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1

Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

1993-02-01

2

Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon. Final Phase 1 environmental report  

SciTech Connect

The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

1993-02-01

3

Active channel for Fanno Creek, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban runoff and shows characteristic flashy streamflow and poor water quality commonly associated with urban streams. This data set represents the active, wetted channel as derived from light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and aerial photographic imagery. The wetted channel boundary is equivalent to the extent of water observed during a 2-yr high flow event.

Sobieszczyk, Steven

2011-01-01

4

75 FR 33997 - Safety Zone; McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, Columbia River, Hermiston, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...USCG-2010-0504] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, Columbia River, Hermiston...read as follows: Sec. 165.T13-149 Safety Zone; McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, Columbia River,...

2010-06-16

5

Oregon Watersheds: Many Activities Contribute to Increased Turbidity During Large Storms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The General Accounting Office (GAO) has recently posted this report online (text or .pdf format). Based on five municipal watersheds in western Oregon, the report describes both human activities that may have contributed to 1996's high tubidity levels and efforts "to ensure safe drinking water during future storms."

6

Antioxidant Activity and Phenolic Content of Oregon Caneberries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five types of caneberries (evergreen blackberries (Rubus laciniatus), marionberries (Rubus ursinus), boysenberries (Rubus ursinus idaeus), red raspberries (Rubus idaeus), and black raspberries (Rubus occidentalis)) were analyzed for antioxidant activity by measuring their oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). In addition, the berries were analyzed for total phenolics, anthocyanins, procyanidins, and ellagic acid content. All of the berries had high ORAC activity

Leslie Wada; Boxin Ou

2002-01-01

7

System of activity-based models for Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This report demonstrates that activity-based travel demand models are currently feasible and can replace traditional trip-based travel four-step demand models for urban areas. Travel decisions are part of a broader activity scheduling decision, and requires that one model the demand for activities as well as mobility. The objective of the research project was to emphasize development of a model system that captures the aspects of decision making while remaining applicable in the near term at the level of state and metropolitan planning organizations. The work indicates that activity-based modeling and forecasting is now feasible and can begin to replace the more traditional trip-based forecasting paradigm within MPOs in the United States. Further developments and improvements are possible in model estimation and application procedures. Future advancements in computing processing power will be important in allowing full power of the approach to be applied in practice.

NONE

1998-05-01

8

Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of Oregon caneberries.  

PubMed

Five types of caneberries [evergreen blackberries (Rubus laciniatus), marionberries (Rubus ursinus), boysenberries (Rubus ursinus x idaeus), red raspberries (Rubus idaeus), and black raspberries (Rubus occidentalis)] were analyzed for antioxidant activity by measuring their oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). In addition, the berries were analyzed for total phenolics, anthocyanins, procyanidins, and ellagic acid content. All of the berries had high ORAC activity ranging from 24 to 77.2 micromol of Trolox equiv/g of fresh berries. Anthocyanin content ranged from 0.65 to 5.89 mg/g, and phenolics ranged from 4.95 to 9.8 mg/g. Black raspberries had the highest ORAC and anthocyanin and phenolic contents. Only red raspberries had detectable amounts of procyanidin oligomers (monomer, dimers, and trimers). All berries had high levels of ellagic acid (47-90 mg/g), but boysenberries had the highest level prior to hydrolysis. The results from this study indicate that these caneberries were high in antioxidant activity and were rich sources of anthocyanins and phenolics. PMID:12033817

Wada, Leslie; Ou, Boxin

2002-06-01

9

Integrating computational activities into the upper-level Paradigms in Physics curriculum at Oregon State University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Paradigms in Physics project at Oregon State University has reformed the entire upper-level physics curriculum. The reform has involved a rearrangement of content to better reflect the way physicists think about the field and the use of several new pedagogies that place responsibility for learning more firmly in the hands of the students. In particular, we employ a wide variety of computational examples and problems throughout the courses. Students use MAPLE, MATHEMATICA, JAVA, and other software packages to do calculations, visualizations, and simulations that develop their intuition and physical reasoning. These computational activities are indispensable to the success of the curriculum.

McIntyre, David H.; Tate, Janet; Manogue, Corinne A.

2008-04-01

10

Bat activity in thinned, unthinned, and old-growth forests in western Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Many aspects of the influences of forest management activities on bats (Chiroptera) in the Pacific Northwest are poorly known. We compared thinned and unthinned forest stands of the same age and old-growth forest stands to determine potential differences in structure and amount of use by bats. We hypothesized that activity levels of bats would differ in stands differing in structure as a result of management history and that activity of bats would be similar in stands of similar structure. We used automated ultrasonic detectors (Anabat II) to record calls of bats in 50-100-year-old thinned and unthinned stands, and in old-growth (a?Y200 yr old) stands in the Oregon Coast Range during the summers of 1994 and 1995. Our median index of bat activity was higher in old-growth than in unthinned stands and higher in thinned than in unthinned stands. We were not able to detect a significant difference between the index of median bat activity for old-growth and thinned stands. More than 90% of identifiable passes were identified as calls from Myotis species. The 3 stand types we examined differed in certain structural characteristics such as density and size of trees, and amount of overstory and understory cover. We concluded that the structural changes caused by thinning may benefit bats by creating habitat structure in young stands that bats are able to use more effectively.

Humes, Marcia L.; Hayes, J.P.; Collopy, M.W.

1999-01-01

11

Laboratory-based educational and outreach activities in the framework of a CAREER award at the University of Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Stable Isotope Laboratory at the University of Oregon has been used as a learning and outreach center in the framework of the 09 award entitled "Stable isotope insights into large-volume volcanic eruptions". The PI and other members of the group have actively recruitted undergraduate students, summer session and catalytic outreach undergraduates, and hosted international students, visitors, and collaborators from Russia, Iceland, France, the UK, Australia, and Switzerland. We also integrated closely with the Oregon-wide summer program that brings community college students to the University of Oregon for 2.5 months summer research residence (UCORE). In total we gave supervised five undergraduate students and three UCORE students. Additionally, we recruited undergraduates from U of Chicago, Colorado and Pomona Colleges to spend summers in the lab and in the field. In conjunction with the NSF funded PIRE program, two female graduate and one female undergraduate students participated in fieldwork in Kamchatka, and three Kamchatka undergraduates, and one Moscow graduate student visited the University Oregon. Students performed their own projects or Senior Theses and reported their results locally and at AGU conferences. We developed a management structure in which graduate students, a postdoc, and lab technician co-supervised students and visitors and this exposed them into the supervisory roles, contributed to the project progress, and liberated PI from micromanagement duties. The talk will present our experience with this management concept of a lab-based-learning initiative, which defines roles for each member of the lab. Our outreach activities included public lectures at community colleges by PI and a graduate student, and the topical Penrose conference co-organized by the PI, which attracted many students and visitors who collected their data in the lab. PI has introduced a voluntary fieldtrip as a part of his Volcanoes and Earthquake large enrollment class for non-majors. PI had less success in an attempt to involve non-geoscience majors into an optional satellite class due to the low interest among non-majors to explore geological and volcanological topics. Students in the Isotope Geochemistry and General Geochemistry classes used the Stable Isotope laboratory for their course papers, mostly related to the analyses of carbonate for isotopes of carbon and oxygen (paleoclimate projects), and using oxygen and hydrogen isotopes for sources of precipitation. Overall CAREER award provided excellent chance for multi-dimensional research that cross cut international boundaries, brings new projects in and contributes to the educational development of the PI and his group.

Bindeman, I. N.

2011-12-01

12

Eighth year projects and activities of the Environmental Remote Sensing Applications Laboratory (ERSAL). [Oregon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Projects completed for the NASA Office of University Affairs include the application of remote sensing data in support of rehabilitation of wild fire damaged areas and the use of LANDSAT 3 return beam vidicon in forestry mapping applications. Continuing projects for that office include monitoring western Oregon timber clearcut; detecting and monitoring wheat disease; land use monitoring for tax assessment in Umatilla, Lake, and Morrow Counties; and the use of Oregon Air National Guard thermal infrared scanning data. Projects funded through other agencies include the remote sensing inventory of elk in the Blue Mountains; the estimation of burned agricultural acreage in the Willamette Valley; a resource inventory of Deschutes County; and hosting a LANDSAT digital workshop.

Lewis, A. J.; Isaacson, D. L.; Schrumpf, B. J. (principal investigators)

1980-01-01

13

Activity patterns of marbled murrelets in Douglas-fir old-growth forests of the Oregon Coast Range  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We monitored activity patterns of Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) on a near-dailyb asisu singa udio-visuasl urveys during three breeding seasons at five forest stands in the Oregon Coast Range. Three measures of activity were recorded: number of daily detections, number of daily vocalizations, and duration of daily activity. Each measure was highly variable within and among stands and years, and we recorded greater variability than has been previously reported for this species. The three measures of activity were strongly correlated within a day at each survey station, but correlative relationships at temporal and spatial scales greater than this were inconsistent. Activity varied greatly from one day to the next during all portions of the breeding season, and we did not identify any month when variability in activity was consistently higher or lower than any other month. Multivariate analyses revealed that weather and date variates explained little of the variability in daily activity. Given the extreme levels of variability in Marbled Murrelet activity and our lack of understanding as to which factors drive that variability, it is critical that conclusions about activity or behavior not be drawn from data sets not specifically designed to answer the questions of interest.

Jodice, Patrick G.; Collopy, M.W.

2000-01-01

14

Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Family Child Care Homes in Oregon: Baseline Findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Baseline findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project include data from Family Child Care Providers (FCCPs) in Oregon (n=53) who completed assessments of nutrition and physical activity policies and practices and BMI data for children in the care of FCCPs (n=205). Results show that a significant percentage of FCCPs failed to meet child care…

Gunter, Katherine B.; Rice, Kelly R.; Trost, Stewart G.

2012-01-01

15

Stratigraphic development and hydrothermal activity in the central western Cascade Range, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Two volcanic sequences bounded by erosional unconformities compose the stratigraphy of the North Santiam mining district, Western Cascade Range, Oregon. Diorite, grandodiorite, and leucocratic quartz porphyry dikes, stocks, and sills intrude the breccias, flows, and tuffs of a volcanic center in the older Sardine Formation. Tourmaline-bearing breccia pipes are associated with the porphyritic granodiorite intrusions. An erosional unconformity separates the Sardine Formation from the overlying Elk Lake formation. The alteration patterns in the two formations are consistent with the development of hydrothermal systems during the eruption of each formation. However, the development of the two hydrothermal systems is separated by a period of erosion of the older volcanic pile. Early formation of mineralization that resembles porphyry copper deposits occurred within the Sardine Formation, and later, after eruption of the Elk Lake formation, epithermal veins and alteration developed along faults, fractures, and the margins of dikes in the Sardine Formation.

Cummings, M.L.; Bull, M.K. (Portland State Univ., Oregon (USA)); Pollock, J.M. (Reed Coll., Portland, OR (USA)); Thompson, G.D. (Pioneer Metals Corp., Ruidoso, NM (USA))

1990-11-10

16

Large-area Active Landslide Detection and Monitoring with ALOS/PALSAR Imagery over Northern California and Southern Oregon, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multi-temporal ALOS/PALSAR images acquired during 2007- 2010 are used to investigate landslide activity over an area of ~200 km by ~350 km in northern California and southern Oregon. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) deformation images, InSAR coherence maps, radar backscattering intensity images, and a DEM gradient map are combined to automatically detect active landslides. More than 50 active landslides, ranging in size from 0.2 km2 to more than 10 km2 and comprising a total of 40 km2 in area, are detected. Down-slope landslide motions observed from two adjacent satellite tracks with slightly different radar look angles over the Boulder Creek, California, are used to assess the precision of L-band InSAR measurements. The difference in the measured down-slope displacent reaches to a standard deviation of 0.8 cm. Deformation profiles along the landslide reveal the spatially segmented characteristics of landslide motion. The comparison between the time-series landslide motion from multi-temporal InSAR processing with the precipitation record suggests that the landslide deformation correlates with the rainfall rate, with a lag time of around 1-2 months between the peak of precipitation and the maximum landslide displacement. Our results have provided new insights into landslide mechanisms in the Pacific Northwest, and will facilitate development of early warning systems for landslides under abnormal rainfall conditions.

Zhao, C.; Lu, Z.; Zhang, Q.; De La Fuente, J. A.

2012-12-01

17

Oregon Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the introduction to this fine collection, the curators note that "People create maps to indicate how to get from one place to another and, more broadly, to reconstruct as best as they are able the world around them." It's an important statement, and one that sets the tone for this digital collection created via a partnership between the University of Oregon Libraries and the Oregon State University Libraries. The exhibit focuses on maps dealing with the state's development, and visitors can browse a variety of road maps and other types of maps that document the state's geological makeup and political geography. The road maps afford visitors a unique look into the massive transformation of the roads throughout the state in the early 20th century, particularly during the 1910s. All told, there are over 110 maps in this collection, and the site is rounded out by a set of links to related resources.

18

Historic and recent patterns in dissolved oxygen within the Yaquina Estuary (Oregon, USA): Importance of anthropogenic activities and oceanic conditions  

EPA Science Inventory

Spatial and temporal patterns of dissolved oxygen (DO) in Yaquina Estuary, Oregon (USA) are examined using historic and recent data. There was a significant increasing trend in DO in the upstream portion of the estuary during the years 1960?1985. Historically, minimum dry season ...

19

Planning Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How has the Portland area grown and how will it grow in the future? It's a timely question for public policy analysts, local residents, and community activists. To help answer this and other questions, analysts and activists alike can make use of the Oregon Sustainable Community Digital Library, which is a central online repository for the collection and dissemination of key urban planning documents on the Portland Metropolitan area. The funds for this project came from an Institute of Museum and Library Services grant, and Portland State University's Millar Library is the project's lead grant participant. On the site, visitors can check out the "Most Recent Additions" area, and then use the "Interactive Map" to search by neighborhood or region. Here they will find planning documents, feasibility studies, urban transportation planning studies, and minutes from charrettes and other gatherings. Also, visitors can browse by thematic collection area, which include "City Club of Portland", "African Americans", and "Equity Planning".

20

Fires Scorch Oregon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In southwestern Oregon, the Florence Fire (north) and the Sour Biscuit Fire (south) continue to burn virtually out of control. Numerous evacuation notices have been issued for residents in the area as the fires remain difficult to control due to the steep, rugged terrain of the Klamath Mountains. This false-color image from the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper was acquired on July 21, 2002. In the image, vegetation is green, burned areas are deep magenta, active fire is bright pink, and smoke is light blue. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

2002-01-01

21

Oregon Zoo Polar Bear  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Tasul, an Oregon Zoo polar bear, sports a high-tech collar that will help researchers study her endangered wild counterparts in the Arctic. Photo by Michael Durham, courtesy of the Oregon Zoo. Photo by Michael Durham, courtesy of the Oregon Zoo....

22

Oregon Agriculture and the Economy  

E-print Network

Oregon Agriculture and the Economy: An Update Oregon State University Extension Service Rural Analyst Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics Oregon State University #12;Contents ...........................................................................................................................................12 Agricultural Support Services, Wholesale Trade, Transportation and Warehousing, Retail Trade

Tullos, Desiree

23

Oregon offers something for everyone who loves the outdoors --especially geologists. Oregon is a land filled with wonder and intrigue. Over the state's long history, plate tectonic and volcanic activity  

E-print Network

. Oregon is a land filled with wonder and intrigue. Over the state's long history, plate tectonic tectonic plate under- neath the Pacific Ocean produced the Coast Range over millions of years. Hot fluids coming off the diving plate, beginning about 35 million years ago, resulted in the volcanic eruptions

Tullos, Desiree

24

Groundwater Stewardship in Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Oregon State University site offers in-depth information on groundwater including: human impacts, protection, contamination, regulations, agencies, community action, and community stewardship. Although some information, such as how the geology of Oregon affects groundwater, is specific to that state much of the information is transferable to other locations.

Andrews, Gail

2001-12-14

25

Oregon State Parks and Recreation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What can you do in the great Oregon outdoors? From the world of Cannon Beach to the wild and rugged Snake River, the experiences are diverse, to say the least. The homepage features dramatic vistas, isolated lighthouses, and a whole range of wonderful images to entice visitors. In the Visit area, there is an interactive map of the state that will help plan any trip. Here visitors can select Activities and Facilities to look for specific amenities. Moving along, the Event Calendar area allows visitors to look for upcoming events at a specific park or by category. Policy folks will appreciate the About Us area, as it includes detailed information on the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department's budget, their annual report, information about upcoming initiatives, and construction projects.

26

Oregon Multicultural Archives Digital Collection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ethnic minorities in Oregon are the subject of this Oregon State University Library website and the collection "consists of images that document the lives and activities of ethnic minorities in Oregon." With its streamlined homepage, visitors can focus on the collection and how to search or browse through it. Visitors are also welcome to contribute information on any unidentified photographs, by clicking on "Contact Us", near the bottom of the homepage. In addition, visitors can also click on the "Browse" link to see every one of the 239 items in the collection. Those users with something more specific in mind should use the "Quick Links" drop down box in the top right hand corner of the homepage. Some of the subject areas that can be searched for are "African Americans", "Indians of North America", "Mexican Americans", "Political Parades and Rallies", and "Powwows". The "Indexes" available to search are organized into headings like "Photographer", "Subject" and "Geographic", and they can be found below the "Quick Links" drop down box.

27

Fires Scorch Oregon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In southwest Oregon, the Biscuit Fire continues to grow. This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image from August 14, 2002, shows the burn scar associated with the enormous blaze. The visualization uses ASTER's 30-meter-resolution, short-wave infrared bands to minimize smoke contamination and enhance the burn scar, which appears purple amid green vegetation. Actively burning areas of the fire appear very light purple. More than 6,000 fire personnel are assigned to the Biscuit Fire, which was 390, 276 acres as of Friday morning, August 15, and only 26 percent contained. Among the resources threatened are thousands of homes, three nationally designated wild and scenic rivers, and habitat for several categories of plants and animals at risk of extinction. Firefighters currently have no estimate as to when the fire might be contained. Credit: This image was acquired on an expedited basis as part of NASA Wildfire Response Team activities. Image courtesy Mike Abrams, Simon Hook, and the ASTER team at EROS Data Center DAAC.

2002-01-01

28

South Oregon Coast Reinforcement.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to build a transmission line to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of Oregon. This FYI outlines the proposal, tells how one can learn more, and how one can share ideas and opinions. The project will reinforce Oregon`s south coast area and provide the necessary transmission for Nucor Corporation to build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend area. The proposed plant, which would use mostly recycled scrap metal, would produce rolled steel products. The plant would require a large amount of electrical power to run the furnace used in its steel-making process. In addition to the potential steel mill, electrical loads in the south Oregon coast area are expected to continue to grow.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1998-05-01

29

Smoke from Oregon Fires  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At the Oregon-California state line, an immense wildfire that resulted from the combination of two separate blazes has now burned over 375,000 acres and is still growing. The Biscuit Fire, formerly the Florence Fire and the Sour Biscuit Fire, was sparked by lightning in the Klamath Mountains in Oregon and has burned over the state line into California. The columns of smoke billowing from the fire reach far south down the Pacific Coast.

Greg Rhodes

2002-08-15

30

DESCHUTES CANYON ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An examination of the Deschutes Canyon Roadless Area, Oregon indicated that the area is devoid of mines and active mineral prospects or claims and that there is little likelihood for the occurrence of metallic or nonmetallic mineral resources. There is no evidence to indicate that mineral fuels are present in the roadless area. Nearby parts of central Jefferson County on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation are characterized by higher-than-normal heat flow and by numerous thermal springs, some of which have been partly developed. This may indicate that the region has some as yet undefined potential for the development of geothermal energy.

Walker, George W.; Winters, Richard A.

1984-01-01

31

Knight Library University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon of Missionary  

E-print Network

#12;Knight Library · University of Oregon · Eugene, Oregon Checklist of Missionary Collections July 1988 #12;©1988 Knight Library, University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403 This publication is funded also responds to written questions about the holdings from researchers unable to travel to Eugene

32

Oregon State University Extension Service  

E-print Network

may be thinking, "I don't lead a 4-H Science Club! I'm just a Dog club leader." The goal2012 Oregon State University Extension Service Oregon 4-H Science Rich Handbook Series Focus on the 4-H Dog Project #12;2 Welcome to 4-H Science This handbook series was developed to help Oregon 4-H

New Hampshire, University of

33

The Oregon History Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oregon History Project is an online educational resource designed both for the general public and for students and educators to explore the history of Oregon through primary and secondary documents, photographs, and other ephemera. The site is divided into three main sections. The first, This Land: Oregon, is a narrative overview of Oregon's history, written and compiled by Professor William G. Robbins of Oregon State University. This narrative history is divided into seven broad thematic areas, each containing a number of brief essays on themes ranging from Native American contact with settlers to the nature of the rural-urban interaction in the state. The second section, the Learning Center, contains site guides for teachers and students, a teacher's guide, several interpretive essays, and lesson plans for elementary and middle school classrooms. The site concludes with a section devoted to historical documents, where visitors can browse through 102 items, ranging from a photograph of workers along the Bonneville Dam and a drawing of Fort Vancouver from 1845.

2002-01-01

34

Oregon hydrologic landscape regions  

EPA Science Inventory

Individuals who spend time working with streams intuitively come to understand that stream hydrologic and ecological characteristics are related to the attributes of the watersheds in which they occur. This is easy to see in Oregon with its large climatic and geologic variations ...

35

Oregon's WICHE Intern Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During 1971, Carl Goebel prepared for the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) a report entitled "Evaluation of the WICHE Intern Program in the State of Oregon." In this evaluation he pointed out a number of the deficiencies, as well as the strengths of the program. In concluding, Goebel made a number of suggestions and…

MacDougall, Barrett

36

Crater Lake, Oregon: Mount Mazama, Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource about Mount Mazama, a volcano in the Cascade Range, covers its geographic setting, and geologic and eruptive history. The site also offers information about Crater Lake, a caldera that was created by the largest known eruption from any Cascade Range volcano. The 8 x 10 kilometer caldera lies in the remains of this Pleistocene stratovolcano cluster covering 400 square kilometers in the southern Oregon Cascades. Prior to its climactic eruption, its southern and southeastern flanks were deeply incised by glacial valleys that today form U-shaped notches in the caldera wall. Links labeled 'Special Items of Interest' include volcanic highlights and features, and points of interest. Other links lead to maps, graphics, images, publications, reports, and other items of interest involving this volcano and others.

37

Fires Scorch Oregon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In southwestern Oregon, the Florence Fire (north) and the Sour Biscuit Fire (south) continued to burn virtually out of control on July 21, 2002. Numerous evacuation notices have been issued for residents in the area as the fires remain difficult to control due to the steep, rugged terrain of the Klamath Mountains. This image is from the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

2002-01-01

38

Oregon DEQ: Water Quality  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page hosts information related to groundwater quality in Oregon. Fact sheets about important groundwater problems are available, addressing topics such as septic systems, nonpoint source pollution, total daily maximum loading, drinking water, and storm water management. The site also includes data and maps portraying groundwater quality, describes issues affecting groundwater management, provides results of groundwater assessment programs, and has links to groundwater and water quality regulations and programs. Most of the data and files are in pdf format.

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality

39

DIAMOND PEAK WILDERNESS, OREGON.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

No metallic mineral resources were identified during a mineral survey of the Diamond Peak Wilderness in Oregon. Cinder cones within the wilderness contain substantial cinder resources, but similar deposits that are more accessible occur outside the wilderness. The area could have geothermal resources, but available data are insufficient to evaluate their potential. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas of the High Cascades outside the wilderness, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the several Cascade wilderness could be made.

Sherrod, David R.; Moyle, Phillip R.

1984-01-01

40

THE UMPQUA RIVER IN WESTERN OREGON  

Microsoft Academic Search

AST}ACT.--From 1981-90, the osprey population along the Umpqua River between Roseburg and Reedsport, Oregon increased by 153% (17% annual rate). The first observed decrease in the population occurred in 1991 when one previously occupied breeding territory became vacant. Management activ- ities on USDI Bureau of Land Management administered lands within the study area between 1981-88 consisted of the installation of

JOSEPH W. WITT

41

NOAA Ship Oregon II NOAA Ship Oregon II supports the  

E-print Network

NOAA Ship Oregon II NOAA Ship Oregon II supports the programs of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Southeast Fisheries Science Center. The ship conducts fisheries and living marine resource the Castro regime came to power in the late 1950's. The ship was in Cuban waters to conduct a cooperative

42

OR State Profile. Oregon: Oregon State Assessment System (OSAS)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides information about Oregon State Assessment System. Its purpose is to assess proficiency in the Essential Skills for the purpose of earning a regular or modified high school diploma. Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills is also used for federal accountability purposes under No Child Left Behind. [For the main report, "State…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

43

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF ON-SITE ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR TNT AND RDX IN GROUND WATER  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field demonstration was conducted to assess the performance of eight commercially-available and emerging colorimetric, immunoassay, and biosensor on-site analytical methods for explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in ground water and leachate at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon and U.S. Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Washington, Superfund sites. Ground water samples were analyzed by each of the on-site

Harry Craig; George Ferguson; Anne W. Kusterbeck; L. Shriver-Lake; Thomas Jenkins

2009-01-01

44

The Maupin, Oregon Earthquake Swarm  

Microsoft Academic Search

The area near Maupin, Oregon has experienced over 300 earthquakes since December 2006. The events, located by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN), occurred ~10 km SE of the town in central Oregon and ~50 km E-SE of Mount Hood. The temporal event pattern and lack of a distinct main shock are characteristic of an earthquake swarm with the event-size

J. Braunmiller; M. Williams; A. M. Trehu; J. Nabelek

2008-01-01

45

Biofuels in Oregon and Washington  

E-print Network

PNNL-17351 Biofuels in Oregon and Washington A Business Case Analysis of Opportunities and Challenges Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory #12;#12;Biofuels in Oregon and Washington, particularly in light of the recent growth experienced by the biofuels industry in the Midwest. Policymakers

46

EVALUATING ECONOMIC INCENTIVE PROGRAMS: A WATERSHED-BASED TMDL PROGRAM IN OREGON  

EPA Science Inventory

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has been actively working to develop effluent trading opportunities since 1997. With prior EPA funding, Oregon DEQ developed a draft version of a manual titled "Resource Guide to Watershed-Based Trading". This manual outlined...

47

Mount Thielsen, Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource about Mount Thielsen, a normally polarized shield volcano in the Cascade Range, features links to all aspects of the volcano, including its geographic setting, and geologic and eruptive history. Students learn that Mount Thielsen is similar to many of the basaltic andesite shields that form the bulk of the High Cascades in Oregon. Links labeled 'Special Items of Interest' include information about volcanic highlights and features, and points of interest. Other links lead to maps, graphics, images, publications, reports, and other items of interest involving this volcano and others.

48

STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

1984-01-01

49

Petroleum potential of Oregon and Washington  

SciTech Connect

The states of Oregon and Washington border the Pacific Ocean within an area of diverse topography, climate, and vegetation with altitudes ranging from sea level to more than 8,000 ft. The Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks are quasi-eugeosynclinal but badly indurated and/or metamorphosed, implying that almost all the pre-Tertiary rocks were unfavorable for oil and gas except some 700 mi{sup 2} of outcropping Mesozoic rocks exposed through windows in the overlying volcanics along the SW extension of the Blue and the Klamath mountains, accordingly. A profound angular and erosional unconformity separates the Tertiary sediments and volcanics from the older rocks. During Late Mesozoic and Tertiary time, uplift accompanied by erosion caused the removal of large areas of metamorphosed sediments and the development of pre-Miocene surface of large relief. Crustal movements of Late Miocene age produced NW-SE folds in Washington, and NS folds in the Coast range of Oregon. Some of the exploration methods (excluding wildcat drilling) were inconvenient. Seismic and gravity methods are impeded, the first by glacial till, basalt flows, sills, and dikes, and the second by laccoliths. Although the region is not the best place for hustling, drilling activity for development of potential oil and gas ushered 78% success rate in Oregon, and Shell and Exxon earned significant bonus bids in Washington.

Billo, S.M. (King Saul Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia))

1990-06-01

50

COPE Coastal ocean probe experiment Northern Oregon Coast 14-16 September 1995: Test Operations Report summary of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory activities  

SciTech Connect

Operations involving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) assets associated with a field experiment named COPE (Coastal Ocean Probe Experiment) are described. The lead organization responsible for the planning and conduct of COPE is NOAA/ETL headquartered in Boulder, Colorado. This experiment was conducted off the coast of Northern Oregon during September-October 1995. The primary measurements involve radars and other imaging microwave sensors imaging surface effects associated with natural internal waves which are abundant off the Oregon coast in the late summer and early fall. In-water, surface, and above- water environmental sensors were fielded by ETL and their contractors on the FLIP platform moored 13 miles offshore and elsewhere to characterize the environmental conditions and help interpret various features in the imagery. LLNL`s Imaging and Detection Program has taken advantage of this unique site and suite of ground-truth measurements to collect radar image data over a three-day period (14-16 September 1995) with our Airborne Experimental Test Bed (AETB) and its X-band, HH-polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as a piggyback to the primary COPE data collection. This report documents test operations during this three-day data collection involving the AETB/SAR from a LLNL perspective. A total of 42 SAR images were collected at grazing angles of 8{degrees}, 20{degrees}, and 45{degrees}. From all indications during data collection, data quality appears good for about 75 percent of the passes. Strong internal waves were observed each day in calm to light wind conditions. ETL`s hillside dual-polarization X-band and Ka-band real aperture radars recorded data simultaneous with the AETB SAR. The presence of other airborne platforms and low cloud cover limited the AETB aircraft`s ability to operate at low altitude. Limited sea-truth data was collected onboard FLIP.

Mantrom, D.D.; Miller, M.G.

1995-10-01

51

Oregon Executive MBA Application Instructions  

E-print Network

, gender identity, gender expression, or any other consideration not directly and substantively related-0852 This publication will be made available in accessible formats upon request to Oregon Executive MBA, (503) 276

52

Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.  

SciTech Connect

Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

1997-10-01

53

Anthropology 344 Archaeology of Oregon  

E-print Network

, technologically, and spiritually to their environments. Finally, we will examine the roles the Lewis and Clark expedition and later, the Oregon Trail, played in the westward expansion of the United States of America

54

75 FR 14461 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of...

2010-03-25

55

Effect of deep vs. shallow tillage on onion stunting and onion bulb yield, 2012  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A field experiment was conducted at a site inoculated with R. solani AG 8 at the Oregon State University Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Hermiston, OR to determine the effect of plowing (deep tillage) vs. rototilling (shallow tillage) on onion stunting caused by R. solani AG ...

56

An update of Quaternary faults of central and eastern Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is the online version of a CD-ROM publication. We have updated the eastern portion of our previous active fault map of Oregon (Pezzopane, Nakata, and Weldon, 1992) as a contribution to the larger USGS effort to produce digital maps of active faults in the Pacific Northwest region. The 1992 fault map has seen wide distribution and has been reproduced in essentially all subsequent compilations of active faults of Oregon. The new map provides a substantial update of known active or suspected active faults east of the Cascades. Improvements in the new map include (1) many newly recognized active faults, (2) a linked ArcInfo map and reference database, (3) more precise locations for previously recognized faults on shaded relief quadrangles generated from USGS 30-m digital elevations models (DEM), (4) more uniform coverage resulting in more consistent grouping of the ages of active faults, and (5) a new category of 'possibly' active faults that share characteristics with known active faults, but have not been studied adequately to assess their activity. The distribution of active faults has not changed substantially from the original Pezzopane, Nakata and Weldon map. Most faults occur in the south-central Basin and Range tectonic province that is located in the backarc portion of the Cascadia subduction margin. These faults occur in zones consisting of numerous short faults with similar rates, ages, and styles of movement. Many active faults strongly correlate with the most active volcanic centers of Oregon, including Newberry Craters and Crater Lake.

Weldon, Ray J., II; Fletcher, D.K.; Weldon, E.M.; Scharer, K.M.; McCrory, P.A.

