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Sample records for activity preferentially inhibits

  1. Glaucocalyxin A inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation preferentially via GPVI signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tang, Xiaorong; Yi, Wenxiu; Li, Qiang; Ren, Lijie; Liu, Xiaohui; Chu, Chunjun; Ozaki, Yukio; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a pivotal role in atherothrombosis and the antiplatelet agents have been proved to be useful in preventing onset of acute clinical events including myocardial infarction and stroke. Increasing number of natural compounds has been identified to be potential antiplatelet agents. Here we report the antiplatelet effect of glaucocalyxin A (GLA), an ent-diterpenoid that we isolated and purified from the aerial parts of Rabdosia japonica (Burm. f.) var. glaucocalyx (Maxim.) Hara, and investigate the molecular mechanisms by which GLA inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation. The effect of GLA on platelet activation was measured using platelets freshly isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors. Results showed that pretreatment of human platelets with lower concentrations of GLA (0.01 μg/ml, 0.1 μg/ml) significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen (P<0.001) and CRP (P<0.01), a synthetic GPVI ligand, but not by ADP and U46619. Accordingly, GLA inhibited collagen-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk, LAT, and phospholipase Cγ2, the signaling events in collagen receptor GPⅥ pathway. GLA also inhibited platelet p-selectin secretion and integrin activation by convulxin, a GPVI selective ligand. Additionally, GLA was found to inhibit low-dose thrombin-induced platelet activation. Using a flow chamber device, GLA was found to attenuate platelet adhesion on collagen surfaces in high shear condition. In vivo studies showed that GLA administration increased the time for complete occlusion upon vascular injury in mice, but did not extend tail-bleeding time when mice were administered with relatively lower doses of GLA. Therefore, the present results provide the molecular basis for the inhibition effect of GLA on platelet activation and its in vivo effect on thrombus formation, suggesting that GLA could potentially be developed as an antiplatelet and antithrombotic agent. PMID:24386454

  2. A pyrazolopyran derivative preferentially inhibits the activity of human cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase and induces cell death in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Marani, Marina; Paone, Alessio; Fiascarelli, Alessio; Macone, Alberto; Gargano, Maurizio; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Pontecorvi, Valentino; Koes, David; McDermott, Lee; Yang, Tianyi; Paiardini, Alessandro; Contestabile, Roberto; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2016-01-26

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is a central enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, providing activated one-carbon units in the serine-glycine one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies demonstrated that the cytoplasmic isoform of SHMT (SHMT1) plays a relevant role in lung cancer. SHMT1 is overexpressed in lung cancer patients and NSCLC cell lines. Moreover, SHMT1 is required to maintain DNA integrity. Depletion in lung cancer cell lines causes cell cycle arrest and uracil accumulation and ultimately leads to apoptosis. We found that a pyrazolopyran compound, namely 2.12, preferentially inhibits SHMT1 compared to the mitochondrial counterpart SHMT2. Computational and crystallographic approaches suggest binding at the active site of SHMT1 and a competitive inhibition mechanism. A radio isotopic activity assay shows that inhibition of SHMT by 2.12 also occurs in living cells. Moreover, administration of 2.12 in A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines causes apoptosis at LD50 34 μM and rescue experiments underlined selectivity towards SHMT1. These data not only further highlight the relevance of the cytoplasmic isoform SHMT1 in lung cancer but, more importantly, demonstrate that, at least in vitro, it is possible to find selective inhibitors against one specific isoform of SHMT, a key target in metabolic reprogramming of many cancer types. PMID:26717037

  3. A pyrazolopyran derivative preferentially inhibits the activity of human cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase and induces cell death in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiascarelli, Alessio; Macone, Alberto; Gargano, Maurizio; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Pontecorvi, Valentino; Koes, David; McDermott, Lee; Yang, Tianyi; Paiardini, Alessandro; Contestabile, Roberto; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is a central enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, providing activated one-carbon units in the serine-glycine one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies demonstrated that the cytoplasmic isoform of SHMT (SHMT1) plays a relevant role in lung cancer. SHMT1 is overexpressed in lung cancer patients and NSCLC cell lines. Moreover, SHMT1 is required to maintain DNA integrity. Depletion in lung cancer cell lines causes cell cycle arrest and uracil accumulation and ultimately leads to apoptosis. We found that a pyrazolopyran compound, namely 2.12, preferentially inhibits SHMT1 compared to the mitochondrial counterpart SHMT2. Computational and crystallographic approaches suggest binding at the active site of SHMT1 and a competitive inhibition mechanism. A radio isotopic activity assay shows that inhibition of SHMT by 2.12 also occurs in living cells. Moreover, administration of 2.12 in A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines causes apoptosis at LD50 34 μM and rescue experiments underlined selectivity towards SHMT1. These data not only further highlight the relevance of the cytoplasmic isoform SHMT1 in lung cancer but, more importantly, demonstrate that, at least in vitro, it is possible to find selective inhibitors against one specific isoform of SHMT, a key target in metabolic reprogramming of many cancer types. PMID:26717037

  4. Preferential inhibition of the plasma membrane NADH oxidase (NOX) activity by diphenyleneiodonium chloride with NADPH as donor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James

    2002-01-01

    The cell-surface NADH oxidase (NOX) protein of plant and animal cells will utilize both NADH and NADPH as reduced electron donors for activity. The two activities are distinguished by a differential inhibition by the redox inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). Using both plasma membranes and cells, activity with NADPH as donor was markedly inhibited by DPI at submicromolar concentrations, whereas with NADH as donor, DPI was much less effective or had no effect on the activity. The possibility of the inhibition being the result of two different enzymes was eliminated by the use of a recombinant NOX protein. The findings support the concept that NOX proteins serve as terminal oxidases for plasma membrane electron transport involving cytosolic reduced pyridine nucleotides as the natural electron donors and with molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor.

  5. IMPACT, a protein preferentially expressed in the mouse brain, binds GCN1 and inhibits GCN2 activation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cátia M; Sattlegger, Evelyn; Jiang, Hao-Yuan; Longo, Beatriz M; Jaqueta, Carolina B; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Wek, Ronald C; Mello, Luiz E A M; Castilho, Beatriz A

    2005-08-01

    Translational control directed by the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha-subunit (eIF2alpha) kinase GCN2 is important for coordinating gene expression programs in response to nutritional deprivation. The GCN2 stress response, conserved from yeast to mammals, is critical for resistance to nutritional deficiencies and for the control of feeding behaviors in rodents. The mouse protein IMPACT has sequence similarities to the yeast YIH1 protein, an inhibitor of GCN2. YIH1 competes with GCN2 for binding to a positive regulator, GCN1. Here, we present evidence that IMPACT is the functional counterpart of YIH1. Overexpression of IMPACT in yeast lowered both basal and amino acid starvation-induced levels of phosphorylated eIF2alpha, as described for YIH1 (31). Overexpression of IMPACT in mouse embryonic fibroblasts inhibited phosphorylation of eIF2alpha by GCN2 under leucine starvation conditions, abolishing expression of its downstream target genes, ATF4 (CREB-2) and CHOP (GADD153). IMPACT bound to the minimal yeast GCN1 segment required for interaction with yeast GCN2 and YIH1 and to native mouse GCN1. At the protein level, IMPACT was detected mainly in the brain. IMPACT was found to be abundant in the majority of hypothalamic neurons. Scattered neurons expressing this protein at higher levels were detected in other regions such as the hippocampus and piriform cortex. The abundance of IMPACT correlated inversely with phosphorylated eIF2alpha levels in different brain areas. These results suggest that IMPACT ensures constant high levels of translation and low levels of ATF4 and CHOP in specific neuronal cells under amino acid starvation conditions. PMID:15937339

  6. Inhibition of telomerase activity preferentially targets aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive cancer stem-like cells in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mortality rates for advanced lung cancer have not declined for decades, even with the implementation of novel chemotherapeutic regimens or the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for resistance to chemo/radiotherapy. Therefore, targeting CSCs with novel compounds may be an effective approach to reduce lung tumor growth and metastasis. We have isolated and characterized CSCs from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and measured their telomerase activity, telomere length, and sensitivity to the novel telomerase inhibitor MST312. Results The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive lung cancer cell fraction is enriched in markers of stemness and endowed with stem cell properties. ALDH+ CSCs display longer telomeres than the non-CSC population. Interestingly, MST312 has a strong antiproliferative effect on lung CSCs and induces p21, p27 and apoptosis in the whole tumor population. MST312 acts through activation of the ATM/pH2AX DNA damage pathway (short-term effect) and through decrease in telomere length (long-term effect). Administration of this telomerase inhibitor (40 mg/kg) in the H460 xenograft model results in significant tumor shrinkage (70% reduction, compared to controls). Combination therapy consisting of irradiation (10Gy) plus administration of MST312 did not improve the therapeutic efficacy of the telomerase inhibitor alone. Treatment with MST312 reduces significantly the number of ALDH+ CSCs and their telomeric length in vivo. Conclusions We conclude that antitelomeric therapy using MST312 mainly targets lung CSCs and may represent a novel approach for effective treatment of lung cancer. PMID:21827695

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 signals are involved in preferential inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine release by surfactin in cells activated with Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Young; Kim, Young Hun; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Ryu, Eun Yeon; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2010-12-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered the major pathogen of periodontal disease, which leads to chronic inflammation in oral tissues. P. gingivalis-produced lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key factor in the development of periodontitis. It is established that surfactin produced by Bacillus subtilis confers anti-inflammatory properties. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for surfactin-induced anti-inflammatory actions in the context of periodontitis are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether surfactin affected P. gingivalis LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-12, and determined that it significantly inhibited their production. Surfactin-mediated inhibition was mainly due to blocked activation of P. gingivalis LPS-triggered nuclear factor-κB. We also examined whether the regulatory effect of surfactin on P. gingivalis LPS-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages was mediated by the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) signals, and determined that surfactin also induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression via activation of Nrf-2. Additionally, we found that small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of Nrf-2 significantly inhibited surfactin-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly decreased surfactin-induced HO-1 expression, which is consistent with the suggestion that surfactin-induced HO-1 expression occurs via PI3K/Akt, ERK, and Nrf-2. Treatment with a selective inhibitor of HO-1 reversed the surfactin-mediated inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that surfactin induces anti-inflammatory effects by activating Nrf-2-mediated HO-1 induction via PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling. Collectively, these observations support the potential of surfactin as a candidate in strategies to prevent caries, periodontitis, or other inflammatory diseases. PMID:20833156

  8. ATR inhibition preferentially targets homologous recombination-deficient tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Krajewska, M; Fehrmann, R S N; Schoonen, P M; Labib, S; de Vries, E G E; Franke, L; van Vugt, M A T M

    2015-06-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is required for faithful repair of double-strand DNA breaks. Defects in HR repair cause severe genomic instability and challenge cellular viability. Paradoxically, various cancers are HR defective and have apparently acquired characteristics to survive genomic instability. We aimed to identify these characteristics to uncover therapeutic targets for HR-deficient cancers. Cytogenetic analysis of 1143 ovarian cancers showed that the degree of genomic instability was correlated to amplification of replication checkpoint genes ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) and CHEK1. To test whether genomic instability leads to increased reliance on replication checkpoint signaling, we inactivated Rad51 to model HR-related genomic instability. Rad51 inactivation caused defective HR repair and induced aberrant replication dynamics. Notably, inhibition of Rad51 led to increased ATR/checkpoint kinase-1 (Chk1)-mediated replication stress signaling. Importantly, inhibition of ATR or Chk1 preferentially killed HR-deficient cancer cells. Combined, our data show that defective HR caused by Rad51 inhibition results in differential sensitivity for ATR and Chk1 inhibitors, implicating replication checkpoint kinases as potential drug targets for HR-defective cancers. PMID:25174396

  9. Inhibition of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-interacting Kinase (MNK) Preferentially Affects Translation of mRNAs Containing Both a 5'-Terminal Cap and Hairpin.

    PubMed

    Korneeva, Nadejda L; Song, Anren; Gram, Hermann; Edens, Mary Ann; Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-02-12

    The MAPK-interacting kinases 1 and 2 (MNK1 and MNK2) are activated by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) or p38 in response to cellular stress and extracellular stimuli that include growth factors, cytokines, and hormones. Modulation of MNK activity affects translation of mRNAs involved in the cell cycle, cancer progression, and cell survival. However, the mechanism by which MNK selectively affects translation of these mRNAs is not understood. MNK binds eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and phosphorylates the cap-binding protein eIF4E. Using a cell-free translation system from rabbit reticulocytes programmed with mRNAs containing different 5'-ends, we show that an MNK inhibitor, CGP57380, affects translation of only those mRNAs that contain both a cap and a hairpin in the 5'-UTR. Similarly, a C-terminal fragment of human eIF4G-1, eIF4G(1357-1600), which prevents binding of MNK to intact eIF4G, reduces eIF4E phosphorylation and inhibits translation of only capped and hairpin-containing mRNAs. Analysis of proteins bound to m(7)GTP-Sepharose reveals that both CGP and eIF4G(1357-1600) decrease binding of eIF4E to eIF4G. These data suggest that MNK stimulates translation only of mRNAs containing both a cap and 5'-terminal RNA duplex via eIF4E phosphorylation, thereby enhancing the coupled cap-binding and RNA-unwinding activities of eIF4F. PMID:26668315

  10. Methylisoindigo preferentially kills cancer stem cells by interfering cell metabolism via inhibition of LKB1 and activation of AMPK in PDACs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinlai; Kim, Jee Young; Ghafoory, Shahrouz; Duvaci, Tijen; Rafiee, Roya; Theobald, Jannick; Alborzinia, Hamed; Holenya, Pavlo; Fredebohm, Johannes; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Mehrabi, Arianeb; Hafezi, Mohammadreza; Saffari, Arash; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Wölfl, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) clinically has a very poor prognosis. No small molecule is available to reliably achieve cures. Meisoindigo is chemically related to the natural product indirubin and showed substantial efficiency in clinical chemotherapy for CML in China. However, its effect on PDAC is still unknown. Our results showed strong anti-proliferation effect of meisoindigo on gemcitabine-resistant PDACs. Using a recently established primary PDAC cell line, called Jopaca-1 with a larger CSCs population as model, we observed a reduction of CD133+ and ESA+/CD44+/CD24+ populations upon treatment and concomitantly a decreased expression of CSC-associated genes, and reduced cellular mobility and sphere formation. Investigating basic cellular metabolic responses, we detected lower oxygen consumption and glucose uptake, while intracellular ROS levels increased. This was effectively neutralized by the addition of antioxidants, indicating an essential role of the cellular redox balance. Further analysis on energy metabolism related signaling revealed that meisoindigo inhibited LKB1, but activated AMPK. Both of them were involved in cellular apoptosis. Additional in situ hybridization in tissue sections of PDAC patients reproducibly demonstrated co-expression and -localization of LKB1 and CD133 in malignant areas. Finally, we detected that CD133+/CD44+ were more vulnerable to meisoindigo, which could be mimicked by LKB1 siRNAs. Our results provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that LKB1 sustains the CSC population in PDACs and demonstrate a clear benefit of meisoindigo in treatment of gemcitabine-resistant cells. This novel mechanism may provide a promising new treatment option for PDAC. PMID:26887594

  11. Capsaicin Inhibits Preferentially the NADH Oxidase and Growth of Transformed Cells in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morre, D. James; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Morre, Dorothy M.

    1995-03-01

    A hormone- and growth factor-stimulated NADH oxidase of the mammalian plasma membrane, constitutively activated in transformed cells, was inhibited preferentially in HeLa, ovarian carcinoma, mammary adenocarcinoma, and HL-60 cells, all of human origin, by the naturally occurring quinone analog capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-noneamide), compared with plasma membranes from human mammary epithelial, rat liver, normal rat kidney cells, or HL-60 cells induced to differentiate with dimethyl sulfoxide. With cells in culture, capsaicin preferentially inhibited growth of HeLa, ovarian carcinoma, mammary adenocarcinoma, and HL-60 cells but was largely without effect on the mammary epithelial cells, rat kidney cells, or HL-60 cells induced to differentiate with dimethyl sulfoxide. Inhibited cells became smaller and cell death was accompanied by a condensed and fragmented appearance of the nuclear DNA, as revealed by fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, suggestive of apoptosis. The findings correlate capsaicin inhibition of cell surface NADH oxidase activity and inhibition of growth that correlate with capsaicin-induced apoptosis.

  12. PREDICTING PREFERENTIAL ADSORPTION OF ORGANICS BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preferential adsorption of organic compounds onto activated carbon from dilute aqueous solutions was studied to develop a comprehensive theoretical basis for predicting adsorption of multicomponent solutes. The research program investigates why some solutes are strong adsorbers, ...

  13. Silibinin Preferentially Radiosensitizes Prostate Cancer by Inhibiting DNA Repair Signaling.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Rajamani, Paulraj; Deep, Gagan; Jain, Anil K; Agarwal, Rajesh; Singh, Rana P

    2015-12-01

    Radiotherapy, a frequent mode of cancer treatment, is often restricted by dose-related toxicity and development of therapeutic resistance. To develop a novel and selective radiosensitizer, we studied the radiosensitizing effects and associated mechanisms of silibinin in prostate cancer. The radiosensitizing effect of silibinin with ionizing radiation (IR) was assessed on radioresistant prostate cancer cell lines by clonogenic, cell cycle, cell death, and DNA repair assays. Tumor xenograft growth, immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of tumor tissues, and toxicity-related parameters were measured in vivo. Silibinin (25 μmol/L) enhanced IR (2.5-10 Gy)-caused inhibition (up to 96%, P < 0.001) of colony formation selectively in prostate cancer cells, and prolonged and enhanced IR-caused G2-M arrest, apoptosis, and ROS production. Mechanistically, silibinin inhibited IR-induced DNA repair (ATM and Chk1/2) and EGFR signaling and attenuated the levels of antiapoptotic proteins. Specifically, silibinin suppressed IR-induced nuclear translocation of EGFR and DNA-PK, an important mediator of DSB repair, leading to an increased number of γ-H2AX (ser139) foci suggesting lesser DNA repair. In vivo, silibinin strongly radiosensitized DU145 tumor xenograft inhibition (84%, P < 0.01) with higher apoptotic response (10-fold, P < 0.01) and reduced repair of DNA damage, and rescued the mice from IR-induced toxicity and hematopoietic injury. Overall, silibinin enhanced the radiotherapeutic response via suppressing IR-induced prosurvival signaling and DSB repair by inhibiting nuclear translocation of EGFR and DNA-PK. Because silibinin is already in phase II clinical trial for prostate cancer patients, the present finding has translational relevance for radioresistant prostate cancer. PMID:26516160

  14. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals That Hsp90 Inhibition Preferentially Targets Kinases and the DNA Damage Response*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kirti; Vabulas, R. Martin; Macek, Boris; Pinkert, Stefan; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias; Hartl, F. Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors as chemotherapeutic agents in diseases such as cancer, their global effects on the proteome remain largely unknown. Here we use high resolution, quantitative mass spectrometry to map protein expression changes associated with the application of the Hsp90 inhibitor, 17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG). In depth data obtained from five replicate SILAC experiments enabled accurate quantification of about 6,000 proteins in HeLa cells. As expected, we observed activation of a heat shock response with induced expression of molecular chaperones, which refold misfolded proteins, and proteases, which degrade irreparably damaged polypeptides. Despite the broad range of known Hsp90 substrates, bioinformatics analysis revealed that particular protein classes were preferentially affected. These prominently included proteins involved in the DNA damage response, as well as protein kinases and especially tyrosine kinases. We followed up on this observation with a quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of about 4,000 sites, which revealed that Hsp90 inhibition leads to much more down- than up-regulation of the phosphoproteome (34% down versus 6% up). This study defines the cellular response to Hsp90 inhibition at the proteome level and sheds light on the mechanisms by which it can be used to target cancer cells. PMID:22167270

  15. Arctigenin preferentially induces tumor cell death under glucose deprivation by inhibiting cellular energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuan; Qi, Chunting; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Xiuquan; Zhang, Haohao; Hu, Lihong; Yuan, Junying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-08-15

    Selectively eradicating cancer cells with minimum adverse effects on normal cells is a major challenge in the development of anticancer therapy. We hypothesize that nutrient-limiting conditions frequently encountered by cancer cells in poorly vascularized solid tumors might provide an opportunity for developing selective therapy. In this study, we investigated the function and molecular mechanisms of a natural compound, arctigenin, in regulating tumor cell growth. We demonstrated that arctigenin selectively promoted glucose-starved A549 tumor cells to undergo necrosis by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. In doing so, arctigenin elevated cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocked cellular energy metabolism in the glucose-starved tumor cells. We also demonstrated that cellular ROS generation was caused by intracellular ATP depletion and played an essential role in the arctigenin-induced tumor cell death under the glucose-limiting condition. Furthermore, we combined arctigenin with the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and examined their effects on tumor cell growth. Interestingly, this combination displayed preferential cell-death inducing activity against tumor cells compared to normal cells. Hence, we propose that the combination of arctigenin and 2DG may represent a promising new cancer therapy with minimal normal tissue toxicity. PMID:22687625

  16. Conopeptide Vt3.1 Preferentially Inhibits BK Potassium Channels Containing β4 Subunits via Electrostatic Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Chang, Shan; Yang, Longjin; Shi, Jingyi; McFarland, Kelli; Yang, Xiao; Moller, Alyssa; Wang, Chunguang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Chi, Chengwu; Cui, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    BK channel β subunits (β1–β4) modulate the function of channels formed by slo1 subunits to produce tissue-specific phenotypes. The molecular mechanism of how the homologous β subunits differentially alter BK channel functions and the role of different BK channel functions in various physiologic processes remain unclear. By studying channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we show a novel disulfide-cross-linked dimer conopeptide, Vt3.1 that preferentially inhibits BK channels containing the β4 subunit, which is most abundantly expressed in brain and important for neuronal functions. Vt3.1 inhibits the currents by a maximum of 71%, shifts the G-V relation by 45 mV approximately half-saturation concentrations, and alters both open and closed time of single channel activities, indicating that the toxin alters voltage dependence of the channel. Vt3.1 contains basic residues and inhibits voltage-dependent activation by electrostatic interactions with acidic residues in the extracellular loops of the slo1 and β4 subunits. These results suggest a large interaction surface between the slo1 subunit of BK channels and the β4 subunit, providing structural insight into the molecular interactions between slo1 and β4 subunits. The results also suggest that Vt3.1 is an excellent tool for studying β subunit modulation of BK channels and for understanding the physiological roles of BK channels in neurophysiology. PMID:24398688

  17. Phosphodiesterase inhibition by a gastroprotective agent irsogladine: preferential blockade of cAMP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kyoi, Takashi; Oka, Michiko; Noda, Kumiko; Ukai, Yojiro

    2004-08-27

    The effect of irsogladine [2,4-diamino-6-(2,5-dichlorophenyl)-s-triazine maleate], an antiulcer drug, on contents of cyclic nucleotides including cAMP and cGMP was investigated in rat stomachs. Irsogladine concentration-dependently increased cAMP content in rat glandula stomach. However, irsogladine at higher concentration (10(-5) M) was unable to further increase cAMP level in the presence of non-selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, although 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine by itself increased cAMP level. On the other hand, irsogladine had no effect on the glandula cGMP content. Subsequently, the effect of irsogladine on the cyclic nucleotide degradation by purified bovine brain and heart PDEs was investigated. The cAMP degradation by purified bovine brain PDE was partially suppressed by PDE1 inhibitor vinpocetin, PDE2 inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine hydrochloride and PDE4 inhibitor rolipram but not by PDE3 inhibitor cilostamide, and completely inhibited by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, suggesting that is attributed almost exclusively to PDE1, PDE2 and PDE4. Meanwhile, cGMP degradation by purified bovine brain PDE was partially suppressed by erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine hydrochloride. Irsogladine preferentially inhibited the response to cAMP degradation compared with cGMP degradation by this brain PDE. The cAMP degradation by bovine heart PDE was almost completely inhibited by the combination with vinpocetine and cilostamide, indicating that is mediated almost exclusively by PDE1 and PDE3. Irsogladine suppressed this cAMP degradation measured in the presence of vinpocetine to almost the same extent as that determined in the presence of cilostamide. These results indicate that irsogladine produces the increase of intracellular cAMP content via non-selective inhibition of PDE isozymes, which may be a key mechanism involved in its gastroprotective actions. PMID:15302227

  18. XPO1 Inhibition Preferentially Disrupts the 3D Nuclear Organization of Telomeres in Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Kashton, Cheryl; Lichtensztejn, Daniel; Baloglu, Erkan; Senapedis, William; Shacham, Sharon; Kauffman, Michael G; Kotb, Rami; Mai, Sabine

    2016-12-01

    Previous work has shown that the three-dimensional (3D) nuclear organization of telomeres is altered in cancer cells and the degree of alterations coincides with aggressiveness of disease. Nuclear pores are essential for spatial genome organization and gene regulation and XPO1 (exportin 1/CRM1) is the key nuclear export protein. The Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds developed by Karyopharm Therapeutics (KPT-185, KPT-330/selinexor, and KPT-8602) inhibit XPO1 nuclear export function. In this study, we investigated whether XPO1 inhibition has downstream effects on the 3D nuclear organization of the genome. This was assessed by measuring the 3D telomeric architecture of normal and tumor cells in vitro and ex vivo. Our data demonstrate for the first time a rapid and preferential disruption of the 3D nuclear organization of telomeres in tumor cell lines and in primary cells ex vivo derived from treatment-naïve newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients. Normal primary cells in culture as well as healthy lymphocyte control cells from the same patients were minimally affected. Using both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tumor cell lines, we found that the downstream effects on the 3D nuclear telomere structure are independent of tumor type. We conclude that the 3D nuclear organization of telomeres is a sensitive indicator of cellular response when treated with XPO1 inhibitors. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2711-2719, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991404

  19. Piperlongumine selectively kills hepatocellular carcinoma cells and preferentially inhibits their invasion via ROS-ER-MAPKs-CHOP.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Ju Mei; Xiong, Xin Xin; Qiu, Xin Yao; Pan, Feng; Liu, Di; Lan, Shu Jue; Jin, Si; Yu, Shang Bin; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2015-03-20

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) are highly malignant and aggressive tumors lack of effective therapeutic drugs. Piperlongumine (PL), a natural product isolated from longer pepper plants, is recently identified as a potent cytotoxic compound highly selective to cancer cells. Here, we reported that PL specifically suppressed HCC cell migration/invasion via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-MAPKs-CHOP signaling pathway. PL selectively killed HCC cells but not normal hepatocytes with an IC50 of 10-20 µM while PL at much lower concentrations only suppressed HCC cell migration/invasion. PL selectively elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HCC cells, which activated or up-regulated downstream PERK/Ire 1α/Grp78, p38/JNK/Erk and CHOP subsequently. Administration of antioxidants completely abolished PL's effects on cell death and migration/invasion. However, pharmacological inhibition of ER stress-responses or MAPKs signaling pathways with corresponding specific inhibitors only reversed PL's effect on cell migration/invasion but not on cell death. Consistently, knocking-down of CHOP by RNA interference only reversed PL-suppressed HCC cell migration. Finally, PL significantly suppressed HCC development and activated the ER-MAPKs-CHOP signaling pathway in HCC xenografts in vivo. Taken together, PL selectively killed HCC cells and preferentially inhibited HCC cell migration/invasion via ROS-ER-MAPKs-CHOP axis, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy for the highly malignant and aggressive HCC clinically. PMID:25788268

  20. Piperlongumine selectively kills hepatocellular carcinoma cells and preferentially inhibits their invasion via ROS-ER-MAPKs-CHOP

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Ju Mei; Xiong, Xin Xin; Qiu, Xin Yao; Pan, Feng; Liu, Di; Lan, Shu Jue; Jin, Si; Yu, Shang Bin; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) are highly malignant and aggressive tumors lack of effective therapeutic drugs. Piperlongumine (PL), a natural product isolated from longer pepper plants, is recently identified as a potent cytotoxic compound highly selective to cancer cells. Here, we reported that PL specifically suppressed HCC cell migration/invasion via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-MAPKs-CHOP signaling pathway. PL selectively killed HCC cells but not normal hepatocytes with an IC50 of 10-20 μM while PL at much lower concentrations only suppressed HCC cell migration/invasion. PL selectively elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HCC cells, which activated or up-regulated downstream PERK/Ire 1α/Grp78, p38/JNK/Erk and CHOP subsequently. Administration of antioxidants completely abolished PL's effects on cell death and migration/invasion. However, pharmacological inhibition of ER stress-responses or MAPKs signaling pathways with corresponding specific inhibitors only reversed PL's effect on cell migration/invasion but not on cell death. Consistently, knocking-down of CHOP by RNA interference only reversed PL-suppressed HCC cell migration. Finally, PL significantly suppressed HCC development and activated the ER-MAPKs-CHOP signaling pathway in HCC xenografts in vivo. Taken together, PL selectively killed HCC cells and preferentially inhibited HCC cell migration/invasion via ROS-ER-MAPKs-CHOP axis, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy for the highly malignant and aggressive HCC clinically. PMID:25788268

  1. Hepatitis C Virus Translation Preferentially Depends on Active RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Helene Minyi; Aizaki, Hideki; Machida, Keigo; Ou, J.-H. James; Lai, Michael M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA initiates its replication on a detergent-resistant membrane structure derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in the HCV replicon cells. By performing a pulse-chase study of BrU-labeled HCV RNA, we found that the newly-synthesized HCV RNA traveled along the anterograde-membrane traffic and moved away from the ER. Presumably, the RNA moved to the site of translation or virion assembly in the later steps of viral life cycle. In this study, we further addressed how HCV RNA translation was regulated by HCV RNA trafficking. When the movement of HCV RNA from the site of RNA synthesis to the Golgi complex was blocked by nocodazole, an inhibitor of ER-Golgi transport, HCV protein translation was surprisingly enhanced, suggesting that the translation of viral proteins occurred near the site of RNA synthesis. We also found that the translation of HCV proteins was dependent on active RNA synthesis: inhibition of viral RNA synthesis by an NS5B inhibitor resulted in decreased HCV viral protein synthesis even when the total amount of intracellular HCV RNA remained unchanged. Furthermore, the translation activity of the replication-defective HCV replicons or viral RNA with an NS5B mutation was greatly reduced as compared to that of the corresponding wildtype RNA. By performing live cell labeling of newly synthesized HCV RNA and proteins, we further showed that the newly synthesized HCV proteins colocalized with the newly synthesized viral RNA, suggesting that HCV RNA replication and protein translation take place at or near the same site. Our findings together indicate that the translation of HCV RNA is coupled to RNA replication and that the both processes may occur at the same subcellular membrane compartments, which we term the replicasome. PMID:22937067

  2. Modeling preferential water flow and solute transport in unsaturated soil using the active region model

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, F.; Wang, K.; Zhang, R.; Liu, H.H.

    2009-03-15

    Preferential flow and solute transport are common processes in the unsaturated soil, in which distributions of soil water content and solute concentrations are often characterized as fractal patterns. An active region model (ARM) was recently proposed to describe the preferential flow and transport patterns. In this study, ARM governing equations were derived to model the preferential soil water flow and solute transport processes. To evaluate the ARM equations, dye infiltration experiments were conducted, in which distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration were measured. Predicted results using the ARM and the mobile-immobile region model (MIM) were compared with the measured distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration. Although both the ARM and the MIM are two-region models, they are fundamental different in terms of treatments of the flow region. The models were evaluated based on the modeling efficiency (ME). The MIM provided relatively poor prediction results of the preferential flow and transport with negative ME values or positive ME values less than 0.4. On the contrary, predicted distributions of soil water content and Cl- concentration using the ARM agreed reasonably well with the experimental data with ME values higher than 0.8. The results indicated that the ARM successfully captured the macroscopic behavior of preferential flow and solute transport in the unsaturated soil.

  3. Oxidized derivative of docosahexaenoic acid preferentially inhibit cell proliferation in triple negative over luminal breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Bayoumy, Karam; Amin, Shantu; Gowda, Krishne; de Cicco, Ricardo López; Barton, Maria; Su, Yanrong; Russo, Irma H.; Himmelberger, Julie A.; Slifker, Michael; Manni, Andrea; Russo, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exert an anticancer effect by affecting multiple cellular mechanisms leading to inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. It is well known that breast cancer comprises distinct molecular subtypes which differ in their responsiveness to therapeutic and preventive agents. We tested the hypothesis that n-3FA may preferentially affect triple-negative breast cancer cells for which no targeted intervention is presently available. The in vitro antiproliferative effects of n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and its metabolite, 4-OH-DHA as well as its putative metabolite 4-OXO-DHA, were tested in five triple-negative human basal breast cell lines at different stages of transformation (MCF-10F, trMCF, bsMCF, MDA-MB-231, and BT-549) and three luminal breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T-47D, and SK-BR-3). Cell proliferation was measured with the tetrazolium MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. DHA and its oxidized derivatives significantly inhibited cell proliferation (20–90% reduction) of both basal and luminal breast cancer cell lines. The inhibitory effect was more pronounced on triple-negative basal breast cancer cell lines as compared to luminal breast cancer cell lines after 4-OXO-DHA treatment. Our data provide novel information regarding the preferential antitumor effect of oxidized derivatives of DHA on basal type breast cancer. PMID:25413005

  4. Activation of CCR9/CCL25 in Cutaneous Melanoma Mediates Preferential Metastasis to the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Amersi, Farin F.; Terando, Alicia M.; Goto, Yasufumi; Scolyer, Richard A.; Thompson, John F.; Tran, Andy N.; Faries, Mark B.; Morton, Donald L.; Hoon, Dave S.B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Specific chemokines and their respective receptors have been implicated in distant tumor cell metastasis. Cutaneous melanoma has a distinct pattern of metastasis, preferentially targeting the submucosa of the small intestine. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanism remains unknown. Migration of CCR9(+) lymphocytes to the small intestine is known to occur in response to the chemoattractant effects of CCL25 (thymus-expressed chemokine). The integrin heterodimers αβ are also known to be important mediators of cellular adhesion. We hypothesize that the mechanism of small intestinal metastasis by melanoma is via the CCR9-CCL25 axis and specific integrins. Experimental Design Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess melanoma tumors for CCR9 and CCL25. Integrin expression was assessed using flow cytometry. CCR9 expression by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR was assessed in primary (n = 23) and metastatic (n = 198) melanomas, and melanoma lines derived from small intestinal metastases (n = 23). Results We showed CCR9 expression in 88 of 102 paraffin-embedded metastatic melanomas from the small intestine, 8 of 8 melanoma lines derived from metastases in the small intestine, and 0 of 96 metastatic melanomas from other sites. In vitro migration and invasion studies done on CCR9(+) melanoma lines showed migration in response to CCL25 that was inhibited by anti-CCR9 antibody or by short interfering RNA CCR9. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed CCR9 expression by melanomas to the small intestine and showed concomitant α4β1 integrin expression. Conclusions Our findings show that functionally active CCR9 on melanoma cells facilitates metastasis to the small intestine. The CCR9-CCL25 axis may explain the high incidence of melanoma metastasis to this specific location. PMID:18245522

  5. In vivo comparison of harmine efficacy against psychostimulants: preferential inhibition of the cocaine response through a glutamatergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Owaisat, Suzan; Raffa, Robert B; Rawls, Scott M

    2012-09-01

    Harmine is a β-carboline compound that targets glutamatergic, monoaminergic, and GABAergic pathways underlying drug addiction. We compared the efficacy of harmine against different psychoactive drugs using an invertebrate (planarian) assay designed to quantify 'C-shape' responses. Harmine itself (0.01-10 μM) did not produce C-shapes. However, when applied over the same concentration range, harmine significantly inhibited C-shapes elicited by cocaine, with a concentration of 0.1 μM producing almost 90% inhibition. Consistent with its putative actions, harmine produced a similar, though less efficacious, inhibition of C-shapes elicited by the substituted amphetamines methamphetamine and mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) but was much less effective against nicotine. When tested in the presence of the glutamate transporter inhibitor dihydrokainate (DHK) (0.1, 1 μM), harmine (0.1 μM) efficacy against cocaine-induced C-shapes was significantly reduced. Harmine also attenuated C-shapes elicited by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and by glutamate itself. The present data suggest that harmine displays preferential efficacy against different addictive substances (cocaine>amphetamines>nicotine) and, at least for cocaine, is dependent on the glutamate system. PMID:22877698

  6. The preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) inhibits myeloid differentiation in normal hematopoietic and leukemic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Katherine A.; Cummings, Carrie L.; Sabo, Kathleen; Wood, Brent L.; Gooley, Ted; Yang, Taimei; Epping, Mirjam T.; Shou, Yaping; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era; Ladne, Paula; Stirewalt, Derek L.; Abkowitz, Janis L.; Radich, Jerald P.

    2009-01-01

    The preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) is expressed in several hematologic malignancies, but either is not expressed or is expressed at only low levels in normal hematopoietic cells, making it a target for cancer therapy. PRAME is a tumor-associated antigen and has been described as a corepressor of retinoic acid signaling in solid tumor cells, but its function in hematopoietic cells is unknown. PRAME mRNA expression increased with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) disease progression and its detection in late chronic-phase CML patients before tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy was associated with poorer therapeutic responses and ABL tyrosine kinase domain point mutations. In leukemia cell lines, PRAME protein expression inhibited granulocytic differentiation only in cell lines that differentiate along this lineage after all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) exposure. Forced PRAME expression in normal hematopoietic progenitors, however, inhibited myeloid differentiation both in the presence and absence of ATRA, and this phenotype was reversed when PRAME was silenced in primary CML progenitors. These observations suggest that PRAME inhibits myeloid differentiation in certain myeloid leukemias, and that its function in these cells is lineage and phenotype dependent. Lastly, these observations suggest that PRAME is a target for both prognostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:19625708

  7. Nonsynaptic junctions on myelinating glia promote preferential myelination of electrically active axons

    PubMed Central

    Wake, Hiroaki; Ortiz, Fernando C.; Woo, Dong Ho; Lee, Philip R.; Angulo, María Cecilia; Fields, R. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The myelin sheath on vertebrate axons is critical for neural impulse transmission, but whether electrically active axons are preferentially myelinated by glial cells, and if so, whether axo-glial synapses are involved, are long-standing questions of significance to nervous system development, plasticity and disease. Here we show using an in vitro system that oligodendrocytes preferentially myelinate electrically active axons, but synapses from axons onto myelin-forming oligodendroglial cells are not required. Instead, vesicular release at nonsynaptic axo-glial junctions induces myelination. Axons releasing neurotransmitter from vesicles that accumulate in axon varicosities induces a local rise in cytoplasmic calcium in glial cell processes at these nonsynaptic functional junctions, and this signalling stimulates local translation of myelin basic protein to initiate myelination. PMID:26238238

  8. Notexin preferentially inhibits the release of newly synthesized acetylcholine from rat brain synaptosomal fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Gundersen, C.B.; Jenden, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation was made of the effects of the snake venom neurotoxin, notexin, on acetylcholine turnover in rat brain P2 fractions using a gas chromatographic mass spectrometric assay for acetylcholine and choline. In contrast to earlier reports, we found a stimulation of the uptake and acetylation of labeled choline by toxin-treated P2 fractions. More significantly, notexin inhibited the release of this newly synthesized transmitter. These effects were found to be dependent on the dose of the toxin and the time of exposure of the P2 fraction to notexin. Longer exposure to notexin or experiments involving resuspension of notexin-treated P2 fractions appeared to result in considerable lysis of the transmitter-containing particles. Thus, notexin may alter acetylcholine compartmentation in the nerve ending and thereby affect acetylcholine synthesis.

  9. Characterizing soil preferential flow using iodine--starch staining experiments and the active region model

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Feng; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Renduo; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2009-03-01

    Thirteen iodine-starch staining experiments with different boundary conditions and measurement scales were conducted at two sites to study preferential flow processes in natural unsaturated soils. Digital imaging analyses were implemented to obtain the corresponding preferential flow patterns. The test results are used to evaluate a recently proposed active region model in terms of its usefulness and robustness for characterizing unsaturated flow processes at field scale. Test results provide useful insights into flow patterns in unsaturated soils. They show that flow pattern depends on the top boundary condition. As the total infiltrating-water depth increased form 20 mm to 80 mm for the 100 x 100 cm{sup 2} plots, the corresponding flow pattern changed from few preferential flow paths associated with a relatively small degree of stained coverage and a small infiltration depth, to a pattern characterized by a higher stained coverage and a larger infiltration depth, and to (finally) a relatively homogeneous flow pattern with few unstained area and a much larger infiltration depth. Test results also show that the preferential flow pattern became generally more heterogeneous and complex for a larger measurement scale (or size of infiltration plot). These observations support the general idea behind the active region model that preferential flow pattern in unsaturated soils are dynamic and depend on water flow conditions. Further analyses of the test results indicate that the active-region model is able to capture the major features of the observed flow pattern at the scale of interest, and the determined parameter values do not significantly depend on the test conditions (initial water content and total amount of infiltrating water) for a given test site. This supports the validity of the active region model that considers that parameter to be a property of the corresponding unsaturated soil. Results also show that some intrinsic relation seems to exist between active

  10. A clickable neurosteroid photolabel reveals selective Golgi compartmentalization with preferential impact on proximal inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoping; Shu, Hong-Jin; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Qian, Mingxing; Taylor, Amanda A; Covey, Douglas F; Zorumski, Charles F; Mennerick, Steven

    2016-09-01

    Anesthetic, GABA-active neurosteroids potently augment GABAA receptor function, leading to important behavioral consequences. Neurosteroids and their synthetic analogues are also models for a wide variety of cell-permeant neuroactive compounds. Cell permeation and compartmentalization raise the possibility that these compounds' actions are influenced by their cellular partitioning, but these contributions are not typically considered experimentally or therapeutically. To examine the interplay between cellular accumulation and pharmacodynamics of neurosteroids, we synthesized a novel chemical biology analogue (bio-active, clickable photolabel) of GABA-active neurosteroids. We discovered that the analogue selectively photo-labels neuronal Golgi in rat hippocampal neurons. The active analogue's selective distribution was distinct from endogenous cholesterol and not completely shared by some non-GABA active, neurosteroid-like analogues. On the other hand, the distribution was not enantioselective and did not require energy, in contrast to other recent precedents from the literature. We demonstrate that the soma-selective accumulation can act as a sink or source for steroid actions at plasma-membrane GABA receptors, altering steady-state and time course of effects at somatic GABAA receptors relative to dendritic receptors. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for compartment-selective drug actions at plasma-membrane receptors. PMID:27114255

  11. Müllerian inhibiting substance preferentially inhibits stem/progenitors in human ovarian cancer cell lines compared with chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaolong; Dombkowski, David; Meirelles, Katia; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Szotek, Paul P.; Chang, Henry L.; Preffer, Frederic I.; Mueller, Peter R.; Teixeira, Jose; MacLaughlin, David T.; Donahoe, Patricia K.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are proposed to be tumor-initiating cells capable of tumorigenesis, recurrence, metastasis, and drug resistance, and, like somatic stem cells, are thought to be capable of unlimited self-renewal and, when stimulated, proliferation and differentiation. Here we select cells by expression of a panel of markers to enrich for a population with stem cell-like characteristics. A panel of eight was initially selected from 95 human cell surface antigens as each was shared among human ovarian primary cancers, ovarian cancer cell lines, and normal fimbria. A total of 150 combinations of markers were reduced to a panel of three—CD44, CD24, and Epcam—which selected, in three ovarian cancer cell lines, those cells which best formed colonies. Cells expressing CD44, CD24, and Epcam exhibited stem cell characteristics of shorter tumor-free intervals in vivo after limiting dilution, and enhanced migration in invasion assays in vitro. Also, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and paclitaxel increased this enriched population which, conversely, was significantly inhibited by Müllerian inhibiting substance (MIS) or the MIS mimetic SP600125. These findings demonstrate that flow cytometry can be used to detect a population which shows differential drug sensitivity, and imply that treatment of patients can be individualized to target both stem/progenitor cell enriched and nonenriched subpopulations. The findings also suggest that this population, amenable to isolation by flow cytometry, can be used to screen for novel treatment paradigms, including biologic agents such as MIS, which will improve outcomes for patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:20952655

  12. Wnt/β-Catenin Small-Molecule Inhibitor CWP232228 Preferentially Inhibits the Growth of Breast Cancer Stem-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gyu-Beom; Hong, In-Sun; Kim, Ran-Ju; Lee, Su-Youn; Park, Se-Jin; Lee, Eun-Sook; Park, Jung Hyuck; Yun, Chi-Ho; Chung, Jae-Uk; Lee, Kyoung-June; Lee, Hwa-Yong; Nam, Jeong-Seok

    2015-04-15

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSC) are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which may destroy tumor masses but not all BCSC that can mediate relapses. In the present study, we showed that the level of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in BCSC is relatively higher than in bulk tumor cells, contributing to a relatively higher level of therapeutic resistance. We designed a highly potent small-molecule inhibitor, CWP232228, which antagonizes binding of β-catenin to T-cell factor (TCF) in the nucleus. Notably, although CWP232228 inhibited the growth of both BCSC and bulk tumor cells by inhibiting β-catenin-mediated transcription, BCSC exhibited greater growth inhibition than bulk tumor cells. We also documented evidence of greater insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) expression by BCSC than by bulk tumor cells and that CWP232228 attenuated IGF-I-mediated BCSC functions. These results suggested that the inhibitory effect of CWP232228 on BCSC growth might be achieved through the disruption of IGF-I activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that CWP232228 offers a candidate therapeutic agent for breast cancer that preferentially targets BCSC as well as bulk tumor cells. PMID:25660951

  13. Nucleus accumbens core acetylcholine is preferentially activated during acquisition of drug- vs food-reinforced behavior.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Jose A; Stöckl, Petra; Zorn, Katja; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2008-12-01

    Acquisition of drug-reinforced behavior is accompanied by a systematic increase of release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) rather than dopamine, the expected prime reward neurotransmitter candidate, in the nucleus accumbens core (AcbC), with activation of both muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptors in the AcbC by ACh volume transmission being necessary for the drug conditioning. The present findings suggest that the AcbC ACh system is preferentially activated by drug reinforcers, because (1) acquisition of food-reinforced behavior was not paralleled by activation of ACh release in the AcbC whereas acquisition of morphine-reinforced behavior, like that of cocaine or remifentanil (tested previously), was, and because (2) local intra-AcbC administration of muscarinic or nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists (atropine or mecamylamine, respectively) did not block the acquisition of food-reinforced behavior whereas acquisition of drug-reinforced behavior had been blocked. Interestingly, the speed with which a drug of abuse distributed into the AcbC and was eliminated from the AcbC determined the size of the AcbC ACh signal, with the temporally more sharply delineated drug stimulus producing a more pronounced AcbC ACh signal. The present findings suggest that muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptors in the AcbC are preferentially involved during reward conditioning for drugs of abuse vs sweetened condensed milk as a food reinforcer. PMID:18418362

  14. CDK5 activator protein p25 preferentially binds and activates GSK3β.

    PubMed

    Chow, Hei-Man; Guo, Dong; Zhou, Jie-Chao; Zhang, Guan-Yun; Li, Hui-Fang; Herrup, Karl; Zhang, Jie

    2014-11-11

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) are tau kinases and have been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The 3D structures of these kinases are remarkably similar, which led us to hypothesize that both might be capable of binding cyclin proteins--the activating cofactors of all CDKs. CDK5 is normally activated by the cyclin-like proteins p35 and p39. By contrast, we show that GSK3β does not bind to p35 but unexpectedly binds to p25, the calpain cleavage product of p35. Indeed, overexpressed GSK3β outcompetes CDK5 for p25, whereas CDK5 is the preferred p35 partner. FRET analysis reveals nanometer apposition of GSK3β:p25 in cell soma as well as in synaptic regions. Interaction with p25 also alters GSK3β substrate specificity. The GSK3β:p25 interaction leads to enhanced phosphorylation of tau, but decreased phosphorylation of β-catenin. A partial explanation for this situation comes from in silico modeling, which predicts that the docking site for p25 on GSK3β is the AXIN-binding domain; because of this, p25 inhibits the formation of the GSK3β/AXIN/APC destruction complex, thus preventing GSK3β from binding to and phosphorylating β-catenin. Coexpression of GSK3β and p25 in cultured neurons results in a neurodegeneration phenotype that exceeds that observed with CDK5 and p25. When p25 is transfected alone, the resulting neuronal damage is blocked more effectively with a specific siRNA against Gsk3β than with one against Cdk5. We propose that the effects of p25, although normally attributed to activate CDK5, may be mediated in part by elevated GSK3β activity. PMID:25331900

  15. CDK5 activator protein p25 preferentially binds and activates GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Hei-Man; Guo, Dong; Zhou, Jie-Chao; Zhang, Guan-Yun; Li, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) are tau kinases and have been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. The 3D structures of these kinases are remarkably similar, which led us to hypothesize that both might be capable of binding cyclin proteins—the activating cofactors of all CDKs. CDK5 is normally activated by the cyclin-like proteins p35 and p39. By contrast, we show that GSK3β does not bind to p35 but unexpectedly binds to p25, the calpain cleavage product of p35. Indeed, overexpressed GSK3β outcompetes CDK5 for p25, whereas CDK5 is the preferred p35 partner. FRET analysis reveals nanometer apposition of GSK3β:p25 in cell soma as well as in synaptic regions. Interaction with p25 also alters GSK3β substrate specificity. The GSK3β:p25 interaction leads to enhanced phosphorylation of tau, but decreased phosphorylation of β-catenin. A partial explanation for this situation comes from in silico modeling, which predicts that the docking site for p25 on GSK3β is the AXIN-binding domain; because of this, p25 inhibits the formation of the GSK3β/AXIN/APC destruction complex, thus preventing GSK3β from binding to and phosphorylating β-catenin. Coexpression of GSK3β and p25 in cultured neurons results in a neurodegeneration phenotype that exceeds that observed with CDK5 and p25. When p25 is transfected alone, the resulting neuronal damage is blocked more effectively with a specific siRNA against Gsk3β than with one against Cdk5. We propose that the effects of p25, although normally attributed to activate CDK5, may be mediated in part by elevated GSK3β activity. PMID:25331900

  16. Structure-Function Analysis of the Drosophila melanogaster Caudal Transcription Factor Provides Insights into Core Promoter-preferential Activation.

    PubMed

    Shir-Shapira, Hila; Sharabany, Julia; Filderman, Matan; Ideses, Diana; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Mannervik, Mattias; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2015-07-10

    Regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription is critical for the proper development, differentiation, and growth of an organism. The RNA polymerase II core promoter is the ultimate target of a multitude of transcription factors that control transcription initiation. Core promoters encompass the RNA start site and consist of functional elements such as the TATA box, initiator, and downstream core promoter element (DPE), which confer specific properties to the core promoter. We have previously discovered that Drosophila Caudal, which is a master regulator of genes involved in development and differentiation, is a DPE-specific transcriptional activator. Here, we show that the mouse Caudal-related homeobox (Cdx) proteins (mCdx1, mCdx2, and mCdx4) are also preferential core promoter transcriptional activators. To elucidate the mechanism that enables Caudal to preferentially activate DPE transcription, we performed structure-function analysis. Using a systematic series of deletion mutants (all containing the intact DNA-binding homeodomain) we discovered that the C-terminal region of Caudal contributes to the preferential activation of the fushi tarazu (ftz) Caudal target gene. Furthermore, the region containing both the homeodomain and the C terminus of Caudal was sufficient to confer core promoter-preferential activation to the heterologous GAL4 DNA-binding domain. Importantly, we discovered that Drosophila CREB-binding protein (dCBP) is a co-activator for Caudal-regulated activation of ftz. Strikingly, dCBP conferred the ability to preferentially activate the DPE-dependent ftz reporter to mini-Caudal proteins that were unable to preferentially activate ftz transcription themselves. Taken together, it is the unique combination of dCBP and Caudal that enables the co-activation of ftz in a core promoter-preferential manner. PMID:26018075

  17. Neamine is preferential as an anti-prostate cancer reagent by inhibiting cell proliferation and angiogenesis, with lower toxicity than cis-platinum

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YA-PING; HU, GUO-FU; WU, YUN-XIA

    2015-01-01

    Hormone therapy is the most commonly used treatment for prostate cancer, but for androgen-independent cancer, few effective treatment methods are available. Therefore, the requirement to develop novel and effective anti-prostate cancer drugs is extremely urgent. Angiogenin has been suggested as a molecular target for prostate cancer treatment; its overexpression contributes to androgen-dependent prostate cancer growth and castration-resistant growth of androgen-independent prostate cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether neamine, a low toxicity angiogenin nuclear translocation inhibitor, has preferential anti-prostate cancer activity compared with cis-platinum (DDP) and the mechanisms involved. Immunofluorescence and MTT assays were used to observe the effect of neamine on the nuclear translocation of angiogenin and cell proliferation, and a PC-3 cell transplanted tumor model was used to investigate the in vivo activity of neamine and DDP. Immunohistochemistry was performed to observe the expression of angiogenin, cluster of differentiation (CD)31 and Ki-67. It was found that neamine blocked nuclear translocation of angiogenin effectively and inhibited angiogenin-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell and PC-3 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Neamine exerted a comparative antitumor effect, but lower toxicity (weight loss), in the PC-3 xenograft models treated with DDP. Neamine consistently reduced the expression of angiogenin and CD31 significantly, but no difference was found in Ki-67 expression compared with DDP. These data suggested that neamine may be a promising agent for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:26170989

  18. Huntingtin inhibits caspase-3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Leavitt, Blair R; van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Goldowitz, Dan; MacDonald, Marcy E; Hayden, Michael R; Friedlander, Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Huntington's disease results from a mutation in the HD gene encoding for the protein huntingtin. The function of huntingtin, although beginning to be elucidated, remains largely unclear. To probe the prosurvival function of huntingtin, we modulate levels of wild-type huntingtin in a number of cellular and in vivo models. Huntingtin depletion resulted in caspase-3 activation, and overexpression of huntingtin resulted in caspase-3 inhibition. Additionally, we demonstrate that huntingtin physically interacts with active caspase-3. Interestingly, mutant huntingtin binds active caspase-3 with a lower affinity and lower inhibitory effect on active caspase-3 than does wild-type huntingtin. Although reduction of huntingtin levels resulted in caspase-3 activation in all conditions examined, the cellular response was cell-type specific. Depletion of huntingtin resulted in either overt cell death, or in increased vulnerability to cell death. These data demonstrate that huntingtin inhibits caspase-3 activity, suggesting a mechanism whereby caspase-mediated huntingtin depletion results in a detrimental amplification cascade leading to further caspase-3 activation, resulting in cell dysfunction and cell death. PMID:17124493

  19. Resveratrol and clofarabine induces a preferential apoptosis-activating effect on malignant mesothelioma cells by Mcl-1 down-regulation and caspase-3 activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lee, Yong-Jin; Lee, Sang-Han

    2015-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that resveratrol and clofarabine elicited a marked cytotoxicity on malignant mesothelioma (MM) MSTO-211H cells but not on the corresponding normal mesothelial MeT-5A cells. Little is known of the possible molecules that could be used to predict preferential chemosensitivity on MSTO-211H cells. Resveratrol and clofarabine induced down-regulation of Mcl-1 protein level in MSTO-211H cells. Treatment of cells with cycloheximide in the presence of proteasome inhibitor MG132 suggested that Mcl-1 protein levels were regulated at the post-translational step. The siRNA-based knockdown of Mcl-1 in MSTO-211H cells triggered more growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing effects with the resultant cleavages of procaspase-3 and its substrate PARP, increased caspase-3/7 activity, and increased percentage of apoptotic propensities. However, the majority of the observed changes were not shown in MeT-5A cells. Collectively, these studies indicate that the preferential activation of caspase cascade in malignant cells might have important applications as a therapeutic target for MM. PMID:24924397

  20. Preferential Repair of DNA Double-strand Break at the Active Gene in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Priyasri; Sen, Rwik; Pandita, Tej K.; Bhaumik, Sukesh R.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled nucleotide/base excision repair. We report here for the first time that DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is also coupled to transcription. We generated a yeast strain by introducing a homing (Ho) endonuclease cut site followed by a nucleotide sequence for multiple Myc epitopes at the 3′ end of the coding sequence of a highly active gene, ADH1. This yeast strain also contains the Ho cut site at the nearly silent or poorly active mating type α (MATα) locus and expresses Ho endonuclease under the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter. Using this strain, DSBs were generated at the ADH1 and MATα loci in galactose-containing growth medium that induced HO expression. Subsequently, yeast cells were transferred to dextrose-containing growth medium to stop HO expression, and the DSB repair was monitored at the ADH1 and MATα loci by PCR, using the primer pairs flanking the Ho cut sites. Our results revealed a faster DSB repair at the highly active ADH1 than that at the nearly silent MATα locus, hence implicating a transcription-coupled DSB repair at the active gene in vivo. Subsequently, we extended this study to another gene, PHO5 (carrying the Ho cut site at its coding sequence), under transcriptionally active and inactive growth conditions. We found a fast DSB repair at the active PHO5 gene in comparison to its inactive state. Collectively, our results demonstrate a preferential DSB repair at the active gene, thus supporting transcription-coupled DSB repair in living cells. PMID:22910905

  1. The dual topoisomerase inhibitor A35 preferentially and specially targets topoisomerase 2α by enhancing pre-strand and post-strand cleavage and inhibiting DNA religation

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Chongwen; Li, Yangbiao; Liu, Jingbo; Ye, Cheng; He, Hongwei; Li, Liang

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases play a key role in tumor proliferation. Chemotherapeutics targeting topoisomerases have been widely used in clinical oncology, but resistance and side effects, particularly cardiotoxicity, usually limit their application. Clinical data show that a decrease in topoisomerase (top) levels is the primary factor responsible for resistance, but in cells there is compensatory effect between the levels of top1 and top2α. Here, we validated cyclizing-berberine A35, which is a dual top inhibitor and preferentially targets top2α. The impact on the top2α catalytic cycle indicated that A35 could intercalate into DNA but did not interfere with DNA-top binding and top2α ATPase activity. A35 could facilitate DNA-top2α cleavage complex formation by enhancing pre-strand and post-strand cleavage and inhibiting religation, suggesting this compound can be a topoisomerase poison and had a district mechanism from other topoisomerase inhibitors. TARDIS and comet assays showed that A35 could induce cell DNA breakage and DNA-top complexes but had no effect on the cardiac toxicity inducer top2β. Silencing top1 augmented DNA break and silencing top2α decreased DNA break. Further validation in H9c2 cardiac cells showed A35 did not disturb cell proliferation and mitochondrial membrane potency. Additionally, an assay with nude mice further demonstrated A35 did not damage the heart. Our work identifies A35 as a novel skeleton compound dually inhibits topoisomerases, and predominantly and specially targets top2α by interfering with all cleavage steps and its no cardiac toxicity was verified by cardiac cells and mice heart. A35 could be a novel and effective targeting topoisomerase agent. PMID:26462155

  2. Renin inhibition activity by chitooligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Park, Pyo-Jam; Ahn, Chang-Bum; Jeon, You-Jin; Je, Jae-Young

    2008-04-01

    Six kinds of chitooligosaccharides (COSs) with different molecular weight (MW) and degree of deacetylation (DD) were prepared using ultrafiltration membrane reactor, and their renin inhibition modes were evaluated. All the COSs showed the renin-inhibitory activities with dose-dependent manner, and 90-COSs had the potent renin-inhibitory activity than that of 50-COSs. Among them, 90-MMWCOS (1000-5000Da) exhibits the highest activity with IC(50) value of 0.51mg/mL and acts as competitive inhibitor with K(i) value of 0.28mg/mL by Lineweaver-Burk and Dixon plots. These results indicated that DD value and MW of COSs are important factors affecting renin-inhibitory activity. PMID:18313296

  3. Structure-Activity Relationship in Nanostructured Copper-Ceria-Based Preferential CO Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gamarra,D.; Munuera, G.; Hungria, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.; Conesa, J.; Midgley, P.; Wang, X.; Hanson, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Martinez-Arias, A.

    2007-01-01

    Two series of nanostructured oxidized copper-cerium catalysts with varying copper loadings, and prepared, respectively, by impregnation of ceria and by coprecipitation of the two components within reverse microemulsions, have been characterized in detail at structural and electronic levels by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) (including Ar{sup +}-sputtering), and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). These results have been correlated with analysis of their catalytic properties for preferential oxidation of CO in a H{sub 2}-rich stream (CO-PROX), complemented by Operando-DRIFTS. A relevant difference between the two series of catalysts concerns the nature of the support for the surface-dispersed copper oxide entities, which is essentially ceria for the samples prepared by impregnation and a Ce-Cu mixed oxide for those prepared by microemulsion-coprecipitation. The existence of copper segregation in the form of copper oxide or copper-enriched Cu-Ce mixed oxides for the latter type of samples is uniquely revealed by nanoprobe XEDS and XPS Ar{sup +}-sputtering experiments. The CO oxidation activity under CO-PROX conditions is correlated to the degree of support-promoted reduction achieved by the dispersed copper oxide particles under reaction conditions. Nevertheless, catalysts which display higher CO oxidation activity are generally more efficient also for the undesired H{sub 2} oxidation reaction. The balance between both reactions results in differences in the CO-PROX activity between the two series of catalysts which are examined on the basis of the structural differences found.

  4. Preferential Acquisition and Activation of Plasminogen Glycoform II by PAM Positive Group A Streptococcal Isolates.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, David M P; Law, Ruby H P; Ly, Diane; Cook, Simon M; Quek, Adam J; McArthur, Jason D; Whisstock, James C; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2015-06-30

    Plasminogen (Plg) circulates in the host as two predominant glycoforms. Glycoform I Plg (GI-Plg) contains glycosylation sites at Asn289 and Thr346, whereas glycoform II Plg (GII-Plg) is exclusively glycosylated at Thr346. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that Plg binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM) exhibits comparative equal affinity for GI- and GII-Plg in the "closed" conformation (for GII-Plg, KD = 27.4 nM; for GI-Plg, KD = 37.0 nM). When Plg was in the "open" conformation, PAM exhibited an 11-fold increase in affinity for GII-Plg (KD = 2.8 nM) compared with that for GI-Plg (KD = 33.2 nM). The interaction of PAM with Plg is believed to be mediated by lysine binding sites within kringle (KR) 2 of Plg. PAM-GI-Plg interactions were fully inhibited with 100 mM lysine analogue ε-aminocaproic acid (εACA), whereas PAM-GII-Plg interactions were shown to be weakened but not inhibited in the presence of 400 mM εACA. In contrast, binding to the KR1-3 domains of GII-Plg (angiostatin) by PAM was completely inhibited in the presence 5 mM εACA. Along with PAM, emm pattern D GAS isolates express a phenotypically distinct SK variant (type 2b SK) that requires Plg ligands such as PAM to activate Plg. Type 2b SK was able to generate an active site and activate GII-Plg at a rate significantly higher than that of GI-Plg when bound to PAM. Taken together, these data suggest that GAS selectively recruits and activates GII-Plg. Furthermore, we propose that the interaction between PAM and Plg may be partially mediated by a secondary binding site outside of KR2, affected by glycosylation at Asn289. PMID:26029848

  5. Trastuzumab has preferential activity against breast cancers driven by HER2 homodimers

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ritwik; Narasanna, Archana; Wang, Shizhen Emily; Liu, Shuying; Chakrabarty, Anindita; Balko, Justin M.; González-Angulo, Ana María; Mills, Gordon B.; Penuel, Elicia; Winslow, John; Sperinde, Jeff; Dua, Rajiv; Pidaparthi, Sailaja; Mukherjee, Ali; Leitzel, Kim; Kostler, Wolfgang J.; Lipton, Allan; Bates, Michael; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2011-01-01

    In breast cancer cells with HER2 gene amplification, HER2 receptors exist on the cell surface as monomers, homodimers and heterodimers with EGFR/HER3. The therapeutic antibody trastuzumab, an approved therapy for HER2+ breast cancer, cannot block ligand-induced HER2 heterodimers, suggesting it cannot effectively inhibit HER2 signaling. Hence, HER2 oligomeric states may predict the odds of a clinical response to trastuzumab in HER2-driven tumors. To test this hypothesis, we generated non-transformed human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells stably expressing a chimeric HER2-FKBP molecule that could be conditionally induced to homodimerize by adding the FKBP ligand AP1510, or instead induced to heterodimerize with EGFR or HER3 by adding the heterodimer ligands EGF/TGFα or heregulin. AP1510, EGF, and heregulin each induced growth of MCF10A cells expressing HER2-FKBP. As expected, trastuzumab inhibited homodimer-mediated but not heterodimer-mediated cell growth. In contrast, the HER2 antibody pertuzumab, which blocks HER2 heterodimerization, inhibited growth induced by heregulin but not AP1510. Lastly, HER2/EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib blocked both homodimer- and heterodimer-induced growth. AP1510 triggered phosphorylation of Erk1/2 but not AKT, whereas trastuzumab inhibited AP1510-induced Erk1/2 phosphorylation and Shc-HER2 homodimer binding, but not TGFα-induced AKT phosphorylation. Consistent with these observations, high levels of HER2 homodimers correlated with longer time to progression following trastuzumab therapy in a cohort of HER2-overexpressing patients. Together, our findings corroborate the hypothesis that HER2 oligomeric states regulate HER2 signaling, also arguing that trastuzumab sensitivity of homodimers reflects an inability to activate the PI3K/AKT pathway. One of the most important clinical implications of our results is that high levels of HER2 homodimers may predict a positive response to trastuzumab. PMID:21324925

  6. Trastuzumab has preferential activity against breast cancers driven by HER2 homodimers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ritwik; Narasanna, Archana; Wang, Shizhen Emily; Liu, Shuying; Chakrabarty, Anindita; Balko, Justin M; González-Angulo, Ana María; Mills, Gordon B; Penuel, Elicia; Winslow, John; Sperinde, Jeff; Dua, Rajiv; Pidaparthi, Sailaja; Mukherjee, Ali; Leitzel, Kim; Kostler, Wolfgang J; Lipton, Allan; Bates, Michael; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2011-03-01

    In breast cancer cells with HER2 gene amplification, HER2 receptors exist on the cell surface as monomers, homodimers, and heterodimers with EGFR/HER3. The therapeutic antibody trastuzumab, an approved therapy for HER2(+) breast cancer, cannot block ligand-induced HER2 heterodimers, suggesting it cannot effectively inhibit HER2 signaling. Hence, HER2 oligomeric states may predict the odds of a clinical response to trastuzumab in HER2-driven tumors. To test this hypothesis, we generated nontransformed human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells stably expressing a chimeric HER2-FKBP molecule that could be conditionally induced to homodimerize by adding the FKBP ligand AP1510, or instead induced to heterodimerize with EGFR or HER3 by adding the heterodimer ligands EGF/TGFα or heregulin. AP1510, EGF, and heregulin each induced growth of MCF10A cells expressing HER2-FKBP. Trastuzumab inhibited homodimer-mediated but not heterodimer-mediated cell growth. In contrast, the HER2 antibody pertuzumab, which blocks HER2 heterodimerization, inhibited growth induced by heregulin but not AP1510. Lastly, the HER2/EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib blocked both homodimer- and heterodimer-induced growth. AP1510 triggered phosphorylation of Erk1/2 but not AKT, whereas trastuzumab inhibited AP1510-induced Erk1/2 phosphorylation and Shc-HER2 homodimer binding, but not TGFα-induced AKT phosphorylation. Consistent with these observations, high levels of HER2 homodimers correlated with longer time to progression following trastuzumab therapy in a cohort of patients with HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. Together, our findings confirm the notion that HER2 oligomeric states regulate HER2 signaling, also arguing that trastuzumab sensitivity of homodimers may reflect their inability to activate the PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/AKT pathway. A clinical implication of our results is that high levels of HER2 homodimers may predict a positive response to trastuzumab. PMID:21324925

  7. Effects of small doses of cytochalasins on fibroblasts: preferential changes of active edges and focal contacts.

    PubMed Central

    Domnina, L V; Gelfand, V I; Ivanova, O Y; Leonova, E V; Pletjushkina, O Y; Vasiliev, J M; Gelfand, I M

    1982-01-01

    The effects of low doses of cytochalasin B (2 micrograms/ml) and cytochalasin D (0.2 microgram/ml) on the spreading of normal mouse fibroblasts in culture were investigated to find out which components of cell-substrate interactions are most sensitive to alterations of the state of actin cytoskeleton. Cytochalasin B disorganized the cortical layer of actin microfilaments and caused partial or complete disappearance of microfilament bundles; focal contacts with the substrate seen by interference-reflection microscopy also disappeared. Diffuse close contacts were apparently insensitive to cytochalasin B. Low doses of cytochalasin B did not inhibit the outgrowth and maintenance of lamellas at the cell periphery. However, in contrast to controls, these lamellas had no distal zones with convex outer edges and ruffles at the upper surfaces. The disappearance of these ruffling active edges was accompanied by loss of the ability to clear the surface of the lamellas from the concanavalin A receptors crosslinked by the corresponding ligand. The effects of cytochalasin D were similar to those of cytochalasin B. Thus, ruffling active edges and focal contacts can be regarded as specialized parts of lamellas with increased sensitivity to cytochalasins; the presence of ruffling active edges is essential for the initiation of centripetal movement of the patches of crosslinked surface receptors. Images PMID:6961447

  8. Preferential Phosphorylation of R-domain Serine 768 Dampens Activation of CFTR Channels by PKA

    PubMed Central

    Csanády, László; Seto-Young, Donna; Chan, Kim W.; Cenciarelli, Cristina; Angel, Benjamin B.; Qin, Jun; McLachlin, Derek T.; Krutchinsky, Andrew N.; Chait, Brian T.; Nairn, Angus C.; Gadsby, David C.

