament. Its existence is supported by geologic and geophysical data. Its correlation with the northwestern boundaries of the Klamath and Blue Mountain provinces suggests that these are continuous beneath the Cascade volcanic arc. The lineament may represent a pre-Tertiary strike-slip continental margin which,

Robin Riddihough; Carol Finn; Richard Couch

1986-01-01

128

Eruptive history of South Sister, Oregon Cascades  

USGS Publications Warehouse

South Sister is southernmost and highest of the Three Sisters, three geologically dissimilar stratovolcanoes that together form a spectacular 20km reach along the Cascade crest in Oregon. North Sister is a monotonously mafic edifice as old as middle Pleistocene, Middle Sister a basalt-andesite-dacite cone built between 48 and 14ka, and South Sister is a basalt-free edifice that alternated rhyolitic and intermediate modes from 50ka to 2ka (largely contemporaneous with Middle Sister). Detailed mapping, 330 chemical analyses, and 42 radioisotopic ages show that the oldest exposed South Sister lavas were initially rhyolitic ~50ka. By ~37ka, rhyolitic lava flows and domes (72-74% SiO2) began alternating with radially emplaced dacite (63-68% SiO2) and andesite (59-63% SiO2) lava flows. Construction of a broad cone of silicic andesite-dacite (61-64% SiO2) culminated ~30ka in a dominantly explosive sequence that began with crater-forming andesitic eruptions that left fragmental deposits at least 200m thick. This was followed at ~27ka by growth of a steeply dipping summit cone of agglutinate-dominated andesite (56-60.5% SiO2) and formation of a summit crater ~800m wide. This crater was soon filled and overtopped by a thick dacite lava flow and then by >150m of dacitic pyroclastic ejecta. Small-volume dacite lavas (63-67% SiO2) locally cap the pyroclastic pile. A final sheet of mafic agglutinate (54-56% SiO2) - the most mafic product of South Sister - erupted from and drapes the small (300-m-wide) present-day summit crater, ending a summit-building sequence that lasted until ~22ka. A 20kyr-long-hiatus was broken by rhyolite eruptions that produced (1) the Rock Mesa coulee, tephra, and satellite domelets (73.5% SiO2) and (2) the Devils Chain of ~20 domes and short coulees (72.3-72.8% SiO2) from N-S vent alignments on South Sister's flanks. The compositional reversal from mafic summit agglutinate to recent rhyolites epitomizes the frequently changing compositional modes of the South Sister locus throughout its lifetime. South Sister is part of a reach of the Cascades unusually active in the last 50kyr, characterized by high vent density, N-S vent alignments, and numerous eruptive units of true rhyolite (? 72% SiO2) that distinguishes it from much of the Quaternary Cascade arc; these are eruptive expressions of the complex confluence of arc and intraplate magmatic-tectonic regimes.

Fierstein, J.; Hildreth, W.; Calvert, A. T.

2011-01-01

129

Eruptive history of South Sister, Oregon Cascades  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

South Sister is southernmost and highest of the Three Sisters, three geologically dissimilar stratovolcanoes that together form a spectacular 20 km reach along the Cascade crest in Oregon. North Sister is a monotonously mafic edifice as old as middle Pleistocene, Middle Sister a basalt-andesite-dacite cone built between 48 and 14 ka, and South Sister is a basalt-free edifice that alternated rhyolitic and intermediate modes from 50 ka to 2 ka (largely contemporaneous with Middle Sister). Detailed mapping, 330 chemical analyses, and 42 radioisotopic ages show that the oldest exposed South Sister lavas were initially rhyolitic ~ 50 ka. By ~ 37 ka, rhyolitic lava flows and domes (72-74% SiO 2) began alternating with radially emplaced dacite (63-68% SiO 2) and andesite (59-63% SiO 2) lava flows. Construction of a broad cone of silicic andesite-dacite (61-64% SiO 2) culminated ~ 30 ka in a dominantly explosive sequence that began with crater-forming andesitic eruptions that left fragmental deposits at least 200 m thick. This was followed at ~ 27 ka by growth of a steeply dipping summit cone of agglutinate-dominated andesite (56-60.5% SiO 2) and formation of a summit crater ~ 800 m wide. This crater was soon filled and overtopped by a thick dacite lava flow and then by > 150 m of dacitic pyroclastic ejecta. Small-volume dacite lavas (63-67% SiO 2) locally cap the pyroclastic pile. A final sheet of mafic agglutinate (54-56% SiO 2) - the most mafic product of South Sister - erupted from and drapes the small (300-m-wide) present-day summit crater, ending a summit-building sequence that lasted until ~ 22 ka. A 20 kyr-long-hiatus was broken by rhyolite eruptions that produced (1) the Rock Mesa coulee, tephra, and satellite domelets (73.5% SiO 2) and (2) the Devils Chain of ~ 20 domes and short coulees (72.3-72.8% SiO 2) from N-S vent alignments on South Sister's flanks. The compositional reversal from mafic summit agglutinate to recent rhyolites epitomizes the frequently changing compositional modes of the South Sister locus throughout its lifetime. South Sister is part of a reach of the Cascades unusually active in the last 50 kyr, characterized by high vent density, N-S vent alignments, and numerous eruptive units of true rhyolite (? 72% SiO 2) that distinguishes it from much of the Quaternary Cascade arc; these are eruptive expressions of the complex confluence of arc and intraplate magmatic-tectonic regimes.

Fierstein, Judy; Hildreth, Wes; Calvert, Andrew T.

2011-10-01

130

76 FR 36146 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene...SUMMARY: The University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History has completed...remains may contact the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History....

2011-06-21

131

77 FR 51565 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Southern Oregon Historical Society, Medford, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and Siuslaw Indians of Oregon; Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon (previously listed as the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation); Coquille Tribe of Oregon; and the Quartz Valley Indian...

2012-08-24

132

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology Slides & Photographs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learning about the world of marine biology through a well-organized set of images can be quite revealing, and this digital collection from the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology is just right for the job. The collection includes over 7,000 images donated through the decades by faculty, students, visiting faculty, and those with "a passion for the local Coos Bay marine environment and the Oregon coast." The oldest items here date from the 1920s and visitors will find dramatic images of marine organisms, along with aerial shots of different marine environments, maps, and charts. The homepage has a section titled Browse, which allows users to look around via topic, subtopic, genus, and common names. The common names area is a great way to look around, as it offers over 200 different animal names, such as albacore tuna and Pacific oyster. Moving on, the natural views section boasts over 700 images, including dramatic shots of the Oregon coastline near Coos Head.

2012-07-04

133

Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

1988-10-27

134

Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)

Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01

135

Oregon State University: Linus Pauling and the Race for DNA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Housed in the archives of Special Collections at Oregon State University's Valley Library, this website narrates the "details of the pursuit of the discovery of the double helix structure of DNA." The story is told through the use of old photographs, video excerpts, audio clips, and more than 800 scanned documents. Linus Pauling (renowned chemist and winner of two Noble Prizes) is the central figure in the website's telling of the DNA story. The site contains three main sections: an illustrated narrative describing the primary actors and events involved in the discovery; a daily account of "Linus Pauling's personal and professional communications and activities for each day of the years 1952 and 1953"; and a collection of documents and other media that includes published papers, manuscripts, and more than 300 letters. The site also provides a Select Bibliography, a Chronological List of Documents, and links to other DNA-related sites.

136

Oregon`s forest products industry: 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of a survey of primary forest products industries in Oregon for 1994. The survey included the following sectors: lumber; veneer; pulp and board; shake and shingle; export; and post, pole, and piling. Tables, presented by sector and for the industry as a whole, include characteristics of the industry, nature and flow of logs consumed, and disposition of mill residues.

Ward, F.R.

1997-03-01

137

Oregon Coaches Background Survey. Background of Coaches in Oregon High Schools 1984-1985.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey questionnaire sought information on the background of paid coaches in Oregon high schools during 1984-85. Specific questions addressed coaches' teacher certification status, preparation for coaching, and training for athletic injury management. Additionally, the gender of the coach was identified. A secondary purpose of the study was to…

Sisley, Becky L.; Capel, Susan A.

138

Forest Grove High School, Forest Grove, Oregon. PLATO Evaluation Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forest Grove High School (FGHS) is a suburban school in Oregon that implemented an extensive remediation program to increase the mathematics scores of its learners taking the state-mandated competency examination, the Oregon Statewide Assessment Test (OSAT). Learners who failed at least two of the mathematics sections of the 1998 OSAT, taken when…

Sugar, William

139

The Oregon Death With Dignity Act: implementation issues.  

PubMed Central

Passage of the Oregon Death With Dignity Act in 1994 raises nationally relevant questions for health care organization, state agencies, and clinicians. As debate over physician-assisted suicide continues in the United States, the experiences in Oregon may offer insight into the clinical complexities of legalizing physician-assisted suicide.

Lee, M A

1997-01-01

140

Tensleep reservoir study, Oregon Basin Field, Wyoming: reservoir characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Engineers and geologists worked together to perform a reservoir study of the Tensleep at Oregon Basin. Oregon Basin Field, located in northwestern Wyoming, has produced over 122 million barrels of Tensleep oil. Layers of non-reservoir material separate the Tensleep into zones that perform as discrete reservoirs. Some zones have been completely eroded in portions of the field by post-Tensleep streams.

J. T. Morgan; F. S. Cordiner; A. R. Livingston

1976-01-01

141

The Whiz Kid: Terry Reese--Oregon State University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We should be grateful that Terry Reese had to work his way through college. As a work-study student, taught to do cartographic cataloging in the University, of Oregon's map library, he discovered the mental challenges libraries offered. Later he became Oregon State University (OSU)'s cataloger for networked resources and digital unit production…

Library Journal, 2005

2005-01-01

142

Oregon's Quality Education Model: Linking Adequacy and Outcomes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes development of the Oregon Quality Education model, an adequacy-funding model. Explores the rationale behind its development as well as the political and economic realities policymakers face in attempting to determine how much money Oregon's schools would need to meet state education reform goals and provide a quality education to all…

Conley, David T.; Picus, Lawrence O.

2003-01-01

143

Selected Collective Bargaining Agreements of Oregon Two-Year Colleges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twelve collective bargaining agreements between selected community colleges in Oregon and their respective faculty associations are presented, representing contracts in effect in 1987. Contracts for the following colleges are provided: Blue Mountain Community College, Central Oregon Community College, Chemeketa Community College, Clackamas…

National Education Association, Washington, DC.

144

Oregon's High School Dropouts: Examining the Economic and Social Costs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This analysis presents the public costs of high school dropouts in Oregon. It examines how dropouts in the state dramatically impact state finances through reduced tax revenues, increased Medicaid costs, and high incarceration rates. This study describes how much high school dropouts cost Oregon's tax-payers each year, and how much could be saved…

House, Emily Anne

2010-01-01

145

33 CFR 110.228 - Columbia River, Oregon and Washington.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Columbia River, Oregon and Washington. 110.228...Anchorage Grounds § 110.228 Columbia River, Oregon and Washington. (a) Anchorage...Anchorage. The waters of the Columbia River bounded by a line connecting the...

2013-07-01

146

Oregon Pre-Engineering Learning Outcomes Study: Final Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oregon Pre-engineering Learning Outcomes Project was conducted by the Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC) with grant funding from the Engineering and Technology Industry Council (ETIC). The study sought to improve student preparation and success in pre-engineering programs through the development of the Oregon Pre-engineering Learning…

Conley, David T.; Langan, Holly; Veach, Darya; Farkas, Virginia

2007-01-01

147

Hydrogeological modeling of porous flow in the Oregon accretionary prism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Venting of pore fluid was recently reported near the front of the Oregon accretionary prism and was directly measured at one of the venting sites during Alvin dives. In this study, we model the flow of pore fluid in the Oregon accretionary prism. We use seismic reflection sections to constrain subsurface structures, drill-hole results from Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg

Yaolin Shi; Chi-Yuen Wang; Win-Tsuang Hwang; Roland von Huene

1989-01-01

148

Strategic Plan of the Oregon Community Colleges for Distance Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed jointly by Oregon's 17 community college presidents and the state Office of Community College Services, this strategic plan is designed to establish a common vision, define strategic directions, and identify implementation strategies for the coordinated delivery of distance learning (DL) services throughout Oregon's community colleges.…

Baker, Ron

149

The Role of Earth Science in Oregon’s Tsunami Preparedness (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earth science played a critical role in understanding the scope of Oregon’s tsunami hazard. When in the early 1990’s earth scientists communicated to stakeholders the seriousness of the threat posed by local Cascadia subduction zone tsunamis, tsunami preparedness began to rise in priority at all levels of government. Hard field evidence in the form of prehistoric tsunami deposits was a critical component in making the hazard “real” to local governments. State-produced tsunami inundation maps derived from numerical simulations gave decision makers and educators reliable tools to illustrate the spatial scope of the hazard. These maps allowed local cities to plan for evacuation and empowered the State of Oregon to begin “hard” mitigation by limiting new construction of critical facilities seaward of a regulatory inundation line. “Entering” and “Leaving” tsunami hazard zone signs were placed along the Oregon Coast Highway where it dips below this inundation line as means of raising awareness of both the local and transient populations. When detailed inundation studies and derivative evacuation maps were produced for individual communities, State scientists sought advice from local officials at every stage, giving them ownership of the final products. This sense of ownership gave decision makers much greater confidence in the maps and turned many skeptics into passionate advocates. This network of advocates has, over time, resulted in local jurisdictions taking substantive preparedness actions such as replacing critical evacuation bridges, starting networks of emergency response volunteers, and moving critical structures like schools and fire stations. One place that earth science has some difficulty is in communicating probability and uncertainty. For example, the State of Oregon is currently producing new maps that depict uncertainty of tsunami flooding from a future Cascadia subduction zone earthquake. These maps show a range of inundation lines that reflect the relative confidence level (percentage) that a local Cascadia tsunami will NOT exceed each line. In the first of these studies at Cannon Beach, Oregon (Priest et al., 2009) the 90th percentile flood level was only about half to two-thirds as high as the 99th percentile. On the northern Oregon coast Cascadia recurrence is ~500 years, so a percentile map depicts spatial uncertainty of inundation for that event. A Cascadia tsunami approximating the 99th percentile confidence level is no doubt a rare event, but how rare we really do not know. We suspect from offshore turbidite data that only one of these extreme events may have occurred in the last 10,000 years. When the map and underlying data were presented to local officials, they had some difficulty in understanding how to use the information. Erring on the side of caution, they chose the 99th percentile line for evacuation planning but this decision greatly limited available evacuation sites. Cost may make a similarly conservative decision inappropriate for use in building codes or for design of vertical evacuation structures. REFERENCE Priest, G.R.; Goldfinger C.; Wang, K.; Witter, R.C.; Zhang; Y., Baptista, A.M. (2009) Tsunami hazard assessment of the Northern Oregon coast: a multi-deterministic approach tested at Cannon Beach, Clatsop County, Oregon. Oregon Dept. Geol. Mineral Industries Special Paper 41.

Priest, G. R.

2009-12-01

150

Geothermal Gradients in Oregon, 1985-1994  

SciTech Connect

This data set is comprised of three groups of temperature-depth data. All the sites are located in southeastern Oregon. The first is a set of 7 wells logged during 1993 in south central Oregon in the Basin and Range province. All these wells, with the exception of the Blue Mountain Oil well, are water wells. These wells were part of a geothermal reconnaissance of this area. The Blue Mountain oil well of this set has been described by Sass et al. (1971) as well. Gannet in the vicinity of the Vale, Oregon (Bowen and Blackwell, 1972; Blackwell et al., 1978) geothermal system in Malheur County. These wells were logged in 1986 during a study of the area described by Gannett (1988). There are 17 wells (plus one relog) in this data set. All these wells are in a small area just east of the town of Vale in Malheur County. The second set of data consists of a group of wells that were logged by Marshall The third set of data represents the results of an exploration project in the general area of the Lake Owyhee thermal area in Malheur County. This data set is comprised of 16 wells. This data set was collected by Hunt Energy Corporation and made available though the efforts of Roger Bowers. A small scale map of the locations of the wells is shown in Figure 1. The well location and some pertinent information about the wells is shown in Table 1. The detailed lists of temperature-depth data and plots for each well, either individually or with a group, follow the list of references cited.

Blackwell, D.D.

1995-01-01

151

A Forest Vegetation Database for Western Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Data on forest vegetation in western Oregon were assembled for 2323 ecological survey plots. All data were from fixed-radius plots with the standardized design of the Current Vegetation Survey (CVS) initiated in the early 1990s. For each site, the database includes: 1) live tree density and basal area of common tree species, 2) total live tree density, basal area, estimated biomass, and estimated leaf area; 3) age of the oldest overstory tree examined, 4) geographic coordinates, 5) elevation, 6) interpolated climate variables, and 7) other site variables. The data are ideal for ecoregional analyses of existing vegetation.

Busing, Richard T.

2004-01-01

152

Dental pathology of prehistoric residents of Oregon.  

PubMed

Dentitions of 208 prehistoric skeletal specimens from five geographic regions of Oregon were studied to describe their dental status. Comparisons were made of the incidence of specific pathologies among regions and between jaws. Maxillary premortem tooth losses were significantly higher than mandibular tooth loss. A relatively high caries incidence occurs in samples from the Willamette Valley and Klamath Basin, where plant foods were used aboriginally to a significant extent. A high frequency of abscesses was recorded in the Klamath Basin and the Lower Columbia River sample, which also showed the highest levels of attrition. Each of the five subsamples shows patterns of dental pathology consistent with former use of natural resources. PMID:3518480

Hall, R L; Morrow, R; Clarke, J H

1986-03-01

153

Is Portland, Oregon Experiencing Global Warming?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Weather involves the daily fluctuations in temperature, humidity, clouds, winds, etc. By contrast, climate is the long term weather patterns in a region. Therefore, to assess changes in climate, one has to look at average changes over long periods of time. Students will use long wave radiation data to determine whether the climate has changed in Portland, Oregon over a 20 year time span. They will learn the difference between climate and weather and discover that temperature and radiation changes vary on our planet.

154

Seabird Monitoring and Response to Independence Day Fireworks Displays at Two Locations within Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oregon supports 1.3 million seabirds of fifteen species, with 393 breeding colonies distributed along all parts of the coast. The majority of colony sites are located within Oregon Islands and Three Arch Rocks National Wildlife Refuges (NWR), which are de...

D. B. Ledig R. W. Lowe S. W. Stephensen W. T. Bridgeland

2012-01-01

155

Stronger Youth and Smarter Communities: An Analysis of Oregon’s Investment in Runaway and Homeless Youth Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oregon Runaway and Homeless Workgroup estimates that 24,000 unaccompanied youth experience homelessness each year in Oregon. National studies indicate that most of these youth run away due to family conflict or abuse, while others are kicked out of their home or \\

Katherine Cahn; Don Schweitzer; Ally Jamieson; Hannah Slevin

2009-01-01

156

77 FR 62442 - Safety Zone; Oregon City Bridge Grand Opening Fireworks Display; Willamette River, Oregon City, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...USCG-2012-0805] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Oregon City Bridge Grand Opening Fireworks Display; Willamette River...on the Willamette River between the Oregon City Bridge and the Interstate 205 Bridge on October 13, 2012 from 7:30 p.m....

2012-10-15

157

Implications of Floodplain Isolation and Connectivity on the Conservation of an Endangered Minnow, Oregon Chub, in the Willamette River, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution and abundance of endangered Oregon chub Oregonichthys crameri, a small floodplain minnow endemic to the Wil- lamette Valley of western Oregon; to describe the fish communities in current and historic chub habitats; and to establish new populations through introductions. Various sampling gears were used, including seines, minnow traps, dip nets,

Paul D. Scheerer

2002-01-01

158

Articulation Problems of the Japanese Language Programs between High Schools in Oregon and the University of Oregon.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of high school Japanese language programs (JLPs) in Oregon has been remarkable since the 1980s. However, high school students educated in Japanese face problems of articulation as they enter the JLP at the University of Oregon. Because little attention has been paid to the problem of articulation, a study of these students'…

Toriyama, Kyoko

159

Hydrocarbon exploration in Western Oregon and Washington  

SciTech Connect

Continuing development of the Mist gas field and stepout discovery wells affirm the hydrocarbon prospectivity of western Oregon and Washington. Reservoir sandstones in the Mist area are in the Cowlitz Formation of middle to late Eocene age. Reservoir-quality sandstones have average porosities of 25% and average permeabilities of 200 md. The reservoir sands are wellsorted feldspathic-quartzose sandstones and are less susceptible to diagenetically formed pore-filling authigenic minerals than are the more lithic sandstones of other horizons and less well-sorted depositional environments. Potential hydrocarbon source rocks consist of marine shale to coaly facies. Organic matter is predominately terrestrially derived. Mist gas field pools are small and have variable gas types, suggesting to some workers that the gas is generated from rocks immediately adjacent to the reservoir. Gas wetness and delta/sup 13/C values indicate that gas from the Bruer, Flora, and Newton pools is probably thermally generated. Shales encasing the Mist gas field sandstone reservoirs are thermally immature, having vitrinite reflectance values less than 0.4%. Thermal gas most likely would have been generated downdip within nearby depocenters and migrated into the reservoir. The integration of paleogeographic models for mineralogic provenance, well-sorted sand accumulation, and thermal maturation within Cenozoic depocenters provides an exploration strategy for defining areas of highest hydrocarbon potential in western Oregon and Washington.

Armentrout, J.M.; Suek, D.H.

1985-04-01

160

Career Exploration/Industrial Arts (Student Managed Learning). An Adopter's Guide Referenced in "Promising Practices in Oregon Education, 1975."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Career Exploration/Industrial Arts program guide is based on experiences at two Oregon junior high schools. The program is unique in two respects: the learning is student-managed and the facility is a general open shop in which students plan and develop projects in a variety of activity areas. Student management consists of a notebook kept by…

Fairbanks, Dwight W.

161

COMPONENTS OF SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE CONNECTIVITY IN A LARGE OREGON (USA) RIVER--WHAT CAN BE RESTORED?  

EPA Science Inventory

We conducted research on the Willamette River in western Oregon (USA) to determine the ecological functions of off-channel habitats (OCH). OCHs have declined in our 70 km study reach of the active floodplain since European settlement. Surface and subsurface connectivity between...

162

The stratigraphy, depositional processes, and environment of the late Pleistocene Polallie-period deposits at Mount Hood Volcano, Oregon, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Polallie eruptive period of Mt. Hood, Oregon, is the last major episode of eruption and dome growth, before the late Holocene activity which was centered at Crater Rock. A volume of 4–8 km3 of Polallie deposits forms an apron of ca. 60 km2 on the east, northeast and southeast flanks. The Polallie deposits can be divided, stratigraphically, into four

Jean-Claude Thouret

2005-01-01

163

Oregon Trail Mushrooms geothermal loan guaranty application, Malheur County, Oregon: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The action assessed is the guaranty of a loan by the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to finance the construction and operation of a mushroom-growing facility that will use geothermal (hot) water for process and space heat. The project consists of two separate facilities: a growing facility located just outside of the eastern limit of the city of Vale, Oregon (Malheur County, Oregon) and a composting facility located about 6.4 km (4 miles) southwest of the city limits (also in Malheur County, Oregon). Five test wells have been drilled into the geothermal resource at the growing site. Either well No. 4 or well No. 5 will serve as a production well. All geothermal fluids will be reinjected into the geothermal aquifer, so either well No. 3 will be used for this purpose, wells Nos. 1 and 2 will be deepened, or a new well will be drilled on the site. A cold-water well will be drilled at the growing site, and another will be drilled at the composting site. The environmental effects of the proposed project are not expected to be significant.

Not Available

1981-05-01

164

Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Point of Entry/Point of Use Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Oregon Institute of Technology at Klamath Falls, OR - Final Performance Evaluation Report  

EPA Science Inventory

This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) at Klamath Falls, OR. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness...

165

MOUNT HOOD WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, OREGON.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, was conducted. Geochemical data indicate two areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential containing weak epithermal mineralization: an area of the north side of Zigzag Mountain where vein-type lead-zinc-silver deposits occur and an area of the south side of Zigzag Mountain, where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has propylitic alteration associated with mineralization of copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc in discontinuous veins. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248 degree F) hot-water systems in the wilderness is probable in these areas. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), which is considered to have probable geothermal-resource potential, and two parts of the wilderness have been included in geothermal lease areas.

Keith, T. E. C.; Causey, J. D.

1984-01-01

166

Ospreys in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From early April through September each year, famous residents grace the small western town of Corvallis, Oregon. Two ospreys have become mascots of the town since the pair's arrival in 1994. Their nest, built on a 90-foot power pole near the twin bridges over the Willamette River, could be seen by many commuters on their way in and out of town. After the 2002 nesting season, the nest was moved a short distance downriver to a constructed nesting platform because sticks sometimes dropped from the huge nest onto power lines below and caused power outages. At the new location, the pair can once again raise a family of young, their general well being monitored by the 50,000 residents of the community.

Henny, Charles J.; Kaiser, James L.; Grove, Robert A.

2002-01-01

167

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) is concerned with much more than fish and wildlife, and their website provides a cornucopia of material on conservation, wildlife management, and recreation opportunities. On the homepage, visitors can use the menu on the left-hand of the site to learn about ten different subjects, including materials for hunters, potential volunteers, and fishing enthusiasts. Visitors looking to experience a bit of the flavor of the state may wish to start by clicking on the "Photo and Video Gallery". Here they will find images taken by ODFW employees, along with video clips, such as "How-to-Demonstrations" and news reports. Scientists and policy types may wish to click on over to the "Conservation Strategy" area, as they can view the department's overall strategy, along with "Hot Topics" features on gray wolves and invasive species.

168

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Klamath Falls Quadrangle, Oregon and California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Klamath Falls Quadrangle, Oregon, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits according to criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Surface radiometric reconnaissance and geochemical sampling we...

S. B. Castor M. R. Berry J. W. Robins

1982-01-01

169

Identification of the Role of the Physician's Assistant in Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The results of a survey on the role of physician's assistants in the State of Oregon are presented. The survey consisted of the administration of three questionnaires. In the results of the third questionnaire, summarized reasons are given by respondents ...

1973-01-01

170

ALTERNATIVE FUTURES FOR THE WILLAMETTE RIVER BASIN, OREGON  

EPA Science Inventory

Alternative futures analysis is an assessment approach designed to inform community decisions regarding land and water use. We conducted an alternative futures analysis in the Willamette River Basin in western Oregon. Based on detailed input from local stakeholders, three alter...

171

Oregon's Contribution to Career Information Delivery 1972-1987.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Career Information System consortium in Oregon was structured so that all interested agencies could obtain relevant products and services while providing an equitable level of support consistent with their own budgets. (JOW)

McKinlay, Bruce

1988-01-01

172

Scientists Explore Large Gas Hydrate Field off Oregon Coast  

NSF Publications Database

... Oregon Coast Details emerge of possible new energy source Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) scientists ... may eventually serve as a major new worldwide energy source. Among the most surprising findings of ...

173

RESEARCH PLAN AND METHODS MANUAL FOR THE OREGON WETLANDS STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

The goals of the Oregon Wetlands Study are to develop a monitoring method for characterizing and comparing natural and project freshwater, emergent wetlands in different land use settings, and to obtain information that will improve wetland management strategies employing restora...

174

Technology Demonstration Summary, Chemfix Solidification/Stabilization Process, Clackamas, Oregon  

EPA Science Inventory

ChemfIx's* patented stabilization/solidification technology was demonstrated at the Portable Equipment Salvage Company (PESC) site in Clackamas, Oregon, as part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The Chemfix process is designed to solidify and sta...

175

COMMUNITY AND URBAN FORESTRY IN WASHINGTON AND OREGON1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Federal and state government involvement in community and urban forestry in Washington and Oregon plays a key role in initiating urban forestry programs. An analysis of case studies throughout the area reveals that even without all the components of the \\

N. Robin Morgan

1989-01-01

176

Plant Associations of the Central Oregon Pumice Zone.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This publication identifies and describes the natural occurring plant associations within the central Oregon pumice deposition zone. A dichotomous vegetation-site key is provided toward the front of the publication to assist administrators and field perso...

L. A. Volland

1985-01-01

177

Comparison of Nutrient Drivers and Response Metrics in Oregon Estuaries  

EPA Science Inventory

With the goal of assessing sensitivity to nutrient enrichment, we present a cross-estuary comparison of nutrient sources, levels, and biological responses (phytoplankton and macroalgae) for thirteen Oregon estuaries. Nitrogen levels in the upstream portions of the estuaries are ...

178

INTERIOR RADIO BEACON ROOM, LOOKING NORTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR RADIO BEACON ROOM, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

179

Oregon Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report, FY 2003.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2003, Oregons Center for Water and Environmental Sustainability (CWESt) focused efforts on three programs: (1) The Water Resources Program administers interdisciplinary and multi-agency watershed education and water resources research programs in Orego...

2003-01-01

180

American Fisheries Society, Oregon Chapter: Annual Meeting and Symposium.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document contains the abstracts of papers presented at the Oregon Chapter of the American Fisheries Society. Topics included: land and water use, professional ethics, fishery management issues, hatchery problems, fish diseases, fish behavior, and asp...

1989-01-01

181

CONTROLS ON WATER CHEMISTRY OF AN OREGON COAST RANGE STREAM  

EPA Science Inventory

Numerous factors may control losses of dissolved nutrients from forested basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Potentially important factors include forest composition, stand age, forest management, grazing, agriculture, sewage inputs and bedrock types, as well as others perhaps not...

182

Estimating Flow-Duration and Low-Flow Frequency Statistics for Unregulated Streams in Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flow statistical datasets, basin-characteristic datasets, and regression equations were developed to provide decision makers with surface-water information needed for activities such as water-quality regulation, water-rights adjudication, biological habitat assessment, infrastructure design, and water-supply planning and management. The flow statistics, which included annual and monthly period of record flow durations (5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, and 95th percent exceedances) and annual and monthly 7-day, 10-year (7Q10) and 7-day, 2-year (7Q2) low flows, were computed at 466 streamflow-gaging stations at sites with unregulated flow conditions throughout Oregon and adjacent areas of neighboring States. Regression equations, created from the flow statistics and basin characteristics of the stations, can be used to estimate flow statistics at ungaged stream sites in Oregon. The study area was divided into 10 regression modeling regions based on ecological, topographic, geologic, hydrologic, and climatic criteria. In total, 910 annual and monthly regression equations were created to predict the 7 flow statistics in the 10 regions. Equations to predict the five flow-duration exceedance percentages and the two low-flow frequency statistics were created with Ordinary Least Squares and Generalized Least Squares regression, respectively. The standard errors of estimate of the equations created to predict the 5th and 95th percent exceedances had medians of 42.4 and 64.4 percent, respectively. The standard errors of prediction of the equations created to predict the 7Q2 and 7Q10 low-flow statistics had medians of 51.7 and 61.2 percent, respectively. Standard errors for regression equations for sites in western Oregon were smaller than those in eastern Oregon partly because of a greater density of available streamflow-gaging stations in western Oregon than eastern Oregon. High-flow regression equations (such as the 5th and 10th percent exceedances) also generally were more accurate than the low-flow regression equations (such as the 95th percent exceedance and 7Q10 low-flow statistic). The regression equations predict unregulated flow conditions in Oregon. Flow estimates need to be adjusted if they are used at ungaged sites that are regulated by reservoirs or affected by water-supply and agricultural withdrawals if actual flow conditions are of interest. The regression equations are installed in the USGS StreamStats Web-based tool (http://water.usgs.gov/osw/streamstats/index.html, accessed July 16, 2008). StreamStats provides users with a set of annual and monthly flow-duration and low-flow frequency estimates for ungaged sites in Oregon in addition to the basin characteristics for the sites. Prediction intervals at the 90-percent confidence level also are automatically computed.

