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Sample records for activity suppresses foxo1

  1. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma-associated proteins PAX3/FOXO1A and PAX7/FOXO1A suppress the transcriptional activity of MyoD-target genes in muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Calhabeu, F; Hayashi, S; Morgan, J E; Relaix, F; Zammit, P S

    2013-01-31

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the commonest soft-tissue sarcoma in childhood and is characterized by expression of myogenic proteins, including the transcription factors MyoD and myogenin. There are two main subgroups, embryonal RMS and alveolar RMS (ARMS). Most ARMS are associated with chromosomal translocations that have breakpoints in introns of either PAX3 or PAX7, and FOXO1A. These translocations create chimeric transcription factors termed PAX3/FOXO1A and PAX7/FOXO1A respectively. Upon ectopic PAX3/FOXO1A expression, together with other genetic manipulation in mice, both differentiating myoblasts and satellite cells (the resident stem cells of postnatal muscle) can give rise to tumours with ARMS characteristics. As PAX3 and PAX7 are part of transcriptional networks that regulate muscle stem cell function in utero and during early postnatal life, PAX3/FOXO1A and PAX7/FOXO1A may subvert normal PAX3 and PAX7 functions. Here we examined how PAX3/FOXO1A and PAX7/FOXO1A affect myogenesis in satellite cells. PAX3/FOXO1A or PAX7/FOXO1A inhibited myogenin expression and prevented terminal differentiation in murine satellite cells: the same effect as dominant-negative (DN) Pax3 or Pax7 constructs. The transcription of MyoD-target genes myogenin and muscle creatine kinase were suppressed by PAX3/FOXO1A or PAX7/FOXO1A in C2C12 myogenic cells again as seen with Pax3/7DN. PAX3/FOXO1A or PAX7/FOXO1A did not inhibit the transcriptional activity of MyoD by perturbing MyoD expression, localization, phosphorylation or interaction with E-proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation on the myogenin promoter showed that PAX3/FOXO1A or PAX7/FOXO1A did not prevent MyoD from binding. However, PAX3/FOXO1A or PAX7/FOXO1A reduced occupation of the myogenin promoter by RNA polymerase II and decreased acetylation of histone H4, but did not directly bind to the myogenin promoter. Together, these observations reveal that PAX3/FOXO1A and PAX7/FOXO1A act to prevent myogenic differentiation via

  2. FOXO1 delays skeletal muscle regeneration and suppresses myoblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Atsushi; Hatazawa, Yukino; Hirose, Yuma; Ono, Yusuke; Kamei, Yasutomi

    2016-08-01

    Unloading stress, such as bed rest, inhibits the regenerative potential of skeletal muscles; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. FOXO1 expression, which induces the upregulated expression of the cell cycle inhibitors p57 and Gadd45α, is known to be increased in the skeletal muscle under unloading conditions. However, there is no report addressing FOXO1-induced inhibition of myoblast proliferation. Therefore, we induced muscle injury by cardiotoxin in transgenic mice overexpressing FOXO1 in the skeletal muscle (FOXO1-Tg mice) and observed regeneration delay in skeletal muscle mass and cross-sectional area in FOXO1-Tg mice. Increased p57 and Gadd45α mRNA levels, and decreased proliferation capacity were observed in C2C12 myoblasts expressing a tamoxifen-inducible active form of FOXO1. These results suggest that decreased proliferation capacity of myoblasts by FOXO1 disrupts skeletal muscle regeneration under FOXO1-increased conditions, such as unloading. PMID:27010781

  3. Elevated nuclear Foxo1 suppresses excitability of skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Schachter, Tova Neustadt; Schneider, Martin F

    2013-09-15

    Forkhead box O 1 (Foxo1) controls the expression of proteins that carry out processes leading to skeletal muscle atrophy, making Foxo1 of therapeutic interest in conditions of muscle wasting. The transcription of Foxo1-regulated proteins is dependent on the translocation of Foxo1 to the nucleus, which can be repressed by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) treatment. The role of Foxo1 in muscle atrophy has been explored at length, but whether Foxo1 nuclear activity affects skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling has not yet been examined. Here, we use cultured adult mouse skeletal muscle fibers to investigate the effects of Foxo1 overexpression on EC coupling. Fibers expressing Foxo1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) exhibit an inability to contract, impaired propagation of action potentials, and ablation of calcium transients in response to electrical stimulation compared with fibers expressing GFP alone. Evaluation of the transverse (T)-tubule system morphology, the membranous system involved in the radial propagation of the action potential, revealed an intact T-tubule network in fibers overexpressing Foxo1-GFP. Interestingly, long-term IGF-1 treatment of Foxo1-GFP fibers, which maintains Foxo1-GFP outside the nucleus, prevented the loss of normal calcium transients, indicating that Foxo1 translocation and the atrogenes it regulates affect the expression of proteins involved in the generation and/or propagation of action potentials. A reduction in the sodium channel Nav1.4 expression in fibers overexpressing Foxo1-GFP was also observed in the absence of IGF-1. We conclude that increased nuclear activity of Foxo1 prevents the normal muscle responses to electrical stimulation and that this indicates a novel capability of Foxo1 to disable the functional activity of skeletal muscle. PMID:23804205

  4. Constitutively Active FOXO1 Diminishes Activin Induction of Fshb Transcription in Immortalized Gonadotropes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chung Hyun; Skarra, Danalea V.; Rivera, Alissa J.; Arriola, David J.; Thackray, Varykina G.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate whether the FOXO1 transcription factor modulates activin signaling in pituitary gonadotropes. Our studies show that overexpression of constitutively active FOXO1 decreases activin induction of murine Fshb gene expression in immortalized LβT2 cells. We demonstrate that FOXO1 suppression of activin induction maps to the −304/−95 region of the Fshb promoter containing multiple activin response elements and that the suppression requires the FOXO1 DNA-binding domain (DBD). FOXO1 binds weakly to the −125/−91 region of the Fshb promoter in a gel-shift assay. Since this region of the promoter contains a composite SMAD/FOXL2 binding element necessary for activin induction of Fshb transcription, it is possible that FOXO1 DNA binding interferes with SMAD and/or FOXL2 function. In addition, our studies demonstrate that FOXO1 directly interacts with SMAD3/4 but not SMAD2 in a FOXO1 DBD-dependent manner. Moreover, we show that SMAD3/4 induction of Fshb-luc and activin induction of a multimerized SMAD-binding element-luc are suppressed by FOXO1 in a DBD-dependent manner. These results suggest that FOXO1 binding to the proximal Fshb promoter as well as FOXO1 interaction with SMAD3/4 proteins may result in decreased activin induction of Fshb in gonadotropes. PMID:25423188

  5. FOXO1 Mediates RANKL Induced Osteoclast Formation and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Dong, Guangyu; Jeon, Hyeran Helen; Elazizi, Mohamad; La, Lan B.; Hameedaldeen, Alhassan; Xiao, E; Tian, Chen; Alsadun, Sarah; Choi, Yongwon; Graves, Dana T.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that the transcription factor FOXO1 is elevated in conditions with high levels of bone resorption. To investigate the role of FOXO1 in the formation of osteoclasts we examined mice with lineage specific deletion of FOXO1 in osteoclast precursors and by knockdown of FOXO1 with siRNA. The receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL), a principal bone resorbing factor, induced FOXO1 expression and nuclear localization two days after stimulation in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) and RAW264.7 osteoclast precursors. RANKL- induced osteoclast formation and osteoclast activity was reduced in half in vivo and in vitro with lineage specific FOXO1 deletion (LyzM.Cre+FOXO1L/L) compared to matched controls (LyzM.Cre−FOXO1L/L). Similar results were obtained by knockdown of FOXO1 in RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, FOXO1-mediated osteoclast formation was linked to regulation of NFATc1 nuclear localization and expression as well as a number of downstream factors including dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), ATP6vod2, cathepsin K and integrin αν Lastly, FOXO1 deletion reduced M-CSF induced RANK expression and migration of osteoclast precursors. Studies presented here provide the evidence that FOXO1 plays a direct role in osteoclast formation by mediating the effect of RANKL on NFATc1 and several downstream effectors. This is likely to be significant since FOXO1 and RANKL are elevated in osteolytic conditions. PMID:25694609

  6. FOXO1 inhibits Runx2 transcriptional activity and prostate cancer cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun; Pan, Yunqian; Zheng, Li; Choe, Chungyoul; Lindgren, Bruce; Jensen, Eric D.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Cheng, Liang; Huang, Haojie

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients with regional lymph node involvement at radical prostatectomy often experience disease progression to other organs, with the bone as the predominant site. The transcription factor Runx2 plays an important role in bone formation and PCa cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Here we demonstrated that the forkhead protein FOXO1, a key downstream effector of the tumor suppressor PTEN, inhibits the transcriptional activity of Runx2 in PCa cells. This inhibition was enhanced by PTEN but diminished by active Akt. FOXO1 bound to Runx2 in vitro and in vivo and suppressed Runx2’s activity independent of its transcriptional function. FOXO1 inhibited Runx2-promoted migration of PCa cells while silencing of endogenous FOXO1 enhanced PCa cell migration in a Runx2-dependent manner. Forced expression of FOXO1 also inhibited Runx2-promoted PCa cell invasion. Finally, we found that expression of PTEN and the level of FOXO1 in the nucleus is inversely correlated with expression of Runx2 in a cohort of PCa specimens from patients with lymph node and bone metastasis. These data reveal FOXO1 as a critical negative regulator of Runx2 in PCa cells. Inactivation of FOXO1 due to frequent loss of PTEN in PCa cells may leave the oncogenic activities of Runx2 unchecked, thereby driving promiscuous expression of Runx2 target genes involved in cell migration and invasion and favoring PCa progression. PMID:21505104

  7. FoxO1 antagonist suppresses autophagy and lipid droplet growth in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longhua; Zheng, Louise D; Zou, Peng; Brooke, Joseph; Smith, Cayleen; Long, Yun Chau; Almeida, Fabio A; Liu, Dongmin; Cheng, Zhiyong

    2016-08-01

    Obesity and related metabolic disorders constitute one of the most pressing heath concerns worldwide. Increased adiposity is linked to autophagy upregulation in adipose tissues. However, it is unknown how autophagy is upregulated and contributes to aberrant adiposity. Here we show a FoxO1-autophagy-FSP27 axis that regulates adipogenesis and lipid droplet (LD) growth in adipocytes. Adipocyte differentiation was associated with upregulation of autophagy and fat specific protein 27 (FSP27), a key regulator of adipocyte maturation and expansion by promoting LD formation and growth. However, FoxO1 specific inhibitor AS1842856 potently suppressed autophagy, FSP27 expression, and adipocyte differentiation. In terminally differentiated adipocytes, AS1842856 significantly reduced FSP27 level and LD size, which was recapitulated by autophagy inhibitors (bafilomycin-A1 and leupeptin, BL). Similarly, AS1842856 and BL dampened autophagy activity and FSP27 expression in explant cultures of white adipose tissue. To our knowledge, this is the first study addressing FoxO1 in the regulation of adipose autophagy, shedding light on the mechanism of increased autophagy and adiposity in obese individuals. Given that adipogenesis and adipocyte expansion contribute to aberrant adiposity, targeting the FoxO1-autophagy-FSP27 axis may lead to new anti-obesity options. PMID:27260854

  8. FOXO1 Regulates Dendritic Cell Activity Through ICAM-1 and CCR7

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guangyu; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Mei; Pujado, Sandra Pacios; Xu, Fanxing; Tian, Chen; Xiao, E; Choi, Yongwon; Graves, Dana T.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor FOXO1 regulates cell function and is expressed in dendritic cells (DC). We investigated the role of FOXO1 in activating DCs to stimulate a lymphocyte response to bacteria. We show that bacteria induce FOXO1 nuclear localization through the MAP kinase pathway and identify for the first time that FOXO1 is needed for dendritic cell activation of lymphocytes in vivo. This occurs through FOXO1 regulation of DC phagocytosis, chemotaxis, and DC-lymphocyte binding. FOXO1 induces DC activity by regulating ICAM-1 and CCR7. FOXO1 binds to the CCR7 and ICAM-1 promoters, stimulates CCR7 and ICAM-1 transcriptional activity and regulates their expression. This is functionally important since transfection of DC from FOXO1 deleted CD11c.Cre+FOXO1L/L mice with an ICAM-1 expressing plasmid rescues the negative effect of FOXO1 deletion on DC bacterial phagocytosis and chemotaxis. Rescue with both CCR7 and ICAM-1 reverses impaired DC homing to lymph nodes in vivo when FOXO1 is deleted. Moreover, antibody production following injection of bacteria is significantly reduced with lineage specific FOXO1 ablation. Thus FOXO1 coordinates up-regulation of DC activity through key downstream target genes that are needed for DC to stimulate T and B lymphocytes and generate an antibody defense to bacteria. PMID:25786691

  9. MK5 activates Rag transcription via Foxo1 in developing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Kwan T.; Timblin, Greg A.; McWhirter, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Foxo1 is a critical, direct regulator of Rag (recombination activating gene) transcription during B cell development and is thus essential for the generation of a diverse repertoire of antigen receptors. Although Foxo1 regulation has been widely studied in many cell types, pathways regulating Foxo1 in B cells have not been fully elucidated. By screening a panel of Foxo1 mutants, we identified serine 215 on Foxo1 as a novel phosphorylation site that is essential for the activation of Rag transcription. Mutation of S215 strongly attenuated transactivation of Rag but did not affect most other Foxo1 target genes. We show that MK5, a MAPK-activated protein kinase, is a previously unidentified upstream regulator of Foxo1. MK5 was necessary and sufficient to activate Rag transcription in transformed and primary pro–B cells. Together, our experiments show that MK5 positively regulates Rag transcription via phosphorylation of Foxo1 in developing B cells. PMID:23878308

  10. FoxO1-Mediated Activation of Akt Plays a Critical Role in Vascular Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lei; Dupuis, Dylan; Beeler, David; Spokes, Katherine C.; Janes, Lauren; Sciuto, Tracey; Kang, Peter M.; Jaminet, Shou-Ching S.; Dvorak, Ann; Grant, Marianne A.; Regan, Erzsébet Ravasz; Aird, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Forkhead box-O transcription factors (FoxOs) transduce a wide range of extracellular signals, resulting in changes in cell survival, cell cycle progression, and a number of cell type-specific responses. FoxO1 is expressed in many cell types, including endothelial cells. Previous studies have shown that FoxO1 knockout in mice results in embryonic lethality at E11 due to impaired vascular development. In contrast, somatic deletion of FoxO1 is associated with hyperproliferation of endothelial cells. Thus, the precise role of FoxO1 in the endothelium remains enigmatic. Objective To determine the effect of endothelial-specific knockout and overexpression of FoxO1 on vascular homeostasis. Methods and Results We show that endothelial cell (EC)-specific disruption of FoxO1 in mice phenocopies the full knockout. While endothelial expression of FoxO1 rescued otherwise FoxO-null animals, overexpression of constitutively active FoxO1 resulted in increased EC size, occlusion of capillaries, elevated peripheral resistance, heart failure and death. Knockdown of FoxO1 in ECs resulted in marked inhibition of basal and VEGF-induced Akt-mTOR1 signaling. Conclusions Our findings suggest that in mice endothelial expression of FoxO1 is both necessary and sufficient for embryonic development. Moreover, FoxO1-mediated feedback activation of Akt maintains growth factor-responsive Akt/mTORC1 activity within a homeostatic range. PMID:24874427

  11. Chemotherapy resistance and metastasis-promoting effects of thyroid hormone in hepatocarcinoma cells are mediated by suppression of FoxO1 and Bim pathway.