    2005-01-01

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), the protein whose dysfunction causes cystic fibrosis, is a chloride ion channel whose gating is controlled by interactions of MgATP with CFTR's two cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains, but only after several serines in CFTR's regulatory (R) domain have been phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Whereas eight R-domain serines have previously been shown to be phosphorylated in purified CFTR, it is not known how individual phosphoserines regulate channel gating, although two of them, at positions 737 and 768, have been suggested to be inhibitory. Here we show, using mass spectrometric analysis, that Ser 768 is the first site phosphorylated in purified R-domain protein, and that it and five other R-domain sites are already phosphorylated in resting Xenopus oocytes expressing wild-type (WT) human epithelial CFTR. The WT channels have lower activity than S768A channels (with Ser 768 mutated to Ala) in resting oocytes, confirming the inhibitory influence of phosphoserine 768. In excised patches exposed to a range of PKA concentrations, the open probability (Po) of mutant S768A channels exceeded that of WT CFTR channels at all [PKA], and the half-maximally activating [PKA] for WT channels was twice that for S768A channels. As the open burst duration of S768A CFTR channels was almost double that of WT channels, at both low (55 nM) and high (550 nM) [PKA], we conclude that the principal mechanism by which phosphoserine 768 inhibits WT CFTR is by hastening the termination of open channel bursts. The right-shifted Po-[PKA] curve of WT channels might explain their slower activation, compared with S768A channels, at low [PKA]. The finding that phosphorylation kinetics of WT or S768A R-domain peptides were similar provides no support for an alternative explanation, that early phosphorylation of Ser 768 in WT CFTR might also impair subsequent phosphorylation of stimulatory R-domain serines. The

  9. Toxic and chemopreventive ligands preferentially activate distinct aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathways: implications for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Okino, Steven T; Pookot, Deepa; Basak, Shashwati; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2009-03-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated regulatory protein that controls estrogen action through two distinct pathways. In one pathway, AhR acts as a transcription factor that induces the expression of the CYP1 family of estrogen-metabolizing genes; in the other pathway, AhR initiates the degradation of the estrogen receptor and suppresses estrogen signaling. The AhR ligand 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) is a beneficial dietary constituent that prevents breast tumors in rodents and is associated with decreased breast cancer risk in humans. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a toxic AhR ligand that is implicated in birth defects, infertility, and cancer. We analyzed MCF-7 cells to gain insight into how two AhR ligands can exert such fundamentally different health effects. We find that DIM and TCDD have differing abilities to activate the distinct AhR-controlled pathways. TCDD strongly induces AhR-dependent CYP1 gene expression, whereas DIM is a relatively weak CYP1 inducer. DIM strongly inhibits estrogen receptor-alpha expression and estrogen signaling, whereas TCDD has a notably weaker effect on these processes. Small interfering RNA knockdown of AhR confirms that the effects of DIM and TCDD are indeed AhR dependent. Our findings reveal that DIM and TCDD each elicit a unique pattern of change in pathways that control estrogen action; such patterns may determine if an AhR ligand has beneficial or adverse health effects. PMID:19223575

  10. The tetraspanin CD9 is preferentially expressed on the human CD4+CD45RA+ naive T cell population and is involved in T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, H; HOSONO, O; IWATA, S; KAWASAKI, H; KUWANA, M; TANAKA, H; DANG, N H; MORIMOTO, C

    2004-01-01

    Human CD4+ T cells can be divided into reciprocal memory and naive T cell subsets based on their expression of CD45 isoforms and CD29/integrin beta1 subunit. To identify unique cell surface molecules on human T cells, we developed a new monoclonal antibody termed anti5H9. Binding of anti5H9 triggers a co-stimulatory response in human peripheral blood T cells. Retrovirus-mediated expression cloning has revealed that the antigen recognized by anti5H9 is identical to the tetraspanin CD9. We now show that human CD9 is preferentially expressed on the CD4+CD45RA+ naive T cell subset, and that CD9+CD45RA+ T cells respond preferentially to the recombinant beta2-glycoprotein I, compared to CD9–CD45RA+ T cells. Furthermore, anti5H9 inhibits both the recombinant beta2-glycoprotein I- and the recall antigen tetanus toxoid-specific T cell proliferation. These results suggest that the tetraspanin CD9 plays an important role in T cell activation. PMID:15196249

  11. Inhibition of endothelial lipase activity by sphingomyelin in the lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Belikova, Natalia A; Billheimer, Jeff; Rader, Daniel J; Hill, John S; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a major determinant of plasma HDL concentration, its activity being inversely proportional to HDL levels. Although it is known that it preferentially acts on HDL compared to LDL and VLDL, the basis for this specificity is not known. Here we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin, a major phospholipid in lipoproteins is a physiological inhibitor of EL, and that the preference of the enzyme for HDL may be due to low sphingomyelin/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) ratio in HDL, compared to other lipoproteins. Using recombinant human EL, we showed that sphingomyelin inhibits the hydrolysis of PtdCho in the liposomes in a concentration-dependent manner. While the enzyme showed lower hydrolysis of LDL PtdCho, compared to HDL PtdCho, this difference disappeared after the degradation of lipoprotein sphingomyelin by bacterial sphingomyelinase. Analysis of molecular species of PtdCho hydrolyzed by EL in the lipoproteins showed that the enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed PtdCho containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as 22:6, 20:5, 20:4 at the sn-2 position, generating the corresponding PUFA-lyso PtdCho. This specificity for PUFA-PtdCho species was not observed after depletion of sphingomyelin by sphingomyelinase. These results show that sphingomyelin not only plays a role in regulating EL activity, but also influences its specificity towards PtdCho species. PMID:25167836

  12. Preferential inhibition of the lycopene epsilon-cyclase by the substituted triethylamine compound MPTA in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Phillip, Denise M; Young, Andrew J

    2006-03-01

    In addition to the usual complement of carotenoids found in the plant leaf tissues, lettuce (Lactuca sativa), unusually, possesses large amounts of the diol lactucaxanthin. This carotenoid possesses two epsilon-end-groups and its presence provides a good model in which to study the effects of the substituted triethylamine compound 2-(4-methylphenoxy)triethylamine (MPTA) on the cyclisation of beta- and epsilon-end-groups during the biosynthesis of carotenoids. Treatment with 10 or 20microM MPTA significantly reduced levels of both beta-carotene and neoxanthin (up to 18-fold), whilst levels of violaxanthin and lutein were less affected (4-fold reduction). In contrast, levels of lactucaxanthin were not reduced even at the highest inhibitor concentration, and at 10microM MPTA levels of this xanthophyll doubled. The pigment stoichiometry of the bulk light-harvesting complex (LHCIIb) isolated from treated plants shows that lactucaxanthin successfully substituted for lutein and neoxanthin in two of the xanthophyll binding sites, namely L2 and N1. Inhibition of cyclisation was accompanied by the accumulation of lycopene and trace amounts of delta-carotene and a number of oxygenated derivatives of these precursors. Two forms of mono-hydroxy lycopene were identified together with mono-epoxy delta-carotene. PMID:16455351

  13. Preferential nitration with tetranitromethane of a specific tyrosine residue in penicillinase from Staphylococcus aureus PCl. Evidence that the preferentially nitrated residue is not part of the active site but that loss of activity is due to intermolecular cross-linking.

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, A F; Virden, R

    1978-01-01

    1. Nitration of tyrosine residues of staphylococal penicillinase was accompanied by a partial loss of enzymic activity, which was not readily explained by nitration of a single residue. 2. Loss of activity correlated with low recovery of tyrosine plus nitrotyrosine, which was consistent with cross-linking. 3. The fraction of treated enzyme that was eluted from Sephadex G-75 earlier than native penicillinase was similar to the fraction of enzyme activity lost. Protein eluted in positions corresponding to monomer, dimer and higher oligomers respectively showed major bands in corresponding positions in sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, indicating that the increase in molecular weight was due to intermolecular cross-linking. Monomeric enzyme containing up to 4 mol of nitrotyrosine/mol retained full catalytic activity. Dimeric enzyme retained 50% of normal activity, whereas higher oligomers retained an average of 8-15% of normal activity. 4. Monomeric enzyme isolated after treatment with equimolar tetranitromethane was nitrated predominantly at tyrosine-72.5. Reaction of reduced nitrated monomer with 1,5-difluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene gave a monomeric, apparently cross-linked product with full catalytic activity. 6. It is concluded that tyrosine-72 plays no part in the active site. Its preferential nitration may be due to its being insufficiently exposed to be available for intermolecular cross-linking. This poperty may make it useful for attachment of a reporter group. PMID:629760

  14. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, YiJing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis. PMID:24954746

  15. Tasting a liquid meal after a prolonged fast is associated with preferential activation of the left hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Del Parigi, Angelo; Chen, Kewei; Salbe, Arline D; Gautier, Jean-François; Ravussin, Eric; Reiman, Eric M; Tataranni, P Antonio

    2002-07-01

    We used positron emission tomographic scanning of the brain and measures of regional cerebral blood flow to investigate the response of 44 right-handed people to the oral administration of 2 ml of a liquid formula meal after a 36 h fast (and shortly before the administration of a satiating amount of the same meal). Several areas of the left hemisphere were significantly more activated than the contralateral, including the frontal operculum, ventral insula, and piriform cortex. In contrast with reports of right-hemisphere dominance in chemosensory perception in non-hungry individuals, our study reveals a preferential activation of the left hemisphere when people who are very hungry are briefly exposed to the chemical and physical properties of a liquid meal. This raises the possibility that the physiological context in which perception takes place (i.e. extreme vs moderate vs no hunger) may importantly affect the brain representation of chemosensory stimuli. PMID:12151757

  16. H2A.Z has a function reminiscent of an activator required for preferential binding to intergenic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Larochelle, Marc; Gaudreau, Luc

    2003-01-01

    H2A.Z has been shown to regulate transcription in yeast, and that function resides in its C-terminal region as the reciprocal portion of H2A cannot substitute for the latter. We show that fusion of a transcriptional activating region to the C-terminal region of H2A, which is substituted for that of H2A.Z, can allow the chimera to fulfil the special role of H2A.Z in positive gene regulation, as well as complement growth deficiencies of htz1Δ cells. We further show that the ‘transcription’ function of H2A.Z is linked to its ability to preferentially localize to certain intergenic DNA regions. Our results suggest that H2A.Z modulates functional interactions with transcription regulatory components, and thus increases its localization to promoters where it helps poise chromatin for gene activation. PMID:12941702

  17. Tetracaine, a local anesthetic, preferentially induces translational inhibition with processing body formation rather than phosphorylation of eIF2α in yeast.

    PubMed

    Araki, Tomoyuki; Toh-e, Akio; Kikuchi, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Chihiro K; Hachiya, Takushi; Noguchi, Ko; Terashima, Ichiro; Uesono, Yukifumi

    2015-02-01

    It is unclear whether local anesthetics, such as tetracaine, and antipsychotics, such as phenothiazines, act on lipids or proteins. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, these drugs inhibit growth, translation initiation, and actin polarization, and induce cell lysis at high concentrations. These activities are likely due to the cationic amphiphilic structure common to these agents. Although drug-induced translational inhibition is conserved in mammalian cells, other mechanisms, including the phosphorylation of eIF2α, a eukaryotic translational initiation factor, remain poorly understood. At a concentration of 10 mM, tetracaine rapidly inhibited translation initiation and lysed cells, whereas, at 2.5 mM, it slowly induced inhibition without lysis. The pat1 disruptant defective in mRNA decapping and the xrn1 disruptant defective in 5'-3' exoribonuclease were partially resistant to translational inhibition by tetracaine at each concentration, but the gcn2 disruptant defective in the eIF2α kinase was not. Phosphorylation of eIF2α was induced by 10 mM but not by 2.5 mM tetracaine, whereas processing bodies (P-bodies) were formed at 2.5 mM in Pat1-dependent and -independent manners. Therefore, administration of tetracaine inhibits translation initiation with P-body formation at both concentrations but acts via the Gcn2-eIF2α system only at the higher concentration. Because other local anesthetics and phenothiazines induced Pat1-dependent P-body formation, the mechanisms involved in translational inhibition by these cationic amphiphiles are similar. These results suggest that this dose-dependent biphasic translational inhibition by tetracaine results from an increase in membrane proteins that are indirectly inhibited by nonspecific interactions of cationic amphiphiles with membrane lipids. PMID:25119673

  18. Activin inhibits telomerase activity in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Katik, Indzi; Mackenzie-Kludas, Charley; Nicholls, Craig; Jiang, Fang-Xu; Zhou, Shufeng; Li, He; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2009-11-27

    Activin is a pleiotropic cytokine with broad tissue distributions. Recent studies demonstrate that activin-A inhibits cancer cell proliferation with unknown mechanisms. In this report, we demonstrate that recombinant activin-A induces telomerase inhibition in cancer cells. In breast and cervical cancer cells, activin-A resulted in telomerase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant inhibition was observed at 10 ng/ml of activin-A, with a near complete inhibition at 80 ng/ml. Consistently, activin-A induced repression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, with the hTERT gene to be suppressed by 60-80% within 24 h. In addition, activin-A induced a concomitant increase in Smad3 signaling and decrease of the hTERT gene promoter activity in a concentration-dependent fashion. These data suggest that activin-A triggered telomerase inhibition by down-regulating hTERT gene expression is involved in activin-A-induced inhibition of cancer cell proliferation.

  19. Preferential PPAR-α activation reduces neuroinflammation, and blocks neurodegeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Mohammad A; Yadav, Shilpi; Gupta, Ravi Kr; Waggoner, Garrett R; Deloach, Abigail; Calingasan, Noel Y; Beal, M Flint; Kiaei, Mahmoud

    2016-01-15

    Neuroinflammation, immune reactivity and mitochondrial abnormalities are considered as causes and/or contributors to neuronal degeneration. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate both inflammatory and multiple other pathways that are implicated in neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of fenofibrate (Tricor), a pan-PPAR agonist that activates PPAR-α as well as other PPARs. We administered fenofibrate to superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1(G93A)) mice daily prior to any detectable phenotypes and then animal behavior, pathology and longevity were assessed. Treated animals showed a significant slowing of the progression of disease with weight loss attenuation, enhanced motor performance, delayed onset and survival extension. Histopathological analysis of the spinal cords showed that neuronal loss was significantly attenuated in fenofibrate-treated mice. Mitochondria were preserved as indicated by Cytochrome c immunostaining in the spinal cord, which maybe partly due to increased expression of the PPAR-γ co-activator 1-α. The total mRNA analysis revealed that neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory genes were elevated, while neuroinflammatory genes were down-regulated. This study demonstrates that the activation of PPAR-α action via fenofibrate leads to neuroprotection by both reducing neuroinflammation and protecting mitochondria, which leads to a significant increase in survival in SOD1(G93A) mice. Therefore, the development of therapeutic strategies to activate PPAR-α as well as other PPARs may lead to new therapeutic agents to slow or halt the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:26604138

  20. Inhibition of ammonia poisoning by addition of platinum to Ru/α-Al2 O3 for preferential CO oxidation in fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Yagi, Sho; Zaitsu, Shuhei; Kitayama, Godai; Kayada, Yuto; Teramura, Kentaro; Takita, Yusaku; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2014-12-01

    In polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems, small amounts of ammonia (NH3 ) present in the reformate gas deactivate the supported ruthenium catalysts used for preferential oxidation (PROX) of carbon monoxide (CO). In this study, we investigated how the addition of a small amount of platinum to a Ru/α-Al2 O3 catalyst (Pt/Ru=1:9 w/w) affected the catalyst's PROX activity in both the absence and the presence of NH3 (130 ppm) under conditions mimicking the reformate conditions during steam reforming of natural gas. The activity of undoped Ru/α-Al2 O3 decreased sharply upon addition of NH3 , whereas Pt/Ru/α-Al2 O3 exhibited excellent PROX activity even in the presence of NH3 . Ruthenium K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra indicated that in the presence of NH3 , some of the ruthenium in the undoped catalyst was oxidized in the presence of NH3 , whereas ruthenium oxidation was not observed with Pt/Ru/α-Al2 O3 . These results suggest that ruthenium oxidation is retarded by the platinum, so that the catalyst shows high activity even in the presence of NH3 . PMID:25351412

  1. Inhibition of CDK1 activity by sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuxuan; Lucas, Benjamin; Molcho, Elana; Schiff, Tania; Vigodner, Margarita

    2016-09-16

    Sumoylation (a covalent modification by Small Ubiquitin-like Modifiers or SUMO proteins) has been implicated in the regulation of various cellular events including cell cycle progression. We have recently identified CDK1, a master regulator of mitosis and meiosis, as a SUMO target both in vivo and in vitro, supporting growing evidence concerning a close cross talk between sumoylation and phosphorylation during cell cycle progression. However, any data regarding the effect of sumoylation upon CDK1 activity have been missing. In this study, we performed a series of in vitro experiments to inhibit sumoylation by three different means (ginkgolic acid, physiological levels of oxidative stress, and using an siRNA approach) and assessed the changes in CDK1 activity using specific antibodies and a kinase assay. We have also tested for an interaction between SUMO and active and/or inactive CDK1 isoforms in addition to having assessed the status of CDK1-interacting sumoylated proteins upon inhibition of sumoylation. Our data suggest that inhibition of sumoylation increases the activity of CDK1 probably through changes in sumoylated status and/or the ability of specific proteins to bind CDK1 and inhibit its activity. PMID:27520372

  2. Preferential binding of allosteric modulators to active and inactive conformational states of metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Tirupula, Kalyan C; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G protein coupled receptors that play important roles in synaptic plasticity and other neuro-physiological and pathological processes. Allosteric mGluR ligands are particularly promising drug targets because of their modulatory effects – enhancing or suppressing the response of mGluRs to glutamate. The mechanism by which this modulation occurs is not known. Here, we propose the hypothesis that positive and negative modulators will differentially stabilize the active and inactive conformations of the receptors, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we have generated computational models of the transmembrane regions of different mGluR subtypes in two different conformations. The inactive conformation was modeled using the crystal structure of the inactive, dark state of rhodopsin as template and the active conformation was created based on a recent model of the light-activated state of rhodopsin. Ligands for which the nature of their allosteric effects on mGluRs is experimentally known were docked to the modeled mGluR structures using ArgusLab and Autodock softwares. We find that the allosteric ligand binding pockets of mGluRs are overlapping with the retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin, and that ligands have strong preferences for the active and inactive states depending on their modulatory nature. In 8 out of 14 cases (57%), the negative modulators bound the inactive conformations with significant preference using both docking programs, and 6 out of 9 cases (67%), the positive modulators bound the active conformations. Considering results by the individual programs only, even higher correlations were observed: 12/14 (86%) and 8/9 (89%) for ArgusLab and 10/14 (71%) and 7/9 (78%) for AutoDock. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that mGluR allosteric modulation occurs via stabilization of different conformations analogous to those identified in rhodopsin where they are induced by photochemical isomerization

  3. Modest Interference with Actin Dynamics in Primary T Cell Activation by Antigen Presenting Cells Preferentially Affects Lamellal Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roybal, Kole T.; Mace, Emily M.; Clark, Danielle J.; Leard, Alan D.; Herman, Andrew; Verkade, Paul; Orange, Jordan S.; Wülfing, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic subcellular distributions of signaling system components are critical regulators of cellular signal transduction through their control of molecular interactions. Understanding how signaling activity depends on such distributions and the cellular structures driving them is required for comprehensive insight into signal transduction. In the activation of primary murine T cells by antigen presenting cells (APC) signaling intermediates associate with various subcellular structures, prominently a transient, wide, and actin-associated lamellum extending from an interdigitated T cell:APC interface several micrometers into the T cell. While actin dynamics are well established as general regulators of cellular organization, their role in controlling signaling organization in primary T cell:APC couples and the specific cellular structures driving it is unresolved. Using modest interference with actin dynamics with a low concentration of Jasplakinolide as corroborated by costimulation blockade we show that T cell actin preferentially controls lamellal signaling localization and activity leading downstream to calcium signaling. Lamellal localization repeatedly related to efficient T cell function. This suggests that the transient lamellal actin matrix regulates T cell signaling associations that facilitate T cell activation. PMID:26237588

  4. Controlling activity and selectivity using water in the Au-catalysed preferential oxidation of CO in H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Johnny; Whittaker, Todd; Chen, Zhifeng; Pursell, Christopher J.; Rioux, Robert M.; Chandler, Bert D.

    2016-06-01

    Industrial hydrogen production through methane steam reforming exceeds 50 million tons annually and accounts for 2–5% of global energy consumption. The hydrogen product, even after processing by the water–gas shift, still typically contains ∼1% CO, which must be removed for many applications. Methanation (CO + 3H2 → CH4 + H2O) is an effective solution to this problem, but consumes 5–15% of the generated hydrogen. The preferential oxidation (PROX) of CO with O2 in hydrogen represents a more-efficient solution. Supported gold nanoparticles, with their high CO-oxidation activity and notoriously low hydrogenation activity, have long been examined as PROX catalysts, but have shown disappointingly low activity and selectivity. Here we show that, under the proper conditions, a commercial Au/Al2O3 catalyst can remove CO to below 10 ppm and still maintain an O2-to-CO2 selectivity of 80–90%. The key to maximizing the catalyst activity and selectivity is to carefully control the feed-flow rate and maintain one to two monolayers of water (a key CO-oxidation co-catalyst) on the catalyst surface.

  5. Controlling activity and selectivity using water in the Au-catalysed preferential oxidation of CO in H2.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Johnny; Whittaker, Todd; Chen, Zhifeng; Pursell, Christopher J; Rioux, Robert M; Chandler, Bert D

    2016-06-01

    Industrial hydrogen production through methane steam reforming exceeds 50 million tons annually and accounts for 2-5% of global energy consumption. The hydrogen product, even after processing by the water-gas shift, still typically contains ∼1% CO, which must be removed for many applications. Methanation (CO + 3H2 → CH4 + H2O) is an effective solution to this problem, but consumes 5-15% of the generated hydrogen. The preferential oxidation (PROX) of CO with O2 in hydrogen represents a more-efficient solution. Supported gold nanoparticles, with their high CO-oxidation activity and notoriously low hydrogenation activity, have long been examined as PROX catalysts, but have shown disappointingly low activity and selectivity. Here we show that, under the proper conditions, a commercial Au/Al2O3 catalyst can remove CO to below 10 ppm and still maintain an O2-to-CO2 selectivity of 80-90%. The key to maximizing the catalyst activity and selectivity is to carefully control the feed-flow rate and maintain one to two monolayers of water (a key CO-oxidation co-catalyst) on the catalyst surface. PMID:27219703

  6. Hypoxia inhibits abdominal expiratory nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Fregosi, R F; Knuth, S L; Ward, D K; Bartlett, D

    1987-07-01

    Our purpose was to examine the influence of steady-state changes in chemical stimuli, as well as discrete peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation, on abdominal expiratory motor activity. In decerebrate, paralyzed, vagotomized, and ventilated cats that had bilateral pneumothoraces, we recorded efferent activity from a phrenic nerve and from an abdominal nerve (cranial iliohypogastric nerve, L1). All cats showed phasic expiratory abdominal nerve discharge at normocapnia [end-tidal PCO2 38 +/- 2 Torr], but small doses (2-6 mg/kg) of pentobarbital sodium markedly depressed this activity. Hyperoxic hypercapnia consistently enhanced abdominal expiratory activity and shortened the burst duration. Isocapnic hypoxia caused inhibition of abdominal nerve discharge in 11 of 13 cats. Carotid sinus nerve denervation (3 cats) exacerbated the hypoxic depression of abdominal nerve activity and depressed phrenic motor output. Stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors with NaCN increased abdominal nerve discharge in 7 of 10 cats, although 2 cats exhibited marked inhibition. Four cats with intact neuraxis, but anesthetized with ketamine, yielded qualitatively similar results. We conclude that when cats are subjected to steady-state chemical stimuli in isolation (no interference from proprioceptive inputs), hypercapnia potentiates, but hypoxia attenuates, abdominal expiratory nerve activity. Mechanisms to explain the selective inhibition of expiratory motor activity by hypoxia are proposed, and physiological implications are discussed. PMID:3624126

  7. Activated CD4+ T cells preferentially take up lipid microspheres, but resting cells do not.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, K

    1995-01-01

    Lipid microspheres (LM) used as drug carriers increase the effectiveness and reduce the toxicity of incorporated drugs. The present study is designed to determine whether or not activated T lymphocytes, which were the cells chosen first from the 'inflammatory cells', can take up LM in vitro. LM were labelled with a fluorescent probe, DiI (DiI-LM), to examine the kinetics. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that in freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes principally took up DiI-LM, while lymphocytes and granulocytes did not. When PBMC were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 MoAb and IL-2, cells expressing CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD16 incorporated DiI-LM. Purified CD4+ T cells, obtained by positive panning selection, were stimulated with this system. They were CD25, CD71, LFA-1-positive, and also showed an ability to take up DiI-LM, which resting cells did not. The findings were confirmed by flow cytometry and quantitative analysis of DiI. Confocal micrographs showed fluorescent granules from the probe in the cytoplasm of stimulated CD4+ T cells after incubation with DiI-LM. These results suggest that immunomodulatory agents incorporated into LM might selectively regulate the function of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells when these are activated. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7882572

  8. Early Postnatal Exposure to Ultrafine Particulate Matter Air Pollution: Persistent Ventriculomegaly, Neurochemical Disruption, and Glial Activation Preferentially in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Joshua L.; Liu, Xiufang; Pelkowski, Sean; Palmer, Brian; Conrad, Katherine; Oberdörster, Günter; Weston, Douglas; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot

    2014-01-01

    Background: Air pollution has been associated with adverse neurological and behavioral health effects in children and adults. Recent studies link air pollutant exposure to adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes, including increased risk for autism, cognitive decline, ischemic stroke, schizophrenia, and depression. Objectives: We sought to investigate the mechanism(s) by which exposure to ultrafine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) adversely influences central nervous system (CNS) development. Methods: We exposed C57BL6/J mice to ultrafine (< 100 nm) CAPs using the Harvard University Concentrated Ambient Particle System or to filtered air on postnatal days (PNDs) 4–7 and 10–13, and the animals were euthanized either 24 hr or 40 days after cessation of exposure. Another group of males was exposed at PND270, and lateral ventricle area, glial activation, CNS cytokines, and monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitters were quantified. Results: We observed ventriculomegaly (i.e., lateral ventricle dilation) preferentially in male mice exposed to CAPs, and it persisted through young adulthood. In addition, CAPs-exposed males generally showed decreases in developmentally important CNS cytokines, whereas in CAPs-exposed females, we observed a neuroinflammatory response as indicated by increases in CNS cytokines. We also saw changes in CNS neurotransmitters and glial activation across multiple brain regions in a sex-dependent manner and increased hippocampal glutamate in CAPs-exposed males. Conclusions: We observed brain region– and sex-dependent alterations in cytokines and neurotransmitters in both male and female CAPs-exposed mice. Lateral ventricle dilation (i.e., ventriculomegaly) was observed only in CAPs-exposed male mice. Ventriculomegaly is a neuropathology that has been associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcome, autism, and schizophrenia. Our findings suggest alteration of developmentally important neurochemicals and lateral ventricle dilation may be

  9. Sulforaphane inhibits the engagement of LPS with TLR4/MD2 complex by preferential binding to Cys133 in MD2.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jung Eun; Park, Zee-Yong; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Joo Young

    2013-05-10

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key pattern-recognition receptors that recognize invading pathogens and non-microbial endogenous molecules to induce innate and adaptive immune responses. Since activation of TLRs is deeply implicated in the pathological progress of autoimmune diseases, sepsis, metabolic diseases, and cancer, modulation of TLR activity is considered one of the most important therapeutic approaches. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxin of gram-negative bacteria, is a well-known agonist for TLR4 triggering inflammation and septic shock. LPS interacts with TLR4 through binding to a hydrophobic pocket in myeloid differentiation 2 (MD2), a co-receptor of TLR4. In this study, we showed that sulforaphane (SFN) interfered with the binding of LPS to MD2 as determined by in vitro binding assay and co-immunoprecipitation of MD2 and LPS in a cell system. The inhibitory effect of SFN on the interaction of LPS and MD2 was reversed by thiol supplementation with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dithiothreitol showing that the inhibitory effect of SFN is dependent on its thiol-modifying activity. Indeed, micro LC-MS/MS analysis showed that SFN preferentially formed adducts with Cys133 in the hydrophobic pocket of MD2, but not with Cys95 and Cys105. Molecular modeling showed that SFN bound to Cys133 blocks the engagement of LPS and lipid IVa to hydrophobic pocket of MD2. Our results demonstrate that SFN interrupts LPS engagement to TLR4/MD2 complex by direct binding to Cys133 in MD2. Our data suggest a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of SFN, and provide a novel target for the regulation of TLR4-mediated inflammatory and immune responses by phytochemicals. PMID:23583403

  10. High levels of functional endopeptidase 24.11 (CD10) activity on human thymocytes: preferential expression on immature subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Mari, B; Breittmayer, J P; Guerin, S; Belhacene, N; Peyron, J F; Deckert, M; Rossi, B; Auberger, P

    1994-01-01

    Although it is now well established that cells of the immune system express most of the exopeptidases described so far, little information is available concerning the identification and the characterization of the peptidases associated with the surface of human thymocytes. In the present study we have focused on CD10 expression on thymocytes using both FACS and enzymatic analysis. Unfractionated intact human thymocytes were shown to express significant levels of CD10-specific enzymatic activity, as assessed by the hydrolysis of the neutral endopeptidase (NEP) substrate Suc-Ala-Ala-Phe-pNA and of D-Ala2-Leu-enkephalin, a typical NEP substrate. CD10 activity was abolished by specific NEP inhibitors, including thiorphan, retrothiorphan and phosphoramidon. Moreover, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that intact thymocytes and purified NEP hydrolysed thymopentin, a thymic factor known to induce the maturation of prothymocytes into thymocytes. Finally, CD 10/NEP was preferentially associated with CD3- CD3low and immature CD4- CD8- thymocytes. The data demonstrate for the first time that human thymocytes express functional NEP and suggest a role for this enzyme in the maturation of human thymocytes. PMID:7959879

  11. Preferential Elimination of Older Erythrocytes in Circulation and Depressed Bone Marrow Erythropoietic Activity Contribute to Cadmium Induced Anemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sreoshi; Saxena, Rajiv K.

    2015-01-01

    Feeding cadmium chloride (50 or 1000 ppm CdCl2 in drinking water, ad libitum) to C57BL/6 mice resulted in a significant and sustained fall in blood erythrocyte count and hemoglobin levels that started 4 and 3 weeks after the start of 50 and 1000 ppm cadmium doses respectively. A transient yet significant reticulocytosis occurred during the first 4 weeks of cadmium treatment. Using the recently developed double in vivo biotinylation (DIB) technique, turnover of erythrocyte cohorts of different age groups was simultaneously monitored in control and cadmium treated mice. A significant accumulation of younger erythrocytes and a concomitant decline in the relative proportions of older erythrocytes in circulation was observed in both 50 and 1000 ppm cadmium groups indicating that older erythrocytes were preferentially eliminated in cadmium induced anemia. A significant increase in the erythropoietin levels in plasma was seen in mice exposed to 1000 ppm cadmium. Levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL1A, IL6, TNFα, IFNγ) were however not significantly altered in cadmium treated mice. A significant increase in cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed in older erythrocytes in circulation but not in younger erythrocytes. Erythropoietic activity in the bone marrows and spleens of cadmium treated mice was examined by monitoring the relative proportion of cells belonging to the erythroid line of differentiation in these organs. Erythroid cells in bone marrow declined markedly (about 30%) in mice in the 1000 ppm cadmium group but the decline was not significant in the 50 ppm cadmium group. Cells representing various stages of erythroid differentiation in bone marrow and spleen were enumerated flow cytometrically by double staining with anti-Ter119 and anti-transferrin receptor (CD71) monoclonal antibodies. Decline of erythroid cells was essentially confined to pro-erythroblast and erythroblast-A, along with a concurrent increase in the splenic erythroid

  12. Gain-of-Function Mutant p53 Promotes Cell Growth and Cancer Cell Metabolism via Inhibition of AMPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ge; Wang, Jiping; Zhao, Mei; Xie, Tong-Xin; Tanaka, Noriaki; Sano, Daisuke; Patel, Ameeta A.; Ward, Alexandra M; Sandulache, Vlad; Jasser, Samar A.; Skinner, Heath D.; Fitzgerald, Alison Lea; Osman, Abdullah A.; Wei, Yongkun; Xia, Xuefeng; Songyang, Zhou; Mills, Gordon B.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Caulin, Carlos; Liang, Jiyong; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Many mutant p53 proteins (mutp53s) exert oncogenic gain-of-function (GOF) properties, but the mechanisms mediating these functions remain poorly defined. We show here that GOF mutp53s inhibit AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling in head and neck cancer cells. Conversely, downregulation of GOF mutp53s enhances AMPK activation under energy stress, decreasing the activity of the anabolic factors acetyl-CoA carboxylase and ribosomal protein S6 and inhibiting aerobic glycolytic potential and invasive cell growth. Under conditions of energy stress, GOF mutp53s, but not wild-type p53, preferentially bind to the AMPKα subunit and inhibit AMPK activation. Given the importance of AMPK as an energy sensor and tumor suppressor that inhibits anabolic metabolism, our findings reveal that direct inhibition of AMPK activation is an important mechanism through which mutp53s can gain oncogenic function. PMID:24857548

  13. Methylsulfonylmethane inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Huijeong; Kim, Jeeyoung; Lee, Min-Jae; Kim, Young Jin; Cho, Young-Wook; Lee, Geun-Shik

    2015-02-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is an organosulfur compound and the health benefits associated with MSM include inflammation. Although MSM has been shown to have various physiological effects, no study has yet focused on inflammasome activation. The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex that serves as a platform for caspase 1-dependent proteolytic maturation and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In this study, we tested the effect of MSM on inflammasome activation using mouse and human macrophages. In our results, MSM significantly attenuated NLRP3 inflammasome activation in lipopolysaccharide-primed macrophages, although it had no effect on NLCR4 or AIM2 inflammasome activation. Extracts of MSM-enriched vegetables presented the same inhibitory effect on NLRP3 inflammasome activation as MSM. MSM also attenuated the transcriptional expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and NLRP3. Taken together, these results show that MSM has anti-inflammatory characteristics, interrupts NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and inhibits pro-cytokine expression. We further confirmed the intracellular mechanism of MSM in relation to NLRP3 inflammasome activation, followed by comparison with that of DMSO. Both chemicals showed a synergic effect on anti-NLRP3 activation and attenuated production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, MSM is a selective inhibitor of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and can be developed as a supplement to control several metabolic disorders. PMID:25461402

  14. The Chromatin Regulator BRPF3 Preferentially Activates the HBO1 Acetyltransferase but Is Dispensable for Mouse Development and Survival.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kezhi; You, Linya; Degerny, Cindy; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Liu, Xin; Chen, Lulu; Li, Lin; Miao, Dengshun; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2016-02-01

    To interpret epigenetic information, chromatin readers utilize various protein domains for recognition of DNA and histone modifications. Some readers possess multidomains for modification recognition and are thus multivalent. Bromodomain- and plant homeodomain-linked finger-containing protein 3 (BRPF3) is such a chromatin reader, containing two plant homeodomain-linked fingers, one bromodomain and a PWWP domain. However, its molecular and biological functions remain to be investigated. Here, we report that endogenous BRPF3 preferentially forms a tetrameric complex with HBO1 (also known as KAT7) and two other subunits but not with related acetyltransferases such as MOZ, MORF, TIP60, and MOF (also known as KAT6A, KAT6B, KAT5, and KAT8, respectively). We have also characterized a mutant mouse strain with a lacZ reporter inserted at the Brpf3 locus. Systematic analysis of β-galactosidase activity revealed dynamic spatiotemporal expression of Brpf3 during mouse embryogenesis and high expression in the adult brain and testis. Brpf3 disruption, however, resulted in no obvious gross phenotypes. This is in stark contrast to Brpf1 and Brpf2, whose loss causes lethality at E9.5 and E15.5, respectively. In Brpf3-null mice and embryonic fibroblasts, RT-quantitative PCR uncovered no changes in levels of Brpf1 and Brpf2 transcripts, confirming no compensation from them. These results indicate that BRPF3 forms a functional tetrameric complex with HBO1 but is not required for mouse development and survival, thereby distinguishing BRPF3 from its paralogs, BRPF1 and BRPF2. PMID:26677226

  15. Preferential Extracellular Generation of the Active Parkinsonian Toxin MPP+ by Transporter-Independent Export of the Intermediate MPDP+

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Regina; Meiser, Johannes; Karreman, Christiaan; Strittmatter, Tobias; Odermatt, Meike; Cirri, Erica; Friemel, Anke; Ringwald, Markus; Pasquarelli, Noemi; Ferger, Boris; Brunner, Thomas; Marx, Andreas; Möller, Heiko M.; Hiller, Karsten; Leist, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) is among the most widely used neurotoxins for inducing experimental parkinsonism. MPTP causes parkinsonian symptoms in mice, primates, and humans by killing a subpopulation of dopaminergic neurons. Extrapolations of data obtained using MPTP-based parkinsonism models to human disease are common; however, the precise mechanism by which MPTP is converted into its active neurotoxic metabolite, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium (MPP+), has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to address two unanswered questions related to MPTP toxicology: (1) Why are MPTP-converting astrocytes largely spared from toxicity? (2) How does MPP+ reach the extracellular space? Results: In MPTP-treated astrocytes, we discovered that the membrane-impermeable MPP+, which is generally assumed to be formed inside astrocytes, is almost exclusively detected outside of these cells. Instead of a transporter-mediated export, we found that the intermediate, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-2,3-dihydropyridinium (MPDP+), and/or its uncharged conjugate base passively diffused across cell membranes and that MPP+ was formed predominately by the extracellular oxidation of MPDP+ into MPP+. This nonenzymatic extracellular conversion of MPDP+ was promoted by O2, a more alkaline pH, and dopamine autoxidation products. Innovation and Conclusion: Our data indicate that MPTP metabolism is compartmentalized between intracellular and extracellular environments, explain the absence of toxicity in MPTP-converting astrocytes, and provide a rationale for the preferential formation of MPP+ in the extracellular space. The mechanism of transporter-independent extracellular MPP+ formation described here indicates that extracellular genesis of MPP+ from MPDP is a necessary prerequisite for the selective uptake of this toxin by catecholaminergic neurons. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1001–1016. PMID:26413876

  16. Mitochondrial uncouplers inhibit hepatic stellate cell activation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction participates in the progression of several pathologies. Although there is increasing evidence for a mitochondrial role in liver disease, little is known about its contribution to hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. In this study we investigated the role of mitochondrial activity through mild uncoupling during in vitro activation of HSCs. Methods Cultured primary human and mouse HSCs were treated with the chemical uncouplers FCCP and Valinomycin. ATP levels were measured by luciferase assay and production of reactive oxygen species was determined using the fluorescent probe DCFH-DA. Possible cytotoxicity by uncoupler treatment was evaluated by caspase 3/7 activity and cytoplasmic protease leakage. Activation of HSCs and their response to the pro-fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β was evaluated by gene expression of activation markers and signal mediators using RT-qPCR. Proliferation was measured by incorporation of EdU and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and western blot. Results FCCP and Valinomycin treatment mildly decreased ATP and reactive oxygen species levels. Both uncouplers increased the expression of mitochondrial genes such as Tfam and COXIV while inducing morphological features of quiescent mouse HSCs and abrogating TGF-β signal transduction. Mild uncoupling reduced HSC proliferation and expression of pro-fibrogenic markers of mouse and human HSCs. Conclusions Mild mitochondrial uncoupling inhibits culture-induced HSC activation and their response to pro-fibrogenic cytokines like TGF-β. These results therefore suggest mitochondrial uncoupling of HSCs as a strategy to reduce progression of liver fibrosis. PMID:22686625

  17. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity by essential oil from Citrus paradisi.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, M; Tougo, H; Ishihara, M

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity by essential oils of Citrus paradisi (grapefruit pink in USA) was studied. Inhibition of AChE was measured by the colorimetric method. Nootkatone and auraptene were isolated from C. paradisi oil and showed 17-24% inhibition of AChE activity at the concentration of 1.62 microg/mL. PMID:11858553

  18. Stathmin Potentiates Vinflunine and Inhibits Paclitaxel Activity

    PubMed Central

    Malesinski, Soazig; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Kruczynski, Anna; Peyrot, Vincent; Devred, François

    2015-01-01

    Cell biology and crystallographic studies have suggested a functional link between stathmin and microtubule targeting agents (MTAs). In a previous study we showed that stathmin increases vinblastine (VLB) binding to tubulin, and that conversely VLB increases stathmin binding to tubulin. This constituted the first biochemical evidence of the direct relationship between stathmin and an antimitotic drug, and revealed a new mechanism of action for VLB. The question remained if the observed interaction was specific for this drug or represented a general phenomenon for all MTAs. In the present study we investigated the binding of recombinant stathmin to purified tubulin in the presence of paclitaxel or another Vinca alkaloid, vinflunine, using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). These experiments revealed that stathmin binding to tubulin is increased in the presence of vinflunine, whereas no signal is observed in the presence of paclitaxel. Further investigation using turbidity and co-sedimentation showed that stathmin inhibited paclitaxel microtubule-stabilizing activity. Taken together with the previous study using vinblastine, our results suggest that stathmin can be seen as a modulator of MTA activity and binding to tubulin, providing molecular explanation for multiple previous cellular and in vivo studies showing that stathmin expression level affects MTAs efficiency. PMID:26030092

  19. Stathmin potentiates vinflunine and inhibits Paclitaxel activity.

    PubMed

    Malesinski, Soazig; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Kruczynski, Anna; Peyrot, Vincent; Devred, François

    2015-01-01

    Cell biology and crystallographic studies have suggested a functional link between stathmin and microtubule targeting agents (MTAs). In a previous study we showed that stathmin increases vinblastine (VLB) binding to tubulin, and that conversely VLB increases stathmin binding to tubulin. This constituted the first biochemical evidence of the direct relationship between stathmin and an antimitotic drug, and revealed a new mechanism of action for VLB. The question remained if the observed interaction was specific for this drug or represented a general phenomenon for all MTAs. In the present study we investigated the binding of recombinant stathmin to purified tubulin in the presence of paclitaxel or another Vinca alkaloid, vinflunine, using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). These experiments revealed that stathmin binding to tubulin is increased in the presence of vinflunine, whereas no signal is observed in the presence of paclitaxel. Further investigation using turbidity and co-sedimentation showed that stathmin inhibited paclitaxel microtubule-stabilizing activity. Taken together with the previous study using vinblastine, our results suggest that stathmin can be seen as a modulator of MTA activity and binding to tubulin, providing molecular explanation for multiple previous cellular and in vivo studies showing that stathmin expression level affects MTAs efficiency. PMID:26030092

  20. Time course of morphine's effects on adult hippocampal subgranular zone reveals preferential inhibition of cells in S phase of the cell cycle and a subpopulation of immature neurons.

    PubMed

    Arguello, A A; Harburg, G C; Schonborn, J R; Mandyam, C D; Yamaguchi, M; Eisch, A J

    2008-11-11

    Opiates, such as morphine, decrease neurogenesis in the adult hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ), raising the possibility that decreased neurogenesis contributes to opiate-induced cognitive deficits. However, there is an incomplete understanding of how alterations in cell cycle progression and progenitor maturation contribute to this decrease. The present study examined how morphine regulates progenitor cell cycle, cell death and immature SGZ neurons (experiment 1) as well as the progression of SGZ progenitors through key stages of maturation (experiment 2). In experiment 1, mice received sham or morphine pellets (s.c., 0 and 48 h) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) 2 h prior to sacrifice (24, 72 or 96 h). Morphine decreased both the number of S phase and total cycling cells, as there were fewer cells immunoreactive (IR) for the S phase marker BrdU and the cell cycle marker Ki67. The percentage of Ki67-IR cells that were BrdU-IR was decreased after 24 but not 96 h of morphine, suggesting a disproportionate effect on S phase cells relative to all cycling cells at this time point. Cell death (activated caspase-3 counts) was increased after 24 but not 96 h. In experiment 2, nestin-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice given BrdU 1 day prior to morphine or sham surgery (0 and 48 h, sacrifice 96 h) had fewer Ki67-IR cells, but no change in BrdU-IR cell number, suggesting that this population of BrdU-IR cells was less sensitive to morphine. Interestingly, examination of key stages of progenitor cell maturation revealed that morphine increased the percent of BrdU-IR cells that were type 2b and decreased the percent that were immature neurons. These data suggest that chronic morphine decreases SGZ neurogenesis by inhibiting dividing cells, particularly those in S phase, and progenitor cell progression to a more mature neuronal stage. PMID:18832014

  1. Highly effective poly(ethylene glycol) architectures for specific inhibition of immune receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Baird, Emily J; Holowka, David; Coates, Geoffrey W; Baird, Barbara

    2003-11-11

    Architectural features of synthetic ligands were systematically varied to optimize inhibition of mast cell degranulation initiated by multivalent crossing of IgE-receptor complexes. A series of ligands were generated by end-capping poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymers and amine-based dendrimers with the hapten 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP). These were used to explore the influence of polymeric backbone length, valency, and hapten presentation on binding to anti-DNP IgE and inhibition of stimulated activation of RBL cells. Monovalent MPEG(5000)-DNP (IC(50) = 50 nM), bivalent DNP-PEG(3350)-DNP (IC(50) = 8 nM), bismonovalent MPEG(5000)-DNP(2) (IC(50) = 20 nM), bisbivalent DNP(2)-PEG(3350)-DNP(2) (IC(50) = 3nM) and DNP(4)-dendrimer ligands (IC(50) = 50 nM) all effectively inhibit cellular activation caused by multivalent antigen, DNP-bovine serum albumin. For different DNP ligands, we provide evidence for more effective inhibition due to (i) preferential formation of intra-IgE cross-links by bivalent ligands of sufficient length, (ii) self-association of monovalent ligands with longer tails, and (iii) higher probability of binding for bisvalent ligands. We also show that larger DNP(16)-dendrimers of higher valency trigger degranulation by cross-linking IgE-receptor complexes, whereas smaller DNP-dendrimers are inhibitory. Thus, features of synthetic ligands can be manipulated to control receptor occupation, aggregation, and inhibition of the cellular response. PMID:14596588

  2. Endoxifen, the active metabolite of tamoxifen, inhibits cloned hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Ju; Lee, Keon Jin; Lee, Hong Joon; Sung, Ki-Wug; Choi, Jin-Sung; Lee, Eun Hui; Hahn, Sang June

    2015-04-01

    The effects of tamoxifen, and its active metabolite endoxifen (4-hydroxy-N-desmethyl-tamoxifen), on hERG currents stably expressed in HEK cells were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and an immunoblot assay. Tamoxifen and endoxifen inhibited hERG tail currents at -50mV in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 1.2 and 1.6μM, respectively. The steady-state activation curve of the hERG currents was shifted to the hyperpolarizing direction in the presence of endoxifen. The voltage-dependent inhibition of hERG currents by endoxifen increased steeply in the voltage range of channel activation. The inhibition by endoxifen displayed a shallow voltage dependence (δ=0.18) in the full activation voltage range. A fast application of endoxifen induced a reversible block of hERG tail currents during repolarization in a concentration-dependent manner, which suggested an interaction with the open state of the channel. Endoxifen also decreased the hERG current elicited by a 5s depolarizing pulse to +60mV to inactivate the hERG currents, suggesting an interaction with the activated (open and/or inactivated) states of the channels. Tamoxifen and endoxifen inhibited the hERG channel protein trafficking to the plasma membrane in a concentration-dependent manner with endoxifen being more potent than tamoxifen. These results indicated that tamoxifen and endoxifen inhibited the hERG current by direct channel blockage and by the disruption of channel trafficking to the plasma membrane in a concentration-dependent manner. A therapeutic concentration of endoxifen inhibited the hERG current by preferentially interacting with the activated (open and/or inactivated) states of the channel. PMID:25680947

  3. Platelet surface-associated activation and secretion-mediated inhibition of coagulation factor XII.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Natalia V; Artemenko, Elena O; Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Demina, Irina A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation factor XII (fXII) is important for arterial thrombosis, but its physiological activation mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we elucidated the role of platelets and platelet-derived material in fXII activation. FXII activation was only observed upon potent platelet stimulation (with thrombin, collagen-related peptide, or calcium ionophore, but not ADP) accompanied by phosphatidylserine exposure and was localised to the platelet surface. Platelets from three patients with grey platelet syndrome did not activate fXII, which suggests that platelet-associated fXII-activating material might be released from α-granules. FXII was preferentially bound by phosphotidylserine-positive platelets and annexin V abrogated platelet-dependent fXII activation; however, artificial phosphotidylserine/phosphatidylcholine microvesicles did not support fXII activation under the conditions herein. Confocal microscopy using DAPI as a poly-phosphate marker did not reveal poly-phosphates associated with an activated platelet surface. Experimental data for fXII activation indicates an auto-inhibition mechanism (ki/ka = 180 molecules/platelet). Unlike surface-associated fXII activation, platelet secretion inhibited activated fXII (fXIIa), particularly due to a released C1-inhibitor. Platelet surface-associated fXIIa formation triggered contact pathway-dependent clotting in recalcified plasma. Computer modelling suggests that fXIIa inactivation was greatly decreased in thrombi under high blood flow due to inhibitor washout. Combined, the surface-associated fXII activation and its inhibition in solution herein may be regarded as a flow-sensitive regulator that can shift the balance between surface-associated clotting and plasma-dependent inhibition, which may explain the role of fXII at high shear and why fXII is important for thrombosis but negligible in haemostasis. PMID:25688860

  4. Platelet Surface-Associated Activation and Secretion-Mediated Inhibition of Coagulation Factor XII

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Natalia V.; Artemenko, Elena O.; Podoplelova, Nadezhda A.; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N.; Demina, Irina A.; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I.; Panteleev, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation factor XII (fXII) is important for arterial thrombosis, but its physiological activation mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we elucidated the role of platelets and platelet-derived material in fXII activation. FXII activation was only observed upon potent platelet stimulation (with thrombin, collagen-related peptide, or calcium ionophore, but not ADP) accompanied by phosphatidylserine exposure and was localised to the platelet surface. Platelets from three patients with grey platelet syndrome did not activate fXII, which suggests that platelet-associated fXII-activating material might be released from α-granules. FXII was preferentially bound by phosphotidylserine-positive platelets and annexin V abrogated platelet-dependent fXII activation; however, artificial phosphotidylserine/phosphatidylcholine microvesicles did not support fXII activation under the conditions herein. Confocal microscopy using DAPI as a poly-phosphate marker did not reveal poly-phosphates associated with an activated platelet surface. Experimental data for fXII activation indicates an auto-inhibition mechanism (ki/ka = 180 molecules/platelet). Unlike surface-associated fXII activation, platelet secretion inhibited activated fXII (fXIIa), particularly due to a released C1-inhibitor. Platelet surface-associated fXIIa formation triggered contact pathway-dependent clotting in recalcified plasma. Computer modelling suggests that fXIIa inactivation was greatly decreased in thrombi under high blood flow due to inhibitor washout. Combined, the surface-associated fXII activation and its inhibition in solution herein may be regarded as a flow-sensitive regulator that can shift the balance between surface-associated clotting and plasma-dependent inhibition, which may explain the role of fXII at high shear and why fXII is important for thrombosis but negligible in haemostasis. PMID:25688860

  5. The transcriptional corepressor DSP1 inhibits activated transcription by disrupting TFIIA-TBP complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, N C; Lieberman, P M; Rushlow, C

    1996-01-01

    Transcriptional repression of eukaryotic genes is essential for many cellular and developmental processes, yet the precise mechanisms of repression remain poorly understood. The Dorsal Switch Protein (DSP1) was identified in a genetic screen for activities which convert Dorsal into a transcriptional repressor. DSP1 shares structural homology with the HMG-1/2 family and inhibits activation by the rel transcription factors Dorsal and NF-kappaB in transfection studies. Here we investigate the mechanism of transcriptional repression by DSP1. We found that DSP1 protein can act as a potent transcriptional repressor for multiple activator families in vitro and in transfection studies. DSP1 bound directly to the TATA binding protein (TBP), and formed a stable ternary complex with TBP bound to DNA. DSP1 preferentially disrupted the DNA binding of TBP complexes containing TFIIA and displaced TFIIA from binding to TBP. Consistent with the inhibition of TFIIA-bound complexes, DSP1 was shown to inhibit activated but not basal transcription reactions in vitro. The ability of DSP1 to interact with TBP and to repress transcription was mapped to the carboxy-terminal domain which contains two HMG boxes. Our results support the model that DSP1 represses activated transcription by interfering with the binding of TFIIA, a general transcription factor implicated in activated transcription pathways. Images PMID:9003783

  6. Anticoagulant activity of tissue factor pathway inhibitor in human plasma is preferentially associated with dense subspecies of LDL and HDL and with Lp(a).

    PubMed

    Lesnik, P; Vonica, A; Guérin, M; Moreau, M; Chapman, M J

    1993-07-01

    Human plasma contains a multivalent, Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor termed tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), which specifically inhibits the action of the factor VII(a)-tissue factor complex in coagulation. In the present study, we examined the distribution and anticoagulant activity of TFPI among plasma lipoprotein subspecies separated by isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation; this procedure permitted the simultaneous fractionation of the major lipoprotein classes (very-low-density lipoprotein [VLDL], intermediate-density lipoprotein [IDL], low-density lipoprotein [LDL], high-density lipoprotein [HDL] 2 and 3, and very-high-density lipoprotein [VHDL]). Studies of eight normolipidemic subjects revealed two major lipoprotein carriers of TFPI activity: dense LDL subspecies (d = 1.039 to 1.063 g/mL) and both dense HDL particles and VHDL (d = 1.133 to 1.190 g/mL), representing 33.8% and 35.9%, respectively, of the total lipoprotein-associated TFPI activity in plasma. TFPI activity was also associated with lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), whose density distribution (d = 1.044 to 1.100 g/mL) overlapped that of LDL and HDL2; such association was related to Lp(a)'s particle size and phenotype. VLDL, IDL, and LDL1 through LDL3 (d = 1.019 to 1.039 g/mL), HDL2 (d = 1.063 to 1.100 g/mL), and light subfractions of HDL3 (d = 1.100 to 1.167 g/mL) conveyed only 1.8%, 10%, and 18.5%, respectively, of lipoprotein-associated TFPI activity. Such anticoagulant activity was dependent on the presence of TFPI protein. The dense subspecies of HDL3 (d = 1.133 to 1.167 g/mL) with which TFPI was preferentially associated were small, displayed a cholesteryl ester to protein ratio of approximately 0.2, and were deficient in phospholipid (13.6% to 18.3%). HDL subspecies of d = 1.110 to 1.167 g/mL mainly contained the higher relative molecular mass form of TFPI of 41 kD (a form that is known to be covalently associated with apolipoprotein [apo] A-II) and minor bands of the 35- and 52-k

  7. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  8. Acetylcholine release in mouse hippocampal CA1 preferentially activates inhibitory-selective interneurons via α4β2* nicotinic receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Bell, L. Andrew; Bell, Karen A.; McQuiston, A. Rory

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) release onto nicotinic receptors directly activates subsets of inhibitory interneurons in hippocampal CA1. However, the specific interneurons activated and their effect on the hippocampal network is not completely understood. Therefore, we investigated subsets of hippocampal CA1 interneurons that respond to ACh release through the activation of nicotinic receptors and the potential downstream effects this may have on hippocampal CA1 network function. ACh was optogenetically released in mouse hippocampal slices by expressing the excitatory optogenetic protein oChIEF-tdTomato in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca cholinergic neurons using Cre recombinase-dependent adeno-associated viral mediated transfection. The actions of optogenetically released ACh were assessed on both pyramidal neurons and different interneuron subtypes via whole cell patch clamp methods. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing interneurons that selectively innervate other interneurons (VIP/IS) were excited by ACh through the activation of nicotinic receptors containing α4 and β2 subunits (α4β2*). ACh release onto VIP/IS was presynaptically inhibited by M2 muscarinic autoreceptors. ACh release produced spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current (sIPSC) barrages blocked by dihydro-β-erythroidine in interneurons but not pyramidal neurons. Optogenetic suppression of VIP interneurons did not inhibit these sIPSC barrages suggesting other interneuron-selective interneurons were also excited by α4β2* nicotinic receptor activation. In contrast, interneurons that innervate pyramidal neuron perisomatic regions were not activated by ACh release onto nicotinic receptors. Therefore, we propose ACh release in CA1 facilitates disinhibition through activation of α4β2* nicotinic receptors on interneuron-selective interneurons whereas interneurons that innervate pyramidal neurons are less affected by nicotinic receptor activation. PMID:25918499

  9. Inhibiting caspase-6 activation and catalytic activity for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Flygare, John A; Arkin, Michelle R

    2014-01-01

    Partnerships between industry and academia are becoming increasingly complex and relevant in the drive to discover innovative new medicines. We describe the structure of the collaboration between the University of California - San Francisco - Small Molecule Discovery Center (UCSF-SMDC) and Genentech to develop chemical matter that inhibits the activity of caspase-6. We focus on the scientific basis for the partnership and how the orientation- and transaction-related barriers were overcome. We describe the division of labor that allowed two groups to operate as a unified team to generate multiple chemical series with distinct mechanisms of action. The successful structure of the agreement serves as a model for future collaborations at both institutions. PMID:24283214

  10. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, M.A.; Hoch, M.M.

    1997-06-10

    Method is described for controlling the supply of air to a PROX (PReferential OXidation for CO cleanup) reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference there between correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference. 2 figs.

  11. Histamine release inhibition activity of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Tsuchiya, S; Sugimoto, Y; Sugimura, Y; Yamada, Y

    1992-12-01

    Eleven examples of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (head-to-head; 10, head-to-tail; 1) and one half molecule type (N-methylcoclaurine), were tested by in vitro histamine release inhibition assay. The order of the potency of the inhibitory effect was ranked thus: homoaromoline, aromoline, isotetrandrine, cepharanthine, fangchinoline, obaberine, and tetrandrine. The following substances, cepharanoline, berbamine, oxyacanthine, and cycleanine (head-to-tail structure) had no inhibitory effect. N-Methylcoclaurine showed an inhibitory effect comparable to that of fangchinoline. PMID:1484888

  12. The preferential dopamine D3 receptor antagonist S33138 inhibits cocaine reward and cocaine-triggered relapse to drug-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao-Qing; Ashby, Charles R; Spiller, Krista; Li, Xia; Li, Jie; Thomasson, Nitza; Millan, Mark J; Mocaër, Elisabeth; Muńoz, Carmen; Gardner, Eliot L; Xi, Zheng-Xiong

    2009-03-01

    We have previously reported that selective dopamine (DA) D3 receptor antagonists are effective in a number of animal models of drug addiction, but not in intravenous drug self-administration, suggesting a limited ability to modify drug reward. In the present study, we evaluated the actions ofS33138, a novel partially selective D3 receptor antagonist, in animal models relevant to drug addiction. S33138, at doses of 0.156 or 0.625 mg/kg (i.p.), attenuated cocaine-enhanced brain-stimulation reward (BSR), and the highest dose tested (2.5 mg/kg) produced a significant aversive-like rightward shift in BSR rate-frequency reward functions. Further, S33138 produced biphasic effects on cocaine self-administration, i.e., a moderate dose (2.5 mg/kg, p.o.) increased, while a higher dose (5 mg/kg, p.o.) inhibited, cocaine self-administration. The increase in cocaine self-administration likely reflects a compensatory response to a partial reduction in drug reward after S33138. In addition, S33138 (0.156-2.5 mg/kg, p.o.) also dose-dependently inhibited cocaine-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. The reduction in cocaine-enhanced BSR and cocaine-triggered reinstatement produced by lower effective doses (e.g., 0.156 or 0.625 mg/kg) of 533138 is unlikely due to impaired locomotion, as lower effective doses of S33138 decreased neither Ymax levels in the BSR paradigm, rotarod performance, nor locomotion. However, the higher doses (2.5 or 5 mg/kg) of S33138 also significantly inhibited sucrose self-administration and rotarod performance, suggesting non-D3 receptor-mediated effects on non-drug reward and locomotion. These data suggest that lower doses of S33138 interacting essentially with D3 receptors have pharmacotherapeutic potential in treatment of cocaine addiction, while higher doses occupying D2 receptors may influence locomotion and non-drug reward. PMID:19136017

  13. Antipneumococcal activity of neuraminidase inhibiting artocarpin.

    PubMed

    Walther, E; Richter, M; Xu, Z; Kramer, C; von Grafenstein, S; Kirchmair, J; Grienke, U; Rollinger, J M; Liedl, K R; Slevogt, H; Sauerbrei, A; Saluz, H P; Pfister, W; Schmidtke, M

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a major cause of secondary bacterial pneumonia during influenza epidemics. Neuraminidase (NA) is a virulence factor of both pneumococci and influenza viruses. Bacterial neuraminidases (NAs) are structurally related to viral NA and susceptible to oseltamivir, an inhibitor designed to target viral NA. This prompted us to evaluate the antipneumococcal potential of two NA inhibiting natural compounds, the diarylheptanoid katsumadain A and the isoprenylated flavone artocarpin. Chemiluminescence, fluorescence-, and hemagglutination-based enzyme assays were applied to determine the inhibitory efficiency (IC(50) value) of the tested compounds towards pneumococcal NAs. The mechanism of inhibition was studied via enzyme kinetics with recombinant NanA NA. Unlike oseltamivir, which competes with the natural substrate of NA, artocarpin exhibits a mixed-type inhibition with a Ki value of 9.70 μM. Remarkably, artocarpin was the only NA inhibitor (NAI) for which an inhibitory effect on pneumococcal growth (MIC: 0.99-5.75 μM) and biofilm formation (MBIC: 1.15-2.97 μM) was observable. In addition, we discovered that the bactericidal effect of artocarpin can reduce the viability of pneumococci by a factor of >1000, without obvious harm to lung epithelial cells. This renders artocarpin a promising natural product for further investigations. PMID:25592264

  14. TRAIL-receptor costimulation inhibits proximal TCR signaling and suppresses human T cell activation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Corinna; Weiswange, Maxi; Jeremias, Irmela; Bayer, Carina; Grunert, Michaela; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Strauss, Gudrun

    2014-10-15

    The TRAIL-receptor/TRAIL system originally described to induce apoptosis preferentially in malignant cells is also known to be involved in T cell homeostasis and the response to viral infections and autoimmune diseases. Whereas the expression of TRAIL on activated NK and T cells increases their cytotoxicity, induction of TRAIL on APCs can turn them into apoptosis inducers but might also change their immunostimulatory capacity. Therefore, we analyzed how TRAIL-receptor (TRAIL-R) costimulation is modulating TCR-mediated activation of human T cells. T cells triggered by rTRAIL in combination with anti-CD3 and -CD28 Abs exhibited a strong decrease in the expression of activation markers and Th1 and Th2 cytokines compared with CD3/CD28-activated T cells. Most importantly, proliferation of TRAIL-R costimulated T cells was strongly impaired, but no apoptosis was induced. Addition of exogenous IL-2 could not rescue T cells silenced by TRAIL-R costimulation, and TRAIL-mediated inhibition of T cell proliferation only prevented TCR-triggered proliferation but was ineffective if T cells were activated downstream of the TCR. Inhibition of T cell proliferation was associated with abrogation of proximal TCR signaling by inhibiting recruitment of TCR-associated signaling molecules to lipid rafts, followed by abrogation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation of ZAP70, phospholipase C-γ1, and protein kinase C-θ, and impaired nuclear translocation of NFAT, AP-1, and NF-κB. Most importantly, TRAIL-R costimulation efficiently inhibited alloantigen-induced T cell proliferation and CD3/28-induced activation and proliferation of autoreactive T cells derived from patients with Omenn syndrome, indicating that coactivation of TRAIL-R and TCR represents a mechanism to downmodulate T cell immune responses. PMID:25217163

  15. A sesquiterpene lactone from a medicinal herb inhibits proinflammatory activity of TNF-α by inhibiting ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH5.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Hua, Yaping; Wang, Dan; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Yuan; Zhu, Junsheng; Jin, Huizi; Li, Honglin; Hu, Zhenlin; Zhang, Weidong

    2014-10-23

    UbcH5 is the key ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme catalyzing ubiquitination during TNF-α-triggered NF-κB activation. Here, we identified an herb-derived sesquiterpene lactone compound IJ-5 as a preferential inhibitor of UbcH5 and explored its therapeutic value in inflammatory and autoimmune disease models. IJ-5 suppresses TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory gene transcription by inhibiting the ubiquitination of receptor-interacting protein 1 and NF-κB essential modifier, which is essential to IκB kinase activation. Mechanistic investigations revealed that IJ-5 preferentially binds to and inactivates UbcH5 by forming a covalent adduct with its active site cysteine and thereby preventing ubiquitin conjugation to UbcH5. In preclinical models, pretreatment of IJ-5 exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activity against TNF-α- and D-galactosamine-induced hepatitis and collagen-induced arthritis. These findings highlight the potential of UbcH5 as a therapeutic target for anti-TNF-α interventions and provide an interesting lead compound for the development of new anti-inflammation agents. PMID:25200604

  16. Right dorsolateral prefrontal cortical activity and behavioral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shackman, Alexander J; McMenamin, Brenton W; Maxwell, Jeffrey S; Greischar, Lawrence L; Davidson, Richard J

    2009-12-01

    Individuals show marked variation in their responses to threat. Such individual differences in behavioral inhibition play a profound role in mental and physical well-being. Behavioral inhibition is thought to reflect variation in the sensitivity of a distributed neural system responsible for generating anxiety and organizing defensive responses to threat and punishment. Although progress has been made in identifying the key constituents of this behavioral inhibition system in humans, the involvement of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) remains unclear. Here, we acquired self-reported Behavioral Inhibition System Sensitivity scores and high-resolution electroencephalography from a large sample (n= 51). Using the enhanced spatial resolution afforded by source modeling techniques, we show that individuals with greater tonic (resting) activity in right-posterior DLPFC rate themselves as more behaviorally inhibited. This observation provides novel support for recent conceptualizations of behavioral inhibition and clues to the mechanisms that might underlie variation in threat-induced negative affect. PMID:19906125

  17. Characterization of 2'-fluoro-RNA aptamers that bind preferentially to disease-associated conformations of prion protein and inhibit conversion.