2002-01-01

57

Relationship between carbonate deposits and fluid venting: Oregon accretionary prism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Active fluid venting and its surface manifestations (unique animals and carbonates) occur over the accretionary prism in the Cascadia subduction zone located off central Oregon. A large variety of authigenic carbonate deposits and unique carbonate structures have been observed from submersibles and remotely operated vehicles and recovered with aid of submersibles and bottom trawls from the outermost continental shelf and

La Verne D. Kulm; Erwin Suess

1990-01-01

58

Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries brings geologic information about the state of Oregon to the public. Topics covered include general geology of Oregon, fossils, earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, gems and minerals, and debris flows. Details about mined land reclamation and oil, gas, and geothermal projects are given. Oregon Geology magazine's latest issue is available to download, as well as general Northwest geology data.

59

Population Structure of Phytophthora ramorum in Oregon  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Phytophthora ramorum is infecting plants in Oregon forests and nurseries. In this study, we analyzed the population structure of P. ramorum in Oregon from 2001 to 2004, using microsatellites. The P. ramorum population in Oregon is characterized by low genetic diversity, significant genetic differenc...

60

Three Sisters, Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Earlier this month, the US Geological Survey (USGS) released a report stating that USGS scientists have detected a slight uplift of the ground surface over a broad area centered 5 kilometers west of South Sister volcano in the Three Sisters region of the central Oregon Cascade Range. This uplift was detected using a relatively new technique, Satellite Radar Interferometry (InSAR). InSAR uses satellite data to make radar images of the Earth's surface and then compares images from the same location acquired at different times to detect minor (a few centimeters) changes in the ground elevation. This page comes from the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory Website, and it contains links to the May 8 press release, current hazards report (spring 2001), geologic descriptions of the Three Sisters volcanoes, color interferograms, site photographs, earthquake maps, an overview of InSAR, daily seismicity measurements, and much more. The USGS's Cascade Volcano Observatory has been featured previously in our reports (see the September 23, 1994 Scout Report for Science & Engineering), but the Three Sisters research is particularly timely.

2001-01-01

61

The Oregon Geothermal Planning Conference  

SciTech Connect

Oregon's geothermal resources represent a large portion of the nation's total geothermal potential. The State's resources are substantial in size, widespread in location, and presently in various stages of discovery and utilization. The exploration for, and development of, geothermal is presently dependent upon a mixture of engineering, economic, environmental, and legal factors. In response to the State's significant geothermal energy potential, and the emerging impediments and incentives for its development, the State of Oregon has begun a planning program intended to accelerate the environmentally prudent utilization of geothermal, while conserving the resource's long-term productivity. The program, which is based upon preliminary work performed by the Oregon Institute of Technology's Geo-Heat Center, will be managed by the Oregon Department of Energy, with the assistance of the Departments of Economic Development, Geology and Mineral Industries, and Water Resources. Funding support for the program is being provided by the US Department of Energy. The first six-month phase of the program, beginning in July 1980, will include the following five primary tasks: (1) coordination of state and local agency projects and information, in order to keep geothermal personnel abreast of the rapidly expanding resource literature, resource discoveries, technological advances, and each agency's projects. (2) Analysis of resource commercialization impediments and recommendations of incentives for accelerating resource utilization. (3) Compilation and dissemination of Oregon geothermal information, in order to create public and potential user awareness, and to publicize technical assistance programs and financial incentives. (4) Resource planning assistance for local governments in order to create local expertise and action; including a statewide workshop for local officials, and the formulation of two specific community resource development plans. (5) Formulation and implementation of various statewide incentives; emphasis will be given to the recommendations of the Oregon Alternate Energy Development Commission and its Geothermal Task Force.

None

1980-10-02

62

Monitoring of ergot (Claviceps purpurea) ascospore release to better time fungicide application in NE Oregon grass seed production  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Ergot, caused by Claviceps purpurea, is an important floral infecting and seed limiting disease of Kentucky bluegrass. Regional differences in ergot occurrence in Kentucky bluegrass and perennial ryegrass have been observed in grass seed production areas near Hermiston and near La Grande, OR. This ...

63

Be Active, Work Safe is part of a research project being conducted by Drs. Laurel Kincl and Simon Driver at Oregon State University.  

E-print Network

of our online program aimed at increasing the physical activity and workplace safety for people email: health.disability@oregonstate.edu Fact: Physical activity and workplace safety are important of physical activity and workplace safety for you Basics about how to increase your activity level Strategies

Tullos, Desiree

64

Child Care and Education in Oregon and Its Counties: 2010  

E-print Network

Child Care and Education in Oregon and Its Counties: 2010 Prepared by Bobbie Weber of the Oregon Child Care Research Partnership, Oregon State University, and Becky Vorpagel of Information Architecture, consultant to the Oregon Child Care Resource and Referral Network. Oregon Child Care Research Partnership

Escher, Christine

65

Record Conversion at Oregon State.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the conversion of card catalog records at William Jasper Kerr Library, Oregon State University, to an online system. Discussion covers the use of OCLC and student assistants, procedures and specifications, and problems associated with massive retrospective conversion needs and uncertain budget allocations. Eight sources are recommended.…

Watkins, Deane

1985-01-01

66

Commercial farmland preservation in Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oregon's agricultural land preservation program emphasizes the importance of commercial agriculture to the state's economy. Statewide zoning requirements and farm use incentives are designed to protect commercial agriculture from fragmentation and conflicting uses. While the state has invested significant staff and funding commitments over nearly a decade, the program's long-term effectiveness still faces difficult tests.

J. R. Pease

1982-01-01

67

HEDCO Education Building Eugene, Oregon  

E-print Network

into the building automation system, the HEDCO facility's energy performance is significantly above its counterpartsHEDCO Education Building Eugene, Oregon ASHRAE Level I Energy Audit June 2011 Prepared.................................................................................................................................................. 18 #12;| ASHRAE Level One Energy Audit3 SUMMARY The HEDCO Education Building is part of the College

Oregon, University of

68

Oregon Schools Begin Inspection, Cleanup.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the need for environmental health inspections in schools. Reports on the results of a survey of Clackamas County (Oregon) school kitchens, in relation to a high incidence of hepatitis A. Describes the variety of violations found and urges that schools no longer be exempt from state health division regulations. (TW)

Buckley, James F.

1987-01-01

69

Success for Oregon: Success for All Schools in Oregon Gain on Oregon Statewide Assessment-Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Success for All is the most extensively researched of all comprehensive reform models for Title I elementary schools. It incorporates scientifically based principles of reading, cooperative learning, professional development, tutoring, and family support. Oregon elementary schools using the Success for All reading program once again made…

Success for All Foundation, 2004

2004-01-01

70

1) Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA.  

E-print Network

). Furthermore, in a forest stand with a deciduous component, not only the light intensity but also the phenology, USA. 2) Department of Forest Science, College of Forestry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon

Lachenbruch, Barbara

71

Oregon as unspoiled nature: a rhetorical criticism of Oregon's tourism campaign  

E-print Network

by the campaign as "Oregon is unspoiled nature. The religious and frontier metaphorical systems which develop this literalized master metaphor are examined along with the actions they invite from visitors to Oregon. Numerous inconsistencies arise between...

Loughran, Tamara Kay

1993-01-01

72

University of Oregon Police Department Campus Crime Alert 20141114  

E-print Network

University of Oregon Police Department Campus Crime Alert 2014­11­14 A University of Oregon student-346-2919 WHAT IS THIS NOTICE? Campus Crime Alerts are released by the University of Oregon Police Department

Cina, Jeff

73

University of Oregon Police Department Campus Crime Alert 20141109  

E-print Network

University of Oregon Police Department Campus Crime Alert 2014­11­09 A University of Oregon student-346-2919 WHAT IS THIS NOTICE? Campus Crime Alerts are released by the University of Oregon Police Department

Cina, Jeff

74

Oregon Ballast Water Task Force Report on Ballast Water Management in Oregon  

E-print Network

and state levels; ballast water discharge trends in Oregon; the shipping industry's compliance with Oregon and efficient management to prevent the introduction of ANS via shipping vectors such as ballast water on the global commercial ship fleet. Ballast water management is particularly important for Oregon waters

75

Marine Biology on the Oregon Coast Oregon Institute of Marine Biology  

E-print Network

LIVEIT! Marine Biology on the Oregon Coast Oregon Institute of Marine Biology SUMMER 2013 #12;T he Oregon Institute of Marine Biology (OIMB) has offered a variety of exciting courses in marine biology of leaving the docks. Within eight miles of the marine biology laboratory, sea lions, elephant seals

Oregon, University of

76

The Oregon State University Kelley Engineering Center  

E-print Network

The Oregon State University Kelley Engineering Center Bob Schroeder, P.E., LEED AP, Principal Glumac August, 2010 Agenda 1 About Kelley 2 Design Process 3 Project Features 4 Building Performance 5 Q&A ? Oregon State University, Corvallis... Design Process Project Features Building Performance ? Energy model to meet Oregon State Energy Efficiency Design (SEED) guidelines ? Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling ? LEED benchmarking ? Design for LEED Gold Design Process About...

Schroeder, B.

77

Faculty Position in Biostatistics University of Oregon  

E-print Network

Faculty Position in Biostatistics University of Oregon for two more positions in biostatistics in the immediate future. We undergraduate teaching. Interested persons should apply online to the BIOSTATISTICS

Lockery, Shawn

78

Oregon State University: It's in the Blood!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website from the Valley Library at Oregon State University is subtitled: A Documentary History of Linus Pauling, Hemoglobin and Sickle Cell Anemia. The site is part of a series of Valley Library websites that focus on different aspects of chemist Linus Pauling's notable career. The site is composed of three main sections. The first section narrates "the story of Linus Pauling's research into the nature of human blood. The second, and most impressive, "provides access to more than three hundred primary source documents and images, including letter, manuscripts, diary entries, photographs, audio-visual materials, and published papers." The final section is yet to be completed, but will offer daily accounts of Pauling's activities between 1940 and 1949. The website also includes a hyperlinked Chronological List of Documents on the site, a sizeable bibliography, and links to a few websites concerned with sickle cell anemia and hemoglobin.

79

Newberry Volcano—Central Oregon's Sleeping Giant  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hidden in plain sight, Oregon's massive Newberry Volcano is the largest volcano in the Cascades volcanic arc and covers an area the size of Rhode Island. Unlike familiar cone-shaped Cascades volcanoes, Newberry was built into the shape of a broad shield by repeated eruptions over 400,000 years. About 75,000 years ago a major explosion and collapse event created a large volcanic depression (caldera) at its summit. Newberry last erupted about 1,300 years ago, and present-day hot springs and geologically young lava flows indicate that it could reawaken at any time. Because of its proximity to nearby communities, frequency and size of past eruptions, and geologic youthfulness, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are working to better understand volcanic activity at Newberry and closely monitor the volcano for signs of unrest.

Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Stovall, Wendy K.; Ramsey, David W.; Ewert, John W.; Jensen, Robert A.

2011-01-01

80

Oral History: Oregon State University Extension Service  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Extension programs are a common feature of many state universities, and they often provide support to residents in areas such as agriculture, community development, and planning. In preparation for its centennial in 2011, the Oregon State University Extension Service interviewed several of its emeritus faculty in order to preserve the history of the Service from WWII to the late 1990s. This website contains interviews, transcripts, and photographs from 10 former faculty members, including Roberta Frasier Anderson, who taught child development and other subjects at OSU from 1959 to 1974. The other interviewees cover topics that include home economics, 4-H activities, administration history, and communications. Visitors can also click on the "More Oral History Collections" link to find out more about other OSU collections.

81

DOES ANTHROPOGENIC ACTIVITIES OR NATURE DOMINATE THE SHAPING OF THE LANDSCAPE IN THE OREGON PILOT STUDY AREA FOR 1990-1999?  

EPA Science Inventory

Climatic variation and human activities are major factors resulting in land degradation in arid and semiarid lands. In the Mediterranean region and over history, climatic drying was coincidental with developing agricultural technology and the rapid increase of the population and ...

82

Impacts of multispecies parasitism on juvenile Oregon coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We are studying the impacts of parasites on threatened stocks of Oregon coastal coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). In our previous studies, we have found high infections of digeneans and myxozoans in coho salmon parr from the lower main stem of West Fork Smith River (WFSR), Oregon. In contrast parr from tributaries of this river, and outmigrating smolts, harbor considerably less parasites. Thus, we have hypothesized that heavy parasite burdens in parr from this river are associated with poor overwintering survival. The objective of the current study was to ascertain the possible effects these parasites have on smolt fitness. We captured parr from the lower main stem and tributaries of WFSR and held them in the laboratory to evaluate performance endpoints of smolts with varying degrees of infection by three digeneans (Nanophyetus salmincola, Apophallus sp., and neascus) and one myxozoan (Myxobolus insidiosus). The parameters we assessed were weight, fork length, growth, swimming stamina, and gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity. We repeated our study on the subsequent year class and with hatchery reared coho salmon experimentally infected with N. salmincola. The most significant associations between parasites and these performance or fitness endpoints were observed in the heavily infected groups from both years. We found that all parasite species, except neascus, were negatively associated with fish fitness. This was corroborated for N. salmincola causing reduced growth with our experimental infection study. Parasites were most negatively associated with growth and size, and these parameters likely influenced the secondary findings with swimming stamina and ATPase activity levels.

Ferguson, Jayde A.; Romer, Jeremy; Sifneos, Jean C.; Madsen, Lisa; Schreck, Carl B.; Glynn, Michael; Kent, Michael L.

2011-01-01

83

University of Oregon Archives Photographs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How might one choose to celebrate the University of Oregon? It might be done via song, working paper, or proclamation. Of course one might also look over this digital collection of photographs from the University of Oregon Libraries. On this page, visitors can look over items that celebrate the school's athletics, professors, presidents, and other aspects of college life. First-time users can look over the thematic areas that include Buildings, Cinema, and Commencement. Interestingly, the Cinema area includes press photographs from the film, "Animal House,â?ť which was filmed on campus. This same area contains stills from the coming of age college tale, "Ed's Co-Ed,â?ť which is a minor classic in the genre. Users also have access to the "Oregon Daily Emerald,â?ť which contains full-text versions of this popular monthly from September 2005 to the present. As an alternative to browsing, a full-text search can be performed to look for items of particular interest.

2011-10-09

84

The role of silviculture in the active management of riparian zone vegetation in the Oregon Coast Range: a partnership between researchers and managers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Riparian plant communities are extremely diverse. Their structure and composition can affect fish and wildlife habitat, while trees and associated vegetation can provide sustainable sources of forest products. Management of riparian vegetation can greatly affect these values. Little information exists however, about the consequences of actively managing riparians to develop desirable habitat characteristics and enhance function versus setting aside areas

Samuel S. Chant; Margaret David Bailey; Daniel Karnes; Robert Metzger; Walter W. Kastner

85

DOES ANTHROPOGENIC ACTIVITIES OR NATURE DOMINATE THE SHAPING OF THE LANDSCDAPE IN THE OREGON PILOT STUDY AREA FOR 1990-1999?  

EPA Science Inventory

Climatic variation and human activities are major factors resulting in land degradation in arid and semi-arid lands. In the Mediterranean region and over history, climatic drying was coincidental with developing agricultural technology and the rapid increase of the population and...

86

What is the Ocean Like off Oregon?  

E-print Network

that a Department of Oceanography be established and, to the Office of Naval Research, that it be funded. (See is the ocean like off Oregon?" s in many research institutions, the study of all fields within Oceanography and storms characteristic of the northern end of the California Current. Oceanography took root at Oregon

Kurapov, Alexander

87

Oregon Tax Revenue Scope and Timeline  

E-print Network

Oregon Tax Revenue Scope and Timeline Presented to Scott Dawson Business Advisory Council Prepared to collectively as the "Client") to perform an extensive analysis of how Oregon collects its tax revenues, as well. The challenges laid forth are to ascertain the necessary research to both estimate and compare the tax impact

88

ROBERT M. SURYAN Oregon State University  

E-print Network

include: marine ecosystem processes, food webs, foraging ecology, population dynamics, human1 ROBERT M. SURYAN Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center 2030 S.E. Marine Science.suryan@oregonstate.edu Education Ph.D. - Oregon State University, Wildlife Science with an emphasis in marine avian ecology

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

89

Endangered Plants in Oregon and Washington.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a partial list of the 132 Oregon and Washington plants which have been proposed for federal protection under the Endangered Species Act. Suggestions for student/citizen involvement in preserving these species and a description of a videotape about rare/endangered species of the Willamette Valley (Oregon) are included. (DH)

Love, Rhoda M.

1985-01-01

90

Oregon Migrant Health Project, 1970 Annual Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 1970 annual report on the Oregon Migrant Health Project discusses health services for migrant agricultural workers and their families (approximately 30,000 individuals) who worked and lived temporarily in various Oregon counties. As noted, some 9,000 of the 30,000 migrants were estimated to be in need of some type of medical service. Thus, the…

Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

91

Oregon State University AMBC Service Satisfaction Survey  

E-print Network

Oregon State University AMBC Service Satisfaction Survey April 19, 2012 The Close to the Customer Project C2C@bus.oregonstate.edu (541) 713-8041 #12;Close to the Customer Project C2C@bus.oregonstate.edu (541) 713-8041 Oregon State University AMBC: Service Satisfaction Survey 1 Table of Contents Research

Escher, Christine

92

40 CFR 81.338 - Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...noted. Oregon—Ozone (1-Hour Standard... Attainment Air Quality Maintenance Area...Medford-Ashland Air Quality Maintenance Area...3 The 1-hour ozone standard is...noted. Oregon—Ozone (8-Hour Standard...Portland-Vancouver AQMA: (Air Quality Maintenance...

2012-07-01

93

40 CFR 81.338 - Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...noted. Oregon—Ozone (1-Hour Standard... Attainment Air Quality Maintenance Area...Medford-Ashland Air Quality Maintenance Area...3 The 1-hour ozone standard is...194 X Oregon—Ozone (8-Hour Standard...Portland-Vancouver AQMA: (Air Quality Maintenance...

2011-07-01

94

40 CFR 81.338 - Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...noted. Oregon—Ozone (1-Hour Standard... Attainment Air Quality Maintenance Area...Medford-Ashland Air Quality Maintenance Area...3 The 1-hour ozone standard is...194 X Oregon—Ozone (8-Hour Standard...Portland-Vancouver AQMA: (Air Quality Maintenance...

2010-07-01

95

On the Oregon Trail. [Lesson Plan].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this lesson, students work with primary documents and latter-day photographs to recapture the experience of traveling on the Oregon Trail. The learning objectives of the lesson are: (1) to learn about the pioneer experience on the Oregon Trail; (2) to evaluate a historical re-enactment in light of documentary evidence; and (3) to synthesize…

2000

96

Dissolved Oxygen Data for Coos Estuary (Oregon)  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of this product is the transmittal of dissolved oxygen data collected in the Coos Estuary, Oregon to Ms. Molly O'Neill (University of Oregon), for use in her studies on the factors influencing spatial and temporal patterns in dissolved oxygen in this estuary. These d...

97

Oregon School Bond Manual. Sixth Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given that purchasers of Oregon school bonds rely on recommendations of accredited bond attorneys, this document is designed to assist school districts in complying with state statutes regulating the issuance of school bond issues in order that attorney opinions may be favorable. Six initial steps toward a bond sale and Oregon laws regarding bonds…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Office of School District Services.

98

2005 -2006 Annual Report Oregon State University  

E-print Network

2005 - 2006 Annual Report Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center 2030 SE Marine://hmsc.oregonstate.edu #12;#12;1 HATFIELD MARINE SCIENCE CENTER ANNUAL REPORT 2005-2006 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. RESEARCH 2 A 49 #12;HATFIELD MARINE SCIENCE CENTER ANNUAL REPORT 2005-2006 2 I. RESEARCH A. Oregon State

99

Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center  

E-print Network

Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center 2012 - 2013 Annual Report 2030 SE Marine............................24 Marine Geochemistry................................................... 25 College of Science Science Drive Newport, Oregon 97365-5296 Telephone 541-867-0100 Fax 541-867-0138 Web Page: http

Tullos, Desiree

100

Oregon Health & Science University Hospitals and Clinics  

E-print Network

Oregon Health & Science University Hospitals and Clinics CONSENT TO PARTICIPATE IN TELEMEDICINE to participate in a telemedicine health service provided by Oregon Health & Science University in connection with the following services or procedure(s) provided 2. NATURE OF TELEMEDICINE HEALTH SERVICE: During

Chapman, Michael S.

101

School of Nursing Oregon Health & Science University  

E-print Network

School of Nursing Oregon Health & Science University http://nursing.ohsufoundation.org The OHSU School of Nursing, part of Oregon Health & Science University, is consistently ranked one of the nation's best and most innovative nursing schools. The school is dedicated to exceptional nursing education

Chapman, Michael S.

102

The Oregon Career and Technical Education Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oregon educators, policymakers, and business people are working together to increase the number and quality of Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs in secondary and postsecondary institutions. CTE is an integral component of Oregon's education and workforce development system and prepares students for careers in areas ranging from the…

Klein, Steven; Richards, Amanda

2008-01-01

103

Steller Cove. Oregon Zoo Teacher Resource Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this teacher guide is to promote education by providing resources and information to aid classroom teachers in using the Oregon Zoo as an educational setting. The unit also emphasizes the integration of science, mathematics, reading, writing, speaking, and problem solving. It is designed for grades 3-5 and is based on the Oregon State…

Ward, Kristin

104

Oregon University System Fact Book 2013  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is the last Fact Book published under the auspices of the Oregon University System. The introduction includes a mission statement, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education,…

Oregon University System, 2014

2014-01-01

105

Why the Oregon CCO Experiment Could Founder  

PubMed Central

The most recent Oregon Medicaid experiment is the boldest attempt yet to limit health care spending. Oregon’s approach using a Medicaid waiver from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services utilizes global payments with two-sided risk at two levels—coordinated care organizations (CCOs) and the state. Equally important, the Oregon experiment mandates coverage of medical, behavioral, and dental health care using flexible coverage, with the locus of delivery innovation focused at the individual CCO level and with financial consequences for quality-of-care metrics. But insightful design alone is insufficient to overcome the vexing challenge of cost containment on a two- to five-year time horizon; well-tuned execution is also necessary. There are a number of reasons that the Oregon CCO model faces an uphill struggle in implementing the envisioned design. PMID:24842972

Stecker, Eric C.

2015-01-01

106

MICHAEL G. RAYMER Curriculum Vitae (07/2010) Department of Physics and Oregon Center for Optics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403  

E-print Network

for Optics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (503) 346-4785 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Knight Professor, 1998 - 1999. Director, Oregon Center for Optics, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon; 1997 ­ 1998 of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon; 1988 - 1990. Associate Professor of Optics, The Institute

Richmond, Geraldine L.

107

Landslide assessment of Newell Creek Canyon, Oregon City, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

A study has been conducted in Newell Creek Canyon near Oregon City, Oregon, T3S, T2S, R2E. A landslide inventory has located 53 landslides in the 2.8 km[sup 2] area. The landslides range in area from approximately 15,000m[sup 2] to 10m[sup 2]. Past slides cover an approximate 7% of the canyon area. Landslide processes include: slump, slump-translational, slump-earthflow and earthflow. Hard, impermeable clay-rich layers in the Troutdale Formation form the failure planes for most of the slides. Slopes composed of Troutdale material may seem to be stable, but when cuts and fills are produced, slope failure is common because of the perched water tables and impermeable failure planes. Good examples of cut and fill failures are present on Highway 213 which passes through Newell Creek Canyon. Almost every cut and fill has failed since the road construction began. The latest failure is in the fill located at mile-post 2.1. From data gathered, a slope stability risk map was generated. Stability risk ratings are divided into three groups: high, moderate and low. High risk of slope instability is designated to all landslides mapped in the slide inventory. Moderate risk is designated to slopes in the Troutdale Formation greater than 8[degree]. Low risk is designated to slopes in the Troutdale Formation less than 8[degree].

Growney, L.; Burris, L.; Garletts, D.; Walsh, K. (Portland State Univ., OR (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1993-04-01

108

Organizing for Digitization at Oregon State University: A Case Study and Comparison with ARL Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a case study of how Oregon State University Libraries (OSUL) organized to accomplish digitization activities. Digitization activities are broken down into six major categories: management, copyright, digital imaging, metadata, hardware/software/web design, and selection. The OSUL departments responsible for tasks within each…

Boock, Michael

2008-01-01

109

Developing the OORCC: A Multifaceted Astronomical Research and Outreach Facility at the University of Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The University of Oregon (UO) owns and operates Pine Mountain Observatory (PMO), located in central Oregon on the summit of Pine Mountain at an elevation of 1980 meters. PMO consists of four telescopes ranging in size from 0.35 - 0.8 meters. The Oregon Observatory Remote Control Center (OORCC) is a remote-observing center within the Department of Physics on the UO campus (~140 miles from the observatory) that has a direct connection to PMO through a dedicated fiber-optic cable. With this facility, we will enable UO undergraduate student researchers, UO faculty, and the non-scientific community to fully control and operate a newly installed robotic telescope on the summit of Pine Mountain from Eugene, or any other authorized site in Oregon. In addition to providing undergraduates with instrumentation and engineering experience, we will implement research by photometrically monitoring bright and variable astronomical sources including main belt comets, Herbig Ae/Be stars, and active galactic nuclei in extragalactic systems. The primary objective with the OORCC is to manage a multifaceted astronomy and astrophysics research facility, extending as a state-wide resource for K-12 STEM activities and public outreach programs. With the OORCC, we intend to bring unique and enriching astronomy exposure to many different groups of people throughout the state of Oregon.

Kwan, Teiler J.; Bullis, Jeremy; Gustafsson, Annika; Fisher, Robert Scott

2015-01-01

110

76 FR 19355 - Oregon Winds Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oregon Winds Hydro, LLC; Notice...Oregon Winds Hydro, LLC filed an...the Oregon Winds Pumped Storage Project to be...tunnel; (6) an underground power house located...the Oregon Winds Pumped Storage Project...

2011-04-07

111

78 FR 37124 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oregon: Heat Smart Program and Enforcement...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oregon: Heat Smart Program and Enforcement Procedures...submitted revisions relate to Oregon's Heat Smart program, rules for enforcement procedures...submitted revisions relate to Oregon's Heat Smart program in Oregon...

2013-06-20

112

75 FR 57058 - Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Habitat Conservation Plan Along the Pacific Coast in...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oregon 97103; Bandon Public Library, City Hall, Hwy. 101, Bandon, Oregon 97411; Chetco Community Public Library, 405 Alder St., Brookings, Oregon 97415; Coos Bay Public Library, 525 Anderson, Coos Bay, Oregon 97420; Siuslaw Public...

2010-09-17

113

University of Oregon Human Anatomy I  

E-print Network

University of Oregon Human Anatomy I HPHY 321 Fall 2013 Monday learning opportunity occurs if students choose to take HPHY 321 (Anatomy I Resources: 1. Anatomy & Physiology Revealed 3.0, Web-Based Program. This is a great

Lockery, Shawn

114

Oregon Executive MBA Application for Admission  

E-print Network

, gender identity, gender expression, or any other consideration not directly and substantively related-0852 This publication will be made available in accessible formats upon request to Oregon Executive MBA, (503) 276 ____________________________ Home Phone ___________________________ Gender: Male Female Home Address (Street

115

Oregon Salt Marshes: How Blue are They?  

EPA Science Inventory

Two important ecosystem services of wetlands are carbon sequestration and filtration of nutrients and particulates. We quantified the carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates in salt marshes at 135 plots distributed across eight estuaries located in Oregon, USA. Net carbon and ...

116

Oregon State University Herbarium: Vascular Plants Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Representing the collections of the Oregon State University Herbarium, the Vascular Plants database "provides access to all known vascular plant holotypes (ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms) and isotypes..." all within three herbaria housed at Oregon State University, University of Oregon, and Willamette University. Although the Herbarium collections have a "strong emphasis on the state of Oregon and the Pacific Northwest" their scope is worldwide. The database search engine provides ten fields with pull-down menus including Genus, Species, Authority, County, and more. Furthermore, "searches can be conducted by both basionyms (the original published name) and current names (i.e., the most recent annotation of the type specimen)." Searchers can retrieve from 10 to 5,000 Records/Page. This site is also reviewed in the February 20, 2004 _NSDL Life Sciences Report_.

117

40 CFR 81.338 - Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...noted. Oregon—Ozone (1-Hour Standard... Attainment Air Quality Maintenance Area...Medford-Ashland Air Quality Maintenance Area...3 The 1-hour ozone standard is...1997 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS (Primary...Portland-Vancouver AQMA: (Air Quality Maintenance...

2014-07-01

118

40 CFR 81.338 - Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...noted. Oregon—Ozone (1-Hour Standard... Attainment Air Quality Maintenance Area...Medford-Ashland Air Quality Maintenance Area...3 The 1-hour ozone standard is...1997 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS (Primary...Portland-Vancouver AQMA: (Air Quality Maintenance...

2013-07-01

119

LIVE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR OREGON VINEYARDS  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA Region 10 has funded the Oregon Winegrape Commission in a project that promotes the LIVE (Low Input Viticulture and Enology) certification program. LIVE is an integrated winegrape production system that promotes ecologically sensible production techniques. For example, cer...

120

Why the Oregon CCO experiment could founder.  

PubMed

The most recent Oregon Medicaid experiment is the boldest attempt yet to limit health care spending. Oregon's approach using a Medicaid waiver from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services utilizes global payments with two-sided risk at two levels?-?coordinated care organizations (CCOs) and the state. Equally important, the Oregon experiment mandates coverage of medical, behavioral, and dental health care using flexible coverage, with the locus of delivery innovation focused at the individual CCO level and with financial consequences for quality-of-care metrics. But insightful design alone is insufficient to overcome the vexing challenge of cost containment on a two- to five-year time horizon; well-tuned execution is also necessary. There are a number of reasons that the Oregon CCO model faces an uphill struggle in implementing the envisioned design. PMID:24842972

Stecker, Eric C

2014-08-01

121

76 FR 11835 - Oregon Disaster #OR-00036  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the State of Oregon (FEMA-1956- DR), dated 02/17/2011. Incident: Severe Winter Storm, Flooding, Mudslides, Landslides, and Debris Flows. Incident Period: 01/13/2011 through 01/21/2011. Effective Date: 02/17/2011....

2011-03-03

122

A Plan for Course and Credit Transfer between Oregon Community Colleges and Oregon University System Institutions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents a plan for course and credit transfer between Oregon community colleges and Oregon University System (OUS) institutions. It outlines the current and proposed policies, practices, and procedures for providing effective course and credit transfer in the state. The document also provides a summary of intersector communication…

Oregon Univ. System, Eugene. Office of Academic Affairs.

123

College of Pharmacy Oregon State University, 203 Pharmacy Building., Corvallis, Oregon 97331-3507  

E-print Network

College of Pharmacy Oregon State University, 203 Pharmacy Building., Corvallis, Oregon 97331-3507 T 541-737-3424 | F 541-737-3999 | http://pharmacy.oregonstate.edu April 20, 2010 To: Becky Warner and Professor Re: College of Pharmacy response to queries related to implementation plan · You presented

Escher, Christine

124

Center for Genome Research & Biocomputing Oregon State University, 3021 ALS Bldg, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-7303  

E-print Network

Center for Genome Research & Biocomputing Oregon State University, 3021 ALS Bldg, Corvallis, Oregon, 2008 COMPUTATIONAL AND GENOME BIOLOGY INITIATIVE 1. What was accomplished in 2007-2008? Several goals to attract and elevate the profile of graduate students in computational and genome biology in the MCB

Escher, Christine

125

INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY BI 451-551 8 credits Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, University of Oregon  

E-print Network

INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY BI 451-551 8 credits Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, University of Oregon Invertebrates comprise roughly 97% of animal species on the planet. The Invertebrate Zoology course at OIMB is a study this fantastic diversity of life as illustrated by marine invertebrates in one of the most ideal

Oregon, University of

126

Old World Monkeys Stephen R Frost, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA  

E-print Network

Old World Monkeys Stephen R Frost, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA Alfred L Rosenberger) article, Old World Monkeys by Walter Carl Hartwig and Alfred L Rosenberger. Old World monkeys (hominoids) than they are to the monkeys of Central and South America. Introduction Old World monkeys

Rosenberger, Alfred H.