    PubMed

    Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Chen, Shen-Liang; Cheng, Yi-Hung; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Tsai, Ming-Ming; Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Huang, Ya-Hui; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and systemic chemotherapy is the major treatment strategy for late-stage HCC patients. Poor prognosis following chemotherapy is the general outcome owing to recurrent resistance. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to cytotoxic effects on tumor cells, chemotherapy can induce an alternative cascade that supports tumor growth and metastasis. In the present investigation, we showed that thyroid hormone (TH), a potent hormone-mediating cellular differentiation and metabolism, acts as an antiapoptosis factor upon challenge of thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-expressing HCC cells with cancer therapy drugs, including cisplatin, doxorubicin and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). TH/TR signaling promoted chemotherapy resistance through negatively regulating the pro-apoptotic protein, Bim, resulting in doxorubicin-induced metastasis of chemotherapy-resistant HCC cells. Ectopic expression of Bim in hepatoma cells challenged with chemotherapeutic drugs abolished TH/TR-triggered apoptosis resistance and metastasis. Furthermore, Bim expression was directly transactivated by Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1), which was negatively regulated by TH/TR. TH/TR suppressed FoxO1 activity through both transcriptional downregulation and nuclear exclusion of FoxO1 triggered by Akt-mediated phosphorylation. Ectopic expression of the constitutively active FoxO1 mutant, FoxO1-AAA, but not FoxO1-wt, diminished the suppressive effect of TH/TR on Bim. Our findings collectively suggest that expression of Bim is mediated by FoxO1 and indirectly downregulated by TH/TR, leading to chemotherapy resistance and doxorubicin-promoted metastasis of hepatoma cells. PMID:27490929

  12. Metabolic stress–induced activation of FoxO1 triggers diabetic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Hojayev, Berdymammet; Jiang, Nan; Wang, Zhao V.; Luo, Xiang; Iglewski, Myriam; Shelton, John M.; Gerard, Robert D.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Gillette, Thomas G.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is cardiovascular disease; diabetic cardiomyopathy is typified by alterations in cardiac morphology and function, independent of hypertension or coronary disease. However, the molecular mechanism that links diabetes to cardiomyopathy is incompletely understood. Insulin resistance is a hallmark feature of diabetes, and the FoxO family of transcription factors, which regulate cell size, viability, and metabolism, are established targets of insulin and growth factor signaling. Here, we set out to evaluate a possible role of FoxO proteins in diabetic cardiomyopathy. We found that FoxO proteins were persistently activated in cardiac tissue in mice with diabetes induced either genetically or by high-fat diet (HFD). FoxO activity was critically linked with development of cardiomyopathy: cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of FoxO1 rescued HFD-induced declines in cardiac function and preserved cardiomyocyte insulin responsiveness. FoxO1-depleted cells displayed a shift in their metabolic substrate usage, from free fatty acids to glucose, associated with decreased accumulation of lipids in the heart. Furthermore, we found that FoxO1-dependent downregulation of IRS1 resulted in blunted Akt signaling and insulin resistance. Together, these data suggest that activation of FoxO1 is an important mediator of diabetic cardiomyopathy and is a promising therapeutic target for the disease. PMID:22326951

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorβ/δ activation is essential for modulating p-Foxo1/Foxo1 status in functional insulin-positive cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Li, T; Zhang, Y; Pan, Z; Wu, B; Huang, X; Zhang, Y; Mei, Y; Ge, L; Shen, G; Ge, R-s; Zhu, D; Lou, Y

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) participate in energy homeostasis and play essential roles in diabetes therapy through their effects on non-pancreas tissues. Pathological microenvironment may influence the metabolic requirements for the maintenance of stem cell differentiation. Accordingly, understanding the mechanisms of PPARs on pancreatic β-cell differentiation may be helpful to find the underlying targets of disrupted energy homeostasis under the pancreatic disease condition. PPARs are involved in stem cell differentiation via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, but the subtype member activation and the downstream regulation in functional insulin-positive (INS+) cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we show a novel role of PPARβ/δ activation in determining INS+ cell differentiation and functional maturation. We found PPARβ/δ expression selectively upregulated in mouse embryonic pancreases or stem cells-derived INS+ cells at the pancreatic mature stage in vivo and in vitro. Strikingly, given the inefficiency of generating INS+ cells in vitro, PPARβ/δ activation displayed increasing mouse and human ES cell-derived INS+ cell numbers and insulin secretion. This phenomenon was closely associated with the forkhead box protein O1 (Foxo1) nuclear shuttling, which was dependent on PPARβ/δ downstream PI3K/Akt signaling transduction. The present study reveals the essential role of PPARβ/δ activation on p-Foxo1/Foxo1 status, and in turn, determining INS+ cell generation and insulin secretion via affecting pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 expression. The results demonstrate the underlying mechanism by which PPARβ/δ activation promotes functional INS+ cell differentiation. It also provides potential targets for anti-diabetes drug discovery and hopeful clinical applications in human cell therapy. PMID:25855963

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorβ/δ activation is essential for modulating p-Foxo1/Foxo1 status in functional insulin-positive cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Li, T; Zhang, Y; Pan, Z; Wu, B; Huang, X; Zhang, Y; Mei, Y; Ge, L; Shen, G; Ge, R-s; Zhu, D; Lou, Y

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) participate in energy homeostasis and play essential roles in diabetes therapy through their effects on non-pancreas tissues. Pathological microenvironment may influence the metabolic requirements for the maintenance of stem cell differentiation. Accordingly, understanding the mechanisms of PPARs on pancreatic β-cell differentiation may be helpful to find the underlying targets of disrupted energy homeostasis under the pancreatic disease condition. PPARs are involved in stem cell differentiation via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, but the subtype member activation and the downstream regulation in functional insulin-positive (INS+) cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we show a novel role of PPARβ/δ activation in determining INS+ cell differentiation and functional maturation. We found PPARβ/δ expression selectively upregulated in mouse embryonic pancreases or stem cells-derived INS+ cells at the pancreatic mature stage in vivo and in vitro. Strikingly, given the inefficiency of generating INS+ cells in vitro, PPARβ/δ activation displayed increasing mouse and human ES cell-derived INS+ cell numbers and insulin secretion. This phenomenon was closely associated with the forkhead box protein O1 (Foxo1) nuclear shuttling, which was dependent on PPARβ/δ downstream PI3K/Akt signaling transduction. The present study reveals the essential role of PPARβ/δ activation on p-Foxo1/Foxo1 status, and in turn, determining INS+ cell generation and insulin secretion via affecting pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 expression. The results demonstrate the underlying mechanism by which PPARβ/δ activation promotes functional INS+ cell differentiation. It also provides potential targets for anti-diabetes drug discovery and hopeful clinical applications in human cell therapy. PMID:25855963

  15. MiR-182 Is Associated with Growth, Migration and Invasion in Prostate Cancer via Suppression of FOXO1

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Christopher J.D.; Gordanpour, Aida; Bendavid, Jessica Stojcic; Sugar, Linda; Nam, Robert K.; Seth, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Background: MicroRNA (miRNA) have been shown to regulate gene expression in many cancers. MiR-182 has recently been found to be prognostic for patients treated with radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. We sought to assess miR-182 as a prognostic marker and understand its role in prostate cancer progression and metastasis. Methods: We analysed miR-182 expression among 147 men treated for prostate cancer using biochemical recurrence and metastasis as the endpoints. We examined miR-182 expression in prostate cancer cells and created cell lines that overexpressed miR-182 for functional assays. Finally, we examined pathways through which miR-182 may function using prediction algorithms and confirmed by Western blotting and knock-down assays. Results: We found that miR-182 was not associated with biochemical recurrence (p=0.1111) or metastasis (p=0.9268) following radical prostatectomy. However, in mechanistic assays, we found that miR-182 expression was higher among aggressive prostate cancer cells and that ectopic miR-182 expression resulted in increased proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. We identified FOXO1 as regulated by miR-182 in prostate cancer cells, confirmed that ectopic miR-182 expression resulted in diminished FOXO1 levels, and showed that miR-182 inhibition results in increased FOXO1 levels. Expression of FOXO1 (p=0.0014) in tumors from patients who developed biochemical recurrence compared to tumors from patients who were recurrence-free five years after their radical prostatectomy. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that miR-182 may act to increase prostate cancer proliferation, migration and invasion through suppression of FOXO1. This may be valuable in the development of further therapeutic interventions. PMID:26640590

  16. FOXO1 activates glutamine synthetase gene in mouse skeletal muscles through a region downstream of 3'-UTR: possible contribution to ammonia detoxification.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Yasutomi; Hattori, Maki; Hatazawa, Yukino; Kasahara, Tomomi; Kanou, Masanobu; Kanai, Sayaka; Yuan, Xunmei; Suganami, Takayoshi; Lamers, Wouter H; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-15

    Skeletal muscle is a reservoir of energy in the form of protein, which is degraded under catabolic conditions, resulting in the formation of amino acids and ammonia as a byproduct. The expression of FOXO1, a forkhead-type transcription factor, increases during starvation and exercise. In agreement, transgenic FOXO1-Tg mice that overexpress FOXO1 in skeletal muscle exhibit muscle atrophy. The aim of this study was to examine the role of FOXO1 in amino acid metabolism. The mRNA and protein expressions of glutamine synthetase (GS) were increased in skeletal muscle of FOXO1-Tg mice. Fasting induced FOXO1 and GS expression in wild-type mice but hardly increased GS expression in muscle-specific FOXO1 knockout (FOXO1-KO) mice. Activation of FOXO1 also increased GS mRNA and protein expression in C2C12 myoblasts. Using a transient transfection reporter assay, we observed that FOXO1 activated the GS reporter construct. Mutation of a putative FOXO1-binding consensus sequence in the downstream genomic region of GS decreased basal and FOXO1-dependent reporter activity significantly. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that FOXO1 was recruited to the 3' region of GS in C2C12 myoblasts. These results suggest that FOXO1 directly upregulates GS expression. GS is considered to mediate ammonia clearance in skeletal muscle. In agreement, an intravenous ammonia challenge increased blood ammonia concentrations to a twofold higher level in FOXO1-KO than in wild-type mice, demonstrating that the capacity for ammonia disposal correlated inversely with the expression of GS in muscle. These data indicate that FOXO1 plays a role in amino acid metabolism during protein degradation in skeletal muscle. PMID:25074987

  17. The constitutive androstane receptor activator 4-[(4R,6R)-4,6-diphenyl-1,3-dioxan-2-yl]-N,N-dimethylaniline inhibits the gluconeogenic genes PEPCK and G6Pase through the suppression of HNF4α and FOXO1 transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Yarushkin, AA; Kachaylo, EM; Pustylnyak, VO

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The dual role of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) as both a xenosensor and a regulator of endogenous energy metabolism (lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis) has recently gained acceptance. Here, we investigated the effects of 4-[(4R,6R)-4,6-diphenyl-1,3-dioxan-2-yl]-N,N-dimethylaniline (transpDMA), an effective CAR activator, on the gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in rat livers. Experimental Approach The effects of transpDMA were investigated in normal and high-fat diet-fed Wistar rats using real-time PCR, Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP), glucose tolerance test and insulin tolerance test. Key Results The expression of the gluconeogenic enzymes PEPCK and G6Pase was repressed by transpDMA treatment under fasting conditions. Long-term CAR activation by transpDMA significantly reduced fasting blood glucose levels and improved glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in high-fat diet-fed rats. The metabolic benefits of CAR activation by transpDMA may have resulted from the inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenic genes. ChIP assays demonstrated that transpDMA prevented the binding of forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) to insulin response sequences in the PEPCK and G6Pase gene promoters in rat livers. Moreover, transpDMA-activated CAR inhibited hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF4α) transactivation by competing with HNF4α for binding to the specific binding element (DR1-site) in the gluconeogenic gene promoters. Conclusions and Implications Our results provide evidence to support the conclusion that transpDMA inhibits the gluconeogenic genes PEPCK and G6Pase through suppression of HNF4α and FOXO1 transcriptional activity. PMID:23231652

  18. The metabolic activator FOXO1 binds hepatitis B virus DNA and activates its transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomai, Amir; Shaul, Yosef

    2009-04-17

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small DNA virus that targets the liver and infects humans worldwide. Recently we have shown that the metabolic regulator PGC-1{alpha} coactivates HBV transcription thereby rendering the virus susceptible to fluctuations in the nutritional status of the liver. PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV is mediated through the liver-enriched nuclear receptor HNF4{alpha} and through another yet unknown transcription factor(s). Here we show that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1, a known target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation and a central mediator of glucose metabolism in the liver, binds HBV core promoter and activates its transcription. This activation is further enhanced in the presence of PGC-1{alpha}, implying that FOXO1 is a target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV transcription. Thus, our results identify another key metabolic regulator as an activator of HBV transcription, thereby supporting the principle that HBV gene expression is regulated in a similar way to key hepatic metabolic genes.

  19. Early-life physical activity reverses metabolic and Foxo1 epigenetic misregulation induced by gestational sleep disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Mutskov, Vesco; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Wang, Yang; Carreras, Alba; Nobrega, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders are highly prevalent during late pregnancy and can impose adverse effects, such as preeclampsia and diabetes. However, the consequences of sleep fragmentation (SF) on offspring metabolism and epigenomic signatures are unclear. We report that physical activity during early life, but not later, reversed the increased body weight, altered glucose and lipid homeostasis, and increased visceral adipose tissue in offspring of mice subjected to gestational SF (SFo). The reversibility of this phenotype may reflect epigenetic mechanisms induced by SF during gestation. Accordingly, we found that the metabolic master switch Foxo1 was epigenetically misregulated in SFo livers in a temporally regulated fashion. Temporal Foxo1 analysis and its gluconeogenetic targets revealed that the epigenetic abnormalities of Foxo1 precede the metabolic syndrome phenotype. Importantly, regular physical activity early, but not later in life, reversed Foxo1 epigenetic misregulation and altered the metabolic phenotype in gestationally SF-exposed offspring. Thus, we have identified a restricted postnatal period during which lifestyle interventions may reverse the Foxo1 epigenetically mediated risk for metabolic dysfunction later in the life, as induced by gestational sleep disorders. PMID:25568076

  20. Expression of PUMA in Follicular Granulosa Cells Regulated by FoxO1 Activation During Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze-Qun; Shen, Ming; Wu, Wang-Jun; Li, Bo-Jiang; Weng, Qian-Nan; Li, Mei; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis is a main cause of follicular atresia. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced granulosa cell (GC) apoptosis is regulated by a variety of signaling pathways involving numerous genes and transcription factors. In this study, we found expression of the p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), a BH3-only Bcl-2 subfamily protein, in ovarian GCs during oxidative stress. By overexpression and knockdown of Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), we found that FoxO1 regulates PUMA at the protein level. Moreover, as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to activate FoxO1 by promoting its nuclear import, we used a JNK inhibitor to reduce FoxO1 activation and detected decreased PUMA messenger RNA expression and protein levels during oxidative stress. In addition, in vivo oxidative stress-induced upregulation of PUMA was found following injection of 3 nitropropionic acid in mice. In conclusion, oxidative stress increases PUMA expression regulated by FoxO1 in follicular GCs. PMID:25425107

  1. The Nuclear Zinc Finger Protein Zfat Maintains FoxO1 Protein Levels in Peripheral T Cells by Regulating the Activities of Autophagy and the Akt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Shuhei; Iwaihara, Yuri; Tanaka, Yoko; Luo, Hao; Nishi, Kensuke; Doi, Keiko; Koyanagi, Midori; Okamura, Tadashi; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Shirasawa, Senji

    2016-07-15

    Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) is a key molecule for the development and functions of peripheral T cells. However, the precise mechanisms regulating FoxO1 expression in peripheral T cells remain elusive. We previously reported that Zfat(f/f)-CD4Cre mice showed a marked decline in FoxO1 protein levels in peripheral T cells, partially through proteasomal degradation. Here we have identified the precise mechanisms, apart from proteasome-mediated degradation, of the decreased FoxO1 levels in Zfat-deficient T cells. First, we confirmed that tamoxifen-inducible deletion of Zfat in Zfat(f/f)-CreERT2 mice coincidently decreases FoxO1 protein levels in peripheral T cells, indicating that Zfat is essential for maintaining FoxO1 levels in these cells. Although the proteasome-specific inhibitors lactacystin and epoxomicin only moderately increase FoxO1 protein levels, the inhibitors of lysosomal proteolysis bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine restore the decreased FoxO1 levels in Zfat-deficient T cells to levels comparable with those in control cells. Furthermore, Zfat-deficient T cells show increased numbers of autophagosomes and decreased levels of p62 protein, together indicating that Zfat deficiency promotes lysosomal FoxO1 degradation through autophagy. In addition, Zfat deficiency increases the phosphorylation levels of Thr-308 and Ser-473 of Akt and the relative amounts of cytoplasmic to nuclear FoxO1 protein levels, indicating that Zfat deficiency causes Akt activation, leading to nuclear exclusion of FoxO1. Our findings have demonstrated a novel role of Zfat in maintaining FoxO1 protein levels in peripheral T cells by regulating the activities of autophagy and the Akt signaling pathway. PMID:27226588