    PubMed

    Rhie, Alexandre; Kirby, Louise; Sayer, Natalie; Wellesley, Rosanna; Disterer, Petra; Sylvester, Ian; Gill, Andrew; Hope, James; James, William; Tahiri-Alaoui, Abdessamad

    2003-10-10

    We have isolated artificial ligands or aptamers for infectious prions in order to investigate conformational aspects of prion pathogenesis. The aptamers are 2'-fluoro-modified RNA produced by in vitro selection from a large, randomized library. One of these ligands (aptamer SAF-93) had more than 10-fold higher affinity for PrPSc than for recombinant PrPC and inhibited the accumulation of PrPres in near physiological cell-free conversion assay. To understand the molecular basis of these properties and to distinguish specific from non-specific aptamer-PrP interactions, we studied deletion mutants of bovine PrP in denatured, alpha-helix-rich and beta-sheet-rich forms. We provide evidence that, like scrapie-associated fibrils (SAF), the beta-oligomer of PrP bound to SAF-93 with at least 10-fold higher affinity than did the alpha-form. This differential affinity could be explained by the existence of two binding sites within the PrP molecule. Site 1 lies within residues 23-110 in the unstructured N terminus and is a nonspecific RNA binding site found in all forms of PrP. The region between residue 90 and 110 forms a hinge region that is occluded in the alpha-rich form of PrP but becomes exposed in the denatured form of PrP. Site 2 lies in the region C-terminal of residue 110. This site is beta-sheet conformation-specific and is not recognized by control RNAs. Taken together, these data provide for the first time a specific ligand for a disease conformation-associated site in a region of PrP critical for conformational conversion. This aptamer could provide tools for the further analysis of the processes of PrP misfolding during prion disease and leads for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to TSEs. PMID:12902353

  18. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  19. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  20. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  1. Synthesis, Preferentially Hypoxic Apoptosis and Anti-Angiogenic Activity of 3-Amino-1,2,4-Benzotriazine-1,4-Dioxide Bearing Alkyl Linkers with a 3-Amino-1,2,4-Benzotriazine-1-Oxide Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun-I; Huang, Chien-Ming; Huang, Wen-Hsin; Lee, An-Rong

    2014-01-01

    3-(Aminoalkylamino)-1,2,4-benzotriazine-1,4-dioxide-extended derivatives were synthesized by the structural modification of 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine-1,4-dioxide (tirapazamine, TPZ) that incorporated homologue-alkyl linkers, without or with an extended 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine-1-oxide moiety at the 3-position of the TPZ. According to sequential evaluation of preferentially normoxic and hypoxic cytotoxicities against MCF-7, NCI-H460 and HCT-116, most of the synthesized compounds exhibited hypoxic cytotoxicity greater than or comparable to that of TPZ. Among them, compounds 9a and 9b more powerfully inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7, NCI-H460 and HCT-116 in hypoxia than did TPZ. The representative of 3-(aminoalkylamino)-1,2,4-benzotriazine-1,4-dioxide-extended derivatives, 9a exhibited greater hypoxic cytotoxicity than TPZ, mediated by cell cycle arrest. The induction of DNA damage, the activation of caspase 3/7 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-related apoptosis, which were detected in HCT-116 cells in both normoxia and hypoxia. In vitro anti-angiogenic assay of co-cultured HUVECs and fibroblasts that were exposed to the selected 7b, 8g, 9a and 9b exhibited 80-90% inhibition of tube formation at 20 μM, whereas TPZ exhibited approximately 50% inhibition of tube formation at 20 μM. At 2 μM, 9a and 9b significantly reduced the areas, lengths, paths and joints of tube formation by 70-80% and 45-50%, respectively. These results reveal that most of synthesized TPZ derivatives in this study exhibited more potent anti-angiogenesis than TPZ.

  2. Anchoring High-Concentration Oxygen Vacancies at Interfaces of CeO(2-x)/Cu toward Enhanced Activity for Preferential CO Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqing; Li, Liping; Hu, Wanbiao; Huang, Xinsong; Li, Qi; Xu, Yangsen; Zuo, Ying; Li, Guangshe

    2015-10-21

    Catalysts are urgently needed to remove the residual CO in hydrogen feeds through selective oxidation for large-scale applications of hydrogen proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We herein propose a new methodology that anchors high concentration oxygen vacancies at interface by designing a CeO2-x/Cu hybrid catalyst with enhanced preferential CO oxidation activity. This hybrid catalyst, with more than 6.1% oxygen vacancies fixed at the favorable interfacial sites, displays nearly 100% CO conversion efficiency in H2-rich streams over a broad temperature window from 120 to 210 °C, strikingly 5-fold wider than that of conventional CeO2/Cu (i.e., CeO2 supported on Cu) catalyst. Moreover, the catalyst exhibits a highest cycling stability ever reported, showing no deterioration after five cycling tests, and a super long-time stability beyond 100 h in the simulated operation environment that involves CO2 and H2O. On the basis of an arsenal of characterization techniques, we clearly show that the anchored oxygen vacancies are generated as a consequence of electron donation from metal copper atoms to CeO2 acceptor and the subsequent reverse spillover of oxygen induced by electron transfer in well controlled nanoheterojunction. The anchored oxygen vacancies play a bridging role in electron capture or transfer and drive molecule oxygen into active oxygen species to interact with the CO molecules adsorbed at interfaces, thus leading to an excellent preferential CO oxidation performance. This study opens a window to design a vast number of high-performance metal-oxide hybrid catalysts via the concept of anchoring oxygen vacancies at interfaces. PMID:26444246

  3. CD8+ T cells Are Preferentially Activated during Primary Low Dose Leishmania major Infection but Are Completely Dispensable during Secondary Anti-Leishmania Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Okwor, Ifeoma B.; Jia, Ping; Mou, Zhirong; Onyilagha, Chukwunonso; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that CD8+ T cells are required for optimal primary immunity to low dose Leishmania major infection. However, it is not known whether immunity induced by low dose infection is durable and whether CD8+ T cells contribute to secondary immunity following recovery from low dose infection. Here, we compared primary and secondary immunity to low and high dose L. major infections and assessed the influence of infectious dose on the quality and magnitude of secondary anti-Leishmania immunity. In addition, we investigated the contribution of CD8+ T cells in secondary anti-Leishmania immunity following recovery from low and high dose infections. We found that the early immune response to low and high dose infections were strikingly different: while low dose infection preferentially induced proliferation and effector cytokine production by CD8+ T cells, high dose infection predominantly induced proliferation and cytokine production by CD4+ T cells. This differential activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by high and low dose infections respectively, was imprinted during in vitro and in vivo recall responses in healed mice. Both low and high dose-infected mice displayed strong infection-induced immunity and were protected against secondary L. major challenge. While depletion of CD4+ cells in mice that healed low and high dose infections abolished resistance to secondary challenge, depletion of CD8+ cells had no effect. Collectively, our results show that although CD8+ T cells are preferentially activated and may contribute to optimal primary anti-Leishmania immunity following low dose infection, they are completely dispensable during secondary immunity. PMID:25412267

  4. Inhibition of apple polyphenol oxidase activity by sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shengmin; Luo, Yaguang; Feng, Hao

    2006-05-17

    Sodium chlorite (SC) was shown to have strong efficacy both as a sanitizer to reduce microbial growth on produce and as a browning inhibitor on fresh-cut apples in previous experiments. This study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory effect of SC on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and the associated mechanisms. The experiment showed that SC had a strong inhibition of apple PPO. The extent of inhibition was influenced by SC concentration and pH. Inhibition was most prominent at pH 4.5, at which approximately 30% of enzyme activity was lost in the presence of 10 mM SC, followed closely by that at pH 4.0 with a 26% reduction in PPO activity. The inhibition mode was determined using Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plots, which established SC to be a mixed inhibitor of apple PPO for the oxidation of catechol. Preincubation of PPO with 8 mM SC for 8 min caused a maximum of 46% activity reduction compared to noninhibited control. However, preincubation of SC with catechol for 8 min resulted in no additional loss of PPO activity. These findings provide further evidence that the inhibition of PPO activity by SC is due to the inhibition of the enzyme itself rather than removal of the substrate. PMID:19127746

  5. Increasing Stability and Activity of Core-Shell Catalysts by Preferential Segregation of Oxide on Edges and Vertexes: Oxygen Reduction on Ti-Au@Pt/C.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jue; Wu, Lijun; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A; Goodman, Kenneth R; Zhang, Chengxu; Zhu, Yimei; Vukmirovic, Miomir B; White, Michael G; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R

    2016-07-27

    We describe a new class of core-shell nanoparticle catalysts having edges and vertexes covered by refractory metal oxide that preferentially segregates onto these catalyst sites. The monolayer shell is deposited on the oxide-free core atoms. The oxide on edges and vertexes induces high catalyst stability and activity. The catalyst and synthesis are exemplified by fabrication of Au nanoparticles doped by Ti atoms that segregate as oxide onto low-coordination sites of edges and vertexes. Pt monolayer shell deposited on Au sites has the mass and specific activities for the oxygen reduction reaction about 13 and 5 times higher than those of commercial Pt/C catalysts. The durability tests show no activity loss after 10 000 potential cycles from 0.6 to 1.0 V. The superior activity and durability of the Ti-Au@Pt catalyst originate from protective titanium oxide located at the most dissolution-prone edge and vertex sites and Au-supported active and stable Pt shell. PMID:27362731

  6. Inhibition of Naja kaouthia venom activities by plant polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Bavovada, Rapepol; Pakmanee, Narumol; Suttisri, Rutt; Saen-oon, Suwipa

    2005-03-21

    Plant polyphenols from the aqueous extracts of Pentace burmanica, Pithecellobium dulce, Areca catechu and Quercus infectoria were tested for their inhibitory activities against Naja kaouthia (NK) venom by in vitro neutralization method. The first three extracts could completely inhibit the lethality of the venom at 4 LD50 concentration and the venom necrotizing activity at the minimum necrotizing dose while also inhibited up to 90% of the acetylcholinesterase activity of NK venom at much lower tannin concentrations than that of Quercus infectoria. The ED50 of plant tannins in inhibiting NK venom activities varied according to condensed tannins and their content in the extracts. Molecular docking of the complexes between alpha-cobratoxin and either hydrolysable or condensed tannins at their lowest energetic conformations were proposed. The anti-venom activities of these plant polyphenols by selectively blocking the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and non-selectively by precipitation of the venom proteins were suggested. PMID:15740891

  7. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  8. STAT3 signaling is activated preferentially in tumor-initiating cells in claudin-low models of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Tweardy, David J; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Landua, John; Petrovic, Ivana; Bu, Wen; Roarty, Kevin; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    In breast cancer, a subset of tumor-initiating cells (TIC) or "cancer stem cells" are thought to be responsible for tumor maintenance, treatment resistance, and disease recurrence. While current breast cancer stem cell markers (e.g., CD44(high) /CD24(low/neg) , ALDH positive) have allowed enrichment for such cells, they are not universally expressed and may actually identify distinct TIC subpopulations in the same tumor. Thus, additional markers of functional stem cells are needed. The STAT3 pathway is a critical regulator of the function of normal stem cells, and evidence is accumulating for its important role in breast cancer stem cells. However, due to the lack of a method for separating live cells based on their level of STAT3 activity, it remains unknown whether STAT3 functions in the cancer stem cells themselves, or in surrounding niche cells, or in both. To approach this question, we constructed a series of lentiviral fluorescent (enhanced green fluorescent protein, EGFP) reporters that enabled flow cytometric enrichment of cells differing in STAT3-mediated transcriptional activity, as well as in vivo/in situ localization of STAT3 responsive cells. Using in vivo claudin-low cell line xenograft models of human breast cancer, we found that STAT3 signaling reporter activity (EGFP(+) ) is associated with a subpopulation of cancer cells enriched for mammosphere-forming efficiency, as well as TIC function in limiting dilution transplantation assays compared to negative or unsorted populations. Our results support STAT3 signaling activity as another functional marker for human breast cancer stem cells thus making it an attractive therapeutic target for stem-cell-directed therapy in some breast cancer subtypes. PMID:24891218

  9. Suppressing Irrelevant Information: Knowledge Activation or Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Danielle S.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not…

  10. Inhibition of urease activity by dipeptidyl hydroxamic acids.

    PubMed

    Odake, S; Nakahashi, K; Morikawa, T; Takebe, S; Kobashi, K

    1992-10-01

    A series of dipeptidyl hydroxamic acids (H-X-Gly-NHOH: X = amino acid residues) was synthesized, and the inhibitory activity against Jack bean and Proteus mirabilis ureases [EC 3.5.1.5] was examined. A number of H-X-Gly-NHOH inhibited Jack bean urease with an I50 of the order of 10(-6) M and inhibited Proteus mirabilis urease with an I50 of the order of 10(-5) M. The inhibition against Jack bean urease was more potent than that with the corresponding aminoacyl hydroxamic acids (H-X-NHOH). PMID:1464106

  11. Achilles, a New Family of Transcriptionally Active Retrotransposons from the Olive Fruit Fly, with Y Chromosome Preferential Distribution.

    PubMed

    Tsoumani, Konstantina T; Drosopoulou, Elena; Bourtzis, Kostas; Gariou-Papalexiou, Aggeliki; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Mathiopoulos, Kostas D

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have many unusual features relative to autosomes. The in depth exploration of their structure will improve our understanding of their origin and divergence (degeneration) as well as the evolution of genetic sex determination pathways which, most often are attributed to them. In Tephritids, the structure of Y chromosome, where the male-determining factor M is localized, is largely unexplored and limited data concerning its sequence content and evolution are available. In order to get insight into the structure and organization of the Y chromosome of the major olive insect pest, the olive fly Bactrocera oleae, we characterized sequences from a Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE)-isolated Y chromosome. Here, we report the discovery of the first olive fly LTR retrotransposon with increased presence on the Y chromosome. The element belongs to the BEL-Pao superfamily, however, its sequence comparison with the other members of the superfamily suggests that it constitutes a new family that we termed Achilles. Its ~7.5 kb sequence consists of the 5'LTR, the 5'non-coding sequence and the open reading frame (ORF), which encodes the polyprotein Gag-Pol. In situ hybridization to the B. oleae polytene chromosomes showed that Achilles is distributed in discrete bands dispersed on all five autosomes, in all centromeric regions and in the granular heterochromatic network corresponding to the mitotic sex chromosomes. The between sexes comparison revealed a variation in Achilles copy number, with male flies possessing 5-10 copies more than female (CI range: 18-38 and 12-33 copies respectively per genome). The examination of its transcriptional activity demonstrated the presence of at least one intact active copy in the genome, showing a differential level of expression between sexes as well as during embryonic development. The higher expression was detected in male germline tissues (testes). Moreover, the presence of Achilles-like elements in different species of

  12. The Inhibition of Lipase and Glucosidase Activities by Acacia Polyphenol

    PubMed Central

    Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Takeda, Rumi; Ito, Kiyomi; Ochiai, Wataru; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Acacia polyphenol (AP) extracted from the bark of the black wattle tree (Acacia mearnsii) is rich in unique catechin-like flavan-3-ols, such as robinetinidol and fisetinidol. In an in vitro study, we measured the inhibitory activity of AP on lipase and glucosidase. In addition, we evaluated the effects of AP on absorption of orally administered olive oil, glucose, maltose, sucrose and starch solution in mice. We found that AP concentration-dependently inhibited the activity of lipase, maltase and sucrase with an IC50 of 0.95, 0.22 and 0.60 mg ml−1, respectively. In ICR mice, olive oil was administered orally immediately after oral administration of AP solution, and plasma triglyceride concentration was measured. We found that AP significantly inhibited the rise in plasma triglyceride concentration after olive oil loading. AP also significantly inhibited the rise in plasma glucose concentration after maltose and sucrose loading, and this effect was more potent against maltose. AP also inhibited the rise in plasma glucose concentration after glucose loading and slightly inhibited it after starch loading. Our results suggest that AP inhibits lipase and glucosidase activities, which leads to a reduction in the intestinal absorption of lipids and carbohydrates. PMID:21660093

  13. Achilles, a New Family of Transcriptionally Active Retrotransposons from the Olive Fruit Fly, with Y Chromosome Preferential Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Tsoumani, Konstantina T.; Drosopoulou, Elena; Bourtzis, Kostas; Gariou-Papalexiou, Aggeliki; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Mathiopoulos, Kostas D.

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have many unusual features relative to autosomes. The in depth exploration of their structure will improve our understanding of their origin and divergence (degeneration) as well as the evolution of genetic sex determination pathways which, most often are attributed to them. In Tephritids, the structure of Y chromosome, where the male-determining factor M is localized, is largely unexplored and limited data concerning its sequence content and evolution are available. In order to get insight into the structure and organization of the Y chromosome of the major olive insect pest, the olive fly Bactrocera oleae, we characterized sequences from a Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE)-isolated Y chromosome. Here, we report the discovery of the first olive fly LTR retrotransposon with increased presence on the Y chromosome. The element belongs to the BEL-Pao superfamily, however, its sequence comparison with the other members of the superfamily suggests that it constitutes a new family that we termed Achilles. Its ~7.5 kb sequence consists of the 5’LTR, the 5’non-coding sequence and the open reading frame (ORF), which encodes the polyprotein Gag-Pol. In situ hybridization to the B. oleae polytene chromosomes showed that Achilles is distributed in discrete bands dispersed on all five autosomes, in all centromeric regions and in the granular heterochromatic network corresponding to the mitotic sex chromosomes. The between sexes comparison revealed a variation in Achilles copy number, with male flies possessing 5–10 copies more than female (CI range: 18–38 and 12–33 copies respectively per genome). The examination of its transcriptional activity demonstrated the presence of at least one intact active copy in the genome, showing a differential level of expression between sexes as well as during embryonic development. The higher expression was detected in male germline tissues (testes). Moreover, the presence of Achilles-like elements in different

  14. Ammonium inhibition of nitrogenase activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, H.; Burris, R.H. )

    1989-06-01

    The effect of oxygen, ammonium ion, and amino acids on nitrogenase activity in the root-associated N{sub 2}-fixing bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae was investigated in comparison with Azospirillum spp. and Rhodospirillum rubrum. H. seropedicae is microaerophilic, and its optimal dissolved oxygen level is from 0.04 to 0.2 kPa for dinitrogen fixation but higher when it is supplied with fixed nitrogen. No nitrogenase activity was detected when the dissolved O{sub 2} level corresponded to 4.0 kPa. Ammonium, a product of the nitrogenase reaction, reversible inhibited nitrogenase activity when added to derepressed cell cultures. However, the inhibition of nitrogenase activity was only partial even with concentrations of ammonium chloride as high as 20 mM. Amides such as glutamine and asparagine partially inhibited nitrogenase activity, but glutamate did not. Nitrogenase in crude extracts prepared from ammonium-inhibited cells showed activity as high as in extracts from N{sub 2}-fixing cells. The pattern of the dinitrogenase and the dinitrogenase reductase revealed by the immunoblotting technique did not change upon ammonium chloride treatment of cells in vivo. No homologous sequences were detected with the draT-draG probe from Azospirillum lipoferum. There is no clear evidence that ADP-ribosylation of the dinitrogenase reductase is involved in the ammonium inhibition of H. seropedicae. The uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone decreased the intracellular ATP concentration and inhibited the nitrogenase activity of whole cells. The ATP pool was significantly disturbed when cultures were treated with ammonium in vivo.

  15. Inhibition of existing denitrification enzyme activity by chloramphenicol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.H.; Smith, R.L.; Macalady, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Chloramphenicol completely inhibited the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in acetylene-block incubations with (i) sediments from a nitrate-contaminated aquifer and (ii) a continuous culture of denitrifying groundwater bacteria. Control flasks with no antibiotic produced significant amounts of nitrous oxide in the same time period. Amendment with chloramphenicol after nitrous oxide production had begun resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of nitrous oxide production. Chloramphenicol also decreased (>50%) the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in pure cultures of Pseudomonas denitrificans that were harvested during log- phase growth and maintained for 2 weeks in a starvation medium lacking electron donor. Short-term time courses of nitrate consumption and nitrous oxide production in the presence of acetylene with P. denitrificans undergoing carbon starvation were performed under optimal conditions designed to mimic denitrification enzyme activity assays used with soils. Time courses were linear for both chloramphenicol and control flasks, and rate estimates for the two treatments were significantly different at the 95% confidence level. Complete or partial inhibition of existing enzyme activity is not consistent with the current understanding of the mode of action of chloramphenicol or current practice, in which the compound is frequently employed to inhibit de novo protein synthesis during the course of microbial activity assays. The results of this study demonstrate that chloramphenicol amendment can inhibit the activity of existing denitrification enzymes and suggest that caution is needed in the design and interpretation of denitrification activity assays in which chloramphenicol is used to prevent new protein synthesis.

  16. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark A.; Hoch, Martin M.

    1997-01-01

    Method for controlling the supply of air to a PROX reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference therebetween correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference.

  17. TDAG8 activation inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Hikiji, Hisako; Endo, Daisuke; Horie, Kyoji; Harayama, Takeshi; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Igarashi, Hidemitsu; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Yanagida, Keisuke; Takeda, Junji; Koji, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takao; Ishii, Satoshi

    2014-02-01

    Although the roles of acids in bone metabolism are well characterized, the function of proton-sensing receptors in bone metabolism remains to be explored. In this study, we evaluated the role of proton-sensing receptor T-cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) in osteoclastic activity during bone loss after ovariectomy. Through observations of bone mineral content, we found that pathological bone resorption was significantly exacerbated in mice homozygous for a gene trap mutation in the Tdag8 gene. Furthermore, osteoclasts from the homozygous mutant mice resorbed calcium in vitro more than the osteoclasts from the heterozygous mice did. Impaired osteoclast formation under acidic conditions was ameliorated in cultures of bone marrow cells by Tdag8 gene mutation. Extracellular acidification changed the cell morphology of osteoclasts via the TDAG8-Rho signaling pathway. These results suggest that the enhancement of TDAG8 function represents a new strategy for preventing bone resorption diseases, such as osteoporosis. PMID:24221084

  18. The preferentially magnified active nucleus in IRAS F10214+4724 - III. VLBI observations of the radio core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deane, R. P.; Rawlings, S.; Garrett, M. A.; Heywood, I.; Jarvis, M. J.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Marshall, P. J.; McKean, J. P.

    2013-10-01

    We report 1.7 GHz very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of IRAS F10214+4724, a lensed z = 2.3 obscured quasar with prodigious star formation. We detect what we argue to be the obscured active nucleus with an effective angular resolution of <50 pc at z = 2.3. The S1.7 = 210 μJy (9σ) detection of this unresolved source is located within the Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame ultraviolet/optical arc, however, ≳100 mas northwards of the arc centre of curvature. This leads to a source-plane inversion that places the European VLBI Network detection to within milliarcseconds of the modelled cusp caustic, resulting in a very large magnification (μ ˜70), over an order of magnitude larger than the CO (1→0) derived magnification of a spatially resolved Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) map, using the same lens model. We estimate the quasar bolometric luminosity from a number of independent techniques and with our X-ray modelling find evidence that the AGN may be close to Compton thick, with an intrinsic bolometric luminosity of log10(/L⊙) = 11.34 ± 0.27 dex. We make the first black hole mass estimate of IRAS F10214+4724 and find log10(MBH/M⊙) = 8.36 ± 0.56 which suggests a low black hole accretion rate (λ = dot{M} / dot{M}_Edd ˜ 3± ^7_2 per cent). We find evidence for an MBH/Mspheroid ratio that is one to two orders of magnitude larger than that of submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) at z ˜ 2. At face value, this suggests that IRAS F10214+4724 has undergone a different evolutionary path compared to SMGs at the same epoch. A primary result of this work is the demonstration that emission regions of different sizes and positions can undergo significantly different magnification boosts (>1 dex) and therefore distort our view of high-redshift, gravitationally lensed galaxies.

  19. Nuclear localization of Lyn tyrosine kinase mediated by inhibition of its kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kikuko; Nakayama, Yuji; Togashi, Yuuki; Obata, Yuuki; Kuga, Takahisa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2008-11-01

    Src-family kinases, cytoplasmic enzymes that participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and late endosomes/lysosomes. Lyn, a member of the Src-family kinases, is known to play a role in DNA damage response and cell cycle control in the nucleus. However, it is still unclear how the localization of Lyn to the nucleus is regulated. Here, we investigated the mechanism of the distribution of Lyn between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in epitheloid HeLa cells and hematopoietic THP-1 cells. Lyn was definitely detected in purified nuclei by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. Nuclear accumulation of Lyn was enhanced upon treatment of cells with leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of Crm1-mediated nuclear export. Moreover, Lyn mutants lacking the sites for lipid modification were highly accumulated in the nucleus upon LMB treatment. Intriguingly, inhibition of the kinase activity of Lyn by SU6656, Csk overexpression, or point mutation in the ATP-binding site induced an increase in nuclear Lyn levels. These results suggest that Lyn being imported into and rapidly exported from the nucleus preferentially accumulates in the nucleus by inhibition of the kinase activity and lipid modification.

  20. Cd59a deficiency in mice leads to preferential innate immune activation in the retinal pigment epithelium-choroid with age.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Philipp; Cowing, Jill A; Cristante, Enrico; Liyanage, Sidath E; Ribeiro, Joana; Duran, Yanai; Abelleira Hervas, Laura; Carvalho, Livia S; Bainbridge, James W B; Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Ali, Robin R

    2015-09-01

    Dysregulation of the complement system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration. To investigate consequences of altered complement regulation in the eye with age, we examined Cd59a complement regulator deficient (Cd59a(-/-)) mice between 4 and 15 months. In vivo imaging revealed an increased age-related accumulation of autofluorescent spots in Cd59a(-/-) mice, a feature that reflects accumulation of subretinal macrophages and/or microglia. Despite this activation of myeloid cells in the eye, Cd59a(-/-) mice showed normal retinal histology and function as well as normal choroidal microvasculature. With age, they revealed increased expression of activators of the alternative complement pathway (C3, Cfb, Cfd), in particular in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid but less in the retina. This molecular response was not altered by moderately-enhanced light exposure. Cd59a deficiency therefore leads to a preferential age-related dysregulation of the complement system in the RPE-choroid, that alone or in combination with light as a trigger, is not sufficient to cause choroidal vascular changes or retinal degeneration and dysfunction. This data emphasizes the particular vulnerability of the RPE-choroidal complex to dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway during aging. PMID:26234657

  1. Targeted nitric oxide delivery preferentially induces glioma cell chemosensitivity via altered p53 and O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Shahana; Payne, Courtney A; Tu, Nam H; Taite, Lakeshia J

    2013-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor, and also among the most difficult to treat due to a lack of response to chemotherapeutics. New methods of countering the mechanisms that confer chemoresistance to malignant gliomas could lead to significant advances in the quest to identify novel drug combinations or targeted drug delivery systems for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigate the use of a targeted nitric oxide (NO) donor as a pretreatment to sensitize glioma cells to chemotherapy. The protein chlorotoxin (CTX) has been shown to preferentially target glioma cells, and we have developed CTX-NO, a glioma-specific, NO-donating CTX derivative. Pretreatment of cells with CTX-NO followed by 48-h exposure to either carmustine (BCNU) or temozolomide (TMZ), both common chemotherapeutics used in glioma treatment, resulted in increased efficacy of both therapeutics. After CTX-NO exposure, both T98G and U-87MG human malignant glioma cells show increased sensitivity to BCNU and TMZ. Further investigation revealed that the consequences of this combination therapy was a reduction in active levels of the cytoprotective enzyme MGMT and altered p53 activity, both of which are essential in DNA repair and tumor cell resistance to chemotherapy. The combination of CTX-NO and chemotherapeutics also led to decreased cell invasion. These studies indicate that this targeted NO donor could be an invaluable tool in the development of novel approaches to treat cancer. PMID:23125026

  2. Circulating Th1 cell-type Tfh cells that exhibit impaired B cell help are preferentially activated during acute malaria in children

    PubMed Central

    Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Portugal, Silvia; Tran, Tuan M.; Yazew, Takele B.; Skinner, Jeff; Li, Shanping; Jain, Aarti; Felgner, Philip L.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Crompton, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Malaria-specific antibody responses are short-lived in children, leaving them susceptible to repeated bouts of febrile malaria. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this apparent immune deficiency are poorly understood. Recently, T follicular helper (Tfh) cells have been shown to play a critical role in generating long-lived antibody responses. We show that Malian children have resting PD-1+CXCR5+CD4+ Tfh cells in circulation that resemble germinal center Tfh cells phenotypically and functionally. Within this population PD-1+CXCR5+CXCR3− Tfh cells are superior to Th1-polarized PD-1+CXCR5+CXCR3+ Tfh cells in helping B cells. Longitudinally, we observed that malaria drives Th1 cytokine responses, and accordingly, the less functional Th1-polarized Tfh subset was preferentially activated and its activation did not correlate with antibody responses. These data provide insights into the Tfh cell biology underlying suboptimal antibody responses to malaria in children, and suggest that vaccine strategies that promote CXCR3− Tfh cell responses may improve malaria vaccine efficacy. PMID:26440897

  3. Circulating Th1-Cell-type Tfh Cells that Exhibit Impaired B Cell Help Are Preferentially Activated during Acute Malaria in Children.

    PubMed

    Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Portugal, Silvia; Tran, Tuan M; Yazew, Takele B; Skinner, Jeff; Li, Shanping; Jain, Aarti; Felgner, Philip L; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-10-13

    Malaria-specific antibody responses are short lived in children, leaving them susceptible to repeated bouts of febrile malaria. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this apparent immune deficiency are poorly understood. Recently, T follicular helper (Tfh) cells have been shown to play a critical role in generating long-lived antibody responses. We show that Malian children have resting PD-1(+)CXCR5(+)CD4(+) Tfh cells in circulation that resemble germinal center Tfh cells phenotypically and functionally. Within this population, PD-1(+)CXCR5(+)CXCR3(-) Tfh cells are superior to Th1-polarized PD-1(+)CXCR5(+)CXCR3(+) Tfh cells in helping B cells. Longitudinally, we observed that malaria drives Th1 cytokine responses, and accordingly, the less-functional Th1-polarized Tfh subset was preferentially activated and its activation did not correlate with antibody responses. These data provide insights into the Tfh cell biology underlying suboptimal antibody responses to malaria in children and suggest that vaccine strategies that promote CXCR3(-) Tfh cell responses may improve malaria vaccine efficacy. PMID:26440897

  4. Organophosphorus pesticides markedly inhibit the activities of natural killer, cytotoxic T lymphocyte and lymphokine-activated killer: a proposed inhibiting mechanism via granzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Nagahara, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Hidemi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Ko; Minami, Masayasu

    2002-04-01

    We have previously found that diisopropyl methylphosphonate, an organophosphorus by-product generated during sarin synthesis in the Tokyo sarin disaster, significantly inhibited natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activities. In the present study, to investigate whether organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) also affect NK and CTL activities, we firstly examined the effect of five OPs on human NK activity, and then the effect of Dimethyl 2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphate (DDVP), an OP on murine splenic NK, CTL and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK), and human LAK activities in vitro. To explore the underlying mechanism of decreased NK activity, we also investigated the effect of 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride-HCl (p-ABSF), an inhibitor of serine proteases on NK, LAK and CTL activities, and the effect of DDVP on the activity of granzymes (serine proteases). We found that OPs significantly decreased human NK activity in a dose-dependent manner, but the degree of decrease in NK activity differed among the OPs investigated, and that DDVP significantly decreased NK, LAK and CTL activities in a dose-dependent manner, but the degree of decrease in these activities differed. p-ABSF showed a similar inhibitory pattern to DDVP, and had an additive inhibitory effect with DDVP on NK, LAK and CTL activities. We also found that DDVP significantly inhibited granzyme activity in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicate that OPs significantly decrease NK, LAK and CTL activities in vitro via granzyme inhibition. PMID:11893417

  5. Ghrelin Inhibits Oligodendrocyte Cell Death by Attenuating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, we reported the antiapoptotic effect of ghrelin in spinal cord injury-induced apoptotic cell death of oligodendrocytes. However, how ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocytes apoptosis, is still unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether ghrelin inhibits microglia activation and thereby inhibits oligodendrocyte apoptosis. Methods Using total cell extracts prepared from BV-2 cells activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without ghrelin, the levels of p-p38 phosphor-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38MAPK), phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK), p-c-Jun, and pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) were examined by Western blot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated by using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. To examine the effect of ghrelin on oligodendrocyte cell death, oligodendrocytes were cocultured in transwell chambers of 24-well plates with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. After 48 hours incubation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2'-deoxyuridine, 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling staining were assessed. Results Ghrelin treatment significantly decreased levels of p-p38MAPK, p-JNK, p-c-Jun, and proNGF in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. ROS production increased in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells was also significantly inhibited by ghrelin treatment. In addition, ghrelin significantly inhibited oligodendrocyte cell death when cocultured with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Conclusion Ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by decreasing proNGF and ROS production as well as p38MAPK and JNK activation in activated microglia as an anti-inflammatory hormone. PMID:25309797

  6. Mesencephalic stimulation elicits inhibition of phrenic nerve activity in cat.

    PubMed

    Gallman, E A; Lawing, W L; Millhorn, D E

    1991-05-01

    1. Previous work from this laboratory has indicated that the mesencephalon is the anatomical substrate for a mechanism capable of inhibiting central respiratory drive in glomectomized cats for periods of up to 1 h or more following brief exposure to systemic hypoxia; phrenic nerve activity was used as an index of central respiratory drive. 2. The present study was undertaken to further localize the region responsible for the observed post-hypoxic inhibition of respiratory drive. We studied the phrenic nerve response to stimulations of the mesencephalon in anaesthetized, paralysed peripherally chemo-denervated cats with end-expired PCO2 and body temperature servo-controlled. 3. Stimulations of two types were employed. Electrical stimulation allowed rapid determination of sites from which phrenic inhibition could be elicited. Microinjections of excitatory amino acids were used subsequently in order to confine excitation to neuronal cell bodies and not axons of passage. 4. Stimulation of discrete regions of the ventromedial aspect of the mesencephalon in the vicinity of the red nucleus produced substantial inhibition of phrenic activity which lasted up to 45 min. Stimulation of other areas of the mesencephalon either produced no phrenic inhibition or resulted in a slight stimulation of phrenic activity. 5. The results are discussed in the context of the central respiratory response to hypoxia. PMID:1676420

  7. Recruitment of Perisomatic Inhibition during Spontaneous Hippocampal Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Molter, Colin; Mehidi, Amine; Szabadics, Janos; Leinekugel, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    It was recently shown that perisomatic GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) originating from basket and chandelier cells can be recorded as population IPSPs from the hippocampal pyramidal layer using extracellular electrodes (eIPSPs). Taking advantage of this approach, we have investigated the recruitment of perisomatic inhibition during spontaneous hippocampal activity in vitro. Combining intracellular and extracellular recordings from pyramidal cells and interneurons, we confirm that inhibitory signals generated by basket cells can be recorded extracellularly, but our results suggest that, during spontaneous activity, eIPSPs are mostly confined to the CA3 rather than CA1 region. CA3 eIPSPs produced the powerful time-locked inhibition of multi-unit activity expected from perisomatic inhibition. Analysis of the temporal dynamics of spike discharges relative to eIPSPs suggests significant but moderate recruitment of excitatory and inhibitory neurons within the CA3 network on a 10 ms time scale, within which neurons recruit each other through recurrent collaterals and trigger powerful feedback inhibition. Such quantified parameters of neuronal interactions in the hippocampal network may serve as a basis for future characterisation of pathological conditions potentially affecting the interactions between excitation and inhibition in this circuit. PMID:23805227

  8. Recruitment of Perisomatic Inhibition during Spontaneous Hippocampal Activity In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Anna; Retailleau, Aude; Molter, Colin; Mehidi, Amine; Szabadics, Janos; Leinekugel, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    It was recently shown that perisomatic GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) originating from basket and chandelier cells can be recorded as population IPSPs from the hippocampal pyramidal layer using extracellular electrodes (eIPSPs). Taking advantage of this approach, we have investigated the recruitment of perisomatic inhibition during spontaneous hippocampal activity in vitro. Combining intracellular and extracellular recordings from pyramidal cells and interneurons, we confirm that inhibitory signals generated by basket cells can be recorded extracellularly, but our results suggest that, during spontaneous activity, eIPSPs are mostly confined to the CA3 rather than CA1 region. CA3 eIPSPs produced the powerful time-locked inhibition of multi-unit activity expected from perisomatic inhibition. Analysis of the temporal dynamics of spike discharges relative to eIPSPs suggests significant but moderate recruitment of excitatory and inhibitory neurons within the CA3 network on a 10 ms time scale, within which neurons recruit each other through recurrent collaterals and trigger powerful feedback inhibition. Such quantified parameters of neuronal interactions in the hippocampal network may serve as a basis for future characterisation of pathological conditions potentially affecting the interactions between excitation and inhibition in this circuit. PMID:23805227

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells inhibit complement activation by secreting factor H.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhidan; Li, Qing; Bu, Hong; Lin, Feng

    2010-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent and broad immunosuppressive capabilities, and have shown promise in clinical trials treating many inflammatory diseases. Previous studies have found that MSCs inhibit dendritic cell, T-cell, and B-cell activities in the adaptive immunity; however, whether MSCs inhibit complement in the innate immunity, and if so, by which mechanism, have not been established. In this report, we found that MSCs constitutively secrete factor H, which potently inhibits complement activation. Depletion of factor H in the MSC-conditioned serum-free media abolishes their complement inhibitory activities. In addition, production of factor H by MSCs is augmented by inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in dose- and time-dependent manners, while IL-6 does not have a significant effect. Furthermore, the factor H production from MSCs is significantly suppressed by the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis inhibitor indomethacin and the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitor 1-methyl-d-tryptophan (1-MT), both of which inhibitors are known to efficiently dampen MSCs immunosuppressive activity. These results indicate that MSCs inhibit complement activation by producing factor H, which could be another mechanism underlying MSCs broad immunosuppressive capabilities. PMID:20163251

  10. The serotonin receptor agonist 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine facilitates noradrenaline release from rat spinal cord slices and inhibits monoamine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Reimann, W; Schneider, F

    1993-03-01

    1. The influences of the purported serotonergic agonist 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (MeODMT) on noradrenaline release and metabolism were investigated in a rat spinal cord release model and a monoamine oxidase (MAO) assay. 2. MeODMT inhibited the basal outflow of tritium from rat spinal cord slices preincubated with [3H]noradrenaline and enhanced the electrically-evoked overflow. 3. Effects on basal outflow were not observed, when monoamine oxidase (MAO) was inhibited by pargyline. Effects on the evoked overflow were not observed in the presence of metitepine or phentolamine. 4. Preferential inhibition by MeODMT of MAO A-type enzyme activity was found in a direct assay. 5. The results provide evidence for two different effects by which MeODMT reinforces noradrenergic neurotransmission in the rat spinal cord: facilitation of stimulation-evoked noradrenaline release and inhibition of noradrenaline metabolism by MAO inhibition. PMID:8482527

  11. Inhibition of nitrogenase activity by metronidazole in rhodopseudomonas capsulata.

    PubMed

    Kelley, B C; Nicholas, D J

    1981-07-01

    Inhibition of photosynthetic growth of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata by metronidazole was dependent on the nitrogen supply in culture solutions. Cultures fixing dinitrogen were more susceptible to inhibition by low concentrations than those supplied with NH4+. Light-dependent C2H2 reduction and H2 production by washed cells were inhibited by 80% and 60% respectively by 1 mM metronidazole. When this compound was first reduced with H2-palladised asbestos prior to assay, it only partially restricted C2H2 reduction in washed cells (33%) compared with unreduced inhibitor (68%). Metronidazole was without effect on other metabolic functions. Thus, even at 40 mM it did not inhibit either (a) dark or light respiration in cells grown under photo- and chemo-heterotrophic conditions; (b) H2-dependent photoreduction of 14CO2; (C) gamma-glutamyltransferase activity of glutamine synthetase in cell-free extracts (25 mM inhibitor). Metronidazole (1 mM) completely inhibited C2H2 reduction by washed cells of Azotobacter vinelandii. The dithionite-dependent C2H2 reduction of a partially purified nitrogenase was only partially inhibited (30%) by 1 mM metronidazole. PMID:6116482

  12. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  13. Tabernaemontana divaricata extract inhibits neuronal acetylcholinesterase activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Chattipakorn, Siriporn; Pongpanparadorn, Anucha; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Pongchaidacha, Anchalee; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2007-03-01

    The current pharmacotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChE-Is). A previous in vitro study showed that Tabernaemontana divaricata extract (TDE) can inhibit AChE activity. However, neither the AChE inhibitory effects nor the effect on neuronal activity of TDE has been investigated in vivo. To determine those effects of TDE in animal models, the Ellman's colorimetric method was implemented to investigate the cortical and circulating cholinesterase (ChE) activity, and Fos expression was used to determine the neuronal activity in the cerebral cortex, following acute administration of TDE with various doses (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) and at different time points. All doses of TDE 2 h after a single administration significantly inhibited cortical AChE activity and enhanced neuronal activity in the cerebral cortex. The enhancement of Fos expression and AChE inhibitory effects in the cerebral cortex among the three TDE-treated groups was not significantly different. A 2 h interval following all doses of TDE administration had no effect on circulating ChE activity. However, TDE significantly inhibited circulating AChE 10, 30 and 60 min after administration. Our findings suggest that TDE is a reversible AChE-I and could be beneficial as a novel therapeutic agent for AD. PMID:17023131

  14. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yoki; Murakami, Sumika; Sagae, Toshiyuki

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular anti-oxidant, was investigated because H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}} or SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, and cations such as K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 2+}, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated from cells in addition to that of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Leesha K.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Gunnink, Stephen M.; Schuiteman, Sam J.; Strohbehn, Lauren E.; Hamilton, Kathryn E.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin’s inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin. PMID:27039889

  16. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1.

    PubMed

    Gunnink, Leesha K; Alabi, Ola D; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Gunnink, Stephen M; Schuiteman, Sam J; Strohbehn, Lauren E; Hamilton, Kathryn E; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin's inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin. PMID:27039889

  17. Irregular activity arises as a natural consequence of synaptic inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Terman, D.; Rubin, J. E.; Diekman, C. O.

    2013-12-15

    Irregular neuronal activity is observed in a variety of brain regions and states. This work illustrates a novel mechanism by which irregular activity naturally emerges in two-cell neuronal networks featuring coupling by synaptic inhibition. We introduce a one-dimensional map that captures the irregular activity occurring in our simulations of conductance-based differential equations and mathematically analyze the instability of fixed points corresponding to synchronous and antiphase spiking for this map. We find that the irregular solutions that arise exhibit expansion, contraction, and folding in phase space, as expected in chaotic dynamics. Our analysis shows that these features are produced from the interplay of synaptic inhibition with sodium, potassium, and leak currents in a conductance-based framework and provides precise conditions on parameters that ensure that irregular activity will occur. In particular, the temporal details of spiking dynamics must be present for a model to exhibit this irregularity mechanism and must be considered analytically to capture these effects.

  18. Irregular activity arises as a natural consequence of synaptic inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terman, D.; Rubin, J. E.; Diekman, C. O.

    2013-12-01

    Irregular neuronal activity is observed in a variety of brain regions and states. This work illustrates a novel mechanism by which irregular activity naturally emerges in two-cell neuronal networks featuring coupling by synaptic inhibition. We introduce a one-dimensional map that captures the irregular activity occurring in our simulations of conductance-based differential equations and mathematically analyze the instability of fixed points corresponding to synchronous and antiphase spiking for this map. We find that the irregular solutions that arise exhibit expansion, contraction, and folding in phase space, as expected in chaotic dynamics. Our analysis shows that these features are produced from the interplay of synaptic inhibition with sodium, potassium, and leak currents in a conductance-based framework and provides precise conditions on parameters that ensure that irregular activity will occur. In particular, the temporal details of spiking dynamics must be present for a model to exhibit this irregularity mechanism and must be considered analytically to capture these effects.

  19. Inhibition of chrysin on xanthine oxidase activity and its inhibition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Suyun; Zhang, Guowen; Liao, Yijing; Pan, Junhui

    2015-11-01

    Chrysin, a bioactive flavonoid, was investigated for its potential to inhibit the activity of xanthine oxidase (XO), a key enzyme catalyzing xanthine to uric acid and finally causing gout. The kinetic analysis showed that chrysin possessed a strong inhibition on XO ability in a reversible competitive manner with IC50 value of (1.26±0.04)×10(-6)molL(-1). The results of fluorescence titrations indicated that chrysin bound to XO with high affinity, and the interaction was predominately driven by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces. Analysis of circular dichroism demonstrated that chrysin induced the conformational change of XO with increases in α-helix and β-sheet and reductions in β-turn and random coil structures. Molecular simulation revealed that chrysin interacted with the amino acid residues Leu648, Phe649, Glu802, Leu873, Ser876, Glu879, Arg880, Phe1009, Thr1010, Val1011 and Phe1013 located within the active cavity of XO. The mechanism of chrysin on XO activity may be the insertion of chrysin into the active site occupying the catalytic center of XO to avoid the entrance of xanthine and causing conformational changes in XO. Furthermore, the interaction assays indicated that chrysin and its structural analog apigenin exhibited an additive effect on inhibition of XO. PMID:26275460

  20. Inhibition of Neuroinflammation in LPS-Activated Microglia by Cryptolepine.

    PubMed

    Olajide, Olumayokun A; Bhatia, Harsharan S; de Oliveira, Antonio C P; Wright, Colin W; Fiebich, Bernd L

    2013-01-01

    Cryptolepine, an indoloquinoline alkaloid in Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, has anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of cryptolepine on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- induced neuroinflammation in rat microglia and its potential mechanisms. Microglial activation was induced by stimulation with LPS, and the effects of cryptolepine pretreatment on microglial activation and production of proinflammatory mediators, PGE2/COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase and nitric oxide/iNOS were investigated. We further elucidated the role of Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF- κ B) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases in the antiinflammatory actions of cryptolepine in LPS-stimulated microglia. Our results showed that cryptolepine significantly inhibited LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF α ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1 β ), nitric oxide, and PGE2. Protein and mRNA levels of COX-2 and iNOS were also attenuated by cryptolepine. Further experiments on intracellular signalling mechanisms show that I κ B-independent inhibition of NF- κ B nuclear translocation contributes to the anti-neuroinflammatory actions of cryptolepine. Results also show that cryptolepine inhibited LPS-induced p38 and MAPKAPK2 phosphorylation in the microglia. Cell viability experiments revealed that cryptolepine (2.5 and 5  μ M) did not produce cytotoxicity in microglia. Taken together, our results suggest that cryptolepine inhibits LPS-induced microglial inflammation by partial targeting of NF- κ B signalling and attenuation of p38/MAPKAPK2. PMID:23737832

  1. Acetaminophen inhibits intestinal p-glycoprotein transport activity.

    PubMed

    Novak, Analia; Carpini, Griselda Delli; Ruiz, María Laura; Luquita, Marcelo G; Rubio, Modesto C; Mottino, Aldo D; Ghanem, Carolina I

    2013-10-01

    Repeated acetaminophen (AP) administration modulates intestinal P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. Whether AP can modulate P-gp activity in a short-term fashion is unknown. We investigated the acute effect of AP on rat intestinal P-gp activity in vivo and in vitro. In everted intestinal sacs, AP inhibited serosal-mucosal transport of rhodamine 123 (R123), a prototypical P-gp substrate. R123 efflux plotted against R123 concentration adjusted well to a sigmoidal curve. Vmax decreased 50% in the presence of AP, with no modification in EC50, or slope, ruling out the possibility of inhibition to be competitive. Inhibition by AP was absent at 0°C, consistent with interference of the active transport of R123 by AP. Additionally, AP showed no effect on normal localization of P-gp at the apical membrane of the enterocyte and neither affected paracellular permeability. Consistent with absence of a competitive inhibition, two further strategies strongly suggested that AP is not a P-gp substrate. First, serosal-mucosal transport of AP was not affected by the classical P-gp inhibitors verapamil or Psc 833. Second, AP accumulation was not different between P-gp knock-down and wild-type HepG2 cells. In vivo intestinal absorption of digoxin, another substrate of P-gp, was assessed in the presence or absence of AP (100 μM). Portal digoxin concentration was increased by 214%, in average, by AP, as compared with digoxin alone. In conclusion, AP inhibited P-gp activity, increasing intestinal absorption of digoxin, a prototypical substrate. These results suggest that therapeutic efficacy of P-gp substrates can be altered if coadministered with AP. PMID:23897240

  2. Sesquiterpenes inhibiting the microglial activation from Laurus nobilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongqiang; Xie, Chunfeng; Wang, Hao; Jin, Da-Qing; Li, Shen; Wang, Meicheng; Ren, Quanhui; Xu, Jing; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Guo, Yuanqiang

    2014-05-21

    The inhibitory reagents to inhibit the activation of microglial cells may be potentially useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The leaves of the plant Laurus nobilis belonging to the family Lauraceae, namely, bay leaves, have been used as a popular spice, and their extract showed moderate inhibition on microglial activation. A further phytochemical investigation of the leaves led to the isolation of two new (1, 2) and eight known (3-10) sesquiterpenes. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR (HMQC, HMBC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, and NOESY) spectroscopic data analyses and Chem3D modeling. The following biological studies disclosed that these isolated compounds showed inhibitory activities on LPS-induced microglial activation. The results of our phytochemical investigation, including two new sesquiterpenes (1 and 2) and the first report of two compounds (3 and 4) from this species, further revealed the chemical composition of bay leaves as a popular spice, and the biological studies implied that bay leaves, containing bioactive substances with the inhibition of microglial activation, were potentially beneficial to human health. PMID:24801989

  3. AMDE-1 Is a Dual Function Chemical for Autophagy Activation and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Yang, Zuolong; Vollmer, Laura L.; Gao, Ying; Fu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Cui; Chen, Xiaoyun; Liu, Peiqing; Vogt, Andreas; Yin, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is the process by which cytosolic components and organelles are delivered to the lysosome for degradation. Autophagy plays important roles in cellular homeostasis and disease pathogenesis. Small chemical molecules that can modulate autophagy activity may have pharmacological value for treating diseases. Using a GFP-LC3-based high content screening assay we identified a novel chemical that is able to modulate autophagy at both initiation and degradation levels. This molecule, termed as Autophagy Modulator with Dual Effect-1 (AMDE-1), triggered autophagy in an Atg5-dependent manner, recruiting Atg16 to the pre-autophagosomal site and causing LC3 lipidation. AMDE-1 induced autophagy through the activation of AMPK, which inactivated mTORC1 and activated ULK1. AMDE-1did not affect MAP kinase, JNK or oxidative stress signaling for autophagy induction. Surprisingly, treatment with AMDE-1 resulted in impairment in autophagic flux and inhibition of long-lived protein degradation. This inhibition was correlated with a reduction in lysosomal degradation capacity but not with autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Further analysis indicated that AMDE-1 caused a reduction in lysosome acidity and lysosomal proteolytic activity, suggesting that it suppressed general lysosome function. AMDE-1 thus also impaired endocytosis-mediated EGF receptor degradation. The dual effects of AMDE-1 on autophagy induction and lysosomal degradation suggested that its net effect would likely lead to autophagic stress and lysosome dysfunction, and therefore cell death. Indeed, AMDE-1 triggered necroptosis and was preferentially cytotoxic to cancer cells. In conclusion, this study identified a new class of autophagy modulators with dual effects, which can be explored for potential uses in cancer therapy. PMID:25894744

  4. Inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and correlation of this inhibition with the occurrence of energy-coupling site 1 in various organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, T.

    1987-05-19

    The NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity of the respiratory chains of several organisms was inhibited by the carboxyl-modifying reagent N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD). This inhibition correlated with the presence of an energy-transducing site in this segment of the respiratory chain. Where the NADH-quinone reductase segment involved an energy-coupling site (e.g., in bovine heart and rat liver mitochondria, and in Paracoccus denitrificans, Escherichia coli, and Thermus thermophilus HB-8 membranes), DCCD acted as an inhibitor of ubiquinone reduction by NADH. By contrast, where energy-coupling site 1 was absent (e.g., in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria and BacilLus subtilis membranes), there was no inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity by DCCD. In the bovine and P. denitrificans systems, DCCD inhibition was pseudo first order with respect to incubation time, and reaction order with respect to inhibitor concentration was close to unity, indicating that inhibition resulted from the binding of one inhibitor molecule per active unit of NADH-ubiquinone reductase. In the bovine NADH-ubiquinone reductase complex (complex I), (/sup 14/C)DCCD was preferentially incorporated into two subunits of molecular weight 49,000 and 29,000. The time course of labeling of the 29,000 molecular weight subunit with (/sup 14/C)DCCD paralleled the time course of inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity.

  5. Topiramate inhibits trigeminovascular activation: an intravital microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Akerman, Simon; Goadsby, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    Activation, or the altered perception of activation, of trigeminal nerves that innervate the cranial vasculature is considered to be a pivotal component of the pathophysiology of acute migraine. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels are increased during migraine and after trigeminal nerve stimulation in the cat. Both CGRP and nitric oxide (NO) infusion causes headache and delayed migraine in migraineurs. Neurogenic stimulation of a cranial window, CGRP and NO injection all cause meningeal artery dilation in the rat when viewed using intravital microscopy. Topiramate is an antiepileptic drug with established efficacy as a migraine preventive, and has recently been shown to inhibit neurons of the trigeminocervical complex after superior sagittal sinus stimulation. In this study, we used intravital microscopy with neurogenic dural vasodilation, and CGRP- and NO-induced dilation to examine whether intravenous topiramate has effects on the trigeminovascular system. Topiramate was able to attentuate neurogenic dural vasodilation maximally after 15 min by 52% at 30 mg kg−1 (t5=6.78, n=6); there was no significant inhibition at 10 mg kg−1. There was also significant attenuation of the NO-induced dilation maximally after 15 min, at both 10 and 30 mg kg−1 by 21% (t6=6.09, n=7) and 41% (t6=5.3, n=7), respectively. CGRP-induced dilation was not inhibited at either dose of topiramate. The study demonstrates that topiramate is likely to inhibit neurogenic dural vasodilation by inhibiting the release of CGRP from prejunctional trigeminal neurons, thus attenuating the dural vasodilation. Topiramate is not able to act postsynaptically at the blood vessels themselves as the CGRP-induced dilation was not attenuated. The data are consistent with an effect of topiramate on trigeminovascular activation which may form part of its preventive antimigraine mechanisms of action. PMID:15980877

  6. Extract of acai-berry inhibits osteoclast differentiation and activity.

    PubMed

    Brito, C; Stavroullakis, A T; Ferreira, A C; Li, K; Oliveira, T; Nogueira-Filho, G; Prakki, A

    2016-08-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is the major cellular event responsible for bone loss and is triggered by inflammation. Acai-berry has proven anti-inflammatory effects. However, there is a lack of evidence for its effects on osteoclastogenesis. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether acai-berry extract (ABE) could inhibit osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity in vitro. The secretion of cytokines by osteoclasts has been also evaluated. RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with RANKL (50ng/mL) and treated with various concentrations of ABE (25-100μg/mL) to verify: cell viability (MTT), total protein concentration (BCA), osteoclast differentiation and activity, and cytokine secretion. Cell viability and protein assays showed no toxicity to RAW cells for the tested ABE concentrations (p>0.05). ABE also showed a dose-dependent inhibition of osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and hydroxylapatite resorption assay, respectively (p<0.05). ABE decreased the secretion of interleukin (IL)-1α, -6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha while increasing the secretion of IL-3, -4, -13 and interferon gamma when compared to the control group (p<0.05). Results of this study showed that acai-berry extract inhibits osteoclast differentiation and activity possibly due to the modulation of a vast number of cytokines produced by osteoclast precursor cells. PMID:27054700

  7. Luteolin, a flavonoid, inhibits AP-1 activation by basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Toru; Higa, Shinji; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Naka, Tetsuji; Ogata, Atsushi; Shima, Yoshihito; Fujimoto, Minoru; Yamadori, Tomoki; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Kuwabara, Yusuke; Kawai, Mari; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Maezaki, Naoyoshi; Tanaka, Tetsuaki; Kawase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshio . E-mail: ttanak@imed3.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    Flavonoids including luteolin, apigenin, and fisetin are inhibitors of IL-4 synthesis and CD40 ligand expression by basophils. This study was done to search for compounds with greater inhibitory activity of IL-4 expression and to clarify the molecular mechanisms through which flavonoids inhibit their expression. Of the 37 flavonoids and related compounds examined, ayanin, luteolin, and apigenin were the strongest inhibitors of IL-4 production by purified basophils in response to anti-IgE antibody plus IL-3. Luteolin did not suppress Syk or Lyn phosphorylation in basophils, nor did suppress p54/46 SAPK/JNK, p38 MAPK, and p44/42 MAPK activation by a basophilic cell line, KU812 cells, stimulated with A23187 and PMA. However, luteolin did inhibit phosphorylation of c-Jun and DNA binding activity of AP-1 in nuclear lysates from stimulated KU812 cells. These results provide a fundamental structure of flavonoids for IL-4 inhibition and demonstrate a novel action of flavonoids that suppresses the activation of AP-1.