127

Crumb rubber modified asphalt concrete in Oregon. Summary report. Report for 1985-94  

SciTech Connect

Over the last nine years, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has constructed 13 projects using crumb rubber modifiers (CRM) in asphalt concrete pavements using both the wet and dry process. State and federal legislation may require the use of recycled rubber in asphalt concrete, therefore, the Oregon Department of Transportation is interested in determining the most cost -effective crumb rubber modified asphalt concrete. The report includes a literature review on the use of crumb rubber modifiers in asphalt concrete pavement; a review on non-ODOT CRM paving projects constructed by Oregon counties and cities; and the Washington Department of Transportation. In additon, the report summarizes the data collected on all CRM hot mix asphalt concrete pavement projects constructed by ODOT. The ODOT information includes background constitution, cost, and performance data for each of the test and control sections. Finally, the future activities of the project are reviewed.

Hunt, E.; Peters, W.

1995-07-01

128

UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Lakeview, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide background, guidance, and justification for water sampling activities for the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) processing and disposal sites. This water sampling and analysis plan will form the basis for groundwater sampling and analysis work orders (WSAWO) to be implemented during 1993. Monitoring at the former Lakeview processing site is for characterization purposes and in preparation for the risk assessment, scheduled for the fall of 1993. Compliance monitoring was conducted at the disposal site. Details of the sampling plan are discussed in Section 5.0.

Not Available

1993-09-29

129

Some important elk-forest habitat relationships for Western Oregon and Washington. [Cervus canadensis  

SciTech Connect

The report identifies some basic Roosevelt elk - habitat relationships so that the needs of elk could be better integrated with forestry practices and other human activities occurring in the forestlands of western Oregon and Washington. The relationships discussed are: space and water, large areas, cover areas, and interspersion component, and the roading/disturbance component. (ACR)

Witmer, G.; Wisdom, M.

1986-01-01

130

Some important elk-forest habitat relationships for Western Oregon and Washington. [Cervus canadensis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The report identifies some basic Roosevelt elk - habitat relationships so that the needs of elk could be better integrated with forestry practices and other human activities occurring in the forestlands of western Oregon and Washington. The relationships discussed are: space and water, large areas, cover areas, and interspersion component, and the roading\\/disturbance component. (ACR)

G. Witmer; M. Wisdom

1986-01-01

131

BEHAVIORIAL AND BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF WEATHER ON THE GRAY FIELD SLUG IN WESTERN OREGON  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Slug damage in western Oregon seed-producing fields can be extensive and expensive to control. A lack of data on the effects of temperature and moisture has limited efforts to reduce slug numbers because there was insufficient data on when slugs were most active and likely to be exposed to bait. Th...

132

30 CFR 937.700 - Oregon Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Reclamation Act, as amended, ORS 517.750-ORS 517.990. (2) Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR), Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, Division 30, Rules and Regulations, Oregon Mined Land Reclamation Act, OAR 632-30-005...

2014-07-01

133

30 CFR 937.700 - Oregon Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Reclamation Act, as amended, ORS 517.750-ORS 517.990. (2) Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR), Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, Division 30, Rules and Regulations, Oregon Mined Land Reclamation Act, OAR 632-30-005...

2011-07-01

134

30 CFR 937.700 - Oregon Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Reclamation Act, as amended, ORS 517.750-ORS 517.990. (2) Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR), Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, Division 30, Rules and Regulations, Oregon Mined Land Reclamation Act, OAR 632-30-005...

2013-07-01

135

30 CFR 937.700 - Oregon Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Reclamation Act, as amended, ORS 517.750-ORS 517.990. (2) Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR), Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, Division 30, Rules and Regulations, Oregon Mined Land Reclamation Act, OAR 632-30-005...

2012-07-01

136

71. MYRTLE CREED BRIDGE, OREGON STATE HIGHWAY 199, AT END ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

71. MYRTLE CREED BRIDGE, OREGON STATE HIGHWAY 199, AT END OF STOUT GROVE ROAD. JOSEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON. LOOKING WNW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

137

Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Workshop  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Geologists from DOGAMI (Oregon's Department of Geology and Mineral Industries) meet with local representatives from the cities of Gresham and Troutdale, Oregon Dept. of Transportation, and planning, emergency management, highways, and law enforcement agencies from Multnomah County, to discuss hazard...

2010-05-20

138

75 FR 13252 - Oregon Coast Provincial Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Stimulus, Secure Rural Schools, BLM Update, Budget, Timber Sale Plan, Oregon Dunes Designated Routes, Rural Job Creation, 30-mile OHV Loop, Expansion of Oregon Dunes and Salmon River Estuary. [[Page 13253

2010-03-19

139

FIELD AND LABORATORY OPERATIONS REPORT FOR THE OREGON WETLANDS STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

The Oregon Wetlands Study (OWS) was designed to provide detailed characterizations of natural, created, and restored freshwater wetlands which is located in the urban environment of Portland, Oregon. his document discusses training the elementary, middle and high school teachers ...

140

Lowering the Age of Identification: Oregon's Design and Preliminary Results.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This newsletter article describes early identification of children who have hearing impairments in Oregon. Oregon was selected to demonstrate a model system for early identification that had been developed in Utah. A new birth certificate was designed, which enabled the Oregon Health Division to screen for risk factors for hearing loss. A…

Josephson, Jean Attridge; Moore, William

1993-01-01

141

27 CFR 9.190 - Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. 9.190...American Viticultural Areas § 9.190 Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. (a) Name...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon”. For...

2010-04-01

142

27 CFR 9.190 - Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. 9.190...American Viticultural Areas § 9.190 Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. (a) Name...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon”. For...

2014-04-01

143

27 CFR 9.190 - Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. 9.190...American Viticultural Areas § 9.190 Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. (a) Name...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon”. For...

2011-04-01

144

27 CFR 9.190 - Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. 9.190...American Viticultural Areas § 9.190 Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. (a) Name...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon”. For...

2013-04-01

145

27 CFR 9.190 - Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. 9.190...American Viticultural Areas § 9.190 Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. (a) Name...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon”. For...

2012-04-01

146

Summer Program for Undergraduate Research Alaska Oregon Research Training Alliance  

E-print Network

Summer Program for Undergraduate Research Alaska Oregon Research Training Alliance NSF REU Site Program in Molecular Biosciences NIH NICHD R25 Summer Research Program Oregon Undergraduate Researchers)346-5862; fax (541)346-4548 Summer Program for Undergraduate Research (SPUR) spur.uoregon.edu Alaska Oregon

Oregon, University of

147

Marine Biology on the Oregon Coast SUMMER 2014  

E-print Network

LIVEIT! Marine Biology on the Oregon Coast SUMMER 2014 Oregon Institute of Marine Biology #12;T he Oregon Institute of Marine Biology (OIMB) has offered a variety of exciting courses in marine biology of leaving the docks. Within eight miles of the marine biology laboratory, sea lions, elephant seals

148

Corrosion prevention of Oregon's reinforced coastal bridges  

SciTech Connect

The Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) maintains more than 120 coastal bridges; many are reinforced concrete structures over 15 m (50 ft) in length. Twelve of these bridges are historic structures. Oregon DOT is concerned about the ongoing deterioration of these bridges, rising maintenance and repair costs, and the need to protect Oregon’s large investment in coastal bridges. Over 80,000 m2 (850,000 ft2) of coastal bridge surface have been repaired and protected from further chloride-induced corrosion damage by using conductive coating anodes. Most of the anode area is thermal-sprayed (TS) Zn. Other anode materials include TS Ti, Zn-hydrogel, and conductive carbon paint. TS Zn anodes are estimated to have a service life exceeding 25 years but exhibit increasing anode polarization with age. Catalyzed TS Ti anodes develop no significant anode polarization and have exhibited stable long-term performance over 8 years of service. Galvanic Zn-hydrogel anodes produce a stable protection current with no evidence of aging effects over 6 years of service. The conductive carbon paint anode operates at a low anode current density and consumption rate with a low rate of acidification at the anode-concrete interface, which has contributed to a stable protection current over 17 years of service.

Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cryer. C.B (Oregon Dept. of Transportation, Salem, OR); Gallardo, M. L. (Oregon Dept. of Transportation, Salem, OR)

2004-06-01

149

New Approaches to Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Demonstrated in Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and Oregon Emergency Management collaborated over the last four years to increase tsunami preparedness for residents and visitors to the Oregon coast. Utilizing support from the National Tsunami Hazards Mitigation Program (NTHMP), new approaches to outreach and tsunami hazard assessment were developed and then applied. Hazard assessment was approached by first doing two pilot studies aimed at calibrating theoretical models to direct observations of tsunami inundation gleaned from the historical and prehistoric (paleoseismic/paleotsunami) data. The results of these studies were then submitted to peer-reviewed journals and translated into 1:10,000-12,000-scale inundation maps. The inundation maps utilize a powerful new tsunami model, SELFE, developed by Joseph Zhang at the Oregon Health & Science University. SELFE uses unstructured computational grids and parallel processing technique to achieve fast accurate simulation of tsunami interactions with fine-scale coastal morphology. The inundation maps were simplified into tsunami evacuation zones accessed as map brochures and an interactive mapping portal at http://www.oregongeology.org/tsuclearinghouse/. Unique in the world are new evacuation maps that show separate evacuation zones for distant versus locally generated tsunamis. The brochure maps explain that evacuation time is four hours or more for distant tsunamis but 15-20 minutes for local tsunamis that are invariably accompanied by strong ground shaking. Since distant tsunamis occur much more frequently than local tsunamis, the two-zone maps avoid needless over evacuation (and expense) caused by one-zone maps. Inundation mapping for the entire Oregon coast will be complete by ~2014. Educational outreach was accomplished first by doing a pilot study to measure effectiveness of various approaches using before and after polling and then applying the most effective methods. In descending order, the most effective methods were: (1) door-to-door (person-to-person) education, (2) evacuation drills, (3) outreach to K-12 schools, (4) media events, and (5) workshops targeted to key audiences (lodging facilities, teachers, and local officials). Community organizers were hired to apply these five methods to clusters of small communities, measuring performance by before and after polling. Organizers were encouraged to approach the top priority, person-to-person education, by developing Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) or CERT-like organizations in each community, thereby leaving behind a functioning volunteer-based group that will continue the outreach program and build long term resiliency. One of the most effective person-to-person educational tools was the Map Your Neighborhood program that brings people together so they can sketch the basic layout of their neighborhoods to depict key earthquake and tsunami hazards and mitigation solutions. The various person-to-person volunteer efforts and supporting outreach activities are knitting communities together and creating a permanent culture of tsunami and earthquake preparedness. All major Oregon coastal population centers will have been covered by this intensive outreach program by ~2014.

Priest, G. R.; Rizzo, A.; Madin, I.; Lyles Smith, R.; Stimely, L.

2012-12-01

150

Sprague River geomorphology studies, Klamath Basin, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sprague River drains 4050 square kilometers with a mean annual discharge of 16.3 m3/s before emptying into the Williamson River and then upper Klamath Lake in southcentral Oregon. The alternating wide alluvial segments and narrow canyon reaches of this 135-km-long westward flowing river provide for a variety of valued ecologic conditions and human uses along the river corridor, notably fisheries (including two endangered species of suckers, and formerly salmon), timber harvest, agriculture, and livestock grazing. The complex history of land ownership and landuse, water control and diversion structures, and fishery alterations, provides several targets for attributing historic changes to channel and floodplain conditions. Recently, evolving societal values (as well as much outside money) are inspiring efforts by many entities to 'restore' the Sprague River watershed. In cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Klamath Tribes, and many local landowners, we are launching an analysis of Sprague River channel and floodplain processes. The overall objective is to guide restoration activities by providing sound understanding of local geomorphic processes and conditions. To do this we are identifying key floodplain and channel processes, and investigating how they have been affected by historic floodplain activites and changes to the watershed. This is being accomplished by analysis of historic aerial photographs and maps, stratigraphic analysis of floodplain soils and geologic units, mapping of riparian vegetation conditions and changes, and quantitative analysis of high resolution LiDAR topography acquired for the entire river course in December 2004. Preliminary results indicate (1) much of the coarser (and more erodible) floodplain soils are largely composed of pumice deposited in the basin by the 7700 year BP eruption of Mount Mazama; and (2) the LiDAR digital elevation models provide a ready means of subdividing the river into segments with quantifiably different characteristics of channel width, sinuosity, slope, and incision (relative to adjacent floodplain elevations).

McDowell, P. F.; O'Connor, J. E.; Lind, P.

2005-12-01

151

Development of a Regional Seafloor Surficial Geologic (Habitat)Development of a Regional Seafloor Surficial Geologic (Habitat) Map for the Continental Margin of OregonMap for the Continental Margin of Oregon CChris Romsos, Chris Goldfinger, Rondi Robison,  

E-print Network

, Rondi Robison, and Randall Milsteinin Active Tectonics and Seafloor Mapping Lab, College of Oceanic anActive Tectonics and Seafloor Mapping Lab, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University essential to commercially fished species. As large components of the species harvested along the West Coast

Goldfinger, Chris

152

An indirect assessment of thematic accuracy in the geologic habiAn indirect assessment of thematic accuracy in the geologic habitat maps of Oregon and Washingtontat maps of Oregon and Washington CChris Romsos, Chris Goldfinger, Rondi Robison, and Jason Ch  

E-print Network

, and Jason Chaytor Active Tectonics and Seafloor Mapping Lab, College of Oceanic anActive Tectonics and Seafloor Mapping Lab, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR- density value at each grid cell among all datasets What is Thematic Accuracy and how is it commonly

Goldfinger, Chris

153

http://oregonstate.edu/admissions/international/ Oregon State UniversityOregon State University  

E-print Network

(engineering firm) · Pendleton (clothing) · Tektronics · Tripwire · Vesta Corporation · Intel · Kettle's (potato chips) · Stash Tea #12;http://oregonstate.edu/admissions/international/ Corvallis, Oregon

154

Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center  

E-print Network

in the marine sciences, oceanography, engineering, forestry, and science. The combination of location, physicalOregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center Strategic Plan December, 2006 #12;Table of the university, the Hatfield Marine Science Center has been engaged in developing a strategic plan to envision

Tullos, Desiree

155

Oregon Pilot Retrieval Dissemination Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oregon Pilot Retrieval Dissemination Project was one of three state experimental programs conducted in mainly rural areas. The primary objective was to develop a dissemination network, test its effectiveness, and recommend a model for implementation in other states. It was designed to serve teachers and administrators who need access to…

Fussell, Robert

156

Change Planning and Implementation at Oregon.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The strategic plan developed for the future of Oregon Health Sciences University School of Dentistry has as a major thrust the addition of a fifth-year extramural preceptorship to the program. Reinvigoration of the minority recruitment program, initiation of an early entry admissions track, and curriculum revision are additional goals. (MLW)

Van Hassel, H. J.; Retzlaff, A. E.

1990-01-01

157

November 2, 2010 Oregon Convention Center  

E-print Network

posture and automatically adjusts sensor sensitivity based on alterations in Korotkoff (blood pressure of Oregon Can we trust 24hr ambulatory blood pressure monitors? S-Ray Corporation: Steve Baird - CEO Daniel 24hr ambulatory blood pressure monitors? V. Pat Lombardi, PhD Dr. Lombardi is a Research Assistant

Chapman, Michael S.

158

University of Oregon Atlas of Trees  

E-print Network

University of Oregon Atlas of Trees Maps created by the UO InfoGraphics Lab, Department and Real Estate) and the InfoGraphics Lab in the Geography Department . A second painstakingly produced by staff in the InfoGraphics Lab and will be updated

Oregon, University of

159

Proceedings of Coastal Zone 07 Portland, Oregon  

E-print Network

DATA FOR THE SEASIDE, OREGON, TSUNAMI PILOT STUDY TO MODERNIZE FEMA FLOOD HAZARD MAPS Florence L. Wong of the Federal Emergency Management's (FEMA) Flood Insurance Rate Map Modernization Program (Tsunami Pilot Study Analysis (PTHA) and to provide recommendations for improving tsunami hazard assessment guidelines for FEMA

160

Notes on the Distribution of Oregon Bats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distributional data are given for 15 species of bats known to occur in Oregon: Antrozous pallidus, Eptesicus fuscus, Euderma maculatum, Lasionycteris noctivagans, Lasiurus cinereus\\/ Myotis californicus, M. evotis, M. leibi, M. lucifugusf M. thysanodes, M. volans, M. yumanensis, Pipistrellus hesperus, Plecotus townsendi, Tadarida brasiliensis. Distribution is also discussed in terms of physiography.

Chris Maser; Stephen P. Cross

161

Oregon Archaeology (Anth 344) Winter 2012  

E-print Network

Oregon Archaeology (Anth 344) Winter 2012 Class Syllabus Instructors: Dr. Thomas J. Connolly 346 Archaeology" (2011) by C. Melvin Aikens, Thomas J. Connolly, and Dennis L. Jenkins Readings: Assigned chapters, in Pacific, Room 123 Objectives: This course will focus on the archaeologically derived culture history

162

Patrick O'Grady University of Oregon  

E-print Network

with applicable laws. Preparation of Section 106 documents for mitigation of archaeological sites. Regulatory, and reporting of archaeological clearance projects in advance of Oregon Department of Transportation highway specimens of reptiles, mammals, fish, and birds. Supervision of field operations, analysis, and reporting

163

Oregon State University Postdoc Survival Guide  

E-print Network

by a happy hour ("Peers and Beers") hosted by the Oregon State Postdoctoral Association (OPA) to meet some/staff permits Transit and Parking Services 100 Adams Hall Monday ­ Friday 7:30am to 4:30pm (541) 737-2583 http://oregonstate.edu/dept/facilities/taps

Escher, Christine

164

Oregon Health & Science University 2013 FACT BOOK  

E-print Network

2013 FACT BOOK #12;Oregon Health & Science University 2013 FACT BOOK February 2014 This publication-494-5117 Email: honnellc@ohsu.edu #12;Contributors This fifth edition of the Fact Book contains a wide variety of the 2013 Fact Book: Academic and Student Affairs Units Cherie Honnell, Sarah Kennedy, Robert Oster

Chapman, Michael S.

165

Oregon Health & Science University 2012 FACT BOOK  

E-print Network

2012 FACT BOOK #12; #12;Oregon Health & Science University 2012 FACT BOOK February 2013 community and public. Update to the 2012 Fact Book Online Thank you for downloading the 2012 Fact Book in the print and electronic version of the 2012 Fact Book. For up to date versions of individual pages

Chapman, Michael S.

166

DISTRIBUTION OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN OREGON LAKES  

EPA Science Inventory

This is a data report presenting the species and abundance of phytoplankton in the 8 lakes sampled by the National Eutrophication Survey in the State of Oregon. Results from the calculation of several water quality indices are also included (Nygaard's Trophic State Index, Palmer'...

167

77 FR 14853 - Oregon Disaster #OR-00041  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Assistance Only for the State of Oregon (FEMA-4055- DR), dated 03/02/2012. Incident: Severe Winter Storm, Flooding, Landslides, and Mudslides. Incident Period: 01/17/2012 through 01/21/2012. Effective Date: 03/02/2012. Physical...

2012-03-13

168

OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY PARKING VIOLATION APPEAL FORM  

E-print Network

OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY PARKING VIOLATION APPEAL FORM NAME STAFF VISITOR CITATION DATE______________________ ALL APPEALS MUST BE SUBMITTED WITHIN 10 DAYS FROM DATE OF CITATION(S) (APPEALS SUBMITTED AFTER 10 DAYS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED FOR REVIEW/APPEAL) PAYMENT OF CITATION

Escher, Christine

169

Oregon University System Fact Book 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is produced every two years. The introduction includes a mission and vision statement, OUS Governance Change Proposal, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education, and Access…

Oregon University System, 2011

2011-01-01

170

Oregon University System Fact Book 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is produced every two years. The introduction includes a mission and vision statement, strategic priorities, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education, OUS degree partnership…

Oregon University System, 2009

2009-01-01

171

Oregon University System Fact Book 2012  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is produced every two years. The introduction includes a mission and vision statement, OUS Governance Change Move, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education, and Access and…

Oregon University System, 2013

2013-01-01

172

Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission  

E-print Network

capability by 2008 #12;Program Background/Detail Slides #12;`Cool Keeper' Program ­ Radio control throughDemand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission January 6, 2005 Mike Koszalka Director, Demand Side Management #12;Current Programs/Tariffs ­ Load Control Programs Cool Keeper, Utah (currently

173

Activity patterns and behavior of free-living Nuttall's cottontails.  

E-print Network

??Population attributes, behavior, and activity patterns of Nuttall's cottontails (Sylvilagus nuttallii) inhabiting a juniper-sagebrush scabland community in central Oregon were studied between June 1980 and… (more)

Gehman, Steven D.

1983-01-01

174

76 FR 43714 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR AGENCY: National...Oregon State University Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human...Oregon State University Department of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human...

2011-07-21

175

HANNAH GOSNELL Dept of Geosciences | Wilkinson 104 | Oregon State University| Corvallis, OR 97331  

E-print Network

HANNAH GOSNELL Dept of Geosciences | Wilkinson 104 | Oregon State University| Corvallis Associate Professor Department of Geosciences, Water Resources Graduate Program Oregon State University Program Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 2009present Research Consultant Future West

Campana, Michael E.

176

Eruptive history of South Sister, Oregon Cascades  

USGS Publications Warehouse

South Sister is southernmost and highest of the Three Sisters, three geologically dissimilar stratovolcanoes that together form a spectacular 20km reach along the Cascade crest in Oregon. North Sister is a monotonously mafic edifice as old as middle Pleistocene, Middle Sister a basalt-andesite-dacite cone built between 48 and 14ka, and South Sister is a basalt-free edifice that alternated rhyolitic and intermediate modes from 50ka to 2ka (largely contemporaneous with Middle Sister). Detailed mapping, 330 chemical analyses, and 42 radioisotopic ages show that the oldest exposed South Sister lavas were initially rhyolitic ~50ka. By ~37ka, rhyolitic lava flows and domes (72-74% SiO2) began alternating with radially emplaced dacite (63-68% SiO2) and andesite (59-63% SiO2) lava flows. Construction of a broad cone of silicic andesite-dacite (61-64% SiO2) culminated ~30ka in a dominantly explosive sequence that began with crater-forming andesitic eruptions that left fragmental deposits at least 200m thick. This was followed at ~27ka by growth of a steeply dipping summit cone of agglutinate-dominated andesite (56-60.5% SiO2) and formation of a summit crater ~800m wide. This crater was soon filled and overtopped by a thick dacite lava flow and then by >150m of dacitic pyroclastic ejecta. Small-volume dacite lavas (63-67% SiO2) locally cap the pyroclastic pile. A final sheet of mafic agglutinate (54-56% SiO2) - the most mafic product of South Sister - erupted from and drapes the small (300-m-wide) present-day summit crater, ending a summit-building sequence that lasted until ~22ka. A 20kyr-long-hiatus was broken by rhyolite eruptions that produced (1) the Rock Mesa coulee, tephra, and satellite domelets (73.5% SiO2) and (2) the Devils Chain of ~20 domes and short coulees (72.3-72.8% SiO2) from N-S vent alignments on South Sister's flanks. The compositional reversal from mafic summit agglutinate to recent rhyolites epitomizes the frequently changing compositional modes of the South Sister locus throughout its lifetime. South Sister is part of a reach of the Cascades unusually active in the last 50kyr, characterized by high vent density, N-S vent alignments, and numerous eruptive units of true rhyolite (? 72% SiO2) that distinguishes it from much of the Quaternary Cascade arc; these are eruptive expressions of the complex confluence of arc and intraplate magmatic-tectonic regimes.

Fierstein, J.; Hildreth, W.; Calvert, A.T.

2011-01-01

177

Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)

Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01

178

Mercury and fish tissue -- Status of Oregon reservoirs and lakes  

SciTech Connect

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality monitors contaminants in fish and sediment. Total mercury was analyzed in fish tissue taken from ten water bodies in 1993 and 1994. Mercury was measured in bass (Micropterus salmoides, M. dolomieui), salmonids (Salmo trutta, Oncorhynchus mykiss, O. clarki) and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, I. nebulosus) in support of health department consumption advisories. Elevated mercury concentrations above the EPA screening value of 0.6 mg/kg wet were found in fish from watersheds with cinnabar geology or historical mining activity. Established bioaccumulation correlations between mercury and species, age, and length were also observed. Results from East Lake, a popular recreational fishery that had not previously been studied, were found to have fish mercury concentrations approaching 3.0 mg/kg wet. Regulatory and fish management issues will also be presented.

Drake, D.; Stifel, B.; DiDomenico, G.; McCartney, R. [Dept. of Environmental Quality, Portland, OR (United States)

1995-12-31

179

Oregon earthquakes increase local landslide risk  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coastal Oregon is home to a number of slow, recurrent landslides. During bouts of heavy rain, water gets into the soil, reducing friction and causing the ground to slip. Often, these landslides creep along at a barely perceptible rate—less than a centimeter per day. Yet the landslides are a lurking threat, as past events that have damaged infrastructure and cut communities off for months at a time have demonstrated.

Schultz, Colin

2014-11-01

180

Resource Partitioning Among Woodpeckers in Northeastern Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eight species of woodpeckers coexist in conifer forests in northeastern Oregon: northern flicker (Colaptes auratus); yellow-bellied (Sphyrapicus varius) and Williamson's (S. thyroideus) sapsuckers; and pileated (Dryocopus pileatus), hairy (Picoides villosus), white-headed (P. albolarvatus), three-toed (P. tridactylus), and black-backed (P. arcticus) woodpeckers. Tree diameter was the most important factor considered in selection of nest trees by northern flickers, Williamson's sapsuckers, and

Evelyn L. Bull; Steven R. Peterson; Jack Ward Thomas

181

Seaside, Oregon, Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment Pilot Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of a pilot study to assess the risk from tsunamis for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon region will be presented. To determine the risk from tsunamis, it is first necessary to establish the hazard or probability that a tsunami of a particular magnitude will occur within a certain period of time. Tsunami inundation maps that provide 100-year and 500-year probabilistic tsunami wave height contours for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon, region were developed as part of an interagency Tsunami Pilot Study(1). These maps provided the probability of the tsunami hazard. The next step in determining risk is to determine the vulnerability or degree of loss resulting from the occurrence of tsunamis due to exposure and fragility. The tsunami vulnerability assessment methodology used in this study was developed by M. Papathoma and others(2). This model incorporates multiple factors (e.g. parameters related to the natural and built environments and socio-demographics) that contribute to tsunami vulnerability. Data provided with FEMA's HAZUS loss estimation software and Clatsop County, Oregon, tax assessment data were used as input to the model. The results, presented within a geographic information system, reveal the percentage of buildings in need of reinforcement and the population density in different inundation depth zones. These results can be used for tsunami mitigation, local planning, and for determining post-tsunami disaster response by emergency services. (1)Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group, Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Pilot Study--Modernization of FEMA Flood Hazard Maps, Joint NOAA/USGS/FEMA Special Report, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency, 2006, Final Draft. (2)Papathoma, M., D. Dominey-Howes, D.,Y. Zong, D. Smith, Assessing Tsunami Vulnerability, an example from Herakleio, Crete, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 3, 2003, p. 377-389.

Dunbar, P. K.; Dominey-Howes, D.; Varner, J.

2006-12-01

182

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology Slides & Photographs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learning about the world of marine biology through a well-organized set of images can be quite revealing, and this digital collection from the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology is just right for the job. The collection includes over 7,000 images donated through the decades by faculty, students, visiting faculty, and those with "a passion for the local Coos Bay marine environment and the Oregon coast." The oldest items here date from the 1920s and visitors will find dramatic images of marine organisms, along with aerial shots of different marine environments, maps, and charts. The homepage has a section titled Browse, which allows users to look around via topic, subtopic, genus, and common names. The common names area is a great way to look around, as it offers over 200 different animal names, such as albacore tuna and Pacific oyster. Moving on, the natural views section boasts over 700 images, including dramatic shots of the Oregon coastline near Coos Head.

2012-05-11

183

Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

1988-10-27

184

Extirpation and reintroduction of fishers ( Martes pennanti) in Oregon: implications for their conservation in the Pacific states  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prior to extensive European settlement, the fisher (Martes pennanti) occupied most coniferous forest habitats in Washington, Oregon, and California. Human activities since that time have resulted in the apparent extirpation of fishers throughout much of their historical range in the Pacific states. Fisher extirpations in California and Washington have been documented previously, but no comprehensive assessments of the distribution of

Keith B Aubry; Jeffrey C Lewis

2003-01-01

185

In 2005, Oregon State University established the Institute for Water and Watersheds as the hub for water-related  

E-print Network

In 2005, Oregon State University established the Institute for Water and Watersheds as the hub coordination of water and watershed activities at OSU, connect a diverse student body with relevant issues of shared water and watershed collaboratories supporting research, teaching and outreach. Program Overview

Escher, Christine

186

COMPONENTS OF SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE CONNECTIVITY IN A LARGE OREGON (USA) RIVER--WHAT CAN BE RESTORED?  

EPA Science Inventory

We conducted research on the Willamette River in western Oregon (USA) to determine the ecological functions of off-channel habitats (OCH). OCHs have declined in our 70 km study reach of the active floodplain since European settlement. Surface and subsurface connectivity between...

187

Report on the Oregon Ballast Water Management Program in 2004  

E-print Network

Summary The uptake and management of ballast water aboard ships is critical to safe cargo operations that are associated with shipping. To protect Oregon water resources from the risk of ballast water regulations; shipping industry's compliance with Oregon law; and ballast water treatment technology

188

Oregon State University BEBC Service Satisfaction Survey: A Sample Report  

E-print Network

Oregon State University BEBC Service Satisfaction Survey: A Sample Report Updated: December 30, 2010 The Close to the Customer Project C2C@bus.oregonstate.edu (541) 713-8041 #12;Close to the Customer Project C2C@bus.oregonstate.edu (541) 713-8041 Oregon State University BEBC: Service Satisfaction Survey 1

Escher, Christine

189

State of Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries  

E-print Network

State of Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Vicki S. McConnell, State Geologist G Y A ND M INERALINDUSTRIES 1937 2008 1 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, Grants and Mineral Industries Open-File Report O-08-14 Published in conformance with ORS 516.030 For copies

Goldfinger, Chris

190

State of Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries  

E-print Network

State of Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Vicki S. McConnell, State Geologist A ND M INERALINDUSTRIES 1937 2009 1 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, Coastal Field Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Special Paper 41 Published in conformance with ORS 516

Goldfinger, Chris

191

Forest Grove High School, Forest Grove, Oregon. PLATO Evaluation Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forest Grove High School (FGHS) is a suburban school in Oregon that implemented an extensive remediation program to increase the mathematics scores of its learners taking the state-mandated competency examination, the Oregon Statewide Assessment Test (OSAT). Learners who failed at least two of the mathematics sections of the 1998 OSAT, taken when…

Sugar, William

192

Oregon Directory of American Indian Resources, 1999-2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This directory provides information on tribes, organizations, public agencies, schools, and centers offering a variety of services of interest to American Indians in Oregon. Introductory sections discuss tribal sovereignty and the federal trust relationship; define Indian ancestry and eligibility for tribal benefits; list Oregon statutes relating…

Ritter, Gladine G., Comp.