  2. USP7 Attenuates Hepatic Gluconeogenesis Through Modulation of FoxO1 Gene Promoter Occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jessica A.; Tabata, Mitsuhisa; Rodgers, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic forkhead protein FoxO1 is a key component of systemic glucose homeostasis via its ability to regulate the transcription of rate-limiting enzymes in gluconeogenesis. Important in the regulation of FoxO1 transcriptional activity are the modifying/demodifying enzymes that lead to posttranslational modification. Here, we demonstrate the functional interaction and regulation of FoxO1 by herpesvirus-associated ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7; also known as herpesvirus-associated ubiquitin-specific protease, HAUSP), a deubiquitinating enzyme. We show that USP7-mediated mono-deubiquitination of FoxO1 results in suppression of FoxO1 transcriptional activity through decreased FoxO1 occupancy on the promoters of gluconeogenic genes. Knockdown of USP7 in primary hepatocytes leads to increased expression of FoxO1-target gluconeogenic genes and elevated glucose production. Consistent with this, USP7 gain-of-function suppresses the fasting/cAMP-induced activation of gluconeogenic genes in hepatocyte cells and in mouse liver, resulting in decreased hepatic glucose production. Notably, we show that the effects of USP7 on hepatic glucose metabolism depend on FoxO1. Together, these results place FoxO1 under the intimate regulation of deubiquitination and glucose metabolic control with important implication in diseases such as diabetes. PMID:24694308

  3. PKA turnover by the REGγ-proteasome modulates FoxO1 cellular activity and VEGF-induced angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Lai, Li; Zuo, Qiuhong; Dai, Fujun; Wu, Lin; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Qingxia; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jiang; Li, Lei; Lin, Qingxiang; Creighton, Chad J.; Costello, Myra Grace; Huang, Shixia; Jia, Caifeng; Liao, Lujian; Luo, Honglin; Fu, Junjiang; Liu, Mingyao; Yi, Zhengfang; Xiao, Jianru; Li, Xiaotao

    2014-01-01

    The REGγ-proteasome serves as a short-cut for the destruction of certain intact mammalian proteins in the absence of ubiquitin-and ATP. The biological roles of the proteasome activator REGγ are not completely understood. Here we demonstrate that REGγ controls degradation of protein kinase A catalytic subunit-α (PKAca) both in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs). Accumulation of PKAca in REGγ-deficient HUVECs or MEFs results in phosphorylation and nuclear exclusion of the transcription factor FoxO1, indicating that REGγ is involved in preserving FoxO1 transcriptional activity. Consequently, VEGF-induced expression of the FoxO1 responsive genes, VCAM-1 and E-Selectin, was tightly controlled by REGγ in a PKA dependent manner. Functionally, REGγ is crucial for the migration of HUVECs. REGγ−/− mice display compromised VEGF-instigated neovascularization in cornea and aortic ring models. Implanted matrigel plugs containing VEGF in REGγ−/− mice induced fewer capillaries than in REGγ+/+ littermates. Taken together, our study identifies REGγ as a novel angiogenic factor that plays an important role in VEGF-induced expression of VCAM-1 and E-Selectin by antagonizing PKA signaling. Identification of the REGγ–PKA–FoxO1 pathway in endothelial cells (ECs) provides another potential target for therapeutic intervention in vascular diseases. PMID:24560667

  4. PI3 Kinase and FOXO1 Transcription Factor Activity Differentially Control B Cells in the Germinal Center Light and Dark Zones.

    PubMed

    Sander, Sandrine; Chu, Van Trung; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Franklin, Andrew; Graf, Robin; Calado, Dinis Pedro; Li, Shuang; Imami, Koshi; Selbach, Matthias; Di Virgilio, Michela; Bullinger, Lars; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2015-12-15

    Phosphatidylinositol 3' OH kinase (PI3K) signaling and FOXO transcription factors play opposing roles at several B cell developmental stages. We show here abundant nuclear FOXO1 expression in the proliferative compartment of the germinal center (GC), its dark zone (DZ), and PI3K activity, downregulating FOXO1, in the light zone (LZ), where cells are selected for further differentiation. In the LZ, however, FOXO1 was expressed in a fraction of cells destined for DZ reentry. Upon FOXO1 ablation or induction of PI3K activity, GCs lost their DZ, owing at least partly to downregulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4. Although this prevented proper cyclic selection of cells in GCs, somatic hypermutation and proliferation were maintained. Class switch recombination was partly lost due to a failure of switch region targeting by activation-induced deaminase (AID). PMID:26620760

  5. Gonadal expression of Foxo1, but not Foxo3, is conserved in diverse Mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Tarnawa, Edward D; Baker, Michael D; Aloisio, Gina M; Carr, Bruce R; Castrillon, Diego H

    2013-04-01

    The Foxos are key effectors of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and regulate diverse physiologic processes. Two of these factors, Foxo1 and Foxo3, serve specific roles in reproduction in the mouse. Foxo3 is required for suppression of primordial follicle activation in females, while Foxo1 regulates spermatogonial stem cell maintenance in males. In the mouse ovary, Foxo1 is highly expressed in somatic cells (but not in oocytes), suggesting an important functional role for Foxo1 in these cells. Given that invertebrate model species such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster harbor a single ancestral Foxo homolog, these observations suggest that gene duplication conferred a selective advantage by permitting the Foxos to adopt distinct roles in oogenesis and spermatogenesis. Our objective was to determine if the remarkably specific expression patterns of Foxo1 and Foxo3 in mouse gonads (and, by inference, Foxo function) are conserved in diverse mammalian species. Western blotting was used to validate isoform-specific antibodies in rodents, companion animals, farm animals, nonhuman primates, and humans. Following validation of each antibody, immunohistochemistry was performed to ascertain Foxo1 and Foxo3 gonadal expression patterns. While Foxo1 expression in spermatogonia and granulosa cells was conserved in each species evaluated, Foxo3 expression in oocytes was not. Our findings suggest that Foxo3 is not uniquely required for primordial follicle maintenance in nonrodent species and that other Foxos, particularly Foxo1, may contribute to oocyte maintenance in a functionally redundant manner. PMID:23486915

  6. Novel Foxo1–dependent transcriptional programs control Treg cell function

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Weiming; Liao, Will; Luo, Chong T.; Yin, Na; Huse, Morgan; Kim, Myoungjoo V.; Peng, Min; Chan, Pamela; Ma, Qian; Mo, Yifan; Meijer, Dies; Zhao, Keji; Rudensky, Alexander Y.; Atwal, Gurinder; Zhang, Michael Q.; Li, Ming O.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, characterized by expression of the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), maintain immune homeostasis by suppressing self-destructive immune responses1–4. Foxp3 operates as a late-acting differentiation factor controlling Treg cell homeostasis and function5, whereas the early Treg-cell-lineage commitment is regulated by the Akt kinase and the forkhead box O (Foxo) family of transcription factors6–10. However, whether Foxo proteins act beyond the Treg-cell-commitment stage to control Treg cell homeostasis and function remains largely unexplored. Here we show that Foxo1 is a pivotal regulatorof Treg cell function. Treg cells express high amounts of Foxo1 and display reduced T-cell-receptor-induced Akt activation, Foxo1 phosphorylation and Foxo1 nuclear exclusion. Mice with Treg-cell-specific deletion of Foxo1 develop a fatal inflammatory disorder similar in severity to that seen in Foxp3-deficient mice, but without the loss of Treg cells. Genome-wide analysis of Foxo1 binding sites reveals ~300 Foxo1-bound target genes, including the pro-inflammatory cytokine Ifng, that do not seem to be directly regulated by Foxp3. These findings show that the evolutionarily ancient Akt–Foxo1 signalling module controls a novel genetic program indispensable for Treg cell function. PMID:23135404

  7. FoxO1 Protein Cooperates with ATF4 Protein in Osteoblasts to Control Glucose Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Kode, Aruna; Mosialou, Ioanna; Silva, Barbara C.; Joshi, Sneha; Ferron, Mathieu; Rached, Marie Therese; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2012-01-01

    The Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits through its expression in osteoblasts β-cell proliferation, insulin secretion, and sensitivity. At least part of the FoxO1 metabolic functions result from its ability to suppress the activity of osteocalcin, an osteoblast-derived hormone favoring glucose metabolism and energy expenditure. In searching for mechanisms mediating the metabolic actions of FoxO1, we focused on ATF4, because this transcription factor also affects glucose metabolism through its expression in osteoblasts. We show here that FoxO1 co-localizes with ATF4 in the osteoblast nucleus, and physically interacts with and promotes the transcriptional activity of ATF4. Genetic experiments demonstrate that FoxO1 and ATF4 cooperate to increase glucose levels and decrease glucose tolerance. These effects result from a synergistic effect of the two transcription factors to suppress the activity of osteocalcin through up-regulating expression of the phosphatase catalyzing osteocalcin inactivation. As a result, insulin production by β-cells and insulin signaling in the muscle, liver and white adipose tissue are compromised and fat weight increases by the FoxO1/ATF4 interaction. Taken together these observations demonstrate that FoxO1 and ATF4 cooperate in osteoblasts to regulate glucose homeostasis. PMID:22298775

  8. Novel Mechanism of Blood Pressure Regulation By Foxo1-Mediated Transcriptional Control of Hepatic Angiotensinogen

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yajuan; Zhang, Kebin; Wu, Yuxin; Xu, Zihui; Yong, QC; Kumar, Rajesh; Baker, Kenneth M.; Zhu, Qinglei; Chen, Shouwen; Guo, Shaodong

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a major determinant of blood pressure regulation. It consists of a cascade of enzymatic reactions involving three components: angiotensinogen (Agt), renin, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), which generate angiotensin II (Ang II) as a biologically active product. Agt is largely produced in the liver, acting as a major determinant of the circulating RAS, which exerts acute hemodynamic effects on blood pressure regulation. How the expression of Agt is regulated is not completely understood. Here we hypothesize that Agt is regulated by forkhead transcription factor forkhead box class O1 (Foxo1), an insulin-suppressed transcription factor, and thereby controls blood pressure in mice. We generated liver-specific Foxo1 knockout mice (L-F1KO mice), which exhibited a reduction in plasma Agt and Ang II levels and a significant decrease in blood pressure. Using hepatocyte cultures, we demonstrated that overexpression of Foxo1 increased Agt expression, while hepatocytes lacking Foxo1 demonstrated a reduction of Agt gene expression and partially impaired insulin inhibition on Agt gene expression. Furthermore, mouse Agt prompter analysis demonstrated that the Agt promoter region contains a functional Foxo1 binding site, which is responsible for both Foxo1 stimulation and insulin suppression on the promoter activity. Together, these data demonstrate that Foxo1 regulates hepatic Agt gene expression and controls plasma Agt and Ang II levels, modulating blood pressure control in mice. PMID:25069665

  9. Foxo1 regulates Dbh expression and the activity of the sympathetic nervous system in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kajimura, Daisuke; Paone, Riccardo; Mann, J John; Karsenty, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    The transcription factor FoxO1 regulates multiple physiological processes. Here, we show that FoxO1 is highly expressed in neurons of the locus coeruleus and of various sympathetic ganglions, but not in the adrenal medulla. Consistent with this pattern of expression, mice lacking FoxO1 only in sympathetic neurons (FoxO1 Dbh-/-) display a low sympathetic tone without modification of the catecholamine content in the adrenal medulla. As a result, FoxO1 Dbh-/- mice demonstrate an increased insulin secretion, improved glucose tolerance, low energy expenditure, and high bone mass. FoxO1 favors catecholamine synthesis because it is a potent regulator of the expression of Dbh that encodes the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of these neurotransmitters. By identifying FoxO1 as a transcriptional regulator of the sympathetic tone, these results advance our understanding of the control of some aspects of metabolism and of bone mass accrual. PMID:25353004

  10. FOXO1 Mediates Vitamin D Deficiency-induced Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcang; Villalta, Armando; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies have consistently shown a relationship between vitamin D deficiency, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). This is supported by recent trials showing that vitamin D supplementation in prediabetic or insulin-resistant patients with inadequate vitamin D levels improves insulin sensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying vitamin D deficiency-induced insulin resistance and DM2 remain unknown. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is a primary defect in the majority of patients with DM2. While sustained activation of forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) in skeletal muscle causes insulin resistance, a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and FOXO1 activation in muscle is unknown. We generated skeletal muscle-specific vitamin D receptor (VDR)-null mice and discovered that these mice developed insulin resistance and glucose intolerance accompanied by increased expression and activity of FOXO1. We also found sustained FOXO1 activation in the skeletal muscle of global VDR-null mice. Treatment of C2C12 muscle cells with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (VD3) reduced FOXO1 expression, nuclear translocation, and activity. The VD3-dependent suppression of FOXO1 activation disappeared by knockdown of VDR, indicating that it is VDR-dependent. Taken together, these results suggest that FOXO1 is a critical target mediating VDR-null signaling in skeletal muscle. The novel findings provide the conceptual support that persistent FOXO1 activation may be responsible for insulin resistance and impaired glucose metabolism in vitamin D signaling-deficient mice, as well as evidence for the utility of vitamin D supplementation for intervention in DM2. PMID:26462119

  11. Deletion of FoxO1 Leads to Shortening of QRS by Increasing Na+ Channel Activity through Enhanced Expression of both Cardiac NaV1.5 and β3 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Benzhi; Wang, Ning; Mao, Weike; You, Tao; Lu, Yan; Li, Xiang; Ye, Bo; Li, Faqian; Xu, Haodong

    2014-01-01

    Our in vitro studies revealed that a transcription factor, Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1), negatively regulates the expression of NaV1.5, a main α subunit of the cardiac Na+ channel, by altering the promoter activity of SCN5a in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. The in vivo role of FoxO1 in the regulation of cardiac NaV1.5 expression remains unknown. The present study aimed to define the role of FoxO1 in the regulation of NaV1.5 expression and cardiac Na+ channel activity in mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes and assess the cardiac electrophysiological phenotype of mice with cardiac FoxO1 deletion. Tamoxifen-induced and cardiac-specific FoxO1 deletion was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Cardiac FoxO1 deletion failed to result in either cardiac functional changes or hypertrophy as assessed by echocardiography and individual ventricular cell capacitances, respectively. Western blotting showed that FoxO1 was significantly decreased while NaV1.5 protein level was significantly increased in mouse hearts with FoxO1 deletion. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) revealed that FoxO1 deletion led to an increase in NaV1.5 and Na+ channel subunit β3 mRNA, but not β1, 2, 4, or connexin 43. Whole patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that cardiac Na+ currents were significantly augmented by FoxO1 deletion without affecting the steady-state activation and inactivation, leading to accelerated depolarization of action potentials in mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes. Electrocardiogram recordings showed that the QRS complex was significantly shortened and P wave amplitude was significantly increased in conscious and unrestrained mice with cardiac FoxO1 deletion. NaV1.5 expression was decreased in the peri-infarct (border-zone) of mice with myocardial infarction and FoxO1 accumulated in the cardiomyocyte nuclei of chronic ischemic human hearts. Our findings indicate that FoxO1 plays an important role in the regulation of NaV1.5 and β3 subunit expression as well as Na+ channel activity

  12. Loss of Interdependent Binding by the FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 Forkhead Transcription Factors Culminates in Perturbation of Active Chromatin Marks and Binding of Transcriptional Regulators at Insulin-sensitive Genes.