  8. Tiagabine Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Neurotoxins by Inhibiting Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Dongping; Xu, Jing; Tong, Jiabin; Wang, Zishan; Huang, Li; Yang, Yufang; Bai, Xiaochen; Wang, Pan; Suo, Haiyun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Yu, Mei; Fei, Jian; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Microglial activation and inflammation are associated with progressive neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has recently been shown to play an inhibitory role in the immune system. Tiagabine, a piperidine derivative, enhances GABAergic transmission by inhibiting GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1). In the present study, we found that tiagabine pretreatment attenuated microglial activation, provided partial protection to the nigrostriatal axis and improved motor deficits in a methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. The protective function of tiagabine was abolished in GAT 1 knockout mice that were challenged with MPTP. In an alternative PD model, induced by intranigral infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), microglial suppression and subsequent neuroprotective effects of tiagabine were demonstrated. Furthermore, the LPS-induced inflammatory activation of BV-2 microglial cells and the toxicity of conditioned medium toward SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited by pretreatment with GABAergic drugs. The attenuation of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the inhibition of the generation of inflammatory mediators were the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggest that tiagabine acts as a brake for nigrostriatal microglial activation and that it might be a novel therapeutic approach for PD. PMID:26499517

  9. Histidine-rich glycoprotein inhibits contact activation of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, A B; Andersen, H F; Magnusson, S; Halkier, T

    1990-12-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein has been purified from bovine plasma employing two different purification procedures. The first procedure was one-step ion-exchange chromatography using phosphocellulose, while the second procedure involved fractionation using polyethyleneglycol 6000 followed by column chromatography employing CM-Sepharose and heparin-Sepharose. The effect of purified bovine histidine-rich glycoprotein on the contact activation of blood coagulation was studied in human plasma by using as activating surface either an ellagic acid-phospholipid suspension (Cephotest) or sulfatide. Contact activation was monitored by the generation of amidolytic activity towards a synthetic chromogenic substrate (S-2302) for factor XIIa and plasma kallikrein. Bovine histidine-rich glycoprotein inhibits the contact activation induced by both of these activating surfaces. PMID:2084959

  10. Inhibition of thrombin activity with DNA-aptamers.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolsky, A B; Titaeva, E V; Khaspekova, S G; Spiridonova, V A; Kopylov, A M; Mazurov, A V

    2009-07-01

    The effects of two DNA aptamers (oligonucleotides) 15TBA and 31TBA (15- and 31-mer thrombin-binding aptamers, respectively) on thrombin activity were studied. Both aptamers added to human plasma dose-dependently increased thrombin time (fibrin formation upon exposure to exogenous thrombin), prothrombin time (clotting activation by the extrinsic pathway), and activated partial thromboplastin time (clotting activation by the intrinsic pathway). At the same time, these aptamers did not modify amidolytic activity of thrombin evaluated by cleavage of synthetic chromogenic substrate. Aptamers also inhibited thrombin-induced human platelet aggregation. The inhibitory effects of 31TBA manifested at lower concentrations than those of 15TBA in all tests. These data indicate that the studied antithrombin DNA aptamers effectively suppress its two key reactions, fibrin formation and stimulation of platelet aggregation, without modifying active center of the thrombin molecule. PMID:19902090

  11. Emergent patterns from probabilistic generalizations of lateral activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kabla, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The combination of laterally activating and inhibiting feedbacks is well known to spontaneously generate spatial organization. It was introduced by Gierer and Meinhardt as an extension of Turing's great insight that two reacting and diffusing chemicals can spontaneously drive spatial morphogenesis per se. In this study, we develop an accessible nonlinear and discrete probabilistic model to study simple generalizations of lateral activation and inhibition. By doing so, we identify a range of modes of morphogenesis beyond the familiar Turing-type modes; notably, beyond stripes, hexagonal nets, pores and labyrinths, we identify labyrinthine highways, Kagome lattices, gyrating labyrinths and multi-colour travelling waves and spirals. The results are discussed within the context of Turing's original motivating interest: the mechanisms which underpin the morphogenesis of living organisms. PMID:27170648

  12. Spillover-mediated feedforward-inhibition functionally segregates interneuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Coddington, Luke T.; Rudolph, Stephanie; Lune, Patrick Vande; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda; Wadiche, Jacques I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter spillover represents a form of neural transmission not restricted to morphologically defined synaptic connections. Communication between climbing fibers (CFs) and molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) in the cerebellum is mediated exclusively by glutamate spillover. Here, we show how CF stimulation functionally segregates MLIs based on their location relative to glutamate release. Excitation of MLIs that reside within the domain of spillover diffusion coordinates inhibition of MLIs outside the diffusion limit. CF excitation of MLIs is dependent on extrasynaptic NMDA receptors that enhance the spatial and temporal spread of CF signaling. Activity mediated by functionally segregated MLIs converges onto neighboring Purkinje cells (PCs) to generate a long-lasting biphasic change in inhibition. These data demonstrate how glutamate release from single CFs modulates excitability of neighboring PCs, thus expanding the influence of CFs on cerebellar cortical activity in a manner not predicted by anatomical connectivity. PMID:23707614

  13. Intrinsic mechanisms of pain inhibition: activation by stress.

    PubMed

    Terman, G W; Shavit, Y; Lewis, J W; Cannon, J T; Liebeskind, J C

    1984-12-14

    Portions of the brain stem seem normally to inhibit pain. In man and laboratory animals these brain areas and pathways from them to spinal sensory circuits can be activated by focal stimulation. Endogenous opioids appear to be implicated although separate nonopioid mechanisms are also evident. Stress seems to be a natural stimulus triggering pain suppression. Properties of electric footshock have been shown to determine the opioid or nonopioid basis of stress-induced analgesia. Two different opioid systems can be activated by different footshock paradigms. This dissection of stress analgesia has begun to integrate divergent findings concerning pain inhibition and also to account for some of the variance that has obscured the reliable measurement of the effects of stress on tumor growth and immune function. PMID:6505691

  14. Inhibition of human DNA topoisomerase IB by nonmutagenic ruthenium(II)-based compounds with antitumoral activity.

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Mariana S; da Silva, Monize M; Correa, Rodrigo S; Vieira, Sara D; Castelli, Silvia; D'Anessa, Ilda; De Grandis, Rone; Varanda, Eliana; Deflon, Victor M; Desideri, Alessandro; Batista, Alzir A

    2016-02-01

    Herein we synthesized two new ruthenium(II) compounds [Ru(pySH)(bipy)(dppb)]PF6 (1) and [Ru(HSpym)(bipy)(dppb)]PF6 (2) that are analogs to an antitumor agent recently described, [Ru(SpymMe2)(bipy)(dppb)]PF6 (3), where [(Spy) = 2-mercaptopyridine anion; (Spym) = 2-mercaptopyrimidine anion and (SpymMe2) = 4,6-dimethyl-2-mercaptopyrimidine anion]. In vitro cell culture experiments revealed significant anti-proliferative activity for 1-3 against HepG2 and MDA-MB-231 tumor cells, higher than the standard anti-cancer drugs doxorubicin and cisplatin. No mutagenicity is detected when compounds are evaluated by cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus cytome and Ames test in the presence and absence of S9 metabolic activation from rat liver. Interaction studies show that compounds 1-3 can bind to DNA through electrostatic interactions and to albumin through hydrophobic interactions. The three compounds are able to inhibit the DNA supercoiled relaxation mediated by human topoisomerase IB (Top1). Compound 3 is the most efficient Top1 inhibitor and the inhibitory effect is enhanced upon pre-incubation with the enzyme. Analysis of different steps of Top1 catalytic cycle indicates that 3 inhibits the cleavage reaction impeding the binding of the enzyme to DNA and slows down the religation reaction. Molecular docking shows that 3 preferentially binds closer to the residues of the active site when Top1 is free and lies on the DNA groove downstream of the cleavage site in the Top1-DNA complex. Thus, 3 can be considered in further studies for a possible use as an anticancer agent. PMID:26758075

  15. Ginger extract inhibits LPS induced macrophage activation and function

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Macrophages play a dual role in host defence. They act as the first line of defence by mounting an inflammatory response to antigen exposure and also act as antigen presenting cells and initiate the adaptive immune response. They are also the primary infiltrating cells at the site of inflammation. Inhibition of macrophage activation is one of the possible approaches towards modulating inflammation. Both conventional and alternative approaches are being studied in this regard. Ginger, an herbal product with broad anti inflammatory actions, is used as an alternative medicine in a number of inflammatory conditions like rheumatic disorders. In the present study we examined the effect of ginger extract on macrophage activation in the presence of LPS stimulation. Methods Murine peritoneal macrophages were stimulated by LPS in presence or absence of ginger extract and production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed. We also studied the effect of ginger extract on the LPS induced expression of MHC II, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 molecules. We also studied the antigen presenting function of ginger extract treated macrophages by primary mixed lymphocyte reaction. Results We observed that ginger extract inhibited IL-12, TNF-α, IL-1β (pro inflammatory cytokines) and RANTES, MCP-1 (pro inflammatory chemokines) production in LPS stimulated macrophages. Ginger extract also down regulated the expression of B7.1, B7.2 and MHC class II molecules. In addition ginger extract negatively affected the antigen presenting function of macrophages and we observed a significant reduction in T cell proliferation in response to allostimulation, when ginger extract treated macrophages were used as APCs. A significant decrease in IFN-γ and IL-2 production by T cells in response to allostimulation was also observed. Conclusion In conclusion ginger extract inhibits macrophage activation and APC function and indirectly inhibits T cell activation. PMID:18173849

  16. Inhibition of telomerase activity enhances hyperthermia-mediated radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Manjula; Pandita, Shruti; Hunt, Clayton R; Gupta, Arun; Yue, Xuan; Khan, Saira; Pandita, Raj K; Pratt, David; Shay, Jerry W; Taylor, John-Stephen A; Pandita, Tej K

    2008-05-01

    Hyperthermia is a potent sensitizer of cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR); however, hyperthermia also induces heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) synthesis and HSP70 expression is associated with radioresistance. Because HSP70 interacts with the telomerase complex and expression of the telomerase catalytic unit (hTERT) extends the life span of the human cells, we determined if heat shock influences telomerase activity and whether telomerase inhibition enhances heat-mediated IR-induced cell killing. In the present study, we show that moderate hyperthermia (43 degrees C) enhances telomerase activity. Inhibition of telomerase activity with human telomerase RNA-targeted antisense agents, and in particular GRN163L, results in enhanced hyperthermia-mediated IR-induced cell killing, and ectopic expression of catalytic unit of telomerase (TERT) decreased hyperthermia-mediated IR-induced cell killing. The increased cell killing by heat and IR exposure in telomerase-inhibited cells correlates with delayed appearance and disappearance of gamma-H2AX foci as well as decreased chromosome repair. These results suggest that inactivation of telomerase before combined hyperthermia and radiotherapy could improve tumor killing. PMID:18451164

  17. Resveratrol attenuates hypoxia-induced neurotoxicity through inhibiting microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Qingrui; Gao, Yan; Liu, Guangheng; Xiu, Meng; Wei, Xiang; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Dexiang

    2015-09-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol enriched in Polygonum cuspidatum and has been found to afford neuroprotective effects against neuroinflammation in the brain. Activated microglia can secrete various pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotoxic mediators, which may contribute to hypoxic brain injuries. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential role of resveratrol in attenuating hypoxia-induced neurotoxicity via its anti-inflammatory actions through in vitro models of the BV-2 microglial cell line and primary microglia. We found that resveratrol significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced microglial activation and reduced subsequent release of pro-inflammatory factors. In addition, resveratrol inhibited the hypoxia-induced degradation of IκB-alpha and phosphorylation of p65 NF-κB protein. Hypoxia-induced ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation was also strongly inhibited by resveratrol, whereas resveratrol had no effect on hypoxia-stimulated p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Importantly, treating primary cortical neurons with conditioned medium (CM) from hypoxia-stimulated microglia induced neuronal apoptosis, which was reversed by CM co-treated with resveratrol. Taken together, resveratrol exerts neuroprotection against hypoxia-induced neurotoxicity through its anti-inflammatory effects in microglia. These effects were mediated, at least in part, by suppressing the activation of NF-ĸB, ERK and JNK MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:26225925

  18. Artemisinin Inhibits Chloroplast Electron Transport Activity: Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Bharati, Adyasha; Kar, Monaranjan; Sabat, Surendra Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo), behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the QB; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth. PMID:22719995

  19. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng; Cui, Jianxiu

    2016-09-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10(-8)~10(-6) mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10(-9) mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  20. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10–8~10–6 mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10–9 mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  1. 2-Methoxycinnamaldehyde inhibits tumor angiogenesis by suppressing Tie2 activation.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Sakimoto, Susumu; Jia, Weizhen; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2011-11-11

    Blood vessels are mainly composed of intraluminal endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells adhering to the ECs on their basal side. Immature blood vessels lacking mural cells are leaky; thus, the process of mural cell adhesion to ECs is indispensable for stability of the vessels during physiological angiogenesis. However, in the tumor microenvironment, although some blood vessels are well-matured, the majority is immature. Because mural cell adhesion to ECs also has a marked anti-apoptotic effect, angiogenesis inhibitors that destroy immature blood vessels may not affect mature vessels showing more resistance to apoptosis. Activation of Tie2 receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in ECs mediates pro-angiogenic effects via the induction of EC migration but also facilitates vessel maturation via the promotion of cell adhesion between mural cells and ECs. Therefore, inhibition of Tie2 has the advantage of completely inhibiting angiogenesis. Here, we isolated a novel small molecule Tie2 kinase inhibitor, identified as 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde (2-MCA). We found that 2-MCA inhibits both sprouting angiogenesis and maturation of blood vessels, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth. Our results suggest a potent clinical benefit of disrupting these two using Tie2 inhibitors. PMID:22033407

  2. Activation and Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase 8 by Monovalent Cations*

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Stephanie L.; Joseph, Caleb G.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    The metal-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze hydrolysis of acetyl groups from acetyllysine side chains and are targets of cancer therapeutics. Two bound monovalent cations (MVCs) of unknown function have been previously observed in crystal structures of HDAC8; site 1 is near the active site, whereas site 2 is located >20 Å from the catalytic metal ion. Here we demonstrate that one bound MVC activates catalytic activity (K1/2 = 3.4 mm for K+), whereas the second, weaker-binding MVC (K1/2 = 26 mm for K+) decreases catalytic activity by 11-fold. The weaker binding MVC also enhances the affinity of the HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid by 5-fold. The site 1 MVC is coordinated by the side chain of Asp-176 that also forms a hydrogen bond with His-142, one of two histidines important for catalytic activity. The D176A and H142A mutants each increase the K1/2 for potassium inhibition by ≥40-fold, demonstrating that the inhibitory cation binds to site 1. Furthermore, the MVC inhibition is mediated by His-142, suggesting that this residue is protonated for maximal HDAC8 activity. Therefore, His-142 functions either as an electrostatic catalyst or a general acid. The activating MVC binds in the distal site and causes a time-dependent increase in activity, suggesting that the site 2 MVC stabilizes an active conformation of the enzyme. Sodium binds more weakly to both sites and activates HDAC8 to a lesser extent than potassium. Therefore, it is likely that potassium is the predominant MVC bound to HDAC8 in vivo. PMID:20029090

  3. Verbascoside Inhibits Promastigote Growth and Arginase Activity of Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Maquiaveli, Claudia C; Lucon-Júnior, João F; Brogi, Simone; Campiani, Giuseppe; Gemma, Sandra; Vieira, Paulo C; Silva, Edson R

    2016-05-27

    Verbascoside (1) is a phenylethanoid glycoside that has antileishmanial activity against Leishmania infantum and Leishmania donovani. In this study, we verified the activity of 1 on Leishmania amazonensis and arginase inhibition. Compound 1 showed an EC50 of 19 μM against L. amazonensis promastigotes and is a competitive arginase inhibitor (Ki = 0.7 μM). Docking studies were performed to assess the interaction of 1 with arginase at the molecular level. Arginase is an enzyme of the polyamine biosynthesis pathway that is important to parasite infectivity, and the results of our study suggest that 1 could be useful to develop new approaches for treating leishmaniasis. PMID:27096224

  4. Inhibition of polyphenol oxidases activity by various dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Anna M; Mattei, Enrico; Messina, Antonella; Tarola, Anna M

    2004-05-19

    In an effort to develop natural and nontoxic inhibitors on the activity of mushroom polyphenol oxidase (PPO) the effect of various glycyl-dipeptides (GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyHis, GlyLeu, GlyLys, GlyPhe, GlyPro, GlyTyr) was investigated. The inhibition study with dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) as substrate is based on separation of the enzymatic reaction components by reversed phase HPLC and the UV detection of the dopachrome formed. The results have evidenced that several of tested dipeptides inhibited PPO activity in the range of 20-40% while GlyPro and GlyLeu had no effect. The study has also permitted the characterization of the following kinetic pattern: a linear-mixed-type mechanism for GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyLys, and GlyPhe and a hyperbolic-mixed-type for GlyTyr. It was not possible to identify the inhibition mechanism for GlyHis, although it affects PPO activity. In addition the effects of GlyAsp, GlyLys and GlyHis were evaluated for lessening the browning of fresh Golden Delicious apple and Irish White Skinned potato. The effectiveness of such inhibitors was determined by the difference between the colors observed in the dipeptide-treated sample and the controls using the color space CIE-Lab system. The % browning inhibition on potato (20-50%) was greater than of apple (20-30%) by the all tested dipeptides. Only GlyLys presented the significant value of 50%. PMID:15137808

  5. Inhibition of Neuroinflammation in LPS-Activated Microglia by Cryptolepine

    PubMed Central

    Olajide, Olumayokun A.; Bhatia, Harsharan S.; de Oliveira, Antonio C. P.; Wright, Colin W.; Fiebich, Bernd L.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptolepine, an indoloquinoline alkaloid in Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, has anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of cryptolepine on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- induced neuroinflammation in rat microglia and its potential mechanisms. Microglial activation was induced by stimulation with LPS, and the effects of cryptolepine pretreatment on microglial activation and production of proinflammatory mediators, PGE2/COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase and nitric oxide/iNOS were investigated. We further elucidated the role of Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases in the antiinflammatory actions of cryptolepine in LPS-stimulated microglia. Our results showed that cryptolepine significantly inhibited LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), nitric oxide, and PGE2. Protein and mRNA levels of COX-2 and iNOS were also attenuated by cryptolepine. Further experiments on intracellular signalling mechanisms show that IκB-independent inhibition of NF-κB nuclear translocation contributes to the anti-neuroinflammatory actions of cryptolepine. Results also show that cryptolepine inhibited LPS-induced p38 and MAPKAPK2 phosphorylation in the microglia. Cell viability experiments revealed that cryptolepine (2.5 and 5 μM) did not produce cytotoxicity in microglia. Taken together, our results suggest that cryptolepine inhibits LPS-induced microglial inflammation by partial targeting of NF-κB signalling and attenuation of p38/MAPKAPK2. PMID:23737832

  6. Inhibition of PMN-elastase activity by semisynthetic glucan sulfates.

    PubMed

    Becker, Markus; Franz, Gerhard; Alban, Susanne

    2003-05-01

    Proteolysis of connective tissue by enzymes such as PMN-elastase (PMNE) is a crucial step during inflammation and metastasis. Semisynthetic sulfated carbohydrates (SC) were shown to exhibit potent antiinflammatory and antimetastatic activity in vivo. The aim of the present study was to examine whether interferences with PMN-elastase may contribute to these effects. Therefore, the interactions of these compounds with PMNE were evaluated in various test systems. Besides semisynthetic alpha-1,4/1,6- and beta-1,3-glucan sulfates, UFH, a LMWH and pentosan polysulfate (PPS) were included in the study. The inhibitory activity of SC improves not only with increasing molecular weight (MW 10 - 250 kDa: 37 - 54% inhibition at 0.25 micro g/ml) and degree of sulfation (DS 0.25 - 2.0: 16 - 50% inhibition at 0.25 micro g/ml), but depends also on their genuine polysaccharide structure (IC50 beta-1,3-glucan sulfate 0.18 / alpha-1,4/1,6-glucan sulfate 0.25 / UFH 0.5 micro g/ml). Using physiological substrate assays (collagen, elastin), beta-1,3- and alpha-1,4/1,6-glucan sulfates are more active than UFH (inhibition at 1.5 micro g/ml: 41 / 32 / 12%). According to enzyme-inhibitor binding studies, SC exhibit structure dependent affinity to the enzyme (K(d) for PMNE: beta-1,3 < alpha-1,4/1,6 < UFH). Finally, SC were shown to inhibit cancer cell-mediated elastinolysis. PMID:12719790

  7. Inhibition of rotaviruses by selected antiviral substances: mechanisms of viral inhibition and in vivo activity.

    PubMed Central

    Smee, D F; Sidwell, R W; Clark, S M; Barnett, B B; Spendlove, R S

    1982-01-01

    Several RNA virus inhibitors were evaluated against simian (SA11) rotavirus infections in vitro and murine rotavirus gastroenteritis in vivo. Test compounds included 1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide (ribavirin), 3-deazaguanine (3-DG), 3-deazauridine, and 9-(S)-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)adenine [(S)-DHPA]. All drugs inhibited total infectious SA11 virus yields in MA-104 cells. Ribavirin, 3-DG, and (S)-DHPA affected [3H]uridine uptake into uninfected MA-104 cells in both the acid-soluble and -insoluble fractions. All drugs reduced the levels of dense (precursor) and light (complete) SA11 particle yields compared with control but did not alter the relative amounts of dense compared with light particles, suggesting that the agents did not interfere with virus assembly. Ribavirin and 3-DG inhibited SA11 polypeptide synthesis, as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis studies. None of the agents or mono- and triphosphate derivatives of ribavirin inhibited SA11 RNA polymerase activity. In murine rotavirus studies, oral therapy with ribavirin-2',3',5'-triacetate and (S)-DHPA increased mean survival time, but no increase in survivor rate was observed. 3-DG- and (S)-DHPA-treated mice had a more rapid weight gain than controls, suggesting a probable lessening of the severity of the disease. Images PMID:6282209

  8. Reduced brain activation in violent adolescents during response inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yi; Mei, Yi; Du, XiaoXia; Xie, Bin; Shao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control have been linked to aggression and violent behaviour. This study aimed to observe whether violent adolescents show different brain activation patterns during response inhibition and to ascertain the roles these brain regions play. A self-report method and modified overt aggression scale (MOAS) were used to evaluate violent behaviour. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 22 violent adolescents and 17 matched healthy subjects aged 12 to 18 years. While scanning, a go/no-go task was performed. Between-group comparisons revealed that activation in the bilateral middle and superior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, and right orbitofrontal area (BA11) regions were significantly reduced in the violent group compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the violent group had more widespread activation in the prefrontal cortex than that observed in the control group. Activation of the prefrontal cortex in the violent group was widespread but lacking in focus, failing to produce intensive activation in some functionally related regions during response inhibition. PMID:26888566

  9. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  10. Sensorimotor-Independent Prefrontal Activity During Response Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weidong; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Gore, John C.; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2015-01-01

    A network of brain regions involving the ventral inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula (vIFG/AI), presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and basal ganglia has been implicated in stopping impulsive, unwanted responses. However, whether this network plays an equal role in response inhibition under different sensorimotor contexts has not been tested systematically. Here, we conducted an fMRI experiment using the stop signal task, a sensorimotor task requiring occasional withholding of the planned response upon the presentation of a stop signal. We manipulated both the sensory modality of the stop signal (visual versus auditory) and the motor response modality (hand versus eye). Results showed that the vIFG/AI and the preSMA along with the right middle frontal gyrus were commonly activated in response inhibition across the various sensorimotor conditions. Our findings provide direct evidence for a common role of these frontal areas, but not striatal areas in response inhibition independent of the sensorimotor contexts. Nevertheless, these three frontal regions exhibited different activation patterns during successful and unsuccessful stopping. Together with the existing evidence, we suggest that the vIFG/AI is involved in the early stages of stopping such as triggering the stop process while the preSMA may play a role in regulating other cortical and subcortical regions involved in stopping. PMID:23798325

  11. Sensorimotor-independent prefrontal activity during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weidong; Cannistraci, Christopher J; Gore, John C; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2014-05-01

    A network of brain regions involving the ventral inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula (vIFG/AI), presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and basal ganglia has been implicated in stopping impulsive, unwanted responses. However, whether this network plays an equal role in response inhibition under different sensorimotor contexts has not been tested systematically. Here, we conducted an fMRI experiment using the stop signal task, a sensorimotor task requiring occasional withholding of the planned response upon the presentation of a stop signal. We manipulated both the sensory modality of the stop signal (visual versus auditory) and the motor response modality (hand versus eye). Results showed that the vIFG/AI and the preSMA along with the right middle frontal gyrus were commonly activated in response inhibition across the various sensorimotor conditions. Our findings provide direct evidence for a common role of these frontal areas, but not striatal areas in response inhibition independent of the sensorimotor contexts. Nevertheless, these three frontal regions exhibited different activation patterns during successful and unsuccessful stopping. Together with the existing evidence, we suggest that the vIFG/AI is involved in the early stages of stopping such as triggering the stop process while the preSMA may play a role in regulating other cortical and subcortical regions involved in stopping. PMID:23798325

  12. Inhibition of Type III Interferon Activity by Orthopoxvirus Immunomodulatory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The type III interferon (IFN) family elicits an antiviral response that is nearly identical to that evoked by IFN-α/β. However, these cytokines (known as IFN-λ1, 2, and 3) signal through a distinct receptor, and thus may be resistant to the evasion strategies used by some viruses to avoid the IFN-α/β response. Orthopoxviruses are highly resistant to IFN-α/β because they encode well-characterized immunomodulatory proteins that inhibit IFN activity. These include a secreted receptor (B18R) that neutralizes IFN-α/β, and a cytoplasmic protein (E3L) that blocks IFN-α/β effector functions in infected cells. We therefore determined the ability of these immunomodulators to abrogate the IFN-λ–induced antiviral response. We found that (i) vaccinia virus (VACV) replication is resistant to IFN-λ antiviral activity; (ii) neither VACV B18R nor the variola virus homolog B20R neutralizes IFN-λ; (iii) VACV E3L inhibits the IFN-λ–mediated antiviral response through a PKR-dependent pathway; (iv) VACV infection inhibits IFN-λR–mediated signal transduction and gene expression. These results demonstrate differential sensitivity of IFN-λ to multiple distinct evasion mechanisms employed by a single virus. PMID:20038204

  13. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  14. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  15. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  16. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  17. TLR2 Activation Inhibits Embryonic Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Okun, Eitan; Griffioen, Kathleen J.; Gen-Son, Tae; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roberts, Nicholas J.; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Hutchison, Emmette; Cheng, Aiwu; Arumugam, Thiruma V.; Lathia, Justin D.; van Praag, Henriette; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play essential roles in innate immunity, and increasing evidence indicates that these receptors are expressed in neurons, astrocytes and microglia in the brain, where they mediate responses to infection, stress and injury. To address the possibility that TLR2 heterodimer activation could affect progenitor cells in the developing brain, we analyzed the expression of TLR2 throughout the mouse cortical development, and assessed the role of TLR2 heterodimer activation in neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation. TLR2 mRNA and protein was expressed in the cortex in embryonic and early postnatal stages of development, and in cultured cortical NPC. While NPC from TLR2-deficient and wild type embryos had the same proliferative capacity, TLR2 activation by the synthetic bacterial lipopeptides Pam3CSK4 and FSL1, or low molecular weight hyaluronan, an endogenous ligand for TLR2, inhibited neurosphere formation in vitro. Intracerebral in utero administration of TLR2 ligands resulted in ventricular dysgenesis characterized by increased ventricle size, reduced proliferative area around the ventricles, increased cell density, an increase in PH3+ cells and a decrease in BrdU+ cells in the sub-ventricular zone. Our findings indicate that loss of TLR2 does not result in defects in cerebral development. However, TLR2 is expressed and functional in the developing telencephalon from early embryonic stages and infectious agent-related activation of TLR2 inhibits NPC proliferation. TLR2–mediated inhibition of NPC proliferation may therefore be a mechanism by which infection, ischemia and inflammation adversely affect brain development. PMID:20456021

  18. Preferential Remedies for Employment Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry T.; Zaretsky, Barry L.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of the problem of preferential remedies to achieve equal employment opportunities for women and minority groups. Contends that "color blindness" will not end discrimination but that some form of "color conscious" affirmative action program must be employed. Temporary preferential treatment is justified, according to the author, by the…

  19. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    SciTech Connect

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C.; Sudano, Isabella; Luescher, Thomas F.; Camici, Giovanni G.

    2010-01-22

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 {+-} 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% {+-} 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 {+-} 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  20. Antioedematogenic activity, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and antimicrobial properties of Jacaranda oxyphylla.

    PubMed

    Pereira, V V; Silva, R R; Dos Santos, M H; Dias, D F; Moreira, M E C; Takahashi, J A

    2016-09-01

    Jacaranda oxyphylla Cham. (Bignoniaceae) is a shrub found in the Brazilian cerrado and used in folk medicine to treat microbial infections. The aim of this study was to carry out a phytochemical screening and evaluate antioedematogenic, antimicrobial and antiacetylcholinesterase properties of J. oxyphylla crude extracts. All extracts analysed showed presence of terpenoids, which are potentially active chemical substances. A high AChE inhibitory activity for hexane extract from leaves and for the extracts from twigs was found. Ethanol extract from leaves of J. oxyphylla showed activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. This extract was also effective in inhibiting the stages of inflammation evaluated. Biological investigation and phytochemical screening of J. oxyphylla extracts provided additional evidence of its traditional medicinal value. PMID:26469996

  1. MEROPENEM INHIBITS D,D-CARBOXYPEPTIDASE ACTIVITY IN MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Arora, Kriti; Lloyd, John R.; Lee, Ill Young; Nair, Vinod; Fischer, Elizabeth; Boshoff, Helena I.M.; Barry, Clifton E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Carbapenems such as meropenem are being investigated for their potential therapeutic utility against highly drug-resistant tuberculosis. These β-lactams target the transpeptidases that introduce interpeptide cross-links into bacterial peptidoglycan thereby controlling rigidity of the bacterial envelope. Treatment of M. tuberculosis (Mtb) with the β-lactamase inhibitor clavulanate together with meropenem resulted in rapid, polar, cell lysis releasing cytoplasmic contents. In Mtb it has been previously demonstrated that 3-3 cross-linkages (involving two diaminopimelate (DAP) molecules) predominate over 4-3 cross-linkages (involving one DAP and one D-alanine) in stationary-phase cells. We purified and analyzed peptidoglycan from Mtb and found that 3-3 cross-linkages predominate throughout all growth phases and the ratio of 4-3/3-3 linkages does not vary significantly under any growth condition. Meropenem treatment was accompanied by a dramatic accumulation of unlinked pentapeptide stems with no change in the tetrapeptide pools, suggesting that meropenem inhibits both a D,D-carboxypeptidase and an L,D-transpeptidase. We purified a candidate D,D-carboxypeptidase DacB2 and showed that meropenem indeed directly inhibits this enzyme by forming a stable adduct at the enzyme active site. These results suggest that the rapid lysis of meropenem-treated cells is the result of synergistically inhibiting the transpeptidases that introduce 3,3-cross-links while simultaneously limiting the pool of available substrates available for cross-linking. PMID:22906310

  2. Meropenem inhibits D,D-carboxypeptidase activity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Arora, Kriti; Lloyd, John R; Lee, Ill Y; Nair, Vinod; Fischer, Elizabeth; Boshoff, Helena I M; Barry, Clifton E

    2012-10-01

    Carbapenems such as meropenem are being investigated for their potential therapeutic utility against highly drug-resistant tuberculosis. These β-lactams target the transpeptidases that introduce interpeptide cross-links into bacterial peptidoglycan thereby controlling rigidity of the bacterial envelope. Treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) with the β-lactamase inhibitor clavulanate together with meropenem resulted in rapid, polar, cell lysis releasing cytoplasmic contents. In Mtb it has been previously demonstrated that 3-3 cross-linkages [involving two diaminopimelate (DAP) molecules] predominate over 4-3 cross-linkages (involving one DAP and one D-alanine) in stationary-phase cells. We purified and analysed peptidoglycan from Mtb and found that 3-3 cross-linkages predominate throughout all growth phases and the ratio of 4-3/3-3 linkages does not vary significantly under any growth condition. Meropenem treatment was accompanied by a dramatic accumulation of unlinked pentapeptide stems with no change in the tetrapeptide pools, suggesting that meropenem inhibits both a D,D-carboxypeptidase and an L,D-transpeptidase. We purified a candidate D,D-carboxypeptidase DacB2 and showed that meropenem indeed directly inhibits this enzyme by forming a stable adduct at the enzyme active site. These results suggest that the rapid lysis of meropenem-treated cells is the result of synergistically inhibiting the transpeptidases that introduce 3,3-cross-links while simultaneously limiting the pool of available substrates available for cross-linking. PMID:22906310

  3. Inhibition of autophagy enhances the anticancer activity of silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jun; Huang, Zhihai; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Wei; Jin, Peipei; Wei, Pengfei; Zhang, Yunjiao; Zheng, Fang; Zhang, Jiqian; Xu, Jing; Hu, Yi; Wang, Yanhong; Li, Yajuan; Gu, Ning; Wen, Longping

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are cytotoxic to cancer cells and possess excellent potential as an antitumor agent. A variety of nanoparticles have been shown to induce autophagy, a critical cellular degradation process, and the elevated autophagy in most of these situations promotes cell death. Whether Ag NPs can induce autophagy and how it might affect the anticancer activity of Ag NPs has not been reported. Here we show that Ag NPs induced autophagy in cancer cells by activating the PtdIns3K signaling pathway. The autophagy induced by Ag NPs was characterized by enhanced autophagosome formation, normal cargo degradation, and no disruption of lysosomal function. Consistent with these properties, the autophagy induced by Ag NPs promoted cell survival, as inhibition of autophagy by either chemical inhibitors or ATG5 siRNA enhanced Ag NPs-elicited cancer cell killing. We further demonstrated that wortmannin, a widely used inhibitor of autophagy, significantly enhanced the antitumor effect of Ag NPs in the B16 mouse melanoma cell model. Our results revealed a novel biological activity of Ag NPs in inducing cytoprotective autophagy, and inhibition of autophagy may be a useful strategy for improving the efficacy of Ag NPs in anticancer therapy. PMID:25484080

  4. Inhibition of autophagy enhances the anticancer activity of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun; Huang, Zhihai; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Wei; Jin, Peipei; Wei, Pengfei; Zhang, Yunjiao; Zheng, Fang; Zhang, Jiqian; Xu, Jing; Hu, Yi; Wang, Yanhong; Li, Yajuan; Gu, Ning; Wen, Longping

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are cytotoxic to cancer cells and possess excellent potential as an antitumor agent. A variety of nanoparticles have been shown to induce autophagy, a critical cellular degradation process, and the elevated autophagy in most of these situations promotes cell death. Whether Ag NPs can induce autophagy and how it might affect the anticancer activity of Ag NPs has not been reported. Here we show that Ag NPs induced autophagy in cancer cells by activating the PtdIns3K signaling pathway. The autophagy induced by Ag NPs was characterized by enhanced autophagosome formation, normal cargo degradation, and no disruption of lysosomal function. Consistent with these properties, the autophagy induced by Ag NPs promoted cell survival, as inhibition of autophagy by either chemical inhibitors or ATG5 siRNA enhanced Ag NPs-elicited cancer cell killing. We further demonstrated that wortmannin, a widely used inhibitor of autophagy, significantly enhanced the antitumor effect of Ag NPs in the B16 mouse melanoma cell model. Our results revealed a novel biological activity of Ag NPs in inducing cytoprotective autophagy, and inhibition of autophagy may be a useful strategy for improving the efficacy of Ag NPs in anticancer therapy. PMID:25484080

  5. Copper oxide nanoparticles inhibit the metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mashock, Michael J; Kappell, Anthony D; Hallaj, Nadia; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2016-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are used increasingly in industrial applications and consumer products and thus may pose risk to human and environmental health. The interaction of CuO NPs with complex media and the impact on cell metabolism when exposed to sublethal concentrations are largely unknown. In the present study, the short-term effects of 2 different sized manufactured CuO NPs on metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. The role of released Cu(2+) during dissolution of NPs in the growth media and the CuO nanostructure were considered. Characterization showed that the 28 nm and 64 nm CuO NPs used in the present study have different primary diameter, similar hydrodynamic diameter, and significantly different concentrations of dissolved Cu(2+) ions in the growth media released from the same initial NP mass. Exposures to CuO NPs or the released Cu(2+) fraction, at doses that do not have impact on cell viability, showed significant inhibition on S. cerevisiae cellular metabolic activity. A greater CuO NP effect on the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae growth under respiring conditions was observed. Under the tested conditions the observed metabolic inhibition from the NPs was not explained fully by the released Cu ions from the dissolving NPs. PMID:26178758

  6. Activation and inhibition of transglutaminase 2 in mice.

    PubMed

    Dafik, Laila; Albertelli, Megan; Stamnaes, Jorunn; Sollid, Ludvig M; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is an allosterically regulated enzyme with transamidating, deamidating and cell signaling activities. It is thought to catalyze sequence-specific deamidation of dietary gluten peptides in the small intestines of celiac disease patients. Because this modification has profound consequences for disease pathogenesis, there is considerable interest in the design of small molecule TG2 inhibitors. Although many classes of TG2 inhibitors have been reported, thus far an animal model for screening them to identify promising celiac drug candidates has remained elusive. Using intraperitoneal administration of the toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I∶C)), we induced rapid TG2 activation in the mouse small intestine. Dose dependence was observed in the activation of TG2 as well as the associated villous atrophy, gross clinical response, and rise in serum concentration of the IL-15/IL-15R complex. TG2 activity was most pronounced in the upper small intestine. No evidence of TG2 activation was observed in the lung mucosa, nor were TLR7/8 ligands able to elicit an analogous response. Introduction of ERW1041E, a small molecule TG2 inhibitor, in this mouse model resulted in TG2 inhibition in the small intestine. TG2 inhibition had no effect on villous atrophy, suggesting that activation of this enzyme is a consequence, rather than a cause, of poly(I∶C) induced enteropathy. Consistent with this finding, administration of poly(I∶C) to TG2 knockout mice also induced villous atrophy. Our findings pave the way for pharmacological evaluation of small molecule TG2 inhibitors as drug candidates for celiac disease. PMID:22319575

  7. Zeno inhibition of polarization rotation in an optically active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalo, Isabel; Porras, Miguel A.; Luis, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experiment in which the rotation of the polarization of light propagating in an optically active water solution of D-fructose tends to be inhibited by frequent monitoring whether the polarization remains unchanged. This is an example of the Zeno effect that has remarkable pedagogical interest because of its conceptual simplicity, easy implementation, low cost, and because the same the Zeno effect holds at classical and quantum levels. An added value is the demonstration of the Zeno effect beyond typical idealized assumptions in a practical setting with real polarizers.

  8. Lipid-induced NOX2 activation inhibits autophagic flux by impairing lysosomal enzyme activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Jaishy, Bharat; Zhang, Quanjiang; Chung, Heaseung S.; Riehle, Christian; Soto, Jamie; Jenkins, Stephen; Abel, Patrick; Cowart, L. Ashley; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Abel, E. Dale

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in maintaining energy and organelle homeostasis. The relationship between obesity and the regulation of autophagy is cell type specific. Despite adverse consequences of obesity on cardiac structure and function, the contribution of altered cardiac autophagy in response to fatty acid overload is incompletely understood. Here, we report the suppression of autophagosome clearance and the activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox)2 in both high fat-fed murine hearts and palmitate-treated H9C2 cardiomyocytes (CMs). Defective autophagosome clearance is secondary to superoxide-dependent impairment of lysosomal acidification and enzyme activity in palmitate-treated CMs. Inhibition of Nox2 prevented superoxide overproduction, restored lysosome acidification and enzyme activity, and reduced autophagosome accumulation in palmitate-treated CMs. Palmitate-induced Nox2 activation was dependent on the activation of classical protein kinase Cs (PKCs), specifically PKCβII. These findings reveal a novel mechanism linking lipotoxicity with a PKCβ-Nox2-mediated impairment in pH-dependent lysosomal enzyme activity that diminishes autophagic turnover in CMs. PMID:25529920

  9. Eriodictyol Inhibits RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Formation and Function Via Inhibition of NFATc1 Activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Fangming; Zhou, Lin; Zhao, Jinmin; Liu, Qian; Yang, Mingli; Tan, Renxiang; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Ge; Quinn, Julian M W; Tickner, Jennifer; Huang, Yuanjiao; Xu, Jiake

    2016-09-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) induces differentiation and function of osteoclasts through triggering multiple signaling cascades, including NF-κB, MAPK, and Ca(2+) -dependent signals, which induce and activate critical transcription factor NFATc1. Targeting these signaling cascades may serve as an effective therapy against osteoclast-related diseases. Here, by screening a panel of natural plant extracts with known anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, or anti-oxidant properties for possible anti-osteoclastogenic activities we identified Eriodictyol. This flavanone potently suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption in a dose-dependent manner without detectable cytotoxicity, suppressing RANKL-induced NF-κB, MAPK, and Ca(2+) signaling pathways. Eriodictyol also strongly inhibited RANKL-induction of c-Fos levels (a critical component of AP-1 transcription factor required by osteoclasts) and subsequent activation of NFATc1, concomitant with reduced expression of osteoclast specific genes including cathepsin K (Ctsk), V-ATPase-d2 subunit, and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP/Acp5). Taken together, these data provide evidence that Eriodictyol could be useful for the prevention and treatment of osteolytic disorders associated with abnormally increased osteoclast formation and function. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1983-1993, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26754483

  10. Activation and inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase from Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Zeczycki, Tonya N; Menefee, Ann L; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Wallace, John C; Attwood, Paul V; St Maurice, Martin; Cleland, W Wallace

    2011-11-15

    While crystallographic structures of the R. etli pyruvate carboxylase (PC) holoenzyme revealed the location and probable positioning of the essential activator, Mg(2+), and nonessential activator, acetyl-CoA, an understanding of how they affect catalysis remains unclear. The current steady-state kinetic investigation indicates that both acetyl-CoA and Mg(2+) assist in coupling the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin in the biotin carboxylase (BC) domain with pyruvate carboxylation in the carboxyl transferase (CT) domain. Initial velocity plots of free Mg(2+) vs pyruvate were nonlinear at low concentrations of Mg(2+) and a nearly complete loss of coupling between the BC and CT domain reactions was observed in the absence of acetyl-CoA. Increasing concentrations of free Mg(2+) also resulted in a decrease in the K(a) for acetyl-CoA. Acetyl phosphate was determined to be a suitable phosphoryl donor for the catalytic phosphorylation of MgADP, while phosphonoacetate inhibited both the phosphorylation of MgADP by carbamoyl phosphate (K(i) = 0.026 mM) and pyruvate carboxylation (K(i) = 2.5 mM). In conjunction with crystal structures of T882A R. etli PC mutant cocrystallized with phosphonoacetate and MgADP, computational docking studies suggest that phosphonoacetate could coordinate to one of two Mg(2+) metal centers in the BC domain active site. Based on the pH profiles, inhibition studies, and initial velocity patterns, possible mechanisms for the activation, regulation, and coordination of catalysis between the two spatially distinct active sites in pyruvate carboxylase from R. etli by acetyl-CoA and Mg(2+) are described. PMID:21958066

  11. Calmodulin binds to and inhibits the activity of phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) functions as a cytoplasmic ATP-generating glycolytic enzyme, a nuclear mediator in DNA replication and repair, a stimulator of Sendai virus transcription and an extracellular disulfide reductase in angiogenesis. Probing of a developmental expression library from Dictyostelium discoideum with radiolabelled calmodulin led to the isolation of a cDNA encoding a putative calmodulin-binding protein (DdPGK) with 68% sequence similarity to human PGK. Dictyostelium, rabbit and yeast PGKs bound to calmodulin-agarose in a calcium-dependent manner while DdPGK constructs lacking the calmodulin-binding domain (209KPFLAILGGAKVSDKIKLIE228) failed to bind. The calmodulin-binding domain shows 80% identity between diverse organisms and is situated beside the hinge and within the ATP binding domain adjacent to nine mutations associated with PGK deficiency. Calmodulin addition inhibits yeast PGK activity in vitro while the calmodulin antagonist W-7 abrogates this inhibition. Together, these data suggest that PGK activity may be negatively regulated by calcium and calmodulin signalling in eukaryotic cells. PMID:15363631

  12. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Inhibits Spontaneous Contractile Activity of Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Lobov, G I; Pan'kova, M N

    2016-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide dose-dependently inhibited spontaneous phase and tonic activity of smooth muscle strips from the capsule of isolated bovine mesenteric lymph nodes. Pretreatment with L-NAME, diclofenac, and methylene blue had practically no effect on the peptide-induced relaxation responses. In contrast, glibenclamide significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide. We suppose that the NO-dependent and cyclooxygenase signaling pathways are not involved in implementation of the inhibitory effects of atrial natriuretic peptide. ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of the smooth muscle cell membrane are the last component in the signaling pathway leading to relaxation of smooth muscles of the lymph node capsule caused by atrial natriuretic peptide; activation of these channels leads to membrane hyperpolarization and smooth muscle relaxation. PMID:27383173

  13. Activated AMPK inhibits PPAR-{alpha} and PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sozio, Margaret S; Lu, Changyue; Zeng, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W

    2011-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) are critical regulators of short-term and long-term fatty acid oxidation, respectively. We examined whether the activities of these molecules were coordinately regulated. H4IIEC3 cells were transfected with PPAR-α and PPAR-γ expression plasmids and a peroxisome-proliferator-response element (PPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid. The cells were treated with PPAR agonists (WY-14,643 and rosiglitazone), AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) and metformin, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Both AICAR and metformin decreased basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity; compound C increased agonist-stimulated reporter activity and partially reversed the effect of the AMPK activators. Similar effects on PPAR-γ were seen, with both AICAR and metformin inhibiting PPRE reporter activity. Compound C increased basal PPAR-γ activity and rosiglitazone-stimulated activity. In contrast, retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α), another nuclear receptor that dimerizes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), was largely unaffected by the AMPK activators. Compound C modestly increased AM580 (an RAR agonist)-stimulated activity. The AMPK activators did not affect PPAR-α binding to DNA, and there was no consistent correlation between effects of the AMPK activators and inhibitor on PPAR and the nuclear localization of AMPK-α subunits. Expression of either a constitutively active or dominant negative AMPK-α inhibited basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity and basal and rosiglitazone-stimulated PPAR-γ activity. We concluded that the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin inhibited transcriptional activities of PPAR-α and PPAR-γ, whereas inhibition of AMPK with compound C activated both PPARs. The effects of AMPK do not appear to be mediated through effects on RXR or on PPAR/RXR binding to DNA. These effects are independent of kinase activity and instead appear to

  14. Obesity and lipid stress inhibit carnitine acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Sarah E; Martin, Ola J; Noland, Robert C; Slentz, Dorothy H; DeBalsi, Karen L; Ilkayeva, Olga R; An, Jie; Newgard, Christopher B; Koves, Timothy R; Muoio, Deborah M

    2014-04-01

    Carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetylcarnitine. Emerging evidence suggests that this enzyme functions as a positive regulator of total body glucose tolerance and muscle activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a mitochondrial enzyme complex that promotes glucose oxidation and is feedback inhibited by acetyl-CoA. Here, we used tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to identify a negative relationship between CrAT activity and muscle content of lipid intermediates. CrAT specific activity was diminished in muscles from obese and diabetic rodents despite increased protein abundance. This reduction in enzyme activity was accompanied by muscle accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines (LCACs) and acyl-CoAs and a decline in the acetylcarnitine/acetyl-CoA ratio. In vitro assays demonstrated that palmitoyl-CoA acts as a direct mixed-model inhibitor of CrAT. Similarly, in primary human myocytes grown in culture, nutritional and genetic manipulations that promoted mitochondrial influx of fatty acids resulted in accumulation of LCACs but a pronounced decrease of CrAT-derived short-chain acylcarnitines. These results suggest that lipid-induced antagonism of CrAT might contribute to decreased PDH activity and glucose disposal in the context of obesity and diabetes. PMID:24395925

  15. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I; Abdel Bar, Fatma M; El-Mahdy, Areej M; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1-V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  16. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I.; Abdel Bar, Fatma M.; El-Mahdy, Areej M.; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1–V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  17. When activity requires breaking up: LEKTI proteolytic activation cascade for specific proteinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Furio, Laetitia; Hovnanian, Alain

    2011-11-01

    Lymphoepithelial Kazal-type related inhibitor (LEKTI) is a multidomain proteinase inhibitor whose defective expression causes Netherton syndrome (NS). LEKTI is encoded by SPINK5, which is also a susceptibility gene for atopic disease. In this issue, Fortugno et al. report an elegant and thorough study of the LEKTI proteolytic activation process in which they identify the precise nature of the cleavage sites used and the bioactive fragments generated. They propose a proteolytic activation model in human skin and confirm differential inhibition of kallikrein (KLK) 5, 7, and 14 by the major physiological LEKTI fragments. They show that these bioactive fragments inhibit KLK-mediated proteolysis of desmoglein 1 (DSG1) and suggest a fine-tuned inhibition process controlling target serine proteinase (SP) activity. PMID:21997416

  18. Dextromethorphan inhibits activations and functions in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN- γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF- κ B translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  19. Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  20. Inhibition of bacterial activity in acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurdeep; Bhatnagar, Miss Mridula

    1988-12-01

    Acid mine drainage water give rise to rapid growth and activity of an iron- and sulphur- oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidians which greatly accelerate acid producing reactions by oxidation of pyrite material associated with coal and adjoining strata. The role of this bacterium in production of acid mine drainage is described. This study presents the data which demonstrate the inhibitory effect of certain organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate, quarternary ammonium compounds on the growth of the acidophilic aerobic autotroph Thiobacillus ferrooxidians. In each experiment, 10 milli-litres of laboratory developed culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians was added to 250 milli-litres Erlenmeyer flask containing 90 milli-litres of 9-k media supplemented with FeSO4 7H2O and organic compounds at various concentrations. Control experiments were also carried out. The treated and untreated (control) samples analysed at various time intervals for Ferrous Iron and pH levels. Results from this investigation showed that some organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate and quarternary ammonium compounds at low concentration (10-2 M, 10-50 ppm concentration levels) are effective bactericides and able to inhibit and reduce the Ferrous Iron oxidation and acidity formation by inhibiting the growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians is also discussed and presented

  1. Inhibition of hepatic microsomal carboxylesterase activity by paraoxon.

    PubMed

    Castle, M C

    1988-01-01

    A large number of therapeutic agents are esters of carboxylic acids and are thus substrates for microsomal carboxylesterase enzymes. These studies characterized the effects of the organophosphate compound, paraoxon, on the hydrolysis of several drug esters (procaine, chloramphenicol succinate, prednisolone succinate, lidocaine, procainamide and methylparaben) by microsomal preparations from guinea-pigs. These investigations demonstrate that carboxylesterase activity toward several drug esters is present in liver, lung and kidney. The liver is by far the major site of hydrolysis of these ester compounds. Since no hydrolysis was observed with the two amide esters, the hydrolysis of carboxylesters and amide esters appears to be mediated by different enzymes in the guinea-pig. At the substrate concentrations studied, the hydrolysis of methylparaben followed zero-order kinetics. When added to isolated microsomal preparations, paraoxon produced a dose-dependent inhibition of hydrolysis of all substrates. Administration of paraoxon to guinea-pigs prior to isolation of microsomes did not produce consistent effects with any substrate. Inhibition of ester hydrolysis was observed with some pretreatments, while either no change or increased hydrolysis was observed with other pretreatment regimens. PMID:3245748

  2. Ginkgetin inhibits the growth of DU−145 prostate cancer cells through inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yoon Jung; Jung, Seung-Nam; Yun, Jieun; Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Jiyeon; Lee, Yu-Jin; Han, Dong Cho; Kwon, Byoung-Mog

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in human cancers. Therefore, STAT3 is a therapeutic target of cancer drug discovery. We previously reported that natural products inhibited constitutively activated STAT3 in human prostate tumor cells. We used a dual-luciferase assay to screen 200 natural products isolated from herbal medicines and we identified ginkgetin obtained from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba L. as a STAT3 inhibitor. Ginkgetin inhibited both inducible and constitutively activated STAT3 and blocked the nuclear translocation of p-STAT3 in DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, ginkgetin selectively inhibited the growth of prostate tumor cells stimulated with activated STAT3. Ginkgetin induced STAT3 dephosphorylation at Try705 and inhibited its localization to the nucleus, leading to the inhibition of expression of STAT3 target genes such as cell survival-related genes (cyclin D1 and survivin) and anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL). Therefore, ginkgetin inhibited the growth of STAT3-activated tumor cells. We also found that ginkgetin inhibited tumor growth in xenografted nude mice and downregulated p-STAT3Tyr705 and survivin in tumor tissues. This is the first report that ginkgetin exerts antitumor activity by inhibiting STAT3. Therefore, ginkgetin is a good STAT3 inhibitor and may be a useful lead molecule for development of a therapeutic STAT3 inhibitor. PMID:25611086

  3. CCR5 antibodies HGS004 and HGS101 preferentially inhibit drug-bound CCR5 infection and restore drug sensitivity of Maraviroc-resistant HIV-1 in primary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Latinovic, Olga; Reitz, Marvin; Le, Nhut M.; Foulke, James S.; Faetkenheuer, Gerd; Lehmann, Clara; Redfield, Robert R.; Heredia, Alonso

    2011-03-01

    R5 HIV-1 strains resistant to the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc (MVC) can use drug-bound CCR5. We demonstrate that MVC-resistant HIV-1 exhibits delayed kinetics of coreceptor engagement and fusion during drug-bound versus free CCR5 infection of cell lines. Antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of CCR5 had greater antiviral activity against MVC-bound compared to MVC-free CCR5 infection. However, in PBMCs, only ECL2 CCR5 antibodies HGS004 and HGS101, but not 2D7, inhibited infection by MVC resistant HIV-1 more potently with MVC-bound than with free CCR5. In addition, HGS004 and HGS101, but not 2D7, restored the antiviral activity of MVC against resistant virus in PBMCs. In flow cytometric studies, CCR5 binding by the HGS mAbs, but not by 2D7, was increased when PBMCs were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC increases exposure of the relevant epitope. Thus, HGS004 and HGS101 have antiviral mechanisms distinct from 2D7 and could help overcome MVC resistance.

  4. Promoter occlusion: transcription through a promoter may inhibit its activity.

    PubMed

    Adhya, S; Gottesman, M

    1982-07-01

    Induction of prophage lambda inhibits the expression of the gal operon from its cognate promoters. The effect is observed only in cis, and is due to frequent transcription of the gal promoter region by RNA polymerase molecules initiating upstream at the prophage PL promoter. The frequency of transcription initiation at PL is some 30 times greater than that at the gal promoter, Pg1. PL is one of the strongest procaryotic promoters. This "promoter occlusion" is essentially complete when the distance between gal and PL is small (less than or equal to 10 kb); and when PL is fully active (that is, in the absence of the cl or cro repressors). We discuss the possibility that promoter occlusion at two lambda promoters, Pint and PR', might play a role in the sequential expression of viral functions. PMID:6217898

  5. Inhibition of tristetraprolin expression by dexamethasone in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jalonen, Ulla; Lahti, Aleksi; Korhonen, Riku; Kankaanranta, Hannu; Moilanen, Eeva

    2005-03-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a factor that regulates mRNA stability and the expression of certain inflammatory genes. In the present study, we found that TTP expression was increased in macrophages exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Dexamethasone and dissociated steroid RU24858 inhibited LPS-induced TTP protein and mRNA expression and the inhibitory effect was reversed by a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone. Histone deacetylase inhibitors trichostatin A (TSA) and apicidin reduced the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone and RU24858 on TTP expression, but the glucocorticoids did not alter TTP mRNA half-life. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory steroids reduce TTP expression in activated macrophages by a glucocorticoid response element (GRE)-independent mechanism, possibly through histone deacetylation and transcriptional silencing. PMID:15710351

  6. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  7. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  8. Is Peroxiredoxin II's peroxidase activity strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes?

    PubMed

    Benfeitas, Rui; Selvaggio, Gianluca; Antunes, Fernando; Coelho, Pedro; Salvador, Armindo

    2014-10-01

    H2O2 elimination in human erythrocytes is mainly carried out by catalase (Cat), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and the more recently discovered peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2). However, the contribution of Prx2 to H2O2 consumption is still unclear. Prx2's high reactivity with H2O2 (kPrx2=10×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kCat =7×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kGPx1 =4×10(7) M(-1)s(-1)) and high abundance ([Prx2]= 570µM, [Cat]= 32µM, [GPx1]= 1µM) suggest that under low H2O2 supply rates it should consume >99% of the H2O2. However, extensive evidence indicates that in intact erythrocytes Prx2 contributes no more than Cat to H2O2 consumption. In order for this to be attained, Prx2's effective rate constant with H2O2would have to be just ~10(5) M(-1)s(-1), much lower than that determined in multiple experiments with the purified proteins. Nevertheless, nearly all Prx2 is oxidized within 1min of exposing erythrocytes to a H2O2 bolus, which is inconsistent with an irreversible inhibition. A mathematical model of the H2O2 metabolism in human erythrocytes [Benfeitas et al. (2014) Free Radic. Biol. Med.] where Prx2 either has a low kPrx2 or is subject to a strong (>99%) but readily reversible inhibition achieves quantitative agreement with detailed experimental observations of the responses of the redox status of Prx2 in human erythrocytes and suggests functional advantages of this design (see companion abstract). By contrast, a variant where Prx2 is fully active with kPrx2=10(8) M(-1)s(-1) shows important qualitative discrepancies. Altogether, these results suggest that Prx2's peroxidase activity is strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes. We acknowledge fellowship SFRH/BD/51199/2010, grants PEst-C/SAU/LA0001/2013-2014, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0612/2013, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0313/2014, and FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020978 (PTDC/QUI-BIQ/119657/2010) co-financed by FEDER through the COMPETE program and by FCT. PMID:26461310

  9. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  10. Inhibition of the central melanocortin system decreases brown adipose tissue activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Kooijman, Sander; Boon, Mariëtte R.; Parlevliet, Edwin T.; Geerling, Janine J.; van de Pol, Vera; Romijn, Johannes A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Meurs, Illiana; Rensen, Patrick C. N.

    2014-01-01

    The melanocortin system is an important regulator of energy balance, and melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) deficiency is the most common monogenic cause of obesity. We investigated whether the relationship between melanocortin system activity and energy expenditure (EE) is mediated by brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity. Therefore, female APOE*3-Leiden.CETP transgenic mice were fed a Western-type diet for 4 weeks and infused intracerebroventricularly with the melanocortin 3/4 receptor (MC3/4R) antagonist SHU9119 or vehicle for 2 weeks. SHU9119 increased food intake (+30%) and body fat (+50%) and decreased EE by reduction in fat oxidation (−42%). In addition, SHU9119 impaired the uptake of VLDL-TG by BAT. In line with this, SHU9119 decreased uncoupling protein-1 levels in BAT (−60%) and induced large intracellular lipid droplets, indicative of severely disturbed BAT activity. Finally, SHU9119-treated mice pair-fed to the vehicle-treated group still exhibited these effects, indicating that MC4R inhibition impairs BAT activity independent of food intake. These effects were not specific to the APOE*3-Leiden.CETP background as SHU9119 also inhibited BAT activity in wild-type mice. We conclude that inhibition of central MC3/4R signaling impairs BAT function, which is accompanied by reduced EE, thereby promoting adiposity. We anticipate that activation of MC4R is a promising strategy to combat obesity by increasing BAT activity. PMID:25016380

  11. Phorbol ester stimulates secretory activity while inhibiting receptor-activated aminopyrine uptake by gastric glands

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.R.; Chew, C.S.

    1986-03-05

    Both cyclic AMP-dependent and -independent secretagogues stimulate pepsinogen release, respiration and H/sup +/ secretory activity (AP uptake) in rabbit gastric glands. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (T), a diacyglycerol analog, activates protein kinase C (PKC) and stimulates secretion in many systems. T stimulated respiration and pepsinogen release by glands and increased AP uptake by both glands and purified parietal cells. However, T reduced AP uptake by glands stimulated with carbachol (C) or histamine (H) with an apparent IC/sub 50/ of 1 nM. Preincubation with T for 30 min produced maximum inhibition which was not reversed by removal of T. T accelerated the decline of the transient C peak while the late steady state response to H was most inhibited. H-stimulated AP uptake was also inhibited by 50 ..mu..g/ml 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol, a reported PKC activator, but not by the inactive phorbol, 4..cap alpha..-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate. In contrast, T potentiated AP uptake by glands stimulated with submaximal doses of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. These results suggest inhibition by T is a specific effect of PKC activators. The differing effects of T on secretion indicators may result from a dual action of T on receptor and post-receptor intracellular events.

  12. Curcumin inhibits activation of TRPM2 channels in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kheradpezhouh, E.; Barritt, G.J.; Rychkov, G.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of many liver diseases including viral and drug-induced hepatitis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. One of the consequences of oxidative stress in the liver is deregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis, resulting in a sustained elevation of the free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) in hepatocytes, which leads to irreversible cellular damage. Recently it has been shown that liver damage induced by paracetamol and subsequent oxidative stress is, in large part, mediated by Ca2+ entry through Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channels. Involvement of TRPM2 channels in hepatocellular damage induced by oxidative stress makes TRPM2 a potential therapeutic target for treatment of a range of oxidative stress-related liver diseases. We report here the identification of curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), a natural plant-derived polyphenol in turmeric spice, as a novel inhibitor of TRPM2 channel. Presence of 5 µM curcumin in the incubation medium prevented the H2O2- and paracetamol-induced [Ca2+]c rise in rat hepatocytes. Furthermore, in patch clamping experiments incubation of hepatocytes with curcumin inhibited activation of TRPM2 current by intracellular ADPR with IC50 of approximately 50 nM. These findings enhance understanding of the actions of curcumin and suggest that the known hepatoprotective properties of curcumin are, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of TRPM2 channels. PMID:26609559

  13. Curcumin inhibits activation of TRPM2 channels in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kheradpezhouh, E; Barritt, G J; Rychkov, G Y

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of many liver diseases including viral and drug-induced hepatitis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. One of the consequences of oxidative stress in the liver is deregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, resulting in a sustained elevation of the free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in hepatocytes, which leads to irreversible cellular damage. Recently it has been shown that liver damage induced by paracetamol and subsequent oxidative stress is, in large part, mediated by Ca(2+) entry through Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channels. Involvement of TRPM2 channels in hepatocellular damage induced by oxidative stress makes TRPM2 a potential therapeutic target for treatment of a range of oxidative stress-related liver diseases. We report here the identification of curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), a natural plant-derived polyphenol in turmeric spice, as a novel inhibitor of TRPM2 channel. Presence of 5µM curcumin in the incubation medium prevented the H2O2- and paracetamol-induced [Ca(2+)]c rise in rat hepatocytes. Furthermore, in patch clamping experiments incubation of hepatocytes with curcumin inhibited activation of TRPM2 current by intracellular ADPR with IC50 of approximately 50nM. These findings enhance understanding of the actions of curcumin and suggest that the known hepatoprotective properties of curcumin are, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of TRPM2 channels. PMID:26609559

  14. Honokiol Inhibits Androgen Receptor Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Karlsson, A. Isabella; Bonner, Michael Y.; Arbiser, Jack L.; Singh, Shivendra V.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND We have shown previously that honokiol (HNK), a bioactive component of the medicinal plant Magnolia officinalis, inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the effect of HNK on androgen receptor (AR) signaling is not known. METHODS LNCaP, C4-2, and TRAMP-C1 cells were used for various assays. Trypan blue dye exclusion assay or clonogenic assay was performed for determination of cell viability. The effects of HNK and/or its analogs on protein levels of AR and its target gene product prostate specific antigen (PSA) were determined by western blotting. RNA interference of p53 was achieved by transient transfection. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed for mRNA expression of AR. Nuclear translocation of AR was visualized by microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by DNA fragmentation assay or flow cytometry after Annexin V-propidium iodide staining. RESULTS HNK and its dichloroacetate analog (HDCA) were relatively more effective in suppressing cell viability and AR protein level than honokiol epoxide or biseugenol. Nuclear translocation of AR stimulated by a synthetic androgen (R1881) was markedly suppressed in the presence of HNK. Downregulation of AR protein resulting from HNK exposure was attributable to transcriptional repression as well as proteasomal degradation. HNK-mediated suppression of AR protein was maintained in LNCaP cells after knockdown of p53 protein. HNK-induced apoptosis was not affected by R1881 treatment. CONCLUSIONS The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that HNK inhibits activity of AR in prostate cancer cells regardless of the p53 status. PMID:24338950

  15. SUMOylation inhibits FOXM1 activity and delays mitotic transition.

    PubMed

    Myatt, S S; Kongsema, M; Man, C W-Y; Kelly, D J; Gomes, A R; Khongkow, P; Karunarathna, U; Zona, S; Langer, J K; Dunsby, C W; Coombes, R C; French, P M; Brosens, J J; Lam, E W-F

    2014-08-21

    The forkhead box transcription factor FOXM1 is an essential effector of G2/M-phase transition, mitosis and the DNA damage response. As such, it is frequently deregulated during tumorigenesis. Here we report that FOXM1 is dynamically modified by SUMO1 but not by SUMO2/3 at multiple sites. We show that FOXM1 SUMOylation is enhanced in MCF-7 breast cancer cells in response to treatment with epirubicin and mitotic inhibitors. Mutation of five consensus conjugation motifs yielded a SUMOylation-deficient mutant FOXM1. Conversely, fusion of the E2 ligase Ubc9 to FOXM1 generated an auto-SUMOylating mutant (FOXM1-Ubc9). Analysis of wild-type FOXM1 and mutants revealed that SUMOylation inhibits FOXM1 activity, promotes translocation to the cytoplasm and enhances APC/Cdh1-mediated ubiquitination and degradation. Further, expression of the SUMOylation-deficient mutant enhanced cell proliferation compared with wild-type FOXM1, whereas the FOXM1-Ubc9 fusion protein resulted in persistent cyclin B1 expression and slowed the time from mitotic entry to exit. In summary, our findings suggest that SUMOylation attenuates FOXM1 activity and causes mitotic delay in cytotoxic drug response. PMID:24362530

  16. AIDing cancer treatment: Reducing AID activity via HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rebhandl, Stefan; Geisberger, Roland

    2015-08-01

    The activation induced deaminase (AID) catalyses the two key events underlying humoral adaptive immunity: class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation of antibody genes in B lymphocytes. AID accomplishes this task by directly deaminating cytosines within the genomic immunoglobulin locus, thereby triggering a complex mutagenic process eventually leading to improved effector function of antibodies. However, it has long been noticed that AID can be aberrantly expressed in cancer and that its activity is not absolutely restricted to antibody genes, as substantial genome-wide off-target mutations have been observed, which contribute to tumorigenesis and clonal evolution of AID-expressing malignancies. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Montamat-Sicotte et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 2365-2376] investigate the feasibility and efficacy of in vivo inhibition of AID with HSP90 inhibitors in a mouse model of B-cell leukemia and in vitro with a human breast cancer cell line, thereby demonstrating that cancer patients may benefit from preventing noncanonical AID functions. PMID:26151367

  17. Activation and inhibition of TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yu-Li; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) encoded by family members of transmembrane proteins of unknown function 16 (TMEM16) have recently been intensely studied for functional properties as well as their physiological roles as chloride channels in various tissues. One technical hurdle in studying these channels is the well-known channel rundown that frequently impairs the precision of electrophysiological measurements for the channels. Using experimental protocols that employ fast-solution exchange, we circumvented the problem of channel rundown by normalizing the Ca(2+)-induced current to the maximally-activated current obtained within a time period in which the channel rundown was negligible. We characterized the activation of the TMEM16A-encoded CaCC (also called ANO1) by Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+), and discovered that Mg(2+) competes with Ca(2+) in binding to the divalent-cation binding site without activating the channel. We also studied the permeability of the ANO1 pore for various anions and found that the anion occupancy in the pore-as revealed by the permeability ratios of these anions-appeared to be inversely correlated with the apparent affinity of the ANO1 inhibition by niflumic acid (NFA). On the other hand, the NFA inhibition was neither affected by the degree of the channel activation nor influenced by the types of divalent cations used for the channel activation. These results suggest that the NFA inhibition of ANO1 is likely mediated by altering the pore function but not through changing the channel gating. Our study provides a precise characterization of ANO1 and documents factors that can affect divalent cation activation and NFA inhibition of ANO1. PMID:24489780

  18. Reduced serum inhibition of platelet-activating factor activity in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, C; Massobrio, M; Bertini, E; Abbondanza, M; Enrieu, N; Tetta, C

    1989-01-01

    We determined in normal nonpregnant (group 1) women, normal pregnant (group 2) women, and patients with preeclampsia (group 3) the serum inhibition of platelet-activating factor activity, the presence of detectable amounts of platelet-activating factor in the blood, and platelet responsiveness in vitro to platelet-activating factor, and to other agonists (adenosine diphosphate, collagen, and ristocetin), and prostacyclin (prostaglandin I2). In patients with preeclampsia (group 3) the serum inhibition of platelet-activating factor activity was significantly lower than that in groups 1 and 2. However, no detectable amounts of platelet-activating factor were observed. The mean values of platelet aggregation induced by platelet-activating factor, adenosine diphosphate, collagen and ristocetin, and the prostaglandin I2-inhibitory concentration of 50% which is inversely correlated with platelet sensitivity to prostaglandin I2, were not significantly different between groups 2 and 3. It is suggested that in preeclampsia the defect in serum inhibitory potential of platelet-activating factor--induced platelet aggregation may contribute to the disturbance in the homeostatic balance between proaggregant and antiaggregant substances. PMID:2912073

  19. Protease activity, localization and inhibition in the human hair follicle

    PubMed Central

    Bhogal, R K; Mouser, P E; Higgins, C A; Turner, G A

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Objective In humans, the process of hair shedding, referred to as exogen, is believed to occur independently of the other hair cycle phases. Although the actual mechanisms involved in hair shedding are not fully known, it has been hypothesized that the processes leading to the final step of hair shedding may be driven by proteases and/or protease inhibitor activity. In this study, we investigated the presence of proteases and protease activity in naturally shed human hairs and assessed enzyme inhibition activity of test materials. Methods We measured enzyme activity using a fluorescence-based assay and protein localization by indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also developed an ex vivo skin model for measuring the force required to pull hair fibres from skin. Results Our data demonstrate the presence of protease activity in the tissue material surrounding club roots. We also demonstrated the localization of specific serine protease protein expression in human hair follicle by IHC. These data provide evidence demonstrating the presence of proteases around the hair club roots, which may play a role during exogen. We further tested the hypothesis that a novel protease inhibitor system (combination of Trichogen® and climbazole) could inhibit protease activity in hair fibre club root extracts collected from a range of ethnic groups (UK, Brazil, China, first-generation Mexicans in the USA, Thailand and Turkey) in both males and females. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this combination is capable of increasing the force required to remove hair in an ex vivo skin model system. Conclusion These studies indicate the presence of proteolytic activity in the tissue surrounding the human hair club root and show that it is possible to inhibit this activity with a combination of Trichogen® and climbazole. This technology may have potential to reduce excessive hair shedding. Résumé Objectif Chez l'homme, le processus de perte de cheveux, désigné comme exog

  20. Assessment of preferential cleavage of an actively transcribed retroviral hybrid gene in murine cells by deoxyribonuclease I, bleomycin, neocarzinostatin, or ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, R.P.; Agostino, M.J.; McHugh, M.M.; Sigmund, R.D.; Beerman, T.A.

    1987-08-25

    Preferential cleavage induced by bleomycin, neocarzinostatin, or ionizing radiation in a transcribed cellular gene was evaluated through comparisons with deoxyribonuclease I. The glucocorticoid-inducible LTL gene previously described served as the specific DNA target. A Southern blot analysis was used to specifically assess cleavage of the LTL gene in nuclei isolated from cells either treated or untreated with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Hypersensitivity of the gene to bleomycin or neocarzinostatin, which paralleled deoxyribonuclease I hypersensitivity, was evident only in nuclei isolated from dexamethasone-treated cells. Like deoxyribonuclease I, sites of dexamethasone-inducible drug hypersensitivity were coincident with the binding region for the glucocorticoid receptor found within the regulatory sequences of the LTL gene. In contrast, no hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation was evident. Although bleomycin and neocarzinostatin showed qualitatively similar preferences for the threshold LTL gene, quantitative evaluations of damage to total cellular DNA by filter elution showed that the relative specificity of bleomycin for the hypersensitive region was much less than that of either deoxyribonuclease I or neocarzinostatin.