Risley, John; Stonewall, Adam; Haluska, Tana

2008-01-01

183

78 FR 36243 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR AGENCY: National Park Service...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, in consultation with the appropriate...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History. If no additional claimants come...

2013-06-17

184

75 FR 21289 - Oregon Wave Energy Partners I, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Project No. 12749-002] Oregon Wave Energy Partners I, LLC; Notice of Preliminary...2010. On March 2, 2010, Oregon Wave Energy Partners I, LLC filed an application...Charles F. Dunleavy, Oregon Wave Energy Partners I, LLC, 1590 Reed...

2010-04-23

185

Statistical summaries of streamflow data in Oregon; Volume 1, Eastern Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Statistical summaries of streamflow data at 335 streamgaging sites are presented in this two volume report to aid in appraising the hydrology of river basins in Oregon. Records for 31 gaging stations were compiled into separate periods owing to changes in regulation during the period of data collection. The periods before and after regulation are presented for comparison. A brief station description is given describing the physical and operational features for each gaging station. Following the station description are tables of monthly and annual flow statistics, flood frequency data, low-flow and high-flow frequency data, and flow-duration information. (USGS)

Friday, John; Miller, S. J.

1984-01-01

186

Geologic evidence for a magma chamber beneath Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

At Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, more than 0.5 m.y. of magmatic activity, including caldera collapse and renewed caldera-filling volcanism, has created a structural and thermal chimney that channels magma ascent. Holocene rhyolitic eruptions (1) have been confined mainly within the caldera in an area 5 km in diameter, (2) have been very similar in chemical composition, phenocryst mineralogy, and eruptive style, and (3) have occurred as recently as 1300 years ago, with repose periods of 2000--3000 years between eruptions. Holocene basaltic andesite eruptions are widespread on the flanks but are excluded from the area of rhyolitic volcanism. Basaltic andesite in fissures at the edge of the rhyolite area has silicic inclusions and shows mixed basalt-rhyolite magma relations. These geologic relations and the high geothermal gradient that characterizes the lower part of a drill hole in the caldera (U.S. Geological Survey Newberry 2) indicate that a rhyolitic magma chamber has existed beneath the caldera throughout the Holocene. Its longevity probably is a result of intermittent underplating by basaltic magma.

Macleod, N.S.; Sherrod, D.R.

1988-09-10

187

Geologic evidence for a magma chamber beneath Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

At Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, more than 0.5 my of magmatic activity, including caldera collapse and renewed caldera-filling volcanism, has created a structural and thermal chimney that channels magma ascent. Holocene rhyolitic eruptions 1) have been confined mainly within the caldera in an area 5 km in diameter, 2) have been very similar in chemical composition, phenocryst mineralogy, and eruptive style, and 3) have occurred as recently as 1300 yr ago, with repose periods of 2000-3000 yr between eruptions. Holocene basaltic andesite eruptions are widespread on the flanks but are excluded from the area of rhyolitic volcanism. Basaltic andesite in fissures at the edge of the rhyolite area has silicic inclusions and shows mixed basalt-rhyolite magma relations. These geologic relations and the high geothermal gradient that characterizes the lower part of a drill hole in the caldera (US Geological Survey Newberry 2) indicate that a rhyolitic magma chamber has existed beneath the caldera throughout the Holocene. Its longevity probably is a result of intermittent underplating by basaltic magma. -Authors

Macleod, N. S.; Sherrod, D. R.

1988-01-01

188

Digital Data for Volcano Hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon, the product of thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service, includes the caldera and extends to the Deschutes River. Newberry volcano is quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. The report USGS Open-File Report 97-513 (Sherrod and others, 1997) describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. When Newberry volcano becomes restless, the eruptive scenarios described herein can inform planners, emergency response personnel, and citizens about the kinds and sizes of events to expect. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layers used to produce the Newberry volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-513 are included in this data set. Scientists at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory created a GIS data layer to depict zones subject to the effects of an explosive pyroclastic eruption (tephra fallout, pyroclastic flows, and ballistics), lava flows, volcanic gasses, and lahars/floods in Paulina Creek. A separate GIS data layer depicts drill holes on the flanks of Newberry Volcano that were used to estimate the probability of coverage by future lava flows.

Schilling, S. P.; Doelger, S.; Sherrod, D. R.; Mastin, L. G.; Scott, W. E.

2008-01-01

189

Gravity model studies of Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Newberry Volcano, a large Quaternary volcano located about 60 km east of the axis of the High Cascades volcanoes in central Oregon, has a coincident positive residual gravity anomaly of about 12 mGals. Model calculations of the gravity anomaly field suggest that the volcano is underlain by an intrusive complex of mafic composition of about 20-km diameter and 2-km thickness, at depths above 4 km below sea level. However, uplifted basement in a northwest trending ridge may form part of the underlying excess mass, thus reducing the volume of the subvolcanic intrusive. A ring dike of mafic composition is inferred to intrude to near-surface levels along the caldera ring fractures, and low-density fill of the caldera floor probably has a thickness of 0.7-0.9 km. The gravity anomaly attributable to the volcano is reduced to the east across a north-northwest trending gravity anomaly gradient through Newberry caldera and suggests that normal, perhaps extensional, faulting has occurred subsequent to caldera formation and may have controlled the location of some late-stage basaltic and rhyolitic eruptions. Significant amounts of felsic intrusive material may exist above the mafic intrusive zone but cannot be resolved by the gravity data. -Authors

Gettings, M. E.; Griscom, A.

1988-01-01

190

Electrical structure of Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From the interpretation of magnetotelluric, transient electromagnetic, and Schlumberger resistivity soundings, the electrical structure of Newberry Volcano in central Oregon is found to consist of four units. From the surface downward, the geoelectrical units are 1) very resistive, young, unaltered volcanic rock, (2) a conductive layer of older volcanic material composed of altered tuffs, 3) a thick resistive layer thought to be in part intrusive rocks, and 4) a lower-crustal conductor. This model is similar to the regional geoelectrical structure found throughout the Cascade Range. Inside the caldera, the conductive second layer corresponds to the steep temperature gradient and alteration minerals observed in the USGS Newberry 2 test-hole. Drill hole information on the south and north flanks of the volcano (test holes GEO N-1 and GEO N-3, respectively) indicates that outside the caldera the conductor is due to alteration minerals (primarily smectite) and not high-temperature pore fluids. On the flanks of Newberry the conductor is generally deeper than inside the caldera, and it deepens with distance from the summit. A notable exception to this pattern is seen just west of the caldera rim, where the conductive zone is shallower than at other flank locations. The volcano sits atop a rise in the resistive layer, interpreted to be due to intrusive rocks. -from Authors

Fitterman, D. V.; Stanley, W. D.; Bisdorf, R. J.

1988-01-01

191

Development of a Bird Integrity Index: measuring avian response to disturbance in the Blue Mountains of Oregon, USA.  

PubMed

The Bird Integrity Index (BII) presented here uses bird assemblage information to assess human impacts to 28 stream reaches in the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon. Eighty-one candidate metrics were extracted from bird survey data for testing. The metrics represented aspects of bird taxonomic richness, tolerance or intolerance to human disturbance, dietary preferences, foraging techniques, and nesting strategies that were expected to be positively or negatively affected by human activities in the region. To evaluate the responsiveness of each metric, it was plotted against an index of reach and watershed disturbance that included attributes of land use/land cover, road density, riparian cover, mining impacts, and percent area in clearcut and partial-cut logging. Nine of the 81 candidate bird metrics remained after eliminating unresponsive and highly correlated metrics. Individual metric scores ranged from 0 to 10, and BII scores varied between 0 and 100. BII scores varied from 78.6 for a minimally disturbed, reference stream reach to 30.4 for the most highly disturbed stream reach. The BII responded clearly to varying riparian conditions and to the cumulative effects of disturbances, such as logging, grazing, and mining, which are common in the mountains of eastern Oregon. This BII for eastern Oregon was compared to an earlier BII developed for the agricultural and urban disturbance regime of the Willamette Valley in western Oregon. The BII presented here was sensitive enough to distinguish differences in condition among stream riparian zones with disturbances that were not as obvious or irreversible as those in the agricultural/urban conditions of western Oregon. PMID:16738817

Bryce, Sandra A

2006-09-01

192

Pygmy Rabbit Surveys on State Lands in Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction The pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis) is classified by the federal government as a species of concern (i.e., under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for consideration as a candidate for listing as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act) because of its specialized habitat requirements and evidence of declining populations. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) lists pygmy rabbits as 'sensitive-vulnerable,' meaning that protective measures are needed if sustainable populations are to be maintained over time (Oregon Natural Heritage Program, 2001). The Oregon Natural Heritage Program considers this species to be threatened with extirpation from Oregon. Pygmy rabbits also are a species of concern in all the other states where they occur (NatureServe, 2004). The Washington population, known as the Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit, was listed as endangered by the federal government in 2003. Historically, pygmy rabbits have been collected from Deschutes, Klamath, Crook, Lake, Grant, Harney, Baker, and Malheur Counties in Oregon. However, the geographic range of pygmy rabbit in Oregon may have decreased in historic times (Verts and Carraway, 1998), and boundaries of the current distribution are not known. Not all potentially suitable sites appear to be occupied, and populations are susceptible to rapid declines and local extirpation (Weiss and Verts, 1984). In order to protect and manage remaining populations on State of Oregon lands, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife needs to identify areas currently occupied by pygmy rabbits, as well as suitable habitats. The main objective of this survey was document to presence or absence of pygmy rabbits on state lands in Malheur, Harney, Lake, and Deschutes counties. Knowledge of the location and extent of pygmy rabbit populations can provide a foundation for the conservation and management of this species in Oregon. The pygmy rabbit is just one of a suite of species of concern associated with sagebrush habitats in the Great Basin. Because information on habitat and distribution of many species is scarce, a secondary goal of the rabbit surveys was to list all other vertebrate species encountered on surveyed sites. This information may be useful in directing future studies aimed at specific taxa.

Hagar, Joan; Lienkaemper, George

2007-01-01

193

The Zoo, Benchmarks & You: How To Reach the Oregon State Benchmarks with Zoo Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document aligns Oregon state educational benchmarks and standards with Oregon Zoo resources. Benchmark areas examined include English, mathematics, science, social studies, and career and life roles. Brief descriptions of the programs offered by the zoo are presented. (SOE)

2002

194

Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Movement and Demography at Dilman Meadow: Implications for Future Monitoring.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

From 2001 to 2005, we studied the demography and seasonal movement of Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) translocated into created ponds in Dilman Meadow in central Oregon. Our objectives were to inform future monitoring and management at the site, and ...

C. A. Pearl J. Bowerman M. J. Adams N. D. Chelgren

2006-01-01

195

Evaluation of the Oregon Medicaid Reform Demonstration: ES-1. Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Oregon Health Plan (OHP) is Oregon's innovative Section 1115 Medicaid waiver program. OHP has garnered national attention for its use of a prioritized list of health care services to define the program's benefit package. In addition, OHP expanded elig...

1998-01-01

196

77 FR 51823 - Notice of Public Meetings, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Notice of Public Meetings, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees AGENCY: Bureau of...Land Management (BLM) western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees, will meet as indicated...meeting is also listed: Coos Bay District Resource Advisory Committee: Megan Harper,...

2012-08-27

197

75 FR 74697 - Central Oregon Irrigation District; Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit Application Accepted...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 13858-000] Central Oregon Irrigation District; Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit Application...November 22, 2010. On October 6, 2010, Central Oregon Irrigation District filed an application for a preliminary permit,...

2010-12-01

198

78 FR 60220 - Safety Zone; Fireworks Display, Willamette River, Oregon City, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Safety Zone; Fireworks Display, Willamette River, Oregon City, OR AGENCY...encompass all waters of the Willamette River south of the I-205 Bridge...Location. All waters of the Willamette River, Oregon City, OR,...

2013-10-01

199

33 CFR 162.225 - Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Washington and Oregon; administration and navigation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Washington and Oregon; administration... § 162.225 Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Washington and Oregon; administration...supervision over the Columbia and Willamette Rivers, and is charged with...

2013-07-01

200

33 CFR 162.225 - Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Washington and Oregon; administration and navigation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Washington and Oregon; administration... § 162.225 Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Washington and Oregon; administration...supervision over the Columbia and Willamette Rivers, and is charged with...

2009-07-01

201

33 CFR 162.225 - Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Washington and Oregon; administration and navigation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Washington and Oregon; administration... § 162.225 Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Washington and Oregon; administration...supervision over the Columbia and Willamette Rivers, and is charged with...

2010-07-01

202

64 FR 13041 - Cascade Steel Rolling Mills, Incorporated, McMinnville, Oregon; Notice of Termination of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Training Administration [NAFTA-02883] Cascade Steel Rolling Mills, Incorporated, McMinnville, Oregon; Notice of Termination...petition filed on behalf of workers at Cascade Steel Rolling Mills, Incorporated, located in McMinnville, Oregon....

1999-03-16

203

78 FR 20073 - Adequacy of Oregon's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Adequacy of Oregon's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program AGENCY: Environmental...Oregon's approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Program. On March 22, 2004, EPA issued...issued to certain municipal solid waste landfills by approved states. On June 14,...

2013-04-03

204

77 FR 51793 - City of Pendleton, Oregon; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14440-000] City of Pendleton, Oregon...2012. d. Applicant: City of Pendleton, Oregon. e. Name of Project: Energy Recovery Phase II...

2012-08-27

205

Oregon Low-Temperature-Resource Assessment Program. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Numerous low-temperature hydrothermal systems are available for exploitation throughout the Cascades and eastern Oregon. All of these areas have heat flow significantly higher than crustal averages and many thermal aquifers. In northeastern Oregon, low temperature geothermal resources are controlled by regional stratigraphic aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group at shallow depths and possibly by faults at greater depths. In southeastern Oregon most hydrothermal systems are of higher temperature than those of northeastern Oregon and are controlled by high-angle fault zones and layered volcanic aquifers. The Cascades have very high heat flow but few large population centers. Direct use potential in the Cascades is therefore limited, except possibly in the cities of Oakridge and Ashland, where load may be great enough to stimulate development. Absence of large population centers also inhibits initial low temperature geothermal development in eastern Oregon. It may be that uses for the abundant low temperature geothermal resources of the state will have to be found which do not require large nearby population centers. One promising use is generation of electricity from freon-based biphase electrical generators. These generators will be installed on wells at Vale and Lakeview in the summer of 1982 to evaluate their potential use on geothermal waters with temperatures as low as 80/sup 0/C (176/sup 0/F).

Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.; Woller, N.M.

1981-01-01

206

Geologic Map of the Carlton Quadrangle, Yamhill County, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Carlton, Oregon, 7.5-minute quadrangle is located in northwestern Oregon, about 35 miles (57 km) southwest of Portland. It encompasses the towns of Yamhill and Carlton in the northwestern Willamette Valley and extends into the eastern flank of the Oregon Coast Range. The Carlton quadrangle is one of several dozen quadrangles being mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) to provide a framework for earthquake- hazard assessments in the greater Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. The focus of USGS mapping is on the structural setting of the northern Willamette Valley and its relation to the Coast Range uplift. Mapping was done in collaboration with soil scientists from the National Resource Conservation Service, and the distribution of geologic units is refined over earlier regional mapping (Schlicker and Deacon, 1967). Geologic mapping was done on 7.5-minute topographic base maps and digitized in ArcGIS to produce ArcGIS geodatabases and PDFs of the map and text. The geologic contacts are based on numerous observations and samples collected in 2002 and 2003, National Resource Conservation Service soils maps, and interpretations of 7.5-minute topography. The map was completed before new, high-resolution laser terrain mapping was flown for parts of the northern Willamette Valley in 2008.

Wheeler, Karen L.; Wells, Ray E.; Minervini, Joseph M.; Block, Jessica L.

2009-01-01

207

A mosaic of fields and forests in the Willamette Basin, Oregon, USA.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Different land uses have created a varied landscape in the Willamette Basin of Oregon that supports a rich array of species as well as an array of economic activities. Researchers have recently developed a spatially explicit model for analyzing the consequences of alternative land-use patterns on various species and market-oriented economic returns. They found that, with careful land-use planning, a large fraction of conservation objectives can be achieved at little cost to the economic bottom line. This photograph originally appeared on the cover of Ecological Applications (15:4) in August of 2005.

Kagan, Jimmy

2010-02-11

208

LEGALIZED PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED SUICIDE IN OREGON — THE FIRST YEAR'S EXPERIENCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Methods On October 27, 1997, Oregon legalized physician-assisted suicide. We col- lected data on all terminally ill Oregon residents who received prescriptions for lethal medications under the Oregon Death with Dignity Act and who died in 1998. The data were obtained from physicians' reports, death certificates, and interviews with physicians. We compared persons who took lethal medications pre-

ARTHUR E. CHIN; KATRINA HEDBERG; GRANT K. HIGGINSON; DAVID W. FLEMING

2010-01-01

209

Southern Oregon Drug Awareness (SODA): Community and School Working Together to Fight Drug Abuse.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Southern Oregon Drug Awareness (SODA) is a group of volunteers headquartered in Medford (Oregon) who work in cooperation with schools and other community agencies to reduce drug problems and other human relations problems among children and adults in Oregon's Jackson County through education, encouragement, and referral to social agencies. This…

Johnson, Virginia Shaumleffel

1982-01-01

210

Subsurface structure of southeastern Oregon and northwestern Nevada from an analysis of complete Bouguer gravity  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new complete Bouguer gravity map has been constructed for southeastern Oregon and northwestern Nevada. The objectives have been to determine the subsurface structure of southeastern Oregon, to look for indications of isostatic compensation for these structures, and to evaluate the continuation of Basin and Range extensional structures from Nevada into Oregon. The gravity map shows several prominent anomalies, some

J. S. II Granata; R. E. Karlin; D. L. Sawatzky; A. Griscom

1993-01-01

211

Oregon Administrative Rules: Adopted by the State Board of Education. 1996 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains the Oregon State Board of Education's 1996 edition of administrative rules relating to Oregon schools and community colleges. The document contains regulatory materials pertaining to the following areas: procedural rules; minimum pay for substitute teachers; reorganization; textbook adoption; special education; the Oregon

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

212

Connecting Rural Oregon Libraries to the Internet, or "Will it Fit in My Car?".  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Jumpstart, a Web site providing remote access to government information in CD-ROM format, developed by Oregon State University's Valley Library, as a joint venture with the Oregon State Library and the Portland Area Library System to provide hardware, software, and training to rural school and public libraries in Oregon that have limited…

Middleton, Cheryl; Cross, Judy

1998-01-01

213

Oregon Consolidated State Performance Report: Comprehensive School Reform Program (CSR), 2003-2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fourteen schools in Oregon have completed their three-year implementation plans as a part of Oregon's Round 2 funding cycle. Seven schools are currently in Round 3 and eight schools are currently in Round 4. Oregon SEA staff worked closely with these schools as they evaluated progress made during their implementation. This report includes an…

Oregon Department of Education, 2004

2004-01-01

214

Oregon Tech Prep/Associate Degree Program: Developing a High Performance Workforce.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Issued jointly by Oregon's Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Commissioner of Community Colleges, this policy statement is aimed at implementing the Oregon Tech Prep/Associate Degree Program (TPAD), a new applied academics curricular structure. The paper begins with a summary of Oregon's school reform effort, an open letter to the…

Oregon State Board of Education, Salem.

215

78 FR 36241 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR AGENCY: National Park Service...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History has completed an inventory of human remains...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History. If no additional requestors come...

2013-06-17

216

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1997 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Oregon freshwater fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed

Mark A. Lewis; Christine Mallette; William M. Murray

1998-01-01

217

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1995 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bonneville Power Administration is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule brood fall chinook were caught primarily in the British Columbia, Washington and northern Oregon ocean commercial fisheries. The up-river bright fall chinook contributed primarily to the Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial fisheries

Robert L. Garrison; Christine Mallette; Mark A. Lewis

1995-01-01

218

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1996 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Oregon freshwater fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed

Mark A. Lewis; Christine Mallette; William M. Murray

1998-01-01

219

Magnitude and frequency of floods in western Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A method for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods is presented for unregulated streams in western Oregon. Equations relating flood magnitude to basin characteristics were developed for exceedance probabilities of 0.5 to 0.01 (2- to 100-year recurrence intervals). Separate equations are presented for four regions: Coast, Willamette, Rogue-Umpqua, and High Cascades. Also presented are values of flood discharges for selected exceedance probabilities and of basin characteristics for all gaging stations used in the analysis. Included are data for 230 stations in Oregon, 6 stations in southwestern Washington, and 3 stations in northwestern California. Drainage areas used in the analysis range from 0.21 to 7,280 square miles. Also included are maximum discharges for all western Oregon stations used in the analysis. (Woodard-USGS)

Harris, David Dell; Hubbard, Larry L.; Hubbard, Lawrence E.

1979-01-01

220

Decline and present status of breeding peregrine falcons in Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1979, only one Peregrine Falcon pair (they fledged two young) and a single adult male were located. A population decline east of the Cascades began in rhe 1930's, probably resulting from a climatic change (drought); however, a statewide decline began in the late 1940's, accelerated in the 1950's, and by the 1960's few pairs remained. The statewide decline closely paralleled the pattern of DDT use. Furthermore, DDE was found in membranes of peregrine eggs from nearby California as early as 1948. Moreover, an unhatched Peregrine Falcon egg found at the Oregon eyrie in 1979 contained 19 ppm DDE and lesser amounts of other contaminants. The eggshell was 19% thinner than normaL The future of the nearly extirpated Peregrine Falcon in Oregon remains uncertain in spite of improved water and habitat conditions in eastern Oregon. Reintroduction of captive-bred birds seems to be the last hope.

Henny, C.J.; Nelson, M.W.

1981-01-01

221

OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY (OSU) TRAINING RESEARCH ISOTOPE GENERAL ATOMICS (TRIGA) OVERPACK CLOSURE WELDING PROCESS PARAMETER DEVELOPMENT & QUALIFICATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the Oregon State University (OSU) TRIGA{reg_sign} Reactor is currently being stored in thirteen 55-gallon drums at the Hanford Site's low-level burial grounds. This fuel is soon to be retrieved from buried storage and packaged into new containers (overpacks) for interim storage at the Hanford Interim Storage Area (ISA). One of the key activities associated with

2006-01-01

222

Marine nekton off Oregon and the 1997 98 El Nino  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several species of migratory, warm-water, oceanic fishes invaded Oregon waters during the summer of 1997. Also, the jumbo squid ( Dosidicus gigas), common in the eastern tropical Pacific, was reported for the first time in 1997 and was caught in large numbers. The occurrence of these oceanic nekton was associated with inshore advection of anomalously warm water. During 1998, after arrival of the main El Niño signal, some warm-water coastal fishes appeared off Oregon. However, unlike observations off California, fewer species of warm-water coastal fishes were noted during the 1997-98 El Niño than during the 1982-83 El Niño.

Pearcy, W. G.

2002-09-01

223

Current research at the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Oregon State University (OSU) Radiation Center is a major nuclear research and teaching facility that serves organizations both nationally and internationally. There is no other university facility in the western half of the United States with the combined capabilities of the OSU Radiation Center. The Radiation Center handles [approximately]200 projects per year for a total of [approximately]350 investigators. The major facility at the OSU Radiation Center is the 1.1-MW Oregon State TRIGA Reactor (OSTR). A synopsis of several newer experiments currently being conducted using the OSTR is given in this paper.

Johnson, A.G.; Binney, S.E. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

1993-01-01

224

Oxygen Isotope Character of the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oxygen isotope analyses of zircons from lavas and tuffs from the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) of east central Oregon unequivocally demonstrate the presence of mid-Miocene low-?18O magmas (?18Ozrc<4.7 ‰). Despite the growing data set of low-?18O melts within, and proximal to, the Snake River Plain (SRP) Large Igneous Province, debate persists regarding both the mechanisms for low-?18O magma petrogenesis, and their relative influence in the SRP. The LOVF is associated with widespread silicic volcanism roughly concurrent with the eruption of the Steens-Columbia River Basalt Group between ~17-15Ma. Silicic activity in the LOVF is limited to 16-15Ma, when an estimated 1100km3 of weakly peralkaline to metaluminous rhyolitic lavas and ignimbrites erupted from a series of fissures and calderas. Geographically, the LOVF overlaps the Oregon-Idaho Graben (OIG), and straddles the 87Sr/86Sr= 0.704 line which, together with the 0.706 line to the east, delineate the regional transition from the North American Precambrian continental crust to the east to younger Phanerozoic accreted terranes to the west. Here we report high accuracy ion microprobe analyses of ?18O in zircons using a 10-15?m spot, with average spot-to-spot precision ±0.28‰ (2SD), to investigate intra-grain and intra-unit ?18Ozrc trends for LOVF rhyolites. Due to its high closure temperature, chemical and physical resistance, and slow oxygen diffusion rates, zircon offers a robust record of magmatic oxygen isotope ratios during crystallization and provides constraints on the petrogenesis of Snake River Plain (SRP) low-?18O melts. Individual zircons from LOVF rhyolites show no evidence of core-rim ?18O zoning, and populations exhibit ?0.42‰ (2SD) intra-unit variability. Unit averages range from 2.2 to 4.3‰, with the lowest values in caldera-forming ignimbrites, but all units show evidence of crystallization from low-?18O melts. Quartz and feldspar analyses by laser fluorination (precision ±0.20‰, 2SD) indicate ?18Oqtz ranges between 5.7 and 6.8‰, and ?18OKfs between -5.4 and +6.7‰. ?18O(qtz-zrc) ranges from 2.1-2.5‰, while ?18O(Kfs-zrc) varies from 2.3 to -7.7‰. Quartz values are consistent with equilibration at magmatic temperatures, however, at least some feldspars have undergone subsolidus exchange and feldspar or whole rock ?18O values are not reliably igneous. The observed low-?18Ozrc values document high temperature interaction of magmatic protoliths with meteoric waters. Current models to account for low-?18O SRP rhyolites include remelting of hydrothermally altered cogenetic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, or partial melting of deeper-seated low-?18O source rocks altered either by SRP hot spot activity or during an earlier event. The SRP represents the greatest known concentration of low-?18O magmas on Earth, arguing against pre-hotspot models. It's likely that plume-related doming and rifting created unusually deep and pervasive pathways for circulation and exchange between surface waters and magma source rocks.

Blum, T.; Strickland, A.; Valley, J. W.

2012-12-01

225

Preliminary Geologic Map of Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The late Pleistocene and Holocene rear-arc Newberry Volcano is located in central Oregon east of the Cascades arc axis. Total area covered by the broad, shield-shaped edifice and its accompanying lava field is about 3,200 square kilometers, encompassing all or part of 38 U.S.G.S. 1:24,000-scale quadrangles. Distance from the northernmost extent of lava flows to the southernmost is about 115 km; east-west maximum width is less than 50 km. A printed version of the preliminary map at its intended publication scale of 1:50,000 is 8 ft high by 4 ft wide. More than 200 units have been identified so far, each typically consisting of the lava flow(s) and accompanying vent(s) that represent single eruptive episodes, some of which extend 10’s of kilometers across the edifice. Vents are commonly aligned north-northwest to north-northeast, reflecting a strong regional tectonic influence. The largest individual units on the map are basaltic, some extending nearly 50 km to the north through the cities of Bend and Redmond from vents low on the northern flank of the volcano. The oldest and most distal of the basalts is dated at about 350 ka. Silicic lava flows and domes are confined to the main edifice of the volcano; the youngest rhyolite flows are found within Newberry Caldera, including the rhyolitic Big Obsidian Flow, the youngest flow at Newberry Volcano (~1,300 yr B.P.). The oldest known rhyolite dome is dated at about 400 ka. Andesite units (those with silica contents between 57% and 63%) are the least common, with only 13 recognized to date. The present 6.5 by 8 km caldera formed about 75 ka with the eruption of compositionally-zoned rhyolite to basaltic andesite ash-flow tuff. Older widespread silicic ash-flow tuffs imply previous caldera collapses. Approximately 20 eruptions have occurred at Newberry since ice melted off the volcano in latest Pleistocene time. The mapping is being digitally compiled as a spatial geodatabase in ArcGIS. Within the geodatabase, feature classes have been created representing geologic lines (contacts, faults, lava tubes, etc.), geologic unit polygons, and volcanic vent location points. The geodatabase can be queried to determine the spatial distributions of different rock types, geologic units, and other geologic and geomorphic features. Map colors are being used to indicate compositions. Some map patterns have been added to distinguish the youngest lavas and the ash-flow tuffs. Geodatabase information can be used to better understand the evolution, growth, and potential hazards of the volcano.

Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Ramsey, D. W.; Jensen, R. A.; Champion, D. E.; Calvert, A. T.

2010-12-01

226

A seasonally modulated earthquake swarm near Maupin, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From December 2006 to November 2011, the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) reported 467 earthquakes in a swarm 60 km east of Mt Hood near the town of Maupin, Oregon. The swarm included 20 MD ? 3.0 events, which account for over 80 per cent of the cumulative seismic moment release of the sequence. Relocation of 45 MD ? 2.5 earthquakes and moment tensor analysis of nine 3.3 ? Mw ? 3.9 earthquakes reveals right-lateral strike-slip motion on a north-northwest trending, 70° west dipping, 1 km2 active fault patch at about 17 km depth. The swarm started at the southern end of the patch and migrated to the northwest at an average rate of 1-2 m d-1 during the first 18 months. Event migration was interrupted briefly in late 2007 when the swarm encountered a 10° fault bend acting as geometrical barrier. The slow migration rate suggests a pore pressure diffusion process. We speculate that the swarm was triggered by flow into the fault zone from upwards-migrating, subduction-derived fluids. Superimposed on the swarm is seasonal modulation of seismicity, with the highest rates in spring, which coincides with the maximum snow load in the nearby Cascade Mountains. The resulting surface load variation of about 4 × 1011 N km-1 arc length causes 1 cm annual vertical displacements at GPS sites in the Cascades and appears sufficient to modulate seismicity by varying normal stresses at the fault and fluid flow rates into the fault zone.

Braunmiller, Jochen; Náb?lek, John L.; Tréhu, Anne M.