193

The Whiz Kid: Terry Reese--Oregon State University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We should be grateful that Terry Reese had to work his way through college. As a work-study student, taught to do cartographic cataloging in the University, of Oregon's map library, he discovered the mental challenges libraries offered. Later he became Oregon State University (OSU)'s cataloger for networked resources and digital unit production…

Library Journal, 2005

2005-01-01

194

Robin Brown Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife  

E-print Network

Robin Brown Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife 2040 SE Marine Science Drive, Bldg. 3 Newport. Oregon 97365 Donald G. Calkins Alaska Department of Fish and Game 333 Raspberry Road Anchorage. Alaska individuals for a variety of species including grey seals, Hali- choerus grypus, wolves, Canis lupus, humans

195

Department of Wood Science & Engineering Oregon State University  

E-print Network

Department of Wood Science & Engineering Oregon State University 119 Richardson Hall Corvallis, Oregon 97331-5706 Faculty Position The Department of Wood Science & Engineering seeks a creative and innovative faculty member for a position as Assistant Professor of Architecture and Wood Design. The position

Jenny, Bernhard

196

Preserve@Home University of Idaho, Oregon State,  

E-print Network

Preserve@Home University of Idaho, Oregon State, and Colorado State University Extension Services Description On-line classroom instruction using University of Idaho Blackboard software monitored of Idaho, Colorado, and Oregon States provide equal opportunity in education and employment on the basis

197

Go West: Imagining the Oregon Trail. [Lesson Plan].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this lesson plan, students in grades 3-5 compare imagined travel experiences of their own with the actual experiences of 19th-century pioneers on the Oregon Trail. After the 4 lessons students will have: (1) learned about the pioneer experience on the Oregon Trail; (2) compared and contrasted modern-day travel experiences with those of the 19th…

National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

198

SPILOGALE GRACILIS IN UPLAND FORESTS OF WESTERN WASHINGTON AND OREGON  

Microsoft Academic Search

During surveys of upland forests in the Tsuga heterophylla Zone in Washington and Oregon, 1986 to 1996, we caught 192 S. gracilis. In the Oregon Coast Range, more (85%) S. gracilis were caught in oldeilar to Coast Range old growth (P = 0.60) with no differences between seral stages (P = 0.74). No S. gracilis were caught in upland forests

ANDREW B. CAREY; JANET E. KERSHNER

1996-01-01

199

Oregon Online: Automated Document Management of an Infobase.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Oregon Online, the gopher developed for Oregon to provide efficient public access and distribution of government information to citizens via Internet as well as by dial-up access. System development and planning, including the use of ASCII (American Standard Code Information Interchange) format rather than HTML (hypertext mark-up…

Perez, Ernest

1995-01-01

200

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art University of Oregon  

E-print Network

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art University of Oregon FACILITY RENTAL RATE INFORMATION The University opportunities for skiing, hiking, mountaineering, and boating. The University of Oregon's Jordan Schnitzer that will deepen the appreciation and understanding of the human experience. The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

201

In Oregon, Colleges Hope to Care for Themselves  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A group of seven private colleges in Oregon, frustrated with the erratic pricing of health care in the state, decided to band together, drop their health-plan providers, and create a consortium to self-insure their employees. The Oregon Independent Colleges Employee Benefits Trust came into existence on May 1, 2003 and offers a collective…

Pulley, John L.

2006-01-01

202

University of Oregon Psychology 473  

E-print Network

comprehension and retention of which will be assessed on the tests). #12; 2 Readings Readings are assigned are expected to complete the assigned readings prior to class and to actively participate in small group and class discussions. I take completion and comprehension of readings very seriously, and as a result may

Lockery, Shawn

203

Pond Dynamics/Aquaculture Collaborative Research Support Program Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-1641  

E-print Network

Pond Dynamics/Aquaculture Collaborative Research Support Program Oregon State University, Corvallis Department of Fisheries and Allied Aquacultures Auburn University, Alabama C.W. Wood Department of Agronomy and Soils Auburn University, Alabama Taworn Thunjai Department of Fisheries and Allied Aquacultures Auburn

Tullos, Desiree

204

Tenure Related Position Oregon Institute of Marine Biology and Department of Biology  

E-print Network

Tenure Related Position Oregon Institute of Marine Biology and Department of Biology University of Oregon The Oregon Institute of Marine Biology (http://oimb.uoregon.edu) and the Department of Biology (Assistant Professor) position in marine biology based at OIMB in Charleston, Oregon. Individuals whose

Lockery, Shawn

205

Radical State Legislation and School Restructuring: Oregon Educator's Reactions to the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Findings of a 1992 survey that examined Oregon educators' perceptions of the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century, a law designed to bring about fundamental change and radical restructuring in public education, are presented in this journal article. Data were derived from questionnaires that were mailed to 2,140 teachers and 120…

Conley, David T.; And Others

1993-01-01

206

Implications of Floodplain Isolation and Connectivity on the Conservation of an Endangered Minnow, Oregon Chub, in the Willamette River, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution and abundance of endangered Oregon chub Oregonichthys crameri, a small floodplain minnow endemic to the Wil- lamette Valley of western Oregon; to describe the fish communities in current and historic chub habitats; and to establish new populations through introductions. Various sampling gears were used, including seines, minnow traps, dip nets,

Paul D. Scheerer

2002-01-01

207

Implications of Floodplain Isolation and Connectivity on the Conservation of an Endangered Minnow, Oregon Chub, in the Willamette River, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution and abundance of endangered Oregon chub Oregonichthys crameri, a small floodplain minnow endemic to the Willamette Valley of western Oregon; to describe the fish communities in current and historic chub habitats; and to establish new populations through introductions. Various sampling gears were used, including seines, minnow traps, dip nets, and

Paul D. Scheerer

2002-01-01

208

The Demise of Oregon’s Medically Needy Program: Effects of Losing Prescription Drug Coverage  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND In January 2003, people covered by Oregon’s Medically Needy program lost benefits owing to state budget shortfalls. The Medically Needy program is a federally matched optional Medicaid program. In Oregon, this program mainly provided prescription drug benefits. OBJECTIVE To describe the Medically Needy population and determine how benefit loss affected this population’s health and prescription use. DESIGN A 49-question telephone survey instrument created by the research team and administered by a research contractor. PARTICIPANTS A random sample of 1,269 eligible enrollees in Oregon’s Medically Needy Program. Response rate was 35% with 439 individuals, ages 21–91 and 64% women, completing the survey. MEASUREMENTS Demographics, health information, and medicatication use at the time of the survey obtained from the interview. Medication use during the program obtained from administrative data. RESULTS In the 6 months after the Medically Needy program ended, 75% had skipped or stopped medications. Sixty percent of the respondents had cut back on their food budget, 47% had borrowed money, and 49% had skipped paying other bills to pay for medications. By self-report, there was no significant difference in emergency department visits, but a significant decrease in hospitalizations comparing 6 months before and after losing the program. Two-thirds of respondents rated their current health as poor or fair. CONCLUSIONS The Medically Needy program provided coverage for a low-income, chronically ill population. Since its termination, enrollees have decreased prescription drug use and increased financial burden. As states make program changes and Medicare Part D evolves, effects on vulnerable populations must be considered. PMID:17380369

Edlund, Tina; Krois, Lisa; Smith, Jeanene

2007-01-01

209

A Forest Vegetation Database for Western Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Data on forest vegetation in western Oregon were assembled for 2323 ecological survey plots. All data were from fixed-radius plots with the standardized design of the Current Vegetation Survey (CVS) initiated in the early 1990s. For each site, the database includes: 1) live tree density and basal area of common tree species, 2) total live tree density, basal area, estimated biomass, and estimated leaf area; 3) age of the oldest overstory tree examined, 4) geographic coordinates, 5) elevation, 6) interpolated climate variables, and 7) other site variables. The data are ideal for ecoregional analyses of existing vegetation.

Busing, Richard T.

2004-01-01

210

Is Portland, Oregon Experiencing Global Warming?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Weather involves the daily fluctuations in temperature, humidity, clouds, winds, etc. By contrast, climate is the long term weather patterns in a region. Therefore, to assess changes in climate, one has to look at average changes over long periods of time. Students will use long wave radiation data to determine whether the climate has changed in Portland, Oregon over a 20 year time span. They will learn the difference between climate and weather and discover that temperature and radiation changes vary on our planet.

211

Quantitative Mineralogical Characterization of Oregon Erionite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Erionite has been classified as Group-I Human Carcinogen by the IARC Working Group. Fibrogenetic potential of erionite varies from low to high yield of mesothelioma. This may require quantitative characterization of physicochemical properties of erionite before any experimental design. The toxicity of the mineral is such that quantitative characterization of erionite is extremely important. Yet, often the erionite specimens were incompletely or incorrectly characterized throwing doubt on the results of the work. For example, none of the Turkish erionite published until recently had balance error (E%) less than 10%, and Mg cation of the type specimen of erionite-Ca from Maze, Niigita Prefecture, Japan is more than 0.8. In the present study, erionite sample near Rome, Oregon have been quantitatively characterized using powder x-ray diffraction, Reitveld refinement, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectroscopy, and Massbauer spectroscopy. The cell parameters of the erionite-K from Oregon is computed as a=13.2217(2) Ĺ and c=15.0671 Ĺ; chemical composition of the erionite as major oxides, rare earth elements and other trace elements, are characterized quantitatively. Crystal chemistries of the erionite are computed based upon the quidelines of the IMAA zeolite report of 1997.

Dogan, A.; Dogan, M.; Ballirano, P.

2006-12-01

212

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Watson, Montgomery

1995-03-01

213

Commercial Energy Code Enforcement in Oregon and Washington  

E-print Network

states. The Oregon study was conducted by Will Miller of Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. (PECI). The Washington study was performed by Maura O'Neill of O'Neill 6 Company, with the help of Jim Stevens of Stevens Engineering, Inc. Both studies were... conducted during the summer and fell of 1987 and were finished in January of 1988. The purpose of the Oregon study was to assess the enforcement of Chapter 53. Energy Conservation. of the 1986 State of Oregon Structural Specialty Code and the Fire...

Johnson, M.; Miller, W.; O'Neill, M.

1988-01-01

214

1A Appendix A--Statewide Management Assessment of Invasive Species in Oregon APPENDIX A. OREGON STATEWIDE MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT OF INVASIVE SPECIES SURVEY  

E-print Network

1A Appendix A--Statewide Management Assessment of Invasive Species in Oregon APPENDIX A. OREGON STATEWIDE MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT OF INVASIVE SPECIES SURVEY OISC Statewide Management Assessment of Invasive Species Thank you for your willingness to participate in this 21-question survey by the Oregon Invasive

215

78 FR 36243 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR AGENCY: National Park Service...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, in consultation with the appropriate...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History. If no additional claimants come...

2013-06-17

216

76 FR 24479 - In the Matter of the Taylor Lumber and Treating Superfund Site, Sheridan, Oregon, Amendment to...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oregon, Amendment to Agreement and Covenant Not To Sue, Pacific Wood Preserving of Oregon AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...Environmental Protection Agency (``EPA'') and Pacific Wood Preserving of Oregon (``PWPO''). In accordance with...

2011-05-02

217

URBAN FOREST CANOPY COVER IN PORTLAND, OREGON, 1972-2002  

E-print Network

URBAN FOREST CANOPY COVER IN PORTLAND, OREGON, 1972-2002: Final Report by Joseph Poracsky University Cartographic Center Urban Forest Canopy, 1972 - 2002 CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii 1. PORTLAND'S URBAN FOREST CANOPY

Poracsky, Joseph

218

Technology Demonstration Summary, Chemfix Solidification/Stabilization Process, Clackamas, Oregon  

EPA Science Inventory

ChemfIx's* patented stabilization/solidification technology was demonstrated at the Portable Equipment Salvage Company (PESC) site in Clackamas, Oregon, as part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The Chemfix process is designed to solidify and sta...

219

TOWARD REAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT: PORTLAND OREGON REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION ARCHIVE LISTING  

E-print Network

TOWARD REAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT: PORTLAND OREGON REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION ARCHIVE LISTING Abstract. Transportation system performance measurement is a key issue for transportation planning and operations, but until recently it has been difficult to incorporate real time intelligent transportation (ITS

Bertini, Robert L.

220

CONTROLS ON WATER CHEMISTRY OF AN OREGON COAST RANGE STREAM  

EPA Science Inventory

Numerous factors may control losses of dissolved nutrients from forested basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Potentially important factors include forest composition, stand age, forest management, grazing, agriculture, sewage inputs and bedrock types, as well as others perhaps not...

221

A Geographically Variable Water Quality Index Used in Oregon.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the procedure developed in Oregon to formulate a valid water quality index which accounts for the specific conditions in the water body of interest. Parameters selected include oxygen depletion, BOD, eutrophication, dissolved substances, health hazards, and physical characteristics. (CS)

Dunnette, D. A.

1979-01-01

222

DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION OF SALMONID SMOLTS IN OREGON RIVERS AND ESTUARIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Migratory fish passage is an important designated use for many Oregon estuaries. Acoustic transmitters were implanted in coho smolts in 2004 and 2006 to evaluate how estuarine habitat, and habitat loss, might affect population health. Acoustic receivers that identified individu...

223

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON RECRUITING EVENTS 2014-2015 FALL EVENTS  

E-print Network

....................................................................... Thursday, March 5, 2015 INTERNSHIP FAIR INTERVIEWS............................................. Friday.....................................................Thursday, February 19, 2015 INTERNSHIP, SUMMER JOB & VOLUNTEER FAIRUNIVERSITY OF OREGON RECRUITING EVENTS 2014-2015 FALL EVENTS: SPRING EVENTS: CONTACT: WINTER EVENTS

224

Yaquina Bay, Oregon, Intertidal Sediment Temperature Database, 1998 - 2006.  

EPA Science Inventory

Detailed, long term sediment temperature records were obtained and compiled in a database to determine the influence of daily, monthly, seasonal and annual temperature variation on eelgrass distribution across the intertidal habitat in Yaquina Bay, Oregon. Both currently and hi...

225

Nekton-habitat associations in Yaquina Bay, Oregon - March 2008  

EPA Science Inventory

We conducted a 3-year field study to determine the relative nekton usage of 4 intertidal habitats (eelgrass [Zostera marina], mud shrimp [Upogebia pugettensis], ghost shrimp [Neotrypaea californiensis], and unvegetated sand) in Yaquina Bay, Oregon. Nekton samples were collected u...

226

Oregon Health & Science University Technology Transfer and Business Development  

E-print Network

Oregon Health & Science University Technology Transfer and Business Development Annual Report 2011 Business Development 6 Impacting Global Health - Drs. David and Deborah Lewinsohn Technology Transfer 7 Changing the Standard for Cancer Detection - OHSU's Advanced Imaging Research Center Technology Development

Chapman, Michael S.

227

GENETIC VARIABILITY OF REINTRODUCED CALIFORNIA BIGHORN SHEEP IN OREGON  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: Of the approximately 2,500 California bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis californiana) in Oregon, USA, the majority descend from a single transplant of 20 animals from British Columbia, Canada, in 1954. Recently, several populations have experienced poor recruitment, raising concerns that populations may be experiencing inbreed- ing depression,resulting from a genetic bottleneck. We sampled 117 animals from 5 populations,in Oregon and

DONALD G. WHITTAKER; STACEY D. OSTERMANN; WALTER M. BOYCE; DeWoody

2004-01-01

228

BATHYMETRIC CHANGE OFF THE WASHINGTON-OREGON COAST  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historical hydrographic data from the Washington\\/Oregon shelf are compared for the first time to identify bathymetric change on a regional scale. Offshore data sets exist for four time periods: 1800s, pre-1950s, post- 1950s, and 1990s. Data from only two time periods, 1868-87 and 1926-27, cover the entire offshore region between Tillamook Head, Oregon and Grays Harbor, Washington. A confidence interval

Ann E. Gibbs; Guy Gelfenbaum

229

Clean Energy Works Oregon Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

In April 2010, the City of Portland received a $20 million award from the U.S. Department of Energy, as part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant program. This award was appropriated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), passed by President Obama in 2009. DOE’s program became known as the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The BBNP grant objectives directed the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) as the primary grantee to expand the BPS-led pilot program, Clean Energy Works Portland, into Clean Energy Works Oregon (CEWO), with the mission to deliver thousands of home energy retrofits, create jobs, save energy and reduce carbon dioxide emissions.The Final Technical Report explores the successes and lessons learned from the first 3 years of program implementation.

Jacob, Andria [City of Portland] [City of Portland; Cyr, Shirley [Clean Energy Works] [Clean Energy Works

2013-12-31

230

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) is concerned with much more than fish and wildlife, and their website provides a cornucopia of material on conservation, wildlife management, and recreation opportunities. On the homepage, visitors can use the menu on the left-hand of the site to learn about ten different subjects, including materials for hunters, potential volunteers, and fishing enthusiasts. Visitors looking to experience a bit of the flavor of the state may wish to start by clicking on the "Photo and Video Gallery". Here they will find images taken by ODFW employees, along with video clips, such as "How-to-Demonstrations" and news reports. Scientists and policy types may wish to click on over to the "Conservation Strategy" area, as they can view the department's overall strategy, along with "Hot Topics" features on gray wolves and invasive species.

231

Ospreys in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From early April through September each year, famous residents grace the small western town of Corvallis, Oregon. Two ospreys have become mascots of the town since the pair's arrival in 1994. Their nest, built on a 90-foot power pole near the twin bridges over the Willamette River, could be seen by many commuters on their way in and out of town. After the 2002 nesting season, the nest was moved a short distance downriver to a constructed nesting platform because sticks sometimes dropped from the huge nest onto power lines below and caused power outages. At the new location, the pair can once again raise a family of young, their general well being monitored by the 50,000 residents of the community.

Henny, Charles J.; Kaiser, James L.; Grove, Robert A.

2002-01-01

232

Mount Hood Wilderness and adjacent areas, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

A mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, was conducted in 1980. Geochemical data indicate two areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential containing weak epithermal mineralization: an area on the north side of Zigzag Mountain, where vein-type lead-zinc-silver deposits occur and an area on the south side of Zigzag Mountain, where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has propylitic alteration associated with mineralization of copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc in discontinuous veins. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248/sup 0/F) hot-water systems in the wilderness is probable in three areas. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), which is considered to have probable geothermal-resource potential, and two parts of the wilderness have been included in geothermal lease areas.

Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

1984-01-01

233

Digital Data for Volcano Hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon, the product of thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service, includes the caldera and extends to the Deschutes River. Newberry volcano is quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. The report USGS Open-File Report 97-513 (Sherrod and others, 1997) describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. When Newberry volcano becomes restless, the eruptive scenarios described herein can inform planners, emergency response personnel, and citizens about the kinds and sizes of events to expect. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layers used to produce the Newberry volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-513 are included in this data set. Scientists at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory created a GIS data layer to depict zones subject to the effects of an explosive pyroclastic eruption (tephra fallout, pyroclastic flows, and ballistics), lava flows, volcanic gasses, and lahars/floods in Paulina Creek. A separate GIS data layer depicts drill holes on the flanks of Newberry Volcano that were used to estimate the probability of coverage by future lava flows.

Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Sherrod, D.R.; Mastin, L.G.; Scott, W.E.

2008-01-01

234

Geologic evidence for a magma chamber beneath Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

At Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, more than 0.5 m.y. of magmatic activity, including caldera collapse and renewed caldera-filling volcanism, has created a structural and thermal chimney that channels magma ascent. Holocene rhyolitic eruptions (1) have been confined mainly within the caldera in an area 5 km in diameter, (2) have been very similar in chemical composition, phenocryst mineralogy, and eruptive style, and (3) have occurred as recently as 1300 years ago, with repose periods of 2000--3000 years between eruptions. Holocene basaltic andesite eruptions are widespread on the flanks but are excluded from the area of rhyolitic volcanism. Basaltic andesite in fissures at the edge of the rhyolite area has silicic inclusions and shows mixed basalt-rhyolite magma relations. These geologic relations and the high geothermal gradient that characterizes the lower part of a drill hole in the caldera (U.S. Geological Survey Newberry 2) indicate that a rhyolitic magma chamber has existed beneath the caldera throughout the Holocene. Its longevity probably is a result of intermittent underplating by basaltic magma.

Macleod, N.S.; Sherrod, D.R.

1988-09-10

235

Geologic map of the Bend 30- x 60-minute quadrangle, central Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This map presents the stratigraphic and structural setting of volcanic and sedimentary strata deposited during the past 35 million years across 4,430 km2 in central Oregon. Snowfall in the Cascade Range (west part of map area) recharges important aquifers in the Deschutes basin (central part of map). The area includes the majestic peaks of the Three Sisters volcanoes, where continued eruptions of basalt and rhyolite in the past 3,000 years indicate an ongoing volcanic hazard. The Sisters fault zone, with several potentially active faults, traverses the map from southeast to northwest.

Sherrod, David R.; Taylor, Edward M.; Ferns, Mark L.; Scott, William E.; Conrey, Richard M.; Smith, Gary A.

2004-01-01

236

Relation of mercury, uranium, and lithium deposits to the McDermitt caldera complex, Nevada-Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The McDermitt caldera complex, located along the Nevada-Oregon border, is a Miocene collapse structure 45 km in diameter. Large-volume rhyolitic and peralkaline ash-flow tufts were erupted from 17.9-15.8 m.y. ago, leading to the formation of overlapping and nested calderas. Emplacement of rhyolitic ring domes, located primarily along the western margin of the calderas, represents the last phase of volcanic activity.

Rytuba, James J.; Glanzman, Richard K.

1979-01-01

237

WEATHERIZATION INDUSTRIES SAVE ENERGY ST SE SALEM, OREGON 97301 (503) 5691381 WEATHERIZATIONALLIES@GMAIL.COM  

E-print Network

WEATHERIZATION INDUSTRIES SAVE ENERGY 565 21ST ST SE SALEM, OREGON 97301 · (503) 5691381 AND CONSERVATION COUNCIL'S CONSERVATION PLANNING ASSUMPTIONS Weatherization Industries Save Energy (WISE) is an Oregon trade association of residential weatherization and HVAC contractors, manufacturers

238

33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section...Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated...Definition. For purposes of this section, race area means an area...

2012-07-01

239

33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section...Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated...Definition. For purposes of this section, race area means an area...

2014-07-01

240

33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section...Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated...Definition. For purposes of this section, race area means an area...

2013-07-01

241

A new way to support higher education, innovation, and the Oregon economy. THE UNIVERSITY VENTURE  

E-print Network

A new way to support higher education, innovation, and the Oregon economy. THE UNIVERSITY VENTURE D royalties to further their research, education and outreach missions; and the Oregon economy, which grows

Bertini, Robert L.

242

75 FR 74697 - Central Oregon Irrigation District; Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit Application Accepted...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 13858-000] Central Oregon Irrigation District; Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit Application...November 22, 2010. On October 6, 2010, Central Oregon Irrigation District filed an application for a preliminary permit,...

2010-12-01

243

75 FR 22621 - Notice of Intent To Solicit Nominations, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...District Resource Advisory Committee: Pat Johnston, 3106 Pierce Parkway, Suite E, Springfield, Oregon 97477, (541) 683-6600. Medford District Resource Advisory Committee: Tim Reuwsaat, 3040 Biddle Road, Medford, Oregon 97504, (541)...

2010-04-29

244

77 FR 51823 - Notice of Public Meetings, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...District Resource Advisory Committee: Pat Johnston, 3106 Pierce Parkway, Suite E, Springfield, Oregon 97477, (541) 683-6600. Medford District Resource Advisory Committee: Jim Whittington, 3040 Biddle Road, Medford, Oregon 97504, (541)...

2012-08-27

245

75 FR 44975 - Notice of Intent To Solicit Nominations, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...District Resource Advisory Committee: Pat Johnston, 3106 Pierce Parkway, Suite E, Springfield, Oregon 97477, (541) 683-6600; Medford District Resource Advisory Committee: Jim Whittington, 3040 Biddle Road, Medford, Oregon 97504, (541)...

2010-07-30

246

78 FR 20073 - Adequacy of Oregon's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Adequacy of Oregon's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program AGENCY...of Oregon's approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Program. On March 22...be issued to certain municipal solid waste landfills by approved...

2013-04-03

247

Flow-banded Rhyolite of the Northern Oregon Cascades: Graveyard and Gordon Buttes, Tygh Valley, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most structurally complex areas along the northeastern margin of the Oregon Cascades is in Tygh Valley. Crustal shortening produced folds and extensional tectonics resulted in rifting during the Miocene/Pliocene. Rhyolite, exposed in channel cuts and river canyon, records this transition, summarized in new, more detailed research. Tygh Valley, Oregon, is a synclinal basin bordered by the Tygh Ridge anticline to the north, Mutton Mountains to the south, and the Cascade Range (with Mt. Hood) to the west. The stratigraphy of the basin consists of epi- and volcaniclastic deposits mostly derived from the Cascades Range, in addition to ash flow tuffs and surficial basalt lava flows. Rhyolite lava flows are found at two dome complexes in the Tygh Valley area, Graveyard Butte and Gordon Butte. At Graveyard Butte, the White River has cut a winding canyon 140 meters deep, exposing at its base, a 40-meter thick outcrop of flow-banded rhyolite (73 wt.% SiO2) that laterally extends along the canyon walls for about 1 km. Stratigraphically above the flow-banded rhyolites are locally-erupted Fe-rich andesites (lava flows, agglutinate and other pyroclastic rocks as well as clastic debris), a rhyolitic ash-flow tuff (74 wt.% SiO2) and the 2.7 My basalt lava flows of Juniper Flat. At Gordon Butte, compositionally similar rhyolite lavas are exposed in channel cuts but flows are less constrained on ridge tops due to heavy vegetation. Ongoing age dating experiments will likely reveal a late Miocene/Pliocene age for these rhyolite lava flows. The rhyolite lavas flows at both buttes are chemically nearly indistinguishable but contrast with the stratigraphically younger rhyolitic ash-flow tuff at Graveyard Butte. Rhyolite lavas are richer in Nb and Zr than the younger rhyolitic tuff (Nb 30-40 versus 13 ppm; Zr 490 versus 240 ppm) and share characteristics with much older (~30 Ma) rhyolites of the Western Cascades and John Day Formation of central and eastern Oregon as well as other A-type rhyolites. The rhyolite lavas are sparsely porphyritic (~7%) consisting mostly of individual feldspars (250 to 500 microns in length) with ragged margins, oscillatory zoning and occasionally with spongy cores. Other phenocrystic phases include sparse equant fayalitic olivine with thick brown coronas. A-type-like incompatible trace-element enriched compositions as well as mineralogical indicators suggest rhyolite lava flows at Graveyard and Gordon Butte are likely generated in an extensional setting. A possible geotectonic framework for generation of these rhyolite lavas is the north propagating intra-arc rift of the Oregon Cascades.

Westby, E.; Streck, M. J.

2013-12-01

248

A new subspecies of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from Oregon (Aves: Timaliinae)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geographic variation in plumage color of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from northern California and southern Oregon is related to climate. A new subspecies, Chamaea fasciata margra, is described from a disjunct population of southern interior Oregon. Colonization of C. fasciata in interior Oregon was perhaps from birds crossing coniferous forests via isolated balds of Ceonothus. Recent increases of Wrentits in interior Oregon may be in response to habitat alterations (deforestation, fires) and concurrent global warming.

Browning, M. Ralph

1992-01-01

249

OREGON PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES Request for Deferral of Application Fee for Admission  

E-print Network

. Student is a current recipient of State of Oregon or U.S. Public Assistance 4. Student is eligible recipient of State of Oregon or U.S. Public Assistance (food stamps only or food stamps, cash, and medicalOREGON PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES Request for Deferral of Application Fee for Admission To 2014

Oregon, University of

250

OREGON PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES Request for Deferral of Application Fee for Admission  

E-print Network

. Student is a current recipient of State of Oregon or U.S. Public Assistance 4. Student is eligible recipient of State of Oregon or U.S. Public Assistance (food stamps only or food stamps, cash, and medicalOREGON PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES Request for Deferral of Application Fee for Admission To 2015

Cina, Jeff

251

76 FR 36146 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR AGENCY: National Park Service...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History has completed an inventory of human remains...Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History. Repatriation of the human remains...

2011-06-21

252

USING METEOROLOGICAL RADAR TO LINK LANDSLIDES AND RAINFALL IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE  

E-print Network

USING METEOROLOGICAL RADAR TO LINK LANDSLIDES AND RAINFALL IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE by AMANDA JANE #12;ii "Using Meteorological Radar to Link Landslides and Rainfall in the Oregon Coast Range METEOROLOGICAL RADAR TO LINK LANDSLIDES AND RAINFALL IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE Approved

Roering, Joshua J.

253

LEGALIZED PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED SUICIDE IN OREGON — THE FIRST YEAR'S EXPERIENCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Methods On October 27, 1997, Oregon legalized physician-assisted suicide. We col- lected data on all terminally ill Oregon residents who received prescriptions for lethal medications under the Oregon Death with Dignity Act and who died in 1998. The data were obtained from physicians' reports, death certificates, and interviews with physicians. We compared persons who took lethal medications pre-

ARTHUR E. CHIN; KATRINA HEDBERG; GRANT K. HIGGINSON; DAVID W. FLEMING

2010-01-01

254

4-H 331 REPRINTED JULY 2005 $8.00 Oregon 4-H Forestry  

E-print Network

4-H 331 REPRINTED JULY 2005 $8.00 #12;Oregon 4-H Forestry Member Manual Contents Lesson 1: Welcome to Oregon 4-H Forestry 1 Lesson 2: Forests in Oregon 4 Lesson 3 Looking Closer 7 Lesson 4 Succession 9 Appendices Appendix A Answers to forestry puzzles 46 Appendix B Extension pubhcations The Wildlife Garden 48

Tullos, Desiree

255

33 CFR 165.1316 - Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon. 165...1316 Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon. (a...All waters of the Columbia River at Astoria, Oregon enclosed by the...Authority. In addition to 33 U.S.C. 1231, the authority...

2011-07-01

256

33 CFR 165.1316 - Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon. 165...1316 Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon. (a...All waters of the Columbia River at Astoria, Oregon enclosed by the...Authority. In addition to 33 U.S.C. 1231, the authority...

2013-07-01

257

33 CFR 165.1316 - Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon. 165...1316 Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon. (a...All waters of the Columbia River at Astoria, Oregon enclosed by the...Authority. In addition to 33 U.S.C. 1231, the authority...

2012-07-01

258

33 CFR 165.1316 - Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon. 165...1316 Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon. (a...All waters of the Columbia River at Astoria, Oregon enclosed by the...Authority. In addition to 33 U.S.C. 1231, the authority...

2014-07-01

259

33 CFR 165.1316 - Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon. 165...1316 Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon. (a...All waters of the Columbia River at Astoria, Oregon enclosed by the...Authority. In addition to 33 U.S.C. 1231, the authority...

2010-07-01

260

Geologic Map of the Carlton Quadrangle, Yamhill County, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Carlton, Oregon, 7.5-minute quadrangle is located in northwestern Oregon, about 35 miles (57 km) southwest of Portland. It encompasses the towns of Yamhill and Carlton in the northwestern Willamette Valley and extends into the eastern flank of the Oregon Coast Range. The Carlton quadrangle is one of several dozen quadrangles being mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) to provide a framework for earthquake- hazard assessments in the greater Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. The focus of USGS mapping is on the structural setting of the northern Willamette Valley and its relation to the Coast Range uplift. Mapping was done in collaboration with soil scientists from the National Resource Conservation Service, and the distribution of geologic units is refined over earlier regional mapping (Schlicker and Deacon, 1967). Geologic mapping was done on 7.5-minute topographic base maps and digitized in ArcGIS to produce ArcGIS geodatabases and PDFs of the map and text. The geologic contacts are based on numerous observations and samples collected in 2002 and 2003, National Resource Conservation Service soils maps, and interpretations of 7.5-minute topography. The map was completed before new, high-resolution laser terrain mapping was flown for parts of the northern Willamette Valley in 2008.

Wheeler, Karen L.; Wells, Ray E.; Minervini, Joseph M.; Block, Jessica L.

2009-01-01

261

Electrical structure of Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From the interpretation of magnetotelluric, transient electromagnetic, and Schlumberger resistivity soundings, the electrical structure of Newberry Volcano in central Oregon is found to consist of four units. From the surface downward, the geoelectrical units are 1) very resistive, young, unaltered volcanic rock, (2) a conductive layer of older volcanic material composed of altered tuffs, 3) a thick resistive layer thought to be in part intrusive rocks, and 4) a lower-crustal conductor. This model is similar to the regional geoelectrical structure found throughout the Cascade Range. Inside the caldera, the conductive second layer corresponds to the steep temperature gradient and alteration minerals observed in the USGS Newberry 2 test-hole. Drill hole information on the south and north flanks of the volcano (test holes GEO N-1 and GEO N-3, respectively) indicates that outside the caldera the conductor is due to alteration minerals (primarily smectite) and not high-temperature pore fluids. On the flanks of Newberry the conductor is generally deeper than inside the caldera, and it deepens with distance from the summit. A notable exception to this pattern is seen just west of the caldera rim, where the conductive zone is shallower than at other flank locations. The volcano sits atop a rise in the resistive layer, interpreted to be due to intrusive rocks. -from Authors

Fitterman, D.V.; Stanley, W.D.; Bisdorf, R.J.