    PubMed

    Yalley, Akua; Schill, Daniel; Hatta, Mitsutoki; Johnson, Nicole; Cirillo, Lisa Ann

    2016-04-15

    FoxO1 binds to insulin response elements located in the promoters of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), activating their expression. Insulin-mediated phosphorylation of FoxO1 promotes cytoplasmic translocation, inhibiting FoxO1-mediated transactivation. We have previously demonstrated that FoxO1 opens and remodels chromatin assembled from the IGFBP1 promoter via a highly conserved winged helix motif. This finding, which established FoxO1 as a "pioneer" factor, suggested a model whereby FoxO1 chromatin remodeling at regulatory targets facilitates binding and recruitment of additional regulatory factors. However, the impact of FoxO1 phosphorylation on its ability to bind chromatin and the effect of FoxO1 loss on recruitment of neighboring transcription factors at its regulatory targets in liver chromatin is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that an amino acid substitution that mimics insulin-mediated phosphorylation of a serine in the winged helix DNA binding motif curtails FoxO1 nucleosome binding. We also demonstrate that shRNA-mediated loss of FoxO1 binding to the IGFBP1 and G6Pase promoters in HepG2 cells significantly reduces binding of RNA polymerase II and the pioneer factors FoxA1/A2. Knockdown of FoxA1 similarly reduced binding of RNA polymerase II and FoxO1. Reduction in acetylation of histone H3 Lys-27 accompanies loss of FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 binding. Interdependent binding of FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 possibly entails cooperative binding because FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 facilitate one another's binding to IGFPB1 promoter DNA. These results illustrate how transcription factors can nucleate transcriptional events in chromatin in response to signaling events and suggest a model for regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism through interdependent FoxO/FoxA binding. PMID:26929406

  13. Foxo1-mediated inflammatory response after cerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; He, Qi; Zhai, Xuan; You, Yan; Li, Lingyu; Hou, Yanghao; He, Faming; Zhao, Yong; Zhao, Jing

    2016-08-26

    The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of transcription factors plays a crucial role in cell apoptosis, immune regulation, and tissue development. Foxo1, as the foremost member of the Foxo family, regulates a wide range of molecular signals in many tissues, including tumor, liver, and brain. This study investigated Foxo1 expression at different time points and in different brain areas, and the role of Foxo1 in vivo in regulating inflammatory injury in a rat model of autologous blood-injected cerebral hemorrhage injury. We found that Foxo1 expression peaked at 12h post-intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and in the ipsilateral corpus striatum. Foxo1 knockdown by Foxo1 siRNA decreased ICH injury, improved neurological function, and decreased the expression of inflammatory factors downstream of the Foxo1 pathway, including TLR4, NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-18. Foxo1 knockdown also decreased the expression and activity of myeloperoxidase, IL-1β, and IL-18. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that Foxo1 is a key regulator of inflammatory injury in rats after ICH. By identifying the molecular mechanisms of Foxo1/TLR4/NF-κB signaling, we provide a novel rationale for therapeutic approaches to managing inflammatory injury after ICH. PMID:27288017

  14. Role of resveratrol in FOXO1-mediated gluconeogenic gene expression in the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joo-Man; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Bae, Jin-Sik; Kim, Mi-Young; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Ahn, Yong-Ho

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Insulin-suppression of PEPCK and G6Pase gene expression is counteracted by resveratrol. {yields} Resveratrol upregulates hepatic gluconeogenic genes by attenuating insulin signaling and deacetylating FOXO1, which are SIRT1-independent in the cytosol and SIRT1-dependent in the nucleus, respectively. {yields} Resveratrol increases the binding activity of Foxo1 to the IRE of PEPCK and G6Pase. -- Abstract: During a state of fasting, the blood glucose level is maintained by hepatic gluconeogenesis. SIRT1 is an important metabolic regulator during nutrient deprivation and the liver-specific knockdown of SIRT1 resulted in decreased glucose production. We hypothesize that SIRT1 is responsible for the upregulation of insulin-suppressed gluconeogenic genes through the deacetylation of FOXO1. Treatment of primary cultured hepatocytes with resveratrol increased insulin-repressed PEPCK and G6Pase mRNA levels, which depend on SIRT1 activity. We found that the resveratrol treatment resulted in a decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO1, which are independent of SIRT1 action. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that resveratrol caused the nuclear localization of FOXO1. In the nucleus, FOXO1 is deacetylated by SIRT1, which might make it more accessible to the IRE of the PEPCK and G6Pase promoter, causing an increase in their gene expression. Our results indicate that resveratrol upregulates the expression of gluconeogenic genes by attenuating insulin signaling and by deacetylating FOXO1, which are SIRT1-independent in the cytosol and SIRT1-dependent in the nucleus, respectively.

  15. FOXO1/3 and PTEN Depletion in Granulosa Cells Promotes Ovarian Granulosa Cell Tumor Development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhilin; Ren, Yi A; Pangas, Stephanie A; Adams, Jaye; Zhou, Wei; Castrillon, Diego H; Wilhelm, Dagmar; Richards, JoAnne S

    2015-07-01

    The forkhead box (FOX), FOXO1 and FOXO3, transcription factors regulate multiple functions in mammalian cells. Selective inactivation of the Foxo1 and Foxo3 genes in murine ovarian granulosa cells severely impairs follicular development and apoptosis causing infertility, and as shown here, granulosa cell tumor (GCT) formation. Coordinate depletion of the tumor suppressor Pten gene in the Foxo1/3 strain enhanced the penetrance and onset of GCT formation. Immunostaining and Western blot analyses confirmed FOXO1 and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) depletion, maintenance of globin transcription factor (GATA) 4 and nuclear localization of FOXL2 and phosphorylated small mothers against decapentaplegic (SMAD) 2/3 in the tumor cells, recapitulating results we observed in human adult GCTs. Microarray and quantitative PCR analyses of mouse GCTs further confirmed expression of specific genes (Foxl2, Gata4, and Wnt4) controlling granulosa cell fate specification and proliferation, whereas others (Emx2, Nr0b1, Rspo1, and Wt1) were suppressed. Key genes (Amh, Bmp2, and Fshr) controlling follicle growth, apoptosis, and differentiation were also suppressed. Inhbb and Grem1 were selectively elevated, whereas reduction of Inha provided additional evidence that activin signaling and small mothers against decapentaplegic (SMAD) 2/3 phosphorylation impact GCT formation. Unexpectedly, markers of Sertoli/epithelial cells (SRY [sex determining region Y]-box 9/keratin 8) and alternatively activated macrophages (chitinase 3-like 3) were elevated in discrete subpopulations within the mouse GCTs, indicating that Foxo1/3/Pten depletion not only leads to GCTs but also to altered granulosa cell fate decisions and immune responses. Thus, analyses of the Foxo1/3/Pten mouse GCTs and human adult GCTs provide strong evidence that impaired functions of the FOXO1/3/PTEN pathways lead to dramatic changes in the molecular program within granulosa cells, chronic activin signaling in the presence of

  16. Oxidative Stress Activates the Transcription Factors FoxO 1a and FoxO 3a in the Hippocampus of Rats Exposed to Low Doses of Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Crisóstomo, Nancy P.; Rodríguez Martínez, Erika

    2014-01-01

    The exposure to low doses of ozone induces an oxidative stress state, which is involved in neurodegenerative diseases. Forkhead box O (FoxO) family of transcription factors are activated by oxidative signals and regulate cell proliferation and resistance to oxidative stress. Our aim was to study the effect of chronic exposure to ozone on the activation of FoxO 1a and FoxO 3a in the hippocampus of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into six groups and exposed to 0.25 ppm of ozone for 0, 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. After treatment, the groups were processed for western blotting and immunohistochemistry against FoxO 3a, Mn SOD, cyclin D2, FoxO 1a, and active caspase 3. We found that exposure to ozone increased the activation of FoxO 3a at 30 and 60 days and expression of Mn SOD at all treatment times. Additionally, increases in cyclin D2 from 7 to 90 days; FoxO 1a at 15, 30, and 60 days; and activate caspase 3 from 30 to 60 days of exposure were noted. The results indicate that ozone alters regulatory pathways related to both the antioxidant system and the cell cycle, inducing neuronal reentry into the cell cycle and apoptotic death. PMID:24967006

  17. Combined Treatment of MCF-7 Cells with AICAR and Methotrexate, Arrests Cell Cycle and Reverses Warburg Metabolism through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) and FOXO1

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, Tamás; Szántó, Magdolna; Abdul-Rahman, Omar; Nagy, Lilla; Dér, Ádám; Kiss, Borbála; Bai, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by metabolic alterations, namely, depressed mitochondrial oxidation, enhanced glycolysis and pentose phosphate shunt flux to support rapid cell growth, which is called the Warburg effect. In our study we assessed the metabolic consequences of a joint treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with AICAR, an inducer of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) jointly with methotrexate (MTX), a folate-analog antimetabolite that blunts de novo nucleotide synthesis. MCF7 cells, a model of breast cancer cells, were resistant to the individual application of AICAR or MTX, however combined treatment of AICAR and MTX reduced cell proliferation. Prolonged joint application of AICAR and MTX induced AMPK and consequently enhanced mitochondrial oxidation and reduced the rate of glycolysis. These metabolic changes suggest an anti-Warburg rearrangement of metabolism that led to the block of the G1/S and the G2/M transition slowing down cell cycle. The slowdown of cell proliferation was abolished when mitotropic transcription factors, PGC-1α, PGC-1β or FOXO1 were silenced. In human breast cancers higher expression of AMPKα and FOXO1 extended survival. AICAR and MTX exerts similar additive antiproliferative effect on other breast cancer cell lines, such as SKBR and 4T1 cells, too. Our data not only underline the importance of Warburg metabolism in breast cancer cells but nominate the AICAR+MTX combination as a potential cytostatic regime blunting Warburg metabolism. Furthermore, we suggest the targeting of AMPK and FOXO1 to combat breast cancer. PMID:26919657

  18. Combined Treatment of MCF-7 Cells with AICAR and Methotrexate, Arrests Cell Cycle and Reverses Warburg Metabolism through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) and FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Tamás; Szántó, Magdolna; Abdul-Rahman, Omar; Nagy, Lilla; Dér, Ádám; Kiss, Borbála; Bai, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by metabolic alterations, namely, depressed mitochondrial oxidation, enhanced glycolysis and pentose phosphate shunt flux to support rapid cell growth, which is called the Warburg effect. In our study we assessed the metabolic consequences of a joint treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with AICAR, an inducer of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) jointly with methotrexate (MTX), a folate-analog antimetabolite that blunts de novo nucleotide synthesis. MCF7 cells, a model of breast cancer cells, were resistant to the individual application of AICAR or MTX, however combined treatment of AICAR and MTX reduced cell proliferation. Prolonged joint application of AICAR and MTX induced AMPK and consequently enhanced mitochondrial oxidation and reduced the rate of glycolysis. These metabolic changes suggest an anti-Warburg rearrangement of metabolism that led to the block of the G1/S and the G2/M transition slowing down cell cycle. The slowdown of cell proliferation was abolished when mitotropic transcription factors, PGC-1α, PGC-1β or FOXO1 were silenced. In human breast cancers higher expression of AMPKα and FOXO1 extended survival. AICAR and MTX exerts similar additive antiproliferative effect on other breast cancer cell lines, such as SKBR and 4T1 cells, too. Our data not only underline the importance of Warburg metabolism in breast cancer cells but nominate the AICAR+MTX combination as a potential cytostatic regime blunting Warburg metabolism. Furthermore, we suggest the targeting of AMPK and FOXO1 to combat breast cancer. PMID:26919657

  19. Extracellular calcium influx promotes antibacterial autophagy in Escherichia coli infected murine macrophages via CaMKKβ dependent activation of ERK1/2, AMPK and FoxO1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Ning; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Yang, Yongjun; Chen, Xiaoli; Chen, Qian; Zhou, Hong; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-15

    Autophagy induction has been found as an alternative mechanism for ultimate elimination of invaded bacteria in innate immune cells. However, underlying mechanisms for the regulation of antibacterial autophagy require further elucidation. The present study mainly explores calcium dependent regulation of autophagy and its contribution to bactericidal activity in Escherichia coli (E. coli) infected murine macrophages. In this study, E. coli was shown to increase cellular calcium levels by triggering extracellular calcium influx in murine bone marrow derived macrophages. The elevated calcium was required for autophagy and bactericidal activity against E. coli, as extracellular calcium depletion or inhibition of calcium influx suppressed E. coli induced Beclin1 and LC3B expression, dampened LC3B puncta or LC3I to LC3II conversion and impaired intracellular E. coli degradation. Then CaMKKβ was identified as activated by E. coli induced calcium influx and chemical inhibition or RNAi knockdown of CaMKKβ abolished calcium mediated antibacterial autophagy. CaMKKβ was demonstrated to activate signaling pathways involving ERK, AMPK and FoxO1 and RNAi knockdown of these molecules also dampened the antibacterial autophagy against E. coli. In summary, we demonstrate a new mechanism of calcium dependent antibacterial strategy in E. coli infected macrophages, which requires autophagy enhancement mediated by activation of CaMKKβ, ERK, AMPK and FoxO1. PMID:26703209

  20. TNF-α Inhibits FoxO1 by Upregulating miR-705 to Aggravate Oxidative Damage in Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Li; Su, Xiaoxia; Yang, Xiaohong; Hu, Chenghu; Li, Bei; Lv, Yajie; Shuai, Yi; Jing, Huan; Deng, Zhihong; Jin, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Decline of antioxidant defense after estrogen deficiency leads to oxidative damage in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), resulting a defect of bone formation in osteoporosis. Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) protein is crucial for defending physiological oxidative damage in bone. But whether FoxO1 is involved in the oxidative damage during osteoporosis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that FoxO1 protein accumulation was decreased in BMMSCs of ovariectomized mice. The decrease of FoxO1 resulted in the suppression of manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2) and catalase (Cat) expression and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting the osteogenic differentiation of BMMSCs. The decline of FoxO1 protein was caused by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) accumulated after estrogen deficiency. Mechanistically, TNF-α activated NF-κB pathway to promote microRNA-705 expression, which function as a repressor of FoxO1 through post-transcriptional regulation. Inhibition of NF-κB pathway or knockdown of miR-705 largely prevented the decline of FoxO1-mediated antioxidant defense caused by TNF-α and ameliorated the oxidative damage in osteoporotic BMMSCs. Moreover, the accumulated ROS further activated NF-κB pathway with TNF-α, which formed a feed-forward loop to persistently inhibiting FoxO1 protein accumulation in BMMSCs. In conclusion, our study revealed that the decline of FoxO1 is an important etiology factor of osteoporosis and unclosed a novel mechanism of FoxO1 regulation by TNF-α. These findings suggested a close correlation between inflammation and oxidative stress in stem cell dysfunction during degenerative bone diseases. PMID:26700816

  1. SIRT2 suppresses adipocyte differentiation by deacetylating FOX01 and enhancing FOXO1's repressive interaction with PPAR gamma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sirtuin family of proteins possesses NAD-dependent deacetylase and ADP ribosyltransferase activities. They are found to respond to nutrient deprivation and profoundly regulate metabolic functions. We have previously reported that caloric restriction increases the expression of one of the seven mamma...