2014-06-01

227

Post-fire geomorphic response in steep, forested landscapes: Oregon Coast Range, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The role of fire in shaping steep, forested landscapes depends on a suite of hydrologic, biologic, and geological characteristics, including the propensity for hydrophobic soil layers to promote runoff erosion during subsequent rainfall events. In the Oregon Coast Range, several studies postulate that fire primarily modulates sediment production via root reinforcement and shallow landslide susceptibility, although few studies have documented post-fire geomorphic response. Here, we describe field observations and topographic analyses for three sites in the central Oregon Coast Range that burned in 1999, 2002, and 2003. The fires generated strongly hydrophobic soil layers that did not promote runoff erosion because the continuity of the layers was interrupted by pervasive discontinuities that facilitated rapid infiltration. At each of our sites, fire generated significant colluvial transport via dry ravel, consistent with other field-based studies in the western United States. Fire-driven dry ravel accumulation in low-order valleys of our Sulphur Creek site equated to a slope-averaged landscape lowering of 2.5 mm. Given Holocene estimates of fire frequency, these results suggest that fire may contribute 10-20% of total denudation across steep, dissected portions of the Oregon Coast Range. In addition, we documented more rapid decline of root strength at our sites than has been observed after timber harvest, suggesting that root strength was compromised prior to fire or that intense heat damaged roots in the shallow subsurface. Given that fire frequencies in the Pacific Northwest are predicted to increase with continued climate change, our findings highlight the importance of fire-induced dry ravel and post-fire debris flow activity in controlling sediment delivery to channels.

Jackson, Molly; Roering, Joshua J.

2009-06-01

228

Mist gas field: drilling heats up in Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Until 1979, no commerical amounts of gas had been found in Oregon. There had been scattered wildcatting attempts since the 1940s, but with the exception of one oil field which produced for 4 yr no significant pools were discovered. However, one area in the northwest corner of the state approx. 45 miles west of Mt. St. Helens, showed some promise. Texaco found permeable potential reservoir rocks near the town of Mist, Ore., in 1947. Ten years later geologists field-mapped the area and found potential oil and gas formations, but no wells were drilled. By 1975, a shortfall or natural gas had developed in N.W. Oregon. Reichhold Chemicals, Inc., which manufactured nitrogen-based products in the St. Helens areas, faced a continued curtailment of its operations if a new supply of gas could not be found. Reichhold leased approx. 80,000 acres in N.W. Oregon for the purpose of exploration. Reichhold drilled dry holes in 1975. Two years later Reichhold acted as operator on the first well drilled near Mist, Oregon. Columbia County No. 1 was drilled to 3105 ft. Five feet in the top of the Clark and Wilson sands contained gas underlain by saltwater sand. Analysis of sidewall cores confirmed the general range of permeabilities that Texaco has found in this sand.

Holloway, G.

1981-05-01

229

On the Cusp: Corey Harper--University of Oregon, Eugene  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A recent library school graduate, Corey Harper was nominated by his colleagues at the University of Oregon (UO) because of the key role he played in implementing digital collections. Along with technical expertise, says Watson, he brought with him "[an ability to] balance idealism with expediency, the striving for perfection with the need to…

Library Journal, 2004

2004-01-01

230

Magnetite diagenesis in marine sediments from the Oregon continental margin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The magnetochemistry of sediments from the Oregon continental margin is examined to determine the effects of iron-sulfur diagenesis on the paleomagnetic record. Magnetic mineral dissolution and transformation into iron sulfides are a common feature in these suboxic to anoxic lutites. These processes are evidenced in rapid decreases in natural remanent magnetization intensities and stabilities, systematic changes in other rock magnetic

Robert Karlin

1990-01-01

231

Oregon Migrant Health Project; Annual Progress Report 1969.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this 1969 annual report, 10 objectives of the Oregon Migrant Health Project--which served approximately 18,400 migrants during the project year--are listed. These objectives relate to providing for diagnostic and medical services, preventive medical services, and dental care, as well as promoting health awareness, education, and improved living…

Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

232

Block Interactions in Southern Oregon, Northern California, and Northwestern Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Southern Oregon, northern California, and northwestern Nevada is an area of plate tectonic interest due to the surrounding complex interactions between the Pacific plate, Sierra Nevada block, western Basin and Range, California Coast Range, Mendocino Transform, Juan de Fuca plate and the San Andreas fault. The overall net effects from these interactions on the tri-state area are unknown and constitute

J. J. Vollick; R. McCaffrey; G. Sella; C. Stevens; T. Williams; C. McCaffrey; B. Walton

2003-01-01

233

Imagining the Northwest : A Digital Library Partnership in Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper documents the development of a digital library of still images created by photographer Lee Moorhouse on the Umatilla Indian Reservation at the turn of the 20th century. The University of Oregon Libraries, working with the Tamastslikt Cultural Institute of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla, developed a Dublin Core compliant metadata structure. The metadata structure accommodates descriptive metadata

Corey Harper; Nathan Georgitis; Carol Hixson

234

Mist gas field: drilling heats up in Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Until 1979, no commerical amounts of gas had been found in Oregon. There had been scattered wildcatting attempts since the 1940s, but with the exception of one oil field which produced for 4 yr no significant pools were discovered. However, one area in the northwest corner of the state approx. 45 miles west of Mt. St. Helens, showed some promise.

1981-01-01

235

Oregon Total Information System. Title III, ESEA Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A description of the Oregon Total Information System (OTIS) project is presented. The purpose of the three year project was to improve education and its administration by implementing and demonstrating a total information system which could provide data processing services to school districts of varying sizes over a large geographic region. The…

Oregon Total Information System, Eugene.

236

Diatom Data from Bradley Lake, Oregon: Downcore Analyses.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Displaced marine diatoms provide biostratigraphic evidence for tsunami inundation at Bradley Lake, a small freshwater lake on the south-central Oregon coast. During the past 7,200 years, fine-grained lacustrine deposits in the deep axis of the lake were d...

E. Hemphill-Haley R. C. Lewis

2003-01-01

237

Investigating Sand on the Coast of Oregon and Washington.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes factors affecting sand composition and distribution along coastlines. Uses variations in sand types along the Oregon coast to illustrate the influences of sand grain density, wave action, and headlands on sand movements. Describes the seasonal movement of sand across beaches. (DLH)

Komar, Paul D.

2002-01-01

238

Petroleum potential of north-central Oregon: an overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Except for a few erosional inliers, north-central Oregon is covered by a blanket of tertiary volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks which had a thick sequence of Cretaceous and Tertiary sedimentary rocks that have led previous investigators to draw negative conclusions regarding the petroleum potential of the region. Present in the prevolcanic sequence are all the prerequisites for petroleum generation and accumulation:

Fisk

1987-01-01

239

Needs Assessment of International Students at Eastern Oregon State College.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the research project was to assess the needs, satisfaction, and concerns of international students attending Eastern Oregon State College. The international student population consisted of students from Micronesia, Netherlands, Somalia, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Iran, Japan, Thailand, Zimbabwe, Belgium, Canada, Nigeria, China,…

Eid, Mamoud Taha; Jordan-Domschot, Theresa

240

Oregon Driver Education. Alcohol/Drugs and Driving.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum unit contains 10 modules, to be used in 10 driver education class sessions, on driving under the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs (DUI). The unit aims to combat the Oregon DUI problem, especially among 15- to 24-year-olds, with values clarification, awareness of risk factors and personal boundaries, refusal skills, social…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Div. of Curriculum and School Improvement.

241

Pertussis vaccine performance in an epidemic year-Oregon, 2012.  

PubMed

A 2012 pertussis epidemic in Oregon afforded an opportunity to measure vaccine effectiveness; it ranged from 95% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92%-97%) among children 15-47 months of age to 47% (95% CI, 19%-65%) among adolescents 13-16 years of age. In all age groups, pertussis incidence was higher among unimmunized persons. PMID:24748523

Liko, Juventila; Robison, Steve G; Cieslak, Paul R

2014-07-15

242

76 FR 19118 - Oregon; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Stafford Act''), as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Oregon resulting from a tsunami wave surge on March 11, 2011, is of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant a major disaster declaration under the...

2011-04-06

243

Evaluation of Blue Bike-Lane Treatment in Portland, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many European cities use colored markings at bicycle-motor vehicle crossings to reduce conflicts. To determine whether such colored mark- ings help improve safety at American bicycle-motor vehicle crossings, the city of Portland, Oregon, studied the use of blue pavement markings and a novel signage system to delineate selected conflict areas. The Uni- versity of North Carolina Highway Safety Research Center

William W. Hunter; David L. Harkey; J. Richard Stewart; Mia L. Birk

2000-01-01

244

Brain Biology Machine Initiative (BBMI) at the University of Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of the 01-05 TATRC grant to the University of Oregon (UO) was to support the mission of the UO's Brain Biology and Machine Initiative (BBMI) of establishing a world-leading center linking genomic and proteomics to human cognitive neuroscience res...

R. W. Linton

2008-01-01

245

Cross-Cultural Psychiatric Residency Training: The Oregon Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The purpose of this article is to describe the goals and structure of cross-cultural psychiatric training at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU). This training in core knowledge, skills, and attitudes of cultural psychiatry over the past three decades has included medical students, residents, and fellows, along with allied…

Boehnlein, James K.; Leung, Paul K.; Kinzie, John David

2008-01-01

246

NITRATE VARIABILITY ALONG THE OREGON COAST: ESTUARINE-COASTAL EXCHANGE  

EPA Science Inventory

Coastal upwelling along the Eastern Pacific provides a major source of nutrients to nearby bays and estuaries during the summer months. To quantify the coastal ocean nitrogen input to Yaquina Bay, Oregon, nitrate concentrations were measured hourly from a moored sensor during sum...

247

Oregon Museum of Science and Industry Traveling Exhibits  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's Science Adventures has a number of programs designed for larger groups in a gymnasium or multi-purpose room setting. Programs run from 1 to 1.5 hours, and can accommodate up to 350 students.

Industry, Oregon M.

2005-04-19

248

Reproduction of Northern Anchovy, 'Engraulis mordax', Off Oregon and Washington.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Mean relative fecundity of 21 anchovies from the northern subpopulation off Oregon and Washington was 826 + or - 49 oocytes per g ovary-free body weight, or 720 + or - 40 oocytes per g total body weight. Sexual maturity is not reached in most anchovies of...

J. L. Laroche S. L. Richardson

1980-01-01

249

75 FR 62690 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Grants Pass, Oregon  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DA 10-1805; MB Docket No. 10-117; RM-11601] Radio Broadcasting Services; Grants Pass, Oregon AGENCY...a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. 0 For the reasons discussed in the...

2010-10-13

250

Profile of Older Workers in Oregon. Local Employment Dynamics.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report uses Quarterly Workforce Indicators (QWIs) from the LED program for the state of Oregon to focus on two groups of older workers: those who are likely to be receiving pension income (65 and older) and the preretirement group (55-64 years old). ...

2004-01-01

251

Oregon Pupil Transportation Manual. 1987 Revised Regulations and Responsibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual provides school bus drivers and school officials in Oregon with material relating to safe and efficient school transportation. The guide is not intended to take the place of motor vehicle laws or school laws, but is a reference for questions that arise in connection with the school bus driver's job. Chapter 1 enumerates laws governing…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

252

Teacher Needs and Researcher Responses--The Oregon Experience.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the past 10 years, a partnership between researchers and practitioners in educational research has developed in Oregon. In 1965 the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission was established. Since then, the commission has carried out research and influenced the development of various aspects of teacher education, certification, and related…

Wallace, James M.

253

Scappoose Drainage District, Oregon. Proposed Improvements, Flood Protection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Scappoose Drainage District is located east of the town of Scappoose in Columbia County, Oregon, along the left bank of Multnomah Channel between Columbia River miles 90.3 and 97.0. The project should increase the flood protection capabilities of the exis...

1971-01-01

254

Ecological functions of riparian zones in Oregon hydrological landscapes  

EPA Science Inventory

The ecological functions of streams and associated riparian zones are strongly influenced by the hydrological attributes of watersheds and landscapes in which they occur. Oregon hydrologic landscape regions (HLRs) have been defined based on four types of GIS data: 1) climate, 2) ...

255

DISTRIBUTION, DENSITY, AND PRODUCTIVITY OF ACCIPITER HAWKS BREEDING IN OREGON  

Microsoft Academic Search

Density of nests and productivity of Sharp-shinned Hawks (Accipiter striatus), Cooper's Hawks (A. cooperii), and Goshawks (A. gent&s) within Oregon are of interest because of recent declines of accipiter hawks in the east- ern United States (Schriver 1969, Hackman and Henny 1971, Henny and Wight 1972). One factor implicated in this decline was contamination with chlorinated hydrocarbons (Ratcliffe 1970, Cade

RICHARD T. REYNOLDS; HOWARD M. WIGHT

1978-01-01

256

45. Photocopy of postcard (from copy print at Oregon Historical ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

45. Photocopy of postcard (from copy print at Oregon Historical Society, Portland, neg. no. 74133, ca. 1910) SP&S BRIDGE OVER WILLAMETTE RIVER - Burlington Northern Railroad Bridge, Spanning Willamette River at River Mile 6.9, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

257

RIPARIAN AREAS OF AN AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPE IN WESTERN OREGON  

EPA Science Inventory

The Willamette Valley is a productive, diversified agricultural area in western Oregon. Pastureland and grass seed fields, mostly located on poorly drained soils, account for 60% of the agricultural land in the valley. The size and character of Willamette Valley streams and ass...

258

Scattering Layers and Vertical Distribution of Oceanic Animals off Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper reviews some of the distributional features of vertically migrating micronekton off Oregon; describes a new, conducting-cable, midwater-trawl system using an eight-net, opening-closing cod-end unit; and gives some preliminary results on trawl ca...

W. G. Pearcy R. S. Mesecar

1974-01-01

259

Oregon, Washington, and Alaska Exports of Edible Fishery Products, 1991.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oregon, Washington, and Alaska (defined in the report as the Pacific Northwest) exports of edible fishery products in 1991 increased 4% in quantity over 1990 to 1.47 billion pounds (lb) or 666,400 metric tons (t). The value of these fishery exports increa...

R. K. Kinoshita J. M. Terry

1993-01-01

260

Oregon, Washington, and Alaska Exports of Edible Fishery Products, 1995.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oregon, Washington, and Alaska (defined in this report as the Pacific Northwest) exports of edible fishery products in 1995 declined slightly in quantity from 1994 to 1.4 billion pounds (lb) or 633,188 metric tons (t). The value of these fishery exports i...

R. K. Kinoshita J. M. Terry

1996-01-01

261

Oregon, Washington, and Alaska Exports of Edible Fishery Products, 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oregon, Washington, and Alaska (defined in the report as the Pacific Northwest) exports of edible fishery products in 1990 increased 42% in quantity over 1989 to over 1.4 billion pounds (lb) or 640,000 metric tons (t). The value of these fishery exports i...

R. K. Kinoshita D. A. Colpo J. M. Terry

1991-01-01

262

Waste Not: An Oregon Solution to Joblessness and Overflowing Landfills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The St. Vincent de Paul Society of Lane County (Oregon) provides a wide range of social services to stimulate community development, based on reuse, repair, and recycling. Job training and jobs are provided in the woodshop, appliance center, mattress factory, glass shop, and environmentally friendly housing construction projects, with priority…

Grossman, Elizabeth

1999-01-01

263

ACT Profile Report: State. Graduating Class 2012. Oregon  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides information about the performance of Oregon's 2012 graduating seniors who took the ACT as sophomores, juniors, or seniors; and self-reported at the time of testing that they were scheduled to graduate in 2012 and tested under standard time conditions. This report focuses on: (1) Performance: student test performance in the…

ACT, Inc., 2012

2012-01-01

264

Oregon, Washington, and Alaska Exports of Edible Fishery Products, 1994.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oregon, Washington, and Alaska (defined in this report as the Pacific Northwest) exports of edible fishery products in 1994 declined 7% in quantity from 1993 to 1.39 billion pounds (lb) or 629,048 metric tons (t). The value of these fishery exports declin...

R. K. Kinoshita J. M. Terry

1996-01-01

265

Air Pollution Source Survey, Kingsley Air Force Station, Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The results of a stack study to determine the emissions from the Central Heating Plant, Kingsley AFS Oregon, are presented. The study was performed at the request of the Base Civil Engineering Division for the purpose of selecting appropriate air pollutio...

K. E. Hundley

1974-01-01

266

Lowering the Age of Identification: Oregon's Design and Preliminary Results.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A program was implemented in Oregon to screen infants at risk for hearing impairment, based on a birth certificate question concerning family history of hearing loss and subsequent parent notification of the need to have the infant's hearing tested. Preliminary results concerning efficacy of the program are reported. (JDD)

Josephson, Jean Attridge; Moore, William G.

1993-01-01

267

Hypoxia on the Oregon Shelf: a Modeling Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last decade frequent summertime episodes of hypoxic (< 1.43 ml DO\\/l; DO - Dissolved Oxygen) waters occupying significant areas of the Oregon coastal shelf have been observed. The spatial extent and severity of low oxygen conditions on the shelf vary interannually and are the cumulative results of both physical and biological processes. Among the most important factors are

A. O. Koch; Y. H. Spitz; H. P. Batchelder

2010-01-01

268

Aerial view of the upper Willamette River, Oregon.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Aerial view of the upper Willamette River, Oregon. Although some off-channel features and riparian forest remain, particularly in upper reaches as illustrated here, overall the Willamette River has lost about 50% of its off-channel alcoves and 80% of its bottomland forest since 1850. Much of the valley has been converted to agriculture and urban and rural development. The Willamette River Basin covers 13% of the area of Oregon, supports almost 70% of the state's population, and produces 45% of OregonÃÂs agricultural market value. The basin also contains the richest native fish fauna in Oregon, as well as several species listed under the Endangered Species Act. The number of people in the basin is expected to nearly double in the next 50 years, placing tremendous demands on limited land and water resources, and creating major challenges for land- and water-use planning and management. This photograph originally appeared on the cover of Ecological Applications (14:2) in April of 2004.

Cline, Steve

2010-02-12

269

The Impact of Oregon Reading First on Student Reading Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the impact of Oregon Reading First on student reading outcomes. Outcomes in schools that began Reading First implementation in 2003-2004 (Cohort A) were compared to outcomes in schools that began Reading First implementation in 2005-2006 (Cohort B). The primary hypothesis, that experienced Cohort A schools would outperform…

Baker, Scott K.; Smolkowski, Keith; Smith, Jeanie Mercier; Fien, Hank; Kame'enui, Edward J.; Beck, Carrie Thomas

2011-01-01

270

Radiological Survey of the Albany Research Center, Albany, Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In early 1984, a radiological survey was conducted at the Albany Research Center (ARC) in Albany, Oregon. The survey was performed as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a US Department of Energy effort to identify, clean...

1985-01-01

271

Mervyn's Family-to-Family Initiative in Oregon.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family-to-Family, a collaboration between community colleges, public agencies, and businesses that is funded by Mervyn's department stores, is a two-year effort to enhance the quality of family child care in Oregon. Its goals are to train at least 450 family child care providers, help at least 60 providers achieve national accreditation, and…

Campbell, Lori; And Others

272

WATER QUALITY: WESTERN FISH TOXICOLOGY STATION AND WESTERN OREGON RIVERS  

EPA Science Inventory

Seasonal variation in water quality was compared for the Western Fish Toxicology Station (WFTS), Corvallis, OR, the adjacent Willamette River and approximately 40 major western Oregon rivers from 1972 through 1974. Water temperature patterns of the Willamette River and the WFTS w...

273

77 FR 64444 - VOR Federal Airway V-595; Oregon  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This action proposes to modify VHF omnidirectional range (VOR) Federal airway V-595 in Oregon. The FAA is proposing this action to redescribe the route due to the scheduled decommissioning of the Portland, OR, VOR/DME facility which currently serves as an end point for the...

2012-10-22

274

Preparing Oregon State University to Meet the Research Challenges of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Final Scientific/Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The OSU Radiation Center requested $100,000 under the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership University Readiness program to provide for graduate student support, reactor equipment upgrades, and irradiation support. A portion of the funds requested were used to support the graduate education of a graduate student for a period of one year. The remaining funds were utilized to enhance the irradiation facilities of the Oregon State TRIGA® Reactor as well as to offset the costs of irradiations for initial investigations where grant funding is not available. The focus of this effort was to create an environment that would enhance facilities and equipment at Oregon State University which emphasize GNEP related themes, specifically material science analytical capabilities for the next generation of nuclear reactors. These enhancements included development of a prompt gamma neutron activation analysis analytical capability, digital reactor data logging, electronic dosimetry for researchers, replacement of sample grapples, and irradiation/analytical services.

Steven R. Reese

2008-10-08

275

Transverse structural trends along the Oregon convergent margin: Implications for Cascadia earthquake potential and crustal rotations  

SciTech Connect

A remarkable set of west-northwest-trending left-lateral strike-slip faults intersects the Cascadia subduction zone. Three of these faults have been mapped off northern and central Oregon by using seismic reflection, SeaMARC-1A sidescan sonar, and SeaBeam bathymetry. These faults are highly oblique to the north-south structural grain of the active accretionary wedge. One of them has 6 km of horizontal slip; the average slip rate is 7-10 mm/yr. The faults cut the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and can be traced into the North American plate. Folds that deform late Pleistocene and Holocene sediments on the upper continental slope and shelf strike north-northwest to west-northwest. Some of the west-northwest-trending folds are associated with the throughgoing strike-slip faults, whereas other northwest-trending folds are approximately normal to the plate convergence direction. Many of these folds are mapped across the shelf, and several active shelf synclines project toward Oregon's coastal bays, where marsh subsidence events are inferred to be the result of great subduction-zone earthquakes. These subsidence events may actually record the growth of local synclines, possibly as secondary effects of slip on the megathrusts. The authors postulate that shortening of the forearc region by clockwise tectonic rotation, associated with movement of the left-lateral faults and folding of the upper plate, may accommodate a significant amount of plate convergence.

Goldfinger, C.; Kulm, L.D.; Yeats, R.S. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States)); Applegate, B.; MacKay, M.E.; Moore, G.F. (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (United States))

1992-02-01

276

The changing world of climate change: Oregon leads the states  

SciTech Connect

Following on the heels of recent national and international developments in climate change policy, Oregon`s {open_quote}best-of-batch{close_quote} proceeding has validated the use of CO{sub 2} offsets as a cost-effective means of advancing climate change mitigation goals. The proceeding was a first in several respects and represents a record commitment of funds to CO{sub 2} mitigation by a private entity. In December 1995, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), issued its Second Assessment Report. The IPCC`s conclusion that {open_quotes}[t]he balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate{close_quotes} fundamentally changed the tenor of the policy debate regarding potential threats associated with global climate change. At the Climate Change Convention`s Conference of the Parties (COP) in Geneva in July 1996, most countries, including the United States, advocated adopting the IPCC report as the basis for swift policy movement toward binding international emissions targets. The next COP, in December 1997, is scheduled to be the venue for the signing of a treaty protocol incorporating such targets. Binding targets would have major consequences for power plant operators in the US and around the world. Recent developments in the state of Oregon show the kinds of measures that may become commonplace at the state level in addressing climate change mitigation. First, Oregon recently completed the first administrative proceeding in the US aimed at offsetting the greenhouse gas emissions of a new power plant. Second, a legislatively mandated energy facility siting task force recently recommended that Oregon adopt a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) standard for new power plant construction and drop use of the {open_quotes}need for power{close_quotes} standard. This article reviews these two policy milestones and their implications for climate change mitigation in the United States.

Carver, P.H.; Sadler, S.; Kosloff, L.H.; Trexler, M.C.

1997-05-01

277

The Oregon Conference Monograph 1995. Volume 7. [Proceedings of a Conference (Eugene, Oregon, February 2-4, 1995).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph presents 23 papers presented at a 1995 Oregon conference which focused on students in trouble due to disabilities or context problems. Paper titles and authors are: "Identifying Students Who Have Learning Disabilities" (Barbara D. Bateman and David J. Chard); "ADHD: A Teachers' Guide" (Rosalyn A. Templeton); "Knowledge about the…

Deffenbaugh, Abe, Ed.; And Others

278

Final Technical Report on DOE Awards DE-FG03 94ER61918, DE-FG06 94ER61918 to Oregon Health Sciences University, September 15, 1994 - September 29, 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the activities conducted with DOE funds at Oregon Health Sciences University between 9/15/94 and 9/29/99. The activities fall into four major categories: Information Technology, Information Services and Support, Medical Informatics and Outcomes Research, and collaboration with other institutions. The focus of these activities was to implement and maintain a regional healthcare information network.

Krages, Kathryn Pyle

1999-11-23

279

Tectonic role of active faulting in central Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geologic and geodetic studies in California indicate that about 1 cmyr-1 of right-lateral shear occurs across what has been referred to as the Eastern California Shear Zone. Northwest trending zones of dextral, sinistral, and normal faults splay eastward from the San Andreas system, continuing through the Mojave Desert, east of the Sierra Nevada, and northward along the Central Nevada and

Silvio K. Pezzopane; Ray J. Weldon

1993-01-01

280

Tectonic role of active faulting in central Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geologic and geodetic studies in California indicate that about 1 cm yr?1 of right-lateral shear occurs across what has been referred to as the Eastern California Shear Zone. Northwest trending zones of dextral, sinistral, and normal faults splay eastward from the San Andreas system, continuing through the Mojave Desert, east of the Sierra Nevada, and northward along the Central Nevada

Silvio K. Pezzopane; Ray J. Weldon

1993-01-01

281

Collective Bargaining Agreement between Association of Professors, Southern Oregon State College, and Southern Oregon State College, November 27, 1985-June 30, 1987.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The collective bargaining agreement between Southern Oregon State College and the Southern Oregon State College Association of Professors, an affiliate of the National Education Association, covering the period November 27, 1985-June 30, 1987, is presented. Items covered in the agreement include: unit recognition, association security, management…

Southern Oregon State Coll., Ashland.

282

Post-Glacial Ant Generated Desert Pavements in Southeastern Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Desert pavements typically require thousands to tens of thousands of years to reach a high level of development. In a pluvial lake valley in Southeastern Oregon I have observed harvester ants creating desert pavement-like features in less than two months. The summer lake basin is a fairly simple sedimentary system. In the eastern half of the basin, the basaltic bedrock is buried under tens of meters of alluvial deposits which lie beneath an approximately ten meter thick dune sheet. The dune sands are noticably different in grainsize and chemistry than the fine component of the alluvial deposits. The dunes began to form at the end of the last pluvial interval (Allison 1980) and continue to be active today. Roughly one fourth of the total area of the dune sheet is mantled with desert pavement, consisting of very coarse sand and fine pebbles (1-8 mm diameter). The dune sand is very fine grained with a considerable amount of silt and minimal clay. It forms thin (2-20 cm thick) well developed Av horizons beneath the desert pavement. Owyhee harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex owyheei) in the area use pebbles of the same size and petrology as the desert pavements to construct their hills. For the ants the closest source of these pebbles is often the alluvium, ten meters below the anthill, rather than in a desert pavement deposit at some distance away overland. An experiment conducted between June and August 1999 demonstrated that the ants rebuild their hills with newly excavated pebbles. When the colonies die off after 5-25 years, the pebbles are stranded at the surface. Processes such as those described by Haff and Werner (1996), where jackrabbits and birds were observed kicking desert pavement clasts aross the ground serve to redistribute the pebbles across the surface of the sand dunes. The sand dunes have been forming over an 8000 year period. Based on anthill-regrowth measurements, the lifespan of an individual colony of harvester ants leads to the excavation of only enough pebbles to cover a two meter square area with desert pavement. This study has determined the quantity of desert pavement currently present at the surface of the sand dunes, and the timescale over which ants can excavate pebbles from the alluvium. The episodic nature of ant colony activity remains to be fully incorporated into the study of desert pavement, usually thought of as a static landform.

Leonard, K. C.

2001-12-01

283

Investigating the Processes of Crust Formation and Intraplate Continental Volcanism in the High Lava Plains, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

East of the southern Cascades is an area of voluminous Late-Cenozoic volcanism built on an immature crustal section accreted to North America in the Mesozoic. With the exception of the Snake River Plain, the High Lava Plains (HLP) of eastern Oregon has been the most volcanically active area in the western United States in the late Cenozoic. Through much of this area, the oldest exposed basement is early Miocene intermediate composition volcanic rocks. Beginning at approximately 16.5 Ma, the HLP was blanketed with flood basalts from both the Steens and Columbia River eruptive centers. The flood basalt era was followed by a time- progressive migration of large silicic centers beginning near the Oregon-Nevada-Idaho borders and extending to the present day activity at Newberry volcano. Quaternary basaltic volcanism is scattered along this whole trend, making the HLP more of a hot-line than a hot-spot. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed to explain this activity including: outflow of the Yellowstone plume-head, back-arc spreading, lithosphere delamination, Basin and Range extension, and asthenospheric inflow around the northward migrating edge of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. These models make distinct predictions about the flow patterns and temperature structure of the shallow mantle underlying this area, but geophysical information capable of discriminating these models is sparse to absent. To remedy this situation and better define the causes of the voluminous volcanism in this area, the HLP project, funded by the NSF Continental Dynamics program, has initiated a multi-level broadband and active-source seismic study combined with field geology, geochemistry, petrology, geochronology and 3D geodynamic modeling of an area reaching from the southern Cascades across eastern Oregon into Idaho and northernmost Nevada. The seismic part of the project employs very dense station spacing that will provide high-resolution images of the crust and upper 100 km of the mantle, where USArray has only poor resolution. The geochemistry and petrology of the HLP volcanic rocks suggest that most of the magmatism originates in this shallow portion of the mantle and has substantially added to and modified the thin crust of the HLP.

Carlson, R. W.; James, D. E.; Fouch, M. J.; Grove, T. L.; Hart, W. K.; Grunder, A. L.; Duncan, R. A.; Keller, G. R.; Harder, S. H.; Kincaid, C. R.

2006-12-01

284

Long-term surveillance plan for the Collins Ranch Disposal Site, Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Lakeview (Collins Ranch) disposal cell, which will be referred to as the Collins Ranch disposal cell throughout this document. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or an Indian tribe, and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

Not Available

1993-12-01

285

Organochlorine residues and shell thinning in Oregon seabird eggs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A single egg was collected at 62 nests of 10 seabird species from Oregon in 1979. The eggs were analyzed for organochlorine contaminants; contemporary shell thickness was compared with eggshells collected during earlier time periods. Concentrations of DDE and PCB's in 1979 were generally low with the most contaminated species being the Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus), Leach's Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa), and Forktailed Storm Petrel (O. furcata). Limited eggshell data provide evidence that shell thinning was more severe along the Oregon coast in the 1950's than in 1979. With the possible exception of the Fork-tailed Storm Petrel, the residues in 1979 posed no known threat to the welfare of the species.

Henny, C.J.; Blus, L.J.; Prouty, R.M.