1988-01-01

262

Gravity model studies of Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Newberry Volcano, a large Quaternary volcano located about 60 km east of the axis of the High Cascades volcanoes in central Oregon, has a coincident positive residual gravity anomaly of about 12 mGals. Model calculations of the gravity anomaly field suggest that the volcano is underlain by an intrusive complex of mafic composition of about 20-km diameter and 2-km thickness, at depths above 4 km below sea level. However, uplifted basement in a northwest trending ridge may form part of the underlying excess mass, thus reducing the volume of the subvolcanic intrusive. A ring dike of mafic composition is inferred to intrude to near-surface levels along the caldera ring fractures, and low-density fill of the caldera floor probably has a thickness of 0.7-0.9 km. The gravity anomaly attributable to the volcano is reduced to the east across a north-northwest trending gravity anomaly gradient through Newberry caldera and suggests that normal, perhaps extensional, faulting has occurred subsequent to caldera formation and may have controlled the location of some late-stage basaltic and rhyolitic eruptions. Significant amounts of felsic intrusive material may exist above the mafic intrusive zone but cannot be resolved by the gravity data. -Authors

Gettings, M.E.; Griscom, A.

1988-01-01

263

Stratigraphic and paleoecologic criteria that distinguish coseismically submerged from gradually submerged tidal wetland deposits, Oregon and Washington  

SciTech Connect

Widespread buried tidal-wetland soils exposed in outcrop in southern Washington and northern Oregon suggest that sudden coastal subsidence accompanied great (M>8) Cascadia subduction zone earthquakes at least twice in the past 2,000 years. But interpretation of the estuarine stratigraphic record along the subduction zone is complicated by the interplay of many coastal-sedimentation and sea-level factors found on passive as well as active continental margins. In this presentation, the author outlines-some simple models of sea-level and land-level change along subduction zone coasts, explain how these types of changes might be recorded in the tidal-wetland stratigraphic record, compare stratigraphies from the active-margin coasts of Oregon and Washington with stratigraphies from similar sites along passive continental margins in North America and Europe, and identify criterion that can help distinguish stratigraphic sequences produced by gradual sea-level change from those that may have been produced by coseismic subsidence. Field stratigraphic data alone are an inadequate basis for mapping the coastal extent of past great earthquakes -- only through detailed paleoecologic and dating analyses can one test proposed models of crustal subsidence and recovery during great earthquakes. Rigorous testing of such models is essential if the coastal paleoseismic record is to be used in forecasting the timing and magnitude of future subduction zone earthquakes in Oregon and Washington.

Nelson, A.R. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-04-01

264

Parelaphostrongylus odocoilei in Columbian black-tailed deer from Oregon.  

PubMed

Documenting the occurrence of Parelaphostrongylus odocoilei has historically relied on the morphological examination of adult worms collected from the skeletal muscle of definitive hosts, including deer. Recent advances in the knowledge of protostrongylid genetic sequences now permit larvae to be identified. Dorsal-spined larvae (DSLs) collected in 2003-2004 from the lung and feces of six Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) from Oregon were characterized genetically. The sequences from unknown DSLs were compared to those from morphologically validated adults and larvae of P. odocoilei at both the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of ribosomal DNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II gene. We provide the first unequivocal identification of P. odocoilei in Columbian black-tailed deer from Oregon. The broader geographic distribution, prevalence, and pathology of P. odocoilei are not known in populations of Oregon deer. PMID:17092883

Mortenson, Jack A; Abrams, Arthur; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dunams, Detiger; Hoberg, Eric P; Bildfell, Robert J; Green, Richard L

2006-07-01

265

Transverse structural trends along the Oregon convergent margin: Implications for Cascadia earthquake potential and crustal rotations  

SciTech Connect

A remarkable set of west-northwest-trending left-lateral strike-slip faults intersects the Cascadia subduction zone. Three of these faults have been mapped off northern and central Oregon by using seismic reflection, SeaMARC-1A sidescan sonar, and SeaBeam bathymetry. These faults are highly oblique to the north-south structural grain of the active accretionary wedge. One of them has 6 km of horizontal slip; the average slip rate is 7-10 mm/yr. The faults cut the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and can be traced into the North American plate. Folds that deform late Pleistocene and Holocene sediments on the upper continental slope and shelf strike north-northwest to west-northwest. Some of the west-northwest-trending folds are associated with the throughgoing strike-slip faults, whereas other northwest-trending folds are approximately normal to the plate convergence direction. Many of these folds are mapped across the shelf, and several active shelf synclines project toward Oregon's coastal bays, where marsh subsidence events are inferred to be the result of great subduction-zone earthquakes. These subsidence events may actually record the growth of local synclines, possibly as secondary effects of slip on the megathrusts. The authors postulate that shortening of the forearc region by clockwise tectonic rotation, associated with movement of the left-lateral faults and folding of the upper plate, may accommodate a significant amount of plate convergence.

Goldfinger, C.; Kulm, L.D.; Yeats, R.S. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States)); Applegate, B.; MacKay, M.E.; Moore, G.F. (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (United States))

1992-02-01

266

Idor Idaho-Oregon Earthscope Project: Deformation and Modification of a Steep Continental Boundary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The IDOR project is an integrated study of the tectonic boundary between Precambrian North America and accreted terranes (island arcs of the Blue Mountains) in the Idaho-Oregon region. Its goal is to determine how the accretionary edge of the continental margin formed and was subsequently modified by deformation and magmatism. The margin contains unusually sharp isotopic gradients (Sr, O) representing the edge of Precambrian continental crust. This isotopic break correlates with a lithospheric-scale shear zone (western Idaho shear zone or WISZ) that formed in the mid Cretaceous in western Idaho. The WISZ is a major deformation zone characterized by a sequence of gneisses ~5 km thick and records transpressional deformation. The sharp isotopic gradient results, at least in part, from modification of the original Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous suturing by the extreme shortening associated with the WISZ. The Idaho batholith, based on recent geochronology, was emplaced in multiple phases and is entirely east of the WISZ. The main batholith phase has no easily recognized mantle component, which contrasts markedly from other Cordilleran batholiths. Batholith emplacement occurred simultaneously with Sevier thrusting further east. Eocene (Challis) magmatism occurred throughout the region, both as localized centers and dike swarms. Miocene deformation and magmatism occurs throughout the region. A second sharp isotopic break is denoted by Miocene basaltic rocks, and is parallel to the sharp isotopic boundary in western Idaho (the exposed WISZ) but located ~120 km to the west. One hypothesis invoked to explain the repeated isotopic boundary is that a Sevier-age detachment cut and offset the WISZ, beheading it and leaving the WISZ’s root zone in eastern Oregon. Miocene magmatism, including the extrusion of the voluminous Columbia River basalts, appears localized on the sharp isotopic boundary in eastern Oregon. Extensional deformation, in contrast, appears partly localized on the WISZ in western Idaho. The IDOR project will investigate these issues through coordinated passive and active seismic (~500 km long line) deployments, geochemistry, geochronology, and structural geology.

Tikoff, B.; Hole, J. A.; Russo, R. M.; Vervoort, J. D.; Braudy, N.; Davenport, K.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Mocanu, V. I.

2010-12-01

267

Post-fire geomorphic response in steep, forested landscapes: Oregon Coast Range, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The role of fire in shaping steep, forested landscapes depends on a suite of hydrologic, biologic, and geological characteristics, including the propensity for hydrophobic soil layers to promote runoff erosion during subsequent rainfall events. In the Oregon Coast Range, several studies postulate that fire primarily modulates sediment production via root reinforcement and shallow landslide susceptibility, although few studies have documented post-fire geomorphic response. Here, we describe field observations and topographic analyses for three sites in the central Oregon Coast Range that burned in 1999, 2002, and 2003. The fires generated strongly hydrophobic soil layers that did not promote runoff erosion because the continuity of the layers was interrupted by pervasive discontinuities that facilitated rapid infiltration. At each of our sites, fire generated significant colluvial transport via dry ravel, consistent with other field-based studies in the western United States. Fire-driven dry ravel accumulation in low-order valleys of our Sulphur Creek site equated to a slope-averaged landscape lowering of 2.5 mm. Given Holocene estimates of fire frequency, these results suggest that fire may contribute 10-20% of total denudation across steep, dissected portions of the Oregon Coast Range. In addition, we documented more rapid decline of root strength at our sites than has been observed after timber harvest, suggesting that root strength was compromised prior to fire or that intense heat damaged roots in the shallow subsurface. Given that fire frequencies in the Pacific Northwest are predicted to increase with continued climate change, our findings highlight the importance of fire-induced dry ravel and post-fire debris flow activity in controlling sediment delivery to channels.

Jackson, Molly; Roering, Joshua J.

2009-06-01

268

High-throughput screen using a single-cell tyrosine phosphatase assay reveals biologically active inhibitors of tyrosine phosphatase CD45  

PubMed Central

Many cellular signaling events are regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation and mediated by the opposing actions of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. Protein tyrosine phosphatases are emerging as drug targets, but poor cell permeability of inhibitors has limited the development of drugs targeting these enzymes [Tautz L, et al. (2006) Expert Opin Ther Targets 10:157–177]. Here we developed a method to monitor tyrosine phosphatase activity at the single-cell level and applied it to the identification of cell-permeable inhibitors. The method takes advantage of the fluorogenic properties of phosphorylated coumaryl amino propionic acid (pCAP), an analog of phosphotyrosine, which can be incorporated into peptides. Once delivered into cells, pCAP peptides were dephosphorylated by protein tyrosine phosphatases, and the resulting cell fluorescence could be monitored by flow cytometry and high-content imaging. The robustness and sensitivity of the assay was validated using peptides preferentially dephosphorylated by CD45 and T-cell tyrosine phosphatase and available inhibitors of these two enzymes. The assay was applied to high-throughput screening for inhibitors of CD45, an important target for autoimmunity and infectious diseases [Hermiston ML, et al. (2003) Annu Rev Immunol 21:107–137]. We identified four CD45 inhibitors that showed activity in T cells and macrophages. These results indicate that our assay can be applied to primary screening for inhibitors of CD45 and of other protein tyrosine phosphatases to increase the yield of biologically active inhibitors. PMID:22891353

Stanford, Stephanie M.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Walker, Logan M.; Wu, Dennis J.; Falk, Matthew D.; Mitra, Sayantan; Damle, Sagar S.; Ruble, David; Kaltcheva, Teodora; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Bavari, Sina; Barrios, Amy M.; Bottini, Nunzio

2012-01-01

269

Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Ocean wave power can be a significant source of large?scale, renewable energy for the US electrical grid. The Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) conservatively estimated that 20% of all US electricity could be generated by wave energy. Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (OPT), with funding from private sources and the US Navy, developed the PowerBuoy? to generate renewable energy from the readily available power in ocean waves. OPT's PowerBuoy converts the energy in ocean waves to electricity using the rise and fall of waves to move the buoy up and down (mechanical stroking) which drives an electric generator. This electricity is then conditioned and transmitted ashore as high?voltage power via underwater cable. OPT's wave power generation system includes sophisticated techniques to automatically tune the system for efficient conversion of random wave energy into low cost green electricity, for disconnecting the system in large waves for hardware safety and protection, and for automatically restoring operation when wave conditions normalize. As the first utility scale wave power project in the US, the Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, OR, will consist of 10 PowerBuoys located 2.5 miles off the coast. This U.S. Department of Energy Grant funding along with funding from PNGC Power, an Oregon?based electric power cooperative, was utilized for the design completion, fabrication, assembly and factory testing of the first PowerBuoy for the Reedsport project. At this time, the design and fabrication of this first PowerBuoy and factory testing of the power take?off subsystem are complete; additionally the power take?off subsystem has been successfully integrated into the spar.

Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator] [Principal Investigator; Downie, Bruce [Project Manager] [Project Manager

2013-10-21

270

Oregon’s Medicaid Transformation: An Innovative Approach To Holding A Health System Accountable For Spending Growth  

PubMed Central

In 2012, Oregon initiated a significant transformation of its Medicaid program, catalyzed in part through an innovative arrangement with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), which provided an upfront investment of $1.9 billion to the state. In exchange, Oregon agreed to reduce the rate of Medicaid spending by 2 percentage points without degrading quality. A failure to meet these targets triggers penalties on the order of hundreds of millions of dollars from CMS. We describe the novel arrangement with CMS and how the CCO structure compares to Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) and managed care organizations (MCOs). PMID:25540719

McConnell, K. John; Chang, Anna Marie; Cohen, Deborah J.; Wallace, Neal; Chernew, Michael E.; Kautz, Glenn; McCarty, Dennis; McFarland, Bentson; Wright, Bill; Smith, Jeanene

2014-01-01

271

Deer and Elk Use on Foothill Rangelands in Northeastern Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forested foothills of the Wallowa Mountains in northeastern Oregon provide spring and early summer range for deer and elk. Deer and elk use varied both between plant communities and seasonally within plant communities. Plant species composition of big game diets also varied with season. Bunchgrass and logged communities collectively occupying 57% of the land area studied, provided 90% of the

RICHARD F. MILLER; WILLIAM C. KRUEGER; MARTIN VAVRA

272

Condition assessment of tidal wetlands of Washington, Oregon and California  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA and State partners conducted an assessment of the condition of estuarine tidal wetlands of Washington, Oregon and California at 217 sites during the summer of 2002. Dominant habitat types varied, although unvegetated sand or mud flats were the dominant habitat types for all...

273

Dear FIG Student, Bienvienue the University of Oregon!  

E-print Network

and HUM 101. Through film, art, and literature we will explore the influences of classical Greek, Roman experience is required! I am a sophomore from Bend, Oregon studying Theater Arts and Psychology and a scholar of the "quarrel between ancient and modern," Professor Moore is uniquely qualified to help us

Oregon, University of

274

Needs Assessment of International Students at Eastern Oregon State College.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the research project was to assess the needs, satisfaction, and concerns of international students attending Eastern Oregon State College. The international student population consisted of students from Micronesia, Netherlands, Somalia, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Iran, Japan, Thailand, Zimbabwe, Belgium, Canada, Nigeria, China,…

Eid, Mamoud Taha; Jordan-Domschot, Theresa

275

Acorn storage alternatives tested on Oregon white oak  

Microsoft Academic Search

We assessed various combinations of storage factors: bag type, temperature, duration, and antifungal pre-storage treatments for white oak acorn storage, using Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana Douglas ex Hook. [Fagaceae]) acorns from 7 seed sources. Acorn viability remained high (84%), even after 2 y of refrigerated storage, but the majority of these acorns germinated between 6 and 12 mo after

Chemist Joseph M Kraft

2010-01-01

276

University of Oregon, Fall 2012 Psychology 302: STATISTICAL METHODS  

E-print Network

University of Oregon, Fall 2012 Psychology 302: STATISTICAL METHODS 142 Straub Hall, MonWed 14 of this course?) Welcome to Psychology 302. Statistical methods are a crucial part of research in many sciences research methods, and about more advanced statistical methods. 3. Ability to identify the appropriate

Lockery, Shawn

277

Oregon NASA Space Grant Consortium 92 Kerr Administration Building  

E-print Network

Oregon NASA Space Grant Consortium 92 Kerr Administration Building Corvallis, OR 97331-2103 Phone upon availability of NASA funding Updated September 16, 2011 LMP OSGC Scholarship Programs Guide Guide Page 3 of 11 *Contingent upon availability of NASA funding Updated September 16, 2011 LMP OSGC

Tullos, Desiree

278

SITE CHARACTERIZATION USING BIRD SPECIES COMPOSITION IN EASTERN OREGON, USA  

EPA Science Inventory

We conducted riparian bird surveys at 25 randomly selected stream reaches in the John Day River Basin of eastern Oregon as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). At each reach along a kilometer-length transect, ...

279

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON CAMCOR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Facility  

E-print Network

Probe (liquids); CP/MAS solids Varian INOVA 500 MHz NMR Spectrometer Varian INOVA 300 MHz NMR Spectrometer 1 HUNIVERSITY OF OREGON CAMCOR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Facility INSTRUMENTS NMR 1H/19F SAMPLES FOR ROUTINE 1H NMR $30 each + materials SOLID STATE NMR surcharge 25% + rotors, caps, & staff time

280

Guide to the Geology of the Owyhee Region of Oregon.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this bulletin a detailed description of a geologic region in Oregon is presented with numerous illustrations, both plates and schematic diagrams. Maps of the region as well as maps of various excursions are included in the booklet. A geologic-time unit table is presented covering the Cenozoic Era. Three excursions with included side-trips are…

Kittleman, Laurence R.

281

Ecological functions of riparian zones in Oregon hydrological landscapes  

EPA Science Inventory

The ecological functions of streams and associated riparian zones are strongly influenced by the hydrological attributes of watersheds and landscapes in which they occur. Oregon hydrologic landscape regions (HLRs) have been defined based on four types of GIS data: 1) climate, 2) ...

282

Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Oregon's Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oregon is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures the…

Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

2011-01-01

283

Division of Arthritis & Rheumatic Diseases at Oregon Health & Science University  

E-print Network

Division of Arthritis & Rheumatic Diseases at Oregon Health & Science University Our areas of expertise include: · Osteoarthritis · Rheumatoid Arthritis · Ankylosing Spondylitis · Psoriatic Arthritis · Dermatomyositis · Polymyositis · Early Arthritis · HIV Associated Arthritis · Joint Injections Contact Us Division

Chapman, Michael S.

284

COMMUNITY RESPIRATION OF DECOMPOSING PLANTS IN OREGON ESTUARINE MARSHES  

EPA Science Inventory

Community respiration rates in air and water were measured as indicators of the decomposition rate of dead plant tissue from nine stands of plants in two Oregon estuarine marshes. Respiration rates were low and relatively constant from November to February; during warmer periods ...

285

Oregon Title 1-M Early Childhood and Elementary Education Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Brief descriptions of Oregon Title 1-M early childhood and elementary education programs for migrant children from infants to grade 8, along with lists of contact persons for each program, include reading, pre-school skill development, English as a second language, individualized instruction, utilization of community services, and parental…

Lugo, Alfredo Morales, Comp.

286

Oregon Driver Education. Alcohol/Drugs and Driving.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum unit contains 10 modules, to be used in 10 driver education class sessions, on driving under the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs (DUI). The unit aims to combat the Oregon DUI problem, especially among 15- to 24-year-olds, with values clarification, awareness of risk factors and personal boundaries, refusal skills, social…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Div. of Curriculum and School Improvement.

287

Geochemical examination of obsidians from Newberry Caldera, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five obsidian flows located in Newberry Caldera, Oregon, were systematically sampled, and the samples have been chemically analyzed to examine the homogeneity in a single large flow and to study chemical differences among the flows. The largest flow, the Big Obsidian Flow, is highly homogeneous chemically. The five flows are very similar in composition, indicating a common source. Small chemical

Richard A. Laidley; David S. McKay

1971-01-01

288

Small-Scale Farming: A Portrait from Polk County, Oregon.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of small-scale farmers in Polk County, Oregon, examined characteristics of, and variations among, small-scale farmers and developed some guidelines for assistance programs targeted for such a group. During the months of May, June, and July of 1978 an average of 4 days a week was spent locating and interviewing 44 small farm operators in…

Young, John A.; Caday, Peter

289

MARKHAM RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY -Hatfield Marine Science Center  

E-print Network

study emphasis is marine biology, particularly marine mammals. `11 Recipient Rebecca Hamner WildlifeMARKHAM RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM Agenda OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY - Hatfield Marine Science Center June, Hatfield Marine Science Center PRESENTATION OF 2012 AWARD WINNERS and REPORTS BY PREVIOUS YEAR RECIPIENTS 9

290

MARKHAM RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY -Hatfield Marine Science Center  

E-print Network

interns, and to students whose major study emphasis is marine biology, particularly marine mammals. `12MARKHAM RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM Agenda OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY - Hatfield Marine Science Center June Director, Hatfield Marine Science Center PRESENTATION OF 2013 AWARD WINNERS and REPORTS BY PREVIOUS YEAR

291

Connecting with Oregon State University Students for Internships  

E-print Network

1 Connecting with Oregon State University Students for Internships: A Guide for Employers for a successful internship. OSU's Internship Programs are very flexible and can be modified to fit a variety, questions, or other input you have. An internship should be an integral part of your organization; therefore

Escher, Christine

292

Psychoactive Drugs (Psy 383) Fall Term, 2011; University of Oregon  

E-print Network

of drug effects, the clinical effects of drugs including addiction and therapy, and finally a sociological pharmacological and neurological concepts and as related to drug use 2. Understand the clinical effectsPsychoactive Drugs (Psy 383) Fall Term, 2011; University of Oregon The Instructor: Dr. Peter Sparks

Lockery, Shawn

293

Waste Not: An Oregon Solution to Joblessness and Overflowing Landfills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The St. Vincent de Paul Society of Lane County (Oregon) provides a wide range of social services to stimulate community development, based on reuse, repair, and recycling. Job training and jobs are provided in the woodshop, appliance center, mattress factory, glass shop, and environmentally friendly housing construction projects, with priority…

Grossman, Elizabeth

1999-01-01

294

Katherine Adams Oregon State University phone: (541) 737-2293  

E-print Network

, NE Pacific Conducted inlab testing of chemical and optical oxygen sensors. Piloting shift: 24 hr Operation Technician, Oregon State University Glider Group, 20092012 Remotely piloted Teledyne Webb and deployment cruises from the R.V. Elakha. Conducted field and lab calibration tests for CTD, oxygen sensor

Kurapov, Alexander

295

CHARACTERIZATION OF AGROSTIS SPP. HABITAT IN CENTRAL OREGON  

EPA Science Inventory

Creeping bentgrass, Agrostis stolonifera L., is a non-native grass commonly found at mesic sites in central Oregon. Interest in A. stolonifera plant communities and the factors that may control its distribution has increased since field trials of A. stolonifera ...

296

Faculty Annual Merit Evaluation at Oregon Institute of Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the approach taken at the Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) for the evaluation of its faculty in conjunction with the OIT administrator evaluation methods. A set of Annual Faculty Objectives (AFO) are established by both faculty and department chairmen. They review divisional and departmental goals and agree on specific…

Ward, John G.

297

PRESSURE AND VACUUM SEWER DEMONSTRATION PROJECT, BEND, OREGON  

EPA Science Inventory

A pressure sewer system collecting domestic septic tank effluent and a vacuum system collecting raw domestic sewage were constructed in the City of Bend, Oregon. Each of the systems collected sewage from eleven houses and discharged into existing gravity sewer mains. Groups of on...

298

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH 341 Waldo Corvallis, Oregon 97331  

E-print Network

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH 341 Waldo · Corvallis, Oregon 97331 Telephone 541-737-8906 Faculty Undergraduate Mentor of the Year Award The Office of Undergraduate Research seeks nominations for the 2014, we aim to reward and encourage faculty mentorship of undergraduates in research, creative, or other

Escher, Christine

299

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH 341 Waldo Hall Corvallis, Oregon 97331  

E-print Network

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH 341 Waldo Hall · Corvallis, Oregon 97331 Telephone 541-737-8906 OSU Undergraduate Researcher of the Year Award The Office of Undergraduate Research seeks nominations for the OSU Undergraduate Researcher of the Year Award. With this recognition, we aim to reward and encourage

Escher, Christine

300

Willamette River Floodplain Restoration, Oregon Ecosystem Restoration Project  

E-print Network

Willamette River Floodplain Restoration, Oregon Ecosystem Restoration Project 18 September 2013 ABSTRACT: The project proposes to restore floodplain ecosystem functions along the Willamette River International River Prize in 2012 as a high profile watershed for restoration and was named an American Heritage

US Army Corps of Engineers

301

Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center  

E-print Network

to be economically viable or production compromises plant health to an unacceptable degree. Dr. Strauss and his co in and extracted from poplar, the first woody plant in which PHB production has been confirmed, with no apparentOregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center Feasibility of Biopolymer Production

Tullos, Desiree

302

Special Education and Student Services in Oregon. 1994 Status Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report on special education services in Oregon provides a statement of what has been accomplished and a baseline measure for use in gauging future progress. It offers a long range plan for special education, focusing on secondary and transition programs, severe emotional disturbance, low incidence populations, family involvement, the talented…

Almond, Patricia, Ed.

303

Septicemic Pasteurellosis in Free-ranging Neonatal Pronghorn in Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of a study to determine the cause(s) of population decline and low survival of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) neonates on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge (HMNAR), Oregon (USA), 55 of 104 neonates captured during May 1996 and 1997 were nec- ropsied (n 28, 1996; n 27, 1997) to deter- mine cause of death. Necropsies were con- ducted on fawns

Mike R. Dunbar; Mark J. Wolcott; Richard B. Rimler; Brenda M. Berlowski

2000-01-01

304

HEALTH EVALUATION OF A PRONGHORN ANTELOPE POPULATION IN OREGON  

Microsoft Academic Search

During 1996 and 1997, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducted a study to determine the cause(s) of population decline and low survival of pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) fawns on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge (HMNAR) located in southeast- ern Oregon (USA). As part of that study, blood, fecal, and tissue samples from 104 neonatal fawns, 40 adult does, and

Mike R. Dunbar; Roser Velarde; Michael A. Gregg; Martin Bray

1999-01-01

305

Impacts of Cattle on Streambanks in North eastern Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Impacts of a Iate season livestock grazhq strategy on stream- bank erosion, morphology, and undercutting were studied for 2 years along Catherine Creek in northeastern Oregon. Streambank loss, disturbance, and undercutting were compared between graz- ing treatments, vegetation type, and stream-meander position. No significant differences were found among vegetation types or stream-meander location. Significantly greater streambank ero- sion and disturbance

J. BOONE KAUFFMAN; W. C. KRUEGER; M. VAVRA

306

Cattle Diets in the Blue Mountains of Oregon II. Forests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Esophagerlly flstulated cows were used on forested range in northeastern Oregon to collect diet samples which were then ana- lyzed by the microhlstological technique. Grasses, forbs, and shrubs averaged 61,16,and 23% of the diet, respectively. Composi- tion of diets differed among years and with seasonal advance. Idaho fescue and elk sedge were the most important forage species consumed. Forbs were

JERRY L. HOLECHEK; MARTIN VAVRA; JON SKOVLIN; WILLIAM C. KRUEGER

307

75 FR 62690 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Grants Pass, Oregon  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DA 10-1805; MB Docket No. 10-117; RM-11601] Radio Broadcasting Services; Grants Pass, Oregon AGENCY...a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. 0 For the reasons discussed in the...

2010-10-13

308

OREGON ECOLOGICAL REGIONS AND SUBREGIONS FOR WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

To aid the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in producing a State Clean Water Strategy and in managing water resources, scientists working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have defined an initial set of regions and subregions of the state with po...

309

Energy-Efficient Schools: Three Case Studies from Oregon.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents case studies of three schools or districts in Oregon that have implemented steps to promote energy efficiency. Steps taken by the schools include daylighting, energy audits, special energy loans, new ventilation design, and sustainable building practices. The facilities described are Ash Creek Intermediate School in…

2003

310

Controlling Tensegrity Robots through Evolution Oregon State University  

E-print Network

Controlling Tensegrity Robots through Evolution Atil Iscen Oregon State University Corvallis, OR.tumer@oregonstate.edu ABSTRACT Tensegrity structures (built from interconnected rods and cables) have the potential to offer shaped tensegrity robot. Experimental results per- formed with a variety of evolutionary algorithms

Tumer, Kagan

311

MARKHAM RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY -Hatfield Marine Science Center  

E-print Network

MARKHAM RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM Agenda OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY - Hatfield Marine Science Center June, Hatfield Marine Science Center PRESENTATION OF 2014 AWARD WINNERS and REPORTS BY PREVIOUS YEAR RECIPIENTS and Isabella Holt Education Fund - intended to foster education in the marine sciences by providing financial

Tullos, Desiree

312

MARKHAM RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY -Hatfield Marine Science Center  

E-print Network

MARKHAM RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM Agenda OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY - Hatfield Marine Science Center June, Hatfield Marine Science Center PRESENTATION OF 2014 AWARD WINNERS and REPORTS BY PREVIOUS YEAR RECIPIENTS engaged in study of marine science at Hatfield Marine Science Center. `13 Recipient Rebecca Hamner

Kurapov, Alexander

313

10 RESEARCH OREGON PORTLAND STATE UNIVEPORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

and the International Space Station. Potential applications for these are improved materials for electronics cooling the PSU facility, or through remote access enabling critical research to take place throughout Oregon into space. Now in PSU's Mas- eeh College of Engineering and Computer Science, he seeks methods to improve

314

2013 SPRING TERM AT THE OREGON INSTITUTE OF MARINE BIOLOGY  

E-print Network

2013 SPRING TERM AT THE OREGON INSTITUTE OF MARINE BIOLOGY April 1 - June 14, 2013 http://www.uoregon.edu/~oimb The University's marine biology station at Charleston is an ideal location for the study of marine systems. Many students majoring in marine biology, biology, general science, environmental science, and environmental

Oregon, University of

315

2014 SPRING TERM AT THE OREGON INSTITUTE OF MARINE BIOLOGY  

E-print Network

2014 SPRING TERM AT THE OREGON INSTITUTE OF MARINE BIOLOGY March 31 - June 13, 2014 http://www.uoregon.edu/~oimb The University's marine biology station at Charleston is an ideal location for the study of marine systems. Many students majoring in marine biology, biology, general science, environmental science, and environmental

316

2013 FALL TERM AT THE OREGON INSTITUTE OF MARINE BIOLOGY  

E-print Network

2013 FALL TERM AT THE OREGON INSTITUTE OF MARINE BIOLOGY September 30 - December 13, 2013 www.uoregon.edu/~oimb The university's marine biology station at Charleston is an ideal location for the study of marine systems. Many students majoring in marine biology, biology, general science, and environmental science. Field trips

Oregon, University of

317

2012 FALL TERM AT THE OREGON INSTITUTE OF MARINE BIOLOGY  

E-print Network

2012 FALL TERM AT THE OREGON INSTITUTE OF MARINE BIOLOGY September 24 - December 7, 2012 www.uoregon.edu/~oimb The university's marine biology station at Charleston is an ideal location for the study of marine systems. Many students majoring in marine biology, biology, general science, and environmental science. Field trips

Oregon, University of

318

CHEMICAL CARCINOGENS IN BIVALVE MOLLUSKS FROM OREGON ESTUARIES  

EPA Science Inventory

The research undertaken involved the use of indigenous populatons of bivalve mollusks as monitors for detecting and quantifying environmental benzo(s)pyrene (BAP) in Oregon estuaries. Short-term and long-term studies were conducted in order to establish baseline levels of BAP and...

319

Sudden Oak Death: Endangering California and Oregon Forest Ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sudden oak death is a new disease affecting tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflora) and oaks (Quercus spp) in California and Oregon, caused by the recently described pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. It has reached epi-demic proportions in several counties in central California, leading to the death of tens of thousands of trees. In addition to oaks and tanoak, P ramorum has been found in

David M. Rizzo; Matteo Garbelotto

2003-01-01

320

A tunnel runs through it: an inside view of the Tualatin Mountains, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Tualatin Mountains form a northwest-striking ridge about 350 m high that separates Portland, Oregon, from the cities of the Tualatin Valley to the west. Known informally as the Portland Hills, the ridge is a late Cenozoic anticline, bounded by reverse faults that dip toward the anticlinal axis. The anticline is a broad, open fold consisting chiefly of Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group, with remnants of Miocene-Pliocene Troutdale Formation and Pleistocene basalt of the Boring Volcanic Field on the flanks of the anticline. Anticlinal structures similar to the Tualatin Mountains are characteristic of the northern Willamette Valley, where the structures accommodate margin-parallel shortening of the Cascadia fore arc. Global Positioning System (GPS) results indicate that the shortening is due to the northward motion of Oregon at several millimeters per year with respect to stable North America. Some of the uplifts may contain active faults, but the structures are poorly exposed and are overlain by thick Pleistocene loess and Missoula flood deposits. Between 1993 and 1998, construction of the 3-mile-long (4500-m-long) TriMet MAX Light Rail tunnel through the Tualatin Mountains provided an unusual opportunity to investigate the geological structure and history of the Tualatin Mountains. This report is a collaborative effort among the tunnel geologists and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to document the geologic story and quantify late Cenozoic and Quaternary deformation rates of the Tualatin Mountains.