  2. Inhibition of hypothalamic Foxo1 expression reduced food intake in diet-induced obesity rats

    PubMed Central

    Ropelle, Eduardo R; Pauli, José R; Prada, Patrícia; Cintra, Dennys E; Rocha, Guilherme Z; Moraes, Juliana C; Frederico, Marisa J S; da Luz, Gabrielle; Pinho, Ricardo A; Carvalheira, José B C; Velloso, Licio A; Saad, Mario A; De Souza, Cláudio T

    2009-01-01

    Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus plays a role in maintaining body weight. The forkhead transcription factor Foxo1 is an important mediator of insulin signalling in the hypothalamus. Foxo1 stimulates the transcription of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y and Agouti-related protein through the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt signalling pathway, but the role of hypothalamic Foxo1 in insulin resistance and obesity remains unclear. Here, we identify that a high-fat diet impaired insulin-induced hypothalamic Foxo1 phosphorylation and degradation, increasing the nuclear Foxo1 activity and hyperphagic response in rats. Thus, we investigated the effects of the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusion of Foxo1-antisense oligonucleotide (Foxo1-ASO) and evaluated the food consumption and weight gain in normal and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Three days of Foxo1-ASO microinfusion reduced the hypothalamic Foxo1 expression by about 85%. i.c.v. infusion of Foxo1-ASO reduced the cumulative food intake (21%), body weight change (28%), epididymal fat pad weight (22%) and fasting serum insulin levels (19%) and increased the insulin sensitivity (34%) in DIO but not in control animals. Collectively, these data showed that the Foxo1-ASO treatment blocked the orexigenic effects of Foxo1 and prevented the hyperphagic response in obese rats. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of Foxo1 may be used to prevent or treat obesity. PMID:19332486

  3. A novel apoptosis-inducing mechanism of 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine in melanoma cells: Demethylation of TNF-α and activation of FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shunsuke; Mori, Takashi; Igase, Masaya; Mizuno, Takuya

    2015-12-28

    Melanoma is a poor-prognosis cancer in both humans and dogs, and so the anti-tumor effects of 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine (5-aza) on solid tumors such as melanoma have gained much attention. However, its anti-tumor mechanism remains entirely unclear. This present study revealed a part of the anti-tumor effects of 5-aza, focusing on apoptosis induction, on human and canine melanoma cells. Treatment with 5-aza markedly induced obvious apoptosis in melanoma cells. 5-Aza-induced apoptosis was possibly due to induced expression of cytotoxic cytokines such as TNF-α. We revealed hypermethylation of the promoter region of TNF-α as a consequence of treatment with 5-aza. Concurrently, we evaluated the effect of 5-aza on the Akt/FOXO1 signaling cascade, which plays a pivotal role in the transcription of cytokine genes. As a result, 5-aza inactivated Akt and inversely activated FOXO1, which contributed to the up-regulation of TNF-α. Furthermore, up-regulation of TNF-α by 5-aza administration was found in in vivo experiments. These current data suggest a novel apoptosis-inducing mechanism of 5-aza and indicate that 5-aza could be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of human and canine melanomas. PMID:26335173

  4. FOXO1 is a direct target of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein in Ewing's sarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Liu; Hu, Hsien-Ming; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Chansky, Howard A.

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Inducible and reversible siRNA knockdown of an oncogenic fusion protein such as EWS-Fli1 is feasible and more advantageous than other siRNA methods. {yields} The tumor suppressor gene FOXO1 is a new EWS-Fli1 target. {yields} While trans-activators are known for the FOXO1 gene, there has been no report on negative regulators of FOXO1 transcription. {yields} This study provides first evidence that the EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein can function as a transcriptional repressor of the FOXO1 gene. -- Abstract: Ewing's family tumors are characterized by a specific t(11;22) chromosomal translocation that results in the formation of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein. To investigate the effects of EWS-Fli1 on gene expression, we carried out DNA microarray analysis after specific knockdown of EWS-Fli1 through transfection of synthetic siRNAs. EWS-Fli1 knockdown increased expression of genes such as DKK1 and p57 that are known to be repressed by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein. Among other potential EWS-Fli1 targets identified by our microarray analysis, we have focused on the FOXO1 gene since it encodes a potential tumor suppressor and has not been previously reported in Ewing's cells. To better understand how EWS-Fli1 affects FOXO1 expression, we have established a doxycycline-inducible siRNA system to achieve stable and reversible knockdown of EWS-Fli1 in Ewing's sarcoma cells. Here we show that FOXO1 expression in Ewing's cells has an inverse relationship with EWS-Fli1 protein level, and FOXO1 promoter activity is increased after doxycycline-induced EWS-Fli1 knockdown. In addition, we have found that direct binding of EWS-Fli1 to FOXO1 promoter is attenuated after doxycycline-induced siRNA knockdown of the fusion protein. Together, these results suggest that suppression of FOXO1 function by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein may contribute to cellular transformation in Ewing's family tumors.

  5. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Inhibits Invasive Bladder Cancer Formation In Vivo and Human Bladder Cancer Invasion In Vitro by Targeting STAT1/FOXO1 Axis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guosong; Wu, Amy D; Huang, Chao; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Liao, Xin; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Zeng, Xingruo; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haojie; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-07-01

    Although our most recent studies have identified Isorhapontigenin (ISO), a novel derivative of stilbene that isolated from a Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, for its inhibition of human bladder cancer growth, nothing is known whether ISO possesses an inhibitory effect on bladder cancer invasion. Thus, we addressed this important question in current study and discovered that ISO treatment could inhibit mouse-invasive bladder cancer development following bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) exposure in vivo We also found that ISO suppressed human bladder cancer cell invasion accompanied by upregulation of the forkhead box class O 1 (FOXO1) mRNA transcription in vitro Accordingly, FOXO1 was profoundly downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and was negatively correlated with bladder cancer invasion. Forced expression of FOXO1 specifically suppressed high-grade human bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas knockdown of FOXO1 promoted noninvasive bladder cancer cells becoming invasive bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockout of FOXO1 significantly increased bladder cancer cell invasion and abolished the ISO inhibition of invasion in human bladder cancer cells. Further studies showed that the inhibition of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation at Tyr701 was crucial for ISO upregulation of FOXO1 transcription. Furthermore, this study revealed that metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was a FOXO1 downstream effector, which was also supported by data obtained from mouse model of ISO inhibition BBN-induced mouse-invasive bladder cancer formation. These findings not only provide a novel insight into the understanding of mechanism of bladder cancer's propensity to invasion, but also identify a new role and mechanisms underlying the natural compound ISO that specifically suppresses such bladder cancer invasion through targeting the STAT1-FOXO1-MMP-2 axis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 567-80. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27080594

  6. FOXO1 is Regulated by Insulin and IGF1 in Pituitary Gonadotropes

    PubMed Central

    Skarra, Danalea V.; Thackray, Varykina G.

    2015-01-01

    The FOXO1 transcription factor is important for multiple aspects of reproductive function. We previously reported that FOXO1 functions as a repressor of gonadotropin hormone synthesis, but how FOXO1 is regulated in pituitary gonadotropes is unknown. The growth factors, insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1) function as key regulators of cell proliferation, metabolism and apoptosis in multiple cell types through the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. In this study, we found that insulin and IGF1 signaling in gonadotropes induced FOXO1 phosphorylation through the PI3K/AKT pathway in immortalized and primary cells, resulting in FOXO1 relocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, insulin administration in vivo induced phosphorylation of FOXO1 and AKT in the pituitary. Thus, insulin and IGF1 act as negative regulators of FOXO1 activity and may serve to fine-tune gonadotropin expression. PMID:25676570

  7. Insulin secretion impairment in Sirt6 knockout pancreatic β cells is mediated by suppression of the FoxO1-Pdx1-Glut2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mi-Young; Wang, Jie; Ka, Sun-O; Bae, Eun Ju; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin 6 (Sirt6), a chromatin associated class III deacetylase, controls whole-body energy homeostasis and has a critical role in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic β cells. However, its underlying molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. To gain further insights, we studied the pathway by which Sirt6 regulates GSIS utilizing mice lacking Sirt6 in their β cells (βS6KO). Further, we overexpressed wild type or deacetylase-inactive mutant Sirt6 in isolated islets as well as in MIN6 cells. We confirmed that βS6KO mice developed glucose intolerance with severely impaired GSIS. Gene expression analysis of knockout islets and overexpression studies demonstrated that Sirt6 deacetylates forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) to trigger its nuclear export and releases its transcriptional repression of key glucose sensing genes such as Pdx1 and Glut2. Ectopic overexpression of Sirt6 in knockout islets resulted in rescue of the defective insulin secretion and restoration of the expression of Pdx1 and Glut2. These results show that Sirt6 in pancreatic β cells deacetylates FoxO1 and subsequently increases the expression of Pdx1 and Glut2 to maintain the glucose-sensing ability of pancreatic β cells and systemic glucose tolerance. PMID:27457971

  8. Insulin secretion impairment in Sirt6 knockout pancreatic β cells is mediated by suppression of the FoxO1-Pdx1-Glut2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Mi-Young; Wang, Jie; Ka, Sun-O; Bae, Eun Ju; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin 6 (Sirt6), a chromatin associated class III deacetylase, controls whole-body energy homeostasis and has a critical role in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic β cells. However, its underlying molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. To gain further insights, we studied the pathway by which Sirt6 regulates GSIS utilizing mice lacking Sirt6 in their β cells (βS6KO). Further, we overexpressed wild type or deacetylase-inactive mutant Sirt6 in isolated islets as well as in MIN6 cells. We confirmed that βS6KO mice developed glucose intolerance with severely impaired GSIS. Gene expression analysis of knockout islets and overexpression studies demonstrated that Sirt6 deacetylates forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) to trigger its nuclear export and releases its transcriptional repression of key glucose sensing genes such as Pdx1 and Glut2. Ectopic overexpression of Sirt6 in knockout islets resulted in rescue of the defective insulin secretion and restoration of the expression of Pdx1 and Glut2. These results show that Sirt6 in pancreatic β cells deacetylates FoxO1 and subsequently increases the expression of Pdx1 and Glut2 to maintain the glucose-sensing ability of pancreatic β cells and systemic glucose tolerance. PMID:27457971

  9. Novel repressor regulates insulin sensitivity through interaction with Foxo1

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Jun; Cao, Yongheng; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takemori, Hiroshi; Kawano, Yoshinaga; Sekioka, Risa; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshiya; Sakai, Juro; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Forkhead box-containing protein o (Foxo) 1 is a key transcription factor in insulin and glucose metabolism. We identified a Foxo1-CoRepressor (FCoR) protein in mouse adipose tissue that inhibits Foxo1's activity by enhancing acetylation via impairment of the interaction between Foxo1 and the deacetylase Sirt1 and via direct acetylation. FCoR is phosphorylated at Threonine 93 by catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and is translocated into nucleus, making it possible to bind to Foxo1 in both cytosol and nucleus. Knockdown of FCoR in 3T3-F442A cells enhanced expression of Foxo target and inhibited adipocyte differentiation. Overexpression of FCoR in white adipose tissue decreased expression of Foxo-target genes and adipocyte size and increased insulin sensitivity in Leprdb/db mice and in mice fed a high-fat diet. In contrast, Fcor knockout mice were lean, glucose intolerant, and had decreased insulin sensitivity that was accompanied by increased expression levels of Foxo-target genes and enlarged adipocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that FCoR is a novel repressor that regulates insulin sensitivity and energy metabolism in adipose tissue by acting to fine-tune Foxo1 activity. PMID:22510882

  10. Regulatory O-GlcNAcylation sites on FoxO1 are yet to be identified

    SciTech Connect

    Fardini, Yann; Perez-Cervera, Yobana; Camoin, Luc; Pagesy, Patrick; Lefebvre, Tony; Issad, Tarik

    2015-06-26

    O-GlcNAcylation is a reversible post-translational modification that regulates cytosolic and nuclear proteins. We and others previously demonstrated that FoxO1 is O-GlcNAcylated in different cell types, resulting in an increase in its transcriptional activity. Four O-GlcNAcylation sites were identified in human FOXO1 but directed mutagenesis of each site individually had modest (T317) or no effect (S550, T648, S654) on its O-GlcNAcylation status and transcriptional activity. Moreover, the consequences of mutating all four sites had not been investigated. In the present work, we mutated these sites in the mouse Foxo1 and found that mutation of all four sites did not decrease Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation status and transcriptional activity, and would even tend to increase them. In an attempt to identify other O-GlcNAcylation sites, we immunoprecipitated wild-type O-GlcNAcylated Foxo1 and analysed the tryptic digest peptides by mass spectrometry using High-energy Collisional Dissociation. We identified T646 as a new O-GlcNAcylation site on Foxo1. However, site directed mutagenesis of this site individually or together with all four previously identified residues did not impair Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation and transcriptional activity. These results suggest that residues important for the control of Foxo1 activity by O-GlcNAcylation still remain to be identified. - Highlights: • We mutate four previously identified O-GlcNAcylation sites on Foxo1. • Unexpectedly, these mutations do not reduce Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation. • These mutation do not reduce Foxo1 transcriptional activity. • We identify a new O-GlcNAcylation site on Foxo1 by mass spectrometry. • Mutation of this site increases Foxo1 transcriptional activity.

  11. HDAC2 regulates FoxO1 during RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dou, Ce; Li, Nan; Ding, Ning; Liu, Chuan; Yang, Xiaochao; Kang, Fei; Cao, Zhen; Quan, Hongyu; Hou, Tianyong; Xu, Jianzhong; Dong, Shiwu

    2016-05-15

    The bone-resorbing osteoclast (OC) is essential for bone homeostasis, yet deregulation of OCs contributes to diseases such as osteoporosis, osteopetrosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Here we show that histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) is a key positive regulator during receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) showed increased HDAC2 expression during osteoclastogenesis. HDAC2 overexpression enhanced, whereas HDAC2 deletion suppressed osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption using lentivirus infection. Mechanistically, upon RANKL activation, HDAC2 activated Akt; Akt directly phosphorylates and abrogates Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1), which is a negative regulator during osteoclastogenesis through reducing reactive oxygen species. HDAC2 deletion in BMMs resulted in decreased Akt activation and increased FoxO1 activity during osteoclastogenesis. In conclusion, HDAC2 activates Akt thus suppresses FoxO1 transcription results in enhanced osteoclastogenesis. Our data imply the potential value of HDAC2 as a new target in regulating osteoclast differentiation and function. PMID:26962001

  12. FOXO1 Deletion Reduces Dendritic Cell Function and Enhances Susceptibility to Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenmei; Dong, Guangyu; Pacios, Sandra; Alnammary, Maher; Barger, Laura A.; Wang, Yu; Wu, Yingying; Graves, Dana T.

    2016-01-01

    The host response plays both protective and destructive roles in periodontitis. FOXO1 is a transcription factor that is activated in dendritic cells (DCs), but its function in vivo has not been examined. We investigated the role of FOXO1 in activating DCs in experimental (CD11c.Cre+.FOXO1L/L) compared with matched control mice (CD11c.Cre−.FOXO1L/L) in response to oral pathogens. Lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion reduced the recruitment of DCs to oral mucosal epithelium by approximately 40%. FOXO1 was needed for expression of genes that regulate migration, including integrins αν and β3 and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Ablation of FOXO1 in DCs significantly decreased IL-12 produced by DCs in mucosal surfaces. Moreover, FOXO1 deletion reduced migration of DCs to lymph nodes, reduced capacity of DCs to induce formation of plasma cells, and reduced production of bacteria-specific antibody. The decrease in DC function in the experimental mice led to increased susceptibility to periodontitis through a mechanism that involved a compensatory increase in osteoclastogenic factors, IL-1β, IL-17, and RANKL. Thus, we reveal a critical role for FOXO1 in DC recruitment to oral mucosal epithelium and activation of adaptive immunity induced by oral inoculation of bacteria. PMID:25794707

  13. SREBP1c-CRY1 signalling represses hepatic glucose production by promoting FOXO1 degradation during refeeding.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hagoon; Lee, Gha Young; Selby, Christopher P; Lee, Gung; Jeon, Yong Geun; Lee, Jae Ho; Cheng, Kenneth King Yip; Titchenell, Paul; Birnbaum, Morris J; Xu, Aimin; Sancar, Aziz; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    SREBP1c is a key lipogenic transcription factor activated by insulin in the postprandial state. Although SREBP1c appears to be involved in suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis, the molecular mechanism is not thoroughly understood. Here we show that CRY1 is activated by insulin-induced SREBP1c and decreases hepatic gluconeogenesis through FOXO1 degradation, at least, at specific circadian time points. SREBP1c(-/-) and CRY1(-/-) mice show higher blood glucose than wild-type (WT) mice in pyruvate tolerance tests, accompanied with enhanced expression of PEPCK and G6Pase genes. CRY1 promotes degradation of nuclear FOXO1 by promoting its binding to the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2. Although SREBP1c fails to upregulate CRY1 expression in db/db mice, overexpression of CRY1 attenuates hyperglycaemia through reduction of hepatic FOXO1 protein and gluconeogenic gene expression. These data suggest that insulin-activated SREBP1c downregulates gluconeogenesis through CRY1-mediated FOXO1 degradation and that dysregulation of hepatic SREBP1c-CRY1 signalling may contribute to hyperglycaemia in diabetic animals. PMID:27412556