1982-01-01

286

Eocene wave-dominated deltaic sedimentation, Oregon Coast Range  

SciTech Connect

The Eocene Tyee and Coaledo Formations of southwest Oregon together illustrate vertical and lateral facies changes in delta-front and prodelta-to-shelf deposits, which prograded into a forearc basin. Prevalent coarse sandstone bodies with wood also contain large-scale, contorted cross-bedding; they show north-northwest paleocurrent transport directions. An abundance of hummocky stratification and symmetrical ripples in the prodelta and shelf sandstones indicate the dominance of wavy processes. Wave-dominated deltaic deposition was a repetitive and persisting style of sedimentation throughout much of the Eocene period in southwest Oregon. This scenario is useful for distinguishing vertical and lateral relationships applicable to other ancient wave-dominated systems and to predictions in potentially economic units of the Pacific Northwest.

Chan, M.A.; Dott, R.H. Jr.

1984-04-01

287

Cost of Impressed Current Cathodic Protection for Coastal Oregon Bridges  

SciTech Connect

The State of Oregon is using arc-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems on reinforced concrete coastal bridges. The two lowest bids for four ICCP projects were averaged and converted to 1997 dollars. The total average cost for the ICCP projects was $51.63/ft2 ($555.51/m2) of protected concrete. The cathodic protection part of the ICCP projects average $14.08/ft2 ($151.47/m2), while zinc anode installation cost an average of $7.13/ft2 ($76.67/m2). Oregon's rugged and beautiful coastline is graced with a series of historical arched bridges designed by Conde B. McCullough. McCullough is the internationally recognized architect who designed many of the Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101) bridges in the 1920s and 1930s. Many are listed on the National Historic Register. After the expense ($45m) and public outcry associated with the replacement of the historic Alsea Bay Bridge in Waldport, Oregon, the Oregon Department of Transportation began using impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) to extend the service life of reinforced concrete bridges. Figure 1 visually illustrates the need for such remediation. It shows exposed rebar from underneath the Brush Creek Bridge, which is very representative of the conditions found underneath many coastal Oregon bridges. Four ICCP projects have been funded, put out for bid, and completed. The four projects, their bid closing dates, and their completion dates are the Cape Creek Bridge (1990- 1992), the Yaquina Bay Bridge south arches (1991-1995), the Depoe Bay Bridge (1993-1997), and the Yaquina Bay Bridge south approach (1995-1997). The Cape Creek, Yaquina Bay, and Depoe Bay Bridges are shown in Figs. 2-4. Other ICCP projects are underway on the Oregon coast. In the ICCP systems, arc-sprayed zinc coatings on the concrete surface are anodes that protect the steel rebar. Accelerated laboratory studies at the Albany Research Center have predicted zinc anode service lives of approximately 27 years based on long-term bond strength measurements.1-3 Experience in California4 has documented zinc anode service lives of over 11 years. Both indicate a substantial savings in project costs compared to bridge replacement. For example, the replacement cost of the arc-sprayed sections of the three Oregon bridges is estimated to be $57m, while the four ICCP projects on those bridges have cost $20m. (The $45m to replace the Alsea Bay Bridge was more than simply the replacement cost--it included expanding the bridge to four lanes and making the bridge ''ICCP ready'' by ensuring electrically continuous rebar).

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cryer, Curtis B.

1998-07-01

288

Theory of elementary particles and accelerator theory: Task C: Experimental high energy physics. [Univ. of Oregon  

SciTech Connect

The experimental high energy physics group at the University of Oregon broadened its effort during the past year. The SLD effort extends from maintaining and operating the SLD luminosity monitor which was built at Oregon, to significant responsibility in physics analysis, such as event selection and background analysis for the left-right asymmetry measurement. The OPAL work focussed on the luminosity monitor upgrade to a silicon-tungsten calorimeter. Building on the work done at Oregon for SLD, the tungsten for this upgrade was machined by the Oregon shops and shipped to CERN for assembly. The Oregon GEM effort now concentrates on tracking, specifically silicon tracking. Oregon also has developed a silicon strip preradiator prototype, and tested it in a Brookhaven beam.

Brau, J.E.

1992-01-01

289

Zeolites in the Cascade Range of northern Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-three zeolite minerals were identified during secondary mineralogy studies of late Tertiary volcanic rock outcrop samples and\\/or late Tertiary to Quaternary geothermal drill-hole specimens in three areas of the Oregon Cascade Range (near Mount Hood, the Breiten bush-Austin Hot Springs area, and Newberry volcano). The Neogene to Holocene volcanic rocks contain euhedral to subhedral zeolite crystals in open spaces of

1997-01-01

290

BLOOD PARASITES IN SAGE-GROUSE FROM NEVADA AND OREGON  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peripheral blood smears from 196 adult and yearling female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were examined for blood parasites (167 from the breeding and 29 from the brood-rearing season) to determine prevalence of blood parasites, to attempt to correlate infection with chick survival, and to establish base-line values of prevalence in sage-grouse from Nevada and Oregon (USA). Birds were captured and

Mike R. Dunbar; Susan Tornquist; Mark R. Giordano

2003-01-01

291

Blood parasites in sage-grouse from Nevada and Oregon.  

PubMed

Peripheral blood smears from 196 adult and yearling female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were examined for blood parasites (167 from the breeding and 29 from the brood-rearing season) to determine prevalence of blood parasites, to attempt to correlate infection with chick survival, and to establish base-line values of prevalence in sage-grouse from Nevada and Oregon (USA). Birds were captured and released on two study areas during 1999-2001; Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) in northwestern Nevada, and Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge (HMNAR) in southeastern Oregon. Birds from a third study area, Beaty's Butte grazing allotment (BB) in southeastern Oregon, were sampled in 2000 and 2001. Overall, 19 birds (10%) were positive for Leucocytozoon lovati (= L. bonasae), 1 (0.5%) for Plasmodium pedioecetii, and 2 (1%) for microfilariae. Although prevalence of L. lovati on HMNAR was 39% during the breeding season in 1999 and 100% during the brood-rearing season in 2000, statistically, prevalence of L. lovati among study areas and years was not different. However, there were statistical differences between capture periods. Overall, 31% of the hens were positive for L. lovati during the brood-rearing season compared to 6% during the breeding season. There was no difference in packed cell volume between infected and non-infected birds and no difference between age-classes. However, mean sage-grouse productivity on HMNAR was higher (1.6 chicks/hen) for non-infected (n = 10) compared to infected hens (0.7 chicks/hen; n = 7), during 1999. Based on these limited observations on HMNAR in 1999, the possible effects that L. lovati may have on young sage-grouse could be detrimental to sage-grouse populations in Nevada and Oregon. PMID:12685084

Dunbar, Mike R; Tornquist, Susan; Giordano, Mark R

2003-01-01

292

GEARHART MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS AND CONTIGUOUS ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mineral-resource appraisal of the Gearhart Mountain Wilderness and contiguous roadless area in Oregon indicates that it is devoid of mines and mineral prospects and that there is little likelihood that metallic mineral resources occur in the area. Higher than normal heat flow characterizes the region containing Gearhart Mountain, indicating that it may have some potential, as yet undefined, for the occurrence of geothermal energy resources, but no geothermal resources were identified in this study.

Walker, George, W.; Ridenour, James

1984-01-01

293

Sensitivity of Oregon's Cascade Lakes to acid precipitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Susceptibility to acidification and present extent of anthropogenic acidification were studied for 63 Oregon Cascade lakes in 1982. Chemical parameters included pH, conductivity, alkalinity, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, dissolved silica, chloride and sulfate. Analyses for total organic carbon, fluoride and aluminum were performed in some cases. Average conductivity was 17.0 umhos\\/cm. Average laboratory-equilibrated pH was 6.96. Alkalinities averaged 137.6 ueq\\/l.

P. O. Nelson; G. K. Delwiche

1983-01-01

294

Oregon, USA, ecological regions and subregions for water quality management  

Microsoft Academic Search

To aid in producing a protection and management strategy for the freshwater resources of Oregon, USA, we have defined an initial\\u000a set of ecological regions and subregions of the state that organize the spatial similarities and differences in water quality.\\u000a We have delineated and mapped these subregions using existing maps of ecological regions, maps of selected environmental characteristics,\\u000a remote sensing

Sharon E. Clarke; Denis White; Andrew L. Schaedel

1991-01-01

295

Super-scale Failure of the Southern Oregon Cascadia Margin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using SeaBeam bathymetry and multichannel seismic reflection records we have identified three large submarine landslides on the southern Oregon Cascadia margin. The area enclosed by the three arcuate slide scarps is approximately 8000 km2, and involves an estimated 12,000-16,000 km3 of the accretionary wedge. The three arcuate slump escarpments are nearly coincident with the continental shelf edge on their landward

C. Goldfinger; L. D. Kulm; L. C. McNeill; P. Watts

2000-01-01

296

Evaluating microbial indicators of environmental condition in Oregon rivers.  

PubMed

Traditional bacterial indicators used in public health to assess water quality and the Biolog system were evaluated to compare their response to biological, chemical, and physical habitat indicators of stream condition both within the state of Oregon and among ecoregion aggregates (Coast Range, Willamette Valley, Cascades, and eastern Oregon). Forty-three randomly selected Oregon river sites were sampled during the summer in 1997 and 1998. The public health indicators included heterotrophic plate counts (HPC), total coliforms (TC), fecal coliforms (FC) and Escherichia coli (EC). Statewide, HPC correlated strongly with physical habitat (elevation, riparian complexity, % canopy presence, and indices of agriculture, pavement, road, pasture, and total disturbance) and chemistry (pH, dissolved O2, specific conductance, acid-neutralizing capacity, dissolved organic carbon, total N, total P, SiO2, and SO4). FC and EC were significantly correlated generally with the river chemistry indicators. TC bacteria significantly correlated with riparian complexity, road disturbance, dissolved O2, and SiO2 and FC. Analyzing the sites by ecoregion, eastern Oregon was characterized by high HPC, FC, EC, nutrient loads, and indices of human disturbance, whereas the Cascades ecoregion had correspondingly low counts of these indicators. The Coast Range and Willamette Valley presented inconsistent indicator patterns that are more difficult to characterize. Attempts to distinguish between ecoregions with the Biolog system were not successful, nor did a statistical pattern emerge between the first five principle components and the other environmental indicators. Our research suggests that some traditional public health microbial indicators may be useful in measuring the environmental condition of lotic systems. PMID:11915970

Pennington, A T; Harding, A K; Hendricks, C W; Campbell, H M

2001-12-01

297

Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment: the Seaside, Oregon Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A pilot study of Seaside, Oregon is underway, to develop methodologies for probabilistic tsunami hazard assessments that can be incorporated into Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) developed by FEMA's National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Current NFIP guidelines for tsunami hazard assessment rely on the science, technology and methodologies developed in the 1970s; although generally regarded as groundbreaking and state-of-the-art for

F. I. Gonzalez; E. L. Geist; C. Synolakis; V. V. Titov

2004-01-01

298

Black bear damage to lodgepole pine in central Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Black bear damage to 108 lodgepole pine trees was found in mixed conifer habitat in central Oregon. No trees of three other conifer species were injured. Eighty-nine percent of the damage occurred in the same year. Nearly 20% of the freshly damaged trees had bark removed from more than 75% of the circumference and, judging from the fate of trees damaged in prior years, probably succumbed.

Barnes, V. G., Jr.; Engeman, R. M.

1995-01-01

299

Cost of Impressed Current Cathodic Protection for Coastal Oregon Bridges  

Microsoft Academic Search

The State of Oregon is using arc-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems on reinforced concrete coastal bridges. The two lowest bids for four ICCP projects were averaged and converted to 1997 dollars. The total average cost for the ICCP projects was $51.63\\/ft2 ($555.51\\/m2) of protected concrete. The cathodic protection part of the ICCP projects

Gordon R. Holcomb; Curtis B. Cryer

1998-01-01

300

Behavioral research on diabetes at the Oregon Research Institute  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article overviews the scope and progression of research on behavioral aspects of diabetes over the past decade at the\\u000a Oregon Research Institute. Our research team has investigated several topics including: (a) conceptual models of self-management;\\u000a (b) social learning factors associated with regimen adherence; (c) individual and group-based interventions to enhance diabetes\\u000a self-management; (d) rates and determinants of participation in

Russell E. Glasgow; Deborah J. Toobert; Sarah E. Hampson; Willetta Wilson

1995-01-01

301

Representative Freshwater Bacterioplankton Isolated from Crater Lake, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-throughput culturing (HTC) methods that rely on dilution to extinction in very-low-nutrient media were used to obtain bacterial isolates from Crater Lake, Oregon. 16S rRNA sequence determination and phy- logenetic reconstruction were used to determine the potential ecological significance of isolated bacteria, both in Crater Lake and globally. Fifty-five Crater Lake isolates yielded 16 different 16S rRNA gene sequences. Thirty

Kathleen A. Page; Stephanie A. Connon; Stephen J. Giovannoni

2004-01-01

302

Migration of a Caldera Eruptive Center, Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Newberry Volcano is located in Deschutes County, Oregon about 35 km south of the city of Bend. It is a bi-modal Quaternary volcano and is one of the largest volcanos in the Cascade Range. The volcano is positioned near the junction of three geologic provinces: the Cascade Range to the west, the High Lava Plains portion of the Basin and Range to the south and east, and the Blue Mountains to the northeast. Newberry Volcano has been active for the past 600,000 years and has had at least two caldera-forming eruptions. The most recent major caldera-related eruptions, resulting in significant silicic ash and pyroclastic deposits, occurred approximately 300,000 and 80,000 years ago. A large-volume basaltic eruption that occurred about 72,000 years ago is represented by the widespread Bend Lavas which extend approximately 70 km to the north of the central caldera. About 6,000 years ago numerous basaltic eruptions occurred along a northwest fracture zone. The most recent eruption, a silicic obsidian flow and associated pumice fall that vented from within the caldera, has been dated at 1,300 ybp. Newberry has been the site of multiple rounds of geothermal exploration over the past 30 years. Geophysical data including gravity, resistivity, and seismic studies collected in the 1980s in early exploration of the volcano have identified anomalous features beneath the west flank of the volcano. Four deep (<2.8km) wells have been drilled on the northern half of the west flank; all of the wells have encountered temperatures in excess of 300°C, however, three of the wells have low permeability and unconnected fractures. The fourth well showed evidence of a hydrothermal system, but the well caved before a flow test could be completed. Recent geophysical analysis coupled with well geochemistry has identified evidence for older nested caldera related eruptive events buried under younger west flank lavas. A strong gravity gradient, a sharp MT boundary, and arcuate surface features from LIDAR coupled with 300-1200m offsets in units between wells is evidence that the caldera has migrated to the east over time. Buried silicic lavas are observed on the west flank; these lavas include McKay Butte, West Flank Dome, and Southwest Flank Dome. If this conclusion is correct, buried volcanic features similar to those observed in the present caldera could be expected under portions of the west flank, now buried by subsequent volcanic units. Hydrothermal systems, as exposed by erosion in older caldera mineral deposits, may be found associated with these features at Newberry.

Frone, Z.; Waibel, A.; Blackwell, D. D.

2012-12-01

303

Maturation anomalies in Cretaceous sediments underlying volcanic plateaus in Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Vitrinite reflectance profiles from three drill holes in Oregon, supplemented by independent data from Oregon and northern California, suggest that a thick sequence of volcanics may lead to a significant thermal input into underlying sediments. Anomalous, nearly vertical maturation profiles, in sedimentary sequences over 4000 ft thick, imply that large volumes of mature source rocks may lie under the volcanic cover of the Pacific Northwest. Several factors may be involved in this vertical homogenization of the temperature field. Although a convective hydrothermal mechanism would be the most effective form of thermal input, this is not considered to be the dominant mechanism due to the low permeabilities of the volcanogenic sediments underlying the volcanics. However, the cooling of intrusive and extrusive volcanics, thermal slip at abrupt changes in lithology, and exothermic hydration reactions of the altering volcanics can all be considered viable mechanisms for the thermal input. These mechanisms can lead to the uniform maturation of the entire sedimentary column and may account for the gas fields in Mist, Oregon. There, poor and immature source rocks give no indication of the actual origin of the gas. However, a mature sedimentary column underlying volcanic cover to the north and east could provide a plausible source for the gas. Other settings in which potentially hydrocarbon-bearing sediments underlie volcanics occur elsewhere in the US, and in India, Argentina, Brazil, Russia, and eastern and southern Africa.

Summer, N.S.; Verosub, K.L.

1986-04-01

304

Mothers and children last: the Oregon Medicaid experiment.  

PubMed

In 1989 and 1991, the Oregon legislature enacted a series of initiatives to extend health coverage to uninsured state residents. Among these initiatives is an act that seeks to extend a modified set of Medicaid benefits to state residents with family incomes below the federal poverty level. This act also reduces benefits the state is now required to provide to Medicaid-enrolled women of childbearing age and children. This Article explores the legal context in which the Oregon Medicaid experiment must be evaluated. It argues that by reducing the level of coverage to which tens of thousands of exceedingly poor, Medicaid-eligible women and children are entitled, the experiment falls outside the scope of valid research that the United States Department of Health and Human Services may either sanction or fund. The Article also discusses the implications of the Oregon experiment, if approved, for the future direction of the Medicaid program in particular, and for health care reform for the poor, generally. PMID:1621705

Rosenbaum, S

1992-01-01

305

Permian and early(?) Triassic radiolarian faunas from the Grindstone Terrane, central Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Moderately well preserved Permian and Early(?) Triassic radiolarian faunas from sedimentary melange cherts of the Grindstone terrane in central Oregon are nearly identical to coeval chert faunas in Japan. Although several Oregon taxa have been reported from limestone sequences in the central United States, most of the Oregon forms have only been found in cherty rocks and nearly half have not previously been reported from North America. Forty-two taxa belonging to 19 genera are systematically treated. Co-occurrences of some species in Oregon indicate that their ranges in North America may differ from those in Japan. -from Authors

Blome, C. D.; Reed, K. M.

1992-01-01

306

Investigation of Induced Seismicity from a Geothermal System, Neal Hot Springs, Eastern Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Newly acquired geophysical data from an eleven-seismometer network surrounding the Neal Hot Springs (NHS) Geothermal Power Plant in eastern Oregon was analyzed for induced seismicity and geothermal fluid flow. Major faults associated with the Oregon-Idaho Graben and the western Snake River Plain provides pathways for deep geothermal fluid flow for the NHS hot-water system. Our short-period seismic stations, can detect regional events not in published earthquake catalogs. These stations have been collecting seismic data from the initiation of the geothermal system's development through fluid injection tests this past summer. Background seismic values were acquired before plant production to measure natural geothermal fluid activity, but no natural fluid flow seismicity was identified. Two local events located less than 10 km to the northeast of NHS along with a catalogued, 2.8 M regional event 200 km away were identified in the data set, verifying the sensitivity and capability of the passive seismic network to capture events that were to occur at NHS. We monitored seismic activity from production and development with 4-8 hour durations for the past 15 months. We identify repeated signals at approximately 2 Hz that likely represent fluid injection or drilling cycles. However, induced earthquakes were not identified during production activities. The lack of microseismic events could be the result of the shallow depth of the geothermal resource, approximately 850 m below the earth surface. Future studies include a receiver function analysis to determine crustal boundaries beneath NHS, along with further monitoring of induced seismicity due to geothermal fluid flow as the geothermal power plant comes online.

Brenn, G. R.; Liberty, L. M.; Van Wijk, K.; Shaltry, D.; Colwell, C.

2012-12-01

307

Health Consultation: Ingestion of Lamprey for the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians. Lamprey Caught at Willamette Falls, Oregon City, Clackamas County, Oregon, Part of Portland Harbor, Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon. EPA Facility ID: ORSFN1002155.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Indians (CTSI) requested that the Superfund Health Investigation and Education (SHINE) program of the Oregon Department of Human Services investigate the risk of ingesting lamprey. This health consultation focuses on ...

2005-01-01

308

Rethinking Recycling: An Oregon Waste Reduction Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This updated curriculum guide is designed to provide teachers of elementary school science with a set of activities on recycling and waste reduction. The curriculum has three sections: (1) Grades K-3 Lessons; (2) Grades 4-5 Lessons; and (3) Teacher's Resource Guide. It is designed to take students from an introduction to natural resources and…

Oregon State Dept. of Environmental Quality, Portland.

309

50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Lewiston Dam (Lewiston Reservoir). Salmon 18010210 Siskiyou (CA) Lower...

2013-10-01

310

Success Is in the Details. No Element of Tech Prep Escapes the Fine-Tuned Planning of Oregon's Design Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Articles describe elements of Oregon's' tech prep program: "New Software Helps Students Visualize a Career Path" (Buhl); "Bridge Construction Ahead" (Roach); and "To Track Students, Oregon Goes to the Bar" (Dutson). (JOW)

Buhl, Cheryl L.; And Others

1995-01-01

311

Health Consultation: Community Concerns, North Ridge Estates, Klamath Falls, Klamath County, Oregon. EPA Facility ID: ORN001002476.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Oregon Department of Human Services/Superfund Health Investigation and Education program (ODHS/SHINE), the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ), and the U.S. Environmental Prot...

2006-01-01

312

33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of... Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of...RNA): All waters of the Willamette River encompassed by a line...

2009-07-01

313

33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of... Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of...RNA): All waters of the Willamette River encompassed by a line...

2009-07-01

314

33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of... Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of...RNA): All waters of the Willamette River encompassed by a line...

2010-07-01

315

50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Lewiston Dam (Lewiston Reservoir). Salmon 18010210 Siskiyou (CA) Lower...

2012-10-01

316

50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Lewiston Dam (Lewiston Reservoir). Salmon 18010210 Siskiyou (CA) Lower...

2010-10-01

317

50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Lewiston Dam (Lewiston Reservoir). Salmon 18010210 Siskiyou (CA) Lower...

2011-10-01

318

University of Oregon Physics Applets: Atomic Emission  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This applet presents the user with an energy level diagram of an atom. The values of the levels (in eV) can be set by parameter tags. Relative transition probabilities can also be set by parameter tags. An active electron can be moved to any level by using the pointing device and then the electron will cascade down to the ground level according to the relative transition probabilities that have been set up. Each time the electron moves from a higher to lower energy level a photon will be emitted. The wavelength of the photon is indicated and some attempt is to color code the outgoing photon by the emitted wavelength.

Bothun, Gregory

2007-01-09

319

78 FR 42945 - Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Oregon  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Notice is hereby given that the State of Oregon has revised its approved State Public Water Supply Supervision Primacy Program. Oregon has adopted regulations analogous to EPA's Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule; Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule; Ground Water Rule; and Lead and Copper Short-Term Regulatory Revisions and Clarifications Rule and has adopted......

2013-07-18

320

Oregon Demonstration Project: Alternate Project Delivery and Accelerated Bridge Construction on OR 38, Drain to Elkton.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

OR 38 is a mountainous two-lane route with large elevation changes that passes across Oregon's coastal range. Oregon's HfL project consisted of removing and replacing five bridges on an 11mi stretch of OR 38 between the towns of Drain and Elkton. All five...

A. Ardani G. Hoffman J. Mallela

2010-01-01

321

A Dualistic Stream Classification System for Oregon: In Support of a Stream Compensatory Mitigation Framework  

EPA Science Inventory

To meet the goals of the U.S. federal Clean Water Act (CWA) and Oregon’s Removal-Fill (R-F) Law, unavoidable impacts to jurisdictional waters, including streams and rivers, must be compensated for through compensatory mitigation under the CWA Section 404 and R-F permitting ...

322

Rural Health Clinics and Diabetes-Related Primary Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries in Oregon  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: This study assessed whether Rural Health Clinics (RHCs) were associated with higher rates of recommended primary care services for adult beneficiaries diagnosed with diabetes in Oregon's Medicaid program, the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). Methods: OHP claims data from 2002 to 2003 were used to assess quality of diabetic care for…

Kirkbride, Kelly; Wallace, Neal

2009-01-01

323

LIFE HISTORY MONITORING OF SALMONIDS IN THE WEST FORK SMITH RIVER, UMPQUA BASIN, OREGON  

EPA Science Inventory

As a life-cycle monitoring basin for the Oregon Salmon Plan, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has estimated adult returns, distribution and smolt outmigration of coho, chinook and winter steelhead in the West Fork Smith River since 1998. In 2001/2002, the Environmenta...

324

Chemical and Isotopic Data for Water from Thermal Springs and Wells of Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The thermal springs of Oregon range in composition from dilute NaHCO sub 3 waters to moderately saline CO sub 2 -charged NaCl-NaHCO sub 3 waters. Most of the thermal springs are located in southeastern or southcentral Oregon, with a few in northeastern Or...

R. H. Mariner J. R. Swanson G. J. Orris T. S. Presser W. C. Evans

1981-01-01

325

Use of hydrologic landscape classification to diagnose streamflow predictability in Oregon  

EPA Science Inventory

We implement a spatially lumped rainfall-runoff model to predict daily streamflow at 88 catchments within Oregon, USA and analyze its performance within the context of Oregon Hydrologic Landscapes (OHL) classification. OHL classification is used to characterize the physio-climat...

326

A mass Budget for Mercury in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Oregon’s Willamette River Basin (Basin), health advisories currently limit consumption of fish that have accumulated methylmercury. Under the Clean Water Act, these advisories create the requirement for a mercury Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), which, in turn, created the need to better characterize the cycling of mercury in the Basin. This paper presents: (a) a mass balance model relating

Bruce K. Hope

2005-01-01

327

76 FR 19355 - Oregon Winds Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the feasibility of the Oregon Winds Pumped Storage Project to be...concrete-lined low-pressure tunnel; (4) a lower reservoir with...steel-lined high-pressure tunnel; (6) an underground power...annual generation of the Oregon Winds Pumped Storage Project...

2011-04-07

328

Rogue River, Mt. Hood, and Willamette National Forests, Calendar Year 1973, Herbicide Use. Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The action covered by the impact survey involves the use of the herbicides Amitrole, Dicamba, 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T, Silvex, and Picloram on the Rogue River, Mt. Hood and Willamette National Forests located in Oregon and California. The Oregon counties affected ...

1972-01-01

329

Oregon's Psychiatric Security Review Board: A Comprehensive System for Managing Insanity Acquittees  

Microsoft Academic Search

The insanity defense is a particularly controversial aspect of the interaction between law and mental health. During the past decade, many states have revised or abolished their insanity defenses. Oregon, however, chose in 1978 to retain its existing defense and create a new, unique system for the post-adjudication management of insanity acquit tees. Oregon's legislature established the Psychiatric Security Review

Jeffrey L. Rogers; Joseph D. Bloom; Spero M. Manson

1986-01-01

330

AIDS Education in Rural Oregon School Districts: Compliance with State Curriculum Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oregon State Department of Education mandates age-appropriate curricula for all grade levels on infectious diseases, including AIDS, ARC, HIV, and Hepatitis B. The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine the extent to which AIDS education was occurring in three remote rural Oregon school districts; (2) to examine the focus of the…

Hales, Loyde W.; McGrew, Robin R.

331

Managing seafood processing wastewater on the Oregon coast: A time of transition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seafood processors along the Oregon coast practice a wastewater management plan that is unique within the state. Most of these operations discharge wastewater under a General Permit issued by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) that requires only that they screen the wastewater to remove particles that will not pass through a 40 mesh screen. The General Permit was

M. D. Anderson; J. R. Miner

1997-01-01

332

78 FR 37124 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oregon: Heat Smart Program and Enforcement...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...supported the approval of the Oregon Heat Smart program rules and their...of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995...submissions relate to Oregon's Heat Smart program, enforcement...March 15, 2011: Division 262, Heat Smart Program for...

2013-06-20

333

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1999 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed

Mark A. Lewis; Christine Mallette; William M. Murray

2000-01-01

334

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1998 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed

Mark A. Lewis; Christine Mallette; William M. Murray

1999-01-01

335

More with Four: A Look at the Four Day Week in Oregon's Small Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 4-day school week offers solutions to the financial and instructional problems often faced by small rural schools. Two southern Oregon schools implemented the 4-day school week on a trial basis in 1982-83 and, along with five eastern Oregon districts, continue to use this schedule today. The primary purpose of the change to a 4-day week was…

Reinke, Joyce M.

336

Linking Prevention Science and Social and Emotional Learning: The Oregon Resiliency Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews the contributions of the Oregon Resiliency Project, an effort to enhance positive social-emotional development of children and youth through social and emotional learning (SEL). The project was launched in 2001 as a collaborative effort between faculty and graduate student researchers at the University of Oregon. The primary…

Merrell, Kenneth W.

2010-01-01

337

77 FR 30440 - Anchorage; Change to Cottonwood Island Anchorage, Columbia River, Oregon and Washington  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Island Anchorage to river mile 72-26. This...Island Anchorage to river mile 71-08. The...Oregon side of the Columbia River channel and the Oregon...1531-1538) requires Federal agencies to assess...the distribution of power and...

2012-05-23

338

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area. (Coastal Oregon) Volume 1 of 4. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Coastal Oregon Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Coastal Oregon Area includes Clatsop, Tillamook, Lincoln, Lane, Douglas, Coos, and Curry counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Oregon, Washington, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socioeconomic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

Not Available

1988-12-01

339

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Coastal Oregon) Volume 3 of 4. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Coastal Oregon Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Coastal Oregon Area includes Clatsop, Tillamook, Lincoln, Lane, Douglas, Coos, and Curry counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Oregon, Washington, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

Not Available

1988-12-01

340

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Coastal Oregon) Volume 2 of 4. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Coastal Oregon Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Coastal Oregon Area includes Clatsop, Tillamook, Lincoln, Lane, Douglas, Coos, and Curry counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Oregon, Washington, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

Not Available

1988-12-01

341

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Coastal Oregon). Volume 4 of 4. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Coastal Oregon Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Coastal Oregon Area includes Clatsop, Tillamook, Lincoln, Lane, Douglas, Coos, and Curry counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Oregon, Washington, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

Not Available

1988-12-01

342

The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Elevation data are essential to a broad range of business uses, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. In the State of Oregon, elevation data are critical for river and stream resource management; forest resources management; water supply and quality; infrastructure and construction management; wildfire management, planning and response; natural resources conservation; and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary source for deriving elevation models and other datasets. The Oregon Lidar Consortium (OLC), led by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI), has developed partnerships with Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies to acquire quality level 1 data in areas of shared interest. The goal of OLC partners is to acquire consistent, high-resolution and high-quality statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data. The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States and quality level 5 ifsar data for Alaska with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other 3D representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

Carswell, William J., Jr.

2014-01-01

343

Debating Death: Religion, Politics, and the Oregon Death With Dignity Act  

PubMed Central

In 1994, Oregon passed the Oregon Death With Dignity Act, becoming the first state in the nation to allow physician-assisted suicide (PAS). This paper compares the public discussion that occurred in 1994 and during the Act’s implementation in 1997 and examines these debates in relation to health care reform under the Obama administration. I argue that the 1994 and 1997 Oregon PAS campaigns and the ensuing public debate represent the culmination of a growing lack of deference to medical authority, concerns with the doctor-patient relationship, and a desire for increased patient autonomy over decisions during death. The public debate over PAS in Oregon underscored the conflicts among competing religious, political, and personal interests. More visible and widespread than any other American debate on PAS, the conflict in Oregon marked the beginning of the now nationwide problem of determining if and when a terminally ill person can choose to die.