  1. Behavioral Inhibition and Activation Systems: Differences in Substance Use Expectancy Organization and Activation in Memory

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Jeffrey S.; Dvorak, Robert D.; Lau-Barraco, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    We used multidimensional scaling to model the semantic network of alcohol and marijuana expectancies (N = 897). Preference mapping was used to estimate vectors representing patterns of activation through the network as a function of levels of behavioral inhibition (BIS) and behavioral activation (BAS). Individuals with low BIS combined with high BAS levels exhibited patterns of activation emphasizing behavioral activation similar to heavier drug users in previous research. High BIS, low BAS individuals exhibited activation patterns with greater emphasis on inhibitory expectancies similar to low-level users. Differences in expectancy activation patterns were maintained after controlling for substance use and gender. Individual differences in BIS/BAS are associated with the organization of semantic networks and patterns of activation of expectancies contributing to differences in substance use behavior. PMID:19586148

  2. Phlorotannins from Alaskan Seaweed Inhibit Carbolytic Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kellogg, Joshua; Grace, Mary H.; Lila, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Global incidence of type 2 diabetes has escalated over the past few decades, necessitating a continued search for natural sources of enzyme inhibitors to offset postprandial hyperglycemia. The objective of this study was to evaluate coastal Alaskan seaweed inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, two carbolytic enzymes involved in serum glucose regulation. Of the six species initially screened, the brown seaweeds Fucus distichus and Alaria marginata possessed the strongest inhibitory effects. F. distichus fractions were potent mixed-mode inhibitors of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, with IC50 values of 0.89 and 13.9 μg/mL, respectively; significantly more efficacious than the pharmaceutical acarbose (IC50 of 112.0 and 137.8 μg/mL, respectively). The activity of F. distichus fractions was associated with phlorotannin oligomers. Normal-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (NPLC-MS) was employed to characterize individual oligomers. Accurate masses and fragmentation patterns confirmed the presence of fucophloroethol structures with degrees of polymerization from 3 to 18 monomer units. These findings suggest that coastal Alaskan seaweeds are sources of α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory phlorotannins, and thus have potential to limit the release of sugar from carbohydrates and thus alleviate postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:25341030

  3. Oligonucleotide facilitators may inhibit or activate a hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, E; Schwenzer, B

    1996-01-01

    Facilitators are oligonucleotides capable of affecting hammerhead ribozyme activity by interacting with the substrate at the termini of the ribozyme. Facilitator effects were determined in vitro using a system consisting of a ribozyme with 7 nucleotides in every stem sequence and two substrates with inverted facilitator binding sequences. The effects of 9mer and 12mer RNA as well as DNA facilitators which bind either adjacent to the 3'- or 5'-end of the ribozyme were investigated. A kinetic model was developed which allows determination of the apparent dissociation constant of the ribozyme-substrate complex from single turnover reactions. We observed a decreased dissociation constant of the ribozyme-substrate complex due to facilitator addition corresponding to an additional stabilization energy of delta delta G=-1.7 kcal/mol with 3'-end facilitators. The cleavage rate constant was increased by 3'-end facilitators and decreased by 5'-end facilitators. Values for Km were slightly lowered by all facilitators and kcat was increased by 3'-end facilitators and decreased by 5'-end facilitators in our system. Generally the facilitator effects increased with the length of the facilitators and RNA provided greater effects than DNA of the same sequence. Results suggest facilitator influences on several steps of the hammerhead reaction, substrate association, cleavage and dissociation of products. Moreover, these effects are dependent in different manners on ribozyme and substrate concentration. This leads to the conclusion that there is a concentration dependence whether activation or inhibition is caused by facilitators. Conclusions are drawn with regard to the design of hammerhead ribozyme facilitator systems. PMID:8602353

  4. Activation of GPR30 inhibits cardiac fibroblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Zhao, Zhuo; Lin, Marina; Groban, Leanne

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction significantly increases in postmenopausal women suggesting the association between estrogen loss and diastolic dysfunction. The in vivo activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30) attenuates the adverse effects of estrogen loss on cardiac fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction in mRen2.Lewis rats. This study was designed to address the effects of GPR30 on cardiac fibroblast proliferation in rats. The expression of GPR30 in cardiac fibroblasts isolated from adult Sprague-Dawley rats was confirmed by RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence staining. Results from BrdU incorporation assays, cell counting, carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester labeling in conjunction with flow cytometry, and Ki-67 staining showed that treatment with G1, a specific agonist of GPR30, inhibited cardiac fibroblast proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with decreases in CDK1 and cyclin B1 protein expressions. In the GPR30-KO cells, BrdU incorporation, and CDK1 and cyclin B1 expressions significantly increased when compared to GPR30-intact cells. G1 had no effect on BrdU incorporation, CDK1 and cyclin B1 mRNA levels in GPR30-KO cells. In vivo studies showed increases in CDK1 and cyclin B1 mRNA levels, Ki-67-positive cells, and the immunohistochemistry staining of vimentin, a fibroblast marker, in the left ventricles from ovariectomized mRen2.Lewis rats versus hearts from ovary-intact littermates; 2 weeks of G1 treatment attenuated these adverse effects of estrogen loss. This study demonstrates that GPR30 is expressed in rat cardiac fibroblasts, and activation of GPR30 limits proliferation of these cells likely via suppression of the cell cycle proteins, cyclin B1, and CDK1. PMID:25893735

  5. Oncolytic reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cells, and synergizes with irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Radhashree; Seetharam, Raviraja; Tesfa, Lydia; Augustine, Titto A.; Klampfer, Lidija; Coffey, Matthew C.; Mariadason, John M.; Goel, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Reovirus is a double stranded RNA virus, with an intrinsic preference for replication in KRAS mutant cells. As 45% of human colorectal cancers (CRC) harbor KRAS mutations, we sought to investigate its efficacy in KRAS mutant CRC cells, and examine its impact in combination with the topoisimerase-1 inhibitor, irinotecan. Reovirus efficacy was examined in the KRAS mutant HCT116, and the isogenic KRAS WT Hke3 cell line, and in the non-malignant rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and TUNEL staining. Combination treatment with reovirus and irintoecan was investigated in 15 CRC cell lines, including the HCT116 p21 isogenic cell lines. Reovirus preferentially induced apoptosis in KRAS mutant HCT116 cells compared to its isogenic KRAS WT derivative, and in KRAS mutant IEC cells. Reovirus showed a greater degree of caspase 3 activation with PARP 1 cleavage, and preferential inhibition of p21 protein expression in KRAS mutant cells. Reovirus synergistically induced growth inhibition when combined with irinotecan. This synergy was lost upon p21 gene knock out. Reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colon cancer cells. Reovirus and irinotecan combination therapy is synergistic, p21 mediated, and represents a novel potential treatment for patients with CRC. PMID:24798549

  6. Oncolytic reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cells, and synergizes with irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Radhashree; Seetharam, Raviraja; Tesfa, Lydia; Augustine, Titto A; Klampfer, Lidija; Coffey, Matthew C; Mariadason, John M; Goel, Sanjay

    2014-05-15

    Reovirus is a double stranded RNA virus, with an intrinsic preference for replication in KRAS mutant cells. As 45% of human colorectal cancers (CRC) harbor KRAS mutations, we sought to investigate its efficacy in KRAS mutant CRC cells, and examine its impact in combination with the topoisimerase-1 inhibitor, irinotecan. Reovirus efficacy was examined in the KRAS mutant HCT116, and the isogenic KRAS WT Hke3 cell line, and in the non-malignant rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and TUNEL staining. Combination treatment with reovirus and irintoecan was investigated in 15 CRC cell lines, including the HCT116 p21 isogenic cell lines. Reovirus preferentially induced apoptosis in KRAS mutant HCT116 cells compared to its isogenic KRAS WT derivative, and in KRAS mutant IEC cells. Reovirus showed a greater degree of caspase 3 activation with PARP 1 cleavage, and preferential inhibition of p21 protein expression in KRAS mutant cells. Reovirus synergistically induced growth inhibition when combined with irinotecan. This synergy was lost upon p21 gene knock out. Reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colon cancer cells. Reovirus and irinotecan combination therapy is synergistic, p21 mediated, and represents a novel potential treatment for patients with CRC. PMID:24798549

  7. Pranlukast inhibits renal epithelial cyst progression via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-02-01

    Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1 receptor) antagonists were found to inhibit chloride secretion in human airway epithelial cells. Since chloride secretion in renal epithelial cells, which shares common mechanisms with airway epithelial cells, plays important roles in renal cyst progression in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), this study was aimed to investigate effects of drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst progression and its underlying mechanisms. Effects of CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst growth and formation were determined using Madine Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cyst models. Mechanisms of actions of CysLT1 receptor antagonists were determined using short-circuit current measurement, assays of cell viability and cell proliferation, and immunoblot analysis of signaling proteins. Of the three drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists (montelukast, pranlukast and zafirlukast) tested, pranlukast was the most promising drug that inhibited MDCK cyst growth and formation without affecting cell viability. Its effect was independent of the inhibition of CysLT1 receptors. Instead, it reduced cAMP-activated chloride secretion and proliferation of MDCK cells in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner and had no effect on CFTR protein expression. Interestingly, pranlukast enhanced AMPK activation via calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase beta (CaMKKβ) with consequent activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. These results indicate that pranlukast retards renal epithelial cyst progression by inhibiting cAMP-activated chloride secretion and cell proliferation via CaMKKβ-AMPK-mTOR pathway. Therefore, pranlukast represents a class of known drugs that may have potential utility in PKD treatment. PMID:24360935

  8. Vanillic Acid Inhibits Inflammatory Pain by Inhibiting Neutrophil Recruitment, Oxidative Stress, Cytokine Production, and NFκB Activation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Calixto-Campos, Cássia; Carvalho, Thacyana T; Hohmann, Miriam S N; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Manchope, Marília F; Zarpelon, Ana C; Baracat, Marcela M; Georgetti, Sandra R; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-08-28

    Vanillic acid (1) is a flavoring agent found in edible plants and fruits. It is an oxidized form of vanillin. Phenolic compounds form a substantial part of plant foods used as antioxidants with beneficial biological activities. These compounds have received considerable attention because of their role in preventing human diseases. Especially, 1 presents antibacterial, antimicrobial, and chemopreventive effects. However, the mechanisms by which 1 exerts its anti-inflammatory effects in vivo are incompletely understood. Thus, the effect of 1 was evaluated in murine models of inflammatory pain. Treatment with 1 inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone, the second phase of the formalin test, and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Treatment with 1 also inhibited carrageenan- and CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, paw edema, myeloperoxidase activity, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of 1 involved the inhibition of oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and NFκB activation in the carrageenan model. The present study demonstrated 1 presents analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in a wide range of murine inflammation models, and its mechanisms of action involves antioxidant effects and NFκB-related inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:26192250

  9. Brain cholinesterase activities of passerine birds in forests sprayed with cholinesterase inhibiting insecticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zinkl, J.G.; Henny, C.J.; Shea, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    Brain cholinesterase activities were determined in passerines collected from northwestern forests that had been sprayed with trichlorfon, acephate, and carbaryl at 0.56, 1.13 and 2.26 kg/ha. Trichlorfon and carbaryl inhibited cholinesterase activity slightly in only a few birds, primarily canopy dwellers. In contrast, acephate caused marked inhibition of cholinesterase activity in nearly all birds collected. The inhibition was present even 33 days after spraying. Some birds from the acephate-sprayed forests exhibited clinical signs compatible with acute acetylcholinesterase inhibition.

  10. Antimyeloma activity of heat shock protein-90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mitsiades, Constantine S; Mitsiades, Nicholas S; McMullan, Ciaran J; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Kung, Andrew L; Davies, Faith E; Morgan, Gareth; Akiyama, Masaharu; Shringarpure, Reshma; Munshi, Nikhil C; Richardson, Paul G; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Gu, Xuesong; Bailey, Charles; Joseph, Marie; Libermann, Towia A; Rosen, Neal S; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2006-02-01

    We show that multiple myeloma (MM), the second most commonly diagnosed hematologic malignancy, is responsive to hsp90 inhibitors in vitro and in a clinically relevant orthotopic in vivo model, even though this disease does not depend on HER2/neu, bcr/abl, androgen or estrogen receptors, or other hsp90 chaperoning clients which are hallmarks of tumor types traditionally viewed as attractive clinical settings for use of hsp90 inhibitors, such as the geldanamycin analog 17-AAG. This class of agents simultaneously suppresses in MM cells the expression and/or function of multiple levels of insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) and interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) signaling (eg, IKK/NF-kappaB, PI-3K/Akt, and Raf/MAPK) and downstream effectors (eg, proteasome, telomerase, and HIF-1alpha activities). These pleiotropic proapoptotic effects allow hsp90 inhibitors to abrogate bone marrow stromal cell-derived protection on MM tumor cells, and sensitize them to other anticancer agents, including cytotoxic chemotherapy and the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. These results indicate that hsp90 can be targeted therapeutically in neoplasias that may not express or depend on molecules previously considered to be the main hsp90 client proteins. This suggests a more general role for hsp90 in chaperoning tumor- or tissue-type-specific constellations of client proteins with critical involvement in proliferative and antiapoptotic cellular responses, and paves the way for more extensive future therapeutic applications of hsp90 inhibition in diverse neoplasias, including MM. PMID:16234364

  11. The satiety signaling neuropeptide perisulfakinin inhibits the activity of central neurons promoting general activity.

    PubMed

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC(50)=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca(2+) current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPgamma channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPgamma channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  12. The Satiety Signaling Neuropeptide Perisulfakinin Inhibits the Activity of Central Neurons Promoting General Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC50=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca2+ current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPγ channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPγ channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  13. Ciclopirox olamine inhibits mTORC1 signaling by activation of AMPK.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyu; Shang, Chaowei; Wang, Min; Shen, Tao; Kong, Lingmei; Yu, Chunlei; Ye, Zhennan; Luo, Yan; Liu, Lei; Li, Yan; Huang, Shile

    2016-09-15

    Ciclopirox olamine (CPX), an off-patent antifungal agent, has recently been identified as a potential anticancer agent. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central controller of cell growth, proliferation and survival. Little is known about whether and how CPX executes its anticancer action by inhibiting mTOR. Here we show that CPX inhibited the phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), two downstream effector molecules of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), in a spectrum of human tumor cells, indicating that CPX inhibits mTORC1 signaling. Using rhabdomyosarcoma cells as an experimental model, we found that expression of constitutively active mTOR (E2419K) conferred resistance to CPX inhibition of cell proliferation, suggesting that CPX inhibition of mTORC1 contributed to its anticancer effect. In line with this, treatment with CPX inhibited tumor growth and concurrently suppressed mTORC1 signaling in RD xenografts. Mechanistically, CPX inhibition of mTORC1 was neither via inhibition of IGF-I receptor or phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), nor by activation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Instead, CPX inhibition of mTORC1 was attributed to activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-tuberous sclerosis complexes (TSC)/raptor pathways. This is supported by the findings that CPX activated AMPK; inhibition of AMPK with Compound C or ectopic expression of dominant negative AMPKα partially prevented CPX from inhibiting mTORC1; silencing TSC2 attenuated CPX inhibition of mTORC1; and CPX also increased AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of raptor (S792). Therefore, the results indicate that CPX exerts the anticancer effect by activating AMPK, resulting in inhibition of mTORC1 signaling. PMID:27396756

  14. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity by purified human breast milk mucin (MUC1) in an inhibition assay.

    PubMed

    Habte, Habtom H; de Beer, Corena; Lotz, Zoë E; Tyler, Marilyn G; Kahn, Delawir; Mall, Anwar S

    2008-01-01

    It has been reported that breast-feeding is responsible for approximately 40% of the HIV transmissions from HIV-positive mothers to children. Human breast milk, however, is known to contain numerous biologically active components which protect breast-fed infants against bacteria, viruses, and toxins. The purpose of this study was to purify and characterize breast milk mucin and to determine its anti-HIV-1 activity in an HIV inhibition assay. Sepharose CL-4B column chromatography and caesium chloride isopycnic density gradient purification were used to isolate and purify the mucin. Following Western blotting and amino acid analysis, an HIV-1 inhibition assay was carried out to determine the anti-HIV-1 activity of crude breast milk and purified milk mucin (MUC1) by incubating them with HIV-1 prior to infection of the human T lymphoblastoid cell line (CEM SS cells). SDS-PAGE analysis of the mucin, together with its amino acid composition and Western blotting, suggested that this purified mucin from human breast milk was MUC1. The HIV inhibition assay revealed that while the purified milk mucin (MUC1) inhibited the HIV-1 activity by approximately 97%, there was no inhibition of the HIV-1 activity by crude breast milk. Although the reason for this is not clear, it is likely that because the MUC1 in crude milk is enclosed by fat globules, there may not be any physical contact between the mucin and the virus in the crude breast milk. Thus, there is a need to free the mucin from the fat globules for it to be effective against the virus. PMID:17878743

  15. Thymol inhibits Staphylococcus aureus internalization into bovine mammary epithelial cells by inhibiting NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhengkai; Zhou, Ershun; Guo, Changming; Fu, Yunhe; Yu, Yuqiang; Li, Yimeng; Yao, Minjun; Zhang, Naisheng; Yang, Zhengtao

    2014-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is one of the most costly and prevalent diseases in the dairy industry and is characterised by inflammatory and infectious processes. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), a Gram-positive organism, is a frequent cause of subclinical, chronic mastitis. Thymol, a monocyclic monoterpene compound isolated from Thymus vulgaris, has been reported to have antibacterial properties. However, the effect of thymol on S. aureus internalization into bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) has not been investigated. In this study, we evaluated the effect of thymol on S. aureus internalization into bMEC, the expression of tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP) and β-defensin (BNBD5), and the inhibition of NF-κB activation in bMEC infected with S. aureus. Our results showed that thymol (16-64 μg/ml) could reduce the internalization of S. aureus into bMEC and down-regulate the mRNA expression of TAP and BNBD5 in bMEC infected with S. aureus. In addition, thymol was found to inhibit S. aureus-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in bMEC and suppress S. aureus-induced NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, these results indicated that thymol inhibits S. aureus internalization into bMEC by inhibiting NF-κB activation. PMID:24583152

  16. Acetohydroxamate inhibition of the activity of urease from dehusked seeds of water melon (Citrullus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan

    2004-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) was purified to apparent homogeneity, using two acetone fractionation steps, heat treatment at 48 degrees C and gel filtration through Sephadex G-200. Effect of acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) on the activity of the homogeneous enzyme preparation (sp. act. 3000 +/- 550U/mg protein) was investigated. AHA exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibition both in the presence and absence of the substrate. The inhibition was uncompetitive and the Ki was 2.5 mM. Binding of AHA with the enzyme was reversible, as 63% activity could be restored by dialysis. Time-dependent inhibition revealed a monophasic inhibition of the activity. Addition of beta-mercaptoethanol (ME) gradually abolished the inhibition. Pre-treatment of native enzyme with 8.0 mM ME for 5 min at 30 degrees C exhibited protection against AHA-induced inhibition. The significance of these observations is discussed. PMID:15558957

  17. Sympathetic sprouting near sensory neurons after nerve injury occurs preferentially on spontaneously active cells and is reduced by early nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith Ann; Li, Huiqing; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Some chronic pain conditions are maintained or enhanced by sympathetic activity. In animal models of pathological pain, abnormal sprouting of sympathetic fibers around large- and medium-size sensory neurons is observed in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Large and medium size cells are also more likely to be spontaneously active, suggesting that sprouting may be related to neuron activity. We previously showed that sprouting could be reduced by systemic or locally applied lidocaine. In the complete sciatic nerve transection model in rats, spontaneous activity initially originates in the injury site; later, the DRG become the major source of spontaneous activity. In this study, spontaneous activity reaching the DRG soma was reduced by early nerve blockade (local perfusion of the transected nerve with TTX for the first 7 days after injury). This significantly reduced sympathetic sprouting. Conversely, increasing spontaneous activity by local nerve perfusion with K+ channel blockers increased sprouting. The hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity of DRG neurons observed in this model were also significantly reduced by early nerve blockade. These effects of early nerve blockade on sprouting, excitability, and spontaneous activity were all observed 4 to 5 weeks after the end of early nerve blockade, indicating that the early period of spontaneous activity in the injured nerve is critical for establishing the more long-lasting pathologies observed in the DRG. Individual spontaneously active neurons, labeled with fluorescent dye, were 5–6 times more likely than quiescent cells to be co-localized with sympathetic fibers, suggesting a highly localized correlation of activity and sprouting. PMID:17065247

  18. Selective and potent Akt inhibition triggers anti-myeloma activities and enhances fatal endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Naoya; Hideshima, Teru; Shimomura, Toshiyasu; Suzuki, Rikio; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Rizq, Ola; Kikuchi, Shohei; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Cottini, Francesca; Jakubikova, Jana; Cirstea, Diana; Gorgun, Gullu; Minami, Jiro; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Richardson, Paul G.; Utsugi, Teruhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt pathway plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM) in the bone marrow (BM) milieu. However, efficacy of selective and potent Akt inhibition has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we therefore examined the biologic impact of selective and potent Akt inhibition by a novel allosteric inhibitor TAS-117. TAS-117 induced significant growth inhibition, associated with downregulation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), selectively in MM cell lines with high baseline p-Akt. Cytotoxicity of TAS-117 was also observed in patients MM cells, but not in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Importantly, TAS-117 induced significant cytotoxicity in MM cells even in the presence of BM stromal cells, associated with inhibition of IL-6 secretion. Oral administration of TAS-117 significantly inhibited human MM cell growth in murine xenograft models. TAS-117 triggered apoptosis and autophagy, as well as induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response with minimal expression of CHOP, a fatal ER-stress marker. Importantly, TAS-117 enhanced bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity, associated with increased CHOP and PARP cleavage and blockade of bortezomib-induced p-Akt, suggesting that TAS-117 augments bortezomib-induced ER stress and apoptotic signaling. Carfilzomib-induced cytotoxicity was similarly enhanced by TAS-117. Importantly, TAS-117 enhanced bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity in vivo, associated with prolonged host survival. Our results show that selective and potent Akt inhibition by TAS-117 triggers anti-MM activities in vitro and in vivo, as well as enhances cytotoxicity of proteasome inhibition, providing the preclinical framework for clinical evaluation of selective Akt inhibitors, alone and in combination with proteasome inhibitors in MM. PMID:24934808

  19. Selective and potent Akt inhibition triggers anti-myeloma activities and enhances fatal endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Naoya; Hideshima, Teru; Shimomura, Toshiyasu; Suzuki, Rikio; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Rizq, Ola; Kikuchi, Shohei; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Cottini, Francesca; Jakubikova, Jana; Cirstea, Diana; Gorgun, Gullu; Minami, Jiro; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Richardson, Paul G; Utsugi, Teruhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2014-08-15

    The PI3K/Akt pathway plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM) in the bone marrow (BM) milieu. However, efficacy of selective and potent Akt inhibition has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we, therefore, examined the biologic impact of selective and potent Akt inhibition by a novel allosteric inhibitor TAS-117. TAS-117 induced significant growth inhibition, associated with downregulation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), selectively in MM cell lines with high baseline p-Akt. Cytotoxicity of TAS-117 was also observed in patient MM cells, but not in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Importantly, TAS-117 induced significant cytotoxicity in MM cells even in the presence of BM stromal cells, associated with inhibition of IL6 secretion. Oral administration of TAS-117 significantly inhibited human MM cell growth in murine xenograft models. TAS-117 triggered apoptosis and autophagy, as well as induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response with minimal expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), a fatal ER stress marker. Importantly, TAS-117 enhanced bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity, associated with increased CHOP and PARP cleavage and blockade of bortezomib-induced p-Akt, suggesting that TAS-117 augments bortezomib-induced ER stress and apoptotic signaling. Carfilzomib-induced cytotoxicity was similarly enhanced by TAS-117. Importantly, TAS-117 enhanced bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity in vivo, associated with prolonged host survival. Our results show that selective and potent Akt inhibition by TAS-117 triggers anti-MM activities in vitro and in vivo, as well as enhances cytotoxicity of proteasome inhibition, providing the preclinical framework for clinical evaluation of selective Akt inhibitors, alone and in combination with proteasome inhibitors in MM. PMID:24934808

  20. Immune-suppressive activity of punicalagin via inhibition of NFAT activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Ik; Kim, Byoung-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Shin; Lee, Samkeun; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Lim, Jong-Soon

    2008-07-11

    Since T cell activation is central to the development of autoimmune diseases, we screened a natural product library comprising 1400 samples of medicinal herbal extracts, to identify compounds that suppress T cell activity. Punicalagin (PCG) isolated from the fruit of Punica granatum was identified as a potent immune suppressant, based on its inhibitory action on the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). PCG downregulated the mRNA and soluble protein expression of interleukin-2 from anti-CD3/anti-CD28-stimulated murine splenic CD4+ T cells and suppressed mixed leukocytes reaction (MLR) without exhibiting cytotoxicity to the cells. In vivo, the PCG treatment inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced chronic ear edema in mice and decreased CD3+ T cell infiltration of the inflamed tissue. These results suggest that PCG could be a potential candidate for the therapeutics of various immune pathologies.

  1. Preferential Interactions and the Effect of Protein PEGylation

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Louise Stenstrup; Thulstrup, Peter W.; Kasimova, Marina R.; van de Weert, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation excipients that preferentially interact with the protein. Methodology/Principal Findings The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000) and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose and preferentially bound guanine hydrochloride. Structural characterization by far- and near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy was supplemented by investigation of protein thermal stability with the use of differential scanning calorimetry, far and near-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that PEGylated lysozyme was stabilized by the preferentially excluded excipient and destabilized by the preferentially bound excipient in a similar manner as lysozyme. However, compared to lysozyme in all cases the melting transition was lower by up to a few degrees and the calorimetric melting enthalpy was decreased to half the value for PEGylated lysozyme. The ratio between calorimetric and van’t Hoff enthalpy suggests that our PEGylated lysozyme is a dimer. Conclusion/Significance The PEGylated model protein displayed similar stability responses to the addition of preferentially active excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins. PMID:26230338

  2. Biomechanical Signals Suppress TAK1 Activation to Inhibit NF-κB Transcriptional Activation in Fibrochondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Shashi; Anghelina, Mirela; Sjostrom, Danen; Dossumbekova, Anar; Guttridge, Denis C.; Agarwal, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Exercise/joint mobilization is therapeutic for inflammatory joint diseases like rheumatoid and osteoarthritis, but the mechanisms underlying its actions remain poorly understood. We report that biomechanical signals at low/physiological magnitudes are potent inhibitors of inflammation induced by diverse proinflammatory activators like IL-1β, TNF-α, and lipopolysaccharides, in fibrochondrocytes. These signals exert their anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting phosphorylation of TAK1, a critical point where signals generated by IL-1β, TNF-α, and LPS converge to initiate NF-κB signaling cascade and proinflammatory gene induction. Additionally, biomechanical signals inhibit multiple steps in the IL-1β-induced proinflammatory cascade downstream of IκB kinase activation to regulate IκBα and IκBβ degradation and synthesis, and promote IκBα shuttling to export nuclear NF-κB and terminate its transcriptional activity. The findings demonstrate that biomechanical forces are but another important signal that uses NF-κB pathway to regulate inflammation by switching the molecular activation of discrete molecules involved in proinflammatory gene transcription. PMID:17947700

  3. A case study of preferential bestiality (zoophilia).

    PubMed

    Earls, Christopher M; Lalumière, Martin L

    2002-01-01

    Humans show a wide array of sexual preferences and behaviors. Although most humans prefer and have sex with consenting adults of the opposite sex, some individuals have unconventional preferences with regard to the sex or age of sexual partners, or with regard to the nature of sexual activities. In this paper, we describe a rare case of preferential bestiality, or zoophilia. The client meets the most stringent criteria for the diagnosis of zoophilia. In particular, his phallometrically measured arousal pattern shows a sexual preference for horses over other species, including humans. PMID:11803597

  4. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  5. Gossypol inhibits calcineurin phosphatase activity at multiple sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcineurin, the calcium/calmodulin dependant serine/threonine phosphatase is the target for the immunosuppressant drugs FK506 and cyclosporine A. These calcineurin inhibitors each require an immunophilin protein cofactor. Gossypol, a polyphenol produced by the cotton plant, inhibits calcineurin, ...

  6. Inhibition of monocyte esterase activity by organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Waters, H C

    1977-11-01

    Organophosphate insecticides, such as Vapona, Naled, and Rabon, are highly potent inhibitors of an enzyme found in human monocytes. The enzyme, a specific monocyte esterase, could be inhibited by Vapona in blood samples via airborne contamination at levels easily achieved from commercial slow-release insecticide strips. Fifty percent inhibition (I50)--as measured on the Hemalog D (Technicon Corp.)--occurred at solution concentrations of 0.22, 1.5, and 2.6 X 10(-6) g/liter for Vapona, Rabon, and Naled, respectively. Parathion (a thiophosphate) and Baygon (a carbamate) were less potent, with I50 values of 3.7 X 10(-5) and 1.5 X 10(-4) g/liter, respectively. Dursban (another thiophosphate) and Carbaryl (a carbamate) showed only marginal inhibition. Eserine, malathion, nicotine and pyrethrum had no inhibitory effect up to 0.5 g/liter. The occurrence of this effect in vivo has not yet been shown, nor is it clear what the implications of such an effect would be. The inhibition of this enzyme by airborne contaminants, however, may interfere with the proper functioning of the Hemalog D. PMID:907842

  7. Inhibition of Rac1 Activity in the Hippocampus Impairs the Forgetting of Contextual Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lizhu; Mao, Rongrong; Zhou, Qixin; Yang, Yuexiong; Cao, Jun; Ding, Yuqiang; Yang, Yuan; Zhang, Xia; Li, Lingjiang; Xu, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Fear is crucial for survival, whereas hypermnesia of fear can be detrimental. Inhibition of the Rac GTPase is recently reported to impair the forgetting of initially acquired memory in Drosophila. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of Rac1 activity in rat hippocampus could contribute to the hypermnesia of contextual fear. We found that spaced but not massed training of contextual fear conditioning caused inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus and heightened contextual fear. Furthermore, intrahippocampal injection of the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 heightened contextual fear in massed training, while Rac1 activator CN04-A weakened contextual fear in spaced training rats. Our study firstly demonstrates that contextual fear memory in rats is actively regulated by Rac1 activity in the hippocampus, which suggests that the forgetting impairment of traumatic events in posttraumatic stress disorder may be contributed to the pathological inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus. PMID:25613020

  8. Curcumin analogues with high activity for inhibiting human prostate cancer cell growth and androgen receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dai-Ying; Ding, Ning; Du, Zhi-Yun; Cui, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Hong; Wei, Xing-Chuan; Conney, Allan H; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Xi

    2014-09-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a critical role in prostate cancer development and progression. Several curcumin analogues (A10, B10, C10, E10 and F10) with different linker groups were investigated for their effects in human prostate cancer CWR‑22Rv1 and LNCaP cell lines. The ability of these compounds to inhibit testosterone (TT)‑ or dihydrotestosterone (DHT)‑induced AR activity was determined by an AR‑linked luciferase assay and by TT‑ or DHT‑induced expression of prostate specific antigen. Compounds F10 and E10 had stronger inhibitory effects on the growth of cultured CWR‑22Rv1 and LNCaP cell lines, and they also had enhanced stimulatory effects on apoptosis compared with curcumin and other curcumin analogues (A10, B10, C10) in CWR‑22Rv1 cells. E10 and F10 were more potent inhibitors of AR activity than curcumin, A10 and B10. The higher activities of E10 and F10 may be correlated with a heteroatom linker. The results indicate that one of the potential mechanisms for the anticancer effect of the curcumin analogues was inhibition of AR pathways in human prostate cancer cells. PMID:25060817

  9. Biomechanical Signals Inhibit IKK Activity to Attenuate NF-κB Transcription Activity in Inflamed Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dossumbekova, Anar; Anghelina, Mirela; Madhavan, Shashi; He, Lingli; Quan, Ning; Knobloch, Thomas; Agarwal, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Objective While the effects of biomechanical signals in the form of joint movement and exercise are known to be beneficial to inflamed joints, limited information is available regarding the intracellular mechanisms of their actions. This study was undertaken to examine the intracellular mechanisms by which biomechanical signals suppress proinflammatory gene induction by the interleukin-1-β (IL-1β)–induced NF-κB signaling cascade in articular chondrocytes. Methods Primary rat articular chondrocytes were exposed to biomechanical signals in the form of cyclic tensile strain, and the effects on the NF-κB signaling cascade were examined by Western blot analysis, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence. Results Cyclic tensile strain rapidly inhibited the IL-1β–induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, but not its IL-1β–induced phosphorylation at serine 276 and serine 536, which are necessary for its transactivation and transcriptional efficacy, respectively. Examination of upstream events revealed that cyclic tensile strain also inhibited the cytoplasmic protein degradation of IκBβ and IκBα, as well as repressed their gene transcription. Additionally, cyclic tensile strain induced a rapid nuclear translocation of IκBα to potentially prevent NF-κB binding to DNA. Furthermore, the inhibition of IL-1β–induced degradation of IκB by cyclic tensile strain was mediated by down-regulation of IκB kinase activity. Conclusion These results indicate that the signals generated by cyclic tensile strain act at multiple sites within the NF-κB signaling cascade to inhibit IL-1β–induced proinflammatory gene induction. Taken together, these findings provide insight into how biomechanical signals regulate and reduce inflammation, and underscore their potential in enhancing the ability of chondrocytes to curb inflammation in diseased joints. PMID:17907174

  10. EPAC activation inhibits acetaldehyde-induced activation and proliferation of hepatic stellate cell via Rap1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Yang, Feng; Wu, Xiaojuan; Lv, Xiongwen; Li, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation represents an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis (ALF). Previous studies have demonstrated that the rat HSCs could be significantly activated after exposure to 200 μmol/L acetaldehyde for 48 h, and the cAMP/PKA signaling pathways were also dramatically upregulated in activated HSCs isolated from alcoholic fibrotic rat liver. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) is a family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for the small Ras-like GTPases Rap, and is being considered as a vital mediator of cAMP signaling in parallel with the principal cAMP target protein kinase A (PKA). Our data showed that both cAMP/PKA and cAMP/EPAC signaling pathways were involved in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Acetaldehyde could reduce the expression of EPAC1 while enhancing the expression of EPAC2. The cAMP analog Me-cAMP, which stimulates the EPAC/Rap1 pathway, could significantly decrease the proliferation and collagen synthesis of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Furthermore, depletion of EPAC2, but not EPAC1, prevented the activation of HSC measured as the production of α-SMA and collagen type I and III, indicating that EPAC1 appears to have protective effects on acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Curiously, activation of PKA or EPAC perhaps has opposite effects on the synthesis of collagen and α-SMA: EPAC activation by Me-cAMP increased the levels of GTP-bound (activated) Rap1 while PKA activation by Phe-cAMP had no significant effects on such binding. These results suggested that EPAC activation could inhibit the activation and proliferation of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs via Rap1. PMID:26854595

  11. Mechanisms of Rose Bengal inhibition on SecA ATPase and ion channel activities.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ying-Hsin; Huang, Ying-Ju; Jin, Jin-Shan; Yu, Liyan; Yang, Hsiuchin; Jiang, Chun; Wang, Binghe; Tai, Phang C

    2014-11-14

    SecA is an essential protein possessing ATPase activity in bacterial protein translocation for which Rose Bengal (RB) is the first reported sub-micromolar inhibitor in ATPase activity and protein translocation. Here, we examined the mechanisms of inhibition on various forms of SecA ATPase by conventional enzymatic assays, and by monitoring the SecA-dependent channel activity in the semi-physiological system in cells. We build on the previous observation that SecA with liposomes form active protein-conducting channels in the oocytes. Such ion channel activity is enhanced by purified Escherichia coli SecYEG-SecDF·YajC liposome complexes. Inhibition by RB could be monitored, providing correlation of in vitro activity and intact cell functionality. In this work, we found the intrinsic SecA ATPase is inhibited by RB competitively at low ATP concentration, and non-competitively at high ATP concentrations while the translocation ATPase with precursors and SecYEG is inhibited non-competitively by RB. The Inhibition by RB on SecA channel activity in the oocytes with exogenous ATP-Mg(2+), mimicking translocation ATPase activity, is also non-competitive. The non-competitive inhibition on channel activity has also been observed with SecA from other bacteria which otherwise would be difficult to examine without the cognate precursors and membranes. PMID:25450394

  12. Hinokitiol inhibits platelet activation ex vivo and thrombus formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan H; Kuo, Jinn R; Lu, Wan J; Chung, Chi L; Chou, Duen S; Huang, Shih Y; Lee, Hsiu C; Sheu, Joen R

    2013-05-15

    Hinokitiol is a tropolone-related bioactive compound that has been used in hair tonics, cosmetics, and food as an antimicrobial agent. Recently, hinokitiol has attracted considerable interest because of its anticancer activities. Platelet activation plays a crucial role in atherothrombotic processes. We examined the effects of hinokitiol treatment on platelet activation using human platelets. In the present study, hinokitiol (1 and 2 μM) inhibited the collagen-induced aggregation of human platelets, but did not inhibit the activation of platelets by other agonists, including thrombin, arachidonic acid, and ADP. Hinokitiol inhibited the phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Akt in collagen-activated human platelets, and significantly reduced intracellular calcium mobilization and hydroxyl radical (OH·) formation. Hinokitiol also reduced the PKC activation and platelet aggregation stimulated by PDBu. In addition, hinokitiol significantly prolonged thrombogenesis in mice. Hinokitiol did not influence the binding of a fluorescent triflavin probe to the αIIbβ3 integrin on platelet membrane, and neither ODQ nor SQ22536 significantly reversed the hinokitiol-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation. In conclusion, hinokitiol may inhibit platelet activation by inhibiting the PLCγ2-PKC cascade and hydroxyl radical formation, followed by suppressing the activation of MAPKs and Akt. Our study suggests that hinokitiol may represent a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention or treatment of thromboembolic disorders. PMID:23473801

  13. Ethacrynic acid inhibitable Ca2+ and Mg2+-activated membrane adenosine triphosphatase in rat mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Magro, A M

    1977-01-01

    A crude plasma membrane fraction from the homogenate of purified rat mast cells demonstrates a high degree of Ca2+-dependent and Mg2+-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity. The microsomal and mitochondrial fractions show negligible amounts of the Ca2+ and Mg2+-activated ATPases. The broad ATPase inhibitor, ethacrynic acid, effectively blocks the mast cell ATPase activity while ouabain demonstrates little inhibitory effect. Correspondingly, ethacrynic acid inhibits histamine release from antigen-challenged mast cells while ouabain does not. Both ATPase inhibition and histamine release inhibition by ethacrynic acid require the presence of the olefinic bond in the ethacrynic acid molecule. PMID:75076

  14. In vitro enzyme inhibition activities of crude ethanolic extracts derived from medicinal plants of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khattak, Somia; Saeed-Ur-Rehman; Shah, Hameed Ullah; Khan, Taous; Ahmad, Manzoor

    2005-09-01

    Twenty two crude ethanolic extracts from 14 indigenous medicinal plants were subjected to enzyme inhibition screening against acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and lipoxygenase enzymes (LO). Three extracts showed activity against AChE, nine extracts were found to be active against BChE and four extracts inhibited the enzyme LO. The most significant inhibition activities (> or =50%) were found in extracts derived from Aloe vera (leaves), Alpinia galanga (rhizome), Curcuma longa (rhizome), Cymbopogon citratus (leaves), Ocimum americanum (leaves), Ocimum americanum (stem) and Withania somnifera (roots). PMID:16010821

  15. Preferential hydrolysis of aberrant intermediates by the type II thioesterase in Escherichia coli nonribosomal enterobactin synthesis: substrate specificities and mutagenic studies on the active-site residues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zu-Feng; Sun, Yueru; Zheng, Suilan; Guo, Zhihong

    2009-03-01

    The type II thioesterase EntH is a hotdog fold protein required for optimal nonribosomal biosynthesis of enterobactin in Escherichia coli. Its proposed proofreading activity in the biosynthesis is confirmed by its efficient restoration of enterobactin synthesis blocked in vitro by analogs of the cognate precursor 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate. Steady-state kinetic studies show that EntH recognizes the phosphopantetheine group and the pattern of hydroxylation in the aryl moiety of its thioester substrates. Remarkably, it is able to distinguish aberrant intermediates from the normal one in the enterobactin assembly line by demonstrating at least 10-fold higher catalytic efficiency toward thioesters derived from aberrant aryl precursors without a para-hydroxyl group, such as salicylate. By structural comparison and site-directed mutagenesis, the thioesterase is found to possess an active site closely resembling that of the 4-hydroxybenzoyl-CoA thioesterase from Arthrobacter sp. strain SU and to involve an acidic residue (glutamate-63) as the catalytic base or nucleophile like all other hotdog thioesterases. In addition, the EntH specificities toward the substrate hydroxylation pattern are found to depend on the active-site histidine-54, threonine-64, serine-67, and methionine-68 with the selectivity significantly reduced or even reversed when they are individually replaced by alanine. These residues are likely responsible for differential interaction of the enzyme with the substrates which leads to distinction between the normal and aberrant precursors in the enterobactin assembly line. These results show that the type II thioesterase evolves its distinctive ability to recognize the aberrant intermediates from the versatile catalytic platform of hotdog proteins and suggests an active search mechanism for type II thioesterases in nonribosomal peptide synthesis. PMID:19193103

  16. Odorants with Multiple Oxygen-Containing Functional Groups and Other Odorants with High Water Solubility Preferentially Activate Posterior Olfactory Bulb Glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brett A.; Arguello, Spart; Leon, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In past studies in which we mapped 2-deoxyglucose uptake evoked by systematically different odorant chemicals across the entire rat olfactory bulb, glomerular responses could be related to each odorant's particular oxygen-containing functional group. In the present study, we tested whether aliphatic odorants containing two such functional groups (esters, ketones, acids, alcohols, and ethers) would stimulate the combination of glomerular regions that are associated with each of the functional groups separately, or whether they would evoke unique responses in different regions of the bulb. We found that these very highly water-soluble molecules rarely evoked activity in the regions responding to the individual functional groups; instead, they activated posterior glomeruli located about halfway between the dorsal and ventral extremes in both the lateral and the medial aspects of the bulb. Additional highly water-soluble odorants, including very small molecules with single oxygenic groups, also strongly stimulated these posterior regions, resulting in a statistically significant correlation between posterior 2-deoxyglucose uptake and molecular properties associated with water solubility. By showing that highly water-soluble odorants stimulate a part of the bulb associated with peripheral and ventral regions of the epithelium, our results challenge a prevalent notion that such odorants would activate class I odorant receptors located in zone 1 of the olfactory epithelium, which projects to the dorsal aspect of the bulb. PMID:17366613

  17. [Detection of nootropic activity indicated by acute inhibition of orientation reaction].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaia, R U; Gudasheva, T A

    1991-05-01

    Exploratory locomotor activity was studied in the experiments on adult male mice. It was shown that routine nootropic drugs as well as newly synthesized nootropic compounds were able to facilitate the development of inhibition during one registration session. Inhibition may be used for revealing only selective nootropic drugs devoid of sedative and stimulating effects. PMID:1878564

  18. Antiresorptive Activity of Bacillus-Fermented Antler Extracts: Inhibition of Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sik-Won; Moon, Seong-Hee; Yang, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Dae Young; Son, Young-Jin; Yu, Ri; Kim, Young Su; Kim, So I.; Chae, Eun Jeong; Park, Sang-Joon; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Antlers have been traditionally used for thousands of years as a natural product with medicinal and pharmaceutical properties. In developing healthy foods, Bacillus-mediated fermentation is widely used to enhance the biological activity of nutrients in foods. Recently, fermentation was shown to enhance the osteogenic activity of antlers. This study aimed to elucidate the antiresorptive activity of Bacillus-fermented antler and its mode of action. We found that Bacillus-fermented antler extract strongly inhibited osteoclast differentiation by downregulating the expression and activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1). This extract also inhibited the activation of phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2), a signaling molecule that could regulate NFATc1 transcriptional activity. This suggested that Bacillus-fermented antler extract could inhibit PLCγ2-NFATc1 signaling required for bone resorption and cell fusion. Consequently, Bacillus-fermented antler extract might benefit osteoclast-related disorders, including osteoporosis; furthermore, it may improve gastrointestinal activity. PMID:23509596

  19. The preferential binding of a sensory organ specific odorant binding protein of the alfalfa plant bug Adelphocoris lineolatus AlinOBP10 to biologically active host plant volatiles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Gu, Shao-Hua; Xiao, Hai-Jun; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Guo, Yu-Yuan; Liu, Ze-Wen; Zhang, Yong-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Semiochemicals such as sex pheromones and plant volatiles are crucial components of insect mating systems and host plant localization. In the olfactory signal transduction pathway, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are important elements that function in the first step of the pathway by carrying hydrophobic semiochemicals across the sensillum lymph to the olfactory receptors (ORs). In this study, we examined the binding affinities of semiochemicals to AlinOBP10, a putative OBP from the alfalfa plant bug, Adelphocoris lineolatus, that we demonstrate is expressed mainly in sensory organs. We then characterized the biological activities of the high affinity semiochemicals by measuring their electrophysiological activities in antennae and behavioral responses in the plant bug. AlinOBP10 displayed weak binding affinities to two major putative pheromone components, hexyl butyrate and (E)-2-hexenyl butyrate. In contrast, AlinOBP10 exhibited higher binding affinities to six host plant volatiles, namely myrcene, β-pinene, β-ionone, 3-hexanone, (E)-2-hexenal, and 1-hexanol. The biological activities of these six putative ligands were further studied in electroantennogram recordings and Y-tube olfactometer trials. The three compounds, (E)-2-hexenal, 1-hexanol, and 3-hexanone elicited strong electrophysiological responses, but elicited distinct behaviors. While 3-hexanone was attractive to female adults, (E)-2-hexenal and 1-hexanol were significant repellents. Although a weak electrophysiological response was elicited with β-pinene, it was a strong repellent. These results demonstrate that AlinOBP10 can interact with attractants, as well as repellents, with some specificity toward plant volatiles over sex pheromones. PMID:23955060

  20. Growth-inhibiting extracellular matrix proteins also inhibit electrical activity by reducing calcium and increasing potassium conductances.

    PubMed

    Vargas, J; De-Miguel, F F

    2009-01-23

    Inhibitionof neurite sprouting and electrical activity by extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins was studied during neurite regeneration by using anterior pagoda (AP) neurons of the leech. Adult isolated neurons were plated in culture inside ganglion capsules, which among many ECM proteins, contain a group of inhibitory peanut lectin- (PNA) binding glycoproteins. These proteins inhibit neurite production and contribute to the formation of a bipolar outgrowth pattern by AP neurons. Addition of PNA lectin to the culture medium to block the inhibitory effects of ECM glycoproteins induced an increase of neurite sprouting, the loss of the bipolar pattern, and also an increase in the amplitude and duration of action potentials evoked by intracellular current injection. PNA lectin had independent effects on neurite sprouting and electrical activity, since there was no correlation between the total neurite length and the amplitude of the action potentials. Moreover, action potentials were increased by the presence of PNA lectin even in neurons that did not grow. The changes induced by PNA lectin on the active conductances underlying the action potentials were estimated by quantitative model simulations. We predict that the increases in the amplitude and duration of the action potential induced by PNA lectin were due to an increase in a calcium conductance and a reduction in the delayed rectifier potassium conductance. Our results suggest that inhibitory ECM glycoproteins may use independent signaling pathways to inhibit neurite sprouting and electrical activity. These proteins affect the action potential by changing the proportion of inward and outward active conductances. PMID:18976697

  1. EB-virus latent membrane protein 1 potentiates the stemness of nasopharyngeal carcinoma via preferential activation of PI3K/AKT pathway by a positive feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Yang, C-F; Yang, G-D; Huang, T-J; Li, R; Chu, Q-Q; Xu, L; Wang, M-S; Cai, M-D; Zhong, L; Wei, H-J; Huang, H-B; Huang, J-L; Qian, C-N; Huang, B-J

    2016-06-30

    Our previous study reported that Epstein-Barr virus(EBV)-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) could induce development of CD44(+/High) stem-like cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie modulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in NPC remain unclear. Here, we show that LMP1 induced CSC-like properties through promotion of the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like cellular markers and through alterations in differentiation markers. Furthermore, LMP1 activated and triggered phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) pathway, which subsequently stimulated expression of CSC markers, development of side population and tumor sphere formation. This suggests that PI3K/AKT pathway has an important role in the induction and maintenance of CSC properties in NPC. Similarly, PI3K/AKT pathway was also activated by phosphorylase in LMP1-induced CD44(+/High) cells. In addition, LMP1 greatly increased expression of miR-21 and downregulated expression of the miR-21 target, PTEN. Overexpression of miR-21 by transfection of miR-21 mimics into LMP1-transformed cells led to phosphorylase-mediated activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway and induction of CSCs. On the contrary, phosphorylation of the PI3K/AKT pathway and the expression of CSC were reversed by an miR-21 inhibitor. The specific inhibitor (Ly294002) of PI3K/AKT pathway significantly decreased expression of miR-21 and CSC markers and upregulated the expression of PTEN, which indicates that miR-21 and PTEN are the downstream effectors of PI3K/AKT and that expression of these two effectors are related to the development of NPC CSCs. Taken together, our novel findings indicate that LMP1, PI3K/AKT, miR-21 and PTEN constitute a positive feedback loop and have a key role in LMP1-induced CSCs in NPC. PMID:26568302

  2. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K.; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A.; Beggs, Reena R.; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G.; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Landar, Aimee

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  3. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  4. Endothelial-dependent vasodilators preferentially increase subendocardial blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pelc, L.R.; Gross, G.J.; Warltier, D.C.

    1986-03-05

    Interference with arachidonic acid metabolism on the effect of acetylcholine (Ach) or arachidonic acid (AA) to preferentially increase subendocardial perfusion was investigated in anesthetized dogs. Hemodynamics, regional myocardial blood flow (MBF (ml/min/g):radioactive microspheres) and the left ventricular transmural distribution of flow (endo/epi) were measured. Intracoronary infusion of Ach (10 ..mu..g/min) and AA (585 ..mu..g/min) significantly (P < .05*) increased myocardial perfusion and selectively redistributed flow to the subendocardium (increased endo/epi) without changes in systemic hemodynamics. Inhibition of phospholipase A/sub 2/ by quinacrine (Q; 600 ..mu..g/min, ic) attenuated the increase in myocardial perfusion produced by Ach but not by AA and inhibited the redistribution of flow to the subendocardium. The present results suggest that endothelium-dependent vasodilators produce a preferential increase in subendocardial perfusion via a product of AA metabolism.

  5. Polygonum cuspidatum and Its Active Components Inhibit Replication of the Influenza Virus through Toll-Like Receptor 9-Induced Interferon Beta Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao-jen; Lin, Hui-Ju; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Hsu, Yu-An; Liu, Chin-San; Hwang, Guang-Yuh; Wan, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus infection is a global public health issue. The effectiveness of antiviral therapies for influenza has been limited by the emergence of drug-resistant viral strains. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify novel antiviral therapies. Here we tested the effects of 300 traditional Chinese medicines on the replication of various influenza virus strains in a lung cell line, A549, using an influenza-specific luciferase reporter assay. Of the traditional medicines tested, Polygonum cuspidatum (PC) and its active components, resveratrol and emodin, were found to attenuate influenza viral replication in A549 cells. Furthermore, they preferentially inhibited the replication of influenza A virus, including clinical strains isolated in 2009 and 2011 in Taiwan and the laboratory strain A/WSN/33 (H1N1). In addition to inhibiting the expression of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, PC, emodin, and resveratrol also increased the expression of interferon beta (IFN-β) through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Moreover, the anti-viral activity of IFN-β or resveratrol was reduced when the A549 cells were treated with neutralizing anti-IFN-β antibodies or a TLR9 inhibitor, suggesting that IFN-β likely acts synergistically with resveratrol to inhibit H1N1 replication. This potential antiviral mechanism, involving direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host immune response, has not been previously described for a single antiviral molecule. In conclusion, our data support the use of PC, resveratrol or emodin for inhibiting influenza virus replication directly and via TLR-9–induced IFN-β production. PMID:25658356

  6. Polygonum cuspidatum and its active components inhibit replication of the influenza virus through toll-like receptor 9-induced interferon beta expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Jen; Lin, Hui-Ju; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Hsu, Yu-An; Liu, Chin-San; Hwang, Guang-Yuh; Wan, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus infection is a global public health issue. The effectiveness of antiviral therapies for influenza has been limited by the emergence of drug-resistant viral strains. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify novel antiviral therapies. Here we tested the effects of 300 traditional Chinese medicines on the replication of various influenza virus strains in a lung cell line, A549, using an influenza-specific luciferase reporter assay. Of the traditional medicines tested, Polygonum cuspidatum (PC) and its active components, resveratrol and emodin, were found to attenuate influenza viral replication in A549 cells. Furthermore, they preferentially inhibited the replication of influenza A virus, including clinical strains isolated in 2009 and 2011 in Taiwan and the laboratory strain A/WSN/33 (H1N1). In addition to inhibiting the expression of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, PC, emodin, and resveratrol also increased the expression of interferon beta (IFN-β) through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Moreover, the anti-viral activity of IFN-β or resveratrol was reduced when the A549 cells were treated with neutralizing anti-IFN-β antibodies or a TLR9 inhibitor, suggesting that IFN-β likely acts synergistically with resveratrol to inhibit H1N1 replication. This potential antiviral mechanism, involving direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host immune response, has not been previously described for a single antiviral molecule. In conclusion, our data support the use of PC, resveratrol or emodin for inhibiting influenza virus replication directly and via TLR-9-induced IFN-β production. PMID:25658356

  7. MDM2 Inhibits Axin-Induced p53 Activation Independently of its E3 Ligase Activity.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Lian, Guili; Lin, Shuyong; Ye, Zhiyun; Li, Qinxi

    2013-01-01

    MDM2 plays a crucial role in negatively regulating the functions of tumor suppressor p53. Here we show that MDM2 can inhibit Axin-stimulated p53-dependent apoptosis by suppressing p53 phosphorylation at Ser 46 and apoptosis-related p53 transactivational activity. Interestingly, the ubiquitin E3 ligase activity of MDM2 is not required for this inhibitory effect. Mechanically, either wildtype MDM2 or its E3-dead mutant, disrupts the Axin-based HIPK2/p53 complex formation by blocking the binding of p53 and HIPK2 to Axin. MDM2Δp53, a deletion mutant that lacks p53 binding domain fails to exert the inhibitory effect, demonstrating that the interaction of MDM2 and p53, but not its E3 ligase activity toward p53 plays key role in suppressing Axin-stimulated p53 activation. Our results thus have revealed a novel aspect of the mechanism by which MDM2 regulates p53 activities. PMID:23826318

  8. Nuclease activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dna2 inhibits its potent DNA helicase activity

    PubMed Central

    Levikova, Maryna; Klaue, Daniel; Seidel, Ralf; Cejka, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Dna2 is a nuclease-helicase involved in several key pathways of eukaryotic DNA metabolism. The potent nuclease activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dna2 was reported to be required for all its in vivo functions tested to date. In contrast, its helicase activity was shown to be weak, and its inactivation affected only a subset of Dna2 functions. We describe here a complex interplay of the two enzymatic activities. We show that the nuclease of Dna2 inhibits its helicase by cleaving 5′ flaps that are required by the helicase domain for loading onto its substrate. Mutational inactivation of Dna2 nuclease unleashes unexpectedly vigorous DNA unwinding activity, comparable with that of the most potent eukaryotic helicases. Thus, the ssDNA-specific nuclease activity of Dna2 limits and controls the enzyme's capacity to unwind dsDNA. We postulate that regulation of this interplay could modulate the biochemical properties of Dna2 and thus license it to carry out its distinct cellular functions. PMID:23671118

  9. Evidence for anti-apoptotic roles of proteasome activator 28γ via inhibiting caspase activity.

    PubMed

    Moncsek, Anja; Gruner, Melanie; Meyer, Hannes; Lehmann, Andrea; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Stohwasser, Ralf

    2015-09-01

    Proteasome activator PA28γ (REGγ, Ki antigen) has recently been demonstrated to display anti-apoptotic properties via enhancing Mdm2-p53 interaction, thereby facilitating ubiquitination and down-regulation of the tumor suppressor p53. In this study we demonstrate a correlation between cellular PA28γ levels and the sensitivity of cells towards apoptosis in different cellular contexts thereby confirming a role of proteasome activator PA28γ as an anti-apoptotic regulator. We investigated the anti-apoptotic role of PA28γ upon UV-C stimulation in B8 mouse fibroblasts stably overexpressing the PA28γ-encoding PSME3 gene and upon butyrate-induced apoptosis in human HT29 adenocarcinoma cells with silenced PSME3 gene. Interestingly, our results demonstrate that PA28γ has a strong influence on different apoptotic hallmarks, especially p53 phosphorylation and caspase activation. In detail, PA28γ and effector caspases mutually restrict each other. PA28γ is a caspase substrate, if PA28γ levels are low. In contrast, PA28γ overexpression reduces caspase activities, including the caspase-dependent processing of PA28γ. Furthermore, overexpression of PA28γ resulted in a nuclear accumulation of transcriptional active p53. In summary, our findings indicate that even in a p53-dominated cellular context, pro-apoptotic signaling might be overcome by PA28γ-mediated caspase inhibition. PMID:26201457

  10. Potent inhibition by star fruit of human cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) activity.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Muneaki; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Ogikubo, Tetsuya; Yamasaki, Keishi; Iwakiri, Tomomi; Okumura, Manabu; Kodama, Hirofumi; Arimori, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-01

    There has been very limited information on the capacities of tropical fruits to inhibit human cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) activity. Thus, the inhibitory effects of tropical fruits on midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activity of CYP3A in human liver microsomes were evaluated. Eight tropical fruits such as common papaw, dragon fruit, kiwi fruit, mango, passion fruit, pomegranate, rambutan, and star fruit were tested. We also examined the inhibition of CYP3A activity by grapefruit (white) and Valencia orange as controls. The juice of star fruit showed the most potent inhibition of CYP3A. The addition of a star fruit juice (5.0%, v/v) resulted in the almost complete inhibition of midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activity (residual activity of 0.1%). In the case of grape-fruit, the residual activity was 14.7%. The inhibition depended on the amount of fruit juice added to the incubation mixture (0.2-6.0%, v/v). The elongation of the preincubation period of a juice from star fruit (1.25 or 2.5%, v/v) with the microsomal fraction did not alter the CYP3A inhibition, suggesting that the star fruit did not contain a mechanism-based inhibitor. Thus, we discovered filtered extracts of star fruit juice to be inhibitors of human CYP3A activity in vitro. PMID:15155547

  11. Evaluation of in vitro urease and lipoxygenase inhibition activity of weight reducing tablets.

    PubMed

    Jaffary, Syed Rashid Ali; Ahmed, Syed Waseemuddin; Shakeel, Sadia; Asif, Hafiz Muhammad; Usmanghani, Khan

    2016-07-01

    Enzyme inhibition is a significant part of research in pharmaceutical field in view of the fact that these studies have directed to the innovations of drugs having remarkable performance in diverse physiological conditions. The present study was aimed to assess urease and lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of weight reducing tablets. For evaluating the urease activity indophenol method was employed using Thiourea as the model urease inhibitor. The lipoxygenase inhibition was evaluated by measuring the hydroperoxides produced in lipoxygenation reaction using a purified lipoxygenase with lionoleic acid as substrate. When formulation of the weight reducing tablets was compared at various concentrations (50, 100 and 500µg/ml). The antiurease activity and lipoxygenase inhibition activity increased in a dose dependent manner. The formulations under test have an excellent antiurease and lipoxygenase inhibition potential and prospective to be used in the cure of a variety of complications associated with the production of urease and lipoxygenase enzymes. PMID:27592490

  12. CORRELATIONS OF PESTICIDE-INDUCED CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION AND MOTOR ACTIVITY CHANGES IN ADULT RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute neurobehavioral effects of acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides are primarily due to overstimulation of the cholinergic system. Lowered motor activity levels represent a sensitive endpoint with which to monitor functional changes in laboratory animals exposed to ...

  13. Development of response activation and inhibition in a selective stop-signal task.

    PubMed

    van de Laar, Maria C; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; van Boxtel, Geert J M; van der Molen, Maurits W

    2014-10-01

    To gain more insight into the development of action control, the current brain potential study examined response selection, activation, and selective inhibition during choice- and stop-signal processing in three age groups (8-, 12-, and 21-year-olds). Results revealed that age groups differed in the implementation of proactive control; children slowed their go response and showed reduced cortical motor output compared to adults. On failed inhibition trials, children were less able than adults to suppress muscle output resulting in increased partial-inhibition rates. On invalid stop trials, all age groups initially activated, subsequently inhibited, and then reactivated the go response. Yet, children were less efficient in implementing this strategy. Then, older children recruit motor responses to a greater extent than younger children and adults, which reduced the efficiency of implementing response inhibition and proactive control. The results are discussed in relation to current notions of developmental change in proactive and reactive action control. PMID:25014630

  14. Exosome poly-ubiquitin inhibits platelet activation, downregulates CD36, and inhibits pro-atherothombotic cellular functions

    PubMed Central

    Srikanthan, Sowmya; Li, Wei; Silverstein, Roy L.; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Activated platelets shed microparticles from plasma membranes, but also release smaller exosomes from internal compartments. While microparticles participate in athero-thrombosis, little is known of exosomes in this process. Materials & Methods Ex vivo biochemical experiments with human platelets and exosomes, and FeCl3-induced murine carotid artery thrombosis. Results Both microparticles and exosomes were abundant in human plasma. Platelet-derived exosomes suppressed ex vivo platelet aggregation and reduced adhesion to collagen-coated microfluidic channels at high shear. Injected exosomes inhibited occlusive thrombosis in FeCl3-damaged murine carotid arteries. Control platelets infused into irradiated, thrombocytopenic mice reconstituted thrombosis in damaged carotid arteries, but failed to do so after prior ex vivo incubation with exosomes. CD36 promotes platelet activation, and exosomes dramatically reduced platelet CD36. CD36 is also expressed by macrophages where it binds and internalizes oxidized LDL and microparticles, supplying lipid to promote foam cell formation. Platelet exosomes inhibited oxidized-LDL binding and cholesterol loading into macrophages. Exosomes were not competitive CD36 ligands, but instead sharply reduced total macrophage CD36 content. Exosomal proteins, in contrast to microparticle or cellular proteins, were highly adducted by ubiquitin. Exosomes enhanced ubiquitination of cellular proteins, including CD36, and blockade of proteosome proteolysis with MG-132 rescued CD36 expression. Recombinant unanchored K48 poly-ubiquitin behaved similarly to exosomes, inhibiting platelet function, macrophage CD36 expression, and macrophage particle uptake. Conclusions Platelet-derived exosomes inhibit athero-thrombotic processes by reducing CD36-dependent lipid loading of macrophages and by suppressing platelet thrombosis. Exosomes increase protein ubiquitination, and enhance proteasome degradation of CD36. PMID:25163645

  15. Information filtering via preferential diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  16. Information filtering via preferential diffusion.

    PubMed

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects. PMID:21797453

  17. PTEN inhibits PREX2-catalyzed activation of RAC1 to restrain tumor cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mense, Sarah M.; Barrows, Douglas; Hodakoski, Cindy; Steinbach, Nicole; Schoenfeld, David; Su, William; Hopkins, Benjamin D.; Su, Tao; Fine, Barry; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN restrains cell migration and invasion by a mechanism that is independent of inhibition of the PI3K pathway and decreased activation of the kinase AKT. PREX2, a widely distributed GEF that activates the GTPase RAC1, binds to and inhibits PTEN. We used mouse embryonic fibroblasts and breast cancer cell lines to show that PTEN suppresses cell migration and invasion by blocking PREX2 activity. In addition to metabolizing the phosphoinositide PIP3, PTEN inhibited PREX2-induced invasion by a mechanism that required the tail domain of PTEN, but not its lipid phosphatase activity. Fluorescent nucleotide exchange assays revealed that PTEN inhibited the GEF activity of PREX2 toward RAC1. PREX2 is a frequently mutated GEF in cancer, and examination of human tumor data showed that PREX2 mutation was associated with high PTEN expression. Therefore, we tested whether cancer-derived somatic PREX2 mutants, which accelerate tumor formation of immortalized melanocytes, were inhibited by PTEN. The three stably expressed, somatic PREX2 cancer mutants that we tested were resistant to PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion but retained the ability to inhibit the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN. In vitro analysis showed that PTEN did not block the GEF activity of two PREX2 cancer mutants and had a reduced binding affinity for the third. Thus, PTEN antagonized migration and invasion by restraining PREX2 GEF activity, and PREX2 mutants are likely selected in cancer to escape PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion. PMID:25829446

  18. SOCIAL DEFEAT, A PARADIGM OF DEPRESSION IN RATS THAT ELICITS 22-kHz VOCALIZATIONS, PREFERENTIALLY ACTIVATES THE CHOLINERGIC SIGNALING PATHWAY IN THE PERIAQUEDUCTAL GRAY

    PubMed Central

    Kroes, Roger A.; Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Otto, Nigel J.; Panksepp, Jaak; Moskal, Joseph R.