  14. SREBP1c-CRY1 signalling represses hepatic glucose production by promoting FOXO1 degradation during refeeding

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hagoon; Lee, Gha Young; Selby, Christopher P.; Lee, Gung; Jeon, Yong Geun; Lee, Jae Ho; Cheng, Kenneth King Yip; Titchenell, Paul; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Xu, Aimin; Sancar, Aziz; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    SREBP1c is a key lipogenic transcription factor activated by insulin in the postprandial state. Although SREBP1c appears to be involved in suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis, the molecular mechanism is not thoroughly understood. Here we show that CRY1 is activated by insulin-induced SREBP1c and decreases hepatic gluconeogenesis through FOXO1 degradation, at least, at specific circadian time points. SREBP1c−/− and CRY1−/− mice show higher blood glucose than wild-type (WT) mice in pyruvate tolerance tests, accompanied with enhanced expression of PEPCK and G6Pase genes. CRY1 promotes degradation of nuclear FOXO1 by promoting its binding to the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2. Although SREBP1c fails to upregulate CRY1 expression in db/db mice, overexpression of CRY1 attenuates hyperglycaemia through reduction of hepatic FOXO1 protein and gluconeogenic gene expression. These data suggest that insulin-activated SREBP1c downregulates gluconeogenesis through CRY1-mediated FOXO1 degradation and that dysregulation of hepatic SREBP1c-CRY1 signalling may contribute to hyperglycaemia in diabetic animals. PMID:27412556

  15. Green tea component EGCG, insulin and IGF-1 promote nuclear efflux of atrophy-associated transcription factor Foxo1 in skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Robert J; Russell, Sarah J; Schneider, Martin F

    2015-12-01

    Prevention and slowing of skeletal muscle atrophy with nutritional approaches offers the potential to provide far-reaching improvements in the quality of life for our increasingly aging population. Here we show that polyphenol flavonoid epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG), found in the popular beverage green tea (Camellia sinensis), demonstrates similar effects to the endogenous hormones insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin in the ability to suppress action of the atrophy-promoting transcription factor Foxo1 through a net translocation of Foxo1 out of the nucleus as monitored by nucleo-cytoplasmic movement of Foxo1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) in live skeletal muscle fibers. Foxo1-GFP nuclear efflux is rapid in IGF-1 or insulin, but delayed by an additional 30 min for EGCG. Once activated, kinetic analysis with a simple mathematical model shows EGCG, IGF-1 and insulin all produce similar apparent rate constants for Foxo1-GFP unidirectional nuclear influx and efflux. Interestingly, EGCG appears to have its effect at least partially via parallel signaling pathways that are independent of IGF-1's (and insulin's) downstream PI3K/Akt/Foxo1 signaling axis. Using the live fiber model system, we also determine the dose-response curve for both IGF-1 and insulin on Foxo1 nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution. The continued understanding of the activation mechanisms of EGCG could allow for nutritional promotion of green tea's antiatrophy skeletal muscle benefits and have implications in the development of a clinically significant parallel pathway for new drugs to target muscle wasting and the reduced insulin receptor sensitivity which causes type II diabetes mellitus. PMID:26344776

  16. FoxO1 regulates allergic asthmatic inflammation through regulating polarization of the macrophage inflammatory phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Tae Jin; Reader, Brenda F.; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Karpurapu, Manjula; Ballinger, Megan N.; Qian, Feng; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Hae Young; Unterman, Terry G.; Croce, Carlo M.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory monocyte and tissue macrophages influence the initiation, progression, and resolution of type 2 immune responses, and alveolar macrophages are the most prevalent immune-effector cells in the lung. While we were characterizing the M1- or M2-like macrophages in type 2 allergic inflammation, we discovered that FoxO1 is highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages. Although several studies have been focused on the fundamental role of FoxOs in hematopoietic and immune cells, the exact role that FoxO1 plays in allergic asthmatic inflammation in activated macrophages has not been investigated. Growing evidences indicate that FoxO1 acts as an upstream regulator of IRF4 and could have a role in a specific inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that IRF4 expression regulated by FoxO1 in alveolar macrophages is required for established type 2 immune mediates allergic lung inflammation. Our data indicate that targeted deletion of FoxO1 using FoxO1-selective inhibitor AS1842856 and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in macrophages significantly decreases IRF4 and various M2 macrophage-associated genes, suggesting a mechanism that involves FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in alveolar macrophages that works to polarize macrophages toward established type 2 immune responses. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, macrophage specific FoxO1 overexpression is associated with an accentuation of asthmatic lung inflammation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of FoxO1 by AS1842856 attenuates the development of asthmatic lung inflammation. Thus, our study identifies a role for FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in the development of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages that contribute to type 2 allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27007158

  17. FoxO1 Deacetylation Regulates Thyroid Hormone-induced Transcription of Key Hepatic Gluconeogenic Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin Ying; You, Seo-Hee; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is a concerted process that integrates transcriptional regulation with hormonal signals. A major regulator is thyroid hormone (TH), which acts through its nuclear receptor (TR) to induce the expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 also is an important regulator of these genes; however, its functional interactions with TR are not known. Here, we report that TR-mediated transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in human hepatic cells and mouse liver was FoxO1-dependent and furthermore required FoxO1 deacetylation by the NAD+-dependent deacetylase, SirT1. siRNA knockdown of FoxO1 decreased, whereas overexpression of FoxO1 increased, TH-dependent transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in cultured hepatic cells. FoxO1 siRNA knockdown also decreased TH-mediated transcription in vivo. Additionally, TH was unable to induce FoxO1 deacetylation or hepatic PCK1 gene expression in TH receptor β-null (TRβ−/−) mice. Moreover, TH stimulated FoxO1 recruitment to the PCK1 and G6PC gene promoters in a SirT1-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that TH-dependent deacetylation of a second metabolically regulated transcription factor represents a novel mechanism for transcriptional integration of nuclear hormone action with cellular energy status. PMID:23995837

  18. Ablation of peroxiredoxin II attenuates experimental colitis by increasing FoxO1-induced Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Won, Hee Yeon; Jang, Eun Jung; Lee, Kihyun; Oh, Sera; Kim, Hyo Kyung; Woo, Hyun Ae; Kang, Sang Won; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Rhee, Sue-Goo; Hwang, Eun Sook

    2013-10-15

    Peroxiredoxin (Prx) II is an intracellular antioxidant molecule that eliminates hydrogen peroxide, employing a high substrate-binding affinity. PrxII deficiency increases the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species in many types of cells, which may increase reactive oxygen species-mediated inflammation. In this study, we investigated the susceptibility of PrxII knockout (KO) mice to experimentally induced colitis and the effects of PrxII on the immune system. Wild-type mice displayed pronounced weight loss, high mortality, and colon shortening after dextran sulfate sodium administration, whereas colonic inflammation was significantly attenuated in PrxII KO mice. Although macrophages were hyperactivated in PrxII KO mice, the amount of IFN-γ and IL-17 produced by CD4(+) T cells was substantially reduced. Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells were elevated, and Foxp3 protein expression was increased in the absence of PrxII in vitro and in vivo. Restoration of PrxII into KO cells suppressed the increased Foxp3 expression. Interestingly, endogenous PrxII was inactivated through hyperoxidation during Treg cell development. Furthermore, PrxII deficiency stabilized FoxO1 expression by reducing mouse double minute 2 homolog expression and subsequently activated FoxO1-mediated Foxp3 gene transcription. PrxII overexpression, in contrast, reduced FoxO1 and Foxp3 expression. More interestingly, adoptive transfer of naive CD4(+) T cells from PrxII KO mice into immune-deficient mice attenuated T cell-induced colitis, with a reduction in mouse double minute 2 homolog expression and an increase in FoxO1 and Foxp3 expression. These results suggest that inactivation of PrxII is important for the stability of FoxO1 protein, which subsequently mediates Foxp3(+) Treg cell development, thereby attenuating colonic inflammation. PMID:24048895

  19. Potential role of FoxO1 and mTORC1 in the pathogenesis of Western diet-induced acne.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2013-05-01

    Acne in adolescents of developed countries is an epidemic skin disease and has currently been linked to the Western diet (WD). It is the intention of this viewpoint to discuss the possible impact of WD-mediated nutrient signalling in the pathogenesis of acne. High glycaemic load and dairy protein consumption both increase insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signalling (IIS) that is superimposed on elevated IGF-1 signalling of puberty. The cell's nutritional status is primarily sensed by the forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FoxO1) and the serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Increased IIS extrudes FoxO1 into the cytoplasm, whereas nuclear FoxO1 suppresses hepatic IGF-1 synthesis and thus impairs somatic growth. FoxO1 attenuates androgen signalling, interacts with regulatory proteins important for sebaceous lipogenesis, regulates the activity of innate and adaptive immunity, antagonizes oxidative stress and most importantly functions as a rheostat of mTORC1, the master regulator of cell growth, proliferation and metabolic homoeostasis. Thus, FoxO1 links nutrient availability to mTORC1-driven processes: increased protein and lipid synthesis, cell proliferation, cell differentiation including hyperproliferation of acroinfundibular keratinocytes, sebaceous gland hyperplasia, increased sebaceous lipogenesis, insulin resistance and increased body mass index. Enhanced androgen, TNF-α and IGF-1 signalling due to genetic polymorphisms promoting the risk of acne all converge in mTORC1 activation, which is further enhanced by nutrient signalling of WD. Deeper insights into the molecular interplay of FoxO1/mTORC1-mediated nutrient signalling are thus of critical importance to understand the impact of WD on the promotion of epidemic acne and more serious mTORC1-driven diseases of civilization. PMID:23614736

  20. Potential role of FoxO1 and mTORC1 in the pathogenesis of Western diet-induced acne

    PubMed Central

    Melnik, Bodo C; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2013-01-01

    Acne in adolescents of developed countries is an epidemic skin disease and has currently been linked to the Western diet (WD). It is the intention of this viewpoint to discuss the possible impact of WD-mediated nutrient signalling in the pathogenesis of acne. High glycaemic load and dairy protein consumption both increase insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signalling (IIS) that is superimposed on elevated IGF-1 signalling of puberty. The cell's nutritional status is primarily sensed by the forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FoxO1) and the serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Increased IIS extrudes FoxO1 into the cytoplasm, whereas nuclear FoxO1 suppresses hepatic IGF-1 synthesis and thus impairs somatic growth. FoxO1 attenuates androgen signalling, interacts with regulatory proteins important for sebaceous lipogenesis, regulates the activity of innate and adaptive immunity, antagonizes oxidative stress and most importantly functions as a rheostat of mTORC1, the master regulator of cell growth, proliferation and metabolic homoeostasis. Thus, FoxO1 links nutrient availability to mTORC1-driven processes: increased protein and lipid synthesis, cell proliferation, cell differentiation including hyperproliferation of acroinfundibular keratinocytes, sebaceous gland hyperplasia, increased sebaceous lipogenesis, insulin resistance and increased body mass index. Enhanced androgen, TNF-α and IGF-1 signalling due to genetic polymorphisms promoting the risk of acne all converge in mTORC1 activation, which is further enhanced by nutrient signalling of WD. Deeper insights into the molecular interplay of FoxO1/mTORC1-mediated nutrient signalling are thus of critical importance to understand the impact of WD on the promotion of epidemic acne and more serious mTORC1-driven diseases of civilization. PMID:23614736

  1. Hepatic FOXO1 Target Genes Are Co-regulated by Thyroid Hormone via RICTOR Protein Deacetylation and MTORC2-AKT Protein Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brijesh K; Sinha, Rohit A; Zhou, Jin; Tripathi, Madhulika; Ohba, Kenji; Wang, Mu-En; Astapova, Inna; Ghosh, Sujoy; Hollenberg, Anthony N; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    MTORC2-AKT is a key regulator of carbohydrate metabolism and insulin signaling due to its effects on FOXO1 phosphorylation. Interestingly, both FOXO1 and thyroid hormone (TH) have similar effects on carbohydrate and energy metabolism as well as overlapping transcriptional regulation of many target genes. Currently, little is known about the regulation of MTORC2-AKT or FOXO1 by TH. Accordingly, we performed hepatic transcriptome profiling in mice after FOXO1 knockdown in the absence or presence of TH, and we compared these results with hepatic FOXO1 and THRB1 (TRβ1) ChIP-Seq data. We identified a subset of TH-stimulated FOXO1 target genes that required co-regulation by FOXO1 and TH. TH activation of FOXO1 was directly linked to an increase in SIRT1-MTORC2 interaction and RICTOR deacetylation. This, in turn, led to decreased AKT and FOXO1 phosphorylation. Moreover, TH increased FOXO1 nuclear localization, DNA binding, and target gene transcription by reducing AKT-dependent FOXO1 phosphorylation in a THRB1-dependent manner. These events were associated with TH-mediated oxidative phosphorylation and NAD(+) production and suggested that downstream metabolic effects by TH can post-translationally activate other transcription factors. Our results showed that RICTOR/MTORC2-AKT can integrate convergent hormonal and metabolic signals to provide coordinated and sensitive regulation of hepatic FOXO1-target gene expression. PMID:26453307

  2. Regulation of FOXO1-mediated transcription and cell proliferation by PARP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamaki, Jun-ichi; Daitoku, Hiroaki; Yoshimochi, Kenji; Miwa, Masanao; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2009-05-08

    Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors play an important role in a wide range of biological processes, including cell cycle control, apoptosis, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and gluconeogenesis through regulation of gene expression. In this study, we demonstrated that PARP-1 functions as a negative regulator of FOXO1. We showed that PARP-1 directly binds to and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ates FOXO1 protein. PARP-1 represses FOXO1-mediated expression of cell cycle inhibitor p27{sup Kip1} gene. Notably, poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation activity was not required for the repressive effect of PARP-1 on FOXO1 function. Furthermore, knockdown of PARP-1 led to a decrease in cell proliferation in a manner dependent on FOXO1 function. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that PARP-1 is recruited to the p27{sup Kip1} gene promoter through a binding to FOXO1. These results suggest that PARP-1 acts as a corepressor for FOXO1, which could play an important role in proper cell proliferation by regulating p27{sup Kip1} gene expression.