Purvis, Taylor E.

2012-01-01

344

Data from geothermal test wells near Mount Hood, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report includes well specifications, drillers ' logs, and temperature logs of geothermal test wells drilled at 7 sites near Mt. Hood, Oreg. The wells were drilled in 1979 and 1980 under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey. The project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, was part of an interagency effort to determine the geothermal potential of Mt. Hood. The agencies involved were, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. (USGS)

Robison, J. H.; Forcella, L. S.; Gannett, Marshall W.

1981-01-01

345

SKY LAKES ROADLESS AREA AND MOUNTAIN LAKES WILDERNESS, OREGON.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Based on a mineral survey of the Sky Lakes Roadless Area and the Mountain Lakes Wilderness, Oregon, the areas have little or no promise for the occurrence of metallic-mineral resources or geothermal energy resources. Nonmetallic resources exist in the areas, but other areas outside the roadless area and wilderness also contain resources of volcanic cinders, scoria, ash, breccia, and sand and gravel which are easier to obtain and closer to markets. The roadless area and wilderness are not geologically favorable for metallic deposits, or for coal, oil, or gas resources.

Smith, James, G.; Benham, John, R.

1984-01-01

346

Mercury levels and relationships in water, sediment, and fish tissue in the Willamette Basin, Oregon.  

PubMed

In Oregon's Willamette River Basin (the Basin), health advisories currently limit consumption of fish that have accumulated methylmercury (MeHg) to levels posing a significant human health risk. These advisories created the requirement for a mercury total maximum daily load for the Basin, which required a greater understanding of the behavior, distribution, and levels of mercury and MeHg in the Basin. In 2002, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality initiated a study to measure (using ultraclean techniques) mercury and MeHg levels in water, sediment, and fish samples collected throughout the Basin. Results from the Middle Fork (nominal background) suggested that naturally occurring surface-water concentrations of mercury and MeHg would on an annual average basis be expected in the range of 0.5 to 1.0 and 0.04 to 0.06 ng L(-1), respectively. Concentrations in the Coast Fork (Cottage Grove), which were markedly higher, are likely the result of historical mining discharges. The possibility exists that wetlands alone could contribute the dissolved MeHg levels (approximately 0.04 ng L(-1)) observed in the Main Stem. Mercury levels in sediment were similar, and near background, in the Main Stem, Coast Fork (Row River), and Middle Fork but significantly increased in the Coast Fork (Cottage Grove). Fish tissue mercury levels were typically highest in piscivorous and lowest in invertivorous species but highest in the Coast Fork (Cottage Grove). In the Coast Fork and Cottage Grove Reservoir, discharges from historical mercury mining activities appear to have significantly impacted water, sediment, and fish tissue levels; however these impacts do not appear to extend into the Main Stem. Basinwide mercury data are at present too spottily distributed to determine whether significant mercury point sources exist along the Main Stem. PMID:15750769

Hope, B K; Rubin, J R

2005-04-01

347

Heat flow, arc volcanism, and subduction in northern Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A total of 75 heat flow measurements are presented for the part of the Oregon Cascade Range and surrounding provinces, including the Willamette Valley, the High Lava Plains, the Deschutes-Umatilla Plateau, and the Blue Mountains, between 43°30' and 45°05'N. The data document a major change in regional heat flow from values of 40±2 mW m-2. in the Western Cascade Range and Willamette Valley provinces to 100±5 mW m-2 along the boundary between the High Cascade Range and Western Cascade Range provinces. This variation has a half width of approximately 10 km and appears to be exactly the same along the whole study area (a strike length of over 150 km). This heat flow change coincides with a line of hot springs and occurs approximately 20-30 km west of the axis of the High Cascade Range where the major andesite stratovolcanoes of Mount Jefferson and the Three Sisters occur. The heat flow boundary corresponds to a steep gravity gradient with about the same half width and an amplitude of approximately -25 mGal. Both sets of data can be explained by a hot, low-density region about 60 km wide in the crust below 7-10 km. This heat source region is probably a zone of temporary residence of magmas melting off the subduction zone. Such crustal staging chambers may be commonly involved in the complex petrologic evolution of andesites and granitic rocks in volcanic arcs. The ratio of apparent intrusive to extrusive rocks ranges from 1:1 counting the total volcanism to 10:1 or 50:1 if only andesitic or rhyolitic volcanics are included. The overall heat flow pattern is consistent with active subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate under the Pacific Northwest. The absorption of heat from the continental outer arc by the sinking plate and the occurrence of the high heat flow associated with the volcanic arc are documented. The lack of earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest is probably related to the proximity to the ridge and the fact that several kilometers of sediment overlie the basaltic basement where it begins to be subducted, so that it is already at a minimum temperature of 100°-200°C. During the Oligocene and Miocene the edge of the volcanic arc was in the Western Cascade Range at least 40-60 km west of its present position. During the last 6-10 m.y. the heat flow has decreased from high volcanic arc values to subnormal outer arc values. The effectiveness of subduction as a heat sink is thus clearly demonstrated. The eastward migration of the volcanic arc axis might be associated with the proposed rotation of the Western Cascade Range due to Basin and Range spreading.

Blackwell, David D.; Bowen, Richard G.; Hull, Donald A.; Riccio, Joseph; Steele, John L.

1982-10-01

348

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2004-02-27

349

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2002-12-01

350

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.  

SciTech Connect

The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2001-03-01

351

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Conceptual Design Report, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Watson, Montgomery (Montgomery Watson, Bellevue, WA)

1995-03-01

352

Hypoxia on the Oregon Shelf: a Modeling Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last decade frequent summertime episodes of hypoxic (< 1.43 ml DO/l; DO - Dissolved Oxygen) waters occupying significant areas of the Oregon coastal shelf have been observed. The spatial extent and severity of low oxygen conditions on the shelf vary interannually and are the cumulative results of both physical and biological processes. Among the most important factors are the amount of total primary production, the retention (or residence) time of water before it is flushed from a local region and DO and nitrate concentration of the source waters that are transported onto the shelf. In order to examine the importance of these physical and biological processes as well as their interaction, a 6-component (nitrate, ammonium, phytoplankton, zooplankton, detritus, oxygen) ecosystem model has been coupled to a ROMS (Regional Ocean Modeling System) circulation model. We analyzed model hindcasts for three years: 2002, with strong hypoxia record, 2006, when hypoxia was severe (even approaching anoxia), spatially extensive and lasted for several months, and 2008, when hypoxic events were shorter and not as widespread along the coast. It was found that the supply of nutrients to the shelf is a key factor leading to hypoxia off Oregon during the summer. The differences in wind forcing, mainly in the frequency of succession of upwelling and downnwelling events, in 2002 and 2006 also appear to influence the extent of hypoxia.

Koch, A. O.; Spitz, Y. H.; Batchelder, H. P.

2010-12-01

353

Co-existence of gas hydrate, free gas, and brine within the regional gas hydrate stability zone at Hydrate Ridge (Oregon margin): evidence from prolonged degassing of a pressurized core  

Microsoft Academic Search

Standard scientific operations on Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204 documented a horizon of massive gas hydrate and highly saline pore water ?0–20 m below the southern summit of Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. The sediment zone lies near active seafloor gas venting, raising the possibility that free gas co-exists with gas hydrate in shallow subsurface layers where pore waters have

Alexei V. Milkov; Gerald R. Dickens; George E. Claypool; Young-Joo Lee; Walter S. Borowski; Marta E. Torres; Wenyue Xu; Hitoshi Tomaru; Anne M. Tréhu; Peter Schultheiss

2004-01-01

354

Predicting the effect of the Oregon Health Plan on Medicaid coverage for outpatients with HIV.  

PubMed Central

The Oregon Health Plan, which took effect in February 1994, extends Medicaid eligibility but limits coverage to conditions and treatments above a certain threshold on a prioritized list. Retrospective analysis was conducted on records of visits to two Oregon human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) outpatient clinics in 1991 and 1992 to determine Medicaid coverage if the plan had been operational. Of 1129 patients, 21.1% were Medicaid-eligible; an additional 56.5% would have been eligible under the Oregon plan. Only 5.0% to 6.8% of these patients' visits were for conditions listed below the plan's coverage threshold; almost none of these were for HIV-specific conditions.

Conviser, R; Retondo, M J; Loveless, M O

1994-01-01

355

Osprey distribution, abundance, and status in western North America: II. The Oregon population  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An estimated 308 ? 23 pairs of Ospreys nested in the survey area in Oregon in 1976. Major concentration centers include Crane Prairie Reservoir and the adjacent Deschutes National Forest, the coastal lakes and reservoirs between Florence and North Bend, the Rogue River, the Lane County reservoirs, and the Umpqua River. An estimated 47 percent of the Oregon population is nesting at reservoirs. Limited information is available concerning the long-term status of the Oregon population; however, the ability of the species to pioneer newly created reservoirs emphasizes that the population is utilizing new habitats.

Henny, C.J.; Collins, J.A.; Deibert, W.J.

1978-01-01

356

An environmental streamflow assessment for the Santiam River basin, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Santiam River is a tributary of the Willamette River in northwestern Oregon and drains an area of 1,810 square miles. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) operates four dams in the basin, which are used primarily for flood control, hydropower production, recreation, and water-quality improvement. The Detroit and Big Cliff Dams were constructed in 1953 on the North Santiam River. The Green Peter and Foster Dams were completed in 1967 on the South Santiam River. The impacts of the structures have included a decrease in the frequency and magnitude of floods and an increase in low flows. For three North Santiam River reaches, the median of annual 1-day maximum streamflows decreased 42–50 percent because of regulated streamflow conditions. Likewise, for three reaches in the South Santiam River basin, the median of annual 1-day maximum streamflows decreased 39–52 percent because of regulation. In contrast to their effect on high flows, the dams increased low flows. The median of annual 7-day minimum flows in six of the seven study reaches increased under regulated streamflow conditions between 60 and 334 percent. On a seasonal basis, median monthly streamflows decreased from February to May and increased from September to January in all the reaches. However, the magnitude of these impacts usually decreased farther downstream from dams because of cumulative inflow from unregulated tributaries and groundwater entering the North, South, and main-stem Santiam Rivers below the dams. A Wilcox rank-sum test of monthly precipitation data from Salem, Oregon, and Waterloo, Oregon, found no significant difference between the pre-and post-dam periods, which suggests that the construction and operation of the dams since the 1950s and 1960s are a primary cause of alterations to the Santiam River basin streamflow regime. In addition to the streamflow analysis, this report provides a geomorphic characterization of the Santiam River basin and the associated conceptual framework for assessing possible geomorphic and ecological changes in response to river-flow modifications. Suggestions for future biomonitoring and investigations are also provided. This study was one in a series of similar tributary streamflow and geomorphic studies conducted for the Willamette Sustainable Rivers Project. The Sustainable Rivers Project is a national effort by the USACE and The Nature Conservancy to develop environmental flow requirements in regulated river systems.

Risley, John C.; Wallick, J. Rose; Mangano, Joseph F.; Jones, Krista L.

2012-01-01

357

Structural Controls of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Field, Malhuer County, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed mapping (1:24,000) of the Neal Hot Springs area (90 km2) in eastern Oregon is part of a larger study of geothermal systems in the Basin and Range, which focuses on the structural controls of geothermal activity. The study area lies within the intersection of two regional grabens, the middle-late Miocene, N-striking, Oregon-Idaho graben and younger late Miocene to Holocene, NW-striking, western Snake River Plain graben. The geothermal field is marked by Neal Hot Springs, which effuse from opaline sinter mounds just north of Bully Creek. Wells producing geothermal fluids, with temperatures at 138°C, intersect a major, W-dipping, NNW-striking, high-angle normal fault at depths of 850-915 m. Displacement along this structure dies southward, with likely horse-tailing, which commonly produces high fracture density and a zone of high permeability conducive for channeling hydrothermal fluids. Mapping reveals that the geothermal resource lies within a local, left step-over. 'Hard-linkage' between strands of the left-stepping normal fault, revealed through a study of well chips and well logs, occurs through two concealed structures. Both are W-striking faults, with one that runs parallel to Cottonwood Creek and one 0.5 km N of the creek. Injection wells intersect these two transverse structures within the step-over. Stepping and displacement continue to the NW of the known geothermal field, along W-dipping, N-striking faults that cut lower to middle Miocene Hog Creek Formation, consisting of silicic and mafic volcanic rocks. These N-striking faults were likely initiated during initial Oregon-Idaho graben subsidence (15.3-15.1 Ma), with continued development through late Miocene. Bully Creek Formation deposits, middle to upper Miocene lacustrine and pyroclastic rocks, concomitantly filled the sub half-grabens, and they dip gently to moderately eastward. Younger, western Snake River Plain deposits, upper Miocene to Pliocene fluvial, lacustrine, and pyroclastic rocks, show various dip directions and gentle tilting. Extensive alluvial fan cover hinders collection of fault kinematic data, which coupled with limited regional seismicity, precludes careful calculation of local stress field orientations. However, the proximity of Neal (4 km) to the active, N- to NW-striking, oblique-normal slip Cottonwood Mountain fault and active hot springs (~90°C), opaline sinter mounds, and geothermal fluid flow at Neal suggest that the geothermal field lies within a reactived (Quaternary), southward-terminating, left-stepping, fault zone, which probably accommodates oblique-slip with a dominant normal component. Sugarloaf Butte (completely silicified and replaced) lies within a left step of this fault zone, ~5 km of Neal Hot Springs and is possibly related to the evolution of the geothermal system. Epithermal deposits and argillic to propylitic alteration in other nearby areas (e.g., Hope Butte, ~3 Ma, 5 km N) indicate previous geothermal activity.

Edwards, J. H.; Faulds, J. E.

2012-12-01

358

High-throughput screen using a single-cell tyrosine phosphatase assay reveals biologically active inhibitors of tyrosine phosphatase CD45  

PubMed Central

Many cellular signaling events are regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation and mediated by the opposing actions of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. Protein tyrosine phosphatases are emerging as drug targets, but poor cell permeability of inhibitors has limited the development of drugs targeting these enzymes [Tautz L, et al. (2006) Expert Opin Ther Targets 10:157–177]. Here we developed a method to monitor tyrosine phosphatase activity at the single-cell level and applied it to the identification of cell-permeable inhibitors. The method takes advantage of the fluorogenic properties of phosphorylated coumaryl amino propionic acid (pCAP), an analog of phosphotyrosine, which can be incorporated into peptides. Once delivered into cells, pCAP peptides were dephosphorylated by protein tyrosine phosphatases, and the resulting cell fluorescence could be monitored by flow cytometry and high-content imaging. The robustness and sensitivity of the assay was validated using peptides preferentially dephosphorylated by CD45 and T-cell tyrosine phosphatase and available inhibitors of these two enzymes. The assay was applied to high-throughput screening for inhibitors of CD45, an important target for autoimmunity and infectious diseases [Hermiston ML, et al. (2003) Annu Rev Immunol 21:107–137]. We identified four CD45 inhibitors that showed activity in T cells and macrophages. These results indicate that our assay can be applied to primary screening for inhibitors of CD45 and of other protein tyrosine phosphatases to increase the yield of biologically active inhibitors.

Stanford, Stephanie M.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Walker, Logan M.; Wu, Dennis J.; Falk, Matthew D.; Mitra, Sayantan; Damle, Sagar S.; Ruble, David; Kaltcheva, Teodora; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Bavari, Sina; Barrios, Amy M.; Bottini, Nunzio

2012-01-01

359

Mineral resources of the Fifteen Mile Creek, Oregon Canyon, Twelve Mile Creek, and Willow Creek Wilderness Study Areas, Malheur and Harney counties, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

The four contiguous study areas are located in a volcanic terrane dominated by tuffs that were erupted from calderas of the McDermitt Caldera complex and the Whitehorse Caldera. None of these areas have identified resources, despite the proximity of mercury, uranium, and lithium mineralization to the south. The southern parts of the Fifteen Mile Creek and the Oregon Canyon Wilderness Study Areas have a low potential for mercury and uranium. The southern parts of the Fifteen Mile Creek, Oregon Canyon, and Willow Creek and the northwestern part of the Oregon Wilderness Study Areas have low potential for antimony, bismuth, mercury, silver,molybdenum, and zinc. In the Oregon Canyon Wilderness Study Area, the tuff of Oregon Canyon and the rim of the caldera of the McDermitt Caldera complex have a low potential for gold and silver in epithermal veins. The study areas have a low potential for zeolite minerals, oil and gas, and geothermal energy throughout, and restricted parts of the study areas have a low potential for pumice, rare-earth elements, zirconium, and decorative building stone.

Peterson, J.A.; Rytuba, J.J.; Plouff, D.; Vercountere, T.L.; Turner, R.L.; Sawatzky, D.L. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA)); Leszcykowski, A.M.; Peters, T.J.; Schmauch, S.W.; Winters, R.A. (US Bureau of Mines (US))

1988-01-01

360

SHALLOW HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEM AT NEWBERRY VOLCANO, OREGON: A CONCEPTUAL MODEL.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Investigations at Newberry Volcano, Oregon, have resulted in a satisfactory account of the shallow hydrothermal system, but have not indicated the nature of a possible geothermal reservoir. Hot springs in the caldera probably represent the return of circulating meteoric water, warmed at shallow depths by high conductive heat flow and by steam rising from greater depths. Ground-water recharge to the hydrothermal system is at most 250 liters per second, of which about 20 liters per second reappears in the hot springs. Analysis of temperature anomalies in a Geological Survey drillhole indicates that ground-water flow totaling about 125 liters per second could be moving laterally at depths of less than 650 m at the drill site. Refs.

Sammel, Edward, A.

1983-01-01

361

Strontium isotopes in some Cenozoic lavas from Oregon and Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 87Sr/86Sr ratios have been determined in 22 volcanic rocks from Oregon and Washington. The emphasis of the study was on andesites and dacites, but several basalts were included. Most of the samples have a very limited range in strontium isotopic composition and all fall within variations previously defined for oceanic basalts. There are no systematic differences between lavas erupted through the pre-Cenozoic basement and those erupted in the Columbia River Embayment. It is concluded that the role played by crustal rocks in the generation of these andesites and dacites is minor or nonexistent, but assimiliation of crustal material may have been a factor for some of the basalts of the Columbia River Group. ?? 1970.

Hedge, C. E.; Hildreth, R. A.; Henderson, W. T.

1970-01-01

362

A new species of Helobdella (Hirudinida: Glossiphoniidae) from Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Helobdella bowermani n. sp. is described from specimens collected in fine sediment of open water benthos of Upper Klamath Lake, Klamath County, Oregon. The new species has pale yellow/buff coloration with scattered chromatophore blotches throughout the dorsal surface, lateral extensions or papillae only on the a2 annulus, dorsal medial row of papillae with small papilla on a1 and larger papillae on a2 and a3, and a small oval scute (rarely triangular). Helobdella bowermani n. sp. is morphologically similar to Helobdella atli and Helobdella simplex. Molecular comparison of CO-I sequence data from H. bowermani n. sp. revealed differences of 10.6%–10.8% with Helobdella californica, differences of 12.2%–13.7% with H. atli, and differences of 12.7%–13.2% with H. simplex.

Moser, William E.; Fend, Steven V.; Richardson, Dennis J.; Hammond, Charlette I.; Lazo-Wasem, Eric A.; Govedich, Fredric R.; Gullo, Bettina S.

2013-01-01

363

Refurbishment of the Oregon State University rotating rack  

SciTech Connect

TRIGA reactors have experienced operational difficulties with the rotating racks used for sample irradiation. The most common problem occurs when the rack seizes, and the corrective action taken is replacement of the rack assembly. This paper describes the symptoms leading to rack failure and a refurbishment procedure to correct the problem without replacing the rack at the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) Facility. This procedure was accomplished with extraordinary results from an operational and a radiation protection standpoint. The refurbishment has extended the useful life of this reactor facility with minimal financial impact. Given the declining number of university-based research reactors, it is in the nation's best interest to maintain the currently operating research reactor facilities, and the described procedure can aid in achieving that goal.

Higginbotham, J.F. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

1991-01-01

364

Super-scale Failure of the Southern Oregon Cascadia Margin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using SeaBeam bathymetry and multichannel seismic reflection records we have identified three large submarine landslides on the southern Oregon Cascadia margin. The area enclosed by the three arcuate slide scarps is approximately 8000 km2, and involves an estimated 12,000-16,000 km3 of the accretionary wedge. The three arcuate slump escarpments are nearly coincident with the continental shelf edge on their landward margins, spanning the full width of the accretionary wedge. Debris from the slides is buried or partially buried beneath the abyssal plain, covering a subsurface area of at least 8000 km2. The three major slides, called the Heceta, Coos Basin and Blanco slides, display morphologic and structural features typical of submarine landslides. Bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and seismic reflection profiles reveal that regions of the continental slope enclosed by the scarps are chaotic, with poor penetration of seismic energy and numerous diffractions. These regions show little structural coherence, in strong contrast to the fold thrust belt tectonics of the adjacent northern Oregon margin. The bathymetric scarps correlate with listric detachment faults identified on reflection profiles that show large vertical separation and bathymetric relief. Reflection profiles on the adjacent abyssal plain image buried debris packages extending 20-35 km seaward of the base of the continental slope. In the case of the youngest slide, an intersection of slide debris and abyssal plain sediments, rather than a thrust fault, mark the base of slope. The age of the three major slides decreases from south to north, indicated by the progressive northward shallowing of buried debris packages, increasing sharpness of morphologic expression, and southward increase in post-slide reformation of the accretionary wedge. The ages of the events, derived from calculated sedimentation rates in overlying Pleistocene sediments, are approximately 110 ka, 450 ka, and 1210 ka. This series of slides traveled 25-70 km onto the abyssal plain in at least three probably catastrophic events, which may have been triggered by subduction earthquakes. The lack of internal structure in the slide packages, and the considerable distance traveled suggest catastrophic rather than incremental slip, although there could have been multiple events. The slides would have generated large tsunami in the Pacific basin, possibly larger than that generated by an earthquake alone. We have identified a potential future slide off southern Oregon that may be released in a subduction earthquake. The occurrence of the slides and subsequent subduction of the slide debris, along with evidence for margin subsidence implies that basal subduction erosion has occurred over at least the last 1 Ma. The massive failure of the southern Oregon slope may have been the result of the collision of a seamount province or aseismic ridge with the margin, suggested by the age progression of the slides and evidence for subducted basement highs. The lack of latitudinal offset between the oldest slide debris and the corresponding scarp on the continental slope implies that the forearc is translating northward at a substantial fraction of the margin-parallel convergence rate.

Goldfinger, C.; Kulm, L. D.; McNeill, L. C.; Watts, P.

365

Pumice deposits of the Klamath Indian Reservation, Klamath County, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A large volume of pumice is widely distributed over the Klamath Indian Reservation in 'flow' and 'fall' deposits. The flow material on the Reservation is restricted to the area west of Klamath Marsh, and the fall material is thickest immediately southeast of the Marsh. Tests of the chemical and physical properties of the pumice indicate that the pumice is suitable, with some limitations, for use as an aggregate and as a low-grade abrasive. Preliminary examination also indicates that with proper processing it may have a potential use as pozzuolana. The pumice is similar to material now being marketed for lightweight aggregate in Oregon, but processing of the pumice is necessary to obtain a suitable size distribution of the particles.

Walker, George Walton

1951-01-01

366

Hydrologic changes after logging in two small Oregon coastal watersheds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Effects of clearcut, cable logging on the hydrologic characteristics of a small coastal stream in Oregon indicate an average 181-percent increase in sediment yield over a 7-year postlogging period. Annual runoff and high-flow volumes increased 19 and 1.1 inches (480 and 28 mm), respectively, after logging in the watershed. Clearcutting in small, spaced patches in another watershed resulted in some increase in water and sediment yields, but the increase was not statistically significant. Average monthly April-October maximum water temperatures increased significantly in the principal stream of both the clearcut and 'patch-cut' watersheds. Hydrologic characteristics of both streams generally appear to be returning to prelogging conditions (19731.

Harris, David Dell

1977-01-01

367

Compositional zoning of the Devine Canyon Tuff, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In eastern Oregon, many voluminous and minor rhyolites erupted from 40 Ma to 1.3 ka. As part of continued investigations into the petrogenesis of Oregon rhyolites, we focus here on the Devine Canyon Tuff (DCT). The 9.7 Ma DCT, with its proposed source in the Harney Basin, is among the most widespread ash flow tuffs in SE Oregon. It originally covered about 20,000 km2 with a minimum volume of 200 km3 as it flowed radially and eastward into the Oregon-Idaho graben. The DCT is crystal rich, pumiceous in places, and non- to densely welded with vitric, devitrified, and vapor phase zones. Pumices range in size from a few cm to about 30 cm and are rhyolitic with a very minor commingled dacite component. Phenocryst content ranges from 7% to 30%. Compositional zoning only becomes apparent by integrating data from several outcrops and therefore the tuff appears little zoned at the single outcrop scale. Published data and our work to date show that bulk tuff and pumices, excluding the commingled mafic component, are mildly peralkaline rhyolites (Na+K/Al = 1.0-1.2) with a limited range in major elements (SiO2, 74.6-77.6 wt%; and FeO*, 2.3-3.1 wt%), but vary greatly in the most incompatibe trace elements including Rb, Zr, Nb, Y. These elements indicate two-fold enrichments with the following concentrations in the least to most evolved samples: Rb from 80 ppm to 167 ppm, Zr from 599 ppm to 1,310 ppm, Nb from 48 ppm to 100 ppm, and Y from 81 ppm to 172 ppm. Other trace elements behave conservatively or decrease. LREE (e.g. Ce) concentrations decrease with differentiation pointing to the fractionation of LREE enriched phases causing rotation of REE patterns from the least (e.g. Ce/Y = 2.7) to most differentiated (Ce/Y = 1.1) samples. Compatible elements such as Ba and Sr range from 260 ppm to 10 ppm and 36 ppm to 3 ppm, respectively, but are more scattered suggesting that changes in alkali feldspar proportions influence concentration levels. Minerals include alkali feldspars, quartz, and minor hedenbergite and fayalitic olivine. Accessory phases include apatite, britholite, aenigmatite, chevkinite, Fe-Ti oxides, and zircon. Most feldspar are sanidine within the range of Ab34.7-61.8 Or34.7-61.8. Observed subtle changes in the mineral assemblages and compositions in different samples likely correlate with compositional changes of the magmas that will continue to be addressed in more detail. Glass analyses of shards, pumices, and quartz hosted melt inclusions mostly correspond with bulk analyses, but some pairs of bulk samples and their glassy components (e.g., the least evolved sample and one of the most evolved samples), have a wider range of major elements than other samples. Streaks of commingled mafic glass of select pumices are as mafic as 63.4 wt% SiO2, and 10.2 wt% FeO* indicating that strongly differentiated tholeiitic magma underlied the rhyolitic Devine Canyon magma and likely provided the thermal input for rhyolites to develop the observed zonations.

Wacaster, S.; Streck, M. J.; Belkin, H. E.; Bodnar, R. J.

2011-12-01

368

U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Oregon  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Oregon.

Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

1998-03-01

369

Septicemic pasteurellosis in free-ranging neonatal pronghorn in Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of a study to determine the cause(s) of population decline and low survival of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) neonates on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge (HMNAR), Oregon (USA), 55 of 104 neonates captured during May 1996 and 1997 were necropsied (n = 28, 1996; n = 27, 1997) to determine cause of death. Necropsies were conducted on fawns that died during May, June, or July of each year. The objectives of this study were to report the occurrence and pathology of pasteurellosis in neonates and determine if the isolated strain of Pasteurella multocida was unique. Septicemic pasteurellosis, caused by P. multocida, was diagnosed as the cause of death for two neonates in May and June 1997. Necropsy findings included widely scattered petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages found over a large portion of the subcutaneous tissue, meninges of the brain, epicardium, skeletal muscle, and serosal surface of the thorasic and abdominal cavities. Histological examination of lung tissues revealed diffuse congestion and edema and moderate to marked multifocal infiltrate of macrophages, neutrophils, and numerous bacteria within many terminal bronchioles and alveoli. Pasteurella multocida serotypes A:3,4, and B:1 were isolated from several tissues including lung, intestinal, thorasic fluid, and heart blood. Each B:1 isolate had DNA restriction endonuclease fingerprint profiles distinct from isolates previously characterized from domestic cattle, swan (Olor spp.), moose (Alces alces), and pronghorn from Montana (USA). This is the first report of pasteurellosis in pronghorn from Oregon and the B:1 isolates appear to be unique in comparison to DNA fingerprint profiles from selected domestic and wild species.

Dunbar, Michael R.; Wolcott, Mark J.; Rimler, R. B.; Berlowski, Brenda M.

2000-01-01

370

Petrology and geochemistry of the Pelican Butte area, S. Oregon  

SciTech Connect

The Cascade mountain range consists of a linear chain of composite volcanoes extending from British Columbia to northern California. The volcanic rocks of the Cascades range in age from Miocene to Holocene. They are believed to result from subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate beneath the North American plate. The area studied is located in the southeastern Oregon Cascades, near Fish Lake, Oregon. Little formal mapping of this area has been done. The purpose of the project was to describe the volcanic units in a seven square mile map area located on the southwestern flank of Pelican Butte. Pelican Butte is a large eruptive center northeast of Mt. McLoughlin. Its summit has been dated at 0.54 Ma + 0.05 Ma. The rocks range in composition from basalts to andesites. Outcrops are generally blocky flows, some of which are associated with pyroclastic material. The overall mineralogy consists of plagioclase feldspar, olivine, [+-] clinopyroxene, [+-] orthopyroxene. In order to investigate genetic relationships between basaltic and andesitic compositions, incompatible elements were plotted on a Cartesian coordinate system. On such a plot, ratios of incompatible elements remain constant among units whose source is the same. A La/Ba plot shows two distinct groups (andesites and basalts) which represent two distinct magmatic sources. The ratios of light REE's, CeN/LaN, however, are within error for all compositions. This suggests a similar mantle source for both basalts and andesites. The increase in Ba in the andesitic compositions may indicate crustal contamination of the mantle source. The trends within compositional groups probably result from crystal fractionation but no fractionation evidence exists between compositional groups.