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression profiles in the periaqueductal gray (PAG) of adult Long-Evans rats as a function of a stressful social defeat in inter-male fighting encounters were examined. This social subordination model mimics prototypical behavioral changes that parallel aspects of clinical depression, has been postulated to simulate early changes in the onset of depression in the losers, and has been successfully utilized for the evaluation of antidepressant activity. 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) have been shown to reflect negative emotional states akin to anxiety and depression. Social defeat is the most robust and reliable method of eliciting these calls. The PAG has been shown to be a key brain region for the generation of 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations, and 22-kHz USVs have been shown to be controlled by the mesolimbic cholinergic system. In this present study we examined gene expression changes in the PAG of social subordinate rats compared to dominant rats (that do not exhibit 22-kHz USVs). We found that social defeat significantly altered the genes associated with cholinergic synaptic transmission in the PAG. The most robust of these were the increased expression of the β2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNB2) and the T-subunit of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) in the subordinate animals. These changes were corroborated by qRT-PCR and found to be exclusive to the PAG compared to seven other brain regions examined. These data suggest that cholinergic transmission in the PAG is involved in the generation of 22-kHz USVs and provide potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of affective disorders. PMID:17452055

  19. Houttuynia cordata blocks HSV infection through inhibition of NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Wang, Zhongxia; Yang, Ziying; Wang, Jingjing; Xu, Yunxia; Tan, Ren-Xiang; Li, Erguang

    2011-11-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb. is a medicinal plant widely used in folk medicine in several Asian countries. It has been reported that a water extract of H. cordata exhibits activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV) and the virus of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), although the mechanisms are not fully understood yet. Previous studies have demonstrated absolute requirement of NF-κB activation for efficient replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 and inhibition of NF-κB activation has been shown to suppress HSV infection. Here we show that a hot water extract of H. cordata (HCWE) inhibits HSV-2 infection through inhibition of NF-κB activation. The IC(50) was estimated at 50 μg/ml of lyophilized HCWE powder. At 150 and 450 μg/ml, HCWE blocked infectious HSV-2 production by more than 3 and 4 logs, respectively. The inhibitory activity was concomitant with an inhibition of NF-κB activation by HSV-2 infection. Although activation of NF-κB and Erk MAPK has been implicated for HSV replication and growth, HCWE showed no effect on HSV-2-induced Erk activation. Furthermore, we show that treatment with quercetin, quercitrin or isoquercitrin, major water extractable flavonoids from H. cordata, significantly blocked HSV-2 infection. These results together demonstrated that H. cordata blocks HSV-2 infection through inhibition of NF-κB activation. PMID:21951655

  20. Inhibition of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Activity by Flavonoids: Structure-Activity Relationship Studies

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Ligia; Castillo, Julián; Quiñones, Mar; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Arola, Lluis; Pujadas, Gerard; Muguerza, Begoña

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that certain flavonoids can have an inhibitory effect on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, which plays a key role in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. In the present study, 17 flavonoids belonging to five structural subtypes were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit ACE in order to establish the structural basis of their bioactivity. The ACE inhibitory (ACEI) activity of these 17 flavonoids was determined by fluorimetric method at two concentrations (500 µM and 100 µM). Their inhibitory potencies ranged from 17 to 95% at 500 µM and from 0 to 57% at 100 µM. In both cases, the highest ACEI activity was obtained for luteolin. Following the determination of ACEI activity, the flavonoids with higher ACEI activity (i.e., ACEI >60% at 500 µM) were selected for further IC50 determination. The IC50 values for luteolin, quercetin, rutin, kaempferol, rhoifolin and apigenin K were 23, 43, 64, 178, 183 and 196 µM, respectively. Our results suggest that flavonoids are an excellent source of functional antihypertensive products. Furthermore, our structure-activity relationship studies show that the combination of sub-structures on the flavonoid skeleton that increase ACEI activity is made up of the following elements: (a) the catechol group in the B-ring, (b) the double bond between C2 and C3 at the C-ring, and (c) the cetone group in C4 at the C-ring. Protein-ligand docking studies are used to understand the molecular basis for these results. PMID:23185345

  1. Therapeutic inhibition of Jak activity inhibits progression of gastrointestinal tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Emma; Buchert, Michael; Putoczki, Tracy; Thiem, Stefan; Farid, Ryan; Elzer, Joachim; Huszar, Dennis; Waring, Paul M; Phesse, Toby J; Ernst, Matthias

    2014-02-01

    Aberrant activation of the latent transcription factor STAT3 and its downstream targets is a common feature of epithelial-derived human cancers, including those of the gastrointestinal tract. Mouse models of gastrointestinal malignancy implicate Stat3 as a key mediator of inflammatory-driven tumorigenesis, in which its cytokine/gp130/Janus kinase (Jak)-dependent activation provides a functional link through which the microenvironment sustains tumor promotion. Although therapeutic targeting of STAT3 is highly desirable, such molecules are not available for immediate clinical assessment. Here, we investigated whether the small-molecule Jak1/2 inhibitor AZD1480 confers therapeutic benefits in two mouse models of inflammation-associated gastrointestinal cancer, which are strictly dependent of excessive Stat3 activation. We confirm genetically that Cre-mediated, tumor cell-specific reduction of Stat3 expression arrests the growth of intestinal-type gastric tumors in gp130(F/F) mice. We find that systemic administration of AZD1480 readily replicates this effect, which is associated with reduced Stat3 activation and correlates with diminished tumor cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Likewise, AZD1480 therapy also conferred a cytostatic effect on established tumors in a colitis-associated colon cancer model in wild-type mice. As predicted from our genetic observations in gp130(F/F) mice, the therapeutic effect of AZD1480 remains fully reversible upon cessation of compound administration. Collectively, our results provide the first evidence that pharmacologic targeting of excessively activated wild-type Jak kinases affords therapeutic suppression of inflammation-associated gastrointestinal cancers progression in vivo. PMID:24398427

  2. Human neutrophil leukocyte elastase activity is inhibited by Phenol Red

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in urine, sputum and nasal mucous is used as an indicator of inflammation due to viral or bacterial infection. However, bovine nasal mucous neutrophils collected, lysed and stored in Dulbecco's minimal medium containing Phenol Red, showed no NE activity with methox...

  3. Selectivity for inhibition of nilotinib on the catalytic activity of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Ai, Limei; Zhu, Liangliang; Yang, Lu; Ge, Guangbo; Cao, Yunfeng; Liu, Yong; Fang, Zhongze; Zhang, Yanyan

    2014-04-01

    1. Nilotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, could potently inhibit SN-38 glucuronidation mainly catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1. This study was designed to investigate whether nilotinib can be used as a selective inhibitor of UGT1A1 in human liver. 2. Assays with recombinant UGTs indicated that nilotinib could strongly inhibit the activity of UGT1A1 and decreased the activity of extra-hepatic UGT1A7 to a much lesser extent. The inhibition on 4-methylumbelliferone (4Mu) glucuronidation by recombinant UGT1A1 obeyed competitive inhibition mechanism, with a kinetic constants (Ki) value of 0.17 μM. Assays with human liver microsomes (HLM) demonstrated that nilotinib could selectively inhibit estradiol-3-O-glucuronidation (E2-3-O-glucuronidation), a probe reaction of UGT1A1. Kinetic studies displayed that the inhibition on E2-3-O-glucuronidation followed non-competitive inhibition model, different from the inhibition on 4Mu glucuronidation. The Ki values were calculated to be 0.14 and 0.53 μM, depending on the enzyme sources of recombinant UGT1A1 or HLM, respectively. 3. Given that UGT1A7 is an extra-hepatic enzyme, this study indicates that nilotinib can be used as a selective inhibitor of UGT1A1 in human liver. PMID:24066723

  4. Gossypol enantiomers potently inhibit human placental 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and aromatase activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yaoyao; Mao, Baiping; Li, Linxi; Guan, Hongguo; Su, Ying; Li, Xiaoheng; Lian, Qingquan; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-03-01

    Gossypol is a chemical isolated from cotton seeds. It exists as (+) or (-) enantiomer and has been tested for anticancer, abortion-inducing, and male contraception. Progesterone formed from pregnenolone by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD3B1) and estradiol from androgen by aromatase (CYP19A1) are critical for the maintenance of pregnancy or associated with some cancers. In this study we compared the potencies of (+)- and (-)-gossypol enantiomers in the inhibition of HSD3B1 and aromatase activities as well as progesterone and estradiol production in human placental JEG-3 cells. (+) Gossypol showed potent inhibition on human placental HSD3B1 with IC50 value of 2.3 μM, while (-) gossypol weakly inhibited it with IC50 over 100 μM. In contrast, (-) gossypol moderately inhibited CYP19A1 activity with IC50 of 23 μM, while (+) gossypol had no inhibition when the highest concentration (100 μM) was tested. (+) Gossypol enantiomer competitively inhibited HSD3B1 against substrate pregnenolone and showed mixed mode against NAD(+). (-) Gossypol competitively inhibited CYP19A1 against substrate testosterone. Gossypol enantiomers showed different potency related to their inhibition on human HSD3B1 and CYP19A1. Whether gossypol enantiomer is used alone or in combination relies on its application and beneficial effects. PMID:26709042

  5. Group A streptococcal peptidoglycan-polysaccharide inhibits phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Leong, P A; Cohen, M S

    1984-01-01

    Injection of sterile aqueous preparations of the peptidoglycan-polysaccharide of group A streptococci (PG-APS) produces chronic inflammation in several animal models. Chronic bacterial infection may be involved in some aspects of the pathogenesis of inflammation associated with the accumulation of PG-APS. Accordingly, the effect of PG-APS on human neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte [PMN]) bactericidal activity was studied with the supposition that this interaction may contribute to the inflammation observed. Concentrations of PG-APS greater than 10 micrograms/ml inhibited the ability of PMNs to kill Staphylococcus aureus. This inhibition was not due to a cytotoxic effect of PG-APS on PMNs, nor did PG-APS inhibit PMN metabolism required for the formation of microbicidal oxygen reduction products. PG-APS concentrations of 10 micrograms/ml or greater in the presence of 10% normal serum inhibited the attachment of bacteria to PMNs by 49% as compared with control cell populations. The concentrations of PG-APS required to inhibit uptake of Staphylococcus aureus were identical to those required for inhibition of PMN bactericidal activity. This inhibition did not occur in the presence of serum-free medium or medium with sera that had been heated to inactivate complement. These results show that PG-APS interacts with serum to inhibit PMN-mediated killing of S. aureus, most probably by interfering with bacterial uptake. PMID:6378796

  6. Class II HDAC Inhibition Hampers Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation by Induction of MicroRNA-29

    PubMed Central

    Mannaerts, Inge; Eysackers, Nathalie; Onyema, Oscar O.; Van Beneden, Katrien; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello; Odenthal, Margarete; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The conversion of a quiescent vitamin A storing hepatic stellate cell (HSC) to a matrix producing, contractile myofibroblast-like activated HSC is a key event in the onset of liver disease following injury of any aetiology. Previous studies have shown that class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are involved in the phenotypical changes occurring during stellate cell activation in liver and pancreas. Aims In the current study we investigate the role of class II HDACs during HSC activation. Methods We characterized the expression of the class II HDACs freshly isolated mouse HSCs. We inhibited HDAC activity by selective pharmacological inhibition with MC1568, and by repressing class II HDAC gene expression using specific siRNAs. Results Inhibition of HDAC activity leads to a strong reduction of HSC activation markers α-SMA, lysyl oxidase and collagens as well as an inhibition of cell proliferation. Knock down experiments showed that HDAC4 contributes to HSC activation by regulating lysyl oxidase expression. In addition, we observed a strong up regulation of miR-29, a well-known anti-fibrotic miR, upon treatment with MC1568. Our in vivo work suggests that a successful inhibition of class II HDACs could be promising for development of future anti-fibrotic compounds. Conclusions In conclusion, the use of MC1568 has enabled us to identify a role for class II HDACs regulating miR-29 during HSC activation. PMID:23383282

  7. Inhibition of transcriptional activity of c-JUN by SIRT1

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhanguo; Ye Jianping

    2008-11-28

    c-JUN is a major component of heterodimer transcription factor AP-1 (Activator Protein-1) that activates gene transcription in cell proliferation, inflammation and stress responses. SIRT1 (Sirtuin 1) is a histone deacetylase that controls gene transcription through modification of chromatin structure. However, it is not clear if SIRT1 regulates c-JUN activity in the control of gene transcription. Here, we show that SIRT1 associated with c-JUN in co-immunoprecipitation of whole cell lysate, and inhibited the transcriptional activity of c-JUN in the mammalian two hybridization system. SIRT1 was found in the AP-1 response element in the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) promoter DNA leading to inhibition of histone 3 acetylation as shown in a ChIP assay. The SIRT1 signal was reduced by the AP-1 activator PMA, and induced by the SIRT1 activator Resveratrol in the promoter DNA. SIRT1-mediaetd inhibition of AP-1 was demonstrated in the MMP9 gene expression at the gene promoter, mRNA and protein levels. In mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) with SIRT1 deficiency (SIRT1{sup -/-}), mRNA and protein of MMP9 were increased in the basal condition, and the inhibitory activity of Resveratrol was significantly attenuated. Glucose-induced MMP9 expression was also inhibited by SIRT1 in response to Resveratrol. These data consistently suggest that SIRT1 directly inhibits the transcriptional activity of AP-1 by targeting c-JUN.

  8. Tissue-specific inhibition and recovery of esterase activities in Lumbricus terrestris experimentally exposed to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Vejares, Sandra González; Sabat, Pablo; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C

    2010-04-01

    Exposure and effect assessment of organophosphate (OP) pesticides generally involves the use of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition. In earthworm, this enzyme activity is often measured in homogenates from the whole organism. Here we examine the tissue-specific response of ChE and carboxylesterase (CE) activities in Lumbricus terrestris experimentally exposed to chlorpyrifos-spiked field soils. Esterases were measured in different gut segments and in the seminal vesicles of earthworms following acute exposure (2 d) to the OP and during 35d of a recovery period. We found that inhibition of both esterase activities was dependent on the tissue. Cholinesterase activity decreased in the pharynx, crop, foregut and seminal vesicles in a concentration-dependent way, whereas CE activity (4-nitrophenyl valerate) was strongly inhibited in these tissues. Gizzard CE activity was not inhibited by the OP, even an increase of enzyme activity was evident during the recovery period. These results suggest that both esterases should be determined jointly in selected tissues of earthworms. Moreover, the high levels of gut CE activity and its inhibition and recovery dynamic following OP exposure suggest that this esterase could play an important role as an enzymatic barrier against OP uptake from the ingested contaminated soil. PMID:20045489

  9. Cadmium inhibits mismatch repair by blocking the ATPase activity of the MSH2-MSH6 complex.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sreeparna; Flores-Rozas, Hernan

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a known carcinogen that inactivates the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. In this study, we have tested the effect of Cd2+ exposure on the enzymatic activity of the mismatch binding complex MSH2-MSH6. Our results indicate that Cd2+ is highly inhibitory to the ATP binding and hydrolysis activities of MSH2-MSH6, and less inhibitory to its DNA mismatch binding activity. The inhibition of the ATPase activity appears to be dose and exposure time dependent. However, the inhibition of the ATPase activity by Cd2+ is prevented by cysteine and histidine, suggesting that these residues are essential for the ATPase activity and are targeted by Cd2+. A comparison of the mechanism of inhibition with N-ethyl maleimide, a sulfhydryl group inhibitor, indicates that this inhibition does not occur through direct inactivation of sulfhydryl groups. Zinc (Zn2+) does not overcome the direct inhibitory effect of Cd2+ on the MSH2-MSH6 ATPase activity in vitro. However, the increase in the mutator phenotype of yeast cells exposed to Cd2+ was prevented by excess Zn2+, probably by blocking the entry of Cd2+ into the cell. We conclude that the inhibition of MMR by Cd2+ is through the inactivation of the ATPase activity of the MSH2-MSH6 heterodimer, resulting in a dominant negative effect and causing a mutator phenotype. PMID:15746000

  10. Mithramycin inhibits SP1 binding and selectively inhibits transcriptional activity of the dihydrofolate reductase gene in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Blume, S W; Snyder, R C; Ray, R; Thomas, S; Koller, C A; Miller, D M

    1991-01-01

    The promoter of the human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene contains two consensus binding sites for the DNA binding protein Sp1. DNAse protection and gel mobility shift assays demonstrate binding of recombinant Sp1 to both decanucleotide Sp1 binding sequences which are located 49 and 14 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. The more distal of the two binding sites exhibits a somewhat higher affinity for Sp1. The G-C specific DNA binding drug, mithramycin, binds to both consensus sequences and prevents subsequent Sp1 binding. Promoter-dependent in vitro transcription of a DHFR template is selectively inhibited by mithramycin when compared to the human H2b histone gene. A similar effect is also noted in vivo. Mithramycin treatment of MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells containing an amplified DHFR gene induces selective inhibition of DHFR transcription initiation, resulting in a decline in DHFR mRNA level and enzyme activity. This selective inhibition of DHFR expression suggests that it is possible to modulate the overexpression of the DHFR gene in methotrexate resistant cells. Images PMID:1834700

  11. Differential Regulation of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Promoter Activation and Protein Degradation by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Qing, Hua; Aono, Jun; Findeisen, Hannes M; Jones, Karrie L; Heywood, Elizabeth B; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2016-06-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) maintains telomeres and is rate limiting for replicative life span. While most somatic tissues silence TERT transcription resulting in telomere shortening, cells derived from cancer or cardiovascular diseases express TERT and activate telomerase. In the present study, we demonstrate that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition induces TERT transcription and promoter activation. At the protein level in contrast, HDAC inhibition decreases TERT protein abundance through enhanced degradation, which decreases telomerase activity and induces senescence. Finally, we demonstrate that HDAC inhibition decreases TERT expression during vascular remodeling in vivo. These data illustrate a differential regulation of TERT transcription and protein stability by HDAC inhibition and suggest that TERT may constitute an important target for the anti-proliferative efficacy of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:26505494

  12. Synthesis and tyrosinase inhibition activity of trans-stilbene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Tabasum; Shafi, Syed; Srinivas, Jada; Sarkar, Dhiman; Qurishi, Yasrib; Khazir, Jabeena; Alam, Mohammad Sarwar; Kumar, Halmuthur Mahabalarao Sampath

    2016-02-01

    Synthesis of a focussed library of trans-stilbene compounds through Wittig and other base catalysed condensation reactions is presented. The synthesized stilbenes were screened for their inhibitory potential against murine tyrosinase activity to explore the structure activity relationship (SAR). Presence of electron withdrawing group (-CN) at the double bond and hydroxyl group or halogen atom especially at para-position on the aromatic rings was found to significantly elevate the inhibitory activity. Among all the compounds screened, compounds 2, 6, 8, 10, 11, 15 and 21 were found to exhibit appreciable inhibitory activity. Compound 21 ((E)-2,3-bis(4-Hydroxyphenyl)acryonitrile) was found to be the most active with an IC50 value of 5.06 μM which is less than half of the value 10.78 μM observed for resveratrol (common standard used in murine tyrosinase activity studies) under similar conditions. The results obtained from the present study reveal structural/functional group sensitivity for the tyrosinase inhibitory activity of stilbenoid moieties and are expected to be very helpful for the design and synthesis of novel, selective and effective tyrosinase inhibitors. PMID:26773755

  13. Inhibition of O-GlcNAc transferase activity reprograms prostate cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Itkonen, Harri M.; Gorad, Saurabh S.; Duveau, Damien Y.; Martin, Sara E.S.; Barkovskaya, Anna; Bathen, Tone F.; Moestue, Siver A.; Mills, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic networks are highly connected and complex, but a single enzyme, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) can sense the availability of metabolites and also modify target proteins. We show that inhibition of OGT activity inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells, leads to sustained loss of c-MYC and suppresses the expression of CDK1, elevated expression of which predicts prostate cancer recurrence (p=0.00179). Metabolic profiling revealed decreased glucose consumption and lactate production after OGT inhibition. This decreased glycolytic activity specifically sensitized prostate cancer cells, but not cells representing normal prostate epithelium, to inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation (rotenone and metformin). Intra-cellular alanine was depleted upon OGT inhibitor treatment. OGT inhibitor increased the expression and activity of alanine aminotransferase (GPT2), an enzyme that can be targeted with a clinically approved drug, cycloserine. Simultaneous inhibition of OGT and GPT2 inhibited cell viability and growth rate, and additionally activated a cell death response. These combinatorial effects were predominantly seen in prostate cancer cells, but not in a cell-line derived from normal prostate epithelium. Combinatorial treatments were confirmed with two inhibitors against both OGT and GPT2. Taken together, here we report the reprogramming of energy metabolism upon inhibition of OGT activity, and identify synergistically lethal combinations that are prostate cancer cell specific. PMID:26824323

  14. Inhibition of O-GlcNAc transferase activity reprograms prostate cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Itkonen, Harri M; Gorad, Saurabh S; Duveau, Damien Y; Martin, Sara E S; Barkovskaya, Anna; Bathen, Tone F; Moestue, Siver A; Mills, Ian G

    2016-03-15

    Metabolic networks are highly connected and complex, but a single enzyme, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) can sense the availability of metabolites and also modify target proteins. We show that inhibition of OGT activity inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells, leads to sustained loss of c-MYC and suppresses the expression of CDK1, elevated expression of which predicts prostate cancer recurrence (p=0.00179). Metabolic profiling revealed decreased glucose consumption and lactate production after OGT inhibition. This decreased glycolytic activity specifically sensitized prostate cancer cells, but not cells representing normal prostate epithelium, to inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation (rotenone and metformin). Intra-cellular alanine was depleted upon OGT inhibitor treatment. OGT inhibitor increased the expression and activity of alanine aminotransferase (GPT2), an enzyme that can be targeted with a clinically approved drug, cycloserine. Simultaneous inhibition of OGT and GPT2 inhibited cell viability and growth rate, and additionally activated a cell death response. These combinatorial effects were predominantly seen in prostate cancer cells, but not in a cell-line derived from normal prostate epithelium. Combinatorial treatments were confirmed with two inhibitors against both OGT and GPT2. Taken together, here we report the reprogramming of energy metabolism upon inhibition of OGT activity, and identify synergistically lethal combinations that are prostate cancer cell specific. PMID:26824323

  15. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg(2+) ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn(2+)); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg(2+) causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn(2+) release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn(2+) or Hg(2+). Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg(2+)-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg(2+) that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system. PMID:20951154

  16. p-HPEA-EDA, a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, activates AMP-activated protein kinase to inhibit carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Prem; Oh, Won-Keun; Yun, Hyo Jeong; Namgoong, Gwang Mo; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Kwon, Seong-Min; Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Choi, Hong Seok

    2011-04-01

    Phenolic constituents of virgin olive oil are reported to have antitumor activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and specific target proteins of virgin olive oil remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycone (p-HPEA-EDA), a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, inhibits tumor promoter-induced cell transformation in JB6 Cl41 cells and suppress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumorigenicity by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in HT-29 cells. p-HPEA-EDA inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and p90RSK in JB6 Cl41 cells, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation, activator protein-1 transactivation and cell transformation promoted by TPA. Moreover, p-HPEA-EDA strongly inhibited the cell viability and COX-2 expression by activation of AMPK activity in HT-29 cells, resulted from depletion of intracellular adenosine triphosphate. p-HPEA-EDA-induced activation of caspase-3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase, phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and DNA fragmentation in HT-29 cells, leading to apoptosis. Importantly, p-HPEA-EDA suppressed the colony formation of HT-29 cells in soft agar. In contrast, Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor, blocked the p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited colony formation in HT-29 cells. In vivo chorioallantoic membrane assay also showed that p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited tumorigenicity of HT-29 cells. These findings revealed that targeted activation of AMPK and inhibition of COX-2 expression by p-HPEA-EDA contribute to the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential of virgin olive oil against colon cancer cells. PMID:21216846

  17. Largazole and Its Derivatives Selectively Inhibit Ubiquitin Activating Enzyme (E1)

    PubMed Central

    Nasveschuk, Christopher G.; Wang, Wei; Quade, Bettina; Zhang, Gan; Kuchta, Robert D.; Phillips, Andrew J.; Liu, Xuedong

    2012-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination plays an important role in the regulation of almost every aspect of eukaryotic cellular function; therefore, its destabilization is often observed in most human diseases and cancers. Consequently, developing inhibitors of the ubiquitination system for the treatment of cancer has been a recent area of interest. Currently, only a few classes of compounds have been discovered to inhibit the ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1) and only one class is relatively selective in E1 inhibition in cells. We now report that Largazole and its ester and ketone analogs selectively inhibit ubiquitin conjugation to p27Kip1 and TRF1 in vitro. The inhibitory activity of these small molecules on ubiquitin conjugation has been traced to their inhibition of the ubiquitin E1 enzyme. To further dissect the mechanism of E1 inhibition, we analyzed the effects of these inhibitors on each of the two steps of E1 activation. We show that Largazole and its derivatives specifically inhibit the adenylation step of the E1 reaction while having no effect on thioester bond formation between ubiquitin and E1. E1 inhibition appears to be specific to human E1 as Largazole ketone fails to inhibit the activation of Uba1p, a homolog of E1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Moreover, Largazole analogs do not significantly inhibit SUMO E1. Thus, Largazole and select analogs are a novel class of ubiquitin E1 inhibitors and valuable tools for studying ubiquitination in vitro. This class of compounds could be further developed and potentially be a useful tool in cells. PMID:22279528

  18. Whey peptide Isoleucine-Tryptophan inhibits expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Kopaliani, Irakli; Martin, Melanie; Zatschler, Birgit; Müller, Bianca; Deussen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Aortic stiffness is an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases. Activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) including angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity leads to overproduction of angiotensin II (ANGII) from its precursor angiotensin I (ANGI). ANGII leads to overexpression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2), which is critically associated with pathophysiology of aortic stiffness. We previously reported that the whey peptide Isoleucine-Tryptophan (IW) acts as a potent ACE inhibitor. Herein, we critically elucidate the mechanism of action by which IW causes inhibition of expression and activity of MMP2 in aortic tissue. Effects of IW on expression and activity of MMP2 were assessed on endothelial and smooth muscle cells (ECs and SMCs) in vitro and ex vivo (isolated rat aorta). As controls we used the pharmaceutical ACE inhibitor - captopril and the ANGII type 1 receptor blocker - losartan. In vitro, both ANGII and ANGI stimulation significantly (P<0.01) increased expression of MMP2 assessed with western blot. Similarly, to captopril IW significantly (P<0.05) inhibited ANGI, but not ANGII mediated increase in expression of MMP2, while losartan also blocked effects of ANGII. Signaling pathways regulating MMP2 expression in ECs and SMCs were similarly inhibited after treatment with IW or captopril. In ECs IW significantly (P<0.05) inhibited JNK pathway, whereas in SMCs JAK2/STAT3 pathway, assessed with western blot. In vitro findings were fully consistent with results in isolated rat aorta ex vivo. Moreover, IW not only inhibited the MMP2 expression, but also its activation assessed with gelatin zymography. Our findings demonstrate that IW effectively inhibits expression and activation of MMP2 in rat aorta by decreasing local conversion of ANGI to ANGII. Thus, similar to pharmaceutical ACE inhibitor captopril the dipeptide IW may effectively inhibit ACE activity and prevent the age and hypertension

  19. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Natalia P.; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Salazar, Julio; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Nunez, Marco T.

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  20. Glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibition limits osteoclast activation and myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Adel; Xu, Ke; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Butters, Terry D.; Santo, Ana Espirito; Vattakuzhi, Youridies; Williams, Lynn M.; Goudevenou, Katerina; Danks, Lynett; Freidin, Andrew; Spanoudakis, Emmanouil; Parry, Simon; Papaioannou, Maria; Hatjiharissi, Evdoxia; Chaidos, Aristeidis; Alonzi, Dominic S.; Twigg, Gabriele; Hu, Ming; Dwek, Raymond A.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Roberts, Irene; Dell, Anne; Rahemtulla, Amin; Horwood, Nicole J.; Karadimitris, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are essential constituents of cell membranes and lipid rafts and can modulate signal transduction events. The contribution of GSLs in osteoclast (OC) activation and osteolytic bone diseases in malignancies such as the plasma cell dyscrasia multiple myeloma (MM) is not known. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pathological activation of OCs in MM requires de novo GSL synthesis and is further enhanced by myeloma cell–derived GSLs. Glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitors, including the clinically approved agent N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ), prevented OC development and activation by disrupting RANKL-induced localization of TRAF6 and c-SRC into lipid rafts and preventing nuclear accumulation of transcriptional activator NFATc1. GM3 was the prevailing GSL produced by patient-derived myeloma cells and MM cell lines, and exogenous addition of GM3 synergistically enhanced the ability of the pro-osteoclastogenic factors RANKL and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) to induce osteoclastogenesis in precursors. In WT mice, administration of GM3 increased OC numbers and activity, an effect that was reversed by treatment with NB-DNJ. In a murine MM model, treatment with NB-DNJ markedly improved osteolytic bone disease symptoms. Together, these data demonstrate that both tumor-derived and de novo synthesized GSLs influence osteoclastogenesis and suggest that NB-DNJ may reduce pathological OC activation and bone destruction associated with MM. PMID:25915583

  1. Inhibition of calmodulin - regulated calcium pump activity in rat brain by toxaphene

    SciTech Connect

    Trottman, C.H.; Moorthy, K.S.

    1986-03-05

    In vivo effects of toxaphene on calcium pump activity in rat brain synaptosomes was studied. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with toxaphene at 0,25,50, and 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days and sacrificed 24 h after last dose. Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and /sup 45/Ca uptake were determined in brain P/sub 2/ fraction. Toxaphene inhibited both Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake and the inhibition was dose dependent. Both substrate and Ca/sup 2 +/ activation kinetics of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase indicated non-competitive type of inhibition as evidenced by decreased catalytic velocity but not enzyme-substrate affinity. The inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake were restored to normal level by exogenously added calmodulin which increased both velocity and affinity. The inhibition of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake and restoration by calmodulin suggests that toxaphene may impair active calcium transport mechanisms by decreasing regulator protein calmodulin levels.

  2. NAC selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity: A higher redox homeostasis threshold exists in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengying; Wu, Meilin; Wang, Jing; Sui, Yilun; Liu, Shanlin; Shi, Dongyun

    2016-08-01

    Telomerase activity controls telomere length, and this plays an important role in stem cells, aging and tumors. Antioxidant was shown to protect telomerase activity in normal cells but inhibit that in cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism is elusive. Here we found that 7721 hepatoma cells held a higher redox homeostasis threshold than L02 normal liver cells which caused 7721 cells to have a higher demand for ROS; MnSOD over-expression in 7721 decreased endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibited telomerase activity; Akt phosphorylation inhibitor and NAC both inhibited 7721 telomerase activity. The over-elimination of ROS by NAC resulted in the inhibition of Akt pathway. Our results suggest that ROS is involved in the regulation of cancer telomerase activity through Akt pathway. The different intracellular redox homeostasis and antioxidant system in normal cells and tumor cells may be the cause of the opposite effect on telomerase activity in response to NAC treatment. Our results provide a theoretical base of using antioxidants selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity. Findings of the present study may provide insights into novel approaches for cancer treatment. PMID:26771767

  3. Neurotransmitter-induced inhibition of exocytosis in insulin-secreting beta cells by activation of calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Renström, E; Ding, W G; Bokvist, K; Rorsman, P

    1996-09-01

    Neurotransmitters and hormones such as somatostatin, galanin, and adrenalin reduce insulin secretion. Their inhibitory action involves direct interference with the exocytotic machinery. We have examined the molecular processes underlying this effect using high resolution measurements of cell capacitance. Suppression of exocytosis was maximal at concentrations that did not cause complete inhibition of glucose-stimulated electrical activity. This action was dependent on activation of G proteins but was not associated with inhibition of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents or adenylate cyclase activity. The molecular processes initiated by the agonists culminate in the activation of the Ca(2+)-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, and suppression of the activity of this enzyme abolishes their action on exocytosis. We propose that mechanisms similar to those we report here may contribute to adrenergic and peptidergic inhibition of secretion in other neuroendocrine cells and in nerve terminals. PMID:8816714

  4. DNA intercalation, topoisomerase II inhibition and cytotoxic activity of the plant alkaloid neocryptolepine.

    PubMed

    Bailly, C; Laine, W; Baldeyrou, B; De Pauw-Gillet, M C; Colson, P; Houssier, C; Cimanga, K; Van Miert, S; Vlietinck, A J; Pieters, L

    2000-06-01

    Cryptolepine and neocryptolepine are two indoloquinoline alkaloids isolated from the roots of the African plant Cryptolepis sanguinolenta. Both drugs have revealed antibacterial and antiparasitic activities and are strongly cytotoxic to tumour cells. We have recently shown that cryptolepine can intercalate into DNA and stimulates DNA cleavage by human topoisomerase II. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of action and cytotoxicity of neocryptolepine, which differs from the parent isomer only by the orientation of the indole unit with respect to the quinoline moiety. The biochemical and physicochemical results presented here indicate that neocryptolepine also intercalates into DNA, preferentially at GC-rich sequences, but exhibits a reduced affinity for DNA compared with cryptolepine. The two alkaloids interfere with the catalytic activity of human topoisomerase II but the poisoning activity is slightly more pronounced with cryptolepine than with its isomer. The data provide a molecular basis to account for the reduced cytotoxicity of neocryptolepine compared with the parent drug. PMID:11049087

  5. Selective inhibition of the p38 alternative activation pathway in infiltrating T cells inhibits pancreatic cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Alam, Muhammad S; Gaida, Matthias M; Bergmann, Frank; Lasitschka, Felix; Giese, Thomas; Giese, Nathalia A; Hackert, Thilo; Hinz, Ulf; Hussain, S Perwez; Kozlov, Serguei V; Ashwell, Jonathan D

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive neoplasm characterized by a marked fibro-inflammatory microenvironment, the presence of which can promote both cancer induction and growth. Therefore, selective manipulation of local cytokines is an attractive, although unrealized, therapeutic approach. T cells possess a unique mechanism of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation downstream of T cell receptor (TCR) engagement through the phosphorylation of Tyr323 (pY323). This alternative p38 activation pathway is required for pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Here we show in human PDAC that a high percentage of infiltrating pY323(+) T cells was associated with large numbers of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α- and interleukin (IL)-17-producing CD4(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and aggressive disease. The growth of mouse pancreatic tumors was inhibited by genetic ablation of the alternative p38 pathway, and transfer of wild-type CD4(+) T cells, but not those lacking the alternative pathway, enhanced tumor growth in T cell-deficient mice. Notably, a plasma membrane-permeable peptide derived from GADD45-α, the naturally occurring inhibitor of p38 pY323(+) (ref. 7), reduced CD4(+) TIL production of TNF-α, IL-17A, IL-10 and secondary cytokines, halted growth of implanted tumors and inhibited progression of spontaneous KRAS-driven adenocarcinoma in mice. Thus, TCR-mediated activation of CD4(+) TILs results in alternative p38 activation and production of protumorigenic factors and can be targeted for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26479921

  6. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Carmen E.; Méndez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25386117

  7. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Flores, Carmen E; Méndez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25386117

  8. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, André M; Figueiredo, Duarte D; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Quail, Peter H; Margarida Oliveira, M; Saibo, Nelson J M

    2016-02-01

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a yeast one-hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein-DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a phytochrome interacting factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. All together, these results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses. PMID:26732823

  9. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of Phytochrome B

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, André M.; Figueiredo, Duarte D.; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A.; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B.F.; Quail, Peter H.; Oliveira, M. Margarida; Saibo, Nelson J. M.

    2016-01-01

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a Yeast one Hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein-DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a Phytochrome Interacting Factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. All together, these results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses. PMID:26732823

  10. RKIP Inhibits Local Breast Cancer Invasion by Antagonizing the Transcriptional Activation of MMP13

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiaoliang; Lewandowski, John; Yeung, Miranda; Ren, Gang; Aras, Shweta; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Cui, Hongjuan; Trumbly, Robert; Arudra, Sri Krishna Chaitanya; De Las Casas, Luis E.; de la Serna, Ivana; Bitar, Milad S.; Yeung, Kam C.

    2015-01-01

    Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein or RKIP was initially identified as a Raf-1 binding protein using the yeast 2-hybrid screen. RKIP inhibits the activation phosphorylation of MEK by Raf-1 by competitively inhibiting the binding of MEK to Raf-1 and thus exerting an inhibitory effect on the Raf-MEK-Erk pathway. RKIP has been identified as a metastasis suppressor gene. Expression of RKIP is low in cancer metastases. Although primary tumor growth remains unaffected, re- expression of RKIP inhibits cancer metastasis. Mechanistically, RKIP constrains metastasis by inhibiting angiogenesis, local invasion, intravasation, and colonization. The molecular mechanism of how RKIP inhibits these individual steps remains undefined. In our present study, using an unbiased PCR based screening and by analyzing DNA microarray expression datasets we observe that the expression of multiple metalloproteases (MMPs) including MMP1, MMP3, MMP10 and MMP13 are negatively correlated with RKIP expression in breast cancer cell lines and clinical samples. Since expression of MMPs by cancer cells is important for cancer metastasis, we hypothesize that RKIP may mediate suppression of breast cancer metastasis by inhibiting multiple MMPs. We show that the expression signature of RKIP and MMPs is better at predicting high metastatic risk than the individual gene. Using a combination of loss- and gain-of-function approaches, we find that MMP13 is the cause of RKIP-mediated inhibition of local cancer invasion. Interestingly expression of MMP13 alone is not sufficient to reverse the inhibition of breast cancer cell metastasis to the lung due to the expression of RKIP. We find that RKIP negatively regulates MMP13 through the Erk2 signaling pathway and the repression of MMP13 by RKIP is transcription factor AP-1 independent. Together, our findings indicate that RKIP inhibits cancer cell invasion, in part, via MMP13 inhibition. These data also implicate RKIP in the regulation of MMP transcription, suggesting a

  11. Inhibition of inflammasome activation by Coxiella burnetii type IV secretion system effector IcaA

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Larissa D.; Ribeiro, Juliana M.; Fernandes, Talita D.; Massis, Liliana M.; Khoo, Chen Ai; Moffatt, Jennifer H.; Newton, Hayley J.; Roy, Craig R.; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2015-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a highly infectious bacterium that promotes its own replication in macrophages by inhibiting several host cell responses. Here, we show that C. burnetii inhibits caspase-1 activation in primary mouse macrophages. By using co-infection experiments, we determine that the infection of macrophages with C. burnetii inhibits the caspase-11-mediated non-canonical activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome induced by subsequent infection with Escherichia coli or Legionella pneumophila. Genetic screening using flagellin mutants of L. pneumophila as a surrogate host, reveals a novel C. burnetii gene (IcaA) involved in the inhibition of caspase activation. Expression of IcaA in L. pneumophila inhibited the caspase-11 activation in macrophages. Moreover, icaA- mutants of C. burnetii failed to suppress the caspase-11-mediated inflammasome activation induced by L. pneumophila. Our data reveal IcaA as a novel C. burnetii effector protein that is secreted by the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system and interferes with the caspase-11-induced, non-canonical activation of the inflammasome. PMID:26687278

  12. Inhibition of Rho A activity causes pemphigus skin blistering

    PubMed Central

    Waschke, Jens; Spindler, Volker; Bruggeman, Paola; Zillikens, Detlef; Schmidt, Gudula; Drenckhahn, Detlev

    2006-01-01

    The autoimmune blistering skin diseases pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus (PF) are mainly caused by autoantibodies against desmosomal cadherins. In this study, we provide evidence that PV–immunoglobulin G (IgG) and PF-IgG induce skin blistering by interference with Rho A signaling. In vitro, pemphigus IgG caused typical hallmarks of pemphigus pathogenesis such as epidermal blistering in human skin, cell dissociation, and loss of desmoglein 1 (Dsg 1)–mediated binding probed by laser tweezers. These changes were accompanied by interference with Rho A activation and reduction of Rho A activity. Pemphigus IgG–triggered keratinocyte dissociation and Rho A inactivation were p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase dependent. Specific activation of Rho A by cytotoxic necrotizing factor-y abolished all pemphigus-triggered effects, including keratin retraction and release of Dsg 3 from the cytoskeleton. These data demonstrate that Rho A is involved in the regulation of desmosomal adhesion, at least in part by maintaining the cytoskeletal anchorage of desmosomal proteins. This may open the possibility of pemphigus treatment with the epidermal application of Rho A agonists. PMID:17130286

  13. Cyanogenesis Inhibits Active Defense Reactions in Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Lieberei, Reinhard; Biehl, Böle; Giesemann, Anette; Junqueira, Nilton T. V.

    1989-01-01

    In the course of fungal attack on the cyanogenic rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell.-Arg.) HCN is liberated from infected tissue. The HCN interferes with plant host and fungal pathogen. It becomes inhibitory to active defense responses which are dependent on biosynthetic processes as far as a threshold concentration is transgressed. PMID:16666758

  14. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, potently inhibits melanoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xueqing; Jiang, Fangzhen; Bao, Qi; Qian, Huan; Fang, Quan; Shao, Zheren

    2016-01-01

    It is vital to develop new therapeutic agents for the treatment of melanoma. In the current study, we studied the potential effect of Compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, in melanoma cells. We showed that C13 exerted mainly cytostatic, but not cytotoxic activities in melanoma cells. C13 potently inhibited proliferation in melanoma cell lines (A375, OCM-1 and B16), but not in B10BR melanocytes. Meanwhile, the AMPK activator inhibited melanoma cell cycle progression by inducing G1-S arrest. Significantly, we failed to detect significant melanoma cell death or apoptosis after the C13 treatment. For the mechanism study, we showed that C13 activated AMPK and inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in melanoma cells through interaction with the α1 subunit. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of AMPKα1 not only blocked C13-mediated AMPK activation but also abolished its antiproliferative activity against melanoma cells. Together, these results show that C13 inhibits melanoma cell proliferation through activating AMPK signaling. Our data suggest that C13 along with other small molecular AMPK activators may be beneficial for patients with melanoma. PMID:26271666

  15. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs. PMID:26407233

  16. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-12

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs. PMID:26407233

  17. 15 CFR 700.14 - Preferential scheduling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Industrial Priorities § 700.14 Preferential scheduling. (a)...

  18. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone release by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, L.A.; Yasumoto, T.; Aurbach, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, a toxin derived from a marine dinoflagellate, is a potent activator of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. To further test the hypothesis that inhibition of PTH secretion by calcium is mediated via a calcium channel we studied the effect of maitotoxin on dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Maitotoxin inhibited PTH release in a dose-dependent fashion, and inhibition was maximal at 1 ng/ml. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA blocked the inhibition of PTH by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin enhanced the effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and increased the rate of radiocalcium uptake in parathyroid cells. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that interacts with calcium channels in the parathyroid cell, did not affect the inhibition of PTH secretion by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin, by its action on calcium channels allows entry of extracellular calcium and inhibits PTH release. Our results suggest that calcium channels are involved in the release of PTH. Inhibition of PTH release by maitotoxin is not sensitive to pertussis toxin, suggesting that maitotoxin may act distal to the site interacting with a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, or maitotoxin could interact with other ions or second messengers to inhibit PTH release.

  19. Inhibited Ru(bpy)3 2+ electrochemiluminescence related to electrochemical oxidation activity of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yuwu; Dong, Yongqiang; Chen, Guonan

    2007-06-15

    Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) has been accepted by the analytical chemist as a powerful tool for detection of many inorganic and organic compounds. Ru(bpy)3 2+ has been the most popular ECL system, and many investigations have been focused on the application based on the enhancement or inhibition of Ru(bpy)3 2+ ECL system. However, not much attention has been paid to the theoretical investigation of this ECL system, especially to the inhibiting mechanism for the Ru(bpy)3 2+ ECL system. In the present study, many of the inorganic and organic compounds with electrochemical oxidation activity were found to strongly inhibit Ru(bpy)3 2+ ECL. To explain these inhibited ECL phenomena, a new "electrochemical oxidation inhibiting" mechanism has been proposed via the establishment of a corresponding model. The effects of applied potential, uncompensated resistance, and concentration of inhibitor on the inhibited ECL derived from the model have been verified by experiments. The new ECL inhibition mechanism can be commonly used to explain many kinds of inhibited ECL presently observed, and it is envisioned to result in finding of more inhibitors of this type and establishment of new sensitive ECL detection methods for them. PMID:17489558

  20. Structural basis of specific inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activators inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lihu; Liu, Min; Zeng, Tu; Shi, Xiaoli; Yuan, Cai; Andreasen, Peter A.; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death worldwide [1]. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is the FDA-approved thrombolytic drug for ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. tPA is a multi-domain serine protease of the trypsin-family [2] and catalyses the critical step in fibrinolysis [3], converting the zymogen plasminogen to the active serine protease plasmin, which degrades the fibrin network of thrombi and blood clots. tPA is rapidly inactivated by endogenous plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) [4] (Fig. 1). Engineering on tPA to reduce its inhibition by PAI-1 without compromising its thrombolytic effect is a continuous effort [5]. Tenecteplase (TNK-tPA) is a newer generation of tPA variant showing slower inhibition by PAI-1 [6]. Extensive studies to understand the molecular interactions between tPA and PAI-1 have been carried out [7], [8], [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15], [16], [17], [18], however, the precise details at atomic resolution remain unknown. We report the crystal structure of tPA·PAI-1 complex here. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1) recombinant expression and purification of a PAI-1 variant (14-1B) containing four mutations (N150H, K154T, Q319L, and M354I), and a tPA serine protease domain (tPA-SPD) variant with three mutations (C122A, N173Q, and S195A, in the chymotrypsin numbering) [19]; (2) formation of a tPA-SPD·PAI-1 Michaëlis complex in vitro [19]; and (3) solving the three-dimensional structure for this complex by X-ray crystallography [deposited in the PDB database as 5BRR]. The data explain the specificity of PAI-1 for tPA and uPA [19], [20], and provide structural basis to design newer generation of PAI-1-resistant tPA variants as thrombolytic agents [19]. PMID:26909366

  1. Structural basis of specific inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activators inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lihu; Liu, Min; Zeng, Tu; Shi, Xiaoli; Yuan, Cai; Andreasen, Peter A; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-03-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death worldwide [1]. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is the FDA-approved thrombolytic drug for ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. tPA is a multi-domain serine protease of the trypsin-family [2] and catalyses the critical step in fibrinolysis [3], converting the zymogen plasminogen to the active serine protease plasmin, which degrades the fibrin network of thrombi and blood clots. tPA is rapidly inactivated by endogenous plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) [4] (Fig. 1). Engineering on tPA to reduce its inhibition by PAI-1 without compromising its thrombolytic effect is a continuous effort [5]. Tenecteplase (TNK-tPA) is a newer generation of tPA variant showing slower inhibition by PAI-1 [6]. Extensive studies to understand the molecular interactions between tPA and PAI-1 have been carried out [7], [8], [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15], [16], [17], [18], however, the precise details at atomic resolution remain unknown. We report the crystal structure of tPA·PAI-1 complex here. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1) recombinant expression and purification of a PAI-1 variant (14-1B) containing four mutations (N150H, K154T, Q319L, and M354I), and a tPA serine protease domain (tPA-SPD) variant with three mutations (C122A, N173Q, and S195A, in the chymotrypsin numbering) [19]; (2) formation of a tPA-SPD·PAI-1 Michaëlis complex in vitro [19]; and (3) solving the three-dimensional structure for this complex by X-ray crystallography [deposited in the PDB database as 5BRR]. The data explain the specificity of PAI-1 for tPA and uPA [19], [20], and provide structural basis to design newer generation of PAI-1-resistant tPA variants as thrombolytic agents [19]. PMID:26909366

  2. Characterization and Antioxidant Properties of Six Algerian Propolis Extracts: Ethyl Acetate Extracts Inhibit Myeloperoxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Boufadi, Yasmina Mokhtaria; Soubhye, Jalal; Riazi, Ali; Rousseau, Alexandre; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Nève, Jean; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Van Antwerpen, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Because propolis contains many types of antioxidant compounds such as polyphenols and flavonoids, it can be useful in preventing oxidative damages. Ethyl acetate extracts of propolis from several Algerian regions show high activity by scavenging free radicals, preventing lipid peroxidation and inhibiting myeloperoxidase (MPO). By fractioning and assaying ethyl acetate extracts, it was observed that both polyphenols and flavonoids contribute to these activities. A correlation was observed between the polyphenol content and the MPO inhibition. However, it seems that kaempferol, a flavonoid, contributes mainly to the MPO inhibition. This molecule is in a high amount in the ethyl acetate extract and demonstrates the best efficiency towards the enzyme with an inhibiting concentration at 50% of 4 ± 2 μM. PMID:24514562

  3. Characterization and antioxidant properties of six Algerian propolis extracts: ethyl acetate extracts inhibit myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Boufadi, Yasmina Mokhtaria; Soubhye, Jalal; Riazi, Ali; Rousseau, Alexandre; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Nève, Jean; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Van Antwerpen, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Because propolis contains many types of antioxidant compounds such as polyphenols and flavonoids, it can be useful in preventing oxidative damages. Ethyl acetate extracts of propolis from several Algerian regions show high activity by scavenging free radicals, preventing lipid peroxidation and inhibiting myeloperoxidase (MPO). By fractioning and assaying ethyl acetate extracts, it was observed that both polyphenols and flavonoids contribute to these activities. A correlation was observed between the polyphenol content and the MPO inhibition. However, it seems that kaempferol, a flavonoid, contributes mainly to the MPO inhibition. This molecule is in a high amount in the ethyl acetate extract and demonstrates the best efficiency towards the enzyme with an inhibiting concentration at 50% of 4 ± 2 µM. PMID:24514562

  4. ACE inhibition reduces infarction in normotensive but not hypertensive rats: correlation with cortical ACE activity

    PubMed Central

    Porritt, Michelle J; Chen, Michelle; Rewell, Sarah S J; Dean, Rachael G; Burrell, Louise M; Howells, David W

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition can reduce stroke risk by up to 43% in humans and reduce the associated disability, and hence understanding the mechanism of improvement is important. In animals and humans, these effects may be independent of the blood pressure-lowering effects of ACE inhibition. Normotensive (Wistar–Kyoto (WKY)) and hypertensive (spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)) animals were treated with the ACE inhibitors ramipril or lisinopril for 7 or 42 days before 2 hours of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Blood pressure, serum ACE, and blood glucose levels were measured and stroke infarct volume was recorded 24 hours after stroke. Despite greater reductions in blood pressure, infarct size was not improved by ACE inhibition in hypertensive animals. Short-term ACE inhibition produced only a modest reduction in blood pressure, but WKY rats showed marked reductions in infarct volume. Long-term ACE inhibition had additional reductions in blood pressure; however, infarct volumes in WKY rats did not improve further but worsened. WKY rats differed from SHR in having marked cortical ACE activity that was highly sensitive to ACE inhibition. The beneficial effects of ACE inhibition on infarct volume in normotensive rats do not correlate with changes in blood pressure. However, WKY rats have ACE inhibitor-sensitive cortical ACE activity that is lacking in the SHR. PMID:20407464

  5. Annexin V inhibits protein kinase C activity via a mechanism of phospholipid sequestration.

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, T; Mira, J P; Feliers, D; Solito, E; Russo-Marie, F; Oudinet, J P

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the role of annexin V, a Ca2+-dependent phospholipid-binding protein, as a regulator of protein kinase C (PKC) and characterized its mechanism of inhibition. Several mutants obtained by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis were tested in vitro on PKC activity in cytosolic fractions from Jurkat cells and on purified PKCalpha. Annexin V inhibited phosphorylation of annexin II by endogenous PKC and phosphorylation of myelin basic protein by PKCalpha. In both systems, the use of single Ca2+-binding-site mutants of annexin V led to a partial reversal of inhibition, and the Ca2+-binding site located in the first domain of annexin V was found to have the most important role. An increase in the number of mutated Ca2+-binding sites led to a greater loss of inhibition. These results corroborated those showing the progressive loss of binding of these mutants to phospholipid liposomes. In conclusion, we show that PKC inhibition by annexin V is the consequence of a mechanism involving phospholipid sequestration by annexin V, and that the Ca2+-binding site located in domain 1 of annexin V plays a predominant role in this process. In addition, we show that the R122AIK site, which may act analogously to a PKC-inhibitory pseudosubstrate site, is not involved in PKC inhibition, and that a peptide corresponding to the C-terminal tail of annexin V inhibits PKC activity but to a lesser extent than annexin V itself. PMID:9494097

  6. Regulation of ERK1/2 activity upon contact inhibition in fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kueppers, Monika; Faust, Dagmar; Linz, Berenike; Dietrich, Cornelia

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Regulation of ERK1/2 activity upon contact inhibition was investigated. {yields} Upstream activation of ERK is attenuated upon contact inhibition. {yields} ERK phosphatases are probably not involved in ERK1/2 dephosphorylation. {yields} Signaling of the EGFR and PDGFR is differentially inhibited upon contact inhibition. -- Abstract: Contact inhibition is a crucial mechanism regulating proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Despite its generally accepted importance for maintaining tissue homeostasis knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms of contact inhibition is still scarce. Since the MAPK ERK1/2 plays a pivotal role in the control of proliferation, we investigated regulation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation which is downregulated in confluent NIH3T3 cultures. We found a decrease in upstream signaling including phosphorylation of the growth factor receptor adaptor protein ShcA and the MAPK kinase MEK1/2 in confluent compared to exponentially growing cultures whereas involvement of ERK1/2 phosphatases in ERK1/2 inactivation is unlikely. Treatment of confluent, serum-deprived cultures with PDGF-B resulted in similar phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and induction of DNA-synthesis as detected in sparse, serum-deprived cultures. In contrast, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and DNA-synthesis could not be stimulated in confluent, serum-deprived cultures exposed to EGF. Our data indicate that PDGFR- and EGFR signaling are differentially inhibited in confluent cultures of NIH3T3 cells.

  7. Selective inhibition of the p38 alternative activation pathway in infiltrating T cells inhibits pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Muhammad S.; Gaida, Matthias M.; Bergmann, Frank; Lasitschka, Felix; Giese, Thomas; Giese, Nathalia A.; Hackert, Thilo; Hinz, Ulf; Hussain, S. Perwez; Kozlov, Serguei V.; Ashwell, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive neoplasm characterized by a marked fibro-inflammatory microenvironment1, the presence of which can promote both cancer induction and growth2–4. Therefore, selective manipulation of local cytokines is an attractive if unrealized therapeutic approach. T cells possess a unique mechanism of activation of p38 MAPK downstream of T cell receptor (TCR) engagement by phosphorylation of Tyr-323 (pY323). This alternative p38 activation pathway is required for pro-inflammatory cytokine production5,6. Here we show in human PDAC that a high percentage of infiltrating pY323+ T cells was associated with large numbers of TNFα and IL-17-producing CD4+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and aggressive disease. The growth of murine pancreatic tumors was inhibited by genetic ablation of the alternative p38 pathway, and transfer of wild type CD4+ T cells but not those lacking the alternative pathway enhanced tumor growth in T cell-deficient mice. Strikingly, a plasma membrane-permeable peptide derived from Gadd45α, the naturally-occurring inhibitor of p38 pY323+ (ref. 7), reduced CD4+ TIL production of TNFα, IL-17A, IL-10, and secondary cytokines, halted growth of implanted tumors, and inhibited progression of spontaneous K-ras-driven adenocarcinoma in mice. Thus, TCR-mediated activation of CD4+ TIL results in alternative p38 activation and production of pro-tumorigenic factors, and can be targeted for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26479921

  8. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of propolis, inhibits Helicobacter pylori peptide deformylase activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Kunqiang; Lu, Weiqiang; Zhu, Lili; Shen, Xu; Huang, Jin

    2013-05-31

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major causative factor for gastrointestinal illnesses, H. pylori peptide deformylase (HpPDF) catalyzes the removal of formyl group from the N-terminus of nascent polypeptide chains, which is essential for H. pylori survival and is considered as a promising drug target for anti-H. pylori therapy. Propolis, a natural antibiotic from honeybees, is reported to have an inhibitory effect on the growth of H. pylori in vitro. In addition, previous studies suggest that the main active constituents in the propolis are phenolic compounds. Therefore, we evaluated a collection of phenolic compounds derived from propolis for enzyme inhibition against HpPDF. Our study results show that Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), one of the main medicinal components of propolis, is a competitive inhibitor against HpPDF, with an IC50 value of 4.02 μM. Furthermore, absorption spectra and crystal structural characterization revealed that different from most well known PDF inhibitors, CAPE block the substrate entrance, preventing substrate from approaching the active site, but CAPE does not have chelate interaction with HpPDF and does not disrupt the metal-dependent catalysis. Our study provides valuable information for understanding the potential anti-H. pylori mechanism of propolis, and CAPE could be served as a lead compound for further anti-H. pylori drug discovery. PMID:23611786

  9. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity.

    PubMed

    Stasiak, Marta; Boncela, Joanna; Perreau, Corinne; Karamanou, Konstantina; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Proult, Isabelle; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Chakravarti, Shukti; Maquart, François-Xavier; Kowalska, M Anna; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1) melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:26930497

  10. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stasiak, Marta; Boncela, Joanna; Perreau, Corinne; Karamanou, Konstantina; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Proult, Isabelle; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Chakravarti, Shukti; Maquart, François-Xavier; Kowalska, M. Anna; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1) melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:26930497

  11. Individual strains of Lactobacillus paracasei differentially inhibit human basophil and mouse mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cassard, Lydie; Lalanne, Ana Inés; Garault, Peggy; Cotillard, Aurélie; Chervaux, Christian; Wels, Michiel; Smokvina, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The microbiota controls a variety of biological functions, including immunity, and alterations of the microbiota in early life are associated with a higher risk of developing allergies later in life. Several probiotic bacteria, and particularly lactic acid bacteria, were described to reduce both the induction of allergic responses and allergic manifestations. Although specific probiotic strains were used in these studies, their protective effects on allergic responses also might be common for all lactobacilli. Methods To determine whether allergic effector cells inhibition is a common feature of lactobacilli or whether it varies among lactobacilli strains, we compared the ability of 40 strains of the same Lactobacillus paracasei species to inhibit IgE‐dependent mouse mast cell and human basophil activation. Results We uncovered a marked heterogeneity in the inhibitory properties of the 40 Lactobacillus strains tested. These segregated into three to four clusters depending on the intensity of inhibition. Some strains inhibited both mouse mast cell and human basophil activation, others strains inhibited only one cell type and another group induced no inhibition of activation for either cell type. Conclusions Individual Lactobacillus strains of the same species differentially inhibit IgE‐dependent activation of mouse mast cells and human basophils, two cell types that are critical in the onset of allergic manifestations. Although we failed to identify specific bacterial genes associated with inhibition by gene‐trait matching analysis, our findings demonstrate the complexity of the interactions between the microbiota and the host. These results suggest that some L. paracasei strains might be more beneficial in allergies than others strains and provide the bases for a rational screening of lactic acid bacteria strains as next‐generation probiotics in the field of allergy. PMID:27621812

  12. Inhibition of peptidoglycan hydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro by energy uncouplers in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rodionov, D G; Ishiguro, E E

    1996-01-01

    The effects of energy uncouplers on in vivo and in vitro peptidoglycan hydrolase activities in Escherichia coli were determined. Sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone all inhibited ampicillin-induced lysis of exponential phase cultures, even when they were added to lysis-committed cultures. These energy uncouplers also inhibited the solubilization of radiolabeled peptidoglycan by bacterial suspensions that had been treated with 5% trichloroacetic acid by the method of Hartmann et al.3 to activate the peptidoglycan hydrolases. Therefore, the in vivo and in vitro activities of peptidoglycan hydrolases in E. coli are dependent on membrane energization. PMID:9158735

  13. Simvastatin Inhibits Glucose Metabolism and Legumain Activity in Human Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert; Solberg, Rigmor; Jacobsen, Linn Løkken; Voreland, Anette Larsen; Rustan, Arild Christian; Thoresen, G. Hege; Johansen, Harald Thidemann

    2014-01-01

    Simvastatin, a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, is prescribed worldwide to patients with hypercholesterolemia. Although simvastatin is well tolerated, side effects like myotoxicity are reported. The mechanism for statin-induced myotoxicity is still poorly understood. Reports have suggested impaired mitochondrial dysfunction as a contributor to the observed myotoxicity. In this regard, we wanted to study the effects of simvastatin on glucose metabolism and the activity of legumain, a cysteine protease. Legumain, being the only known asparaginyl endopeptidase, has caspase-like properties and is described to be involved in apoptosis. Recent evidences indicate a regulatory role of both glucose and statins on cysteine proteases in monocytes. Satellite cells were isolated from the Musculus obliquus internus abdominis of healthy human donors, proliferated and differentiated into polynuclear myotubes. Simvastatin with or without mevalonolactone, farnesyl pyrophosphate or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate were introduced on day 5 of differentiation. After 48 h, cells were either harvested for immunoblotting, ELISA, cell viability assay, confocal imaging or enzyme activity analysis, or placed in a fuel handling system with [14C]glucose or [3H]deoxyglucose for uptake and oxidation studies. A dose-dependent decrease in both glucose uptake and oxidation were observed in mature myotubes after exposure to simvastatin in concentrations not influencing cell viability. In addition, simvastatin caused a decrease in maturation and activity of legumain. Dysregulation of glucose metabolism and decreased legumain activity by simvastatin points out new knowledge about the effects of statins on skeletal muscle, and may contribute to the understanding of the myotoxicity observed by statins. PMID:24416446

  14. Rapid Feedforward Inhibition and Asynchronous Excitation Regulate Granule Cell Activity in the Mammalian Main Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Shawn D.

    2015-01-01

    Granule cell-mediated inhibition is critical to patterning principal neuron activity in the olfactory bulb, and perturbation of synaptic input to granule cells significantly alters olfactory-guided behavior. Despite the critical role of granule cells in olfaction, little is known about how sensory input recruits granule cells. Here, we combined whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in acute mouse olfactory bulb slices with biophysical multicompartmental modeling to investigate the synaptic basis of granule cell recruitment. Physiological activation of sensory afferents within single glomeruli evoked diverse modes of granule cell activity, including subthreshold depolarization, spikelets, and suprathreshold responses with widely distributed spike latencies. The generation of these diverse activity modes depended, in part, on the asynchronous time course of synaptic excitation onto granule cells, which lasted several hundred milliseconds. In addition to asynchronous excitation, each granule cell also received synchronous feedforward inhibition. This inhibition targeted both proximal somatodendritic and distal apical dendritic domains of granule cells, was reliably recruited across sniff rhythms, and scaled in strength with excitation as more glomeruli were activated. Feedforward inhibition onto granule cells originated from deep short-axon cells, which responded to glomerular activation with highly reliable, short-latency firing consistent with tufted cell-mediated excitation. Simulations showed that feedforward inhibition interacts with asynchronous excitation to broaden granule cell spike latency distributions and significantly attenuates granule cell depolarization within local subcellular compartments. Collectively, our results thus identify feedforward inhibition onto granule cells as a core feature of olfactory bulb circuitry and establish asynchronous excitation and feedforward inhibition as critical regulators of granule cell activity. SIGNIFICANCE

  15. Antioxidant Activities and Inhibition of Cancer Cell Proliferation in Wild Strawberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit extracts from seventeen representatives of three species of strawberries (Fragaria virginiana Mill., F. chiloensis (L.) Mill., and F. x ananassa Duchesne ex Rozier) were tested for activities against free radicals, the activities of antioxidant enzymes and the ability to inhibit proliferation...

  16. A caspase active site probe reveals high fractional inhibition needed to block DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Méthot, Nathalie; Vaillancourt, John P; Huang, JingQi; Colucci, John; Han, Yongxin; Ménard, Stéphane; Zamboni, Robert; Toulmond, Sylvie; Nicholson, Donald W; Roy, Sophie

    2004-07-01

    Apoptotic markers consist of either caspase substrate cleavage products or phenotypic changes that manifest themselves as a consequence of caspase-mediated substrate cleavage. We have shown recently that pharmacological inhibitors of caspase activity prevent the appearance of two such apoptotic manifestations, alphaII-spectrin cleavage and DNA fragmentation, but that blockade of the latter required a significantly higher concentration of inhibitor. We investigated this phenomenon through the use of a novel radiolabeled caspase inhibitor, [(125)I]M808, which acts as a caspase active site probe. [(125)I]M808 bound to active caspases irreversibly and with high sensitivity in apoptotic cell extracts, in tissue extracts from several commonly used animal models of cellular injury, and in living cells. Moreover, [(125)I]M808 detected active caspases in septic mice when injected intravenously. Using this caspase probe, an active site occupancy assay was developed and used to measure the fractional inhibition required to block apoptosis-induced DNA fragmentation. In thymocytes, occupancy of up to 40% of caspase active sites had no effect on DNA fragmentation, whereas inhibition of half of the DNA cleaving activity required between 65 and 75% of active site occupancy. These results suggest that a high and persistent fractional inhibition will be required for successful caspase inhibition-based therapies. PMID:15067000

  17. In Vitro α-Amylase Inhibition and Antioxidant Activities of Methanolic Extract of Amaranthus Caudatus Linn

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok; Khan, Saleemulla

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The present study was aimed to investigate the α-amylase inhibition and antioxidant activities of methanolic extract of Amaranthus caudatus Linn (MeAc). Methods Methanolic extract of Amaranthus caudatus was screened for α-amylase inhibition activity by CNPG3 method (2-chloro-p-nitrophenyl-α-D-maltotrioside) and antioxidant activity was evaluated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazile (DPPH) free radical scavenging, superoxide dismutase (SOD) scavenging, hydroxyl free radical scavenging, nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging, and 2.2’-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazole-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging assays. MeAc was also screened for non enzymatic hemoglycosylation. Results The methanolic extract of Amaranthus caudatus showed potent α-amylase inhibition activity (IC50 19.233 µg/ml). MeAc showed significant antioxidant activity in all the in vitro antioxidant models. Furthermore, the MeAc was found to be extremely effective in scavenging ABTS radical activity (IC50 48.75±1.1 µg/ml) when compared to DPPH (IC50 77.5±0.4 µg/ml), SOD (IC50 62.5±2.1 µg/ml), hydroxyl (IC50 88.50±1.8 µg/ml) and NO (IC50 67.5±2.2 µg/ml) scavenging activity. Conclusions The methanolic extract of A. caudatus showed potent α-amylase inhibition and antioxidant activities. PMID:22043408

  18. Thiolactomycin inhibits D-aspartate oxidase: a novel approach to probing the active site environment.

    PubMed

    Katane, Masumi; Saitoh, Yasuaki; Hanai, Toshihiko; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Nakagome, Izumi; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Hirono, Shuichi; Homma, Hiroshi

    2010-10-01

    D-Aspartate oxidase (DDO) and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) are flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-containing flavoproteins that catalyze the oxidative deamination of D-amino acids. While several functionally and structurally important amino acid residues have been identified in the DAO protein, little is known about the structure-function relationships of DDO. In the search for a potent DDO inhibitor as a novel tool for investigating its structure-function relationships, a large number of biologically active compounds of microbial origin were screened for their ability to inhibit the enzymatic activity of mouse DDO. We discovered several compounds that inhibited the activity of mouse DDO, and one of the compounds identified, thiolactomycin (TLM), was then characterized and evaluated as a novel DDO inhibitor. TLM reversibly inhibited the activity of mouse DDO with a mixed type of inhibition more efficiently than meso-tartrate and malonate, known competitive inhibitors of mammalian DDOs. The selectivity of TLM was investigated using various DDOs and DAOs, and it was found that TLM inhibits not only DDO, but also DAO. Further experiments with apoenzymes of DDO and DAO revealed that TLM is most likely to inhibit the activities of DDO and DAO by competition with both the substrate and the coenzyme, FAD. Structural models of mouse DDO/TLM complexes supported this finding. The binding mode of TLM to DDO was validated further by site-directed mutagenesis of an active site residue, Arg-237. Collectively, our findings show that TLM is a novel, active site-directed DDO inhibitor that will be useful for elucidating the molecular details of the active site environment of DDO. PMID:20603179

  19. Biochemical characterization of chitin synthase activity and inhibition in the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Yan Zhu, Kun

    2013-04-01

    Chitin synthase (CHS) is an important enzyme catalyzing the formation of chitin polymers in all chitin containing organisms and a potential target site for insect pest control. However, our understanding of biochemical properties of insect CHSs has been very limited. We here report enzymatic and inhibitory properties of CHS prepared from the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Our study, which represents the first time to use a nonradioactive method to assay CHS activity in an insect species, determined the optimal conditions for measuring the enzyme activity, including pH, temperature, and concentrations of the substrate uridine diphosphate N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) and Mg(++) . The optimal pH was about 6.5-7.0, and the highest activity was detected at temperatures between 37°C and 44°C. Dithithreitol is required to prevent melanization of the enzyme extract. CHS activity was enhanced at low concentration of GlcNAc, but inhibited at high concentrations. Proteolytic activation of the activity is significant both in the 500 ×g supernatant and the 40 000 ×g pellet. Our study revealed only slight in vitro inhibition of A. gambiae CHS activity by diflubenzuron and nikkomycin Z at the highest concentration (2.5 μmol/L) examined. There was no in vitro inhibition by polyoxin D at any concentration examined. Furthermore, we did not observe any in vivo inhibition of CHS activity by any of these chemicals at any concentration examined. Our results suggest that the inhibition of chitin synthesis by these chemicals is not due to direct inhibition of CHS in A. gambiae. PMID:23955856

  20. Cardamonin Inhibits Metastasis of Lewis Lung Carcinoma Cells by Decreasing mTOR Activity

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Pei-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Xuan; Shi, Dao-Hua; Liu, Ying; Chen, Yao-Yao; Deng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates the motility and invasion of cancer cells. Cardamonin is a chalcone that exhibits anti-tumor activity. The previous study had proved that the anti-tumor effect of cardamonin was associated with mTOR inhibition. In the present study, the anti-metastatic effect of cardamonin and its underlying molecule mechanisms were investigated on the highly metastatic Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. The proliferation, invasion and migration of LLC cells were measured by MTT, transwell and wound healing assays, respectively. The expression and activation of mTOR- and adhesion-related proteins were assessed by Western blotting. The in vivo effect of cardamonin on the metastasis of the LLC cells was investigated by a mouse model. Treated with cardamonin, the proliferation, invasion and migration of LLC cells were significantly inhibited. The expression of Snail was decreased by cardamonin, while that of E-cadherin was increased. In addition, cardamonin inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream target ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). Furthermore, the tumor growth and its lung metastasis were inhibited by cardamonin in C57BL/6 mice. It indicated that cardamonin inhibited the invasion and metastasis of LLC cells through inhibiting mTOR. The metastasis inhibitory effect of cardamonin was correlated with down-regulation of Snail and up-regulation of E-cadherin. PMID:25996501

  1. Potentiation of tonic GABAergic inhibition by activation of postsynaptic kainate receptors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Kang, D; Kang, J

    2015-07-01

    Presynaptic kainate-type glutamate ionotropic receptors (KARs) that mediate either the depression or the facilitation of GABA release have been intensively studied. Little attention has been given to the modulation of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) by postsynaptic KARs. Recent studies suggest that two GABAAR populations, synaptic (sGABAAR) and extrasynaptic (eGABAAR) GABAARs, mediate phasic and tonic forms of inhibition, respectively. Tonic inhibition plays an important role in the excitability of neuronal circuits and the occurrence of epileptic seizures. For this study, we are the first to report that the activation of postsynaptic KARs by the KAR agonist, Kainic acid (KA, 5 μM), enhanced tonic inhibition by potentiating eGABAARs. KA enhanced THIP-induced eGABAAR currents and prolonged the rise and decay time of muscimol-induced sGABAAR/eGABAAR currents, but also depressed the amplitude of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), unitary IPSCs (uIPSCs), and muscimol-induced sGABAAR/eGABAAR currents. The PKC inhibitor, staurosporine (1 μM), in the patch pipette solution fully blocked the KA-induced potentiation of tonic inhibition, suggesting the involvement of an intracellular PKC pathway. Our study suggests that the activation of postsynaptic KARs potentiates eGABAARs but depresses sGABAARs. By activating postsynaptic KARs, synaptically released glutamate depresses phasic inhibition to facilitate neuronal plasticity, but potentiates tonic inhibition to protect neurons from over-excitation. PMID:25934031

  2. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2014-11-15

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC.