  3. PRMT1 promotes glucose toxicity-induced β cell dysfunction by regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking of PDX-1 in a FOXO1-dependent manner in INS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lixia; Chen, Hewen; Sun, Jiaying; Lu, Di; Chen, Chen; Liu, Dongfang

    2015-08-01

    Protein N-arginine methyltransferase-1 (PRMT1), the major asymmetric arginine methyltransferase, plays important roles in various cellular processes. Previous reports have demonstrated that levels and activities of PRMT1 can vary in animals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to assess the expression and mechanism of action of PRMT1 during glucose toxicity-induced β cell dysfunction. Liposome-mediated gene transfection was used to transfect INS-1 cells with siPRMT1, which inhibits PRMT1 expression, and pALTER-FOXO1, which overexpresses forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1). The cells were then cultured in media containing 5.6 or 25 mmol/L glucose with or without the small molecule PRMT1 inhibitor AMI-1 for 48 h. The protein levels of PRMT1, the arginine methylated protein α-metR, FOXO1, Phospho-FOXO1, pancreas duodenum homeobox-1 (PDX-1), and the intracellular localization of PDX-1 and FOXO1 were then measured by western blotting. FOXO1 methylation was detected by immunoprecipitated with anti-PRMT1 antibody and were immunoblotted with α-metR. The levels of insulin mRNA were measured by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and intracellular insulin content were measured using radioimmunoassays. Intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) was detected using Fura-2 AM. Intracellular cAMP levels were measured using ELISA. Chronic exposure to high glucose impaired insulin secretion, decreased insulin mRNA levels and insulin content, increased intracellular [Ca(2+)]i and cAMP levels, and abolishes their responses to glucose. Inhibiting PRMT1 expression improved insulin secretion, increased mRNA levels and insulin content by regulating the intracellular translocation of PDX-1 and FOXO1, decreasing the methylation of FOXO1, and reducing intracellular [Ca(2+)]i and cAMP concentrations. Transient overexpression of constitutively active FOXO1 in nuclear reversed the AMI-1-induced improvement of β cell function without

  4. Induction of Cyclin D2 in Rat Granulosa Cells Requires FSH-dependent Relief from FOXO1 Repression Coupled with Positive Signals from Smad*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngkyu; Maizels, Evelyn T.; Feiger, Zachary J.; Alam, Hena; Peters, Carl A.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Unterman, Terry G.; Lee, Eun Jig; Jameson, J. Larry; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Ovarian follicles undergo exponential growth in response to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), largely as a result of the proliferation of granulosa cells (GCs). In vitro under serum-free conditions, rat GCs differentiate in response to FSH but do not proliferate unless activin is also present. In the presence of FSH plus activin, GCs exhibit enhanced expression of cyclin D2 as well as inhibin-α, aromatase, steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1), cholesterol side chain (SCC), and epiregulin. In this report we sought to identify the signaling pathways by which FSH and activin promote GC proliferation and differentiation. Our results show that these responses are associated with prolonged Akt phosphorylation relative to time-matched controls and are dependent on phosphati-dylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) and Smad2/3 signaling, based on the ability of the PI 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 or infection with adenoviral dominant negative Smad3 (DN-Smad3) mutant to attenuate induction of cyclin D2, inhibin-α, aromatase, SCC, SF-1, and epiregulin. The DN-Smad3 mutant also abolished prolonged Akt phosphorylation stimulated by FSH plus activin 24 h post-treatment. Infection with the adenoviral constitutively active forkhead box-containing protein, O subfamily (FOXO)1 mutant suppressed induction of cyclin D2, aromatase, inhibin-α, SF-1, and epiregulin. Transient transfections of GCs with constitutively active FOXO1 mutant also suppressed cyclin D2, inhibin-α, and epiregulin promoter-reporter activities. Chromatin immunoprecipitation results demonstrate in vivo the association of FOXO1 with the cyclin D2 promoter in untreated GCs and release of FOXO1 from the cyclin D2 promoter upon addition of FSH plus activin. These results suggest that proliferation and differentiation of GCs in response to FSH plus activin requires both removal of FOXO1-dependent repression and positive signaling from Smad2/3. PMID:15613482

  5. Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 phosphorylates and positively regulates PAX3-FOXO1 in human alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingling; Wu, Jing; Ong, Su Sien; Chen, Taosheng

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) is an aggressive childhood muscle sarcoma with a 5-year survival rate of less than 30%. More than 80% of ARMSs harbor a PAX3-FOXO1 fusion transcription factor. However, expression of PAX3-FOXO1 in muscle cells alone is not sufficient and requires the loss of function of Ink4a/ARF to promote malignant proliferation of muscle cells in vitro or initiate ARMS tumor formation in vivo. This prompted us to examine the signaling pathways required to activate the function of PAX3-FOXO1 and to explore the functional interaction between the Ink4a/ARF and PAX3-FOXO1 signaling pathways. Here we report that inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) by fascaplysin (a small molecule selective inhibitor of Cdk4/cyclin D1 that we identified in a screen for compounds that inhibit PAX3-FOXO1) led to inhibition of the transcriptional activity of PAX3-FOXO1 in ARMS cell line Rh30. Consistent with this finding, activation of Cdk4 enhanced the activity of PAX3-FOXO1. In vitro kinase assays revealed that Cdk4 directly phosphorylated PAX3-FOXO1 at Ser(430). Whereas fascaplysin did not affect the protein level of PAX3-FOXO1, it did increase the cytoplasmic level of PAX3-FOXO1 in a portion of cells. Our findings indicate that Cdk4 phosphorylates and positively regulates PAX3-FOXO1 and suggest that inhibition of Cdk4 activity should be explored as a promising avenue for developing therapy for ARMS. PMID:23469153

  6. Progesterone receptors induce FOXO1-dependent senescence in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Diep, Caroline H.; Charles, Nathan J.; Gilks, C. Blake; Kalloger, Steve E.; Argenta, Peter A.; Lange, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of nuclear progesterone receptors (PR) and low circulating progesterone levels are associated with increased ovarian cancer (OC) risk. However, PR are abundantly expressed in a significant percentage of serous and endometrioid ovarian tumors; patients with PR+ tumors typically experience longer progression-free survival relative to those with PR-null tumors. The molecular mechanisms of these protective effects are poorly understood. To study PR action in OC in the absence of added estrogen (i.e., needed to induce robust PR expression), we created ES-2 OC cells stably expressing vector control or GFP-tagged PR-B (GFP-PR). Progestin (R5020) stimulation of ES-2 cells stably expressing GFP-PR induced cellular senescence characterized by altered cellular morphology, prolonged survival, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, G1 cell cycle arrest and upregulation of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21, as well as the Forkhead-box transcription factor, FOXO1; these results repeated in unmodified ER+/PR+ PEO4 OC cells. PR-B and FOXO1 were detected within the same PRE-containing regions of the p21 upstream promoter. Knockdown of p21 resulted in molecular compensation via FOXO1-dependent upregulation of numerous FOXO1 target genes (p15, p16, p27) and an increased rate of senescence. Inhibition of FOXO1 (with AS1842856) or stable FOXO1 knockdown inhibited progestin-induced p21 expression and blocked progestin-induced senescence. Overall, these findings support a role for PR as a tumor suppressor in OC cells, which exhibits inhibitory effects by inducing FOXO1-dependent cellular senescence. Clinical “priming” of the PR-FOXO1-p21 signaling pathway using PR agonists may provide a useful strategy to induce irreversible cell cycle arrest and thereby sensitize OC cells to existing chemotherapies as part of combination “two-step” therapies. PMID:23574718

  7. miR-411 contributes the cell proliferation of lung cancer by targeting FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiju; Qin, Limei; Li, Shu

    2016-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; the study of microRNAs gives new hope for lung cancer treatment. miR-411 has been demonstrated to be an independent prognostic factor for lung adenocarcinoma, but the role and regulatory mechanism are largely unknown. In the present study, we found miR-411 was overexpressed in the lung cancer cells; overexpression of miR-411 promoted anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growths of lung cancer, while miR-411 knockdown reduced this effect. Further study showed forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) was a target of miR-411. Overexpression of miR-411 suppressed the expression of FOXO1; the effect of suppression was abrogated when the mutation occurred in the 3'UTR of FOXO1. Knockdown of FOXO1 in cells which miR-411 was inhibited recapitulated the phenotype of miR-411 overexpression. Taken together, our study revealed miR-411 promoted cell proliferation of lung cancer by targeting tumor suppressor gene FOXO1 and miR-411 might be a potential target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:26572153

  8. Forkhead box O member FOXO1 regulates the majority of follicle-stimulating hormone responsive genes in ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Maria K; Law, Nathan C; Donaubauer, Elyse M; Kyriss, Brandon; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary

    2016-10-15

    FSH promotes maturation of ovarian follicles. One pathway activated by FSH in granulosa cells (GCs) is phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/AKT. The AKT target FOXO1 is reported to function primarily as a repressor of FSH genes, including Ccnd2 and Inha. Based on its broad functions in other tissues, we hypothesized that FOXO1 may regulate many more GC genes. We transduced GCs with empty adenovirus or constitutively active FOXO1 followed by treatment with FSH for 24 h, and conducted RNA deep sequencing. Results show that FSH regulates 3772 genes ≥2.0-fold; 60% of these genes are activated or repressed by FOXO1. Pathway Studio Analysis revealed enrichment of genes repressed by FOXO1 in metabolism, signaling, transport, development, and activated by FOXO1 in signaling, cytoskeletal functions, and apoptosis. Gene regulation was verified by q-PCR (eight genes) and ChIP analysis (two genes). We conclude that FOXO1 regulates the majority of FSH target genes in GCs. PMID:27328024

  9. FOXO1 differentially regulates both normal and diabetic wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenying; Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Tian, Chen; Xu, Fanxing; Tarapore, Rohinton; Batres, Angelika; Alsadun, Sarah; Lim, Jason; Dong, Guangyu

    2015-01-01

    Healing is delayed in diabetic wounds. We previously demonstrated that lineage-specific Foxo1 deletion in keratinocytes interfered with normal wound healing and keratinocyte migration. Surprisingly, the same deletion of Foxo1 in diabetic wounds had the opposite effect, significantly improving the healing response. In normal glucose media, forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) enhanced keratinocyte migration through up-regulating TGFβ1. In high glucose, FOXO1 nuclear localization was induced but FOXO1 did not bind to the TGFβ1 promoter or stimulate TGFβ1 transcription. Instead, in high glucose, FOXO1 enhanced expression of serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade B (ovalbumin), member 2 (SERPINB2), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20). The impact of high glucose on keratinocyte migration was rescued by silencing FOXO1, by reducing SERPINB2 or CCL20, or by insulin treatment. In addition, an advanced glycation end product and tumor necrosis factor had a similar regulatory effect on FOXO1 and its downstream targets and inhibited keratinocyte migration in a FOXO1-dependent manner. Thus, FOXO1 expression can positively or negatively modulate keratinocyte migration and wound healing by its differential effect on downstream targets modulated by factors present in diabetic healing. PMID:25918228

  10. Loss of Pdk1-Foxo1 Signaling in Myeloid Cells Predisposes to Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Yoshinaga; Nakae, Jun; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Fujisaka, Shiho; Iskandar, Kristy; Sekioka, Risa; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kasuga, Masato; Noda, Tetsuo; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Onodera, Masafumi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in adipose tissue contributes to obesity-related insulin resistance. The 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (Pdk1)/forkhead transcription factor (Foxo1) pathway is important in regulating glucose and energy homeostasis, but little is known about this pathway in adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). To investigate this, we generated transgenic mice that carried macrophage/granulocyte-specific mutations, including a Pdk1 knockout (LysMPdk1−/−), a Pdk1 knockout with transactivation-defective Foxo1 (Δ256LysMPdk1−/−), a constitutively active nuclear (CN) Foxo1 (CNFoxo1LysM), or a transactivation-defective Foxo1 (Δ256Foxo1LysM). We analyzed glucose metabolism and gene expression in ATM populations isolated with fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The LysMPdk1−/− mice exhibited elevated M1 macrophages in adipose tissue and insulin resistance. Overexpression of transactivation-defective Foxo1 rescued these phenotypes. CNFoxo1LysM promoted transcription of the C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (Ccr2) in ATMs and increased M1 macrophages in adipose tissue. On a high-fat diet, CNFoxo1LysM mice exhibited insulin resistance. Pdk1 deletion or Foxo1 activation in bone marrow–derived macrophages abolished insulin and interleukin-4 induction of genes involved in alternative macrophage activation. Thus, Pdk1 regulated macrophage infiltration by inhibiting Foxo1-induced Ccr2 expression. This shows that the macrophage Pdk1/Foxo1 pathway is important in regulating insulin sensitivity in vivo. PMID:22586579

  11. The B55α-containing PP2A holoenzyme dephosphorylates FOXO1 in islet β-cells under oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ling; Guo, Shuangli; Brault, Marie; Harmon, Jamie; Robertson, R. Paul; Hamid, Rizwan; Stein, Roland; Yang, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The FOXO1 (forkhead box O1) transcription factor influences many key cellular processes, including those important in metabolism, proliferation and cell death. Reversible phosphorylation of FOXO1 at Thr24 and Ser256 regulates its subcellular localization, with phosphorylation promoting cytoplasmic localization, whereas dephosphorylation triggers nuclear import and transcriptional activation. In the present study, we used biochemical and molecular approaches to isolate and link the serine/threonine PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A) holoenzyme containing the B55α regulatory subunit, with nuclear import of FOXO1 in pancreatic islet β-cells under oxidative stress, a condition associated with cellular dysfunction in Type 2 diabetes. The mechanism of FOXO1 dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation was investigated in pancreatic islet INS-1 and βTC-3 cell lines subjected to oxidative stress. A combined chemical cross-linking and MS strategy revealed the association of FOXO1 with a PP2A holoenzyme composed of the catalytic C, structural A and B55α regulatory subunits. Knockdown of B55α in INS-1 cells reduced FOXO1 dephosphorylation, inhibited FOXO1 nuclear translocation and attenuated oxidative stress-induced cell death. Furthermore, both B55α and nuclear FOXO1 levels were increased under hyperglycaemic conditions in db/db mouse islets, an animal model of Type 2 diabetes. We conclude that B55α-containing PP2A is a key regulator of FOXO1 activity in vivo. PMID:22417654

  12. Systems-wide Experimental and Modeling Analysis of Insulin Signaling through Forkhead Box Protein O1 (FOXO1) in Human Adipocytes, Normally and in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Meenu Rohini; Nyman, Elin; Kjølhede, Preben; Cedersund, Gunnar; Strålfors, Peter

    2016-07-22

    Insulin resistance is a major aspect of type 2 diabetes (T2D), which results from impaired insulin signaling in target cells. Signaling to regulate forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) may be the most important mechanism for insulin to control transcription. Despite this, little is known about how insulin regulates FOXO1 and how FOXO1 may contribute to insulin resistance in adipocytes, which are the most critical cell type in the development of insulin resistance. We report a detailed mechanistic analysis of insulin control of FOXO1 in human adipocytes obtained from non-diabetic subjects and from patients with T2D. We show that FOXO1 is mainly phosphorylated through mTORC2-mediated phosphorylation of protein kinase B at Ser(473) and that this mechanism is unperturbed in T2D. We also demonstrate a cross-talk from the MAPK branch of insulin signaling to stimulate phosphorylation of FOXO1. The cellular abundance and consequently activity of FOXO1 are halved in T2D. Interestingly, inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin reduces the abundance of FOXO1 to the levels in T2D. This suggests that the reduction of the concentration of FOXO1 is a consequence of attenuation of mTORC1, which defines much of the diabetic state in human adipocytes. We integrate insulin control of FOXO1 in a network-wide mathematical model of insulin signaling dynamics based on compatible data from human adipocytes. The diabetic state is network-wide explained by attenuation of an mTORC1-to-insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) feedback and reduced abundances of insulin receptor, GLUT4, AS160, ribosomal protein S6, and FOXO1. The model demonstrates that attenuation of the mTORC1-to-IRS1 feedback is a major mechanism of insulin resistance in the diabetic state. PMID:27226562

  13. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  14. Drug Repurposing Screen Identifies Foxo1-Dependent Angiopoietin-2 Regulation in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Chandra C.; Thamm, Kristina; Berghelli, Anthony V.; Schrimpf, Claudia; Maski, Manish R.; Abid, Tanaz; Milam, Katelyn E.; Rajakumar, Augustine; Santel, Ansgar; Kielstein, Jan T.; Ahmed, Asif; Thickett, David; Wang, Keqin; Chase, Maureen; Donnino, Michael W.; Aird, William C.; Haller, Hermann; David, Sascha; Parikh, Samir M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The recent withdrawal of a targeted sepsis therapy has diminished pharmaceutical enthusiasm for developing novel drugs for the treatment of sepsis. Angiopoietin-2 is an endothelial-derived protein that potentiates vascular inflammation and leak-age and may be involved in sepsis pathogenesis. We screened approved compounds for putative inhibitors of angiopoietin-2 production and investigated underlying molecular mechanisms. Design Laboratory and animal research plus prospective placebo- controlled randomized controlled trial (NCT00529139) and retrospective analysis (NCT00676897). Setting Research laboratories of Hannover Medical School and Harvard Medical School. Patients Septic patients/C57Bl/6 mice and human endothelial cells. Interventions Food and Drug Administration–approved library screening. Measurements and Main Results In a cell-based screen of more than 650 Food and Drug Administration–approved compounds, we identified multiple members of the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor drug class (referred to as statins) that suppressed angiopoietin-2. Simvastatin inhibited 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, which in turn activated PI3K-kinase. Downstream of this signaling, PI3K-dependent phosphorylation of the transcription factor Foxo1 at key amino acids inhibited its ability to shuttle to the nucleus and bind cis-elements in the angiopoietin-2 promoter. In septic mice, transient inhibition of angiopoietin-2 expression by liposomal siRNA in vivo improved absolute survival by 50%. Simvastatin had a similar effect, but the combination of angiopoietin-2 siRNA and simvastatin showed no additive benefit. To verify the link between statins and angiopoietin-2 in humans, we performed a pilot matched case-control study and a small randomized placebo-controlled trial demonstrating beneficial effects on angiopoietin-2. Conclusions 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors may operate through a novel Foxo1-angiopoietin-2

  15. FoxO1 Plays an Important Role in Regulating β-Cell Compensation for Insulin Resistance in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Kim, Dae Hyun; Xiao, Xiangwei; Lee, Sojin; Gong, Zhenwei; Muzumdar, Radhika; Calabuig-Navarro, Virtu; Yamauchi, Jun; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Wang, Rennian; Bottino, Rita; Alvarez-Perez, Juan Carlos; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Gittes, George; Dong, H Henry

    2016-03-01

    β-Cell compensation is an essential mechanism by which β-cells increase insulin secretion for overcoming insulin resistance to maintain euglycemia in obesity. Failure of β-cells to compensate for insulin resistance contributes to insulin insufficiency and overt diabetes. To understand the mechanism of β-cell compensation, we characterized the role of forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) in β-cell compensation in mice under physiological and pathological conditions. FoxO1 is a key transcription factor that serves as a nutrient sensor for integrating insulin signaling to cell metabolism, growth, and proliferation. We showed that FoxO1 improved β-cell compensation via 3 distinct mechanisms by increasing β-cell mass, enhancing β-cell glucose sensing, and augmenting β-cell antioxidative function. These effects accounted for increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and enhanced glucose tolerance in β-cell-specific FoxO1-transgenic mice. When fed a high-fat diet, β-cell-specific FoxO1-transgenic mice were protected from developing fat-induced glucose disorder. This effect was attributable to increased β-cell mass and function. Furthermore, we showed that FoxO1 activity was up-regulated in islets, correlating with the induction of physiological β-cell compensation in high-fat-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. These data characterize FoxO1 as a pivotal factor for orchestrating physiological adaptation of β-cell mass and function to overnutrition and obesity. PMID:26727107

  16. Inhibiting phosphorylation of the oncogenic PAX3-FOXO1 reduces alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma phenotypes identifying novel therapy options.