Gorman, C.E. (Beloit Coll., WI (United States))

1994-04-01

371

Appraisal of storm-water quality near Salem, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Stormwater runoff for the period December 1979 to May 1981, at 13 sites (12 basins) in the vicinity of Salem, Oregon, was sampled and analyzed for water quality. Constituent concentrations for urban storm water were relatively small when compared to samples from Portland and Medford, Oregon and to samples from Denver, Colorado. The data indicated that levels of suspended sediment, ultimate CBOD (carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand), and total lead increased with increased urbanization. Much of the suspended sediment and related turbidity result from transport of basin soils rather than from the wash-off of dry fallout solids from impervious areas. Because of small chemical concentrations and winter high flow and low temperature conditions in the Willamette River, Salem storm water probably has little effect on biological or on most chemical conditions in the Willamette River. An analysis of data from a stormwater detention pond (originally designed to reduce peak flows) indicated that the facility was about 47% efficient in reducing suspended sediment loads. The facility also reduced such sediment-related constituent loads as total lead and total phosphorus. Total Kjeldahl nitrogen and ultimate CBOD loads that are transported mostly in the dissolved phase were not measurably affected by the detention pond. Precipitation samples collected at one site for a year were found to be acidic, with a median pH of 4.6. Median total lead concentration was 8 micrograms/L (ug/L) in precipitation, whereas the median total lead concentration in runoff from the 12 basins ranged from 8 to 110 ug/L. The median dissolved ammonia concentration in precipitation was larger than the median dissolved ammonia concentration at all 13 sites. In contrast, the median total Kjeldahl nitrogen concentration in precipitation samples was about half the median for streamwater concentrations. Median ratios of sulfate to chloride and nitrate to chloride in precipitation were much higher than ratios expected for sea water, suggesting anthropogenic sources for sulfate and nitrate. (Author 's abstract)

Miller, T. L.

1987-01-01

372

Anticipating forest and range land development in central Oregon (USA) for landscape analysis, with an example application involving mule deer.  

PubMed

Forest policymakers, public lands managers, and scientists in the Pacific Northwest (USA) seek ways to evaluate the landscape-level effects of policies and management through the multidisciplinary development and application of spatially explicit methods and models. The Interagency Mapping and Analysis Project (IMAP) is an ongoing effort to generate landscape-wide vegetation data and models to evaluate the integrated effects of disturbances and management activities on natural resource conditions in Oregon and Washington (USA). In this initial analysis, we characterized the spatial distribution of forest and range land development in a four-county pilot study region in central Oregon. The empirical model describes the spatial distribution of buildings and new building construction as a function of population growth, existing development, topography, land-use zoning, and other factors. We used the model to create geographic information system maps of likely future development based on human population projections to inform complementary landscape analyses underway involving vegetation, habitat, and wildfire interactions. In an example application, we use the model and resulting maps to show the potential impacts of future forest and range land development on mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) winter range. Results indicate significant development encroachment and habitat loss already in 2000 with development located along key migration routes and increasing through the projection period to 2040. The example application illustrates a simple way for policymakers and public lands managers to combine existing data and preliminary model outputs to begin to consider the potential effects of development on future landscape conditions. PMID:20300934

Kline, Jeffrey D; Moses, Alissa; Burcsu, Theresa

2010-05-01

373

Anticipating Forest and Range Land Development in Central Oregon (USA) for Landscape Analysis, with an Example Application Involving Mule Deer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Forest policymakers, public lands managers, and scientists in the Pacific Northwest (USA) seek ways to evaluate the landscape-level effects of policies and management through the multidisciplinary development and application of spatially explicit methods and models. The Interagency Mapping and Analysis Project (IMAP) is an ongoing effort to generate landscape-wide vegetation data and models to evaluate the integrated effects of disturbances and management activities on natural resource conditions in Oregon and Washington (USA). In this initial analysis, we characterized the spatial distribution of forest and range land development in a four-county pilot study region in central Oregon. The empirical model describes the spatial distribution of buildings and new building construction as a function of population growth, existing development, topography, land-use zoning, and other factors. We used the model to create geographic information system maps of likely future development based on human population projections to inform complementary landscape analyses underway involving vegetation, habitat, and wildfire interactions. In an example application, we use the model and resulting maps to show the potential impacts of future forest and range land development on mule deer ( Odocoileus hemionus) winter range. Results indicate significant development encroachment and habitat loss already in 2000 with development located along key migration routes and increasing through the projection period to 2040. The example application illustrates a simple way for policymakers and public lands managers to combine existing data and preliminary model outputs to begin to consider the potential effects of development on future landscape conditions.

Kline, Jeffrey D.; Moses, Alissa; Burcsu, Theresa

2010-05-01

374

Potential hydrologic effects of developing coal and other geo-energy resources of Oregon; a review  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Southwestern Oregon has several hundred million tons of good-quality minable coal. Because of the dip of the coal beds, the only economical method of mining would be by underground methods. In addition, minor occurrences of low-quality coal have been noted at more than 20 sites in both western and northeastern Oregon. About 2 million acres are now under lease for petroleum and gas exploration across the State. Natural gas was discovered in northwestern Oregon in 1979, and current production is about 17 million cubic feet per day from five wells. Thirteen Known Geothermal Resource Areas in several parts of the State cover 432,000 acres, and more than 420,000 acres are under lease for geothermal exploration. No hydrologic impacts have been noted from exploration and production of coal or other geoenergy resources in Oregon. (USGS)

Sidle, W. C.

1981-01-01

375

77 FR 50080 - Notice of a Meeting of the Northeast Oregon Forests Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...will be held in Grant County Regional Airport, 720 Airport Road, John Day, Oregon. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Todd Buchholz, Designated Federal Official, USDA, Umatilla National Forest, Heppner Ranger District, P.O. Box 7, Heppner,...

2012-08-20

376

Shifting the Paradigm in Oregon from Teen Pregnancy Prevention to Youth Sexual Health  

PubMed Central

Oregon's work on teen pregnancy prevention during the previous 20 years has shifted from a risk-focused paradigm to a youth development model that places young people at the center of their sexual health and well-being. During 2005, the Oregon Governor's Office requested that an ad hoc committee of state agency and private partners develop recommendations for the next phase of teen pregnancy prevention. As a result of that collaborative effort, engagement of young people, and community input, the Oregon Youth Sexual Health Plan was released in 2009. The plan focuses on development of young people and embraces sexuality as a natural part of adolescent development. The plan's five goals and eight objectives guide the work of state agencies and partners addressing youth sexual health. Oregon's development of a statewide plan can serve as a framework for other states and entities to address all aspects of youth sexual health.

Nystrom, Robert J.; Duke, Jessica E.A.; Victor, Brad

2013-01-01

377

Tailed Frogs: Distribution, Ecology, and Association with Timber Harvest in Northeastern Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study was designed to investigate the distribution, abundance, life history, and effect of timber harvest on tailed frogs. In 1992, 80 streams in northeastern Oregon were surveyed for tailed frogs. More intensive surveys (diurnal searches for larvae a...

E. L. Bull B. E. Carter

1996-01-01

378

Oregon Department of Transportation Greenroads Pilot Project: OR 34: Corvallis - Roche St. To Wolcott Rd.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report provides a Greenroads Pilot Project report on the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) project OR 34: Corvallis Roche St. to Wolcott Rd. Greenroads is a sustainability rating system for roadway design and construction (a complete descrip...

S. Garbacik S. T. Muench

2012-01-01

379

Perched water tables on hillsides in western Oregon: II. Preferential downslope movement of water and anions.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reports the results of experiments which were carried out to investigate the flow of solutes and water from buried line sources in and above perched water tables on three different hillsides in W Oregon. -from Authors

Hammermeister, D. P.; Kling, G. F.; Vomocil, J. A.

1982-01-01

380

77 FR 476 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plan Southern Oregon/Northern California Coast Coho...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oregon/ Northern California Coast Coho Salmon Evolutionarily Significant Unit AGENCY...Northern California Coast (SONCC) Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) Evolutionarily...Attn: Recovery Coordinator/SONCC Coho Salmon Public Draft Recovery Plan...

2012-01-05

381

78 FR 74222 - Hours of Service of Drivers: Oregon Trucking Associations; Application for Exemption  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...forestlands. In addition, when the risk of fire increases, the Oregon Department...August 26, 2013), a Level III fire safety restriction barred CMVs from...00 p.m. daily. OTA asserts that fire-safety restrictions are often...

2013-12-10

382

Large-Scale Silviculture Experiments of Western Oregon and Washington (on CD-ROM).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We review 12 large-scale silviculture experiments (LSSEs) in western Washington and Oregon with which the Pacific Northwest Research Station of the USDA Forest Service is substantially involved. We compiled and arrayed information about the LSSEs as a ser...

2007-01-01

383

Utilization Patterns of Intertidal Habitats by Birds in Yaquina Estuary, Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An assessment of bird utilization patterns of the intertidal soft sediment and low marsh habitats of the Yaquina estuary, Oregon was conducted from December 2007- November 2008. Daylight censuses of all birds utilizing selected estuarine intertidal habita...

J. O. Lamberson M. R. Frazier P. J. Clinton W. G. Nelson

2011-01-01

384

DDE not implicated in cliff swallow, Petrochelidon pyrrhonota, mortality during severe spring weather in Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Large numbers ofCliff Swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) died in late May near Burns, Oregon, during cold, wet weather. The brains of five dead birds did not contain lethal concentrations of DDE, and no PCBs were detected.

Henny, C.J.; Blus, L.J.; Stafford, C.J.

1982-01-01

385

75 FR 44975 - Notice of Intent To Solicit Nominations, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Solicit Nominations, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees AGENCY: Bureau of...Medford, Roseburg, and Salem District Resource Advisory Committees (RACs). The Committees...applicant would serve: Coos Bay District Resource Advisory Committee: Glenn...

2010-07-30

386

75 FR 22621 - Notice of Intent To Solicit Nominations, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Solicit Nominations, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees AGENCY: Bureau of...Medford, Roseburg, and Salem District Resource Advisory Committees (RACs). The Committees...applicant would serve: Coos Bay District Resource Advisory Committee: Glenn...

2010-04-29

387

Oregon Ocean Plan. Executive Summary: Program Analysis and Recommendations for Action.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Executive Summary of the Oregon Ocean Resources Management Plan (Plan) briefly describes the recommendations of the Plan and lists legislative and administrative changes necessary to implement it. The Executive Summary is presented in a narrative and...

1991-01-01

388

76 FR 12651 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Oregon; Regional Haze State...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...micrometers. PM coarse emission sources include windblown dust, rock crushing and processing, material transfer, and open pit mining. Windblown dust is the dominant source of PM coarse emissions in Oregon at 104,274 tons/year (60%)....

2011-03-08

389

SUSPENDED AND BENTHIC SEDIMENT RELATIONSHIPS IN THE YAQUINA ESTUARY, OREGON: NUTRIENT PROCESSING  

EPA Science Inventory

Measurements of nutrient loading and subsequent nutrient processing are fundamental for determining biogeochemical processes in rivers and estuaries. In Oregon coastal watersheds, nutrient transport is strongly seasonal with up to 94% of the riverine dissolved nitrate and silic...

390

Incidence of Decay Fungi in Stumps of Two Thinned Western Larch Stands in Northeastern Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Incidence of decay fungi was measured in stumps from two thinned western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.) stands (9 and 15 years after thinning), one precommercially thinned and one commercially thinned, in northeastern Oregon. Ten species of decay fungi ...

G. M. Filip C. A. Parks K. W. Seidel F. F. Lombard

1987-01-01

391

INTERIOR TV/GAME ROOM, LOOKING NORTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR TV/GAME ROOM, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

392

INTERIOR LIBRARY HALL, LOOKING EAST INTO TV/GAME ROOM. Oregon ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR LIBRARY HALL, LOOKING EAST INTO TV/GAME ROOM. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

393

INTERIOR TV/GAME, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR TV/GAME, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

394

76 FR 62758 - Wallowa-Whitman and Umatilla National Forests, Oregon Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Forests, Oregon Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION...impact statement to authorize the approval of mining Plans of Operation in the Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans analysis area on the Whitman...

2011-10-11

395

Long-Term Growth of Eight Legumes Introduced at Three Forest Locations in Southwest Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Using nitrogen-fixing plants in forestry becomes financially more attractive as the costs of fertilizers and their application continue to increase. Eight legume cultivars were screened for suitability in Douglas-fir forests of southwest Oregon. The legum...

R. E. Miller R. Zalunardo

1979-01-01

396

Shifting the paradigm in Oregon from teen pregnancy prevention to youth sexual health.  

PubMed

Oregon's work on teen pregnancy prevention during the previous 20 years has shifted from a risk-focused paradigm to a youth development model that places young people at the center of their sexual health and well-being. During 2005, the Oregon Governor's Office requested that an ad hoc committee of state agency and private partners develop recommendations for the next phase of teen pregnancy prevention. As a result of that collaborative effort, engagement of young people, and community input, the Oregon Youth Sexual Health Plan was released in 2009. The plan focuses on development of young people and embraces sexuality as a natural part of adolescent development. The plan's five goals and eight objectives guide the work of state agencies and partners addressing youth sexual health. Oregon's development of a statewide plan can serve as a framework for other states and entities to address all aspects of youth sexual health. PMID:23450889

Nystrom, Robert J; Duke, Jessica E A; Victor, Brad

2013-01-01

397

Public Health Assessment: Formosa Mine, Riddle, Oregon. EPA Facility ID: ORN001002616.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Environmental Health Assessment Program (EHAP) in the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) developed this public health assessment to address the risk of negative health effects associated with exposure to contaminants in the water and soil from ...

2010-01-01

398

75 FR 76974 - Reedsport OPT Wave Park, LLC; Oregon; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project...12713-002] Reedsport OPT Wave Park, LLC; Oregon; Notice...FR 47897), the Office of Energy Projects has reviewed Reedsport OPT Wave Park, LLC's...

2010-12-10

399

Oregon Center for Water and Sustainability (CWESt) Annual Technical Report, FY 2004.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2004, Oregons Center for Water and Environmental Sustainability (CWESt) focused efforts on three programs: (1) The Water Resources Program administers interdisciplinary and multi-agency watershed education and water resources research programs in Orego...

2004-01-01

400

Geochemical Studies of Rocks, Water, and Gases at Mt. Hood, Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Mr. Hood, a composite andesitic volcano, located near Portland, Oregon, is one of several large eruptive centers which dominate the Cascade Mountains of the western United States. As part of a program of geologic, geophysical and geochemical studies to ex...

H. A. Wollenberg R. E. Bowen H. R. Bowman B. Strisower

1979-01-01

401

Springs On and In the Vicinity of Mount Hood Volcano, Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Chemical and isotopic data are presented for nonthermal, thermal, and slightly thermal springs and drill holes and fumaroles on Mount Hood, Oregon. Temperatures of nonthermal springs on Mount Hood decrease with elevation and are similar to air temperature...

M. Nathenson

2004-01-01

402

Estimated Yields of Dover Sole in Waters Off Northern Oregon-Southern Washington.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dover sole (Microstomus pacificus) has been subject to intensive fishing in waters off northern Oregon-southern Washington. This species has always been an important contributor to the trawl fishery and has been the most valuable species of groundfish lan...

R. L. Demory L. B. Fredd

1973-01-01

403

Biological Recovery Criteria for the Oregon Coast Coho Salmon Evolutionarily Significant Unit.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document outlines biological recovery criteria (also called viability criteria) for the Oregon Coast Coho Salmon Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) as identified in the NOAA Fisheries Service status review for West Coast coho salmon (Oncorhynchus ...

M. W. Chilcote P. W. Lawson T. C. Wainwright

2008-01-01

404

Carbon and Nitrogen Accumulation Rates in Salt Marshes in Oregon, USA  

EPA Science Inventory

Two important ecosystem services of wetlands are carbon sequestration and filtration of nutrients and particulates. We quantified the carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates in salt marshes at 135 plots distributed across eight estuaries located in Oregon, USA. Net carbon and ...

405

A Review of the Cellular Proliferative Disorders of Oysters ('Ostrea lurida') from Yaquina Bay, Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The cellular proliferative disorders of Ostrea lurida from Yaquina Bay, Oregon (USA) is reviewed. The disease is characterized by large, apparently abnormal cells that may proliferate rapidly and cause mortality in bivalve mollusks. The nature of the dise...

M. C. Mix

1976-01-01

406

75 FR 26807 - Notice of Acceptance of Application for Special Nuclear Materials License From Oregon State...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 70-7019...Acceptance of Application for Special Nuclear Materials License From Oregon State University...for Contention Preparation AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION:...

2010-05-12

407

PATTERNS OF NITRATE LOSSES FROM FORESTED BASINS IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE  

EPA Science Inventory

Numerous factors may control losses of dissolved nutrients from forested basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Potentially important factors include forest composition, stand age, forest management, grazing, agriculture, sewage inputs and bedrock types, as well as others perhaps not...

408

78 FR 24347 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oregon: Open Burning and Enforcement Procedures  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plans; Oregon: Open Burning and Enforcement Procedures AGENCY: Environmental Protection...that relate to open burning rules, enforcement procedures, civil penalties, and procedures...revisions relate to open burning rules, enforcement procedures, civil penalties, and...

2013-04-25

409

CONTROLS ON STREAM CHEMISTRY IN AN OREGON COASTAL WATERSHED: THE SALMON RIVER  

EPA Science Inventory

Numerous factors may control losses of dissolved nutrients from forested basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Potentially important factors include forest composition, stand age, forest management, grazing, agriculture, sewage inputs and bedrock types, as well as others perhaps not...

410

77 FR 55815 - City of Hillsboro, Oregon; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14371-000] City of Hillsboro, Oregon; Notice of Application...Administration and Compliance, Office of Energy Projects, Federal Energy Regulatory...

2012-09-11

411

78 FR 24346 - Modification of VOR Federal Airway V-595, Oregon  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This action modifies VHF omnidirectional range (VOR) Federal airway V-595 in Oregon due to the scheduled decommissioning of the Portland, OR, VOR/DME navigation aid, which currently serves as an end point for the...

2013-04-25

412

77 FR 50914 - Anchorage; Change to Cottonwood Island Anchorage, Columbia River, Oregon and Washington  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

[Federal Register Volume...Island Anchorage, Columbia River, Oregon and Washington...Friday, except Federal holidays. FOR...Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice...Anchorage on the Columbia River (76 FR...

2012-08-23

413

ATTITUDES OF OREGON AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY TEACHERS TOWARD INTEGRATING SCIENCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The purpose ,of this study was to determine ,the attitudes of Oregon ,Agricultural Science and Technology,(AST) teachers ,toward ,integrating ,science ,into their agricultural ,education ,programs.,Results of the study indicated that almost one fourth of Oregon 'sAST teachers have a teaching credential with a science endorsement, while almost half the teachers indicated students receive science credit for agriculture classes in

Gregory W. Thompson; Mark M. Balschweid

414

Magmatic Volatiles and Low Pressure Degassing at a Mafic Shield Volcano (Belknap) in the Oregon Cascades  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cinder cones and shield volcanoes frequently coexist in volcanic fields. Despite their proximity, cinder cones often erupt as monogenetic (single) events, whereas shield volcanoes are polygenetic (multiple eruptive events). Why some vents erupt once for a relatively short period of time (months) but others nearby remain active enough to build up as shields (over hundreds or thousands of years) remains ambiguous. To better understand the magma ascent conditions associated with these disparate eruption styles, we contrast the volatile concentrations within olivine-hosted melt inclusions of tephra deposits from the late-stage eruptions of a mafic shield volcano with those from nearby cinder cones. Belknap Crater is a shield volcano in the Central Oregon High Cascades that grew through repeated eruptions from ~2800 to 1500 years BP (Sherrod et al., 2004). Volatile contents from late-stage ash collected on the flanks of the summit cone range from 0.1 to 2.4 wt% H2O and <50 to 770 ppm CO2. The most volatile-rich inclusions record vapor saturation pressures of ~2 kbar, equivalent to ~7 km depth in the crust, whereas inclusions with the lowest volatile contents indicate very low pressures of formation. Given that the height of the volcano is roughly 540 meters above the surrounding ground level, many of the inclusions with relatively low H2O values and CO2 values, which are often below detection limits, likely reflect olivine crystallization within the volcano itself. In contrast, melt inclusions from nearby short-lived cinder cones (e.g. Collier Cone and 4-in-1 Cone) of similar age, < 2900 years BP, contain 2-4 wt% H2O and 500-1200 ppm CO2. These inclusions lack the low H2O, low CO2 values found at Belknap - even in deposits representing the final stages of explosive activity - and record crystallization at pressures between ~1-2 kbar, equivalent depth of ~4-8 km depth in the crust. H2O-CO2 patterns in inclusions from Belknap are similar to those observed in the late-stage inclusions from long-lived, 10-15 year eruptions at Volcán Jorullo and Parícutin in Mexico. The trend from deep to shallow crystallization pressures in these systems suggests that later magma is stored at shallow levels, where it experiences extensive degassing and crystallization prior to eruption. The differences between the degassing patterns inferred from Belknap inclusions and those from most cinder cones in the Oregon Cascades suggest that the subsurface magma plumbing systems beneath these types of volcanoes are different. Specifically, Belknap apparently developed a complex magma plumbing system capable of stalling an ascending batch of magma at shallow depths. In contrast, the plumbing systems beneath many of the Central Oregon High Cascades cinder cones appear to promote rapid migration of magma to the surface.

Mordensky, S. P.; Ruscitto, D. M.; Wallace, P. J.; Cashman, K. V.

2011-12-01

415

Geologic Map of the Saint Helens Quadrangle, Columbia County, Oregon, and Clark and Cowlitz Counties, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Saint Helens 7.5' quadrangle is situated in the Puget-Willamette Lowland approximately 35 km north Portland, Oregon. The lowland, which extends from Puget Sound into west-central Oregon, is a complex structural and topographic trough that lies between the Coast Range and the Cascade Range. Since late Eocene time, Cascade Range has been the locus of a discontinuously active volcanic arc associated with underthrusting of oceanic lithosphere beneath the North American continent along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The Coast Range occupies the forearc position within the Cascadia arc-trench system and consists of a complex assemblage of Eocene to Miocene volcanic and marine sedimentary rocks. The Saint Helens quadrangle lies in the northern part of the Portland Basin, a roughly 2000-km2 topographic and structural depression. It is the northernmost of several sediment-filled structural basins that collectively constitute the Willamette Valley segment of the Puget-Willamette Lowland (Beeson and others, 1989; Swanson and others, 1993; Yeats and others, 1996). The rhomboidal basin is approximately 70 km long and 30 km wide, with its long dimension oriented northwest. The Columbia River flows west and north through the Portland Basin at an elevation near sea level and exits through a confined bedrock valley less than 2.5 km wide about 16 km north of Saint Helens. The flanks of the basin consist of Eocene through Miocene volcanic and sedimentary rocks that rise to elevations exceeding 2000 ft (610 m). Seismic-reflection profiles (L.M. Liberty, written commun., 2003) and lithologic logs of water wells (Swanson and others, 1993; Mabey and Madin, 1995) indicate that as much as 550 m of late Miocene and younger sediments have accumulated in the deepest part of the basin near Vancouver. Most of this basin-fill material was carried in from the east by the Columbia River but contributions from streams draining the adjacent highlands are locally important. The Portland Basin has been interpreted as a pull-apart basin located in the releasing stepover between two echelon, northwest-striking, right-lateral fault zones (Beeson and others, 1985, 1989; Beeson and Tolan, 1990; Yelin and Patton, 1991; Blakely and others, 1995). These fault zones are thought to reflect regional transpression and dextral shear within the forearc in response to oblique subduction along the Cascadia Subduction Zone Pezzopane and Weldon, 1993; Wells and others, 1998). The southwestern margin of the Portland Basin is a well-defined topographic break along the base of the Tualatin Mountains, an asymmetric anticlinal ridge that is bounded its northeast flank by the Portland Hills Fault Zone (Balsillie and Benson, 1971; Beeson and others, 1989; Blakely and others, 1995), which is probably an active structure (Wong and others, 2001; Liberty and others, 2003). The nature of the corresponding northeastern margin of the basin is less clear, but a poorly defined and partially buried dextral extensional fault zone has been hypothesized from topography, microseismicity, potential fieldanomalies, and reconnaissance geologic mapping (Beeson and others, 1989; Beeson and Tolan, 1990; Yelin and Patton, 1991; Blakely and others, 1995). Another dextral structure, the Kalama Structural Zone of Evarts (2002), may underlie the north-northwest-trending reach of the Columbia River north of Woodland (Blakely and others, 1995). This map is a contribution to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) program designed to improve the geologic database for the Portland Basin region of the Pacific Northwest urban corridor, the populated forearc region of western Washington and Oregon. Better and more detailed information on the bedrock and surficial geology of the basin and its surrounding area is needed to refine assessments of seismic risk (Yelin and Patton, 1991; Bott and Wong, 1993), ground-failure hazards (Madin and Wang, 1999; Wegmann and Walsh, 2001) and resource availability in this rapid

Evarts, Russell C.

2004-01-01

416

Chemical, isotopic, and dissolved gas compositions of the hot springs of the Owyhee Uplands, Malheur County, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hot springs along the Owyhee River in southeastern Oregon between Three Forks and Lake Owyhee could be part of a north flowing regional system or a series of small separate geothermal systems Heat for the waters could be from a very young (Holocene) volcanic activity (basalt flows) of the Owyhee Uplands or the regional heat flow. The springs discharge warm to hot, dilute, slightly alkaline, sodium bicarbonate water. Chemically they are similar to the dilute thermal water at Bruneau Grand View and Twin Falls, Idaho. Maximum aquifer temperatures in the Owyhee Uplands, estimated from chemical geothermometry, are about 100°C. Dissolved helium concentrations, carbon 14 activity, and chemical and isotope data are examined fro systematic trends which would indicate a geothermal system of regional extent.

Mariner, R. H.; Young, H. W.; Evans, W. C.

1994-01-01

417

Disabling and Fatal Occupational Claim Rates, Risks, and Costs in the Oregon Construction Industry 1990–1997  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study estimated injury and illness rates, risk factors, and costs associated with construction work in Oregon from 1990–1997 using all accepted workers' compensation claims by Oregon construction employees (N = 20,680). Claim rates and risk estimates were estimated using a baseline calculated from Current Population Survey data of the Oregon work force. The average annual rate of lost-time claims

Irwin B. Horwitz; Brian P. McCall

2004-01-01

418

Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment: the Seaside, Oregon Pilot Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A pilot study of Seaside, Oregon is underway, to develop methodologies for probabilistic tsunami hazard assessments that can be incorporated into Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) developed by FEMA's National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Current NFIP guidelines for tsunami hazard assessment rely on the science, technology and methodologies developed in the 1970s; although generally regarded as groundbreaking and state-of-the-art for its time, this approach is now superseded by modern methods that reflect substantial advances in tsunami research achieved in the last two decades. In particular, post-1990 technical advances include: improvements in tsunami source specification; improved tsunami inundation models; better computational grids by virtue of improved bathymetric and topographic databases; a larger database of long-term paleoseismic and paleotsunami records and short-term, historical earthquake and tsunami records that can be exploited to develop improved probabilistic methodologies; better understanding of earthquake recurrence and probability models. The NOAA-led U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP), in partnership with FEMA, USGS, NSF and Emergency Management and Geotechnical agencies of the five Pacific States, incorporates these advances into site-specific tsunami hazard assessments for coastal communities in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington. NTHMP hazard assessment efforts currently focus on developing deterministic, "credible worst-case" scenarios that provide valuable guidance for hazard mitigation and emergency management. The NFIP focus, on the other hand, is on actuarial needs that require probabilistic hazard assessments such as those that characterize 100- and 500-year flooding events. There are clearly overlaps in NFIP and NTHMP objectives. NTHMP worst-case scenario assessments that include an estimated probability of occurrence could benefit the NFIP; NFIP probabilistic assessments of 100- and 500-yr events could benefit the NTHMP. The joint NFIP/NTHMP pilot study at Seaside, Oregon is organized into three closely related components: Probabilistic, Modeling, and Impact studies. Probabilistic studies (Geist, et al., this session) are led by the USGS and include the specification of near- and far-field seismic tsunami sources and their associated probabilities. Modeling studies (Titov, et al., this session) are led by NOAA and include the development and testing of a Seaside tsunami inundation model and an associated database of computed wave height and flow velocity fields. Impact studies (Synolakis, et al., this session) are led by USC and include the computation and analyses of indices for the categorization of hazard zones. The results of each component study will be integrated to produce a Seaside tsunami hazard map. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the project and an update on progress, while the above-referenced companion presentations will provide details on the methods used and the preliminary results obtained by each project component.

Gonzalez, F. I.; Geist, E. L.; Synolakis, C.; Titov, V. V.

2004-12-01

419

Channel change and bed-material transport in the Umpqua River basin, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers of western Oregon; with headwaters in the Cascade Range, the river flows through portions of the Klamath Mountains and Oregon Coast Range before entering the Pacific Ocean. Above the head of tide, the Umpqua River, along with its major tributaries, the North and South Umpqua Rivers, flows on a mixed bedrock and alluvium bed, alternating between bedrock rapids and intermittent, shallow gravel bars composed of gravel to cobble-sized clasts. These bars have been a source of commercial aggregate since the mid-twentieth century. Below the head of tide, the Umpqua River contains large bars composed of mud and sand. Motivated by ongoing permitting and aquatic habitat concerns related to in-stream gravel mining on the fluvial reaches, this study evaluated spatial and temporal trends in channel change and bed-material transport for 350 kilometers of river channel along the Umpqua, North Umpqua, and South Umpqua Rivers. The assessment produced (1) detailed mapping of the active channel, using aerial photographs and repeat surveys, and (2) a quantitative estimation of bed-material flux that drew upon detailed measurements of particle size and lithology, equations of transport capacity, and a sediment yield analysis. Bed-material transport capacity estimates at 45 sites throughout the South Umpqua and main stem Umpqua Rivers for the period 1951-2008 result in wide-ranging transport capacity estimates, reflecting the difficulty of applying equations of bed-material transport to a supply-limited river. Median transport capacity values calculated from surface-based equations of bedload transport for each of the study reaches provide indications of maximum possible transport rates and range from 8,000 to 27,000 metric tons per year (tons/yr) for the South Umpqua River and 20,000 to 82,000 metric tons/yr for the main stem Umpqua River upstream of the head of tide; the North Umpqua River probably contributes little bed material. A plausible range of average annual transport rates for the South and main stem Umpqua Rivers, based on bedload transport capacity estimates for bars with reasonable values for reference shear stress, is between 500 and 20,000 metric tons/yr. An empirical bed-material yield analysis predicts 20,000-50,000 metric tons/yr on the South Umpqua River and main stem Umpqua River through the Oregon Coast Range, decreasing to approximately 30,000 metric tons/yr at the head of tide. Surveys of individual mining sites in the South Umpqua River indicate minimum local bed-material flux rates that are typically less than 10,000 metric tons/yr but range up to 30,600 metric tons/yr in high-flow years. On the basis of all of these analyses, actual bedload flux in most years is probably less than 25,000 metric tons/yr in the South Umpqua and main stem Umpqua Rivers, with the North Umpqua River probably contributing negligible amounts. For comparison, the estimated annual volume of commercial gravel extraction from the South Umpqua River between 2001 and 2004 ranged from 610 to 36,570 metric tons, indicating that historical in-stream gravel extraction may have been a substantial fraction of the overall bedload flux.

Wallick, J. Rose; O'Connor, Jim E.; Anderson, Scott; Keith, Mackenzie; Cannon, Charles, Risley, John C.