Walsh, Ken; Peterson, Gary L.; Beeson, Marvin H.; Wells, Ray E.; Fleck, Robert J.; Evarts, Russell C.; Duvall, Alison; Blakely, Richard J.; Burns, Scott

2011-01-01

321

Preliminary Geologic Map of Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The late Pleistocene and Holocene rear-arc Newberry Volcano is located in central Oregon east of the Cascades arc axis. Total area covered by the broad, shield-shaped edifice and its accompanying lava field is about 3,200 square kilometers, encompassing all or part of 38 U.S.G.S. 1:24,000-scale quadrangles. Distance from the northernmost extent of lava flows to the southernmost is about 115 km; east-west maximum width is less than 50 km. A printed version of the preliminary map at its intended publication scale of 1:50,000 is 8 ft high by 4 ft wide. More than 200 units have been identified so far, each typically consisting of the lava flow(s) and accompanying vent(s) that represent single eruptive episodes, some of which extend 10’s of kilometers across the edifice. Vents are commonly aligned north-northwest to north-northeast, reflecting a strong regional tectonic influence. The largest individual units on the map are basaltic, some extending nearly 50 km to the north through the cities of Bend and Redmond from vents low on the northern flank of the volcano. The oldest and most distal of the basalts is dated at about 350 ka. Silicic lava flows and domes are confined to the main edifice of the volcano; the youngest rhyolite flows are found within Newberry Caldera, including the rhyolitic Big Obsidian Flow, the youngest flow at Newberry Volcano (~1,300 yr B.P.). The oldest known rhyolite dome is dated at about 400 ka. Andesite units (those with silica contents between 57% and 63%) are the least common, with only 13 recognized to date. The present 6.5 by 8 km caldera formed about 75 ka with the eruption of compositionally-zoned rhyolite to basaltic andesite ash-flow tuff. Older widespread silicic ash-flow tuffs imply previous caldera collapses. Approximately 20 eruptions have occurred at Newberry since ice melted off the volcano in latest Pleistocene time. The mapping is being digitally compiled as a spatial geodatabase in ArcGIS. Within the geodatabase, feature classes have been created representing geologic lines (contacts, faults, lava tubes, etc.), geologic unit polygons, and volcanic vent location points. The geodatabase can be queried to determine the spatial distributions of different rock types, geologic units, and other geologic and geomorphic features. Map colors are being used to indicate compositions. Some map patterns have been added to distinguish the youngest lavas and the ash-flow tuffs. Geodatabase information can be used to better understand the evolution, growth, and potential hazards of the volcano.

Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Ramsey, D. W.; Jensen, R. A.; Champion, D. E.; Calvert, A. T.

2010-12-01

322

Long-term surveillance plan for the Collins Ranch disposal site, Lakeview, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Collins Ranch disposal site, Lakeview, Oregon, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal cell. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

Not Available

1994-08-01

323

Long-term surveillance plan for the Collins Ranch Disposal Site, Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Lakeview (Collins Ranch) disposal cell, which will be referred to as the Collins Ranch disposal cell throughout this document. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or an Indian tribe, and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

Not Available

1993-12-01

324

Increasing Diversity in the Earth Sciences (IDES) - An Oregon Effort  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The IDES (Increasing Diversity in Earth Sciences) Program is the first partnership of its kind in the state of Oregon targeted at broadening participation in the Earth Science enterprise. Funded by the National Science Foundation Opportunities to Enhance Diversity in the Geosciences program (NSF-OEDG), this partnership involves community colleges, a research university with major strengths in Earth Science research and education and an institutionalized commitment to enhancing diversity, state and federal agencies, centers of informal education, and the Oregon Space Grant Consortium, IDES has two integrated goals: 1) to increase the number of students from under-represented groups who pursue careers in Earth Science research and education, and 2) to strengthen the understanding of Earth Sciences and their relevance to society among broad and diverse segments of the population. Built around the best practices of tiered mentoring, interactive student cohort, research and education internships, and financial support, this 4-year program recruits 10 to 12 students (mainly rising juniors) each year from science majors at Oregon State University and five Oregon community colleges. The program is reaching its goals by: a) training participants in the application of geospatial to Earth Science problems of personal relevance b) immersing participants in a two-year mentored research project that involves summer internships with academic units, state and federal agencies, and centers for informal education in Oregon. c) exposing, educating, and involving participants in the breadth of Earth Science careers through contact with Earth Science professionals through mentors, a professional internship, and a learning community that includes a speaker series. d) instilling an understanding of context and relevance of the Earth Science Enterprise to the participants, their families, their communities, and the general public. We report on the first two years of this program during which 20 participants have been involved and significant feedback has been received.

de Silva, S. L.; Duncan, R. A.; Wright, D. J.; de Silva, L.; Guerrero, E. F.

2011-12-01

325

Investigating the Processes of Crust Formation and Intraplate Continental Volcanism in the High Lava Plains, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

East of the southern Cascades is an area of voluminous Late-Cenozoic volcanism built on an immature crustal section accreted to North America in the Mesozoic. With the exception of the Snake River Plain, the High Lava Plains (HLP) of eastern Oregon has been the most volcanically active area in the western United States in the late Cenozoic. Through much of this area, the oldest exposed basement is early Miocene intermediate composition volcanic rocks. Beginning at approximately 16.5 Ma, the HLP was blanketed with flood basalts from both the Steens and Columbia River eruptive centers. The flood basalt era was followed by a time- progressive migration of large silicic centers beginning near the Oregon-Nevada-Idaho borders and extending to the present day activity at Newberry volcano. Quaternary basaltic volcanism is scattered along this whole trend, making the HLP more of a hot-line than a hot-spot. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed to explain this activity including: outflow of the Yellowstone plume-head, back-arc spreading, lithosphere delamination, Basin and Range extension, and asthenospheric inflow around the northward migrating edge of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. These models make distinct predictions about the flow patterns and temperature structure of the shallow mantle underlying this area, but geophysical information capable of discriminating these models is sparse to absent. To remedy this situation and better define the causes of the voluminous volcanism in this area, the HLP project, funded by the NSF Continental Dynamics program, has initiated a multi-level broadband and active-source seismic study combined with field geology, geochemistry, petrology, geochronology and 3D geodynamic modeling of an area reaching from the southern Cascades across eastern Oregon into Idaho and northernmost Nevada. The seismic part of the project employs very dense station spacing that will provide high-resolution images of the crust and upper 100 km of the mantle, where USArray has only poor resolution. The geochemistry and petrology of the HLP volcanic rocks suggest that most of the magmatism originates in this shallow portion of the mantle and has substantially added to and modified the thin crust of the HLP.

Carlson, R. W.; James, D. E.; Fouch, M. J.; Grove, T. L.; Hart, W. K.; Grunder, A. L.; Duncan, R. A.; Keller, G. R.; Harder, S. H.; Kincaid, C. R.

2006-12-01

326

The Oregon Conference Monograph 1995. Volume 7. [Proceedings of a Conference (Eugene, Oregon, February 2-4, 1995).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph presents 23 papers presented at a 1995 Oregon conference which focused on students in trouble due to disabilities or context problems. Paper titles and authors are: "Identifying Students Who Have Learning Disabilities" (Barbara D. Bateman and David J. Chard); "ADHD: A Teachers' Guide" (Rosalyn A. Templeton); "Knowledge about the…

Deffenbaugh, Abe, Ed.; And Others

327

How to Become an Oregon Teacher: An Advising Guide to Teacher Preparation Programs in the State of Oregon  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this Advising Guide is to assist pre-college, community college, college, and university students and faculties in understanding the admission and program requirements in becoming a teacher in Oregon. The Guide is designed to help prospective teachers know where to start, what is involved, how to become involved, and who to contact…

Oregon University System, 2006

2006-01-01

328

A program of the College of Arts and Sciences and its Department of Economics 2013 University of Oregon. All rights reserved.  

E-print Network

University of Oregon. All rights reserved. Released: May 8, 2013. Contact Timothy A. Duy Director, Oregon Economic Forum Department of Economics, University of Oregon 541-346-4660 · duy@uoregon.edu econforum

Oregon, University of

329

A program of the College of Arts and Sciences and its Department of Economics 2013 University of Oregon. All rights reserved.  

E-print Network

University of Oregon. All rights reserved. Released: August 8, 2013. Contact Timothy A. Duy Director, Oregon Economic Forum Department of Economics, University of Oregon 541-346-4660 · duy@uoregon.edu econforum

Oregon, University of

330

A program of the College of Arts and Sciences and its Department of Economics 2013 University of Oregon. All rights reserved.  

E-print Network

University of Oregon. All rights reserved. Released: July 10, 2013. Contact Timothy A. Duy Director, Oregon Economic Forum Department of Economics, University of Oregon 541-346-4660 · duy@uoregon.edu econforum

Oregon, University of

331

A program of the College of Arts and Sciences and its Department of Economics 2012 University of Oregon. All rights reserved.  

E-print Network

University of Oregon. All rights reserved. Released: June 6, 2012. Contact Timothy A. Duy Director, Oregon Economic Forum Department of Economics, University of Oregon 541-346-4660 · duy@uoregon.edu econforum

Oregon, University of

332

A program of the College of Arts and Sciences and its Department of Economics 2012 University of Oregon. All rights reserved.  

E-print Network

University of Oregon. All rights reserved. Released: August 8, 2012. Contact Timothy A. Duy Director, Oregon Economic Forum Department of Economics, University of Oregon 541-346-4660 · duy@uoregon.edu econforum

Oregon, University of

333

A program of the College of Arts and Sciences and its Department of Economics 2013 University of Oregon. All rights reserved.  

E-print Network

University of Oregon. All rights reserved. Released: June 4, 2013. Contact Timothy A. Duy Director, Oregon Economic Forum Department of Economics, University of Oregon 541-346-4660 · duy@uoregon.edu econforum

Oregon, University of

334

Reconciling Oregon's Smart Growth goals with local policy choice| An empirical study of growth management, urban form, and development outcomes in Eugene, Keizer, Salem, and Springfield.  

E-print Network

?? Oregon’s Statewide Planning Goals embody Smart Growth in their effort to revitalize urban areas, finance environmentally responsible transportation systems, provide housing options, and protect… (more)

Witzig, Monica C.

2014-01-01

335

Paleoseismology of Crack-in-the-Ground Fault, Central Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Central Oregon exhibits both extensive active faulting and Quaternary volcanism, yet the relations between them are complex and poorly constrained. The N15W striking North Christmas Valley fault system is a Basin and Range type structure offsetting High Lava Plains volcanics forming a ~3 km wide graben that bounds Christmas Lake. Several young volcanic vents, including Green Mountain (GM), Four Craters (4C), and East Lava Field, are aligned parallel with and bounded by the graben. We focus on Crack-in-the-Ground (CITG) fault which vertically displaces the GM and FC basalts. The GM basalt is dated at 740 +/- 59 ka by 40Ar/39Ar (Jordan, 2002). Our preliminary dating of the 4C basalt yields an average age of 12 +/- 2 ka, determined by cosmogenic 3He exposure dating of olivine from flow surfaces. Since emplacement of the GM basalts, the fault has developed a ~10 m hanging wall monocline and a vertical hinge crack which yields the 0.013 mm/yr slip rate suggested in Jordan (2002). The 4C basalt has also been cracked by the CITG fault, producing a 30 +/-10 cm vertical offset. A trench excavated across a section of CITG exposed the stratigraphy of the upper 2.25 m. The upper 1.25 m is a modern soil developed on ~7 ka Mt. Mazama ash. The whole unit is offset ~12 cm as the result of a presumed co-seismic graben structure in the crack. The lower one meter is a palesol developed on windblown sandy silt. The 4C cinder cones may have produced a basaltic tephra that is not seen in the trench, therefore we think the lower unit is post-4C. The paleo-surface has a shallow east dip caused by co-seismic deformation. The two events seen in the trench are likely post-4C, suggesting the 4C offset is cumulative between two events, yielding a slip rate of 0.025 mm/yr. Comparison of the two slip rates suggests an increased slip rate post-4C. Our results are consistent with a potential volcano-tectonic relationship in which slip rate increased during the Late Pleistocene associated with volcanism of the High Lava Plains.

Castonguay, S. R.; Mackey, B. H.; Weldon, R. J.

2011-12-01

336

Migration of a Caldera Eruptive Center, Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Newberry Volcano is located in Deschutes County, Oregon about 35 km south of the city of Bend. It is a bi-modal Quaternary volcano and is one of the largest volcanos in the Cascade Range. The volcano is positioned near the junction of three geologic provinces: the Cascade Range to the west, the High Lava Plains portion of the Basin and Range to the south and east, and the Blue Mountains to the northeast. Newberry Volcano has been active for the past 600,000 years and has had at least two caldera-forming eruptions. The most recent major caldera-related eruptions, resulting in significant silicic ash and pyroclastic deposits, occurred approximately 300,000 and 80,000 years ago. A large-volume basaltic eruption that occurred about 72,000 years ago is represented by the widespread Bend Lavas which extend approximately 70 km to the north of the central caldera. About 6,000 years ago numerous basaltic eruptions occurred along a northwest fracture zone. The most recent eruption, a silicic obsidian flow and associated pumice fall that vented from within the caldera, has been dated at 1,300 ybp. Newberry has been the site of multiple rounds of geothermal exploration over the past 30 years. Geophysical data including gravity, resistivity, and seismic studies collected in the 1980s in early exploration of the volcano have identified anomalous features beneath the west flank of the volcano. Four deep (<2.8km) wells have been drilled on the northern half of the west flank; all of the wells have encountered temperatures in excess of 300°C, however, three of the wells have low permeability and unconnected fractures. The fourth well showed evidence of a hydrothermal system, but the well caved before a flow test could be completed. Recent geophysical analysis coupled with well geochemistry has identified evidence for older nested caldera related eruptive events buried under younger west flank lavas. A strong gravity gradient, a sharp MT boundary, and arcuate surface features from LIDAR coupled with 300-1200m offsets in units between wells is evidence that the caldera has migrated to the east over time. Buried silicic lavas are observed on the west flank; these lavas include McKay Butte, West Flank Dome, and Southwest Flank Dome. If this conclusion is correct, buried volcanic features similar to those observed in the present caldera could be expected under portions of the west flank, now buried by subsequent volcanic units. Hydrothermal systems, as exposed by erosion in older caldera mineral deposits, may be found associated with these features at Newberry.

Frone, Z.; Waibel, A.; Blackwell, D. D.

2012-12-01

337

76 FR 315 - Sisters Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Oregon; Popper Vegetation Management Project  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Sisters Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Oregon; Popper Vegetation Management Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare...

2011-01-04

338

Fire ecology and management in plant communities of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, southeastern Oregon.  

E-print Network

??This research assesses prescribed burning as a habitat management technique in wetlands and associated upland communities of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, southeastern Oregon. Experimental burns… (more)

Young, Richard P.

1986-01-01

339

Leadership and Legacy: Athletics and the University of Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The history of athletics at the University of Oregon is the primary subject of this site created by the University of Oregon Libraries' Special Collections and University Archives department. While telling the basic story of this history is important, the site also tells "the story of athletics in higher education." Visitors can peruse topics that include "The Track and Field Legacy", "The University's Response to Title IX", and "The University's Approach to Changes in Athletics". Within each section, visitors can view photos and other original documentary materials that tell the story of such luminaries as track legend Steve Prefontaine and others. Additionally, visitors can view their highly interactive timeline of events, which features options that allow users to toggle various sports on and off as they move through time. As expected, those who know what they are looking for can also search the collection by keyword.

340

Developing the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education: the back story.  

PubMed

The Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education (OCNE) is a collaborative partnership between community colleges and a multicampus university in Oregon that developed in response to an emerging nursing shortage and changing health needs in the population. OCNE has created a redesigned curriculum with shared agreements for academic standards, admission, and seamless transition from associate to baccalaureate programs. Although the schools share pedagogical resources, curriculum, and standards, each partner school retains autonomy and accountability for its degree program. The creation and continued development of the consortium required the participation of people from multiple organizations with diverse concerns. Through a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded evaluation of OCNE, this retrospective analysis was conducted to describe the process of consensus building that resulted in OCNE and to provide an explanatory framework for the benefit of others who are seeking to redesign nursing education in their communities. PMID:23910920

Gaines, Barbara C; Spencer, Angela G

2013-01-01

341

Organochlorine residues and shell thinning in Oregon seabird eggs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A single egg was collected at 62 nests of 10 seabird species from Oregon in 1979. The eggs were analyzed for organochlorine contaminants; contemporary shell thickness was compared with eggshells collected during earlier time periods. Concentrations of DDE and PCB's in 1979 were generally low with the most contaminated species being the Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus), Leach's Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa), and Forktailed Storm Petrel (O. furcata). Limited eggshell data provide evidence that shell thinning was more severe along the Oregon coast in the 1950's than in 1979. With the possible exception of the Fork-tailed Storm Petrel, the residues in 1979 posed no known threat to the welfare of the species.

Henny, C.J.; Blus, L.J.; Prouty, R.M.

1982-01-01

342

Blood parasites in sage-grouse from Nevada and Oregon.  

PubMed

Peripheral blood smears from 196 adult and yearling female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were examined for blood parasites (167 from the breeding and 29 from the brood-rearing season) to determine prevalence of blood parasites, to attempt to correlate infection with chick survival, and to establish base-line values of prevalence in sage-grouse from Nevada and Oregon (USA). Birds were captured and released on two study areas during 1999-2001; Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) in northwestern Nevada, and Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge (HMNAR) in southeastern Oregon. Birds from a third study area, Beaty's Butte grazing allotment (BB) in southeastern Oregon, were sampled in 2000 and 2001. Overall, 19 birds (10%) were positive for Leucocytozoon lovati (= L. bonasae), 1 (0.5%) for Plasmodium pedioecetii, and 2 (1%) for microfilariae. Although prevalence of L. lovati on HMNAR was 39% during the breeding season in 1999 and 100% during the brood-rearing season in 2000, statistically, prevalence of L. lovati among study areas and years was not different. However, there were statistical differences between capture periods. Overall, 31% of the hens were positive for L. lovati during the brood-rearing season compared to 6% during the breeding season. There was no difference in packed cell volume between infected and non-infected birds and no difference between age-classes. However, mean sage-grouse productivity on HMNAR was higher (1.6 chicks/hen) for non-infected (n = 10) compared to infected hens (0.7 chicks/hen; n = 7), during 1999. Based on these limited observations on HMNAR in 1999, the possible effects that L. lovati may have on young sage-grouse could be detrimental to sage-grouse populations in Nevada and Oregon. PMID:12685084

Dunbar, Mike R; Tornquist, Susan; Giordano, Mark R

2003-01-01

343

BLOOD PARASITES IN SAGE-GROUSE FROM NEVADA AND OREGON  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peripheral blood smears from 196 adult and yearling female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were examined for blood parasites (167 from the breeding and 29 from the brood-rearing season) to determine prevalence of blood parasites, to attempt to correlate infection with chick survival, and to establish base-line values of prevalence in sage-grouse from Nevada and Oregon (USA). Birds were captured and

Mike R. Dunbar; Susan Tornquist; Mark R. Giordano

2003-01-01

344

Passive solar in the city: 93 townhouses near Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Two speculative condominium projects using passive solar space heating are under construction. Casa del Sol, with 58 townhouse units, uses a direct gain and mass wall hybrid system. Crystal Park, with 35 townhouses, uses direct gain and greenhouses. The dwellings are of wood frame construction with brick and water providing thermal storage. Both projects stand at 10 units per acre within the city limits of Lake Oswego, which shares a common border with Portland, Oregon.

Shea, M.

1981-01-01

345

DIETS AND FORAGING BEHAVIOR OF NORTHERN SPOTTED OWLS IN OREGON  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe local, regional, and annual variation in diets of northern Spotted Owls (Stnx occidaatalis caurina) in Oregon based on 24 497 prey collected at 11 18 owl territories in 1970-2003. The sample included 91.5% mammals, 4.3% birds, 4.1% insects, and 0.1% other prey. The diet included 2131 species, including 49 mammals, 41 birds, 3 reptiles, 1 frog, 1 crayfish,

ERIC D. FORSMAN; ROBERT G. ANTHONY; E. CHARLES ME SLOW; CYNTHIA J. ZABEL

346

14. 'TROOP A, OREGON CAVALRY IN CAMP AT PRESIDIO OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. 'TROOP A, OREGON CAVALRY IN CAMP AT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA, 1915.' Anton C. Heidrick, photographer. This panoramic view looks west from the lower end of Soldier Field, before construction of walls and roads. Original warm toned silver gelatin print measures 94.9 cm by 19.7 cm, flush mounted on mat board. - Presidio of Monterey, Soldier Field, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

347

Ultraviolet radiation and bio-optics in Crater Lake, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crater Lake, Oregon, is a mid-latitude caldera lake famous for its depth (594 m) and blue color. Recent underwater spectral\\u000a measurements of solar radiation (300–800 nm) support earlier observations of unusual transparency and extend these to UV-B\\u000a wavelengths. New data suggest that penetration of solar UVR into Crater Lake has a significant ecological impact. Evidence\\u000a includes a correlation between water column chlorophyll-a

B. R. Hargreaves; S. F. Girdner; M. W. Buktenica; R. W. Collier; E. Urbach; G. L. Larson

2007-01-01

348

Ultraviolet radiation and bio-optics in Crater Lake, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crater Lake, Oregon, is a mid-latitude caldera lake famous for its depth (594 m) and blue color. Recent underwater spectral\\u000a measurements of solar radiation (300–800 nm) support earlier observations of unusual transparency and extend these to UV-B\\u000a wavelengths. New data suggest that penetration of solar UVR into Crater Lake has a significant ecological impact. Evidence\\u000a includes a correlation between water

B. R. Hargreaves; S. F. Girdner; M. W. Buktenica; R. W. Collier; E. Urbach; G. L. Larson

349

Surveillance of sylvatic plaque in Oregon by serotesting carnivores.  

PubMed Central

In Oregon, during 1974-1979, 10.3 per cent of 3.255 statewide blood samples from carnivores were positive for Yersinia pestis. The per cent positive rate and geometric mean positive titer increase monthly from January (6.5 per cent) to June (21.7 per cent), and decline thereafter. Data are presented on how geographic location, species, and time of year affect surveillance results. The correlation of carnivore plague surveillance with human cases in discussed. PMID:7125037

Hopkins, D D; Gresbrink, R A

1982-01-01

350

Ocular Zoonotic Onchocerca Infection in a Resident of Oregon  

PubMed Central

A long, slender filarial nematode was removed from the left anterior chamber of a resident of Oregon after several days of pain and blurred vision. The worm was identified as an Onchocerca, but it could not be further identified. This worm is the third zoonotic Onchocerca removed from the anterior chamber and the second case reported from the United States. Cases of zoonotic onchocerciasis continue to garner attention, and those cases affecting the eye are of particular interest. PMID:23109373

Eberhard, Mark L.; Sims, Annette C.; Bishop, Henry S.; Mathison, Blaine A.; Hoffman, Richard S.

2012-01-01

351

Habitat and host associations of Craterellus tubaeformis in northwestern Oregon.  

PubMed

Knowledge of the habitat and host associations of Craterellus tubaeformis (winter chanterelle) is the key to understanding the ecological characteristics needed for its conservation. In this study, a survey of forest types in northwestern Oregon for mycorrhizal associates is performed and the hypotheses that stand age and the volume of well-decayed, coarse, woody debris (CWD) are significant to the standing crop biomass and the probability of C. tubaeformis occurrence are tested. Host associations were identified with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) typing. Habitat associations were tested by measurements on 64 plots in the Coast and Cascade Ranges of northwestern Oregon. Data analysis found that stand age and well-decayed, coarse, woody debris were related significantly to the probability of C. tubaeformis occurrence but not to standing crop biomass. Results indicated the volume of well-decayed CWD is particularly important to the probability of C. tubaeformis occurrence in stands less than 100 yr of age. Well-decayed CWD was the substratum for 88% of C. tubaeformis sporocarps across all stands, despite the fact that ground area coverage of CWD ranged only from 3 to 26%. Slope, elevation and aspect were not related to the probability of C. tubaeformis occurrence or standing crop biomass. The occurrence of C. tubaeformis in northwestern Oregon is highly correlated to the presence of western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), and their mycorrhizal association was confirmed. Craterellus tubaeformis also can form mycorrhizae with Douglasfir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) but is encountered only rarely in stands without a hemlock component. In northwestern Oregon, the presence of Hydnum spp. in a stand is a good indicator of the presence of C. tubaeformis. Differences in genetic sequences between C. tubaeformis populations in western North America, eastern North America and Europe suggest the likelihood of several distinct species. PMID:21148873

Trappe, M J

2004-01-01

352

HOMESTEAD, LAKE FORK, AND LICK CREEK ROADLESS AREAS, OREGON.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mineral survey concluded that the Homestead, Lake Fork and Lick Creek Roadless Area, Oregon offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the bedrock. Probable mineral-resource potential is assigned to the west and north parts of the Lake Fork Roadless Area, where gold resources may occur in glacial deposits and alluvium transported into this area from sources outside the roadless area to the west.

Evans, James G.; Conyac, Martin D.

1984-01-01

353

Black bear damage to lodgepole pine in central Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Black bear damage to 108 lodgepole pine trees was found in mixed conifer habitat in central Oregon. No trees of three other conifer species were injured. Eighty-nine percent of the damage occurred in the same year. Nearly 20% of the freshly damaged trees had bark removed from more than 75% of the circumference and, judging from the fate of trees damaged in prior years, probably succumbed.

Barnes, V.G., Jr.; Engeman, R.M.

1995-01-01

354

Cattle Diets in the Blue Mountains of Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Esophagerlly flstulated cows were used on forested range in northeastern Oregon to collect diet samples which were then ana- lyzed by the microhlstological technique. Grasses, forbs, and shrubs averaged 61,16,and 23% of the diet, respectively. Composi- tion of diets differed among,years and with seasonal advance. Idaho fescue and elk sedge were the most important forage species consumed. Forbs were

Ii. Forests; Jerry L. Holechek; Martin Vavra; Jon Skovlin; William C. Krueger

355

Hotspots of deep ocean mixing on the Oregon continental slope  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two deep ocean hotspots of turbulent mixing were found over the Oregon continental slope. Thorpe-scale analyses indicate time-averaged turbulent energy dissipation rates of $\\\\epsilon$ > 10?7 W\\/kg and eddy diffusivities of K? ? 10?2 m2\\/s at both hotspots. However, the structure of turbulence and its generation mechanism at each site appear to be different. At the 2200-m isobath, sustained >100-m

J. D. Nash; M. H. Alford; E. Kunze; K. Martini; S. Kelly

2007-01-01

356

Bull Trout Life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Factors in Central and Northeast Oregon. Annual Report 1996.  

SciTech Connect

This study is part of a multi-year research project studying aspects of bull trout life history, ecology and genetics. This report covers the activities of the project in 1996. Results and analysis are presented in the following five areas: (1) analysis of the genetic structure of Oregon bull trout populations; (2) distribution and habitat use of bull trout and brook trout in streams containing both species; (3) bull trout spawning surveys; (4) summary and analysis of historical juvenile bull trout downstream migrant trap catches in the Grande Ronde basin; and (5) food habits and feeding behavior of bull trout alone and in sympatry with brook trout.

Bellerud, Blane L.; Gunckel, Stephanie; Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Buchanan, David V.; Howell, Philip J.

1997-10-01

357

A program of the College of Arts and Sciences and its Department of Economics 2013 University of Oregon. All rights reserved.  

E-print Network

to weigh on that region's measure of activity. The Salem area continues to hold the middle ground regions improved over the past year. Contact Timothy A. Duy Director, Oregon Economic Forum Department Employment 0.05 -0.03 -0.07 -0.02 0.10 Civilian Labor Force 0.03 -0.07 0.00 -0.02 0.02 Unemployment Rate -0

Oregon, University of

358

Maturation anomalies in Cretaceous sediments underlying volcanic plateaus in Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Vitrinite reflectance profiles from three drill holes in Oregon, supplemented by independent data from Oregon and northern California, suggest that a thick sequence of volcanics may lead to a significant thermal input into underlying sediments. Anomalous, nearly vertical maturation profiles, in sedimentary sequences over 4000 ft thick, imply that large volumes of mature source rocks may lie under the volcanic cover of the Pacific Northwest. Several factors may be involved in this vertical homogenization of the temperature field. Although a convective hydrothermal mechanism would be the most effective form of thermal input, this is not considered to be the dominant mechanism due to the low permeabilities of the volcanogenic sediments underlying the volcanics. However, the cooling of intrusive and extrusive volcanics, thermal slip at abrupt changes in lithology, and exothermic hydration reactions of the altering volcanics can all be considered viable mechanisms for the thermal input. These mechanisms can lead to the uniform maturation of the entire sedimentary column and may account for the gas fields in Mist, Oregon. There, poor and immature source rocks give no indication of the actual origin of the gas. However, a mature sedimentary column underlying volcanic cover to the north and east could provide a plausible source for the gas. Other settings in which potentially hydrocarbon-bearing sediments underlie volcanics occur elsewhere in the US, and in India, Argentina, Brazil, Russia, and eastern and southern Africa.

Summer, N.S.; Verosub, K.L.

1986-04-01

359

Oregon Hydrologic Landscapes: An Approach for Broadscale Hydrologic Classification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gaged streams represent only a small percentage of watershed hydrologic conditions throughout the Unites States and globe, but there is a growing need for hydrologic classification systems that can serve as the foundation for broad-scale assessments of the hydrologic functions of landscapes and watersheds. I present a hydrologic landscape (HL) classification approach for Oregon based on factors of climate-watershed systems that control the hydrologic characteristics of watersheds. More than 5000 assessment units (incremental watersheds - headwater watersheds or areas draining directly into streams reaches) were delineated across the state. Each assessment unit was classified according to indices of annual climate, climate seasonality, aquifer permeability, terrain, and soil permeability. To determine the usefulness of HLs in estimating stream hydrologic behavior, 30 streams with long-term streamflow gauging records and without major diversions and impoundments were identified. K-mean cluster analysis was used to create independent groups of streams based on the shapes of their annual hydrographs. Comparison of the stream clusters and HL distributions within watersheds of the clusters showed that the Oregon HL approach has the ability to provide information about the expected hydrologic behavior of HLs and larger streams based on watershed HL composition. The HL conceptual framework developed for Oregon, has potential to serve as the basis for comparing hydrologic attributes of watersheds and streams across broad areas such as the Pacific Northwest or United States.

Wigington, P. J.

2012-12-01

360

Hello! Welcome to the University of Oregon and the Inside Architecture FIG! We hope your summer has been wonderful and cannot wait to hear all about your adventures when  

E-print Network

Hello! Welcome to the University of Oregon and the Inside Architecture FIG! We hope your summer has been wonderful and cannot wait to hear all about your adventures when we meet in the fall as a university student. Throughout the term we will have study sessions, social activities to get to know each

Oregon, University of

361

77 FR 33303 - Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon...the handling of tart cherries grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon...20 and 21, 2011, in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and a second public hearing held...

2012-06-06

362

Success Is in the Details. No Element of Tech Prep Escapes the Fine-Tuned Planning of Oregon's Design Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Articles describe elements of Oregon's' tech prep program: "New Software Helps Students Visualize a Career Path" (Buhl); "Bridge Construction Ahead" (Roach); and "To Track Students, Oregon Goes to the Bar" (Dutson). (JOW)

Buhl, Cheryl L.; And Others

1995-01-01

363

50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Lewiston Dam (Lewiston Reservoir). Salmon 18010210 Siskiyou (CA) Lower...

2012-10-01

364

50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Lewiston Dam (Lewiston Reservoir). Salmon 18010210 Siskiyou (CA) Lower...

2010-10-01

365

50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Lewiston Dam (Lewiston Reservoir). Salmon 18010210 Siskiyou (CA) Lower...

2011-10-01

366

50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Lewiston Dam (Lewiston Reservoir). Salmon 18010210 Siskiyou (CA) Lower...

2013-10-01

367

78 FR 43827 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon, Except Malheur County...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon, except Malheur County...at: http://www.regulations.gov. All comments submitted in response to this...

2013-07-22

368

33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. 165.1322 Section 165...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS...Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated...

2010-07-01

369

33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. 165.1323 Section 165...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS...Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. (a) Location....