  3. Kinesin's light chains inhibit the head- and microtubule-binding activity of its tail.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yao Liang; Rice, Sarah E

    2010-06-29

    Kinesin-1 is a microtubule-based motor comprising two heavy chains (KHCs) and two light chains (KLCs). Motor activity is precisely regulated to avoid futile ATP consumption and to ensure proper intracellular localization of kinesin-1 and its cargoes. The KHC tail inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the enzymatic KHC heads, and the tail also binds microtubules. Here, we present a role for the KLCs in regulating both the head- and microtubule-binding activities of the kinesin-1 tail. We show that KLCs reduce the affinity of the head-tail interaction over tenfold and concomitantly repress the tail's regulatory activity. We also show that KLCs inhibit tail-microtubule binding by a separate mechanism. Inhibition of head-tail binding requires steric and electrostatic factors. Inhibition of tail-microtubule binding is largely electrostatic, pH dependent, and mediated partly by a highly negatively charged linker region between the KHC-interacting and cargo-binding domains of the KLCs. Our data support a model wherein KLCs promote activation of kinesin-1 for cargo transport by simultaneously suppressing tail-head and tail-microtubule interactions. KLC-mediated inhibition of tail-microtubule binding may also influence diffusional movement of kinesin-1 on microtubules, and kinesin-1's role in microtubule transport/sliding. PMID:20547877

  4. Kinesin’s light chains inhibit the head- and microtubule-binding activity of its tail

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yao Liang; Rice, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    Kinesin-1 is a microtubule-based motor comprising two heavy chains (KHCs) and two light chains (KLCs). Motor activity is precisely regulated to avoid futile ATP consumption and to ensure proper intracellular localization of kinesin-1 and its cargoes. The KHC tail inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the enzymatic KHC heads, and the tail also binds microtubules. Here, we present a role for the KLCs in regulating both the head- and microtubule-binding activities of the kinesin-1 tail. We show that KLCs reduce the affinity of the head-tail interaction over tenfold and concomitantly repress the tail’s regulatory activity. We also show that KLCs inhibit tail-microtubule binding by a separate mechanism. Inhibition of head-tail binding requires steric and electrostatic factors. Inhibition of tail-microtubule binding is largely electrostatic, pH dependent, and mediated partly by a highly negatively charged linker region between the KHC-interacting and cargo-binding domains of the KLCs. Our data support a model wherein KLCs promote activation of kinesin-1 for cargo transport by simultaneously suppressing tail-head and tail-microtubule interactions. KLC-mediated inhibition of tail-microtubule binding may also influence diffusional movement of kinesin-1 on microtubules, and kinesin-1’s role in microtubule transport/sliding. PMID:20547877

  5. Sequence specific inhibition of human type II phospholipase A2 enzyme activity by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, C F; Chiang, M Y; Wilson-Lingardo, L; Wyatt, J R

    1994-01-01

    Phosphorothioate oligonucleotides were identified which directly inhibited human type II phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzyme activity in a sequence specific manner. The minimum pharmacophore common to all oligonucleotides which inhibited PLA2 enzyme activity consisted of two sets of three or more consecutive guanosine residues in a row. These oligonucleotides appear to form G quartets resulting in the formation of oligonucleotide aggregates. Additionally, a phosphorothioate backbone was required to be effective inhibitors of type II PLA2. The activity of one oligodeoxynucleotide, IP 3196 (5'-GGGTGGGTATAGAAGGGCTCC-3') has been characterized in more detail. IP 3196 inhibited PLA2 enzyme activity when the substrate was presented in the form of a phospholipid bilayer but not when presented in the form of a mixed micelle with anionic detergents. Human type II PLA2 was 50-fold more sensitive to inhibition by IP 3196 than venom and pancreatic type I enzymes. These data demonstrate that phosphorothioate oligonucleotides can specifically inhibit human type II PLA2 enzyme activity in a sequence specific manner. PMID:8065936

  6. Trichinella spiralis Paramyosin Binds Human Complement C1q and Inhibits Classical Complement Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ran; Zhao, Xi; Wang, Zixia; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Limei; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichinella spiralis expresses paramyosin (Ts-Pmy) as a defense mechanism. Ts-Pmy is a functional protein with binding activity to human complement C8 and C9 and thus plays a role in evading the attack of the host’s immune system. In the present study, the binding activity of Ts-Pmy to human complement C1q and its ability to inhibit classical complement activation were investigated. Methods and Findings The binding of recombinant and natural Ts-Pmy to human C1q were determined by ELISA, Far Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Binding of recombinant Ts-Pmy (rTs-Pmy) to C1q inhibited C1q binding to IgM and consequently inhibited C3 deposition. The lysis of antibody-sensitized erythrocytes (EAs) elicited by the classical complement pathway was also inhibited in the presence of rTs-Pmy. In addition to inhibiting classical complement activation, rTs-Pmy also suppressed C1q binding to THP-1-derived macrophages, thereby reducing C1q-induced macrophages migration. Conclusion Our results suggest that T. spiralis paramyosin plays an important role in immune evasion by interfering with complement activation through binding to C1q in addition to C8 and C9. PMID:26720603

  7. Toxoplasma gondii Actively Inhibits Neuronal Function in Chronically Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, Fahad; Händel, Ulrike; Angenstein, Frank; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Kreutzmann, Peter; Lison, Holger; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Scheich, Henning; Wetzel, Wolfram; Schlüter, Dirk; Budinger, Eike

    2012-01-01

    Upon infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, fast replicating tachyzoites infect a broad spectrum of host cells including neurons. Under the pressure of the immune response, tachyzoites convert into slow-replicating bradyzoites, which persist as cysts in neurons. Currently, it is unclear whether T. gondii alters the functional activity of neurons, which may contribute to altered behaviour of T. gondii–infected mice and men. In the present study we demonstrate that upon oral infection with T. gondii cysts, chronically infected BALB/c mice lost over time their natural fear against cat urine which was paralleled by the persistence of the parasite in brain regions affecting behaviour and odor perception. Detailed immunohistochemistry showed that in infected neurons not only parasitic cysts but also the host cell cytoplasm and some axons stained positive for Toxoplasma antigen suggesting that parasitic proteins might directly interfere with neuronal function. In fact, in vitro live cell calcium (Ca2+) imaging studies revealed that tachyzoites actively manipulated Ca2+ signalling upon glutamate stimulation leading either to hyper- or hypo-responsive neurons. Experiments with the endoplasmatic reticulum Ca2+ uptake inhibitor thapsigargin indicate that tachyzoites deplete Ca2+ stores in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Furthermore in vivo studies revealed that the activity-dependent uptake of the potassium analogue thallium was reduced in cyst harbouring neurons indicating their functional impairment. The percentage of non-functional neurons increased over time In conclusion, both bradyzoites and tachyzoites functionally silence infected neurons, which may significantly contribute to the altered behaviour of the host. PMID:22530040

  8. Toxoplasma gondii actively inhibits neuronal function in chronically infected mice.

    PubMed

    Haroon, Fahad; Händel, Ulrike; Angenstein, Frank; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Kreutzmann, Peter; Lison, Holger; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Scheich, Henning; Wetzel, Wolfram; Schlüter, Dirk; Budinger, Eike

    2012-01-01

    Upon infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, fast replicating tachyzoites infect a broad spectrum of host cells including neurons. Under the pressure of the immune response, tachyzoites convert into slow-replicating bradyzoites, which persist as cysts in neurons. Currently, it is unclear whether T. gondii alters the functional activity of neurons, which may contribute to altered behaviour of T. gondii-infected mice and men. In the present study we demonstrate that upon oral infection with T. gondii cysts, chronically infected BALB/c mice lost over time their natural fear against cat urine which was paralleled by the persistence of the parasite in brain regions affecting behaviour and odor perception. Detailed immunohistochemistry showed that in infected neurons not only parasitic cysts but also the host cell cytoplasm and some axons stained positive for Toxoplasma antigen suggesting that parasitic proteins might directly interfere with neuronal function. In fact, in vitro live cell calcium (Ca(2+)) imaging studies revealed that tachyzoites actively manipulated Ca(2+) signalling upon glutamate stimulation leading either to hyper- or hypo-responsive neurons. Experiments with the endoplasmatic reticulum Ca(2+) uptake inhibitor thapsigargin indicate that tachyzoites deplete Ca(2+) stores in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Furthermore in vivo studies revealed that the activity-dependent uptake of the potassium analogue thallium was reduced in cyst harbouring neurons indicating their functional impairment. The percentage of non-functional neurons increased over time In conclusion, both bradyzoites and tachyzoites functionally silence infected neurons, which may significantly contribute to the altered behaviour of the host. PMID:22530040

  9. Drimendiol, a drimane sesquiterpene with quorum sensing inhibition activity.

    PubMed

    Paza, Cristian; Cárcamo, Gerardo; Silva, Mario; Becerra, José; Urrutia, Homero; Sossa, Katherine

    2013-02-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a regulatory mechanism that enables bacteria to make collective decisions such as an increase in virulence factors and biofilm production. Inhibitors of QS are important research tools in the discovery of new potential anti-bacterial agents. Polygodial, drimenol and drimendiol are drimane sesquiterpenoids isolated from Drimys winteri, a Chilean native tree. Their QS activity, when tested on Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472, showed that drimendiol is an inhibitor of QS, decreasing violaceine production in C violaceum and decreasing biofilm formation of Pseudomonas syringae strains. Consequently it increased the biocide effects of CuSO4 on biofilms of P. syringae. PMID:23513712

  10. IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS THROUGH THE INHIBITION OF CYP17 ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS THROUGH THE INHIBITION OF CYP17 ACTIVITY

    Chad R. Blystone1, David J. Dix2, and John C. Rockett2
    1Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, NC State University, R...

  11. Inhibition of cdc2 activation by INH/PP2A.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T H; Turck, C; Kirschner, M W

    1994-01-01

    INH, a type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A), negatively regulates entry into M phase and the cyclin B-dependent activation of cdc2 in Xenopus extracts. INH appears to be central to the mechanism of the trigger for mitotic initiation, as it prevents the premature activation of cdc2. We first show that INH is a conventional form of PP2A with a B alpha regulatory subunit. We next explore the mechanism by which it inhibits cdc2 activation by examining the effect of purified PP2A on the reaction pathways controlling cdc2 activity. Our results suggest that although PP2A inhibits the switch in tyrosine kinase and tyrosine phosphatase activities accompanying mitosis, this switch is a consequence of the inhibition of some other rate-limiting event. In the preactivation phase, PP2A inhibits the pathway leading to T161 phosphorylation, suggesting that this activity may be one of the rate-limiting events for transition. However, our results also suggest that the accumulation of active cdc2/cyclin complexes during the lag is only one of the events required for triggering entry into mitosis. Images PMID:8049524

  12. Flaking process increases the NF-κB inhibition activity and melanoidin extractability of coffee.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Hu, Kang; Hatzold, Thomas; Black, Richard M; Chen, Don

    2013-09-01

    Research on the health impacts of coffee has escalated. However, few studies were devoted to understanding the potential impact of mechanical processing on coffee's chemistry and subsequent health implications. Coffee flaking is a commonly used process to improve extractability and aroma characteristics. In this study, we studied the biochemical activity, chemical composition, and microstructure of coffee before and after flaking. We found that flaked coffee extract had 3.3-fold higher activity in inhibiting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation than regular coffee extract. Interestingly, flaking did not significantly alter the amount of coffee phenolics. It increased coffee melanoidin, by 2.1-fold, which likely contributed to the observed higher activity in inhibiting NF-κB activation. Flaking crushed cell walls revealed by microscopy might possibly result in disruption of polysaccharide entanglement and release of high-molecular-weight compounds, such as melanoidins. Consequently, the increased melanoidin content in the brew resulted in the increased inhibition of NF-κB activation. Small molecules, like coffee phenolics, are readily soluble in water during coffee brewing even without flaking, suggesting that flaking has no effect on its extractability. In summary, our investigation revealed that flaking enhanced NF-κB inhibition activity, possibly through the release of melanoidins from crushed cell microstructures. PMID:24804042

  13. Flaking process increases the NF-κB inhibition activity and melanoidin extractability of coffee

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Hu, Kang; Hatzold, Thomas; Black, Richard M; Chen, Don

    2013-01-01

    Research on the health impacts of coffee has escalated. However, few studies were devoted to understanding the potential impact of mechanical processing on coffee's chemistry and subsequent health implications. Coffee flaking is a commonly used process to improve extractability and aroma characteristics. In this study, we studied the biochemical activity, chemical composition, and microstructure of coffee before and after flaking. We found that flaked coffee extract had 3.3-fold higher activity in inhibiting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation than regular coffee extract. Interestingly, flaking did not significantly alter the amount of coffee phenolics. It increased coffee melanoidin, by 2.1-fold, which likely contributed to the observed higher activity in inhibiting NF-κB activation. Flaking crushed cell walls revealed by microscopy might possibly result in disruption of polysaccharide entanglement and release of high-molecular-weight compounds, such as melanoidins. Consequently, the increased melanoidin content in the brew resulted in the increased inhibition of NF-κB activation. Small molecules, like coffee phenolics, are readily soluble in water during coffee brewing even without flaking, suggesting that flaking has no effect on its extractability. In summary, our investigation revealed that flaking enhanced NF-κB inhibition activity, possibly through the release of melanoidins from crushed cell microstructures. PMID:24804042

  14. Tonic inhibition and ponto-geniculo-occipital-related activities shape abducens motoneuron discharge during REM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Miguel; Márquez-Ruiz, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Eye movements, ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves, muscular atonia and desynchronized cortical activity are the main characteristics of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Although eye movements designate this phase, little is known about the activity of the oculomotor system during REM sleep. In this work, we recorded binocular eye movements by the scleral search-coil technique and the activity of identified abducens (ABD) motoneurons along the sleep–wake cycle in behaving cats. The activity of ABD motoneurons during REM sleep was characterized by a tonic decrease of their mean firing rate throughout this period, and short bursts and pauses coinciding with the occurrence of PGO waves. We demonstrate that the decrease in the mean firing discharge was due to an active inhibition of ABD motoneurons, and that the occurrence of primary and secondary PGO waves induced a pattern of simultaneous but opposed phasic activation and inhibition on each ABD nucleus. With regard to eye movements, during REM sleep ABD motoneurons failed to codify eye position as during alertness, but continued to codify eye velocity. The pattern of tonic inhibition and the phasic activations and inhibitions shown by ABD motoneurons coincide with those reported in other non-oculomotor motoneurons, indicating that the oculomotor system – contrary to what has been accepted until now – is not different from other motor systems during REM sleep, and that all motor systems are receiving similar command signals during this period. PMID:18499728

  15. Recombinant human diamine oxidase activity is not inhibited by ethanol, acetaldehyde, disulfiram, diethyldithiocarbamate or cyanamide.

    PubMed

    Bartko, Johann; Gludovacz, Elisabeth; Petroczi, Karin; Borth, Nicole; Jilma, Bernd; Boehm, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Human diamine oxidase (hDAO, EC 1.4.3.22) is the key enzyme in the degradation of extracellular histamine. Consumption of alcohol is a known trigger of mast cell degranulation in patients with mast cell activation syndrome. Ethanol may also interfere with enzymatic histamine degradation, but reports on the effects on DAO activity are controversial. There are also conflicting reports whether disulfiram, an FDA-approved agent in the treatment of alcohol dependence, inhibits DAO. We therefore investigated the inhibitory potential of ethanol and disulfiram and their metabolites on recombinant human DAO (rhDAO) in three different assay systems. Relevant concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate did not inhibit rhDAO activity in an in vitro assay system using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) -mediated luminol oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; EC 1.2.1.3) inhibitors cyanamide and its dimer dicyanamide also had no effect on DAO activity. In one assay system, the irreversible ALDH inhibitor disulfiram and its main metabolite diethyldithiocarbamate seemed to inhibit DAO activity. However, the decreased product formation was not due to a direct block of DAO activity but resulted from inhibition of peroxidase employed in the coupled system. Our in vitro data do not support a direct blocking effect of ethanol, disulfiram, and their metabolites on DAO activity in vivo. PMID:27401969

  16. PD-1 Increases PTEN Phosphatase Activity While Decreasing PTEN Protein Stability by Inhibiting Casein Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Li, Lequn; Sari, Duygu; Petkova, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is a potent inhibitor of T cell responses. PD-1 abrogates activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, but the mechanism remains unclear. We determined that during T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3- and CD28-mediated stimulation, PTEN is phosphorylated by casein kinase 2 (CK2) in the Ser380-Thr382-Thr383 cluster within the C-terminal regulatory domain, which stabilizes PTEN, resulting in increased protein abundance but suppressed PTEN phosphatase activity. PD-1 inhibited the stabilizing phosphorylation of the Ser380-Thr382-Thr383 cluster within the C-terminal domain of PTEN, thereby resulting in ubiquitin-dependent degradation and diminished abundance of PTEN protein but increased PTEN phosphatase activity. These effects on PTEN were secondary to PD-1-mediated inhibition of CK2 and were recapitulated by pharmacologic inhibition of CK2 during TCR/CD3- and CD28-mediated stimulation without PD-1. Furthermore, PD-1-mediated diminished abundance of PTEN was reversed by inhibition of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation. Our results identify CK2 as a new target of PD-1 and reveal an unexpected mechanism by which PD-1 decreases PTEN protein expression while increasing PTEN activity, thereby inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling axis. PMID:23732914

  17. T-kininogen inhibits kinin-mediated activation of ERK in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Perez, Viviana; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Walter, Robin; Sierra, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    Serum levels of T-kininogen increase dramatically as rats approach the end of their lifespan. Stable expression of the protein in Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts leads to a dramatic inhibition of cell proliferation, as well as inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway. T-kininogen is a potent inhibitor of cysteine proteinases, and we have described that the inhibition of ERK activity occurs, at least in part, via stabilization of the MAP kinase phosphatase, MKP-1. Since fibroblasts are not a physiological target of T-kininogen, we have now purified the protein from rat serum, and used it to assess the effect of T-kininogen on endothelial cells. Adding purified T-kininogen to EAhy 926 hybridoma cells resulted in inhibition of basal ERK activity levels, as estimated using appropriate anti-phospho ERK antibodies. Furthermore, exogenously added T-kininogen inhibited the activation of the ERK pathway induced by either bradykinin or T-kinin. We conclude that the age-related increase in hepatic T-kininogen gene expression and serum levels of the protein could have dramatic consequences on endothelial cell physiology, both under steady state conditions, and after activation by cell-specific stimuli. Our results are consistent with T-kininogen being an important modulator of the senescent phenotype in vivo. PMID:12415746

  18. Activation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Is Inhibited by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Talon, Julie; Horvath, Curt M.; Polley, Rosalind; Basler, Christopher F.; Muster, Thomas; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2000-01-01

    We present a novel mechanism by which viruses may inhibit the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) cascade. The double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding protein NS1 of influenza virus is shown to prevent the potent antiviral interferon response by inhibiting the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), a key regulator of IFN-α/β gene expression. IRF-3 activation and, as a consequence, IFN-β mRNA induction are inhibited in wild-type (PR8) influenza virus-infected cells but not in cells infected with an isogenic virus lacking the NS1 gene (delNS1 virus). Furthermore, NS1 is shown to be a general inhibitor of the interferon signaling pathway. Inhibition of IRF-3 activation can be achieved by the expression of wild-type NS1 in trans, not only in delNS1 virus-infected cells but also in cells infected with a heterologous RNA virus (Newcastle disease virus). We propose that inhibition of IRF-3 activation by a dsRNA binding protein significantly contributes to the virulence of influenza A viruses and possibly to that of other viruses. PMID:10933707

  19. [Light-induced production and consumption of oxygen by chloroplasts: activation and inhibition].

    PubMed

    Chan Van, N i; Nikandrov, V V; Brin, G P; Krasnovskii, A A

    1977-07-01

    Light-induced production and consumption of oxygen by pea chloroplasts are activated at certain concentrations of the solvents (diethyl ester, methyl alcohol, dimethylsulfoxide) and detergent Triton X-100. At higher concentrations of the compounds studied both reactions are inhibited. The uncouplers (methylamine and carbonyl cyanide-3-chlorophenylhydrazone) activate these processes. The agents studied have a similar effect on the processes of light-induced production and consumption of oxygen, which are limited by a common link bound to the phosphorylation site in photosystem I. The effects observed suggest that the inhibition may be due to inhibition of photosystem II, whereas the activation may be largely due to an action on photosystem I. PMID:907797

  20. PP2A inhibition results in hepatic insulin resistance despite Akt2 activation.

    PubMed

    Galbo, Thomas; Perry, Rachel J; Nishimura, Erica; Samuel, Varman T; Quistorff, Bjørn; Shulman, Gerald I

    2013-10-01

    In the liver, insulin suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis by activating Akt, which inactivates the key gluconeogenic transcription factor FoxO1 (Forkhead Box O1). Recent studies have implicated hyperactivity of the Akt phosphatase Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and impaired Akt signaling as a molecular defect underlying insulin resistance. We therefore hypothesized that PP2A inhibition would enhance insulin-stimulated Akt activity and decrease glucose production. PP2A inhibitors increased hepatic Akt phosphorylation and inhibited FoxO1in vitro and in vivo, and suppressed gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes. Paradoxically, PP2A inhibition exacerbated insulin resistance in vivo. This was explained by phosphorylation of both hepatic glycogen synthase (GS) (inactivation) and phosphorylase (activation) resulting in impairment of glycogen storage. Our findings underline the significance of GS and Phosphorylase as hepatic PP2A substrates and importance of glycogen metabolism in acute plasma glucose regulation. PMID:24150286

  1. Inhibition of gastric H+, K(+)-ATPase activity by compounds from medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Cristina Setim; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Mayer, Bárbara; dos Santos, Ana Cristina; Twardowschy, André; Santos, Cid Aimbiré de Moraes; Marques, Maria Consuelo Andrade

    2011-09-01

    H+, K(+)-ATPase enzyme is a therapeutic target for the treatment of gastric disturbances. Several medicinal plants and isolated compounds inhibit the acid gastric secretion through interaction with the proton pump. In order to add new properties to some natural constituents, five compounds, a benzylated derivative of vincoside, a diterpene (abietic acid) and three alkaloids (cephaeline, vinblastine and vindoline), were tested for their activities on gastric H+, K(+)-ATPase isolated from rabbit stomach. All the compounds inhibited H+, K(+)-ATPase activity with varied potency. The IC50 value for benzylvincoside was 121 (50-293) microM, and for abietic acid 177 (148-211) microM. The alkaloids cephaeline, vinblastine and vindoline inhibited the H+, K(+)-ATPase activity with IC50 values of 194, 761 and 846 microM, respectively. The results suggest that benzylvincoside, abietic acid and cephaeline can be important sources for the development of anti-secretor agents. PMID:21941891

  2. Co-activation of RanGTPase and inhibition of GTP dissociation by Ran-GTP binding protein RanBP1.

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, F R; Krebber, H; Smirnova, E; Dong, W; Ponstingl, H

    1995-01-01

    RCC1 (the regulator of chromosome condensation) stimulates guanine nucleotide dissociation on the Ras-related nuclear protein Ran. Both polypeptides are components of a regulatory pathway that has been implicated in regulating DNA replication, onset of and exit from mitosis, mRNA processing and transport, and import of proteins into the nucleus. In a search for further members of the RCC1-Ran signal pathway, we have identified proteins of 23, 45 and 300 kDa which tightly bind to Ran-GTP but not Ran-GDP. The purified soluble 23 kDa Ran binding protein RanBP1 does not activate RanGTPase, but increases GTP hydrolysis induced by the RanGTPase-activating protein RanGAP1 by an order of magnitude. In the absence of RanGAP, it strongly inhibits RCC1-induced exchange of Ran-bound GTP. In addition, it forms a stable complex with nucleotide-free RCC1-Ran. With these properties, it differs markedly from guanine diphosphate dissociation inhibitors which preferentially prevent the exchange of protein-bound GDP and in some cases were shown to inhibit GAP-induced GTP hydrolysis. RanBP1 is the first member of a new class of proteins regulating the binding and hydrolysis of GTP by Ras-related proteins. Images PMID:7882974

  3. Inhibition of human ornithine decarboxylase activity by enantiomers of difluoromethylornithine.

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Ning; Ignatenko, Natalia A; Yamauchi, Phillip; Stringer, David E; Levenson, Corey; Shannon, Patrick; Perrin, Scott; Gerner, Eugene W

    2003-01-01

    Racemic difluoromethylornithine (D/L-DFMO) is an inhibitor of ODC (ornithine decarboxylase), the first enzyme in eukaryotic polyamine biosynthesis. D/L-DFMO is an effective anti-parasitic agent and inhibitor of mammalian cell growth and development. Purified human ODC-catalysed ornithine decarboxylation is highly stereospecific. However, both DFMO enantiomers suppressed ODC activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. ODC activity failed to recover after treatment with either L- or D-DFMO and dialysis to remove free inhibitor. The inhibitor dissociation constant (K(D)) values for the formation of enzyme-inhibitor complexes were 28.3+/-3.4, 1.3+/-0.3 and 2.2+/-0.4 microM respectively for D-, L- and D/L-DFMO. The differences in these K(D) values were statistically significant ( P <0.05). The inhibitor inactivation constants (K(inact)) for the irreversible step were 0.25+/-0.03, 0.15+/-0.03 and 0.15+/-0.03 min(-1) respectively for D-, L- and D/L-DFMO. These latter values were not statistically significantly different ( P >0.1). D-DFMO was a more potent inhibitor (IC50 approximately 7.5 microM) when compared with D-ornithine (IC50 approximately 1.5 mM) of ODC-catalysed L-ornithine decarboxylation. Treatment of human colon tumour-derived HCT116 cells with either L- or D-DFMO decreased the cellular polyamine contents in a concentration-dependent manner. These results show that both enantiomers of DFMO irreversibly inactivate ODC and suggest that this inactivation occurs by a common mechanism. Both enantiomers form enzyme-inhibitor complexes with ODC, but the probability of formation of these complexes is 20 times greater for L-DFMO when compared with D-DFMO. The rate of the irreversible reaction in ODC inactivation is similar for the L- and D-enantiomer. This unexpected similarity between DFMO enantiomers, in contrast with the high degree of stereospecificity of the substrate ornithine, appears to be due to the alpha-substituent of the inhibitor. The D

  4. The protein structures that shape caspase activity, specificity, activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Salvesen, Guy S.

    2004-01-01

    The death morphology commonly known as apoptosis results from a post-translational pathway driven largely by specific limited proteolysis. In the last decade the structural basis for apoptosis regulation has moved from nothing to ‘quite good’, and we now know the fundamental structures of examples from the initiator phase, the pre-mitochondrial regulator phase, the executioner phase, inhibitors and their antagonists, and even the structures of some substrates. The field is as well advanced as the best known of proteolytic pathways, the coagulation cascade. Fundamentally new mechanisms in protease regulation have been disclosed. Structural evidence suggests that caspases have an unusual catalytic mechanism, and that they are activated by apparently unrelated events, depending on which position in the apoptotic pathway they occupy. Some naturally occurring caspase inhibitors have adopted classic inhibition strategies, but other have revealed completely novel mechanisms. All of the structural and mechanistic information can, and is, being applied to drive therapeutic strategies to combat overactivation of apoptosis in degenerative disease, and underactivation in neoplasia. We present a comprehensive review of the caspases, their regulators and inhibitors from a structural and mechanistic point of view, and with an aim to consolidate the many threads that define the rapid growth of this field. PMID:15450003

  5. PDIA6 regulates insulin secretion by selectively inhibiting the RIDD activity of IRE1.

    PubMed

    Eletto, Daniela; Eletto, Davide; Boyle, Sarah; Argon, Yair

    2016-02-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase A6 (PDIA6) interacts with protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) and inositol requiring enzyme (IRE)-1 and inhibits their unfolded protein response signaling. In this study, shRNA silencing of PDIA6 expression in insulin-producing mouse cells reduced insulin production (5-fold) and, consequently, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (3-4-fold). This inhibition of insulin release was independent of the PDIA6-PERK interaction or PERK activity. Acute inhibition of PERK did not change the short-term response of β cells to glucose. Rather, PDIA6 affected insulin secretion by modulating one of the activities of IRE1. At 11 mM glucose and lower, the regulated IRE1-dependent decay (RIDD) of the mRNA activity of IRE1 was activated, but not its X-box binding protein (XBP)-1 splicing activity. In the absence of PDIA6, RIDD activity toward insulin transcripts was enhanced up to 4-fold, as shown by molecular assays in cultured cells and the use of a fluorescent reporter in intact islets. Such physiologic activation of IRE1 by glucose contrasted with IRE1 activation by chemical stress, when both IRE1 activities were induced. Thus, whereas the stimulus determines the quality of IRE1 signaling, PDIA6 attenuates multiple enzymatic activities of IRE1, maintaining its signaling within a physiologically tolerable range. PMID:26487694

  6. Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) downregulates telomerase activity and inhibits proliferation in telomerase-expressing cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Uziel, O; Fenig, E; Nordenberg, J; Beery, E; Reshef, H; Sandbank, J; Birenbaum, M; Bakhanashvili, M; Yerushalmi, R; Luria, D; Lahav, M

    2005-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which inhibits phosphorylation of downstream proteins involved in BCR-ABL signal transduction. It has proved beneficial in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). In addition, IM demonstrates activity against malignant cells expressing c-kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R). The activity of IM in the blastic crisis of CML and against various myeloma cell lines suggests that this drug may also target other cellular components. In the light of the important role of telomerase in malignant transformation, we evaluated the effect of IM on telomerase activity (TA) and regulation in various malignant cell lines. Imatinib mesylate caused a dose-dependent inhibition of TA (up to 90% at a concentration of 15 μM IM) in c-kit-expressing SK-N-MC (Ewing sarcoma), SK-MEL-28 (melanoma), RPMI 8226 (myeloma), MCF-7 (breast cancer) and HSC 536/N (Fanconi anaemia) cells as well as in ba/F3 (murine pro-B cells), which do not express c-kit, BCR-ABL or PDGF-R. Imatinib mesylate did not affect the activity of other DNA polymerases. Inhibition of TA was associated with 50% inhibition of proliferation. The inhibition of proliferation was associated with a decrease in the S-phase of the cell cycle and an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. No apoptosis was observed. Inhibition of TA was caused mainly by post-translational modifications: dephosphorylation of AKT and, to a smaller extent, by early downregulation of hTERT (the catalytic subunit of the enzyme) transcription. Other steps of telomerase regulation were not affected by IM. This study demonstrates an additional cellular target of IM, not necessarily mediated via known tyrosine kinases, that causes inhibition of TA and cell proliferation. PMID:15870711

  7. Telmisartan Induced Inhibition of Vascular Cell Proliferation beyond Angiotensin Receptor Blockade and PPARγ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Koichi; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Ho, Christopher; Kurtz, Theodore W; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the ability of ARBs with PPARγ agonist activity (telmisartan and irbesartan), and ARBs devoid of PPARγ agonist activity (eprosartan and valsartan), to inhibit vascular cell proliferation studied in the absence of angiotensin II stimulation. Telmisartan and to a lesser extent irbesartan, inhibited proliferation of human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose dependent fashion whereas eprosartan and valsartan did not. To investigate the role of PPARγ in the antiproliferative effects of telmisartan, we studied genetically engineered NIH3T3 cells that express PPARγ. Pioglitazone inhibited proliferation of NIH3T3 cells expressing PPARγ, but had little effect on control NIH3T3 cells that lack PPARγ. In contrast, telmisartan inhibited proliferation equally in NIH3T3 with and without PPARγ. Valsartan failed to inhibit proliferation of either cell line. In addition, telmisartan inhibited proliferation equally in aortic smooth muscle cells derived from mice with targeted knockout of PPARγ in smooth muscle and from control mice whereas valsartan had no effect on cell proliferation. Telmisartan but not valsartan, reduced phosphorylation of AKT but not ERK otherwise induced by exposure to serum of either quiescent human smooth muscle cells, quiescent mice smooth muscle cells lacking PPARγ or quiescent CHO-K1 cells lacking AT1 receptor. In summary, the antiproliferative effect of telmisartan in the absence of exogenously supplemented angiotensin II involve more than just AT1 receptor blockade and do not require activation of PPARγ. It might be postulated that inhibition of AKT activation is a mechanism mediating the antiproliferative effects of telmisartan including in cells lacking AT1 receptors or PPARγ. PMID:19822796

  8. Molecular Pathways: Anticancer Activity by Inhibition of Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Fabio; Wang, Yisong; Rodriguez, Jose A; Alberobello, Anna Teresa; Zhang, Yu-Wen; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2015-10-15

    A dynamic distribution between nucleus and cytoplasm (nucleocytoplasmic shuttling) is one of the control mechanisms adapted by normal cells to regulate the activity of a variety of molecules. Growing evidence suggests that dysregulation of the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling is involved in promoting abnormal cell survival, tumor progression, and drug resistance, and is associated with poor cancer prognosis. Aberrant nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in cancer cells may result from a hyperactive status of diverse signal-transduction pathways, such as the PI3K-AKT and MAPK pathways, or from alterations in the general nuclear import/export machinery. Among the large number of molecules involved in the shuttling process, exportin XPO1, also known as chromosome region maintenance 1, appears to play a particularly prominent role in pathogenesis of both hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Given the importance of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in cancer pathogenesis and the rapidly expanding knowledge in this field, attempts have been made to develop compounds able to revert the aberrant nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. A promising new drug, KPT-330 (Selinexor), which belongs to the class of XPO1 inhibitors called selective inhibitors of nuclear export, is now being tested in phase I/II clinical trials. PMID:26324742

  9. The inhibition activity of selected beta-carboline alkaloids on enzymes of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Krsková, Zuzana; Martin, Jan; Dusek, Jaroslav

    2011-06-01

    This thesis deals with testing of inhibition activity beta-carboline alkaloids on activity of enzymes acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BUCHE) using test "Fast Blue B salt" at TLC desk and Ellman's test using spectrophotometer. It was also investigated how dimethylsulfoxide used as a solvent in combination with water affects activity of enzymes and alkaloids. Results show harmine in form of base and salt in water and in mixture of DMSO and water has the hightest inhibition activity on ACHE using eserine as reference substance. Harmalol in form of salt in water and harmine in form of base and salt in mixture of DMSO and water has the hightest activity on BUCHE. It was find out that DMSO considerably affects activity of enzymes and alkaloids. PMID:21838142

  10. Non-specific binding sites help to explain mixed inhibition in mushroom tyrosinase activities.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Sorour; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Fazli, Mostafa

    2016-10-21

    Inhibition and activation studies of tyrosinase could prove beneficial to agricultural, food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Although non-competitive and mixed-inhibition are frequent modes observed in kinetics studies on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) activities, the phenomena are left unexplained. In this study, dual effects of phthalic acid (PA) and cinnamic acid (CA) on MT during mono-phenolase activity were demonstrated. PA activated and inhibited MT at concentrations lower and higher than 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, CA inhibited and activated MT at concentrations lower and higher than 5 μM. The mode of inhibition for both effectors was mixed-type. Complex kinetics of MT in the presence of a modulator could partly be ascribed to its mixed-cooperativity. However, to explain mixed-inhibition mode, it is necessary to demonstrate how the ternary complex of substrate/enzyme/effector is formed. Therefore, we looked for possible non-specific binding sites using MT tropolone-bound PDB (2Y9X) in the computational studies. When tropolone was in MTPa (active site), PA and CA occupied different pockets (named MTPb and MTPc, respectively). The close Moldock scores of PA binding posed in MTPb and MTPa suggested that MTPb could be a secondary binding site for PA. Similar results were obtained for CA. Ensuing results from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations for 2Y9X-effector complexes indicated that the structures were gradually stabilized during simulation. Tunnel analysis by using CAVER Analyst and CHEXVIS resulted in identifying two distinct channels that assumingly participate in exchanging the effectors when the direct channel to MTPa is not accessible. PMID:27344491

  11. GPER inhibits diabetes-mediated RhoA activation to prevent vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zilin; Cheng, Liang; Liang, Hongliang; Duan, Weixun; Hu, Jing; Zhi, Weiwei; Yang, Jinbao; Liu, Zhenhua; Zhao, Minggao; Liu, Jincheng

    2016-02-01

    The effect of estrogen receptors on diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction is critical, but ambiguous. Individuals with diabetic vascular disease may require estrogen receptor-specific targeted therapy in the future. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) has beneficial effects on vascular function. However, its fundamental mechanisms are unclear. The RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway contributes to diabetic vascular complications, whereas estrogen can suppress Rho-kinase function. Thus, we assumed that GPER inhibits diabetes-mediated RhoA activation to prevent vascular dysfunction. We further investigated the underlying mechanisms involved in this process. Vascular endothelial cells and ex vivo cultured ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6 mouse aortae were treated with high glucose (HG) alone or in combination with GPER agonist (G1). G1 treatment was also administered to OVX db/db mice for 8 weeks. An ex-vivo isovolumic myograph was used to analyze the endothelium-dependent vasodilation and endothelium-independent contraction of mouse aortae. Apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation were attenuated in G1-pretreated vascular endothelial cells. G1 significantly decreased the phosphorylation of inhibitory endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase residue threonine 495 (eNOS Thr495), inhibited RhoA expression, and increased NO production. Additionally, G1 rescued the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and inhibited RhoA activation in the thoracic aorta of OVX db/db mice and ex-vivo cultured OVX C57BL/6 mouse aortae treated with HG. Estrogens acting via GPER could protect vascular endothelium, and GPER activation might elicit ERα-independent effect to inhibit RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway. Additionally, GPER activation might reduce vascular smooth muscle contraction by inhibiting RhoA activation. Thus, the results of the present study suggest a new therapeutic paradigm for end-stage vascular dysfunction by inhibiting RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway via GPER activation. PMID:26785611

  12. NADPH- and iron-dependent lipid peroxidation inhibit aromatase activity in human placental microsomes.

    PubMed

    Milczarek, Ryszard; Sokołowska, Ewa; Hallmann, Anna; Kaletha, Krystian; Klimek, Jerzy

    2008-06-01

    During pregnancy placenta is the most significant source of lipid hydroperoxides and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased production of lipid peroxides and other ROS is often linked to pre-eclampsia. It is already proved that placental endoplasmic reticulum may be an important place of lipid peroxides and superoxide radical production. In the present study we revealed that NADPH- and iron-dependent lipid peroxidation in human placental microsomes (HPM) inhibit placental aromatase--a key enzyme of estrogen biosynthesis in human placenta. We showed that significant inhibition of this enzyme is caused by small lipid peroxidation (TBARS (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances)<4nmol/mg microsomal protein (m.p.)). More intensive lipid peroxidation (TBARS>9nmol/mg microsomal protein) diminishes aromatase activity to value being less than 5% of initial value. NADPH- and iron-dependent lipid peroxidation also causes disappearance of cytochrome P450 parallel to observed aromatase activity inhibition. EDTA, alpha-tocopherol, MgCl(2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevent aromatase activity inhibition and cytochrome P450(AROM) degradation. Mannitol and catalase have not effect on TBARS synthesis, aromatase activity and cytochrome P450 degradation. In view of the above we postulate that the inhibition of aromatase activity observed is mainly a consequence of cytochrome P450(AROM) degradation induced by lipid radicals. The role of hydroxyl radical in cytochrome P450 degradation is negligible in our experimental conditions. The results presented here also suggest that the inhibition of aromatase activity can also take place in placenta at in vivo conditions. PMID:18499441

  13. Lithium potentiates GSK-3β activity by inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated Akt phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Nie; Kanno, Takeshi; Jin, Yu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Lithium suppresses Akt activity by reducing PI3K-mediated Akt phosphorylation. • Lithium enhances GSK-3β activity by reducing Akt-mediated GSK-3β phosphorylation. • Lithium suppresses GSK-3β activity through its direct inhibition. - Abstract: Accumulating evidence has pointed to the direct inhibitory action of lithium, an anti-depressant, on GSK-3β. The present study investigated further insight into lithium signaling pathways. In the cell-free assay Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly inhibited phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Ser473, but Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} did not affect PI3K-mediated PI(3,4,5)P{sub 3} production and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Thr308. This indicates that lithium could enhance GSK-3β activity by suppressing Akt-mediated Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β in association with inhibition of PI3K-mediated Akt activation. There was no direct effect of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} on Akt1-induced phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9, but otherwise Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly reduced GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. This indicates that lithium directly inhibits GSK-3β in an Akt-independent manner. In rat hippocampal slices Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt1/2 at Ser473/474, GSK-3β at Ser9, and β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. Taken together, these results indicate that lithium exerts its potentiating and inhibiting bidirectional actions on GSK-3β activity.

  14. SLO2 Channels Are Inhibited by All Divalent Cations That Activate SLO1 K+ Channels.

    PubMed

    Budelli, Gonzalo; Sun, Qi; Ferreira, Juan; Butler, Alice; Santi, Celia M; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Two members of the family of high conductance K(+)channels SLO1 and SLO2 are both activated by intracellular cations. However, SLO1 is activated by Ca(2+)and other divalent cations, while SLO2 (Slack or SLO2.2 from rat) is activated by Na(+) Curiously though, we found that SLO2.2 is inhibited by all divalent cations that activate SLO1, with Zn(2+)being the most effective inhibitor with an IC50of ∼8 μmin contrast to Mg(2+), the least effective, with an IC50of ∼ 1.5 mm Our results suggest that divalent cations are not SLO2 pore blockers, but rather inhibit channel activity by an allosteric modification of channel gating. By site-directed mutagenesis we show that a histidine residue (His-347) downstream of S6 reduces inhibition by divalent cations. An analogous His residue present in some CNG channels is an inhibitory cation binding site. To investigate whether inhibition by divalent cations is conserved in an invertebrate SLO2 channel we cloned the SLO2 channel fromDrosophila(dSLO2) and compared its properties to those of rat SLO2.2. We found that, like rat SLO2.2, dSLO2 was also activated by Na(+)and inhibited by divalent cations. Inhibition of SLO2 channels in mammals andDrosophilaby divalent cations that have second messenger functions may reflect the physiological regulation of these channels by one or more of these ions. PMID:26823461

  15. Inhibition of Both Hsp70 Activity and Tau Aggregation in Vitro Best Predicts Tau Lowering Activity of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mackenzie D; Baker, Jeremy D; Suntharalingam, Amirthaa; Nordhues, Bryce A; Shelton, Lindsey B; Zheng, Dali; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Haystead, Timothy A J; Gestwicki, Jason E; Dickey, Chad A

    2016-07-15

    Three scaffolds with inhibitory activity against the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family of chaperones have been found to enhance the degradation of the microtubule associated protein tau in cells, neurons, and brain tissue. This is important because tau accumulation is linked to neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Here, we expanded upon this study to investigate the anti-tau efficacy of additional scaffolds with Hsp70 inhibitory activity. Five of the nine scaffolds tested lowered tau levels, with the rhodacyanine and phenothiazine scaffolds exhibiting the highest potency as previously described. Because phenothiazines also inhibit tau aggregation in vitro, we suspected that this activity might be a more accurate predictor of tau lowering. Interestingly, the rhodacyanines did inhibit in vitro tau aggregation to a similar degree as phenothiazines, correlating well with tau-lowering efficacy in cells and ex vivo slices. Moreover, other Hsp70 inhibitor scaffolds with weaker tau-lowering activity in cells inhibited tau aggregation in vitro, albeit at lower potencies. When we tested six well-characterized tau aggregation inhibitors, we determined that this mechanism of action was not a better predictor of tau-lowering than Hsp70 inhibition. Instead, we found that compounds possessing both activities were the most effective at promoting tau clearance. Moreover, cytotoxicity and PAINS activity are critical factors that can lead to false-positive lead identification. Strategies designed around these principles will likely yield more efficacious tau-lowering compounds. PMID:27177119

  16. Doxycycline inhibits MMPs via modulation of plasminogen activators in focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Burggraf, Dorothe; Trinkl, Andreas; Dichgans, Martin; Hamann, Gerhard F

    2007-03-01

    Tetracyclines inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and reduce infarction volume following cerebral ischemia. In this thesis an involvement of urokinase could be proven. Cerebral ischemia in rats was induced for 3 h followed by 24 h reperfusion (suture model). Each 6 animals received orally either doxycycline or water. Doxycycline treatment began 10 days before ischemia. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were substantially decreased. The possibility of involvement of the endogenous MMP inhibitors in the MMP inhibiting mechanisms was excluded. The plasminogen activator uPA was significantly decreased by doxycycline indicating an MMP inhibiting mechanism including the plasminogen/plasmin system. In the doxycycline group, this resulted in a decreased damage to the cerebral microvessels and less loss of the basal lamina antigen collagen type IV. Hemoglobin extravasation was also significantly reduced. Our results suggest that doxycycline may have a potential use as an anti-ischemic compound since it provides microvascular protection by inhibiting the plasminogen system. PMID:17166729

  17. Icmt inhibition exerts anti-angiogenic and anti-hyperpermeability activities impeding malignant pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Magkouta, Sophia; Pappas, Apostolos; Moschos, Charalampos; Vazakidou, Maria-Eleni; Psarra, Katherina; Kalomenidis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Small GTPases are pivotal regulators of several aspects of tumor progression. Their implication in angiogenesis, vascular permeability and tumor-associated inflammatory responses is relevant to the pathobiology of Malignant Pleural Effusion (MPE). Inhibition of isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase (Icmt) abrogates small GTPase activation. We therefore hypothesized that cysmethynil, an Icmt inhibitor would limit pleural fluid accumulation in two models, a lung-adenocarcinoma and a mesothelioma-induced MPE. Cysmethynil significantly reduced MPE volume in both models and tumor burden in the adenocarcinoma model. It inhibited pleural vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis in vivo and reduced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation in vitro. Cysmethynil also promoted M1 anti-tumor macrophage homing in the pleural space in vivo, and inhibited tumor-induced polarization of macrophages towards a M2 phenotype in vitro. In addition, the inhibitor promoted adenocarcinoma cell apoptosis in vivo. Inhibition of small GTPase might thus represent a valuable strategy for pharmacotherapy of MPE. PMID:26959120

  18. Astragaloside IV inhibits microglia activation via glucocorticoid receptor mediated signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Shuai; Shi, Hai-Lian; Huang, Fei; Peterson, Karin E.; Wu, Hui; Lan, Yun-Yi; Zhang, Bei-Bei; He, Yi-Xin; Woods, Tyson; Du, Min; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of microglia activation may provide therapeutic treatment for many neurodegenerative diseases. Astragaloside IV (ASI) with anti-inflammatory properties has been tested as a therapeutic drug in clinical trials of China. However, the mechanism of ASI inhibiting neuroinflammation is unknown. In this study, we showed that ASI inhibited microglia activation both in vivo and in vitro. It could enhance glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-luciferase activity and facilitate GR nuclear translocation in microglial cells. Molecular docking and TR-FRET GR competitive binding experiments demonstrated that ASI could bind to GR in spite of relative low affinity. Meanwhile, ASI modulated GR-mediated signaling pathway, including dephosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, I κB and NF κB, therefore, decreased downstream production of proinflammatory mediators. Suppression of microglial BV-2 activation by ASI was abrogated by GR inhibitor, RU486 or GR siRNA. Similarly, RU486 counteracted the alleviative effect of ASI on microgliosis and neuronal injury in vivo. Our findings demonstrated that ASI inhibited microglia activation at least partially by activating the glucocorticoid pathway, suggesting its possible therapeutic potential for neuroinflammation in neurological diseases. PMID:26750705

  19. Low-power laser irradiation inhibits Aβ25-35-induced cell apoptosis through Akt activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhigang; Tang, Yonghong

    2009-08-01

    Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) can modulate various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Recently, LPLI has been applied to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. The protective role of LPLI against the amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), a major constituent of AD plaques, has not been studied. PI3K/Akt pathway is extremely important in protecting cells from apoptosis caused by diverse stress stimuli. However, whether LPLI can inhibit Aβ-induced apoptosis through Akt activation is still unclear. In current study, using FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) technique, we investigated the activity of Akt in response to LPLI treatment. B kinase activity reporter (BKAR), a recombinant FRET probe of Akt, was utilized to dynamically detect the activation of Akt after LPLI treatment. The results show that LPLI promoted the activation of Akt. Moreover, LPLI inhibits apoptosis induced by Aβ25-35 and the apoptosis inhibition can be abolished by wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of PI3K/Akt. Taken together, these results suggest that LPLI can inhibit Aβ25-35-induced cell apoptosis through Akt activation.

  20. Damnacanthal inhibits IgE receptor-mediated activation of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vilas, Javier A; Medina, Miguel A; Melo, Fabio R; Pejler, Gunnar; Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni

    2015-05-01

    Damnacanthal, an anthraquinone obtained from the noni fruit (Morinda citrifolia L.), has been described to possess anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. Since mast cells are key players in various inflammatory conditions as well as in cancer, we considered the possibility that the biological actions of damnacanthal, at least partly, could be due to effects on mast cells. Many of the biological activities of mast cells are mediated by IgE receptor cross-linking, which results in degranulation with release of preformed granule mediators, as well as de novo synthesis and release of additional compounds. Here we show that damnacanthal has profound inhibitory activity on mast cell activation through this pathway. The release of the granule compounds beta-hexosaminidase and tryptase release was completely abrogated by damnacanthal at doses that were non-toxic to mast cells. In addition, damnacanthal inhibited activation-dependent pro-inflammatory gene induction, as well as cytokine/chemokine release in response to mast cell stimulation. The mechanism underlying damnacanthal inhibition was linked to impaired phosphorylation of Syk and Akt. Furthermore, damnacanthal inhibited mast cell activation in response to calcium ionophore A23187. Altogether, the data presented here demonstrate that damnacanthal inhibits mast cell activation induced by different stimuli and open a new window for the use of this compound as a mast cell stabilizer. PMID:25656801

  1. Urokinase plasminogen activator gene deficiency inhibits fracture cartilage remodeling.

    PubMed

    Popa, Nicoleta L; Wergedal, Jon E; Lau, K-H William; Mohan, Subburaman; Rundle, Charles H

    2014-03-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates a proteolytic cascade of extracellular matrix degradation that functions in tissue development and tissue repair. The development and remodeling of the skeletal extracellular matrix during wound healing suggests that uPA might regulate bone development and repair. To determine whether uPA functions regulate bone development and repair, we examined the basal skeletal phenotype and endochondral bone fracture repair in uPA-deficient mice. The skeletal phenotype of uPA knockout mice was compared with that of control mice under basal conditions by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-CT analysis, and during femur fracture repair by micro-CT and histological examination of the fracture callus. No effects of uPA gene deficiency were observed in the basal skeletal phenotype of the whole body or the femur. However, uPA gene deficiency resulted in increased fracture callus cartilage abundance during femur fracture repair at 14 days healing. The increase in cartilage corresponded to reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining for osteoclasts in the uPA knockout fracture callus at this time, consistent with impaired osteoclast-mediated remodeling of the fracture cartilage. CD31 staining was reduced in the knockout fracture tissues at this time, suggesting that angiogenesis was also reduced. Osteoclasts also colocalized with CD31 expression in the endothelial cells of the fracture tissues during callus remodeling. These results indicate that uPA promotes remodeling of the fracture cartilage by osteoclasts that are associated with angiogenesis and suggest that uPA promotes angiogenesis and remodeling of the fracture cartilage at this time of bone fracture repair. PMID:23700285

  2. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins' active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes. PMID:25449264

  3. Inhibition of platelet-aggregating activity in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura plasma by normal adult immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Lian, E C; Mui, P T; Siddiqui, F A; Chiu, A Y; Chiu, L L

    1984-01-01

    Plasma from patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) caused the aggregation of autologous and homologous platelets, and effect which was inhibited by normal plasma. IgG purified from seven normal adults at a concentration of 0.7 mg/ml completely inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by plasma obtained from two TTP patients with active disease. The inhibition of platelet aggregation by human adult IgG was concentration dependent, and the inhibitory activity of human IgG was neutralized by rabbit antihuman IgG. Fab fragments inhibited the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation as well as intact IgG, whereas Fc fragments had no effect. Platelet aggregation caused by ADP, collagen, epinephrine, or thrombin was not affected by purified human IgG. The prior incubation of IgG with TTP plasma caused a significantly greater reduction of platelet aggregation by TTP plasma than that of IgG and platelet suspension, suggesting that the IgG inhibits TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation through direct interaction with platelet aggregating factor in TTP plasma. IgG obtained initially from five infants and young children under the age of 4 yr did not possess any inhibitory activity. When one of the children reached 3 yr of age, his IgG inhibited the aggregation induced by one TTP plasma, but not that caused by another plasma. The IgG procured from the same boy at 4 yr of age inhibited the aggregation induced by both TTP plasmas. The IgG purified from the TTP plasma during active disease failed to inhibit the aggregation caused by the same plasma. After recovery, however, the IgG effectively inhibited aggregation. These observations suggest that platelet-aggregating factors present in the TTP plasma are heterogeneous in nature and that the IgG present in the normal adult plasma, which inhibits the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation, may be partially responsible for the success of plasma infusion therapy in TTP. Images PMID:6538207

  4. Huanglian, A chinese herbal extract, inhibits cell growth by suppressing the expression of cyclin B1 and inhibiting CDC2 kinase activity in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, X K; Motwani, M; Tong, W; Bornmann, W; Schwartz, G K

    2000-12-01

    Huanglian is an herb that is widely used in China for the treatment of gastroenteritis. We elected to determine whether huanglian could inhibit tumor cell growth by modulating molecular events directly associated with the cell cycle. Huanglian inhibited tumor growth and colony formation of gastric, colon, and breast cancer cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Cell growth was completely inhibited after 3 days of continuous drug exposure to 10 microg/ml of herb. This degree of growth inhibition was significantly greater than that observed with berberine, the major constituent of the herb. The inhibition of cell growth by huanglian was associated with up to 8-fold suppression of cyclin B1 protein. This resulted in complete inhibition of cdc2 kinase activity and accumulation of cells in G(2). The mRNA expression of cyclin B1 was not changed after huanglian treatment. There was no change in the protein expression of cyclins A or E. Therefore, the effect of huanglian on inhibiting tumor growth seems to be mediated by the selective suppression of cyclin B1, which results in the inhibition of cdc2 kinase activity. Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinase (cdk) activity is emerging as an attractive target for cancer chemotherapy. Huanglian represents a class of agents that can inhibit tumor cell growth by directly suppressing the expression of a cyclin subunit that is critical for cell cycle progression. These results indicate that traditional Chinese herbs may represent a new source of agents designed for selective inhibition of cyclin dependent kinases in cancer therapy. PMID:11093765

  5. The Ebola Virus VP35 Protein Inhibits Activation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Christopher F.; Mikulasova, Andrea; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Paragas, Jason; Mühlberger, Elke; Bray, Mike; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2003-01-01

    The Ebola virus VP35 protein was previously found to act as an interferon (IFN) antagonist which could complement growth of influenza delNS1 virus, a mutant influenza virus lacking the influenza virus IFN antagonist protein, NS1. The Ebola virus VP35 could also prevent the virus- or double-stranded RNA-mediated transcriptional activation of both the beta IFN (IFN-β) promoter and the IFN-stimulated ISG54 promoter (C. Basler et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97:12289-12294, 2000). We now show that VP35 inhibits virus infection-induced transcriptional activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3)-responsive mammalian promoters and that VP35 does not block signaling from the IFN-α/β receptor. The ability of VP35 to inhibit this virus-induced transcription correlates with its ability to block activation of IRF-3, a cellular transcription factor of central importance in initiating the host cell IFN response. We demonstrate that VP35 blocks the Sendai virus-induced activation of two promoters which can be directly activated by IRF-3, namely, the ISG54 promoter and the ISG56 promoter. Further, expression of VP35 prevents the IRF-3-dependent activation of the IFN-α4 promoter in response to viral infection. The inhibition of IRF-3 appears to occur through an inhibition of IRF-3 phosphorylation. VP35 blocks virus-induced IRF-3 phosphorylation and subsequent IRF-3 dimerization and nuclear translocation. Consistent with these observations, Ebola virus infection of Vero cells activated neither transcription from the ISG54 promoter nor nuclear accumulation of IRF-3. These data suggest that in Ebola virus-infected cells, VP35 inhibits the induction of antiviral genes, including the IFN-β gene, by blocking IRF-3 activation. PMID:12829834

  6. Smooth Muscle-Alpha Actin Inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration by Inhibiting Rac1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lihua; DeWispelaere, Allison; Dastvan, Frank; Osborne, William R. A.; Blechner, Christine; Windhorst, Sabine; Daum, Guenter

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle alpha-actin (SMA) is a marker for the contractile, non-proliferative phenotype of adult smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Upon arterial injury, expression of SMA and other structural proteins decreases and SMCs acquire a pro-migratory and proliferative phenotype. To what extent SMA regulates migration and proliferation of SMCs is unclear and putative signaling pathways involved remain to be elucidated. Here, we used lentiviral-mediated gene transfer and siRNA technology to manipulate expression of SMA in carotid mouse SMCs and studied effects of SMA. Overexpression of SMA results in decreased proliferation and migration and blunts serum-induced activation of the small GTPase Rac, but not RhoA. All inhibitory effects of SMA are rescued by expression of a constitutively active Rac1 mutant (V12rac1). Moreover, reduction of SMA expression by siRNA technology results in an increased activation of Rac. Taken together, this study identifies Rac1 as a downstream target for SMA to inhibit SMC proliferation and migration. PMID:27176050

  7. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yang-Chang; Sureshbabu, Munisamy; Fang, Yao-Ching; Wu, Yi-Hsiu; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chang, Ya-Wen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-02-01

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.

  8. TAR RNA decoys inhibit tat-activated HIV-1 transcription after preinitiation complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Bohjanen, P R; Liu, Y; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1997-01-01

    The ability of the HIV-1 Tat protein to trans -activate HIV-1 transcription in vitro is specifically inhibited by a circular TAR RNA decoy. This inhibition is not overcome by adding an excess of Tat to the reaction but is partially overcome by adding Tat in combination with nuclear extract, suggesting that TAR RNA might function by interacting with a complex containing Tat and cellular factor(s). A cell-free transcription system involving immobilized DNA templates was used to further define the factor(s) that interact with TAR RNA. Preinitiation complexes formed in the presence or absence of Tat were purified on immobilized templates containing the HIV-1 promoter. After washing, nucleotides and radiolabelled UTP were added and transcription was measured. The presence of Tat during preinitiation complex formation resulted in an increase in the level of full-length HIV-1 transcripts. This Tat-activated increase in HIV-1 transcription was not inhibited by circular TAR decoys added during preinitiation complex formation but was inhibited by circular TAR decoys subsequently added during the transcription reaction. These results suggest that TAR decoys inhibit Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription after preinitiation complex formation, perhaps by interacting with components of transcription complexes. PMID:9358155

  9. Anticancer activity of MPT0G157, a derivative of indolylbenzenesulfonamide, inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Chia; Huang, Fang-I; Mehndiratta, Samir; Lai, Ssu-Chia; Liou, Jing-Ping; Yang, Chia-Ron

    2015-07-30

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) display multifaceted functions by coordinating the interaction of signal pathways with chromatin structure remodeling and the activation of non-histone proteins; these epigenetic regulations play an important role during malignancy progression. HDAC inhibition shows promise as a new strategy for cancer therapy; three HDAC inhibitors have been approved. We previously reported that N-hydroxy-3-{4-[2-(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-ethylsulfamoyl]-phenyl}-acrylamide (MPT0G157), a novel indole-3-ethylsulfamoylphenylacrylamide compound, demonstrated potent HDAC inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we evaluated its anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. MPT0G157 treatment significantly inhibited different tumor growth at submicromolar concentration and was particularly potent in human colorectal cancer (HCT116) cells. Apoptosis and inhibited HDACs activity induced by MPT0G157 was more potent than that by the marketed drugs PXD101 (Belinostat) and SAHA (Vorinostat). In an in vivo model, MPT0G157 markedly inhibited HCT116 xenograft tumor volume and reduced matrigel-induced angiogenesis. The anti-angiogenetic effect of MPT0G157 was found to increase the hyperacetylation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and promote hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) degradation followed by down-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Our results demonstrate that MPT0G157 has potential as a new drug candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:26087180

  10. Liver δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase activity is inhibited by neonicotinoids and restored by antioxidant agents.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Elisa; Moro, Angela M; Brucker, Natália; Nascimento, Sabrina; Gauer, Bruna; Fracasso, Rafael; Gioda, Adriana; Beck, Ruy; Moreira, José C F; Eifler-Lima, Vera Lucia; Garcia, Solange Cristina

    2014-11-01

    Neonicotinoids represent the most used class of insecticides worldwide, and their precursor, imidacloprid, is the most widely marketed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of imidacloprid on the activity of hepatic δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D), protective effect of potential antioxidants against this potential effect and presence of chemical elements in the constitution of this pesticide. We observed that δ-ALA-D activity was significantly inhibited by imidacloprid at all concentrations tested in a dose-dependent manner. The IC50 value was obtained and used to evaluate the restoration of the enzymatic activity. δ-ALA-D inhibition was completely restored by addition of dithiotreitol (DTT) and partly by ZnCl2, demonstrating that the inhibition occurs by oxidation of thiol groups and by displacement of the Zn (II), which can be explained by the presence of chemical elements found in the constitution of pesticides. Reduced glutathione (GSH) had the best antioxidant effect against to δ-ALA-D inhibition caused by imidacloprid, followed by curcumin and resveratrol. It is well known that inhibition of the enzyme δ-ALA-D may result in accumulation of its neurotoxic substrate (δ-ALA), in this line, our results suggest that further studies are needed to investigate the possible neurotoxicity induced by neonicotinoids and the involvement of antioxidants in cases of poisoning by neonicotinoids. PMID:25402564

  11. Liver δ-Aminolevulinate Dehydratase Activity is Inhibited by Neonicotinoids and Restored by Antioxidant Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Elisa; Moro, Angela M.; Brucker, Natália; Nascimento, Sabrina; Gauer, Bruna; Fracasso, Rafael; Gioda, Adriana; Beck, Ruy; Moreira, José C. F.; Eifler-Lima, Vera Lucia; Garcia, Solange Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Neonicotinoids represent the most used class of insecticides worldwide, and their precursor, imidacloprid, is the most widely marketed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of imidacloprid on the activity of hepatic δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D), protective effect of potential antioxidants against this potential effect and presence of chemical elements in the constitution of this pesticide. We observed that δ-ALA-D activity was significantly inhibited by imidacloprid at all concentrations tested in a dose-dependent manner. The IC50 value was obtained and used to evaluate the restoration of the enzymatic activity. δ-ALA-D inhibition was completely restored by addition of dithiotreitol (DTT) and partly by ZnCl2, demonstrating that the inhibition occurs by oxidation of thiol groups and by displacement of the Zn (II), which can be explained by the presence of chemical elements found in the constitution of pesticides. Reduced glutathione (GSH) had the best antioxidant effect against to δ-ALA-D inhibition caused by imidacloprid, followed by curcumin and resveratrol. It is well known that inhibition of the enzyme δ-ALA-D may result in accumulation of its neurotoxic substrate (δ-ALA), in this line, our results suggest that further studies are needed to investigate the possible neurotoxicity induced by neonicotinoids and the involvement of antioxidants in cases of poisoning by neonicotinoids. PMID:25402564

  12. Lithium potentiates GSK-3β activity by inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Nie; Kanno, Takeshi; Jin, Yu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-18

    Accumulating evidence has pointed to the direct inhibitory action of lithium, an anti-depressant, on GSK-3β. The present study investigated further insight into lithium signaling pathways. In the cell-free assay Li2CO3 significantly inhibited phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Ser473, but Li2CO3 did not affect PI3K-mediated PI(3,4,5)P3 production and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Thr308. This indicates that lithium could enhance GSK-3β activity by suppressing Akt-mediated Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β in association with inhibition of PI3K-mediated Akt activation. There was no direct effect of Li2CO3 on Akt1-induced phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9, but otherwise Li2CO3 significantly reduced GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. This indicates that lithium directly inhibits GSK-3β in an Akt-independent manner. In rat hippocampal slices Li2CO3 significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt1/2 at Ser473/474, GSK-3β at Ser9, and β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. Taken together, these results indicate that lithium exerts its potentiating and inhibiting bidirectional actions on GSK-3β activity. PMID:24950409

  13. Anticancer activity of MPT0G157, a derivative of indolylbenzenesulfonamide, inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mehndiratta, Samir; Lai, Ssu-Chia; Liou, Jing-Ping; Yang, Chia-Ron

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) display multifaceted functions by coordinating the interaction of signal pathways with chromatin structure remodeling and the activation of non-histone proteins; these epigenetic regulations play an important role during malignancy progression. HDAC inhibition shows promise as a new strategy for cancer therapy; three HDAC inhibitors have been approved. We previously reported that N-hydroxy-3-{4-[2-(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-ethylsulfamoyl]-phenyl}-acrylamide (MPT0G157), a novel indole-3-ethylsulfamoylphenylacrylamide compound, demonstrated potent HDAC inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we evaluated its anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. MPT0G157 treatment significantly inhibited different tumor growth at submicromolar concentration and was particularly potent in human colorectal cancer (HCT116) cells. Apoptosis and inhibited HDACs activity induced by MPT0G157 was more potent than that by the marketed drugs PXD101 (Belinostat) and SAHA (Vorinostat). In an in vivo model, MPT0G157 markedly inhibited HCT116 xenograft tumor volume and reduced matrigel-induced angiogenesis. The anti-angiogenetic effect of MPT0G157 was found to increase the hyperacetylation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and promote hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) degradation followed by down-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Our results demonstrate that MPT0G157 has potential as a new drug candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:26087180

  14. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg{sup 2+} ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn{sup 2+}); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg{sup 2+} causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn{sup 2+} release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn{sup 2+} or Hg{sup 2+}. Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg{sup 2+}-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg{sup 2+} that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system.