2011-01-01

420

Development of an Environmental Flow Framework for the McKenzie River Basin, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The McKenzie River is a tributary to the Willamette River in northwestern Oregon. The McKenzie River is approximately 90 miles in length and has a drainage area of approximately 1,300 square miles. Two major flood control dams, a hydropower dam complex, and two hydropower canals significantly alter streamflows in the river. The structures reduce the magnitude and frequency of large and small floods while increasing the annual 7-day minimum streamflows. Stream temperatures also have been altered by the dams and other anthropogenic factors, such as the removal of riparian vegetation and channel simplification. Flow releases from one of the flood control dams are cooler in the summer and warmer in the fall in comparison to unregulated flow conditions before the dam was constructed. In 2006, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality listed a total of 112.4, 6.3, and 55.7 miles of the McKenzie River basin mainstem and tributary stream reaches as thermally impaired for salmonid rearing, salmonid spawning, and bull trout, respectively. The analyses in this report, along with previous studies, indicate that dams have altered downstream channel morphology and ecologic communities. In addition to reducing the magnitude and frequency of floods, dams have diminished sediment transport by trapping bed material. Other anthropogenic factors, such as bank stabilization, highway construction, and reductions of in-channel wood, also have contributed to the loss of riparian habitat. A comparison of aerial photography taken in 1939 and 2005 showed substantial decreases in secondary channels, gravel bars, and channel sinuosity, particularly along the lower alluvial reaches of the McKenzie River. In addition, bed armoring and incision may contribute to habitat degradation, although further study is needed to determine the extent of these processes. Peak streamflow reduction has led to vegetation colonization and stabilization of formerly active bar surfaces. The large flood control dams on Blue River and South Fork McKenzie River likely have had the greatest effect on downstream habitats because these sediment and flood-rich tributaries historically contributed a disproportionate volume of bed material, wood, and peak flows in comparison with the spring-fed tributaries of the upper McKenzie River basin. The ecological effects of the dams were examined by focusing on nine exemplar aquatic and terrestrial species, including spring Chinook salmon, bull trout, Oregon chub, Pacific and western brook lamprey, red-legged frog, western pond turtle, alder, and cottonwood. The changes caused by the dams to streamflow hydrograph affect all these and other species in complex ways, although a few commonalities are apparent. A loss of channel complexity in the McKenzie River basin, which is associated with the reduction in flood events and widespread channel stabilization, is the primary factor related to the observed population declines for all nine exemplar species. The dams also have caused direct ecological effects by blocking access to habitat, changing the amount and timing of available critical habitat, and changing water temperature during important seasons for different life stages.

Risley, John; Wallick, J. Rose; Waite, Ian; Stonewall, Adam

2010-01-01

421

Selective Cutting Impact on Carbon Storage in Fremont-Winema National Forest, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Management personnel of the Fremont-Winema National Forest in southern Oregon were interested in investigating how selective cutting or fuel load reduction treatments affect forest carbon sinks and as an ancillary product, fire risk. This study was constructed with the objective of providing this information to the forest administrators, as well as to satisfy a directive to study carbon management, a component of the 2004 NASA's Application Division Program Plan. During the summer of 2004, a request for decision support tools by the forest management was addressed by a NASA sponsored student-led, student-run internship group called DEVELOP. This full-time10-week program was designed to be an introduction to work done by earth scientists, professional business / client relationships and the facilities available at NASA Ames. Four college and graduate students from varying educational backgrounds designed the study and implementation plan. The team collected data for five consecutive days in Oregon throughout the Fremont-Winema forest and the surrounding terrain, consisting of soil sampling for underground carbon dynamics, fire model and vegetation map validation. The goal of the carbon management component of the project was to model current carbon levels, then to gauge the effect of fuel load reduction treatments. To study carbon dynamics, MODIS derived fraction photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) maps, regional climate data, and Landsat 5 generated dominant vegetation species and land cover maps were used in conjunction with the NASA - Carnegie-Ames-Stanford-Approach (CASA) model. To address fire risk the dominant vegetation species map was used to estimate fuel load based on species biomass in conjunction with a mosaic of digital elevation models (DEMs) as components to the creation of an Anderson-inspired fuel map, a rate of spread in meters/minute map and a flame length map using ArcMap 9 and FlamMap. Fire risk results are to be viewed qualitatively as maps output spatial distribution of data rather then quantitative assessment of risk. For the first time ever, the resource managers at the Fremont-Winema forest will be taking into consideration the value of carbon as a resource in their decision making process for the 2005 Fremont-Winema forest management plan.

Huybrechts, C.; Cleve, C. T.

2004-12-01

422

Digital Data for Volcano Hazards of the Three Sisters Region, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three Sisters is one of three active volcanic centers that lie close to rapidly growing communities and resort areas in Central Oregon. The major composite volcanoes of this area are clustered near the center of the region and include South Sister, Middle Sister, and Broken Top. Additionally, hundreds of mafic volcanoes are scattered throughout the Three Sisters area. These range from small cinder cones to large shield volcanoes like North Sister and Belknap Crater. Hazardous events include landslides from the steep flanks of large volcanoes and floods, which need not be triggered by eruptions, as well as eruption-triggered events such as fallout of tephra (volcanic ash) and lava flows. A proximal hazard zone roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter surrounding the Three Sisters and Broken Top could be affected within minutes of the onset of an eruption or large landslide. Distal hazard zones that follow river valleys downstream from the Three Sisters and Broken Top could be inundated by lahars (rapid flows of water-laden rock and mud) generated either by melting of snow and ice during eruptions or by large landslides. Slow-moving lava flows could issue from new mafic volcanoes almost anywhere within the region. Fallout of tephra from eruption clouds can affect areas hundreds of kilometers (miles) downwind, so eruptions at volcanoes elsewhere in the Cascade Range also contribute to volcano hazards in Central Oregon. Scientists at the Cascades Volcano Observatory created a geographic information system (GIS) data set which depicts proximal and distal lahar hazard zones as well as a regional lava flow hazard zone for Three Sisters (USGS Open-File Report 99-437, Scott and others, 1999). The various distal lahar zones were constructed from LaharZ software using 20, 100, and 500 million cubic meter input flow volumes. Additionally, scientists used the depositional history of past events in the Three Sisters Region as well as experience and judgment derived from the study of volcanoes to help construct the regional hazard zone.

Schilling, S. P.; Doelger, S.; Scott, W. E.; Iverson, R. M.

2008-01-01

423

50 CFR 226.210 - Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). 226...210 Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch ),...

2013-10-01

424

50 CFR 226.210 - Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). 226...210 Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch ),...

2010-10-01

425

50 CFR 226.210 - Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). 226...210 Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch ),...

2011-10-01

426

50 CFR 226.210 - Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Southern Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). 226...210 Central California Coast Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch ),...

2012-10-01

427

Feeding ecology of Gila boraxobius (Osteichthyes: Cyprindae) endemic to a thermal lake in southeastern Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Gila boraxobius is a dwarf species of cyprinid endemic to a thermal lake in southeastern Oregon. Despite a relatively depauperate fauna and flora in the lake, 24 food items were found in intestines of G. boraxobius. Ten of the 24 foods, including six insects, were of terrestrial origin. The relative importance of food items fluctuated seasonally. Diatoms, chironomid larvae, microcrustaceans, and dipteran adults were the primary foods during spring. In summer, diatoms decreased and terrestrial insects increased in importance. During autumn important foods were terrestrial insects, chironomid larvae, and diatoms. Diatoms and microcrustaceans increased in importance during winter. Chironomid larvae were of importance in winter, when the importance of terrestrial food items decreased substantially. Similar food habits were observed between juveniles and adults, except that adults consumed more gastropods and diatoms and juveniles consumed more copepods and terrestrial insects. Gila boraxobius feeds opportunistically with individuals commonly containing mostly one food item. Fish typically feed by picking foods from soft bottom sediments or from rocks. However, fish will feed throughout the water column or on the surface if food is abundant there. Gila boraxobius feeds throughout the day, with a peak in feeding activity just after sunset. A daily ration of 11.1 percent body weight was calculated for the species during June. A comparison of food habits among G. boraxobius and populations of G. alvordensis during the summer shows that all are opportunistic in feeding, but that G. boraxobius relies more heavily on terrestrial foods.

Williams, J.E.; Williams, C.D.

1980-06-30

428

Project development and data programs for assessing the quality of the Willamette River, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

Rickert, David A.; Hines, Walter G.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

1976-01-01

429

Methodology for river-quality assessment with application to the Willamette River basin, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

Rickert, David A.; Hines, Walter G.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

1976-01-01

430

Algal conditions and the potential for future algal problems in the Willamette River, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

Rickert, David A.; Petersen, R. R.; McKenzie, S. W.; Hines, W. G.; Wille, S. A.

1977-01-01

431

Wind-driven inner-shelf circulation off central Oregon during summer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Velocity measurements from 17 deployments of moored acoustic Doppler current profilers obtained during four summer upwelling seasons are used to describe the cross-shelf divergence of Ekman transport in the inner shelf off Oregon. For each deployment the measured surface and bottom cross-shelf transports were compared with estimates of the theoretical Ekman transports to find the fraction of full theoretical Ekman transport present. In general, in 15 m of water at 1-2 km offshore, measured transport was 25% of the full Ekman transport. Measured transports reached full Ekman transport 5-6 km offshore in 50 m of water. This result indicates that the region of active upwelling marked by the divergence of Ekman transport was limited to a narrow region along the coast. With small wind stress curl and no major headlands in the region, no along-shelf trends in the transport fractions were observed. Average transport fractions at each station were similar from year to year with one exception. The interannual variability seen at this particular site was most likely a result of local along-shelf bathymetric features. In addition, a weak linear relationship was found between the ambient stratification and the fraction of full Ekman transport. Reduced cross-shelf transport occurred at times of decreased stratification. This type of "shutdown" of the inner-shelf cross-shelf circulation has significant biological implications, sequestering production in the nearshore and reducing larval cross-shelf transport.

Kirincich, Anthony R.; Barth, John A.; Grantham, Brian A.; Menge, Bruce A.; Lubchenco, Jane

2005-10-01

432

Residency and movement patterns of wintering dunlin in the Willamette Valley of Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the winters of 1998a??1999 and 1999a??2000, we tracked 67 radio-marked Dunlin (Calidris alpina) throughout the complex agricultural landscape of the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Individual birds were tracked across 8-week sampling periods and indicated a high degree of regional fidelity throughout the three winter sampling periods. Birds exhibited varied degrees of fidelity to specific wetland sites and were detected at an average of nine different sites. Distances traveled within the region were extensive and greatest during late winter. Females ranged farther from capture sites than males, and movement from capture sites for all birds was greatest during late winter. Mean home-range size (95% minimum convex polygons) of birds was 258.2 A? 44.8 km2 (SE) and was greatest during late winter. Diurnal roosts were identified as centers of activities and daily movements were most pronounced during crepuscular periods. These data represent the most extensive documentation of winter movements for a shorebird at an inland site. Findings indicate Dunlin were winter residents, and extensive local movements suggest a high degree of functional connectivity of habitats.

Sanzenbacher, Peter; Haig, Susan M.

2002-01-01

433

Residency and movement patterns of wintering Dunlin in the Willamette Valley of Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the winters of 1998-1999 and 1999-2000, we tracked 67 radio-marked Dunlin (Calidris alpina) throughout the complex agricultural landscape of the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Individual birds were tracked across 8-week sampling periods and indicated a high degree of regional fidelity throughout the three winter sampling periods. Birds exhibited varied degrees of fidelity to specific wetland sites and were detected at an average of nine different sites. Distances traveled within the region were extensive and greatest during late winter. Females ranged farther from capture sites than males, and movement from capture sites for all birds was greatest during late winter. Mean home-range size (95% minimum convex polygons) of birds was 258.2 ?? 44.8 km2 (SE) and was greatest during late winter. Diurnal roosts were identified as centers of activities and daily movements were most pronounced during crepuscular periods. These data represent the most extensive documentation of winter movements for a shorebird at an inland site. Findings indicate Dunlin were winter residents, and extensive local movements suggest a high degree of functional connectivity of habitats.

Sanzenbacher, P. M.; Haig, S. M.

2002-01-01

434

Long-term limnological research and monitoring at Crater Lake, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Crater Lake is located in the caldera of Mount Mazama in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon. The lake has a surface area of about 53 km2at an elevation of 1882 m and a maximum depth of 594 m. Limited studies of this ultraoligotrophic lake conducted between 1896 and 1981, lead to a 10-year limnological study to evaluate any potential degradation of water quality. No long-term variations in water quality were observed that could be attributed to anthropogenic activity. Building on the success of this study, a permanent limnological program has been established with a long-term monitoring program to insure a reliable data base for use in the future. Of equal importance, this program serves as a research platform to develop and communicate to the public a better understanding of the coupled biological, physical, and geochemical processes in the lake and its surrounding environment. This special volume represents our current state of knowledge of the status of this pristine ecosystem including its special optical properties, algal nutrient limitations, pelagic bacteria, and models of the inter-relationships of thermal properties, nutrients, phytoplankton, deep-water mixing, and water budgets. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

Larson, G. L.; Collier, R.; Buktenica, M.

2007-01-01

435

Organochlorine Contaminants in blubber samples from stranded marine mammals collected from the Oregon and Washington coasts; implications for re-introducing California condors in Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The re-introduction of California condors into Oregon is currently being considered, but there are concerns about the safety of the potential food sources of this species. Condors are opportunistic feeders and a largely available food source for this species will be the carcasses of stranded marine mammals. Organochlorine contaminants are of particular concern due to the life history and trophic

Deke Gundersen; Tina Gundersen

2010-01-01

436

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-309-1739, Oregon Department of Human Resources, Health Division, Gypsy Moth Control Project, Eugene, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluation of occupational and general public exposure to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) during application of this microbial agent for control of the gypsy moth was requested by the Oregon State Department of Human Resources, Health Division, located in Portland. Bt was applied by helicopter on about 250,000 acres of forest, rural, and urban areas in 1985 and 1986. Project operational plans,

L. J. Elliott; M. Huemann; R. Sokolow; S. Elefant

1986-01-01

437

Faculty Racial/Ethnic Diversity in the Oregon State System of Higher Education. A Report Prepared for the Oregon State Board of Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents data on the racial and ethnic diversity of faculty in the Oregon State System of Higher Education (OSSHE) as of October 1996. Comparative data for U.S. institutions in general are for 1992 and are from the National Center for Education Statistics. Highlights include: (1) African Americans make up 0.9 percent of OSSHE faculty…

Oregon State System of Higher Education, Portland. Office of Institutional Research.

438

The Computer: Extension of the Human Mind. Proceedings, Annual Summer Conference, College of Education, University of Oregon (3rd, Eugene, Oregon, July 21-23, 1982).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty-two speakers attending the University of Oregon College of Education's Third Annual Summer Conference, entitled "The Computer: Extension of the Human Mind," in July, 1982, submitted their papers for publication in this volume of conference proceedings. Papers of a wide-ranging speculative or theoretical nature were presented in general…

ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, Eugene, OR.

439

Sediment production from forest roads in western Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Prevention and estimation of soil erosion from forest roads requires an understanding of how road design and maintenance affect sediment production. Seventy-four plots were installed on forest roads in the Oregon Coast Range to examine the relationship between sediment production and road attributes such as distance between culverts, road slope, soil texture, and cutslope height. An additional comparison was made between road segments with cutslopes and ditches freshly cleared of vegetation and segments with established vegetation on cutslopes and in ditches. All road segments were 5 m wide and insloped with aggregate surfacing, light traffic, and no overhanging forest cover. Sediment production was correlated to the product of segment length times road slope squared. Sediment production from aggregate covered roads on a silty clay loam was about 9 times greater than that from roads constructed on a gravelly loam. Sediment production was not correlated to the cutslope height. Road segments where vegetation was cleared from the cutslope and ditch produced about 7 times as much sediment as road segments where vegetation was retained, showing the potential reduction in erosion by revegetation following construction and the potential impact of ditch cleaning during maintenance. Relationships and estimates from this study provide a basis for improved erosion estimates by commonly used empirical procedures.

Luce, Charles H.; Black, Thomas A.

1999-08-01

440

Representative Freshwater Bacterioplankton Isolated from Crater Lake, Oregon  

PubMed Central

High-throughput culturing (HTC) methods that rely on dilution to extinction in very-low-nutrient media were used to obtain bacterial isolates from Crater Lake, Oregon. 16S rRNA sequence determination and phylogenetic reconstruction were used to determine the potential ecological significance of isolated bacteria, both in Crater Lake and globally. Fifty-five Crater Lake isolates yielded 16 different 16S rRNA gene sequences. Thirty of 55 (55%) Crater Lake isolates had 16S rRNA gene sequences with 97% or greater similarity to sequences recovered previously from Crater Lake 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Furthermore, 36 of 55 (65%) Crater Lake isolates were found to be members of widely distributed freshwater groups. These results confirm that HTC is a significant improvement over traditional isolation techniques that tend to enrich for microorganisms that do not predominate in their environment and rarely correlate with 16S rRNA gene clone library sequences. Although all isolates were obtained under dark, heterotrophic growth conditions, 2 of the 16 different groups showed evidence of photosynthetic capability as assessed by the presence of puf operon sequences, suggesting that photoheterotrophy may be a significant process in this oligotrophic, freshwater habitat.

Page, Kathleen A.; Connon, Stephanie A.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

2004-01-01

441

Oregon patients with HIV infection who experience delayed diagnosis.  

PubMed

This project sought to understand factors contributing to the delayed diagnosis of HIV in the state of Oregon, USA in order to increase timely testing and diagnosis. People unaware of their positive HIV status account for a disproportionate number of transmissions of HIV, making delayed diagnosis a profound public health concern. We interviewed a sample of 17 adults, diverse in age, reported risk behaviors and sexual orientation, who were identified as being diagnosed late, about their experiences with testing and diagnosis. We defined delayed diagnosis as a diagnosis of AIDS within 12 months of the first positive HIV test. We conducted thematic analysis using NVivo® software for data management. Three overarching themes emerged: risk perception, missed opportunities for diagnosis, routine testing and the role of the medical community. Definitions of these themes, corresponding sub-themes, and illustrious quotations provide an informative description of characteristics of late testers, factors contributing to delayed diagnosis, and potential points of intervention to increase regular and timely testing. We conclude that routine HIV screening as part of regular medical care might significantly reduce the number of delayed diagnoses and minimize the stigma of testing by normalizing it as part of routine medical care. Earlier diagnosis of HIV will result in better outcomes for individual patients and lower rates of HIV transmission by unknowing individuals. PMID:24571135

Schwartz, Sara Laura; Block, Rebecca G; Schafer, Sean David

2014-09-01

442

Ground-water resources in the Hood Basin, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Hood Basin in north-central Oregon consists of about a 1 ,035-square-mile area underlain by Miocene to Holocene age volcanic, volcaniclastic, sedimentary rocks, and unconsolidated surficial deposits. The most important aquifer is the Columbia River Basalt Group, a unit that underlies most of the basin and probably exceeds a thickness of 2,000 feet wherever it is present. By 1980, only the upper 1,000 feet or less of the formation has been developed for water supplies. Most of this development is in the semiarid eastern half of the basin. Wells in the aquifer unit generally yield from 15 to 1,000 gallons per minute and a few yield as much as 3,300 gallons per minute. Other aquifer units in the basin have more limited areal extent and smaller saturated thickness than does the Columbia River Basalt Group. Generally, these units are capable of yielding from a few to a few hundred gallons per minute to wells. Most of the ground water in the basin is chemically suitable for domestic, irrigation, or other uses. Some ground water has objectionable concentrations of iron (0.3 to 6.4 mg/l) and manganese (0.05 to 1.2 mg/l) or is moderately hard to very hard (60 to 260 mg/l) as calcium carbonate. (USGS)

Grady, Stephen J.

1983-01-01

443

National Uranium Resource Evaluation, Klamath Falls Quadrangle, Oregon and California  

SciTech Connect

The Klamath Falls Quadrangle, Oregon, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits according to criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Surface radiometric reconnaissance and geochemical sampling were used for overall evaluation of the quadrangle. Detailed rock sampling, geologic mapping, and examinations of uranium mines and occurrences were performed in suspected favorable areas. Results of the work indicate good potential for shallow hydrothermal volcanogenic uranium deposits in the Lakeview favorable area, which comprises a northwest-trending belt of rhyolite intrusions in the eastern half of the quadrangle. The young age, peraluminous chemistry, and low thorium-to-uranium ratios of the rhyolite intrusions, as well as low uranium content of groundwater samples, indicate that uranium has not been leached from the intrusions by ground water. Therefore, supergene uranium deposits are not likely in the area. Scattered occurrences of ash-flow tuff in the east half of the quadrangle that contain high uranium and (or) thorium contents, and four occurrences of secondary uranium minerals in ash-flow tuff, indicate possible uranium deposits in ash flows in a poorly defined area that is partially coextensive with the Lakeview favorable area. Small granitic plutons with associated quartz-tourmaline breccia veins and base-metal occurrences may also be favorable for uranium deposits but were not examined during this study.

Castor, S.B.; Berry, M.R.; Robins, J.W.

1982-07-01

444

Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater-breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the Oregon spotted frog (OSF, Rana pretiosa), a state endangered species in Washington. Acute toxicity of herbicides used to control aquatic weeds tends to be low, but the direct effects of herbicide tank mixes on OSFs have remained unexamined. We exposed juvenile OSFs to tank mixes of the herbicide imazapyr, a surfactant, and a marker dye in a 96-h static-renewal test. The tank mix was chosen because of its low toxicity to fish and its effectiveness in aquatic weed control. Concentrations were those associated with low-volume (3.5?L/ha) and high-volume (7.0?L/ha) applications of imazapyr and a clean-water control. Following exposure, frogs were reared for two months in clean water to identify potential latent effects on growth. Endpoints evaluated included feeding behavior, growth, and body and liver condition indices. We recorded no mortalities and found no significant differences for any end point between the herbicide-exposed and clean-water control frogs. The results suggest that imazapyr use in wetland restoration poses a low risk of direct toxic effects on juvenile OSFs.

Yahnke, Amy E.; Grue, Christian E.; Hayes, Marc P.; Troiano, Alexandra T.

2013-01-01

445

Water resources of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 1,000-square-mile Warm Springs Indian Reservation in north-central Oregon were obtained and evaluated. The area is bounded on the west by the crest of the Cascade Range and on the south and east by the Metolius and Deschutes Rivers. The mountainous western part is underlain by young volcanic rocks, and the plateaus and valleys of the eastern part are underlain by basalt, tuff, sand, and gravel of Tertiary and Quaternary ages. There are numerous springs, some developed for stock use, and about 50 domestic and community wells; yields are small, ranging from less than 1 to as much as 25 gallons per minute. Chemical quality of most ground water is suitable for stock or human consumption and for irrigation. Average flows of the Warm Springs River, Metolius River, and Deschutes River are 440, 1,400, and 4,040 cubic feet per second (cfs), respectively. Shitike Creek, which has an average flow of 108 cfs had a peak of 4,000 cfs in January 1974. Most streams have fewer than 100 milligrams per liter (mg/liter) of dissolved solids. Chemical and biological quality of the mountain lakes is also good; of 10 lakes studied, all had fewer than 50 mg/liter of dissolved solids and none had measurable fecal coliform bacteria. (Woodard-USGS)

Robison, J. H.; Laenen, Antonius

1976-01-01

446

Variability in Older Forest Structure in Western Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The goal of this report is to assist Federal land managers in developing realistic structural targets for young forests for which the development of late-successional and old-growth (LSOG) characteristics is a long-term management objective (i.e., in Late-Successional Reserves established under the Northwest Forest Plan). A unique LSOG structural database was created using complete inventories, or censuses (i.e., 100% timber cruise records), of all conifer trees > 1 ft diameter from 586 recently harvested older forests on five Bureau of Land Management (BLM) districts in western Oregon. The average area of each of the 586 inventoried older forests, 28.1 ac, clearly reflected the spatial scales typical of forest management units on Federal lands covered by the Northwest Forest Plan. All told, the LSOG database contains conifer tree census data for over 16,400 ac of LSOG forests. Ecoregion-level variability in LSOG forest structure was compared and contrasted for sites contained in the LSOG database. The spatial variability of trees and snags at 14 LSOG sites was characterized using structural data collected along one or more long (396-2178 ft) belt transects at each site.

Poage, Nathan J.

2005-01-01

447

Feasibility analysis of geothermal district heating for Lakeview, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the geothermal resource at Lakeview, Oregon, indicates that a substantial resource exists in the area capable of supporting extensive residential, commercial and industrial heat loads. Good resource productivity is expected with water temperatures of 200{degrees}F at depths of 600 to 3000 feet in the immediate vicinity of the town. Preliminary district heating system designs were developed for a Base Case serving 1170 homes, 119 commercial and municipal buildings, and a new alcohol fuel production facility; a second design was prepared for a downtown Mini-district case with 50 commercial users and the alcohol plant. Capital and operating costs were determined for both cases. Initial development of the Lakeview system has involved conducting user surveys, well tests, determinations of institutional requirements, system designs, and project feasibility analyses. A preferred approach for development will be to establish the downtown Mini-district and, as experience and acceptance are obtained, to expand the system to other areas of town. Projected energy costs for the Mini-district are $10.30 per million Btu while those for the larger Base Case design are $8.20 per million Btu. These costs are competitive with costs for existing sources of energy in the Lakeview area.

Not Available

1980-12-23

448

Hydrology of the dunes area north of Coos Bay, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrology of a 20-square-mile area of dunes along the central Oregon coast was studied. The area is underlain by 80 to 150 feet of Quaternary dune and marine sand which overlies Tertiary marine clay and shale. Ground water for industrial and municipal use is being withdrawn at a rate of 4 million gallons per day. Original plans to withdraw as much as 30 million gallons per day are evidently limited by the prospect of excessive lowering of levels in shallow lakes near the wells, and possibly sea-water intrusion, if water-level gradients are reversed. At the present stage of development there are 18 production wells, each capable of producing 200-300 gallons per minute from the lower part of the sand deposits. Except for thin layers of silt, clay, and organic matter, the deposits of sand are clean and uniform; horizontal permeability is two orders of magnitude times the vertical permeability. Because of the low vertical permeability, drawdown cones are not evident in the upper part of the aquifer adjacent to the wells. However, present pumping lowers general water levels in the lakes and the shallow ground-water zone as much as several feet. A two-layer electric analog model was built to analyze effects of present and projected development as well as any alternate plans. Model results were used to develop curves for short-term prediction of water levels.

Robison, J. H.

1973-01-01

449

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Deschutes County, Oregon.  

SciTech Connect

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be Deschutes County. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Deschutes County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Geothermal energy is defined as the heat of the earth. For purposes of this study, geothermal energy is heat capable of economically generating electricity (using available technology). That translates to steam or hot water over 300{degrees}F. Local economical impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result for the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued respending as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. The workers associated with plant development bring their families to the area. Additional labor is required to provide support services for the new population. Local government services must also increase to support the new community growth and the geothermal plant itself. These changes yield indirect and induced employment impacts associated with the geothermal plant.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1991-12-01

450

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Harney County, Oregon.  

SciTech Connect

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be in Harney Count. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Harney County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Geothermal energy is defined as the heat of the earth. For purposes of this study, geothermal energy is heat capable of economically generating electricity (using available technology). That translates to steam or hot water over 300{degrees}F. Local economic impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result from the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued respending as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. The workers associated with plant development bring their families to the area. Additional labor is required to provide support services for the new population. Local government services must also increase to support the new community growth and the geothermal plant itself. These changes yield indirect and induced employment impacts associated with the geothermal plant.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1991-12-01

451

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Malheur County, Oregon.  

SciTech Connect

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be in Malheur County, shown in Figure 1. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Malheur County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Local economic impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result from the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued responding as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. Public service impacts include costs such as education, fire protection, roads, waste disposal, and water supply. The project assumption discussion notes experiences at other geothermal areas. The background section compares geothermal with conventional power plants. Power plant fuel distinguishes geothermal from other power sources. Other aspects of development are similar to small scale conventional thermal sources. The process of geothermal development is then explained. Development consists of well drilling, gathering system construction, power plant construction, plant operation and maintenance, and wellfield maintenance.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1993-01-01

452

Strain accumulation and rotation in western Oregon and southwestern Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Velocities of 75 geodetic monuments in western Oregon and southwestern Washington extending from the coast to more than 300 km inland have been determined from GPS surveys over the interval 1992-2000. The average standard deviation in each of the horizontal velocity components is ??? 1 mm yr-1. The observed velocity field is approximated by a combination of rigid rotation (Euler vector relative to interior North America: 43. 40??N ?? 0.14??, 119.33??W ?? 0.28??, and 0.822 ?? 0.057?? Myr-1 clockwise; quoted uncertainties are standard deviations), uniform regional strain rate (??EE = -7.4 ?? 1.8, ??EN = -3.4 ?? 1.0, and ??NN = -5.0 ?? 0.8 nstrain yr-1, extension reckoned positive), and a dislocation model representing subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate beneath North America. Subduction south of 44.5??N was represented by a 40-km-wide locked thrust and subduction north of 44.5??N by a 75-km-wide locked thrust.

Svarc, J. L.; Savage, J. C.; Prescott, W. H.; Murray, M. H.

2002-01-01

453

Comment and response document on the final remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Lakeview, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This report contains comments provided by the Oregon Department of Energy and responses to these comments on the final remedial action plan for the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lakeview, Oregon.

Not Available

1991-10-01

454

The Oregon health insurance experiment: when limited policy resources provide research opportunities.  

PubMed

In 2008 Oregon allocated access to its Medicaid expansion program, Oregon Health Plan Standard, by drawing names from a waiting list by lottery. The lottery was chosen by policy makers and stakeholders as the preferred way to allocate limited resources. At the same time, it also gave rise to the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment: an unprecedented opportunity to do a randomized evaluation - the gold standard in medical and scientific research - of the impact of expanding Medicaid. In this article we provide historical context for Oregon's decision to conduct a lottery, discuss the importance of randomized controlled designs for policy evaluation, and describe some of the practical challenges in successfully capitalizing on the research opportunity presented by the Oregon lottery through public-academic partnerships. Since policy makers will always face tough choices about how to distribute scarce resources, we urge thoughtful consideration of the opportunities to incorporate randomization that can substantially improve the evidence available to inform policy decisions without compromising policy goals. PMID:23974473

Allen, Heidi; Baicker, Katherine; Taubman, Sarah; Wright, Bill; Finkelstein, Amy

2013-12-01

455

Opinions and reactions of physicians in New Jersey regarding the Oregon Death with Dignity Act.  