2010-07-01

370

Neogene explosive volcanism of the Central Oregon Cascades: Implications for an evolving arc  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although the Quaternary volcanism of the Oregon High Cascades is relatively well documented, less is known about the pre-Quaternary record. The Deschutes Basin, located in central Oregon east of the present Cascade Arc, preserves a remarkable record of Neogene volcanism in the central Cascades. Deposits in the Simtustus (15.5 to 12 Ma) and Deschutes (~7.5 to 4 Ma) formations contain significant distal deposits related to explosive silicic volcanism. These extensive records suggest that the arc may have been more productive during this period, however little is known about the detailed timing and geochemistry of the deposits. Our research aims to constrain the age, volume and geochemistry of major Neogene explosive eruptions within the Oregon Cascade arc. Over 70 individual pumice fall and 28 laterally extensive ignimbrite units are preserved within the basin, and current efforts are focused on correlation of these using field observations and geochemical measurements. Initial work on several of the larger ignimbrite units suggests minimum eruptive volumes of 3-7 km3 DRE, with sources in the Mount Jefferson and Three Sisters regions. Major element data from pumice glasses show that erupted compositions are typically bimodal, with banded pumice and zoned pumice/ash falls also attesting to the importance of mixing, recharge and eruption of zoned magma chambers. Glass compositions can range between 52% and 72% (by weight) SiO2 within a single eruption. Data also show that magma compositions are more Fe rich at a given SiO2 than Quaternary Cascade eruptives. This suggests some similarities with intraplate rhyolites, possibly as a result of melting of basaltic crust to produce silicic magmas during the initial stage of High Cascade rifting. Further studies will seek to constrain the volumes and ages of late Neogene silicic eruptions and document major and trace element compositions of these eruptive products. This work will expand the record of explosive activity in the Central Cascades, and provide insight into the transition from the earlier Neogene phases of High Cascades volcanism to the modern arc. This will allow us to examine changes in volcanism related to changes in convergence rate, slab-dip angle, crustal age, degree of on-arc extension and arc system maturity. A more complete understanding of the early Cascadian arc will also allow for comparisons to other arc systems world-wide.

Pitcher, B. W.; Kent, A. J.; Grunder, A.; Duncan, R. A.; Eungard, D. W.

2013-12-01

371

Geologic Map of the Camas Quadrangle, Clark County, Washington, and Multnomah County, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Camas 7.5' quadrangle is in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon approximately 20 km east of Portland. The map area, bisected by the Columbia River, lies on the eastern margin of the Portland Basin, which is part of the Puget-Willamette Lowland that separates the Cascade Range from the Oregon Coast Range. Since late Eocene time, the Cascade Range has been the locus of an episodically active volcanic arc associated with underthrusting of oceanic lithosphere beneath the North American continent along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Bedrock consists largely of basalt and basaltic andesite flows that erupted during late Oligocene time from one or more vents located outside the map area. These rocks crop out only north of the Columbia River: at the base of Prune Hill in Camas, where they dip southward at about 5?; and east of Lacamas Creek, where they dip to the southeast at 15 to 30?. The volcanic bedrock is unconformably overlain by Neogene sediments that accumulated as the Portland Basin subsided. In the Camas quadrangle, most of these sediments consist of basaltic hyaloclastic debris generated in the volcanic arc to the east and carried into the Portland Basin by the ancestral Columbia River. The dominant structures in the map area are northwest-striking dextral strike-slip faults that offset the Paleogene basin floor as well as the lower part of the basin fill. The Oligocene rocks at Prune Hill and to the east were uplifted in late Pliocene to early Pleistocene time within a restraining bend along one of these dextral faults. In Pleistocene time, basaltic andesite flows issued from a volcano centered on the west side of Prune Hill; another flow entered the map area from the east. These flows are part of the Boring volcanic field, which comprises several dozen late Pliocene and younger monogenetic volcanoes scattered throughout the greater Portland region. In latest Pleistocene time, the Missoula floods of glacial-outburst origin inundated the Portland Basin. The floods deposited huge bars of poorly sorted gravel in the lee of Prune Hill and west of the Sandy River. Volcanic debris from Mount Hood form a prominent delta at the mouth of the Sandy River. This map is a contribution to a program designed to improve geologic knowledge of the Portland Basin region of the Pacific Northwest urban corridor, the densely populated Cascadia forearc region of western Washington and Oregon. More detailed information on the bedrock and surficial geology of the basin and its surrounding area is necessary to refine assessments of seismic risk, ground-failure hazards and resource availability in this rapidly growing region.

Evarts, Russell C.; O'Connor, Jim E.

2008-01-01

372

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2002-12-01

373

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.  

SciTech Connect

The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2001-03-01

374

CONTRIBUTION OF WILD AND HATCHERY-REARED COHO SALMON, ONCORHYNCHUS KISUTCH, TO THE OREGON OCEAN SPORT FISHERY  

E-print Network

. A history and current status of Oregon ocean salmon fisheries-troll salmon investigations. Oregon Manuscript, Washington, and California. The number of coho salmon caught in the ocean by sport fisher- men has beenCONTRIBUTION OF WILD AND HATCHERY-REARED COHO SALMON, ONCORHYNCHUS KISUTCH, TO THE OREGON OCEAN

375

78 FR 70571 - Notice of Availability of the Oregon Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Land Use Plan Amendments and Draft...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Availability of the Oregon Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Land Use Plan Amendments and Draft...BLM) has prepared Oregon Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Land Use Plan (LUP) Amendments...comments related to the Oregon Greater Sage- Grouse Draft LUP Amendments/Draft EIS by...

2013-11-26

376

MODELING DEMOGRAPHIC PERFORMANCE OF NORTHERN SPOTTED OWLS RELATIVE TO FOREST HABITAT IN OREGON  

Microsoft Academic Search

Northern spotted owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) are known to be associated with late-successional forests in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, but the effects of habitat on their demographic performance are rel- atively unknown. We developed statistical models relating owl survival and productivity to forest cover types within the Roseburg Study Area in the Oregon Coast Range of Oregon,

GAIL S. OLSON

377

CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network OREGON Keeping Track, Promoting Health  

E-print Network

contaminants affect people's health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is working to close cigarette smoking affects indoor air quality. The Oregon Tracking Program also joined with the Oregon. ETS is also linked to heart disease, nasal and sinus cancer, sudden infant death syndrome, asthma

378

First results from a marine controlled-source electromagnetic survey to detect gas hydrates offshore Oregon  

E-print Network

offshore Oregon K. A. Weitemeyer, S. C. Constable, K. W. Key, and J. P. Behrens Scripps Institution is a hazard to drilling, a potential hydrocarbon resource, and has been implicated as a factor in both from a marine controlled-source electromagnetic survey to detect gas hydrates offshore Oregon, Geophys

Key, Kerry

379

AIDS Education in Rural Oregon School Districts: Compliance with State Curriculum Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oregon State Department of Education mandates age-appropriate curricula for all grade levels on infectious diseases, including AIDS, ARC, HIV, and Hepatitis B. The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine the extent to which AIDS education was occurring in three remote rural Oregon school districts; (2) to examine the focus of the…

Hales, Loyde W.; McGrew, Robin R.

380

Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Pilot Study--Modernization of FEMA Flood Hazard Maps  

E-print Network

Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Pilot Study-- Modernization of FEMA Flood Hazard Maps By Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group Joint NOAA/USGS/FEMA Special Report U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric.002 annual probability of exceedance #12;#12;Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Pilot Study-- Modernization of FEMA

381

Oregon Small Schools Program: A Title III Project. Independent Evaluation Report, 1972.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Title III project, the 1971-72 Oregon Small Schools Program (OSSP) objectives were (1) to increase member schools receptivity to new and better ideas in education; (2) to implement new programs and apply new techniques consistent with the Oregon Board of Education priority objectives and with the…

Miller, Donald F.

382

77 FR 13015 - Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...FV10-930-5] Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon...the handling of tart cherries grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon...20 and 21, 2011, in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and a second public hearing held...

2012-03-05

383

Ecosystem response to upwelling off the Oregon coast: Behavior of three nitrogen-based models  

E-print Network

Ecosystem response to upwelling off the Oregon coast: Behavior of three nitrogen-based models Y. H; published 6 March 2003. [1] The behavior of three ecosystem models is analyzed for upwelling off the Oregon coast as a function of the number of model components. The first ecosystem model includes dissolved

Pierce, Stephen

384

Oregon Education Act for the 21st Century: Implications for the Profession and Administrator Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1991, the Oregon Legislature passed a landmark educational reform bill, the "Oregon Education Act for the 21st Century," providing for an extended school year, instructional accountability, establishment of state-funded, alternative learning centers, and a restructured high school program issuing certificates of mastery. High school as it is…

Engel, Joanne; And Others

385

Transformational Leadership and the Leadership Performance of Oregon Secondary School Principals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of 118 secondary school principals in Oregon was conducted to examine the relationship of transformational leadership to secondary school principals' leadership performance. This study measured the transformational leadership of secondary school principals in Oregon using the "Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (5X-Short)" (Avolio &…

Breaker, Jason Lee

2009-01-01

386

Linking Prevention Science and Social and Emotional Learning: The Oregon Resiliency Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews the contributions of the Oregon Resiliency Project, an effort to enhance positive social-emotional development of children and youth through social and emotional learning (SEL). The project was launched in 2001 as a collaborative effort between faculty and graduate student researchers at the University of Oregon. The primary…

Merrell, Kenneth W.

2010-01-01

387

Rural Health Clinics and Diabetes-Related Primary Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries in Oregon  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: This study assessed whether Rural Health Clinics (RHCs) were associated with higher rates of recommended primary care services for adult beneficiaries diagnosed with diabetes in Oregon's Medicaid program, the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). Methods: OHP claims data from 2002 to 2003 were used to assess quality of diabetic care for…

Kirkbride, Kelly; Wallace, Neal

2009-01-01

388

Iron, nutrient, and phytoplankton distributions in Oregon coastal Zanna Chase,1,2,3  

E-print Network

Iron, nutrient, and phytoplankton distributions in Oregon coastal waters Zanna Chase,1 iron and nitrate concentrations was examined off the coast of Oregon during the upwelling season and the Columbia River. Sedimentary iron, probably largely in the particulate form, appears to be added to surface

Kurapov, Alexander

389

LIFE HISTORY MONITORING OF SALMONIDS IN THE WEST FORK SMITH RIVER, UMPQUA BASIN, OREGON  

EPA Science Inventory

As a life-cycle monitoring basin for the Oregon Salmon Plan, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has estimated adult returns, distribution and smolt outmigration of coho, chinook and winter steelhead in the West Fork Smith River since 1998. In 2001/2002, the Environmenta...

390

Small Farm NewsOregon State University Small Farms Program InThis Issue  

E-print Network

Small Farm NewsOregon State University Small Farms Program InThis Issue: Oregon State University Small Farms Program and Organic 2 Growers Club Sponsor visit by the Generation OrganicTM Who'sYour Farmer?Tour Young Farmer Brings New Life to Family Farm 3 Using Heat Units to ScheduleVegetable Plantings

Tullos, Desiree

391

The Politics of Marginality in Wallowa County, Oregon: Contesting the Production of Landscapes of Consumption  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The state of Oregon's (USA) land use planning framework has long been characterized by tensions between state and local authority, between traditionally-defined "urban" and "rural" concerns, and between the competing interests of various landowners. An examination of Wallowa County, Oregon's implementation of House Bill 3326, a 2001 law giving…

Abrams, Jesse B.; Gosnell, Hannah

2012-01-01

392

Post-fire geomorphic response in steep, forested landscapes: Oregon Coast Range, USA  

E-print Network

Post-fire geomorphic response in steep, forested landscapes: Oregon Coast Range, USA Molly Jackson, Joshua J. Roering* Department of Geological Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-1272, USA Accepted 7 May 2008 a b s t r a c t The role of fire in shaping steep, forested landscapes depends

Roering, Joshua J.

393

50 CFR 660.78 - EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon. 660... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...Groundfish Fisheries § 660.78 EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon....

2011-10-01

394

50 CFR 660.78 - EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon. 660... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...Groundfish Fisheries § 660.78 EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon....

2013-10-01

395

50 CFR 660.78 - EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon. 660... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...Groundfish Fisheries § 660.78 EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon....

2012-10-01

396

50 CFR 660.78 - EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon. 660... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...Groundfish Fisheries § 660.78 EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon....

2014-10-01

397

A Dualistic Stream Classification System for Oregon: In Support of a Stream Compensatory Mitigation Framework  

EPA Science Inventory

To meet the goals of the U.S. federal Clean Water Act (CWA) and Oregon’s Removal-Fill (R-F) Law, unavoidable impacts to jurisdictional waters, including streams and rivers, must be compensated for through compensatory mitigation under the CWA Section 404 and R-F permitting ...

398

CONVERGENT AND COLLISIONAL TECTONICS IN PARTS OF OREGON, MAINE, AND THE VERMONT-QUEBEC BORDER  

E-print Network

CONVERGENT AND COLLISIONAL TECTONICS IN PARTS OF OREGON, MAINE, AND THE VERMONT- QUEBEC BORDER IN PARTS OF OREGON, MAINE, AND THE VERMONT - QUEBEC BORDER by Adam Schoonmaker Abstract of a Dissertation and Morses Line Formations of northwestern Vermont. Field relationships in Vermont indicate that the Highgate

Kidd, William S. F.

399

Professor Paul Engelking Debunks I E Crystals From: paul engelking !engelki@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU?  

E-print Network

Professor Paul Engelking Debunks I E Crystals From: paul engelking !engelki@OREGON.UOREGON.EDU? Subject: Re: IE crystals To: mdallara@kcii.com Cc: dst@cs.cmu.edu Message­id: !3772BC87.DF7C2814@oregon surrounding the charge, will reduce the field strength. Normally this effect of polarization is summarized

Touretzky, David S.

400

Evaluation of the Oregon Business Council-David Douglas Model School District Partnership Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oregon Business Council (OBC)-David Douglas Model District Project was undertaken for two reasons: (1) to create a model for a district's accelerated implementation of all the elements of school reform as mandated in Oregon House Bill 3565; and (2) to learn lessons about school reform that would inform OBC member companies and school districts…

Conley, David T.; Stone, Patricia

401

Evidence for earthquake triggering of large landslides in coastal Oregon, USA William H. Schulz a,  

E-print Network

Evidence for earthquake triggering of large landslides in coastal Oregon, USA William H. Schulz a: Landslide Earthquake Coastal bluff Oregon Tsunami Cascadia subduction zone Landslides are ubiquitous along several hundreds of years old. The offshore Cascadia subduction zone produces great earthquakes every 300

Torgersen, Christian

402

Shallow landsliding, root reinforcement, and the spatial distribution of trees in the Oregon Coast  

E-print Network

Shallow landsliding, root reinforcement, and the spatial distribution of trees in the Oregon Coast. Montgomery Abstract: The influence of root reinforcement on shallow landsliding has been well established and characteristics of trees adjacent to 32 shallow landslides that oc- curred during 1996 in the Oregon Coast Range

Montgomery, David R.

403

A Statewide Survey of Teachers of Mathematics--Oregon 1976-77.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report focuses on determining the effect of five years of the Oregon System of Mathematics Education (OSME) on teachers and their teaching practices. The instrument, first used in 1974-75, was administered to nearly 5,000 teachers of mathematics in Oregon. Minor changes were made in the questionnaire to obtain more information about…

Haladyna, Tom

404

Applications of Growth and Survival Equations for Oregon White Oak in the  

E-print Network

643 Applications of Growth and Survival Equations for Oregon White Oak in the Pacific Northwest1 development has greatly reduced the area of Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana; also known as Garry oak oak stands present significant management challenges. In this paper, new equations, now available

Standiford, Richard B.

405

TRENDS IN DIRECT NORMAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE IN OREGON FROM 1979-2003 Laura Riihimaki  

E-print Network

TRENDS IN DIRECT NORMAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE IN OREGON FROM 1979-2003 Laura Riihimaki Frank Vignola of trends in direct normal irradiance from three sites around Oregon over a period of 25 years. An overall. Changes in clear noon values are also examined. This article analyzes direct normal data unlike other

Oregon, University of

406

VEGETATION COVERAGE FOR OREGON AND IDAHO  

EPA Science Inventory

OR data acquired from Landsat images, generally during July 1988. ID data acquired from vegetation maps from various agencies at various scales, then visually edited using Landsat scenes to correct for changes due to agricultural expansion and timber harvest activities. Scale: ...

407

Rethinking Recycling: An Oregon Waste Reduction Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This updated curriculum guide is designed to provide teachers of elementary school science with a set of activities on recycling and waste reduction. The curriculum has three sections: (1) Grades K-3 Lessons; (2) Grades 4-5 Lessons; and (3) Teacher's Resource Guide. It is designed to take students from an introduction to natural resources and…

Oregon State Dept. of Environmental Quality, Portland.

408

Page 1 of 2 Oregon State U  

E-print Network

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Escher, Christine

409

Interrelationship of fluid venting and structural evolution: Alvin observations from the frontal accretionary prism, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Seismic reflection and Sea Beam bathymetric data plus submarine geological measurements define a ramp anticline at the deformatoin front of the central Oregon subduction zone. At its northern termination the ramp anticline is deeply incised by a large 500-m-deep submarine canyon and cut by a probable backthrust. To the south along the strike of the fold, a smaller submarine canyon shallowly erodes the anticline, and backthrusting is not apparent in the submersible observations. Two Alvin dives along a transect through the southern canyon show active fluid vents demarked by biological communities at the frontal thrust and at the breached crest of the anticline. Along a northern transect, encompassing the large submarine canyon, 10 Alvin dives indicated no venting on the formal thrust, limited venting in the canyon, but numerous biological communities along a scarp interpreted as the surface trace of the backthrust. These observations suggest a scenario of vent and structural-geomorphic development consisting of (1) frontal thrust faulting and associated venting, facilitated by high fluid pressure; (2) erosion of the oversteepened seaward flank of the ramp anticline assisted by seepage forces and leading to fluid flow out of stratigraphically controlled conduits in the limbs of the overthrust deposits; (3) locking of the frontal thrust due to dewatering or a local decrease in wedge taper associated with development of the large canyon, leading to failure along the backthrust; and (4) redirection of fluid flow by the backthrust. Thus, within {le}0.3 m.y., deformation of the relatively permeable sediments of the Oregon margin results in stratigraphically controlled flow being partially captured by faults.

Moore, J.C.; Orange, D. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)); Kulm, L.D. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

1990-06-10

410

EILATox-Oregon Workshop: blind study evaluation of Vitotox test with genotoxic and cytotoxic sample library.  

PubMed

In order to assess the robustness, sensitivity and specificity of a recently developed Vitotox test, 17 blind coded chemicals and three environmental water samples were tested at the EILATox-Oregon Workshop using the Thermo Electron Vitotox kit. The Vitotox test is a rapid geno- and cytotoxicity test using standard 96- or 384-well microtitre plates. The genotoxicity test is based on two genetically modified Salmonella typhimurium strains containing bacterial luciferase operon from Vibrio fisheri under the SOS inducible promoter. The SOS system is an inducible network in Escherichia coli that responds to DNA damage and activates DNA repair. The Vitotox genotoxicity test bacteria strain carries bacterial luciferase genes under the control of SOS inducible promoter and therefore any DNA damage inside the cells induces the production of bacterial luciferase. The luciferase expression is then followed with a microtitre plate luminometer for 3 h after mixing different dilutions of sample with the test bacteria. The genotoxicity index is calculated for each dilution and the genotoxicity of the sample is interpreted based on kinetic time curves and genotoxicity vs concentration/dilution curves. Cytotoxicity of the sample is determined simultaneously with another test strain containing the same luciferase operon controlled by the constitutive promoter. This bacterium produces constant bioluminescence and any decrease of the bioluminescence production is used as a marker for cytotoxicity. As a miniaturized microtitre plate assay the Vitotox test requires a very small quantity of the sample material. The samples used in the workshop were diluted 1 : 10 or 1 : 100 before testing. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity data were collected at dilutions of 1 : 10-1 : 2000. When the samples of the EILATox-Oregon Workshop were tested using the Vitotox test, four coded chemicals out of 17 were determined to be genotoxic. Seven chemicals and one environmental sample were found to be cytotoxic. Three chemical samples were found to be both geno- and cytotoxic. PMID:15478175

Meriläinen, Jari; Lampinen, Jorma

2004-01-01

411

Debating Death: Religion, Politics, and the Oregon Death With Dignity Act  

PubMed Central

In 1994, Oregon passed the Oregon Death With Dignity Act, becoming the first state in the nation to allow physician-assisted suicide (PAS). This paper compares the public discussion that occurred in 1994 and during the Act’s implementation in 1997 and examines these debates in relation to health care reform under the Obama administration. I argue that the 1994 and 1997 Oregon PAS campaigns and the ensuing public debate represent the culmination of a growing lack of deference to medical authority, concerns with the doctor-patient relationship, and a desire for increased patient autonomy over decisions during death. The public debate over PAS in Oregon underscored the conflicts among competing religious, political, and personal interests. More visible and widespread than any other American debate on PAS, the conflict in Oregon marked the beginning of the now nationwide problem of determining if and when a terminally ill person can choose to die. PMID:22737056

Purvis, Taylor E.

2012-01-01

412

30 CFR 937.816 - Performance standards-surface mining activities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Performance standards-surface mining activities. 937.816 Section 937.816 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON...

2010-07-01

413

30 CFR 937.816 - Performance standards-surface mining activities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false Performance standards-surface mining activities. 937.816 Section 937.816 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON...

2014-07-01

414

University of Oregon Physics Applets: Atomic Emission  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This applet presents the user with an energy level diagram of an atom. The values of the levels (in eV) can be set by parameter tags. Relative transition probabilities can also be set by parameter tags. An active electron can be moved to any level by using the pointing device and then the electron will cascade down to the ground level according to the relative transition probabilities that have been set up. Each time the electron moves from a higher to lower energy level a photon will be emitted. The wavelength of the photon is indicated and some attempt is to color code the outgoing photon by the emitted wavelength.

Bothun, Gregory

2007-01-09

415

SKY LAKES ROADLESS AREA AND MOUNTAIN LAKES WILDERNESS, OREGON.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Based on a mineral survey of the Sky Lakes Roadless Area and the Mountain Lakes Wilderness, Oregon, the areas have little or no promise for the occurrence of metallic-mineral resources or geothermal energy resources. Nonmetallic resources exist in the areas, but other areas outside the roadless area and wilderness also contain resources of volcanic cinders, scoria, ash, breccia, and sand and gravel which are easier to obtain and closer to markets. The roadless area and wilderness are not geologically favorable for metallic deposits, or for coal, oil, or gas resources.

Smith, James G.; Benham, John R.

1984-01-01

416

When patients ask about assisted suicide. A viewpoint from Oregon.  

PubMed Central

The passage of the Oregon Death With Dignity Act has profound implications for the prevailing model of care for dying patients. Patients are already asking for assisted suicide. Most physicians have not been trained in evaluating these requests in a therapeutic way. We discuss the issues around the needs of dying patients and, regardless of the legal status, what to do when patients ask for a lethal dose of medication. With the tools to explore the meaning of these requests, physicians will be better able to understand and meet the needs of their dying patients. PMID:8987425

Lee, M A; Ganzini, L; Brummel-Smith, K

1996-01-01

417

Data from geothermal test wells near Mount Hood, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report includes well specifications, drillers ' logs, and temperature logs of geothermal test wells drilled at 7 sites near Mt. Hood, Oreg. The wells were drilled in 1979 and 1980 under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey. The project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, was part of an interagency effort to determine the geothermal potential of Mt. Hood. The agencies involved were, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. (USGS)

Robison, J.H.; Forcella, L.S.; Gannett, Marshall W.

1981-01-01

418

A Survey of Light Pollution in the Rogue Valley, Southwest Oregon, By St. Mary’s School, Medford, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rural areas in Oregon, including the Rogue Valley, are renowned for beautiful dark skies. Electric light came to Medford, Oregon, the largest town in the Rogue Valley, in 1894. During the past 100 years the Rogue Valley grew from 2,500 individuals in 1895 to a population of 76,462 and a metropolitan area population of 208,545, in 2012. The increased population density resulted in increased light pollution. A light pollution chart using DMSP, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, data was published in 2006, but did not show the spatial variation in detail. In the spring of 2014, the 9th grade physics students, astronomy students, and members of the Astronomy Club from St. Mary’s School conducted the first detailed night sky survey. The purpose of the survey is to create a baseline of the variations in light pollution in the Rogue Valley.The project started with a talk by Steve Bosbach, former Texas IDA coordinator, on the topic of light pollution and how it affects our lives and the environment. Groups of students were given the tasks of measuring the night sky brightness in the Rogue Valley, doing a light audit in an area of their choice, and researching what light pollution is and its effects on the environment. From this they created a presentation for a final physics grade. The basis for this project, along with procedures can be found on the Globe at Night (www.globeatnight.org) website. The light audit and research portion were developed from the Dark Sky Rangers section (www.globeatnight.org/dsr/) of the website. In the fall of 2014, astronomy students and club members extended this study to the town of Ashland and the Sothern Oregon University campus, areas of the valley not surveyed in the Spring.This survey will increase awareness of light pollution in the Rogue Valley, as well as educate developers and city planners on the impact that light pollution has on the environment in Southern Oregon. It will help determine areas of concern and areas of dark sky compliant lighting, which could spur appropriate regulation regarding outdoor lighting.

Ashby, Arianna; Cai, Colin; Cox, Thomas; Dorrell, Genna; FitzPatrick, Gabe; FitzPatrick, Meaghan; Mars Liu, Jason; Moczygemba, Mitchell; Rooney, Kieran; Timmons, Emry; You, Ray; students; Mary’s School), (St.

2015-01-01

419

A Survey of Light Pollution in the Rogue Valley, Southwest Oregon, By St. Mary’s School, Medford, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rural areas in Oregon, including the Rogue Valley, are renowned for beautiful dark skies. Electric light came to Medford, Oregon, the largest town in the Rogue Valley, in 1894. During the past 100 years the Rogue Valley grew from 2,500 individuals in 1895 to a population of 76,462 and a metropolitan area population of 208,545, in 2012. The increased population density resulted in increased light pollution. A light pollution chart using DMSP, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, data was published in 2006, but did not show the spatial variation in detail. In the spring of 2014, the 9th grade physics students, astronomy students, and members of the Astronomy Club from St. Mary's School conducted the first detailed night sky survey. The purpose of the survey is to create a baseline of the variations in light pollution in the Rogue Valley.The project started with a talk by Steve Bosbach, former Texas IDA coordinator, on the topic of light pollution and how it affects our lives and the environment. Groups of students were given the tasks of measuring the night sky brightness in the Rogue Valley, doing a light audit in an area of their choice, and researching what light pollution is and its effects on the environment. From this they created a presentation for a final physics grade. The basis for this project, along with procedures can be found on the Globe at Night (www.globeatnight.org) website. The light audit and research portion were developed from the Dark Sky Rangers section (www.globeatnight.org/dsr/) of the website. In the fall of 2014, astronomy students and club members extended this study to the town of Ashland and the Sothern Oregon University campus, areas of the valley not surveyed in the Spring.This survey will increase awareness of light pollution in the Rogue Valley, as well as educate developers and city planners on the impact that light pollution has on the environment in Southern Oregon. It will help determine areas of concern and areas of dark sky compliant lighting, which could spur appropriate regulation regarding outdoor lighting.

Bensel, Holly; Arianna Ashby, Colin Cai, Thomas Cox, Genna Dorrell, Gabe FitzPatrick, Meaghan FitzPatrick, Jason Mars Liu, Mitchell Moczygemba, Kieran Rooney, Emry Timmons,; Ray You, students, (St. Mary's. School)

2015-01-01

420

Structural Controls of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Field, Malhuer County, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed mapping (1:24,000) of the Neal Hot Springs area (90 km2) in eastern Oregon is part of a larger study of geothermal systems in the Basin and Range, which focuses on the structural controls of geothermal activity. The study area lies within the intersection of two regional grabens, the middle-late Miocene, N-striking, Oregon-Idaho graben and younger late Miocene to Holocene, NW-striking, western Snake River Plain graben. The geothermal field is marked by Neal Hot Springs, which effuse from opaline sinter mounds just north of Bully Creek. Wells producing geothermal fluids, with temperatures at 138°C, intersect a major, W-dipping, NNW-striking, high-angle normal fault at depths of 850-915 m. Displacement along this structure dies southward, with likely horse-tailing, which commonly produces high fracture density and a zone of high permeability conducive for channeling hydrothermal fluids. Mapping reveals that the geothermal resource lies within a local, left step-over. 'Hard-linkage' between strands of the left-stepping normal fault, revealed through a study of well chips and well logs, occurs through two concealed structures. Both are W-striking faults, with one that runs parallel to Cottonwood Creek and one 0.5 km N of the creek. Injection wells intersect these two transverse structures within the step-over. Stepping and displacement continue to the NW of the known geothermal field, along W-dipping, N-striking faults that cut lower to middle Miocene Hog Creek Formation, consisting of silicic and mafic volcanic rocks. These N-striking faults were likely initiated during initial Oregon-Idaho graben subsidence (15.3-15.1 Ma), with continued development through late Miocene. Bully Creek Formation deposits, middle to upper Miocene lacustrine and pyroclastic rocks, concomitantly filled the sub half-grabens, and they dip gently to moderately eastward. Younger, western Snake River Plain deposits, upper Miocene to Pliocene fluvial, lacustrine, and pyroclastic rocks, show various dip directions and gentle tilting. Extensive alluvial fan cover hinders collection of fault kinematic data, which coupled with limited regional seismicity, precludes careful calculation of local stress field orientations. However, the proximity of Neal (4 km) to the active, N- to NW-striking, oblique-normal slip Cottonwood Mountain fault and active hot springs (~90°C), opaline sinter mounds, and geothermal fluid flow at Neal suggest that the geothermal field lies within a reactived (Quaternary), southward-terminating, left-stepping, fault zone, which probably accommodates oblique-slip with a dominant normal component. Sugarloaf Butte (completely silicified and replaced) lies within a left step of this fault zone, ~5 km of Neal Hot Springs and is possibly related to the evolution of the geothermal system. Epithermal deposits and argillic to propylitic alteration in other nearby areas (e.g., Hope Butte, ~3 Ma, 5 km N) indicate previous geothermal activity.

Edwards, J. H.; Faulds, J. E.

2012-12-01

421

JUNIPER FOR STREAMBANK STABILIZATION IN EASTERN OREGON 1 2  

E-print Network

Abstract: Cut juniper trees (Juniperous osteosperma Hook.) anchored along eroded streambanks proved beneficial in stabilizing 96 percent of the erosion on eight streams evaluated in eastern Oregon over a 14-year-period. Juniper revetment was a successful substitute for costly rock structures on straight or slightly curved banks, but failed when placed on outside curves or when poorly anchored. Water velocities were reduced by 65 percent where juniper revetment was evaluated. Sediment buried tree tips the first and second year after treatment. Juniper revetment should last at least 20 years with proper grazing management and allow full recovery of riparian vegetation and bank stability. tremuloides Michx.) in other drainages. Western juniper (Juniperous osteosperma Hook.) is found between the lower and upper elevations. Common riparian shrubs and trees include red-osier dogwood (Cornus stolonifera Michx.), thin-leaved alder (Alnus incana Moench), several species of willow (Salix spp.), black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa T. & G.) and water birch (Betula occidentalis Hook.). Streambank stabilization may be required for the improvement of water quality, fish and wildlife habitat and the maintenance of productive riparian areas. Rock revetment, gabions and other structures are often used for bank stabilization. This paper describes a technique used for streambank stabilization that has been in use for over 14 years in eastern Oregon.

Guy R. Sheeter; Errol W. Claire

422

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Conceptual Design Report, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Watson, Montgomery (Montgomery Watson, Bellevue, WA)

1995-03-01

423

Paleocurrent analysis of Cretaceous Mitchell Formation, north-central Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in north-central Oregon contain both potential petroleum source rocks and reservoir rocks. Thus, determining their extent under the cover of Tertiary volcanics is of great importance to future petroleum exploration in the southern portion of the Columbia basin. Limited studies of sediment transport direction have been previously reported by several workers; however, no conclusive evidence was obtained. This study was undertaken to resolve the differences in the previously presented interpretations. The outcropping sedimentary sequence represents part of a subsea fan complex consisting of fan-apron facies turbidites and mudstones (Hudspeth mudstone facies) and channel-facies conglomerates and sandstones (Gable Creek conglomerate facies). Paleocurrent data derived from sole marks, flute casts, clast imbrication, and alignment of elongate plant fragments document that sediment transport was primarily from the south-southeast toward the north-northwest. Thus, the greatest potential for petroleum production from Cretaceous sediments in north-central Oregon lies to the west and northwest of the Mitchell area in northeast-southwest elongated rift basins. These basins, presumably containing thick accumulations of Cretaceous marine sediment fill, are now evidenced by large gravity and magnetic lows.