  15. The case for inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Arabacilar, Pelin; Marber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This minireview discusses the evidence that the inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPKs) maybe of therapeutic value in heart failure. Most previous experimental studies, as well as past and ongoing clinical trials, have focussed on the role of p38 MAPKs in myocardial infarction and acute coronary syndromes. There is now growing evidence that these kinases are activated within the myocardium of the failing human heart and in the heart and blood vessels of animal models of heart failure. Furthermore, from a philosophical viewpoint the chronic activation of the adaptive stress pathways that lead to the activation of p38 MAPKs in heart failure is analogous to the chronic activation of the sympathetic, renin-aldosterone-angiotensin and neprilysin systems. These have provided some of the most effective therapies for heart failure. This minireview questions whether similar and synergistic advantages would follow the inhibition of p38 MAPKs. PMID:26029107

  16. Gadolinium inhibits mechanoelectrical transduction in rabbit carotid baroreceptors. Implication of stretch-activated channels.

    PubMed Central

    Hajduczok, G; Chapleau, M W; Ferlic, R J; Mao, H Z; Abboud, F M

    1994-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd3+) has been shown to prevent mechanoelectrical transduction believed to be mediated through stretch-activated channels. We investigated the possible role of Gd(3+)-sensitive channels in mediating baroreceptor activity in the carotid sinus of rabbits. Baroreceptor activity induced by a ramp increase of carotid sinus pressure was reduced significantly during exposure to Gd3+. The inhibition was dose-related and reversible, and was not associated with alteration of carotid sinus wall mechanics as the pressure-strain relationship was unaffected. Veratrine triggered action potentials from single- and multiple-baroreceptor fibers when their response to pressure was inhibited by Gd3+. This suggests that the effect of Gd3+ on baroreceptors in the isolated carotid sinus was specific to their mechanical activation. The results suggest that stretch-activated ion channels sensitive to Gd3+ may be the mechanoelectrical transducers of rabbit carotid sinus baroreceptors. PMID:7527431

  17. Minocycline, a tetracycline derivative, is neuroprotective against excitotoxicity by inhibiting activation and proliferation of microglia.

    PubMed

    Tikka, T; Fiebich, B L; Goldsteins, G; Keinanen, R; Koistinaho, J

    2001-04-15

    Minocycline, a semisynthetic tetracycline derivative, protects brain against global and focal ischemia in rodents. We examined whether minocycline reduces excitotoxicity in primary neuronal cultures. Minocycline (0.02 microm) significantly increased neuronal survival in mixed spinal cord (SC) cultures treated with 500 microm glutamate or 100 microm kainate for 24 hr. Treatment with these excitotoxins induced a dose-dependent proliferation of microglia that was associated with increased release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and was followed by increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. The excitotoxicity was enhanced when microglial cells were cultured on top of SC cultures. Minocycline prevented excitotoxin-induced microglial proliferation and the increased release of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites and IL-1beta. Excitotoxins induced microglial proliferation and increased the release of NO metabolites and IL-1beta also in pure microglia cultures, and these responses were inhibited by minocycline. In both SC and pure microglia cultures, excitotoxins activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) exclusively in microglia. Minocycline inhibited p38 MAPK activation in SC cultures, and treatment with SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, but not with PD98059, a p44/42 MAPK inhibitor, increased neuronal survival. In pure microglia cultures, glutamate induced transient activation of p38 MAPK, and this was inhibited by minocycline. These findings indicate that the proliferation and activation of microglia contributes to excitotoxicity, which is inhibited by minocycline, an antibiotic used in severe human infections. PMID:11306611

  18. AKT activation controls cell survival in response to HDAC6 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kaliszczak, M; Trousil, S; Ali, T; Aboagye, E O

    2016-01-01

    HDAC6 is emerging as an important therapeutic target for cancer. We investigated mechanisms responsible for survival of tumor cells treated with a HDAC6 inhibitor. Expression of the 20 000 genes examined did not change following HDAC6 treatment in vivo. We found that HDAC6 inhibition led to an increase of AKT activation (P-AKT) in vitro, and genetic knockdown of HDAC6 phenocopied drug-induced AKT activation. The activation of AKT was not observed in PTEN null cells; otherwise, PTEN/PIK3CA expression per se did not predict HDAC6 inhibitor sensitivity. Interestingly, HDAC6 inhibitor treatment led to inactivating phosphorylation of PTEN (P-PTEN Ser380), which likely led to the increased P-AKT in cells that express PTEN. Synergy was observed with phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinases (PI3K) inhibitor treatment in vitro, accompanied by increased caspase 3/7 activity. Furthermore, combination of HDAC6 inhibitor with a PI3K inhibitor caused substantial tumor growth inhibition in vivo compared with either treatment alone, also detectable by Ki-67 immunostaining and (18)F-FLT positron emission tomography (PET). In aggregate AKT activation appears to be a key survival mechanism for HDAC6 inhibitor treatment. Our findings indicate that dual inhibition of HDAC6 and P-AKT may be necessary to substantially inhibit growth of solid tumors. PMID:27362804

  19. Aptamer-controlled reversible inhibition of gold nanozyme activity for pesticide sensing.

    PubMed

    Weerathunge, Pabudi; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Shukla, Ravi; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Bansal, Vipul

    2014-12-16

    This study addresses the need for rapid pesticide (acetamiprid) detection by reporting a new colorimetric biosensing assay. Our approach combines the inherent peroxidase-like nanozyme activity of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with high affinity and specificity of an acetamiprid-specific S-18 aptamer to detect this neurotoxic pesticide in a highly rapid, specific, and sensitive manner. It is shown that the nanozyme activity of GNPs can be inhibited by its surface passivation with target-specific aptamer molecules. Similar to an enzymatic competitive inhibition process, in the presence of a cognate target, these aptamer molecules leave the GNP surface in a target concentration-dependent manner, reactivating GNP nanozyme activity. This reversible inhibition of the GNP nanozyme activity can either be directly visualized in the form of color change of the peroxidase reaction product or can be quantified using UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy. This approach allowed detection of 0.1 ppm acetamiprid within an assay time of 10 min. This reversible nanozyme activation/inhibition strategy may in principle be universally applicable for the detection of a range of environmental or biomedical molecules of interest. PMID:25340286

  20. The effect of enzyme inhibition on the metabolism and activation of tacrine by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Spaldin, V; Madden, S; Pool, W F; Woolf, T F; Park, B K

    1994-01-01

    1. Tacrine (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-9-aminoacridine-hydrochloride: THA) underwent metabolism in vitro by a panel (n = 12) of human liver microsomes genotyped for CYP2D6, in the presence of NADPH, to both protein-reactive and stable metabolites. 2. There was considerable variation in the extent of THA metabolism amongst human livers. Protein-reactive metabolite formation showed a 10-fold variation (0.6 +/- 0.1%-5.2 +/- 0.8% of incubated radioactivity mg-1 protein) whilst stable metabolites showed a 3-fold variation (24.3 +/- 1.7%-78.6 +/- 2.6% of incubated radioactivity). 3. Using cytochrome P450 isoform specific inhibitors CYP1A2 was identified as the major enzyme involved in all routes of THA metabolism. 4. There was a high correlation between aromatic and alicyclic hydroxylation (r = 0.92, P < 0.0001) consistent with these biotransformations being catalysed by the same enzymes. 5. Enoxacin (ENOX), cimetidine (CIM) and chloroquine (CQ) inhibited THA metabolism by a preferential decrease in the bioactivation to protein-reactive, and hence potentially toxic, species. The inhibitory potency of ENOX and CIM was increased significantly upon pre-incubation with microsomes and NADPH. 6. Covalent binding correlated with 7-OH-THA formation before (r = 0.792, P < 0.0001) and after (r = 0.73, P < 0.0001) inhibition by CIM, consistent with a two-step mechanism in the formation of protein-reactive metabolite(s) via a 7-OH intermediate. 7. The use of enzyme inhibitors may provide a useful tool for examining the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of THA in vivo. PMID:7946932

  1. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation.

    PubMed

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favours the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi, flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles as surround muscles, during rest and tonic activation of the FDI muscle in 21 subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under magnetic resonance imaging-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90-120% of the adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI muscle was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of the FDI muscle, CBI was significantly reduced only for the FDI muscle, and not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned motor evoked potential sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI muscle tonic activation as compared with rest, despite background electromyography activity increasing only for the FDI muscle. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle. PMID:26900871

  2. Troglitazone inhibits endothelial cell proliferation through suppression of casein kinase 2 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuy-Sook; Park, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seahyoung; Lim, Hyun-Joung; Jang, Yangsoo; Park, Hyun-Young . E-mail: hypark65@nih.go.kr

    2006-07-21

    Troglitazone, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), has been reported to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation by suppressing Akt activation. Recently, it has been also proposed that phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) plays an important role in such effect of troglitazone. However, the mechanism of how troglitazone regulates PTEN remains to be elucidated. We therefore investigated the effects of troglitazone on casein kinase 2 (CK2), which is known to negatively regulate PTEN activity. Troglitazone significantly inhibited serum-induced proliferation of HUVEC in a concentration dependent manner. Serum-induced Akt and its downstream signaling pathway activation was attenuated by troglitazone (10 {mu}M) pretreatment. The phosphorylation of PTEN, which was directly related to Akt activation, was decreased with troglitazone pretreatment and was inversely proportional to CK2 activity. DRB, a CK2 inhibitor, also showed effects similar to that of troglitazone on Akt and its downstream signaling molecules. In conclusion, our results suggest that troglitazone inhibits proliferation of HUVECs through suppression of CK2 activity rendering PTEN to remain activated, and this effect of troglitazone in HUVECs seems to be PPAR{gamma} independent.

  3. Inhibition of PAI-1 Antiproteolytic Activity Against tPA by RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Damare, Jared; Brandal, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1; SERPINE1) inhibits the plasminogen activators: tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Elevated levels of PAI-1 have been correlated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Pharmacologically suppressing PAI-1 might prevent, or successfully treat PAI-1 related vascular diseases. This can potentially be accomplished by using small RNA molecules (aptamers). This study's goal is to develop RNA aptamers to a region of PAI-1 that will prevent the ability of PAI-1 to interact with the plasminogen activators. The aptamers were generated through a systematic evolution of ligands via exponential enrichment approach that ensures the creation of RNA molecules that bind to our target protein, PAI-1. In vitro assays were used to determine the effect of these aptamers on PAI-1's inhibitory activity. Three aptamers that bind to PAI-1 with affinities in the nanomolar range were isolated. The aptamer clones R10-4 and R10-2 inhibited PAI-1's antiproteolytic activity against tPA and disrupted PAI-1's ability to form a stable covalent complex with tPA. Increasing aptamer concentrations correlated positively with an increase in cleaved PAI-1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of RNA molecules that inhibit the antiproteolytic activity of PAI-1. PMID:24922319

  4. E-NTPDase (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase) of Leishmania amazonensis inhibits macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rodrigo Saar; de Carvalho, Luana Cristina Faria; de Souza Vasconcellos, Raphael; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2015-04-01

    Leishmania amazonensis, the causal agent of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, is known for its ability to modulate the host immune response. Because a relationship between ectonucleotidase activity and the ability of Leishmania to generate injury in C57BL/6 mice has been demonstrated, in this study we evaluated the involvement of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) activity of L. amazonensis in the process of infection of J774-macrophages. Our results show that high-activity parasites show increased survival rate in LPS/IFN-γ-activated cells, by inhibiting the host-cell NO production. Conversely, inhibition of E-NTPDase activity reduces the parasite survival rates, an effect associated with increased macrophage NO production. E-NTPDase activity generates substrate for the production of extracellular adenosine, which binds to A2B receptors and reduces IL-12 and TNF-α produced by activated macrophages, thus inhibiting NO production. These results indicate that E-NTPDase activity is important for survival of L. amazonensis within macrophages, showing the role of the enzyme in modulating macrophage response and lower NO production, which ultimately favors infection. Our results point to a new mechanism of L. amazonensis infection that may pave the way for the development of new treatments for this neglected disease. PMID:25554487

  5. Estrogen ameliorates microglial activation by inhibiting the Kir2.1 inward-rectifier K(+) channel.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Chen, Yun-Wen; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Shih, Yao-Hsiang; Jiang-Shieh, Ya-Fen; Yang, Ting-Ting; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Microglial activation is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although the etiology of PD remains unclear, age and male gender are known PD risk factors. By comparing microglia and dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) of male and female mice of different ages, we found that the degrees of microglial activation and DA neuron loss increased with age in both genders, but were more pronounced in males, as were peripheral lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation and DA neuron loss. A bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) eliminated the female-associated protection against age- and LPS-induced microglial activation, which suggests that ovary hormones are involved in gender-specific responses. Treating female mice with 17β-estradiol supplements reduced the age-associated microglial activation in OVX mice. Moreover, pretreating mouse BV2 microglial cells with 17β-estradiol inhibited LPS-induced elevation of Toll-like receptor 4, phosphorylated p38, and TNF-α levels. We then examined the effect of 17β-estradiol on inward-rectifier K(+) channel Kir2.1, a known regulator of microglial activation. We found that 17β-estradiol inhibited the Kir2.1 activity of BV2 cells by reducing the probability that the channel would be open. We conclude that age- and inflammation-associated microglial activation is attenuated by ovarian estrogen, because it inhibits Kir2.1. PMID:26960267

  6. Estrogen ameliorates microglial activation by inhibiting the Kir2.1 inward-rectifier K+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Chen, Yun-Wen; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Shih, Yao-Hsiang; Jiang-Shieh, Ya-Fen; Yang, Ting-Ting; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Microglial activation is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although the etiology of PD remains unclear, age and male gender are known PD risk factors. By comparing microglia and dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) of male and female mice of different ages, we found that the degrees of microglial activation and DA neuron loss increased with age in both genders, but were more pronounced in males, as were peripheral lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation and DA neuron loss. A bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) eliminated the female-associated protection against age- and LPS-induced microglial activation, which suggests that ovary hormones are involved in gender-specific responses. Treating female mice with 17β-estradiol supplements reduced the age-associated microglial activation in OVX mice. Moreover, pretreating mouse BV2 microglial cells with 17β-estradiol inhibited LPS-induced elevation of Toll-like receptor 4, phosphorylated p38, and TNF-α levels. We then examined the effect of 17β-estradiol on inward-rectifier K+ channel Kir2.1, a known regulator of microglial activation. We found that 17β-estradiol inhibited the Kir2.1 activity of BV2 cells by reducing the probability that the channel would be open. We conclude that age- and inflammation-associated microglial activation is attenuated by ovarian estrogen, because it inhibits Kir2.1. PMID:26960267

  7. Thioredoxin and dihydrolipoic acid inhibit elastase activity in cystic fibrosis sputum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rees L; Rancourt, Raymond C; del Val, Greg; Pack, Kami; Pardee, Churee; Accurso, Frank J; White, Carl W

    2005-11-01

    Excessive neutrophil elastase activity within airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients results in progressive lung damage. Disruption of disulfide bonds on elastase by reducing agents may modify its enzymatic activity. Three naturally occurring dithiol reducing systems were examined for their effects on elastase activity: 1) Escherichia coli thioredoxin (Trx) system, 2) recombinant human thioredoxin (rhTrx) system, and 3) dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA). The Trx systems consisted of Trx, Trx reductase, and NADPH. As shown by spectrophotometric assay of elastase activity, the two Trx systems and DHLA inhibited purified human neutrophil elastase as well as the elastolytic activity present in the soluble phase (sol) of CF sputum. Removal of any of the three Trx system constituents prevented inhibition. Compared with the monothiols N-acetylcysteine and reduced glutathione, the dithiols displayed greater elastase inhibition. To streamline Trx as an investigational tool, a stable reduced form of rhTrx was synthesized and used as a single component. Reduced rhTrx inhibited purified elastase and CF sputum sol elastase without NADPH or Trx reductase. Because Trx and DHLA have mucolytic effects, we investigated changes in elastase activity after mucolytic treatment. Unprocessed CF sputum was directly treated with reduced rhTrx, the Trx system, DHLA, or DNase. The Trx system and DHLA did not increase elastase activity, whereas reduced rhTrx treatment increased sol elastase activity by 60%. By contrast, the elastase activity after DNase treatment increased by 190%. The ability of Trx and DHLA to limit elastase activity combined with their mucolytic effects makes these compounds potential therapies for CF. PMID:16214824

  8. Fractional vesamicol receptor occupancy and acetylcholine active transport inhibition in synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, R; Rogers, G A; Fehlmann, C; Parsons, S M

    1989-09-01

    Vesamicol [(-)-(trans)-2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol] receptor binding and inhibition of acetylcholine (AcCh) active transport by cholinergic synaptic vesicles that were isolated from Torpedo electric organ were studied for 23 vesamicol enantiomers, analogues, and other drugs. Use of trace [3H]vesamicol and [14C]AcCh allowed simultaneous determination of the concentrations of enantiomer, analogue, or drug required to half-saturate the vesamicol receptor (Ki) and to half-inhibit transport (IC50), respectively. Throughout a wide range of potencies for different compounds, the Ki/IC50 ratios varied from 1.5 to 24. Compounds representative of the diverse structures studied, namely deoxyvesamicol, chloroquine, and levorphanol, were competitive inhibitors of vesamicol binding. It is concluded that many drugs can bind to the vesamicol receptor and binding to only a small fraction of the receptors can result in AcCh active transport inhibition. Possible mechanisms for this effect are discussed. PMID:2550778

  9. Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase by cystamine may mediate the hypotriglyceridemic activity of pantethine.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2001-03-01

    Pantethine is a versatile and well-tolerated hypolipidemic agent whose efficacy in this regard appears to be mediated by its catabolic product cystamine, a nucleophile which avidly attacks disulfide groups. An overview of pantethine research suggests that the hypotriglyceridemic activity of pantethine reflects cystamine-mediated inhibition of the hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase, which can be expected to activate hepatic fatty acid oxidation. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase as well as a more distal enzyme in the cholesterol synthetic pathway may account for pantethine's hypocholesterolemic effects. If pantethine does indeed effectively inhibit hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase, it may have adjuvant utility in the hepatothermic therapy of obesity. As a safe and effective compound of natural origin, pantethine merits broader use in the management of hyperlipidemias. PMID:11359352

  10. The effect of dextran to restore the activity of pulmonary surfactant inhibited by albumin.

    PubMed

    Lu, J J; Cheung, W W Y; Yu, L M Y; Policova, Z; Li, D; Hair, M L; Neumann, A W

    2002-04-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is crucial to maintain the proper functioning of the respiration system. Certain types of blood proteins (e.g. albumin) were found to inhibit the activity of pulmonary surfactant. Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA) was used to study the effect of dextran to restore the activity of an albumin-inhibited pulmonary surfactant. It was found that dextran could effectively restore surface tension properties of the inhibited surfactant in vitro. Furthermore, dextran improved the performance of pulmonary surfactants when albumin was absent. It was found that when a surfactant film was under high compression (e.g. above 70% surface area reduction), the presence of dextran increased film stability, so that the film could sustain high surface pressures without being collapsing. PMID:12380007

  11. Potent AChE enzyme inhibition activity of Zizyphus oxyphylla: A new source of antioxidant compounds.

    PubMed

    Mazhar, Farhana; Khanum, Raisa; Ajaib, Muhammad; Jahangir, Muhammad

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the antioxidant potential and enzyme inhibition of various fractions of Zizyphus oxyphylla. The plant metabolites were extracted in methanol and partitioned with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol successively. Phytochemical screening showed presence of alkaloids, terpenoids and flavonoids in ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions. The antioxidant potential and acetylcholine esterase assay of all these fractions and remaining aqueous fraction was evaluated by using reported methods. The results revealed that chloroform soluble fraction exhibited highest percent inhibition of DPPH radical as compared to other fractions. It showed 95.01 ± 0.37% inhibition of DPPH radical at a concentration of 120 μg/mL. The IC₅₀ of this fraction was 13.20 ± 0.27 μg/mL, relative to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT, a reference standard), having IC₅₀ of 12.10 ± 0.29 μg/mL. It also showed highest total antioxidant activity i.e. 1.723 ± 0.34 as well as highest FRAP value (339.5 ± 0.57 TE μm/mL) and highest total phenolic contents (142.65 ± 1.20 GAE mg/g) as compared to the other studied fractions. The fractions were also studied for Acetylcholine esterase enzyme (AChE) enzyme inhibition activity and n-butanol soluble fraction exhibited maximum inhibition (95.5 ± 0.13 mg/mL with IC50 =9.58 ± 0.08 mg/mL relative to galanthamine (13.26 ± 0.73 mg/mL), while n- hexane soluble fraction (165.15 ± 0.94 mg/mL) showed non-significant. We are still working to isolate pure compounds for active fractions targeting potent inhibition responsible for some activities. PMID:26639499

  12. Minocycline protects PC12 cells against NMDA-induced injury via inhibiting 5-lipoxygenase activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Wei, Er-Qing; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Ge, Qiu-Fu; Liu, Jian-Ren; Wang, Meng-Ling; Huang, Xiao-Jia; Hu, Xin; Chen, Zhong

    2006-04-26

    Recently, we have reported that minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline with neuroprotective effects, inhibits the in vitro ischemic-like injury and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activation in PC12 cells. In the present study, we further determined whether minocycline protects PC12 cells from excitotoxicity via inhibiting 5-LOX activation. We used N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 200 microM) to induce early (exposure for 6 h) and delayed (exposure for 6 h followed by 24 h recovery) injuries. We found that NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, 5-LOX inhibitor caffeic acid and minocycline concentration dependently attenuated NMDA-induced early and delayed cell injuries (viability reduction and cell death). However, only ketamine (1 microM) inhibited NMDA-evoked elevation of intracellular calcium. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis showed that NMDA induced 5-LOX translocation to the nuclear membrane after 1- to 6-h exposure which was confirmed by Western blotting, indicating that 5-LOX was activated. Ketamine, caffeic acid and minocycline (each at 1 microM) inhibited 5-LOX translocation after early injury. After delayed injury, PC12 cells were shrunk, and 5-LOX was translocated to the nuclei and nuclear membrane; ketamine, caffeic acid and minocycline inhibited both cell shrinking and 5-LOX translocation. As a control, 12-LOX inhibitor baicalein showed a weak effect on cell viability and death, but no effect on 5-LOX translocation. Therefore, we conclude that the protective effect of minocycline on NMDA-induced injury is partly mediated by inhibiting 5-LOX activation. PMID:16574083

  13. Tremorgenic indole alkaloids potently inhibit smooth muscle high-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Knaus, H G; McManus, O B; Lee, S H; Schmalhofer, W A; Garcia-Calvo, M; Helms, L M; Sanchez, M; Giangiacomo, K; Reuben, J P; Smith, A B

    1994-05-17

    Tremorgenic indole alkaloids produce neurological disorders (e.g., staggers syndromes) in ruminants. The mode of action of these fungal mycotoxins is not understood but may be related to their known effects on neurotransmitter release. To determine whether these effects could be due to inhibition of K+ channels, the interaction of various indole diterpenes with high-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ (maxi-K) channels was examined. Paspalitrem A, paspalitrem C, aflatrem, penitrem A, and paspalinine inhibit binding of [125I]charybdotoxin (ChTX) to maxi-K channels in bovine aortic smooth muscle sarcolemmal membranes. In contrast, three structurally related compounds, paxilline, verruculogen, and paspalicine, enhanced toxin binding. As predicted from the binding studies, covalent incorporation of [125I]ChTX into the 31-kDa subunit of the maxi-K channel was blocked by compounds that inhibit [125I]ChTX binding and enhanced by compounds that stimulate [125I]ChTX binding. Modulation of [125I]ChTX binding was due to allosteric mechanisms. Despite their different effects on binding of [125I]ChTX to maxi-K channels, all compounds potently inhibited maxi-K channels in electrophysiological experiments. Other types of voltage-dependent or Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels examined were not affected. Chemical modifications of paxilline indicate a defined structure-activity relationship for channel inhibition. Paspalicine, a deshydroxy analog of paspalinine lacking tremorgenic activity, also potently blocked maxi-K channels. Taken together, these data suggest that indole diterpenes are the most potent nonpeptidyl inhibitors of maxi-K channels identified to date. Some of their pharmacological properties could be explained by inhibition of maxi-K channels, although tremorgenicity may be unrelated to channel block. PMID:7514038

  14. Ginkgolic acid inhibits HIV protease activity and HIV infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jian-Ming; Yan, Shaoyu; Jamaluddin, Saha; Weakley, Sarah M.; Liang, Zhengdong; Siwak, Edward B.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Several HIV protease mutations, which are resistant to clinical HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), have been identified. There is a great need for second-generation PIs with different chemical structures and/or with an alternative mode of inhibition. Ginkgolic acid is a natural herbal substance and a major component of the lipid fraction in the nutshells of the Ginkgo biloba tree. The objective of this study was to determine whether ginkgolic acid could inhibit HIV protease activity in a cell free system and HIV infection in human cells. Material/Methods Purified ginkgolic acid and recombinant HIV-1 HXB2 KIIA protease were used for the HIV protease activity assay. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used for HIV infection (HIV-1SF162 virus), determined by a p24gag ELISA. Cytotoxicity was also determined. Results Ginkgolic acid (31.2 μg/ml) inhibited HIV protease activity by 60%, compared with the negative control, and the effect was concentration-dependent. In addition, ginkgolic acid treatment (50 and 100 μg/ml) effectively inhibited the HIV infection at day 7 in a concentration-dependent manner. Ginkgolic acid at a concentration of up to 150 μg/ml demonstrated very limited cytotoxicity. Conclusions Ginkgolic acid effectively inhibits HIV protease activity in a cell free system and HIV infection in PBMCs without significant cytotoxicity. Ginkgolic acid may inhibit HIV protease through different mechanisms than current FDA-approved HIV PI drugs. These properties of ginkgolic acid make it a promising therapy for HIV infection, especially as the clinical problem of viral resistance to HIV PIs continues to grow. PMID:22847190

  15. Molecular structure‐function relationship of dietary polyphenols for inhibiting VEGF‐induced VEGFR‐2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo, Ana B.; Winterbone, Mark S.; Moyle, Christina W. A.; Needs, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    1 Scope We recently reported potent inhibition of VEGF signalling by two flavanols at sub‐micromolar concentrations, mediated by direct binding of the flavanols to VEGF. The aim of this study was to quantify the inhibitory potency and binding affinity of a wide range of dietary polyphenols and determine the structural requirements for VEGF inhibition. 2 Methods and results The concentration of polyphenol required to cause 50% inhibition (IC50) of VEGF‐dependent VEGFR‐2 activation in HUVECS was determined after pretreating VEGF with polyphenols at various concentations. Binding affinities and binding sites on VEGF were predicted using in‐silico modelling. Ellagic acid and 15 flavonoids had IC50 values ≤10 μM while 28 other polyhenols were weak/non‐inhibitors. Structural features associated with potent inhibition included 3‐galloylation, C‐ring C2=C3, total OH, B‐ring catechol, C‐ring 3‐OH of flavonoids. Potency was not associated with polyphenol hydrophobicity. There was a strong correlation between potency of inhibition and binding affinities, and all polyphenols were predicted to bind to a region on VEGF involved in VEGFR‐2 binding. 3 Conclusion Specific polyphenols bind directly to a discrete region of VEGF and inhibit VEGF signalling, and this potentially explains the associations between consumption of these polyphenols and CVD risk. PMID:26250940

  16. Deletion of striatal adenosine A(2A) receptor spares latent inhibition and prepulse inhibition but impairs active avoidance learning.

    PubMed

    Singer, Philipp; Wei, Catherine J; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Boison, Detlev; Yee, Benjamin K

    2013-04-01

    Following early clinical leads, the adenosine A(2A)R receptor (A(2A)R) has continued to attract attention as a potential novel target for treating schizophrenia, especially against the negative and cognitive symptoms of the disease because of A(2A)R's unique modulatory action over glutamatergic in addition to dopaminergic signaling. Through (i) the antagonistic interaction with the dopamine D(2) receptor, and (ii) the regulation of glutamate release and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function, striatal A(2A)R is ideally positioned to fine-tune the dopamine-glutamate balance, the disturbance of which is implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the precise function of striatal A(2A)Rs in the regulation of schizophrenia-relevant behavior is poorly understood. Here, we tested the impact of conditional striatum-specific A(2A)R knockout (st-A(2A)R-KO) on latent inhibition (LI) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) - behavior that is tightly regulated by striatal dopamine and glutamate. These are two common cross-species translational tests for the assessment of selective attention and sensorimotor gating deficits reported in schizophrenia patients; and enhanced performance in these tests is associated with antipsychotic drug action. We found that neither LI nor PPI was significantly affected in st-A(2A)R-KO mice, although a deficit in active avoidance learning was identified in these animals. The latter phenotype, however, was not replicated in another form of aversive conditioning - namely, conditioned taste aversion. Hence, the present study shows that neither learned inattention (as measured by LI) nor sensory gating (as indexed by PPI) requires the integrity of striatal A(2A)Rs - a finding that may undermine the hypothesized importance of A(2A)R in the genesis and/or treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:23276608

  17. Cytotoxic activity of Tivantinib (ARQ 197) is not due solely to MET inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Aoyama, Aki; Yamori, Takao; Qi, Jie; Oh-hara, Tomoko; Song, Youngchul; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Fujita, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase c-MET is the high-affinity receptor for the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). The HGF/c-MET axis is often dysregulated in tumors. c-MET activation can be caused by MET gene amplification, activating mutations, and auto- or paracrine mechanisms. Thus, c-MET inhibitors are under development as anti-cancer drugs. Tivantinib (ARQ 197) was reported as a small molecule c-MET inhibitor and early clinical studies suggest anti-tumor activity. To assess if the anti-tumor activity of tivantinib was due to inhibition of c-MET, we compared the activity of tivantinib to other c-MET inhibitors in both c-MET addicted and non-addicted cancer cells. As expected, other c-MET inhibitors, crizotinib and PHA-665752, suppressed the growth of c-MET addicted cancers, but not the growth of cancers that are not addicted to c-MET. In contrast, tivantinib inhibited cell viability with similar potency in both c-MET addicted and non-addicted cells. These results suggest that tivantinib exhibits its antitumor activity in a manner independent of c-MET status. Tivantinib treatment induced a G2/M cell cycle arrest in EBC1 cells similarly to vincristine treatment, whereas PHA-665752 or crizotinib treatment markedly induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. To identify the additional molecular target of tivantinib, we performed COMPARE analysis, an in silico screening of a database of drug sensitivities across 39 cancer cell lines (JFCR39), and identified microtubule as a target of tivantinib. Tivantinib treated cells demonstrated typical microtubule disruption similar to vincristine and inhibited microtubule assembly in vitro. These results suggest that tivantinib inhibits microtubule polymerization in addition to inhibiting c-MET. PMID:23598276

  18. Inhibition of the active lymph pump by flow in rat mesenteric lymphatics and thoracic duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gashev, Anatoliy A.; Davis, Michael J.; Zawieja, David C.; Delp, M. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    There are only a few reports of the influence of imposed flow on an active lymph pump under conditions of controlled intraluminal pressure. Thus, the mechanisms are not clearly defined. Rat mesenteric lymphatics and thoracic ducts were isolated, cannulated and pressurized. Input and output pressures were adjusted to impose various flows. Lymphatic systolic and diastolic diameters were measured and used to determine contraction frequency and pump flow indices. Imposed flow inhibited the active lymph pump in both mesenteric lymphatics and in the thoracic duct. The active pump of the thoracic duct appeared more sensitive to flow than did the active pump of the mesenteric lymphatics. Imposed flow reduced the frequency and amplitude of the contractions and accordingly the active pump flow. Flow-induced inhibition of the active lymph pump followed two temporal patterns. The first pattern was a rapidly developing inhibition of contraction frequency. Upon imposition of flow, the contraction frequency immediately fell and then partially recovered over time during continued flow. This effect was dependent on the magnitude of imposed flow, but did not depend on the direction of flow. The effect also depended upon the rate of change in the direction of flow. The second pattern was a slowly developing reduction of the amplitude of the lymphatic contractions, which increased over time during continued flow. The inhibition of contraction amplitude was dependent on the direction of the imposed flow, but independent of the magnitude of flow. Nitric oxide was partly but not completely responsible for the influence of flow on the mesenteric lymph pump. Exposure to NO mimicked the effects of flow, and inhibition of the NO synthase by N (G)-monomethyl-L-arginine attenuated but did not completely abolish the effects of flow.

  19. Do displacement activities help preschool children to inhibit a forbidden action?

    PubMed

    Pecora, Giulia; Addessi, Elsa; Schino, Gabriele; Bellagamba, Francesca

    2014-10-01

    Displacement activities are commonly recognized as behavioral patterns, mostly including self-directed actions (e.g., scratching, self-touching), that often occur in situations involving conflicting motivational tendencies. In ethology, several researchers have suggested that displacement activities could facilitate individuals in dealing with the stress experienced in a frustrating context. In child developmental research, some authors have assessed whether distraction strategies could help children to inhibit a dominant response during delay of gratification tasks. However, little is known about the displacement activities that young children may produce in such situations. This study was aimed at investigating whether displacement activities had an effect on preschool children's ability to postpone an immediate gratification (i.e., interacting with an attractive toy, a musical box), thereby functioning as regulators of their emotional state. To this end, we administered 143 2- to 4-year-olds with a delay maintenance task and related their performance with displacement activities they produced during the task and with actions with an external object. Children's latency to touch the musical box was positively related to their rate of displacement activities. However, the rate of displacement activities increased progressively as long as the children were able to inhibit the interaction with the musical box. In addition, the rate of displacement activities during the first 1 min of test did not predict the ability of children to inhibit the interaction with the box. These results suggest that displacement activities represented a functionless by-product of motivational conflict rather than a strategy that children used to inhibit their response to an attractive stimulus. PMID:24907630

  20. The inhibition of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 activity by crude and purified human pregnancy plug mucus and mucins in an inhibition assay

    PubMed Central

    Habte, Habtom H; de Beer, Corena; Lotz, Zoë E; Tyler, Marilyn G; Schoeman, Leann; Kahn, Delawir; Mall, Anwar S

    2008-01-01

    Background The female reproductive tract is amongst the main routes for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) transmission. Cervical mucus however is known to protect the female reproductive tract from bacterial invasion and fluid loss and regulates and facilitates sperm transport to the upper reproductive tract. The purpose of this study was to purify and characterize pregnancy plug mucins and determine their anti-HIV-1 activity in an HIV inhibition assay. Methods Pregnancy plug mucins were purified by caesium chloride density-gradient ultra-centrifugation and characterized by Western blotting analysis. The anti-HIV-1 activities of the crude pregnancy plug mucus and purified pregnancy plug mucins was determined by incubating them with HIV-1 prior to infection of the human T lymphoblastoid cell line (CEM SS cells). Results The pregnancy plug mucus had MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC and MUC5B. The HIV inhibition assay revealed that while the purified pregnancy plug mucins inhibit HIV-1 activity by approximately 97.5%, the crude pregnancy plug mucus failed to inhibit HIV-1 activity. Conclusion Although it is not clear why the crude sample did not inhibit HIV-1 activity, it may be that the amount of mucins in the crude pregnancy plug mucus (which contains water, mucins, lipids, nucleic acids, lactoferrin, lysozyme, immunoglobulins and ions), is insufficient to cause viral inhibition or aggregation. PMID:18489743

  1. Verbascoside isolated from Tectona grandis mediates gastric protection in rats via inhibiting proton pump activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Shukla, Nivedita; Singh, Pratibha; Sharma, Rolee; Rajendran, S M; Maurya, Rakesh; Palit, Gautam

    2010-10-01

    Evidences have suggested that Tectona grandis (TG) attenuates gastric mucosal injury; however its mechanism has not yet been established. The aim of present study was to evaluate the gastroprotective mechanism of ethanolic extract of TG (E-EtOH), butanolic fraction (Fr-Bu) and to identify its active constituents. Anti-ulcer activities were evaluated against cold restraint (CRU) and pyloric ligation (PL) induced gastric ulcer models and further confirmed through H(+) K(+)-ATPase inhibitory activity. Cytoprotective activity was evaluated in alcohol (AL) induced gastric ulcer model and further through PGE(2) level. E-EtOH and Fr-Bu attenuated ulcer formation in CRU. Moreover E-EtOH and Fr-Bu displayed potent anti-secretory activity as evident through reduced free acidity and pepsin activity in PL, confirmed further by in vitro inhibition of H(+) K(+)-ATPase activity. In addition cytoprotective potential of E-EtOH and Fr-Bu were apparent with protection in AL model, increased PGE(2) content and enhanced mucin level in PL. Phytochemical investigations of Fr-Bu yielded terpenoides and a phenolic glycoside, verbascoside. The anti-secretory mechanism of verbascoside mediated apparently through inhibition of H(+) K(+)-ATPase with corresponding decrease in plasma gastrin level, is novel to our finding. Gastroprotection elicited by TG might be through proton pump inhibition and consequent augmentation of the defensive mechanism. PMID:20388534

  2. Strategies to Maximize Burst Lengths in Rhythmic Anti-Phase Activity of Networks with Reciprocal Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Amitabha; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2015-06-01

    We consider repetitive activity patterns in which a pair of oscillators take turns becoming active, motivated by anti-phase bursting activity in neuronal networks. In our framework, when one unit is active, it inhibits the other, as occurs with inhibitory synaptic coupling of neurons; when the inhibition is strong enough, the inhibited unit is prevented from activating. We assume that the coupling resources available to each oscillator are constrained and allow each unit to select the amount of input that it provides to the other each time that it activates. In this setting, we investigate the strategies that each oscillator should utilize in order to maximize the number of spikes it can fire (or equivalently the amount of time it is active), corresponding to a burst of spikes in a neuron, before the other unit takes over. We derive a one-dimensional map whose fixed points correspond to periodic anti-phase bursting solutions. We introduce a novel numerical method to obtain the graph of this map and we extend the analysis to select solutions that achieve consistency between coupling resource use and recovery. Our analysis shows that corresponding to each fixed point of the map, there is actually an infinite number of related strategies that yield the same number of spikes per burst.

  3. Potassium humate inhibits complement activation and the production of inflammatory cytokines in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    van Rensburg, C.E.J.; Naude, P.J.

    2009-08-15

    The effects of brown coal derived potassium humate on lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production and complement activation were investigated in vitro. Potassium humate increased lymphocyte proliferation of phytohaemaglutinin A (PHA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated mononuclear lymphocytes (MNL) in vitro from concentrations of 20 to 80 {mu} g/ml, in a dose dependant manner. On the other hand potassium humate, at 40 {mu} g/ml, significantly inhibited the release of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 by PHA stimulated MNL. Regarding complement activation it was found that potassium humate inhibits the activation of both the alternative and classical pathways without affecting the stability of the red blood cell membranes. These results indicate that the anti-inflammatory potential of potassium humate could be partially due to the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines responsible for the initiation of these reactions as well as inhibition of complement activation. The increased lymphocyte proliferation observed, might be due to increased IL-2 production as previously been documented.

  4. Targeting glutaminolysis has antileukemic activity in acute myeloid leukemia and synergizes with BCL-2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jacque, Nathalie; Ronchetti, Anne Marie; Larrue, Clément; Meunier, Godelieve; Birsen, Rudy; Willems, Lise; Saland, Estelle; Decroocq, Justine; Maciel, Thiago Trovati; Lambert, Mireille; Poulain, Laury; Hospital, Marie Anne; Sujobert, Pierre; Joseph, Laure; Chapuis, Nicolas; Lacombe, Catherine; Moura, Ivan Cruz; Demo, Susan; Sarry, Jean Emmanuel; Recher, Christian; Mayeux, Patrick; Tamburini, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells require glutamine to adapt to increased biosynthetic activity. The limiting step in intracellular glutamine catabolism involves its conversion to glutamate by glutaminase (GA). Different GA isoforms are encoded by the genes GLS1 and GLS2 in humans. Herein, we show that glutamine levels control mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Glutaminase C (GAC) is the GA isoform that is most abundantly expressed in AML. Both knockdown of GLS1 expression and pharmacologic GLS1 inhibition by the drug CB-839 can reduce OXPHOS, leading to leukemic cell proliferation arrest and apoptosis without causing cytotoxic activity against normal human CD34+ progenitors. Strikingly, GLS1 knockdown dramatically inhibited AML development in NSG mice. The antileukemic activity of CB-839 was abrogated by both the expression of a hyperactive GACK320A allele and the addition of the tricarboxyclic acid cycle product α-ketoglutarate, indicating the critical function of GLS1 in AML cell survival. Finally, glutaminolysis inhibition activated mitochondrial apoptosis and synergistically sensitized leukemic cells to priming with the BCL-2 inhibitor ABT-199. These findings show that targeting glutamine addiction via GLS1 inhibition offers a potential novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26186940

  5. Differences in Feedback- and Inhibition-Related Neural Activity in Adult ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dibbets, Pauline; Evers, Lisbeth; Hurks, Petra; Marchetta, Natalie; Jolles, Jelle

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine response inhibition- and feedback-related neural activity in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) using event-related functional MRI. Sixteen male adults with ADHD and 13 healthy/normal controls participated in this study and performed a modified Go/NoGo task. Behaviourally,…

  6. FOXO1 inhibits Runx2 transcriptional activity and prostate cancer cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun; Pan, Yunqian; Zheng, Li; Choe, Chungyoul; Lindgren, Bruce; Jensen, Eric D.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Cheng, Liang; Huang, Haojie

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients with regional lymph node involvement at radical prostatectomy often experience disease progression to other organs, with the bone as the predominant site. The transcription factor Runx2 plays an important role in bone formation and PCa cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Here we demonstrated that the forkhead protein FOXO1, a key downstream effector of the tumor suppressor PTEN, inhibits the transcriptional activity of Runx2 in PCa cells. This inhibition was enhanced by PTEN but diminished by active Akt. FOXO1 bound to Runx2 in vitro and in vivo and suppressed Runx2’s activity independent of its transcriptional function. FOXO1 inhibited Runx2-promoted migration of PCa cells while silencing of endogenous FOXO1 enhanced PCa cell migration in a Runx2-dependent manner. Forced expression of FOXO1 also inhibited Runx2-promoted PCa cell invasion. Finally, we found that expression of PTEN and the level of FOXO1 in the nucleus is inversely correlated with expression of Runx2 in a cohort of PCa specimens from patients with lymph node and bone metastasis. These data reveal FOXO1 as a critical negative regulator of Runx2 in PCa cells. Inactivation of FOXO1 due to frequent loss of PTEN in PCa cells may leave the oncogenic activities of Runx2 unchecked, thereby driving promiscuous expression of Runx2 target genes involved in cell migration and invasion and favoring PCa progression. PMID:21505104

  7. Silibinin Inhibits HIV-1 Infection by Reducing Cellular Activation and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Janela; Lovelace, Erica S.; Elahi, Shokrollah; Maurice, Nicholas J.; Wagoner, Jessica; Dragavon, Joan; Mittler, John E.; Kraft, Zane; Stamatatos, Leonidis; Horton, Helen; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Coombs, Robert W.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) block hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL), a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects. PMID:22848626

  8. Augmented AMPK activity inhibits cell migration by phosphorylating the novel substrate Pdlim5

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Tsukamoto, Osamu; Nakano, Atsushi; Kato, Hisakazu; Kioka, Hidetaka; Ito, Noriaki; Higo, Shuichiro; Yamazaki, Satoru; Shintani, Yasunori; Matsuoka, Ken; Liao, Yulin; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Asakura, Masanori; Takafuji, Kazuaki; Minamino, Tetsuo; Asano, Yoshihiro; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Takashima, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Augmented AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity inhibits cell migration, possibly contributing to the clinical benefits of chemical AMPK activators in preventing atherosclerosis, vascular remodelling and cancer metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we identify PDZ and LIM domain 5 (Pdlim5) as a novel AMPK substrate and show that it plays a critical role in the inhibition of cell migration. AMPK directly phosphorylates Pdlim5 at Ser177. Exogenous expression of phosphomimetic S177D-Pdlim5 inhibits cell migration and attenuates lamellipodia formation. Consistent with this observation, S177D-Pdlim5 suppresses Rac1 activity at the cell periphery and displaces the Arp2/3 complex from the leading edge. Notably, S177D-Pdlim5, but not WT-Pdlim5, attenuates the association with Rac1-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors at the cell periphery. Taken together, our findings indicate that phosphorylation of Pdlim5 on Ser177 by AMPK mediates inhibition of cell migration by suppressing the Rac1-Arp2/3 signalling pathway. PMID:25635515

  9. Inhibition of histone deacetylase 6 activity reduces cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cebotaru, Liudmila; Liu, Qiangni; Yanda, Murali K; Boinot, Clement; Outeda, Patricia; Huso, David L; Watnick, Terry; Guggino, William B; Cebotaru, Valeriu

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelium and increased intracystic fluid secretion via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are thought to contribute to cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) expression and activity are increased in certain cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and in Pkd1-mutant renal epithelial cells. Inhibition of HDAC6 activity with specific inhibitors slows cancer growth. Here we studied the effect of tubacin, a specific HDAC6 inhibitor, on cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease. Treatment with tubacin prevented cyst formation in MDCK cells, an in vitro model of cystogenesis. Cyclic AMP stimulates cell proliferation and activates intracystic CFTR-mediated chloride secretion in ADPKD. Treatment with tubacin downregulated cyclic AMP levels, inhibited cell proliferation, and inhibited cyclic AMP-activated CFTR chloride currents in MDCK cells. We also found that tubacin reduced cyst growth by inhibiting proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells, downregulated cyclic AMP levels, and improved renal function in a Pkd1-conditional mouse model of ADPKD. Thus, HDAC6 could play a role in cyst formation and could serve as a potential therapeutic target in ADPKD. PMID:27165822

  10. THE INHIBITION OF ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN PINK SHRIMP 'PENAEUS DUORARUM' BY METHYL PARATHION AND ITS OXON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, E.C.3.1.1.7, (AChE) activity in the ventral nerve cord of pink shrimp (Penaeus duorarum) by methyl parathion (MPT) and methyl paraoxon (MPO) was investigated. When the animals were exposed to these compounds in water (in vivo), AChE activit...

  11. ALKYTIN INHIBITION OF ATPASE ACTIVITIES IN TISSUE HOMOGENATES AND SUBCELLULAR FRACTIONS FROM NEONATAL AND ADULT RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of triethyltin (TET) on ATPase activities in brain and liver homogenates and subcellular fractions were compared in neonatal and adult rats. n 5 day old rats, relative sensitivities to TET inhibition were: brain and liver mitochondrial ATPase >> rain Na+/K+ ATPase > b...

  12. Inhibitory effect of ebselen on cerebral acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro: kinetics and reversibility of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Martini, Franciele; Bruning, César Augusto; Soares, Suelen Mendonca; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Zeni, Gilson

    2015-01-01

    Ebselen is a synthetic organoselenium compound that has been considered a potential pharmacological agent with low toxicity, showing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. It is bioavailable, blood-brain barrier permeant and safe based on cellular toxicity and Phase I-III clinical trials. There is evidence that ebselen inhibits acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, an enzyme that plays a key role in the cholinergic system by hydrolyzing acetylcholine (ACh), in vitro and ex vivo. This system has a well-known relationship with cognitive process, and AChE inhibitors, such as donepezil and galantamine, have been used to treat cognitive deficits, mainly in the Alzheimer's Disease (AD). However, these drugs have poor bioavailability and a number of side effects, including gastrointestinal upsets and hepatotoxicity. In this way, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of ebselen on cerebral AChE activity in vitro and to determine the kinetic profile and the reversibility of inhibition by dialysis. Ebselen inhibited the cerebral AChE activity with an IC50 of 29 µM, similar to IC50 found with pure AChE from electric eel, demonstrating a mixed and reversible inhibition of AChE, since it increased Km and decreased Vmax. The AChE activity was recovered within 60 min of dialysis. Therefore, the use of ebselen as a therapeutic agent for treatment of AD should be considered, although memory behavior tasks are needed to support such hypothesis. PMID:25312723

  13. The dynamical mechanism of auto-inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2011-07-01

    We use a novel normal mode analysis of an elastic network model drawn from configurations generated during microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to analyze the mechanism of auto-inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). A recent X-ray and mutagenesis experiment (Chen, et al Nature 2009, 459, 1146) of the AMPK homolog S. Pombe sucrose non-fermenting 1 (SNF1) has proposed a new conformational switch model involving the movement of the kinase domain (KD) between an inactive unphosphorylated open state and an active or semi-active phosphorylated closed state, mediated by the autoinhibitory domain (AID), and a similar mutagenesis study showed that rat AMPK has the same auto-inhibition mechanism. However, there is no direct dynamical evidence to support this model and it is not clear whether other functionally important local structural components are equally inhibited. By using the same SNF1 KD-AID fragment as that used in experiment, we show that AID inhibits the catalytic function by restraining the KD into an unproductive open conformation, thereby limiting local structural rearrangements, while mutations that disrupt the interactions between the KD and AID allow for both the local structural rearrangement and global interlobe conformational transition. Our calculations further show that the AID also greatly impacts the structuring and mobility of the activation loop. PMID:21814500

  14. Melatonin suppresses hypoxia-induced migration of HUVECs via inhibition of ERK/Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling; Zheng, Jianchao; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Yujie; Gu, Luo; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Yichao; Zhou, Ruijue; Zheng, Lu; Zhang, Xiaoying; Du, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin, a naturally-occurring hormone, possesses antioxidant properties and ameliorates vascular endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we evaluate the impact of melatonin on the migratory capability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to hypoxia and further investigate whether ERK/Rac1 signaling is involved in this process. Here, we found that melatonin inhibited hypoxia-stimulated hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression and cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, melatonin inhibited Rac1 activation and suppressed the co-localized Rac1 and F-actin on the membrane of HUVECs under hypoxic condition. In addition, the blockade of Rac1 activation with ectopic expression of an inactive mutant form of Rac1-T17N suppressed HIF-1α expression and cell migration in response to hypoxia, as well, but constitutive activation of Rac1 mutant Rac1-V12 restored HIF-1α expression, preventing the inhibition of melatonin on cell migration. Furthermore, the anti-Rac1 effect of melatonin in HUVECs appeared to be associated with its inhibition of ERK phosphorylation, but not that of the PI3k/Akt signaling pathway. Taken together, our work indicates that melatonin exerts an anti-migratory effect on hypoxic HUVECs by blocking ERK/Rac1 activation and subsequent HIF-1α upregulation. PMID:25123138

  15. Inhibition of APOBEC3G activity impedes double-stranded DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Ponnandy; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Adi; Schiffer, Celia A; Kotler, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) was first described as an anti-HIV-1 restriction factor, acting by directly deaminating reverse transcripts of the viral genome. HIV-1 Vif neutralizes the activity of A3G, primarily by mediating degradation of A3G to establish effective infection in host target cells. Lymphoma cells, which express high amounts of A3G, can restrict Vif-deficient HIV-1. Interestingly, these cells are more stable in the face of treatments that result in double-stranded DNA damage, such as ionizing radiation and chemotherapies. Previously, we showed that the Vif-derived peptide (Vif25-39) efficiently inhibits A3G deamination, and increases the sensitivity of lymphoma cells to ionizing radiation. In the current study, we show that additional peptides derived from Vif, A3G, and APOBEC3F, which contain the LYYF motif, inhibit deamination activity. Each residue in the Vif25-39 sequence moderately contributes to the inhibitory effect, whereas replacing a single residue in the LYYF motif completely abrogates inhibition of deamination. Treatment of A3G-expressing lymphoma cells exposed to ionizing radiation with the new inhibitory peptides reduces double-strand break repair after irradiation. Incubation of cultured irradiated lymphoma cells with peptides that inhibit double-strand break repair halts their propagation. These results suggest that A3G may be a potential therapeutic target that is amenable to peptide and peptidomimetic inhibition. PMID:26460502

  16. Genipin inhibits NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome activation via autophagy suppression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shui-Xing; Du, Chong-Tao; Chen, Wei; Lei, Qian-Qian; Li, Ning; Qi, Shuai; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Hu, Gui-Qiu; Deng, Xu-Ming; Han, Wen-Yu; Yang, Yong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic, multiprotein complexes that trigger caspase-1 activation and IL-1β maturation in response to diverse stimuli. Although inflammasomes play important roles in host defense against microbial infection, overactive inflammasomes are deleterious and lead to various autoinflammatory diseases. In the current study, we demonstrated that genipin inhibits the induction of IL-1β production and caspase-1 activation by NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes. Furthermore, genipin specifically prevented NLRP3-mediated, but not NLRC4-mediated, ASC oligomerization. Notably, genipin inhibited autophagy, leading to NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome inhibition. UCP2-ROS signaling may be involved in inflammasome suppression by genipin. In vivo, we showed that genipin inhibited NLRP3-dependent IL-1β production and neutrophil flux in LPS- and alum-induced murine peritonitis. Additionally, genipin provided protection against flagellin-induced lung inflammation by reducing IL-1β production and neutrophil recruitment. Collectively, our results revealed a novel role in inhibition of inflammatory diseases for genipin that has been used as therapeutics for centuries in herb medicine. PMID:26659006

  17. Covalent Inhibition of Ubc13 Affects Ubiquitin Signaling and Reveals Active Site Elements Important for Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Curtis D.; Edwards, Ross A.; Markin, Craig J.; McDonald, Darin; Pulvino, Mary; Huen, Michael S. Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Spyracopoulos, Leo; Hendzel, Michael J.; Glover, J.N. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Ubc13 is an E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme that functions in nuclear DNA damage signaling and cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling. Here we present the structures of complexes of Ubc13 with two inhibitors, NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082, which inhibit DNA damage and NF-κB signaling in human cells. NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082 both inhibit Ubc13 by covalent adduct formation through a Michael addition at the Ubc13 active site cysteine. The resulting adducts of both compounds exploit a binding groove unique to Ubc13. We developed a Ubc13 mutant which resists NSC697923 inhibition and, using this mutant, we show that the inhibition of cellular DNA damage and NF-κB signaling by NSC697923 is largely due to specific Ubc13 inhibition. We propose that unique structural features near the Ubc13 active site could provide a basis for the rational development and design of specific Ubc13 inhibitors. PMID:25909880

  18. Covalent Inhibition of Ubc13 Affects Ubiquitin Signaling and Reveals Active Site Elements Important for Targeting.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Curtis D; Edwards, Ross A; Markin, Craig J; McDonald, Darin; Pulvino, Mary; Huen, Michael S Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Spyracopoulos, Leo; Hendzel, Michael J; Glover, J N Mark

    2015-07-17

    Ubc13 is an E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme that functions in nuclear DNA damage signaling and cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling. Here, we present the structures of complexes of Ubc13 with two inhibitors, NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082, which inhibit DNA damage and NF-κB signaling in human cells. NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082 both inhibit Ubc13 by covalent adduct formation through a Michael addition at the Ubc13 active site cysteine. The resulting adducts of both compounds exploit a binding groove unique to Ubc13. We developed a Ubc13 mutant which resists NSC697923 inhibition and, using this mutant, we show that the inhibition of cellular DNA damage and NF-κB signaling by NSC697923 is largely due to specific Ubc13 inhibition. We propose that unique structural features near the Ubc13 active site could provide a basis for the rational development and design of specific Ubc13 inhibitors. PMID:25909880

  19. Genipin inhibits NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome activation via autophagy suppression

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shui-Xing; Du, Chong-Tao; Chen, Wei; Lei, Qian-Qian; Li, Ning; Qi, Shuai; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Hu, Gui-Qiu; Deng, Xu-Ming; Han, Wen-Yu; Yang, Yong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic, multiprotein complexes that trigger caspase-1 activation and IL-1β maturation in response to diverse stimuli. Although inflammasomes play important roles in host defense against microbial infection, overactive inflammasomes are deleterious and lead to various autoinflammatory diseases. In the current study, we demonstrated that genipin inhibits the induction of IL-1β production and caspase-1 activation by NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes. Furthermore, genipin specifically prevented NLRP3-mediated, but not NLRC4-mediated, ASC oligomerization. Notably, genipin inhibited autophagy, leading to NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome inhibition. UCP2-ROS signaling may be involved in inflammasome suppression by genipin. In vivo, we showed that genipin inhibited NLRP3-dependent IL-1β production and neutrophil flux in LPS- and alum-induced murine peritonitis. Additionally, genipin provided protection against flagellin-induced lung inflammation by reducing IL-1β production and neutrophil recruitment. Collectively, our results revealed a novel role in inhibition of inflammatory diseases for genipin that has been used as therapeutics for centuries in herb medicine. PMID:26659006

  20. Subthalamic nucleus activity dissociates proactive and reactive inhibition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Benis, Damien; David, Olivier; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe; Seigneuret, Eric; Krack, Paul; Fraix, Valérie; Chabardès, Stéphan; Bastin, Julien

    2014-05-01

    Models of action selection postulate the critical involvement of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), especially in reactive inhibition processes when inappropriate responses to a sudden stimulus must be overridden. The STN could also play a key role during proactive inhibition, when subjects prepare to potentially suppress their actions. Here, we hypothesized that STN responses to reactive and proactive inhibitory control might be driven by different underlying mechanisms with specific temporal profiles. Direct neural recordings in twelve Parkinson's disease patients during a modified stop signal task (SST) revealed a decrease of beta band activity (βA, 13-35Hz) in the STN during reactive inhibition of smaller amplitude and shorter duration than during motor execution. Crucially, the onset latency of this relative increase of βA took place before the stop signal reaction time. It could thus be thought of as a "stop" signal inhibiting thalamo-cortical activity that would have supported motor execution. Finally, results also revealed a higher level of βA in the STN during proactive inhibition, which correlated with patient's inhibitory performances. We propose that βA in the STN would here participate in the implementation of a "hold your horse" signal to delay motor responses, thus prioritizing accuracy as compared to speed. In brief, our results provide strong electrophysiological support for the hypothesized role of the STN during executive control underlying proactive and reactive response suppression. PMID:24368260

  1. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  2. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  3. Three new alkaloids from Veratrum grandiflorum Loes with inhibition activities on Hedgehog pathway.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lijuan; Chen, Fengyang; Li, Xiaoyu; Xu, Shifang; Huang, Wenhai; Ye, Yiping

    2016-10-01

    Three new steroidal alkaloids 1-3, together with four known compounds 4-7, were isolated from the ethanol extract of Veratrum grandiflorum Loes. Their structures were elucidated by NMR (1D and 2D NMR) and MS spectroscopic data. The inhibition activities on Hedgehog (Hh) pathway were evaluated using a cell-based bioassay system (Shh-LIGHT 2 cells). The results showed that compounds 1-3 and 5 displayed inhibitory activities obviously with the IC50 values of 0.63-3.11μM. Among them, compound 5 showed the most prominent inhibition activity (IC50=0.63±0.02μM). Thus, these active alkaloids may be potent natural compounds as Hh pathway inhibitors for the treatment of various cancers. PMID:27567371

  4. Silver nanoclusters-based fluorescence assay of protein kinase activity and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Congcong; Xia, Xiaodong; Hu, Shengqiang; Yang, Minghui; Wang, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    A simple and sensitive fluorescence method for monitoring the activity and inhibition of protein kinase (PKA) has been developed using polycytosine oligonucleotide (dC12)-templated silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) was found to enhance the fluorescence of Ag NCs, while the hydrolysis of ATP to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by PKA decreased the fluorescence of Ag NCs. Compared to the existing methods for kinase activity assay, the developed method does not involve phosphorylation of the substrate peptides, which significantly simplifies the detection procedures. The method exhibits high sensitivity, good selectivity, and wide linear range toward PKA detection. The inhibition effect of kinase inhibitor H-89 on the activity of PKA was also studied. The sensing protocol was also applied to the assay of drug-stimulated activation of PKA in HeLa cell lysates. PMID:25517425

  5. Sulindac sulfide selectively inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of human breast tumor cells by PDE5 inhibition, elevation of cGMP, and activation of PKG

    PubMed Central

    Tinsley, Heather N.; Gary, Bernard D.; Keeton, Adam B.; Zhang, Wei; Abadi, Ashraf H.; Reynolds, Robert C.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulindac displays promising antineoplastic activity, but toxicities from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition limit its use for chemoprevention. Previous reports suggest that its anticancer properties may be attributed to a COX-independent mechanism, although alternative targets have not been well defined. Here we show that sulindac sulfide (SS) induces apoptosis and inhibits the growth of human breast tumor cells with IC50 values of 60-85 μM. Within the same concentration range, SS inhibited cGMP hydrolysis in tumor cell lysates, but did not affect cAMP hydrolysis. SS did not induce apoptosis of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), nor did it inhibit PDE activity in HMEC lysates. SS increased intracellular cGMP levels and activated protein kinase G in breast tumor cells, but not HMEC. The guanylyl cyclase (GC) activator, NOR-3, and cGMP PDE inhibitors, trequinsin and MY5445, displayed similar growth inhibitory activity as SS, but the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, and other PDE inhibitors had no effect. Moreover, GC activation increased the sensitivity of tumor cells to SS, while GC inhibition reduced sensitivity. By comparing PDE isozyme profiles in breast tumor cells with HMEC and determining the sensitivity of recombinant PDE isozymes to SS, PDE5 was found to be overexpressed in breast tumor cells and selectively inhibited by SS. The mechanism of SS binding to the catalytic domain of PDE5 was revealed by molecular modeling. These data suggest that PDE5 inhibition is responsible for the breast tumor cell growth inhibitory and apoptosis inducing activity of SS and may contribute to the chemopreventive properties of sulindac. PMID:19996273

  6. The relationship between years of cocaine use and brain activation to cocaine and response inhibition cues

    PubMed Central

    Prisciandaro, James J.; Joseph, Jane E.; Myrick, Hugh; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Henderson, Scott; Pfeifer, James; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging research has attempted to elucidate the neurobehavioral underpinnings of cocaine dependence by evaluating differences in brain activation to cocaine and response inhibition cues between cocaine dependent individuals and controls. Less research has investigated associations between task-related brain activation and cocaine use characteristics; the present study was designed to address this gap in the literature. Design Cross-sectional. Setting The Center for Brain Imaging at the Medical University of South Carolina. Participants 51 cocaine users (41 dependent). Measurements Brain activation to cocaine-cue exposure and go no-go tasks in six a priori selected brain regions of interest and cocaine use characteristics (i.e., cocaine dependence status, years of cocaine use, cocaine use in the past 90 days) assessed via standardized interviews. Findings Participants demonstrated elevated activation to cocaine (bilateral ventral striatum, dorsal caudate, amygdala; mean F=19.00, mean p<.001) and response inhibition (bilateral anterior cingulate, insula, inferior frontal gyrus; mean F=7.01, mean p=.02) cues in all hypothesized brain regions. Years of cocaine use was associated with task-related brain activation, with more years of cocaine use associated with greater activation to cocaine cues in right (F=7.97,p=.01) and left (F=5.47,p=.02) ventral striatum and greater activation to response inhibition cues in left insula (F=5.10,p=.03) and inferior frontal gyrus (F=4.12,p=.05) controlling for age, cocaine dependence status, and cocaine use in the past 90 days. Conclusions Years of cocaine use may be more centrally related to cocaine cue and response inhibition brain activation as compared to cocaine dependence diagnosis or amount of recent use. PMID:24938849

  7. Policosanol inhibits cholesterol synthesis in hepatoma cells by activation of AMP-kinase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dev K; Li, Li; Porter, Todd D

    2006-09-01

    Policosanol is a mixture of long-chain primary alcohols that has been shown to decrease serum cholesterol in animals and in humans. The hypocholesterolemic effect results from a decrease in cholesterol synthesis by suppression of HMG-CoA reductase activity, but the mechanism of this suppression and the active components of policosanol have not been established. In the present study, we investigated the ability of policosanol and its principal components to inhibit cholesterol synthesis in cultured rat hepatoma cells. Maximal inhibition by policosanol yielded a 30% decrease in [(14)C]acetate incorporation without evidence of cellular toxicity. Octacosanol (C28, the major constituent of policosanol), heptacosanol (C27), and hexacosanol (C26) yielded smaller and statistically insignificant decreases in cholesterol synthesis, whereas triacontanol (1-hydroxytriacontane; C30) replicated the inhibition obtained with policosanol. At pharmacological concentrations (<5 microg/ml), policosanol and triacontanol decreased [(14)C]acetate incorporation into cholesterol without affecting the incorporation of [(14)C]mevalonate, indicating that these compounds act at or above HMG-CoA reductase. Policosanol and triacontanol did not directly inhibit HMG-CoA reductase, and incubation of these compounds with hepatoma cells did not affect reductase enzyme levels. However, reductase activity was decreased by up to 55% in lysates prepared from these cells, suggesting that HMG-CoA reductase activity was down-regulated by policosanol treatment. Consistent with this hypothesis, a 3-fold increase in AMP-kinase phosphorylation was noted in policosanol-treated cells. Because AMP-kinase is activated by phosphorylation and is well established to suppress HMG-CoA reductase activity, these results suggest that policosanol or a metabolite decreases HMG-CoA reductase activity by activating AMP-kinase. PMID:16714400

  8. Coumarins from Angelica decursiva inhibit α-glucosidase activity and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.