PubMed

Physician-assisted suicide (PAS) was legalized in Oregon in 1997. In the study reported here, the authors surveyed a sample of New Jersey physicians with regard to Oregon's Death with Dignity Act and to whether similar legislation should be enacted in New Jersey. A 49-item questionnaire was sent to 563 physicians in New Jersey who were licensed in the specialties of family practice, internal medicine, surgery, psychiatry, and obstetrics/gynecology. The questionnaire contained sections pertaining to demographics, physicians' attitudes regarding PAS, and physicians' opinions on Oregon's Death with Dignity Act. A brief summary of the legislation was included in the mailing, which participants were asked to read before completing the questionnaire. Of the 191 physicians who responded to the survey, 55% agreed with legislation that would legalize PAS, and 59% said that a law similar to that enacted in Oregon should exist in New Jersey. However, only 47% of respondents indicated that they believed PAS to be consistent with the role of a physician to relieve pain and suffering. Slightly more than half of respondents indicated that they would refuse to participate in PAS and were concerned about issues such as professional and personal liability and the potential for abuse. Physicians in New Jersey will require additional information, education, and discussion of the ethical and legal implications of PAS before a law similar to that in Oregon could be proposed or considered. PMID:10902406

Kersh, S; Cavalieri, T A; Ciesielski, J; Forman, L J

2000-06-01

456

AN APPROACH TO DEVELOPING NUTRIENT CRITERIA FOR PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARIES: A CASE STUDY OF YAQUINA ESTUARY, OREGON  

EPA Science Inventory

NHEERL scientists have developed an approach that could be used by the State of Oregon for development of nutrient and other water quality criteria for the Yaquina Estuary, Oregon. The principle objective in setting protective criteria is to prevent future degradation of estuari...

457

A Cross-Validation of easyCBM[R] Mathematics Cut Scores in Oregon: 2009-2010. Technical Report #1104  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this technical report, we document the results of a cross-validation study designed to identify optimal cut-scores for the use of the easyCBM[R] mathematics test in Oregon. A large sample, randomly split into two groups of roughly equal size, was used for this study. Students' performance classification on the Oregon state test was used as the…

Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

2011-01-01

458

78 FR 43827 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This proposed rule invites comments on the termination of Marketing Order No. 947 (order), which regulates the handling of Irish potatoes grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon, except Malheur County, and the rules and regulations issued thereunder. The order is administered locally by the Oregon-California Potato Committee (Committee), which recommended......

2013-07-22

459

Characteristics and VA Health Care Utilization of U.S. Veterans Who Completed Suicide in Oregon between 2000 and 2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oregon Violent Death Reporting System data were linked with Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative data to identify and describe veterans who completed suicide in Oregon from 2000 to 2005 (n = 968), and to describe their VA health care utilization in the year prior to death. Twenty-two percent had received health care in the VA system. Of these, 57%…

Basham, Chandra; Denneson, Lauren M.; Millet, Lisa; Shen, Xun; Duckart, Jonathan; Dobscha, Steven K.

2011-01-01

460

A Quarter-Century of Attacks on Oregon Public School Library and Text Books: A Chronological Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper compiles information pertaining to over 200 challenges to public school library books, text books, reading series, magazines, newspapers, plays, and nonprint materials in Oregon from 1968 through 1993. Although Oregon ranks 29th in the nation in population, it is second only to California in the average number of challenges in school…

Pyle, Thomas W.

461

The Cost of Caution: Tobacco Industry Political Influence and Tobacco Policy Making in Oregon 1997-2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following the passage of Measure 44, which raised the cigarette tax by $0.30 in 1996, Oregon created its comprehensive Tobacco Prevention and Education Program (TPEP) in 1997 funded by 10% of Measure 44 revenues. The Tobacco Free Coalition of Oregon (TOFCO) was a broad coalition of the voluntary health organizations and community partners that facilitated media advocacy and grassroots opportunities

Kristen Lum; Stanton A. Glantz

2007-01-01

462

Preventing Infectious Aerosol Hazards to Laboratorians: A Team Effort To Obtain Biological Safety Cabinets for Oregon Sentinel Hospital Labs  

Microsoft Academic Search

ISSUE: In November 2002, 44 hospital labs performing high-complexity microbiology on wound, respiratory, and\\/or blood culture specimens were enrolled into the Oregon Laboratory Response Network (OLRN) as “sentinels.” Twelve of the 44 OLRN labs (27%) had inadequate or no biological safety cabinets (BSCs). Coordinated by the Oregon State Public Health Laboratories (OSPHL) and complying with the Centers of Disease Control

T. McGivern

2004-01-01

463

Origins of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon: A Cascade Backarc, High Lava Plains, Basin and Range Shield Volcano?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Newberry Volcano, located 60 km east of the central Oregon High Cascades resides in a complex tectonic and volcanic region. Understanding the petrogenesis of Newberry Volcano is important to understanding the regional geological framework because of its location at the confluence of the back-arc of the Oregon Cascades, the northern end of the Basin and Range, and the western end

M. C. Rowe; A. J. Kent; R. L. Nielsen; P. J. Wallace; J. M. Donnelly-Nolan

2003-01-01

464

78 FR 6832 - Call for Nominations for the John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council, Oregon/Washington  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Call for Nominations for the John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council, Oregon/Washington...BLM) Oregon/ Washington John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council (RAC). Citizens...at 43 CFR subpart 1784. The John Day-Snake RAC seeks nominations to fill one...

2013-01-31

465

77 FR 49854 - Tier 1 Environmental Impact Statement for the Oregon Portion of the Pacific Northwest Rail...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oregon Portion of the Pacific Northwest Rail Corridor (Portland to Eugene) AGENCY...Oregon portion of the Pacific Northwest Rail Corridor (PNWRC). The objective of the...reasonable range of alternatives and select a rail corridor as well as making decisions...

2012-08-17

466

Survival of Columbian white-tailed deer in western Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Columbian white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus leucurus; CWTD) are an endangered subspecies on which little demographic information exists. We determined survival rates and causes of mortality for 64 radiocollared adults from 1996 to 1998, and for 63 radiocollared neonatal fawns during the summer and fall months of 1996-2001 in Douglas County, Oregon, USA. Annual adult survival rates averaged 0.74 over 3 years, and most mortality (73%) occurred between fall and winter. Seasonal survival was lowest (0.75) for the fall-winter 1997-1998, and was ???0.90 during all spring-summer periods. Annual and seasonal survival rates did not differ by gender. Average annual survival was 0.77 for deer in wildland areas compared with 0.66 for deer in suburban areas, but these differences were not consistent between years and seasons. Survival over the entire 3-year study was low (0.38). Eight deer died from a combination of emaciation and disease, and almost all (92%) necropsied deer were in poor body condition. Fawn survival to 7 months was low (0.14, 95% CI = 0.02-0.26) and declined most rapidly during the first 1.5 months of life. Predation (n = 21) and abandonment (n = 6) were the most frequent known causes of death for fawns. Our results suggest that CWTD may have responded to density-dependent factors during this short-term study, although the effects of other environmental or intrinsic factors cannot be ignored. Fawn survival may be insufficient to produce enough recruits for population growth and eventual range expansion.

Ricca, M. A.; Anthony, R. G.; Jackson, D. H.; Wolfe, S. A.

2002-01-01

467

Adverse experiences with implantable defibrillators in Oregon hospices  

PubMed Central

Background Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) improve survival in patients at risk for recurrent, sustained ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. Unless deactivated, ICDs may deliver unwanted shocks to terminally ill patients near the time of death. This study sought to determine the frequency and nature of adverse experiences with ICDs events and what preventative measures the hospice programs had taken. Method A mailed survey to all 50 Oregon Hospice Programs in August 2008. Results 42/50 (84%) programs participated. 36/42 (86%) programs reported having taken care of a patient with an ICD in the preceding four years. The average number of patients with ICDs per program increased from 2.2 (SD 2.5) in 2005 & 2006 to 3.6 (SD 3.7) in 2007 & 2008. Of the 36 programs who had cared for a patient with an ICD, 31 (86%) reported having some kind of adverse experience. These ranged from unwanted shocks delivered (64%), patient/ family distress related to the decision to deactivate the ICD (47%), and time delay in ICD deactivation (42%). Only 16 (38%) programs had policies for managing ICDs and only 19 (43%) routinely screened new patients for ICDs. Discussion As patients near the end of their lives, receiving defibrillating shocks may no longer be consistent with their goals of care. Based on the high frequencies of potentially preventable adverse outcomes documented by this study, we propose that hospices routinely screen patients for ICDs and adopt policies to proactively manage them, rather than in response to an adverse event.

Fromme, Erik K.; Stewart, Tanya Lugliani; Jeppesen, Margaret; Tolle, Susan W.

2013-01-01

468

Water Quality and optical properties of Crater Lake, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We examine observations of key limnological properties (primarily temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen), measured over a 14-year period in Crater Lake, Oregon, and discuss variability in the hypolimnion on time scales of days to a decade. During some years (e.g., 1994a??1995), higher-than-average wintertime deep convection and ventilation led to the removal of significant amounts of heat and salt from the hypolimnion, while dissolved oxygen concentrations increase. In other years, such as the winter of 1996a??1997, heat and salt concentrations increase throughout the year and dissolved oxygen levels drop, indicating conditions were dominated by the background geothermal inputs and dissolved oxygen consumption by bacteria (i.e., minimal deep convection). Over the entire 14 year period, no statistically significant trend was observed in the annual hypolimnetic heat and salt content. Measurements from several thermistors moored in the hypolimnion provide new insight into the time and space scales of the deep convection events. For some events, cool water intrusions are observed sequentially, from shallower depths to deeper depths, suggesting vertical mixing or advection from above. For other events, the cooling is observed first at the deepest sensors, suggesting a thin, cold water pulse that flows along the bottom and mixes more slowly upwards into the basin. In both cases, the source waters must originate from the epilimnion. Conditions during a strong ventilation year (1994a??1995) and a weak ventilation year (1996a??1997) were compared. The results suggest the major difference between these 2 years was the evolution of the stratification in the epilimnion during the first few weeks of reverse stratification such that thermobaric instabilities were easier to form during 1995 thana?#1997. Thus, the details of surface cooling and wind-driven mixing during the early stages ofa?#reverse stratification may determine the neta?#amount of ventilation possible during a particular year.

Larson, Gary L.; Hoffman, Robert L.; McIntire, C. D.; Buktenica, M. W.; Girdner, Scott

2007-01-01

469

NW Oregon radon potential based on soil radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of soil by gamma spectroscopy for Bi-214 (Ra-226) suggests low to moderate radon potentials for northwest Oregon in areas with low to moderate soil permeabilities. Very low radon potential zones (0.2 to 0.7 pCi/g) comprise 58% of the study area. These zones are frequently associated with soils developed from undifferentiated basalts and andesites of the Cascade Range, and basalts and undifferentiated mafic intrusives of the Coast Range. Low radon potential zones (0.7 to 1.2 pCi/g) comprise 28% of the study area. These zones are generally associated with Missoula Flood sediments, pre-Holocene loess in the Portland area, and Eocene/Oligocene marine sediments low in mica and/or tuff along the foothills of the Willamette Valley. Moderate radon potential zones (1.2 to 3.0 pCi/g) comprise 14% of the study area. These zones are often associated with the lateritic soils derived from Columbia River Basalts and Eocene/Oligocene marine sediments high in mica and/or tuff along the western edges of the Willamette Valley. A closer examination of soils in the Portland and Salem areas shows that: (1) Bi-214/K-40 ratios increase from 0.07 to 0.35 with respect to solid development, indicating K-40 to be preferentially leached over Ra-226; (2) clay development within B-horizons does not reflect a significant increase in Ra-226 mobility; and (3) elevated indoor radon within the Portland and Salem areas can be attributed to high soil permeabilities rather than soil chemistry.

Ashbaugh, S.G.; Burns, S.F. (Portland State Univ., OR (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1993-04-01

470

Seismicity induced by seasonal groundwater recharge at Mt. Hood, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater recharge at Mt. Hood, Oregon, is dominated by spring snow melt which provides a natural large-amplitude and narrow-width pore-fluid pressure signal. Time delays between this seasonal groundwater recharge and seismicity triggered by groundwater recharge can thus be used to estimate large-scale hydraulic diffusivities and the state of stress in the crust. We approximate seasonal variations in groundwater recharge with discharge in runoff-dominated streams at high elevations. We interpolate the time series of number of earthquakes, N, seismic moment, Mo, and stream discharge, Q, and determine cross-correlation coefficients at equivalent frequency bands between Q and both N and Mo. We find statistically significant correlation coefficients at a mean time lag of about 151 days. This time lag and a mean earthquake depth of about 4.5 km are used in the solution to the pressure diffusion equation, under periodic (1 year) boundary conditions, to estimate a hydraulic diffusivity of ??10 -1 m 2/s, a hydraulic conductivity of about Kh?10 -7 m/s, and a permeability of about k?10 -15 m 2. Periodic boundary conditions also allow us to determine a critical pore-fluid pressure fraction, P'/ P0?0.1, of the applied near-surface pore-fluid pressure perturbation, P0?0.1 MPa, that has to be reached at the mean earthquake depth to cause hydroseismicity. The low magnitude of P'?0.01 MPa is consistent with other studies that propose 0.01? P'?0.1 MPa and suggests that the state of stress in the crust near Mt. Hood could be near critical for failure. Therefore, we conclude that, while earthquakes occur throughout the year at Mt. Hood, elevated seismicity levels along pre-existing faults south of Mt. Hood during summer months are hydrologically induced by a reduction in effective stress.

Saar, Martin O.; Manga, Michael

2003-09-01

471

Diurnal cortisol rhythms among Latino immigrants in Oregon, USA  

PubMed Central

One of the most commonly used stress biomarkers is cortisol, a glucocorticoid hormone released by the adrenal glands that is central to the physiological stress response. Free cortisol can be measured in saliva and has been the biomarker of choice in stress studies measuring the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Chronic psychosocial stress can lead to dysregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function and results in an abnormal diurnal cortisol profile. Little is known about objectively measured stress and health in Latino populations in the United States, yet this is likely an important factor in understanding health disparities that exist between Latinos and whites. The present study was designed to measure cortisol profiles among Latino immigrant farmworkers in Oregon (USA), and to compare quantitative and qualitative measures of stress in this population. Our results indicate that there were no sex differences in average cortisol AUCg (area under the curve with respect to the ground) over two days (AvgAUCg; males?=?1.38, females?=?1.60; P?=?0.415). AUCg1 (Day 1 AUCg) and AvgAUCg were significantly negatively associated with age in men (P<0.05). AUCg1 was negatively associated with weight (P<0.05), waist circumference (P<0.01) and waist-to-stature ratio (P<0.05) in women, which is opposite of the expected relationship between cortisol and waist-to-stature ratio, possibly indicating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. Among men, more time in the United States and immigration to the United States at older ages predicted greater AvgAUCg. Among women, higher lifestyle incongruity was significantly related to greater AvgAUCg. Although preliminary, these results suggest that chronic psychosocial stress plays an important role in health risk in this population.

2012-01-01

472

Radiological survey of the Albany Research Center, Albany, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

In early 1984, a radiological survey was conducted at the Albany Research Center (ARC) in Albany, Oregon. The survey was performed as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a US Department of Energy effort to identify, clean up, or otherwise control sites where low level radioactive contamination (exceeding current guidelines) remains from the early years of the Nation's atomic energy program. From 1978 through 1982, the Argonne National Laboratory conducted radiological surveys of the ARC and identified areas with radiological readings above background. The 1984 survey was necessary to determine actual levels of contamination in each area and to define the locations and boundaries of above-guideline contamination. The 1984 survey revealed site field areas with above-guideline concentrations of /sup 232/Th and /sup 226/Ra in surface and subsurface soils. Using the 1984 survey findings for surface area and depths of contamination, and based on current cleanup guidelines for /sup 232/Th and /sup 226/Ra, about 2000 m/sup 3/ of contaminated material would require removal for the ARC site to comply with guidelines. Cleanup of approximately 5 m/sup 3/ of above-guideline contamination in two sumps, one drain, and associated piping also would be required. In addition, nine site buildings contained scattered above-guideline contamination on floors and/or walls, in trenches and drains, and on equipment. Decontamination could be accomplished with the removal of approximately 1 m/sup 3/ of surface material, plus decontamination of drains, trenches, and equipment as appropriate.

Not Available

1985-01-01

473

The Oregon Experiment -- Effects of Medicaid on Clinical Outcomes  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Despite the imminent expansion of Medicaid coverage for low-income adults, the effects of expanding coverage are unclear. The 2008 Medicaid expansion in Oregon based on lottery drawings from a waiting list provided an opportunity to evaluate these effects. METHODS Approximately 2 years after the lottery, we obtained data from 6387 adults who were randomly selected to be able to apply for Medicaid coverage and 5842 adults who were not selected. Measures included blood-pressure, cholesterol, and glycated hemoglobin levels; screening for depression; medication inventories; and self-reported diagnoses, health status, health care utilization, and out-of-pocket spending for such services. We used the random assignment in the lottery to calculate the effect of Medicaid coverage. RESULTS We found no significant effect of Medicaid coverage on the prevalence or diagnosis of hypertension or high cholesterol levels or on the use of medication for these conditions. Medicaid coverage significantly increased the probability of a diagnosis of diabetes and the use of diabetes medication, but we observed no significant effect on average glycated hemoglobin levels or on the percentage of participants with levels of 6.5% or higher. Medicaid coverage decreased the probability of a positive screening for depression (?9.15 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, ?16.70 to ?1.60; P = 0.02), increased the use of many preventive services, and nearly eliminated catastrophic out-of-pocket medical expenditures. CONCLUSIONS This randomized, controlled study showed that Medicaid coverage generated no significant improvements in measured physical health outcomes in the first 2 years, but it did increase use of health care services, raise rates of diabetes detection and management, lower rates of depression, and reduce financial strain.

Baicker, Katherine; Taubman, Sarah L.; Allen, Heidi L.; Bernstein, Mira; Gruber, Jonathan H.; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Schneider, Eric C.; Wright, Bill J.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Finkelstein, Amy N.

2013-01-01

474

Fractal image analysis - Application to the topography of Oregon and synthetic images.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Digitized topography for the state of Oregon has been used to obtain maps of fractal dimension and roughness amplitude. The roughness amplitude correlates well with variations in relief and is a promising parameter for the quantitative classification of landforms. The spatial variations in fractal dimension are low and show no clear correlation with different tectonic settings. For Oregon the mean fractal dimension from a two-dimensional spectral analysis is D = 2.586, and for a one-dimensional spectral analysis the mean fractal dimension is D = 1.487, which is close to the Brown noise value D = 1.5. Synthetic two-dimensional images have also been generated for a range of D values. For D = 2.6, the synthetic image has a mean one-dimensional spectral fractal dimension D = 1.58, which is consistent with the results for Oregon. This approach can be easily applied to any digitzed image that obeys fractal statistics.

Huang, Jie; Turcotte, Donald L.

1990-01-01

475

Rural Oregon community perspectives: introducing community-based participatory research into a community health coalition.  

PubMed

The Community Health Improvement Partnership (CHIP) model has supported community health development in more than 100 communities nationally. In 2011, four rural Oregon CHIPs collaborated with investigators from the Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network (ORPRN), a component of the Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute (OCTRI), to obtain training on research methods, develop and implement pilot research studies on childhood obesity, and explore matches with academic partners. This article summarizes the experiences of the Lincoln County CHIP, established in 2003, as it transitioned from CHIP to Community Health Improvement and Research Partnership (CHIRP). Our story and lessons learned may inform rural community-based health coalitions and academicians who are engaged in or considering Community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnerships. Utilizing existing infrastructure and relationships in community and academic settings provides an ideal starting point for rural, bidirectional research partnerships. PMID:24056513

Young-Lorion, Julia; Davis, Melinda M; Kirks, Nancy; Hsu, Anna; Slater, Jana Kay; Rollins, Nancy; Aromaa, Susan; McGinnis, Paul

2013-01-01

476

Lead poisoning associated with intravenous-methamphetamine use--Oregon, 1988  

SciTech Connect

Between August 1 and September 6, 1988, 14 cases of non-A, non-B (NANB) hepatitis were reported in Marion County, Oregon, to the Oregon Health Division (OHD) by the county health department and private physicians. Previously, an average of less than one case per month was reported in the county. During the same period, OHD learned that eight intravenous-methamphetamine users (IVMUs) in Oregon thought to have NANB hepatitis had also been recently diagnosed with lead poisoning. A statewide media campaign describing the lead poisoning outbreak was conducted to alert IVMUs, physicians, and county health departments. In addition, OHD implemented a reporting system for suspected and confirmed lead poisoning cases. Analysis of an illicit methamphetamine sample provided by one of the patients with confirmed lead poisoning detected 60% lead by weight.

Chandler, D.B.; Norton, R.L. (Oregon Health Science Univ. Poison Center, Portland (USA)); Kauffman, K.W.; Gordon, J.; Foster, L.R.

1990-02-09

477

Postglacial vegetation, fire, and climate history of the Siskiyou Mountains, Oregon, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The forests of the Siskiyou Mountains are among the most diverse in North America, yet the long-term relationship among climate, diversity, and natural disturbance is not well known. Pollen, plant macrofossils, and high-resolution charcoal data from Bolan Lake, Oregon, were analyzed to reconstruct a 17,000-yr-long environmental history of high-elevation forests in the region. In the late-glacial period, the presence of a subalpine parkland of Artemisia, Poaceae, Pinus, and Tsuga with infrequent fires suggests cool dry conditions. After 14,500 cal yr B.P., a closed forest of Abies, Pseudotsuga, Tsuga, and Alnus rubra with more frequent fires developed which indicates more mesic conditions than before. An open woodland of Pinus, Quercus, and Cupressaceae, with higher fire activity than before, characterized the early Holocene and implies warmer and drier conditions than at present. In the late Holocene, Abies and Picea were more prevalent in the forest, suggesting a return to cool wet conditions, although fire-episode frequency remained relatively high. The modern forest of Abies and Pseudotsuga and the present-day fire regime developed ca. 2100 cal yr B.P. and indicates that conditions had become slightly drier than before. Sub-millennial-scale fluctuations in vegetation and fire activity suggest climatic variations during the Younger Dryas interval and within the early Holocene period. The timing of vegetation changes in the Bolan Lake record is similar to that of other sites in the Pacific Northwest and Klamath region, and indicates that local vegetation communities were responding to regional-scale climate changes. The record implies that climate-driven millennial- to centennial-scale vegetation and fire change should be considered when explaining the high floristic diversity observed at present in the Siskiyou Mountains.

Briles, Christy E.; Whitlock, Cathy; Bartlein, Patrick J.

2005-07-01

478

The population structure and recent colonization history of Oregon threespine stickleback determined using RAD-seq  

PubMed Central

Understanding how genetic variation is partitioned across genomes within and among populations is a fundamental problem in ecological and evolutionary genetics. To address this problem we are studied the threespine stickleback fish, which has repeatedly undergone parallel phenotypic and genetic differentiation when oceanic fish have invaded freshwater habitats. While significant evolutionary genetic research has been performed using stickleback from geographic regions that have been de-glaciated in the last 20,000 years, less research has focused on freshwater populations that predate the last glacial maximum. We performed RAD-seq based population genomic analyses on stickleback from across Oregon, which was not glaciated during the last maximum. We sampled stickleback from coastal, Willamette Basin, and central Oregon sites, analyzed their genetic diversity using RAD-seq, performed STRUCTURE analyses, reconstructed their phylogeographic history, and tested the hypothesis of recent stickleback introduction into central Oregon, where incidence of this species was only recently documented. Our results showed a clear phylogeographic break between coastal and inland populations, with oceanic populations exhibiting the lowest levels of divergence from one another. Willamette Basin and central Oregon populations formed a clade of closely related populations, a finding consistent with a recent introduction of stickleback into central Oregon. Finally, genome wide analysis of genetic diversity (?) and correlations of alleles within individuals in subpopulations (FIS) supported a role for introgressive hybridization in coastal populations and a recent expansion in central Oregon. Our results exhibit the power of next generation sequencing genomic approaches such as RAD-seq to identify both historical population structure and recent colonization history.

Catchen, Julian; Bassham, Susan; Wilson, Taylor; Currey, Mark; O'Brien, Conor; Yeates, Quick; Cresko, William A.

2013-01-01

479

Co-existence of gas hydrate, free gas, and brine within the regional gas hydrate stability zone at Hydrate Ridge (Oregon margin): evidence from prolonged degassing of a pressurized core  

Microsoft Academic Search

Standard scientific operations on Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204 documented a horizon of massive gas hydrate and highly saline pore water f0-20 m below the southern summit of Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. The sediment zone lies near active seafloor gas venting, raising the possibility that free gas co-exists with gas hydrate in shallow subsurface layers where pore waters have

Alexei V. Milkova; Gerald R. Dickensb; George E. Claypoolc; Young-Joo Leed; Walter S. Borowskie; Marta E. Torresf; Wenyue Xug; Hitoshi Tomaruh; Anne M. Trehuf; Peter Schultheissi

480

Description of Globodera ellingtonae n. sp. (Nematoda: Heteroderidae) from Oregon  

PubMed Central

A new species of cyst nematode, Globodera ellingtonae, is described from soil collected from a field in Oregon. Second-stage juveniles (J2) of the species are characterized by body length of 365-515 ?m, stylet length of 19-22.5 ?m, basal knobs rounded posteriorly and pointed anteriorly, tail 39-55 ?m, hyaline tail terminus 20-32.5 ?m, and tail tapering uniformly but abruptly narrowing and constricted near the posterior third of the hyaline portion, ending with a peg-like, finely rounded to pointed terminus. Cysts are spherical to sub-spherical, dark to light brown and circumfenestrate and cyst wall pattern is ridge-like with heavy punctations. Males have a stylet length of 21-25 ?m and spicule length of 30-37 ?m with a pointed thorn-like tip. Females have a stylet length of 20-22.5 ?m, one head annule and labial disc, heavy punctations on the cuticle, and short vulval slit 7.5-8 ?m long. Morphologically this new, round-cyst species differs from the related species G. pallida, G. rostochiensis, G. tabacum complex and G. mexicana by its distinctive J2 tail, and by one or another of the following: shorter mean stylet length in J2, females and males; number of refractive bodies in the hyaline tail terminus of J2; cyst morphology including Granek’s ratio; number of cuticular ridges between the anus and vulva; and in the shape and length of spicules in males. Its relationship to these closely related species are discussed. Based upon analysis of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, G. ellingtonae n. sp. is distinct from G. pallida, G. rostochiensis, G. tabacum and G. mexicana. Bayesian and Maximum Parsimony analysis of cloned ITS rRNA gene sequences indicated three clades, with intraspecific variability as high as 2.8%. In silico analysis revealed ITS restriction fragment length polymorphisms for enzymes Bsh 1236I, Hinf I, and Rsa I that overlap patterns for other Globodera species.

Handoo, Zafar A.; Carta, Lynn K.; Skantar, Andrea M.; Chitwood, David J.

2012-01-01

481

Paleomagnetism of Basalt Flows near McKenzie Bridge, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A section of twelve Quaternary basalt flows near McKenzie Bridge, Oregon was sampled in July 2004 for paleomagnetic analysis. The thick sequence was chosen for study because field surveys suggest it is the proper age to potentially record the Matuyama-Brunhes transition, and field measurements with a fluxgate magnetometer indicated the presence of both normal and reversely magnetized units (Conrey, pers. comm.). At each site, six to ten oriented cores were collected and analyzed to determine the mean magnetic direction and Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP) position. Standard alternating field demagnetization to 999 oe and thermal demagnetization to 680° C were performed to remove secondary magnetization and get clues to magnetic mineralogy. Eleven of the twelve sites yielded VGPs that cluster in Eastern Siberia. The mean inclination and declination of these 11 sites are 59.5° and 328.3° with a95 = 2.95° . The remaining flow yielded radically different directions from the other sites (D = 278.8°, I = 8.7° ) and a VGP just north of Australia (lat. = 9.4° S long. = 145.0° ). Further investigation of this site needs to be done in order to ensure that the outcrop is in place and yielding a reliable magnetic direction. Changes in intensity during thermal demagnetizations suggest titano-magnetite as the main carrier of magnetic signal. SEM and optical examination will be used to confirm magnetic mineralogy. Assuming a Geocentric Axial Dipole (GAD) field, the expected mean direction for the McKenzie Bridge area is D = 0°, I = 63.4° . The difference in the expected and mean directions for the 11 sites can be explained in several ways. The area may have undergone counterclockwise rotation since these lavas were erupted, or the units sampled may not represent a long enough time period to adequately average paleosecular variation. The low-latitude VGP of the other site suggests an intriguing possibility; that the section does record a reversal. The VGP for this site and VGPs for the other 11 sites fall along one of the preferred longitudinal VGP paths for reversals suggested by several researchers (eg. Love, 1998) and in Hoffman's (1996) patches. Paleomagnetic analyses of 12 flows sitting atop the section studied here reveal similar Siberian VGP locations (LeValley and Valentine, this volume). Further study of flows lying below both of these should clarify the cause of the directional anomaly.

Valentine, M. J.

2005-05-01

482

Geology and ground water of the Tualatin Valley, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Tualatin Valley proper consists of broad valley plains, ranging in altitude from 100 to 300 feet, and the lower mountain slopes of the drainage basin of the Tualatin River, a tributary of the Willamette River in northwestern Oregon. The valley is almost entirely farmed. Its population is increasing rapidly, partly because of the expansion of metropolitan Portland. Structurally, the bedrock of the basin is a saucer-shaped syncline almost bisected lengthwise by a ridge. The bedrock basin has been partly filled by alluvium, which underlies the valley plains. Ground water occurs in the Columbia River basalt, a lava unit that forms the top several hundred feet of the bedrock, and also in the zones of fine sand in the upper part of the alluvial fill. It occurs under unconfined, confined, and perched conditions. Graphs of the observed water levels in wells show that the ground water is replenished each year by precipitation. The graphs show also that the amount and time of recharge vary in different aquifers and for different modes of ground-water occurrence. The shallower alluvial aquifers are refilled each year to a level where further infiltration recharge is retarded and water drains away as surface runoff. No occurrences of undue depletion of the ground water by pumping are known. The facts indicate that there is a great quantity of additional water available for future development. The ground water is developed for use by some spring works and by thousands of wells, most of which are of small yield. Improvements are now being made in the design of the wells in basalt and in the use of sand or gravel envelopes for wells penetrating the fine-sand aquifers. The ground water in the basalt and the valley fill is in general of good quality, only slightly or moderately hard and of low salinity. Saline and mineralized water is present in the rocks of Tertiary age below the Columbia River basalt. Under certain structural and stratigraphic conditions this water of poor quality contaminates the fresh-water aquifers. Detailed hydrologic and geologic conditions are presented in 5 tables, 7 pictures, and 17 graphic figures and plates.

Hart, D. H.; Newcomb, R. C.

1965-01-01

483

Portland, Mount Hood, & Columbia River Gorge, Oregon, Perspective View  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Portland, the largest city in Oregon, is located on the Columbia River at the northern end of the Willamette Valley. On clear days, Mount Hood highlights the Cascade Mountains backdrop to the east. The Columbia is the largest river in the American Northwest and is navigable up to and well beyond Portland. It is also the only river to fully cross the Cascade Range, and has carved the Columbia River Gorge, which is seen in the left-central part of this view. A series of dams along the river, at topographically favorable sites, provide substantial hydroelectric power to the region.

This perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a Landsat satellite image, and a false sky. Topographic expression is vertically exaggerated two times.

Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data substantially help in analyzing Landsat images by revealing the third dimension of Earth's surface, topographic height. The Landsat archive is managed by the U.S. Geological Survey's Eros Data Center (USGS E