Sandefur, C.A.; Fisk, L.H.

1989-03-01

424

Detecting long-term hydrological patterns at Crater Lake, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tree-ring chronologies for mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) were used to reconstruct the water level of Crater Lake, a high-elevation lake in the southern Cascade Range of Oregon. Reconstructions indicate that lake level since the late 1980s has been lower than at any point in the last 300 years except the early 1930s to mid 1940s. Lake level was consistently higher during the Little Ice Age than during the late 20th century; during the late 17th century, lake level was up to 9 m higher than recent (1980s and 1990s) low levels, which is consistent with paleoclimalic reconstructions of regional precipitation and atmospheric pressure. Furthermore, instrumental data available for the 20th century suggest that there are strong teleconnections among atmospheric circulation (e.g., Pacific Decadal Oscillation), tree growth, and hydrology in southern Oregon. Crater Lake is sensitive to interannual, interdecadal and intercentenary variation in precipitation and atmospheric circulation, and can be expected to track both short-term and longterm variation in regional climatic patterns that may occur in the future.

Peterson, D.L.; Silsbee, D.G.; Redmond, Kelly T.

1999-01-01

425

Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a series of activities that help students discover the Pythagorean Theorem and extension activities to explore various dissection proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

Dotseth, Karen A., Ed.; And Others

1993-01-01

426

Anticipating Forest and Range Land Development in Central Oregon (USA) for Landscape Analysis, with an Example Application Involving Mule Deer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Forest policymakers, public lands managers, and scientists in the Pacific Northwest (USA) seek ways to evaluate the landscape-level effects of policies and management through the multidisciplinary development and application of spatially explicit methods and models. The Interagency Mapping and Analysis Project (IMAP) is an ongoing effort to generate landscape-wide vegetation data and models to evaluate the integrated effects of disturbances and management activities on natural resource conditions in Oregon and Washington (USA). In this initial analysis, we characterized the spatial distribution of forest and range land development in a four-county pilot study region in central Oregon. The empirical model describes the spatial distribution of buildings and new building construction as a function of population growth, existing development, topography, land-use zoning, and other factors. We used the model to create geographic information system maps of likely future development based on human population projections to inform complementary landscape analyses underway involving vegetation, habitat, and wildfire interactions. In an example application, we use the model and resulting maps to show the potential impacts of future forest and range land development on mule deer ( Odocoileus hemionus) winter range. Results indicate significant development encroachment and habitat loss already in 2000 with development located along key migration routes and increasing through the projection period to 2040. The example application illustrates a simple way for policymakers and public lands managers to combine existing data and preliminary model outputs to begin to consider the potential effects of development on future landscape conditions.

Kline, Jeffrey D.; Moses, Alissa; Burcsu, Theresa

2010-05-01

427

Anticipating forest and range land development in central Oregon (USA) for landscape analysis, with an example application involving mule deer.  

PubMed

Forest policymakers, public lands managers, and scientists in the Pacific Northwest (USA) seek ways to evaluate the landscape-level effects of policies and management through the multidisciplinary development and application of spatially explicit methods and models. The Interagency Mapping and Analysis Project (IMAP) is an ongoing effort to generate landscape-wide vegetation data and models to evaluate the integrated effects of disturbances and management activities on natural resource conditions in Oregon and Washington (USA). In this initial analysis, we characterized the spatial distribution of forest and range land development in a four-county pilot study region in central Oregon. The empirical model describes the spatial distribution of buildings and new building construction as a function of population growth, existing development, topography, land-use zoning, and other factors. We used the model to create geographic information system maps of likely future development based on human population projections to inform complementary landscape analyses underway involving vegetation, habitat, and wildfire interactions. In an example application, we use the model and resulting maps to show the potential impacts of future forest and range land development on mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) winter range. Results indicate significant development encroachment and habitat loss already in 2000 with development located along key migration routes and increasing through the projection period to 2040. The example application illustrates a simple way for policymakers and public lands managers to combine existing data and preliminary model outputs to begin to consider the potential effects of development on future landscape conditions. PMID:20300934

Kline, Jeffrey D; Moses, Alissa; Burcsu, Theresa

2010-05-01

428

Chemical, isotopic, and dissolved gas compositions of the hot springs of the Owyhee Uplands, Malheur County, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hot springs along the Owyhee River in southeastern Oregon between Three Forks and Lake Owyhee could be part of a north flowing regional system or a series of small separate geothermal systems Heat for the waters could be from a very young (Holocene) volcanic activity (basalt flows) of the Owyhee Uplands or the regional heat flow. The springs discharge warm to hot, dilute, slightly alkaline, sodium bicarbonate water. Chemically they are similar to the dilute thermal water at Bruneau Grand View and Twin Falls, Idaho. Maximum aquifer temperatures in the Owyhee Uplands, estimated from chemical geothermometry, are about 100°C. Dissolved helium concentrations, carbon 14 activity, and chemical and isotope data are examined fro systematic trends which would indicate a geothermal system of regional extent.

Mariner, R.H.; Young, H.W.; Evans, W.C.

1994-01-01

429

Forest engineering implication of storm-induced mass wasting in the Oregon Coast Range, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A severe winter storm, under conditions of high antecedent moisture and a substantial snow pack at higher elevations, in February of 1996 resulted in rapid flooding and a large number of precipitation-induced landslides. The number of mass wasting events greatly exceeded the expectations of many land managers, given the magnitude (50-year return interval ) of the storm event. Both ground and aerial surveys were used to characterize the nature of these events and relate the occurrence of mass wasting activity to the topography, geology, and land management activities of the region. This paper is based upon an aerial videography transect of the north Oregon Coast Range and explores the potential of this technique, with special reference to storm damage assessment in commercial forestry areas. Given the efforts to enhance and protect anadromous fish-rearing habitat in the region's perennial streams, this survey explores the implications of current and past forest engineering practices, and suggests that engineering efforts to 'de-construct' the legacy of old roads and culvert systems may be appropriate in the drainage basins with the highest potential habitat values.

Rosenfeld, Charles L.

1999-12-01

430

Mineral resources of the Fifteen Mile Creek, Oregon Canyon, Twelve Mile Creek, and Willow Creek Wilderness Study Areas, Malheur and Harney counties, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

The four contiguous study areas are located in a volcanic terrane dominated by tuffs that were erupted from calderas of the McDermitt Caldera complex and the Whitehorse Caldera. None of these areas have identified resources, despite the proximity of mercury, uranium, and lithium mineralization to the south. The southern parts of the Fifteen Mile Creek and the Oregon Canyon Wilderness Study Areas have a low potential for mercury and uranium. The southern parts of the Fifteen Mile Creek, Oregon Canyon, and Willow Creek and the northwestern part of the Oregon Wilderness Study Areas have low potential for antimony, bismuth, mercury, silver,molybdenum, and zinc. In the Oregon Canyon Wilderness Study Area, the tuff of Oregon Canyon and the rim of the caldera of the McDermitt Caldera complex have a low potential for gold and silver in epithermal veins. The study areas have a low potential for zeolite minerals, oil and gas, and geothermal energy throughout, and restricted parts of the study areas have a low potential for pumice, rare-earth elements, zirconium, and decorative building stone.

Peterson, J.A.; Rytuba, J.J.; Plouff, D.; Vercountere, T.L.; Turner, R.L.; Sawatzky, D.L. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA)); Leszcykowski, A.M.; Peters, T.J.; Schmauch, S.W.; Winters, R.A. (US Bureau of Mines (US))

1988-01-01

431

ELECTROFISHING EFFORT REQUIREMENTS FOR ASSESSING SPECIES RICHNESS AND BIOTIC INTEGRITY IN WESTERN OREGON STREAMS  

EPA Science Inventory

We empirically examined the sampling effort required to adequately represent species richness and proportionate abundance when backpack electrofishing western Oregon streams. When sampling, we separately recorded data for each habitat unit. In data analyses, we repositioned each...

432

Forest structure and regeneration in the Tsuga heterophylla - Abies amabilis transition zone, central Western Cascades, Oregon.  

E-print Network

??The dynamics of stands in the mid-elevation old-growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests of the central western Oregon Cascade Range were investigated using stand structure analysis.… (more)

Stewart, Glenn H.

1984-01-01

433

76 FR 52347 - Public Land Order No. 7774; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6868; Oregon  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLOR936000-14300000-ET0000; HAG-11-0195; OROR-16124] Public Land Order No. 7774; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6868; Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of...

2011-08-22

434

Estuarine intertidal sediment temperature variability in Zoster marina and Z. japonica habitats in Yaquina Bay, Oregon  

EPA Science Inventory

Physical characterization of intertidal estuarine plant habitats over time may reveal distribution-limiting thresholds. Temperature data from loggers embedded in sediment in transects crossing Zostera marina and Z. japonica habitats in lower Yaquina Bay, Oregon display signific...

435

Spatial and temporal distributions of benthic green macroalgae in Yaquina bay, Oregon  

EPA Science Inventory

Coastal estuaries of Oregon, USA, typically support relatively large accumulations of benthic green macroalgae (BGM) during the summer/early fall growing season. This raises questions regarding possible (positive and negative) effects on eelgrass and benthic epifauna and infauna...

436

Spatial variations in phytoplankton pigment ratios, optical properties, and environmental gradients in Oregon coast surface waters  

E-print Network

Spatial variations in phytoplankton pigment ratios, optical properties, and environmental gradients and taxonomic composition (pigment ratios, relative particle size distribution, and chlorophyll a (chl a pigment ratios, optical properties, and environmental gradients in Oregon coast surface waters, J. Geophys

Pierce, Stephen

437

INTERIOR LIBRARY HALL, LOOKING EAST INTO TV/GAME ROOM. Oregon ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR LIBRARY HALL, LOOKING EAST INTO TV/GAME ROOM. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

438

INTERIOR TV/GAME, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR TV/GAME, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

439

INTERIOR TV/GAME ROOM, LOOKING NORTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR TV/GAME ROOM, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

440

Shifting the Paradigm in Oregon from Teen Pregnancy Prevention to Youth Sexual Health  

PubMed Central

Oregon's work on teen pregnancy prevention during the previous 20 years has shifted from a risk-focused paradigm to a youth development model that places young people at the center of their sexual health and well-being. During 2005, the Oregon Governor's Office requested that an ad hoc committee of state agency and private partners develop recommendations for the next phase of teen pregnancy prevention. As a result of that collaborative effort, engagement of young people, and community input, the Oregon Youth Sexual Health Plan was released in 2009. The plan focuses on development of young people and embraces sexuality as a natural part of adolescent development. The plan's five goals and eight objectives guide the work of state agencies and partners addressing youth sexual health. Oregon's development of a statewide plan can serve as a framework for other states and entities to address all aspects of youth sexual health. PMID:23450889

Nystrom, Robert J.; Duke, Jessica E.A.; Victor, Brad

2013-01-01

441

Wild salmon in California, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho: Some recovery strategies that just might work  

EPA Science Inventory

The primary goal of the Salmon 2100 Project is to identify salmon recovery options that have a high probability of maintaining biologically significant, sustainable populations of wild salmon in California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and southern British Columbia. The Project doe...

442

75 FR 28281 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Public Meeting; Oregon  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...The United States Forest Service (USFS) has...675.51 acres of National Forest System land from mining...withdrew certain lands in Deschutes County, Oregon, from...to 7 p.m. at the Deschutes National Forest Headquarters...

2010-05-20

443

SAMPLING CONSIDERATIONS FOR GARDEN SYMPHYLANS (SCUTIGERELLA IMMACULATA NEWPORT) IN WESTERN OREGON  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Sampling recommendations were developed for a potato bait sampling method used to estimate garden symphylan (Scutigerella immaculata Newport) densities in western Oregon. Sample size requirements were developed using Taylor's power law to describe the relationship between sample means and variances...

444

Insurance Student Health Services Oregon State University, 110 Plageman Building, Corvallis, OR 97331-8567  

E-print Network

Insurance Student Health Services Oregon State University, 110 Plageman Building, Corvallis, OR 97331-8567 Tel 541-737-7600 | Fax 541-737-7914 | osustudent.insurance@oregonstate.edu http an assistantship Address __________________________ Phone: __________________________ The Insurance charge

Tullos, Desiree

445

Insurance Student Health Services Oregon State University, 110 Plageman Building, Corvallis, OR 97331-8567  

E-print Network

Insurance Student Health Services Oregon State University, 110 Plageman Building, Corvallis, OR 97331-8567 Tel 541-737-7600 | Fax 541-737-7914 | osustudent.insurance@oregonstate.edu http. Address __________________________ Phone: __________________________ The Insurance charge will be charged

Tullos, Desiree

446

Managing Ponderosa Pine Forests in Central Oregon: Who Will Speak for the  

E-print Network

and Gregg M. Riegel3 Abstract The soils of the central Oregon pumice plateau are relatively young these coarse- textured, pumice and ash soils are resilient to forest disturbance is not well understood. We

Standiford, Richard B.

447

CONTROLS ON STREAM CHEMISTRY IN AN OREGON COASTAL WATERSHED: THE SALMON RIVER  

EPA Science Inventory

Numerous factors may control losses of dissolved nutrients from forested basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Potentially important factors include forest composition, stand age, forest management, grazing, agriculture, sewage inputs and bedrock types, as well as others perhaps not...

448

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site.

Not Available

1994-10-01

449

Department of the History of Art and Architecture University of Oregon  

E-print Network

Department of the History of Art and Architecture University of Oregon APPLICATION FOR MAJOR DEGREE IN THE HISTORY OF ART AND ARCHITECTURE Submit: ___________________________________________ Email Address:___________________________________ ART HISTORY MAJOR OPTION: (check

450

Department of the History of Art and Architecture University of Oregon  

E-print Network

Department of the History of Art and Architecture University of Oregon APPLICATION FOR MINOR DEGREE IN THE HISTORY OF ART AND ARCHITECTURE Submit: ______________________________________________________________________________ Student UO ID: ______________________________________________ Art History Minor

451

75 FR 26807 - Notice of Acceptance of Application for Special Nuclear Materials License From Oregon State...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 70-7019...Acceptance of Application for Special Nuclear Materials License From Oregon State University...for Contention Preparation AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION:...

2010-05-12

452

76 FR 62758 - Wallowa-Whitman and Umatilla National Forests, Oregon Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...National Forests, Oregon Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans AGENCY: Forest Service...Plans of Operation in the Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans analysis area on the Whitman...in the portions of the Granite Creek Watershed under their administration. As...

2011-10-11

453

78 FR 73186 - Wallowa-Whitman National Forests, Oregon; Lower Imnaha Rangeland Analysis  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Cow Creek, and a portion of the Snake River watersheds of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area...Oregon, and primarily includes the Imnaha River watershed and associated watersheds downstream of the Imnaha River Bridge...

2013-12-05

454

Medicaid Increases Emergency-Department Use: Evidence from Oregon's Health Insurance Experiment  

E-print Network

In 2008, Oregon initiated a limited expansion of a Medicaid program for uninsured, low-income adults, drawing names from a waiting list by lottery. This lottery created a rare opportunity to study the effects of Medicaid ...

Finkelstein, Amy

455

77 FR 476 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plan Southern Oregon/Northern California Coast Coho...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oregon/ Northern California Coast Coho Salmon Evolutionarily Significant Unit AGENCY...Northern California Coast (SONCC) Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) Evolutionarily...Attn: Recovery Coordinator/SONCC Coho Salmon Public Draft Recovery Plan...

2012-01-05

456

78 FR 42945 - Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Oregon  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...approved State Public Water Supply Supervision Primacy Program. Oregon has adopted regulations analogous to EPA's Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule; Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule; Ground Water Rule; and Lead...

2013-07-18

457

78 FR 9651 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oregon: Heat Smart Program and Enforcement...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oregon: Heat Smart Program and Enforcement Procedures...2011 submission contains revisions to the Heat Smart program and to the enforcement procedures...submission contains additional revisions to the Heat Smart program, along with minor...

2013-02-11

458

76 FR 75900 - Notice of Application for Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Oregon  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLOR-936000-L14300000-ET0000; HAG-11-0301; OROR-47267] Notice of Application for Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Oregon AGENCY: Bureau...

2011-12-05

459

71 FR 42667 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the four unassociated funerary objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2006-07-27

460

73 FR 49481 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...itself to be culturally affiliated with the objects of cultural patrimony and/or unassociated funerary objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2008-08-21

461

71 FR 38418 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2006-07-06

462

70 FR 44692 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Horner Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2005-08-03

463

73 FR 49476 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary object should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2008-08-21

464

71 FR 78462 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2006-12-29

465

71 FR 42667 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Horner Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the associated funerary object should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2006-07-27

466

70 FR 61838 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2005-10-26

467

73 FR 59650 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2008-10-09

468

73 FR 49479 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the sacred object and/or unassociated funerary objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2008-08-21

469

73 FR 49477 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2008-08-21

470

73 FR 49483 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Horner Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...tribe or Native Hawaiian Organization that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2008-08-21

471

74 FR 28942 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the sacred objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2009-06-18

472

70 FR 61839 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Horner Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Sabah Randhawa Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2005-10-26

473

71 FR 42666 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Horner Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2006-07-27

474

72 FR 65354 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2007-11-20

475

72 FR 71951 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the sacred objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2007-12-19

476

73 FR 50992 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Horner Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2008-08-29

477

71 FR 5683 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Horner Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2006-02-02

478

71 FR 5683 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration...

2006-02-02

479

78 FR 24717 - Crescent Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Klamath County, Oregon; Marsh Project...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...conifer on the valley flanks. The area is also of high value for its biological resources (including the largest Oregon Spotted Frog population in the state), dispersed recreation opportunities, matsutake mushroom habitat (a commercially harvested and...

2013-04-26

480

75 FR 918 - Oregon: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...authorized hazardous waste management program described in...Oregon's hazardous waste management program revisions...Radioactively Contaminated Batteries, CL 201. NESHAP...202. Hazardous Waste Management 68 FR 44659, 7/30...100-0002. System; Identification...

2010-01-07

481

The bathymetric distribution of intertidal eelgrass Zostera marina L. in three coastal estuaries of Oregon  

EPA Science Inventory

Distributions of native eelgrass Zostera marina L. within the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones of three Oregon coastal estuaries (Tillamook, Yaquina, and Alsea) were determined by digital classification of aerial color infrared (CIR) orthophotographs. Stratified random surv...

482

78 FR 53537 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for the Oregon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...spotted frogs to successfully evade avian, terrestrial, and amphibian predators (Licht 1986b, p. 241; Hallock and Pearson 2001...Sec. 17.95 Critical habitat--fish and wildlife. (d) Amphibians. * * * * * Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) (1)...

2013-08-29

483

Butterfly and flower community composition among prairie-oak ecosystem habitats in the Willamette Valley, Oregon.  

E-print Network

??Prairie-oak ecosystems in the Willamette Valley, Oregon have experienced habitat loss and degradation; most of these ecosystems are fragmented into smaller patches. Prairie-oak butterfly species,… (more)

Powers, Breanna F.

2014-01-01

484

40 CFR 81.249 - Northwest Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Northwest Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.249 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.249...

2011-07-01

485

40 CFR 81.220 - Eastern Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Eastern Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.220 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.220 Eastern...

2011-07-01

486

40 CFR 81.219 - Central Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Central Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.219 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.219 Central...

2010-07-01

487

Distribution of macroalgae and sediment chlorophyll A along salinity and elevation gradients in Oregon tidal marshes  

EPA Science Inventory

Algae contribute to trophic and biogeochemical processes in tidal wetlands. We investigated patterns of sediment pigment content and macroalgal abundance and diversity in marshes in four Oregon estuaries representing a variety of vegetation types, salinity regimes, and tidal ele...

488

MODELING DEMOGRAPHIC PERFORMANCE OF NORTHERN SPOTTED OWLS RELATIVE TO FOREST HABITAT IN OREGON  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: Northern spotted owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) are known,to be associated with late-successional forests in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, but the effects of habitat on their demographic performance are rel- atively unknown.,We developed statistical models,relating owl survival and productivity to forest cover types within the Roseburg Study Area in the Oregon Coast Range of Oregon, USA. We

GAIL S. OLSON; ELIZABETH M. GLENN; ROBERT G. ANTHONY; ERIC D. FORSMAN; JANICE A. REID; PETER J. LOSCHL; WILLIAM J. RIPPLE; Flaspohler

2004-01-01

489

THE OREGON HEALTH INSURANCE EXPERIMENT: EVIDENCE FROM THE FIRST YEAR*  

PubMed Central

In 2008, a group of uninsured low-income adults in Oregon was selected by lottery to be given the chance to apply for Medicaid. This lottery provides an opportunity to gauge the effects of expanding access to public health insurance on the health care use, financial strain, and health of low-income adults using a randomized controlled design. In the year after random assignment, the treatment group selected by the lottery was about 25 percentage points more likely to have insurance than the control group that was not selected. We find that in this first year, the treatment group had substantively and statistically significantly higher health care utilization (including primary and preventive care as well as hospitalizations), lower out-of-pocket medical expenditures and medical debt (including fewer bills sent to collection), and better self-reported physical and mental health than the control group. PMID:23293397

Finkelstein, Amy; Taubman, Sarah; Wright, Bill; Bernstein, Mira; Gruber, Jonathan; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Allen, Heidi; Baicker, Katherine

2012-01-01

490

Pumice deposits of the Klamath Indian Reservation, Klamath County, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A large volume of pumice is widely distributed over the Klamath Indian Reservation in 'flow' and 'fall' deposits. The flow material on the Reservation is restricted to the area west of Klamath Marsh, and the fall material is thickest immediately southeast of the Marsh. Tests of the chemical and physical properties of the pumice indicate that the pumice is suitable, with some limitations, for use as an aggregate and as a low-grade abrasive. Preliminary examination also indicates that with proper processing it may have a potential use as pozzuolana. The pumice is similar to material now being marketed for lightweight aggregate in Oregon, but processing of the pumice is necessary to obtain a suitable size distribution of the particles.

Walker, George Walton

1951-01-01

491

Recent Taxonomic Changes for Oregon Ferns and Fern Allies  

E-print Network

Readers of Kalmiopsis were recently treated to a synopsis of taxonomic changes affecting flowering plants in Oregon (Chambers, 1992). The present article has been written to up-date readers on nomenclatural changes recently proposed for the seedless vascular plants, which include not only ferns, but also horsetails, club-mosses, and their relatives. Together these groups are often referred to as the ferns and fern allies. Many new names have been incorporated in the new Jepson Manual for California (Hickman, 1993), as well as the treatment of ferns and fern allies in Volume 11 of Flora of North America (FNA), due out in September 1993. Publication of the FNA treatment of ferns and fern allies at this time is most fortunate, for there has been a great deal of new and exciting biosystematic research in this group in recent years. As a result,

R. Alverson

492

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Baker Quadrangle, Oregon and Idaho  

SciTech Connect

The Baker Quadrangle, Oregon, and Idaho, was evaluated to identify areas containing geologic environments favorable for uranium deposits. The criteria used was developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Stream-sediment reconnaissance and detailed surface studies were augmented by subsurface-data interpretion and an aerial radiometric survey. Results indicate that lower Pliocene sedimentary rocks in the Lower Powder River Valley-Virtue Flat basin are favorable characteristics, they remain unevaluated because of lack of subsurface data. Tertiary sandstones, possibly present at depth in the Long and Cascade Valleys, also remain unevaluated due to lack of subsurface data. All remaining environments in the Baker Quadrangle are unfavorable for all classes of uranium deposits.

Bernardi, M L; Robins, J W

1982-05-01

493

Oregon state information handbook formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administater, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Oregon. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

none,

1980-12-31

494

Oregon state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Oregon. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

none,

1980-12-31

495

Compositional zoning of the Devine Canyon Tuff, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In eastern Oregon, many voluminous and minor rhyolites erupted from 40 Ma to 1.3 ka. As part of continued investigations into the petrogenesis of Oregon rhyolites, we focus here on the Devine Canyon Tuff (DCT). The 9.7 Ma DCT, with its proposed source in the Harney Basin, is among the most widespread ash flow tuffs in SE Oregon. It originally covered about 20,000 km2 with a minimum volume of 200 km3 as it flowed radially and eastward into the Oregon-Idaho graben. The DCT is crystal rich, pumiceous in places, and non- to densely welded with vitric, devitrified, and vapor phase zones. Pumices range in size from a few cm to about 30 cm and are rhyolitic with a very minor commingled dacite component. Phenocryst content ranges from 7% to 30%. Compositional zoning only becomes apparent by integrating data from several outcrops and therefore the tuff appears little zoned at the single outcrop scale. Published data and our work to date show that bulk tuff and pumices, excluding the commingled mafic component, are mildly peralkaline rhyolites (Na+K/Al = 1.0-1.2) with a limited range in major elements (SiO2, 74.6-77.6 wt%; and FeO*, 2.3-3.1 wt%), but vary greatly in the most incompatibe trace elements including Rb, Zr, Nb, Y. These elements indicate two-fold enrichments with the following concentrations in the least to most evolved samples: Rb from 80 ppm to 167 ppm, Zr from 599 ppm to 1,310 ppm, Nb from 48 ppm to 100 ppm, and Y from 81 ppm to 172 ppm. Other trace elements behave conservatively or decrease. LREE (e.g. Ce) concentrations decrease with differentiation pointing to the fractionation of LREE enriched phases causing rotation of REE patterns from the least (e.g. Ce/Y = 2.7) to most differentiated (Ce/Y = 1.1) samples. Compatible elements such as Ba and Sr range from 260 ppm to 10 ppm and 36 ppm to 3 ppm, respectively, but are more scattered suggesting that changes in alkali feldspar proportions influence concentration levels. Minerals include alkali feldspars, quartz, and minor hedenbergite and fayalitic olivine. Accessory phases include apatite, britholite, aenigmatite, chevkinite, Fe-Ti oxides, and zircon. Most feldspar are sanidine within the range of Ab34.7-61.8 Or34.7-61.8. Observed subtle changes in the mineral assemblages and compositions in different samples likely correlate with compositional changes of the magmas that will continue to be addressed in more detail. Glass analyses of shards, pumices, and quartz hosted melt inclusions mostly correspond with bulk analyses, but some pairs of bulk samples and their glassy components (e.g., the least evolved sample and one of the most evolved samples), have a wider range of major elements than other samples. Streaks of commingled mafic glass of select pumices are as mafic as 63.4 wt% SiO2, and 10.2 wt% FeO* indicating that strongly differentiated tholeiitic magma underlied the rhyolitic Devine Canyon magma and likely provided the thermal input for rhyolites to develop the observed zonations.

Wacaster, S.; Streck, M. J.; Belkin, H. E.; Bodnar, R. J.

2011-12-01

496

Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide  

SciTech Connect

Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

Not Available

2007-08-01

497

Medicaid rationing in Oregon: political wolf in a philosopher's sheepskin.  

PubMed

Although the details of the proposal have shifted since it was first described, the Oregon Medicaid waiver has had one consistent feature: it will reduce benefits to AFDC mothers and children who are currently covered by Medicaid in that state, in the hopes of increasing coverage for other individuals who are now uninsured. Because of the adverse consequences for the AFDC population, there should be strong evidence supporting the purported benefits of the proposal before proceeding with the waiver. One of the most intriguing aspects of the waiver proposal is the claim that the money currently being spent on AFDC beneficiaries could be redistributed to expand coverage to a substantial number of the uninsured. The concept is that far more people could receive the most valuable services if those now being served gave up their coverage of the least valuable services. Other purported benefits of the waiver include enhanced citizen participation in decisionmaking, cost-savings, and improved payment levels and delivery arrangements. Remarkably, this analysis of the proposal reveals that the waiver is likely to achieve none of its stated objectives, and instead will have adverse consequences not identified by its proponents. What the proposal would do is to insulate politicians from visible responsibility for limiting benefits for AFDC children and adults. Finally, the proposal undermines 25 years of Medicaid as an entitlement program. As such, it would establish as a social ethic the principle that the poor can be relegated to inadequate care. Such an extreme measure is not justified by the fiscal situation in Oregon, which is not extraordinarily poor or overtaxed, and does not have a particularly generous or unusually expensive Medicaid program. PMID:10120173

Budetti, P P

1991-01-01

498

Septicemic pasteurellosis in free-ranging neonatal pronghorn in Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of a study to determine the cause(s) of population decline and low survival of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) neonates on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge (HMNAR), Oregon (USA), 55 of 104 neonates captured during May 1996 and 1997 were necropsied (n = 28, 1996; n = 27, 1997) to determine cause of death. Necropsies were conducted on fawns that died during May, June, or July of each year. The objectives of this study were to report the occurrence and pathology of pasteurellosis in neonates and determine if the isolated strain of Pasteurella multocida was unique. Septicemic pasteurellosis, caused by P. multocida, was diagnosed as the cause of death for two neonates in May and June 1997. Necropsy findings included widely scattered petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages found over a large portion of the subcutaneous tissue, meninges of the brain, epicardium, skeletal muscle, and serosal surface of the thorasic and abdominal cavities. Histological examination of lung tissues revealed diffuse congestion and edema and moderate to marked multifocal infiltrate of macrophages, neutrophils, and numerous bacteria within many terminal bronchioles and alveoli. Pasteurella multocida serotypes A:3,4, and B:1 were isolated from several tissues including lung, intestinal, thorasic fluid, and heart blood. Each B:1 isolate had DNA restriction endonuclease fingerprint profiles distinct from isolates previously characterized from domestic cattle, swan (Olor spp.), moose (Alces alces), and pronghorn from Montana (USA). This is the first report of pasteurellosis in pronghorn from Oregon and the B:1 isolates appear to be unique in comparison to DNA fingerprint profiles from selected domestic and wild species.

Dunbar, Michael R.; Wolcott, Mark J.; Rimler, R.B.; Berlowski, Brenda M.

2000-01-01

499

Septicemic pasteurellosis in free-ranging neonatal pronghorn in Oregon.  

PubMed

As part of a study to determine the cause(s) of population decline and low survival of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) neonates on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge (HMNAR), Oregon (USA), 55 of 104 neonates captured during May 1996 and 1997 were necropsied (n = 28, 1996; n = 27, 1997) to determine cause of death. Necropsies were conducted on fawns that died during May, June, or July of each year. The objectives of this study were to report the occurrence and pathology of pasteurellosis in neonates and determine if the isolated strain of Pasteurella multocida was unique. Septicemic pasteurellosis, caused by P. multocida, was diagnosed as the cause of death for two neonates in May and June 1997. Necropsy findings included widely scattered petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages found over a large portion of the subcutaneous tissue, meninges of the brain, epicardium, skeletal muscle, and serosal surface of the thorasic and abdominal cavities. Histological examination of lung tissues revealed diffuse congestion and edema and moderate to marked multifocal infiltrate of macrophages, neutrophils, and numerous bacteria within many terminal bronchioles and alveoli. Pasteurella multocida serotypes A:3,4, and B:1 were isolated from several tissues including lung, intestinal, thorasic fluid, and heart blood. Each B:1 isolate had DNA restriction endonuclease fingerprint profiles distinct from isolates previously characterized from domestic cattle, swan (Olor spp.), moose (Alces alces), and pronghorn from Montana (USA). This is the first report of pasteurellosis in pronghorn from Oregon and the B:1 isolates appear to be unique in comparison to DNA fingerprint profiles from selected domestic and wild species. PMID:10813624

Dunbar, M R; Wolcott, M J; Rimler, R B; Berlowski, B M

2000-04-01

500

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: Watershed Restoration Projects: Annual Report, 1998.  

SciTech Connect

The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous US and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1998, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects implemented included installation of a tailwater collection and reuse system, infiltration galleries, permanent diversions, pumping stations, and irrigation upgrades. Project costs in 1998 totaled $891,504.00 with a total amount of $300,329.00 (34%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

1999-10-01