    PubMed

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Ruffin, D R; Stark, M W; Hollenbach, A D

    2015-01-01

    Patients with translocation-positive alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS), an aggressive childhood tumor primarily characterized by the PAX3-FOXO1 oncogenic fusion protein, have a poor prognosis because of lack of therapies that specifically target ARMS tumors. This fact highlights the need for novel pharmaceutical interventions. Posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation are becoming attractive biological targets for the development of such interventions. Along these lines, we demonstrated that PAX3-FOXO1 is phosphorylated at three specific sites and that its pattern of phosphorylation is altered relative to wild-type Pax3 throughout early myogenesis and in ARMS tumor cells. However, little work has been performed examining the effect of directly inhibiting phosphorylation at these sites on ARMS development. To address this gap in knowledge, we used small molecule inhibitors or mutational analysis to specifically inhibit phosphorylation of PAX3-FOXO1 to investigate how altering phosphorylation of the oncogenic fusion protein affects ARMS phenotypes. We found that inhibiting the phosphorylation of PAX3-FOXO1 at Ser201 significantly reduced migration, invasion and proliferation in two independent ARMS tumor cell lines. Further, we found that inhibition of phosphorylation at Ser205 also decreased proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. Consistent with these in vitro results, we demonstrate for the first time that PAX3-FOXO1 is phosphorylated at Ser201 and Ser205 in a primary tumor sample and in tumor cells actively invading the surrounding normal tissue. This report is the first to demonstrate that the direct inhibition of PAX3-FOXO1 phosphorylation reduces ARMS tumor phenotypes in vitro and that these phosphorylation events are present in primary human ARMS tumors and invading tumor cells. These results identify phosphorylation of PAX3-FOXO1, especially at Ser201, as a novel biological target that can be explored as a promising avenue for ARMS

  17. Acute exercise modulates the Foxo1/PGC-1α pathway in the liver of diet-induced obesity rats

    PubMed Central

    Ropelle, Eduardo R; Pauli, José R; Cintra, Dennys E; Frederico, Marisa J S; de Pinho, Ricardo A; Velloso, Lício A; De Souza, Cláudio T

    2009-01-01

    PGC-1α expression is a tissue-specific regulatory feature that is extremely relevant to diabetes. Several studies have shown that PGC-1α activity is atypically activated in the liver of diabetic rodents and contributes to hepatic glucose production. PGC-1α and Foxo1 can physically interact with one another and represent an important signal transduction pathway that governs the synthesis of glucose in the liver. However, the effect of physical activity on PGC-1α/Foxo1 association is unknown. Here we investigate the expression of PGC-1α and the association of PGC-1α/Foxo1 in the liver of diet-induced obese rats after acute exercise. Wistar rats swam for two 3 h-long bouts, separated by a 45 min rest period. Eight hours after the acute exercise protocol, the rats were submitted to an insulin tolerance test (ITT) and biochemical and molecular analysis. Results demonstrate that acute exercise improved insulin signalling, increasing insulin-stimulated Akt and Foxo1 phosphorylation and decreasing PGC-1α expression and PGC-1α/Foxo1 interaction in the liver of diet-induced obesity rats under fasting conditions. These phenomena are accompanied by a reduction in the expression of gluconeogenesis genes, such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphate (G6Pase). Thus, these results provide new insights into the mechanism by which exercise could improve fasting hyperglycaemia. PMID:19273580

  18. Evidence for AKT-independent regulation of FOXO1 and FOXO3 in haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Raymond; Rimmelé, Pauline; Bigarella, Carolina L; Yalcin, Safak; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2016-03-18

    Transcription factors FOXOs (1, 3, 4) are essential for the maintenance of haematopoietic stem cells. FOXOs are evolutionary conserved substrates of the AKT serine threonine protein kinase that are also phosphorylated by several kinases other than AKT. Specifically, phosphorylation by AKT is known to result in the cytosolic localization of FOXO and subsequent inhibition of FOXO transcriptional activity. In addition to phosphorylation, FOXOs are regulated by a number of other post-translational modifications including acetylation, methylation, redox modulation, and ubiquitination that altogether determine these factors' output. Cumulating evidence raises the possibility that in stem cells, including in haematopoietic stem cells, AKT may not be the dominant regulator of FOXO. To address this question in more detail, we examined gene expression, subcellular localization, and response to AKT inhibition of FOXO1 and FOXO3, the main FOXO expressed in HSPCs (haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells). Here we show that while FOXO1 and FOXO3 transcripts are expressed at similar levels, endogenous FOXO3 protein is mostly nuclear compared to the cytoplasmic localization of FOXO1 in HSPCs. Furthermore, inhibition of AKT does not enhance nuclear localization of FOXO1 nor FOXO3. Nonetheless AKT inhibition in the context of loss of NAD-dependent SIRT1 deacetylase modulates FOXO3 localization in HSPCs. Together, these data suggest that FOXO3 is more active than FOXO1 in primitive haematopoietic stem and multipotent progenitor cells. In addition, they indicate that upstream regulators other than AKT, such as SIRT1, maintain nuclear FOXO localization and activity in HSPCs. PMID:26929388

  19. Genome-wide analysis of FoxO1 binding in hepatic chromatin: Potential involvement of FoxO1 in linking retinoid signaling to hepatic gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-Ju; Joshi, Pujan; Hong, Seung-Hyun; Mosure, Kathleen; Shin, Dong-Guk; Osborne, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    The forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 is a critical regulator of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism, and dysregulation of FoxO1 function has been implicated in diabetes and insulin resistance. We globally identified FoxO1 occupancy in mouse hepatic chromatin on a genome-wide level by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq). To establish the specific functional significance of FoxO1 against other FoxO proteins, ChIP-seq was performed with chromatin from liver-specific FoxO1 knockout and wild-type mice. Here we identified 401 genome-wide FoxO1-binding locations. Motif search reveals a sequence element, 5′ GTAAACA 3′, consistent with a previously known FoxO1-binding site. Gene set enrichment analysis shows that the data from FoxO1 ChIP-seq are highly correlated with the global expression profiling of genes regulated by FoxO1, demonstrating the functional relevance of our FoxO1 ChIP-seq study. Interestingly, gene ontology analysis reveals the functional significance of FoxO1 in retinoid metabolic processes. We show here that FoxO1 directly binds to the genomic sites for the genes in retinoid metabolism. Notably, deletion of FoxO1 caused a significantly reduced induction of Pck1 and Pdk4 in response to retinoids. As Pck1 and Pdk4 are downstream targets of retinoid signaling, these results suggest that FoxO1 plays a potential role in linking retinoid metabolism to hepatic gluconeogenesis. PMID:23066095

  20. Clenbuterol changes phosphorylated FOXO1 localization and decreases protein degradation in the sartorius muscle of neonatal chicks.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Saki; Ijiri, Daichi; Nakashima, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Mana; Ishimaru, Yoshitaka; Furukawa, Airi; Ohtsuka, Akira

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the intracellular signaling mechanisms by which clenbuterol reduces muscle protein degradation, we examined the phosphorylation level and intracellular localization of FOXO1 in the sartorius muscle of neonatal chicks. One-day-old chicks were given a single intraperitoneal injection of clenbuterol (0.1 mg/kg body weight). Three hours after injection, AKT protein was phosphorylated in the sartorius muscle by clenbuterol injection. Coincidentally, clenbuterol increased cytosolic level of phosphorylated FOXO1 protein, while it decreased nuclear level of FOXO1 protein in the sartorius muscle. Furthermore, clenbuterol decreased the expression of mRNAs for muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases (atrogin-1/MAFbx and MuRF1) in the sartorius muscle accompanied by decreased plasma 3-methylhistidine concentration, an index of muscle protein degradation, at 3 h after injection. These results suggested that, in the sartorius muscle of the chicks, clenbuterol changed the intracellular localization of phosphorylated FOXO1, and consequently decreased protein degradation via suppressing the expression of genes encoding muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases. PMID:27055887

  1. The transcription factors E2A and HEB act in concert to induce the expression of FOXO1 in the common lymphoid progenitor.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Eva; Mansson, Robert; Mercer, Elinore M; Bryder, David; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Murre, Cornelis

    2011-10-18

    Recent studies have identified a number of transcriptional regulators, including E proteins, EBF1, FOXO1, and PAX5, that act together to orchestrate the B-cell fate. However, it still remains unclear as to how they are linked at the earliest stages of B-cell development. Here, we show that lymphocyte development in HEB-ablated mice exhibits a partial developmental arrest, whereas B-cell development in E2A(+/-)HEB(-/-) mice is completely blocked at the LY6D(-) common lymphoid progenitor stage. We show that the transcription signatures of E2A- and HEB-ablated common lymphoid progenitors significantly overlap. Notably, we found that Foxo1 expression was substantially reduced in the LY6D(-) HEB- and E2A-deficient cells. Finally, we show that E2A binds to enhancer elements across the FOXO1 locus to activate Foxo1 expression, linking E2A and FOXO1 directly in a common pathway. In summary, the data indicate that the earliest event in B-cell specification involves the induction of FOXO1 expression and requires the combined activities of E2A and HEB. PMID:21972416

  2. Analysis of FOXO1 mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Abstract: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) accounts for 30% to 40% of newly diagnosed lymphomas and has an overall cure rate of approximately 60%. Previously, we observed FOXO1 mutations in non-Hodgkin lymphoma patient samples. To explore the effects of FOXO1 mutations, we assessed FOXO1 status in 279 DLBCL patient samples and 22 DLBCL-derived cell lines.

  3. MicroRNA-183-96-182 Cluster Regulates Bovine Granulosa Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Transition by Coordinately Targeting FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhn, Samuel; Salilew-Wondim, Dessie; Hoelker, Michael; Rings, Franca; Neuhoff, Christiane; Tholen, Ernst; Schellander, Karl; Tesfaye, Dawit

    2016-06-01

    Large-scale expression profiling of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) in bovine granulosa cells from dominant and subordinate follicles on Day 19 of the estrous cycle revealed enriched micro-RNA-183-96-182 cluster miRNAs in preovulatory dominant follicles that coordinately regulate the forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) gene. However, little is known about the role of this cluster in bovine granulosa cell function. We used an in vitro granulosa cell culture model to investigate this role. Granulosa cells aspirated from small growing follicles (3-5 mm in diameter) were cultured in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium/F-12 medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum and transfected with locked nucleic acid-based miRNA mimics, inhibitors, and corresponding negative controls. Overexpression of the miRNA cluster resulted in suppression of FOXO1 mRNA and protein, whereas inhibition of the cluster increased expression of FOXO1 mRNA. Overexpression also increased the relative rate of cell proliferation, whereas inhibition slowed it down. Similarly, the proportion of cells under G0/G1 arrest declined, whereas the ratio of cells in S phase increased in response to miR-183-96-182 overexpression. Selective knockdown of FOXO1 mRNA using anti-FOXO1 small interfering RNA increased the rate of granulosa cell proliferation, decreased the proportion of cells under G0/G1 arrest, and increased the proportion of cells in the S phase of cell cycle. Our data suggest that miR-183-96-182 cluster miRNAs promote proliferation and G1/S transition of bovine granulosa cells by coordinately targeting FOXO1, suggesting a critical role in granulosa cell function. MicroRNA-183-96-182 cluster regulates bovine granulosa cell function by targeting FOXO1 gene. PMID:27122636

  4. FoxO1 Deacetylation Decreases Fatty Acid Oxidation in β-Cells and Sustains Insulin Secretion in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kim-Muller, Ja Young; Kim, Young Jung R; Fan, Jason; Zhao, Shangang; Banks, Alexander S; Prentki, Marc; Accili, Domenico

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic β-cell dysfunction contributes to onset and progression of type 2 diabetes. In this state β-cells become metabolically inflexible, losing the ability to select between carbohydrates and lipids as substrates for mitochondrial oxidation. These changes lead to β-cell dedifferentiation. We have proposed that FoxO proteins are activated through deacetylation-dependent nuclear translocation to forestall the progression of these abnormalities. However, how deacetylated FoxO exert their actions remains unclear. To address this question, we analyzed islet function in mice homozygous for knock-in alleles encoding deacetylated FoxO1 (6KR). Islets expressing 6KR mutant FoxO1 have enhanced insulin secretion in vivo and ex vivo and decreased fatty acid oxidation ex vivo Remarkably, the gene expression signature associated with FoxO1 deacetylation differs from wild type by only ∼2% of the >4000 genes regulated in response to re-feeding. But this narrow swath includes key genes required for β-cell identity, lipid metabolism, and mitochondrial fatty acid and solute transport. The data support the notion that deacetylated FoxO1 protects β-cell function by limiting mitochondrial lipid utilization and raise the possibility that inhibition of fatty acid oxidation in β-cells is beneficial to diabetes treatment. PMID:26984405

  5. Protection against dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy is related to modulation by testosterone of FOXO1 and PGC-1{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Weiping; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} In rat gastrocnemius muscle, dexamethasone reduced PGC-1{alpha} cellular and nuclear levels without altering mRNA levels for this factor. {yields} Dexamethasone reduced phosphorylating of p38 MAPK, which stabilizes PGC-1{alpha} and promotes its nuclear entry. {yields} Co-administration of testosterone with dexamethasone increased cellular and nuclear levels of PGC-1{alpha} protein without changing its mRNA levels. {yields} Co-administration of testosterone restored p38 MAPK levels to those of controls. -- Abstract: Glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy results from muscle protein catabolism and reduced protein synthesis, associated with increased expression of two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases (MAFbx and MuRF1), and of two inhibitors of protein synthesis, REDD1 and 4EBP1. MAFbx, MuRF1, REDD1 and 4EBP1 are up-regulated by the transcription factors FOXO1 and FOXO3A. The transcriptional co-activator PGC-1{alpha} has been shown to attenuate many forms of muscle atrophy and to repress FOXO3A-mediated transcription of atrophy-specific genes. Dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy can be prevented by testosterone, which blocks up-regulation by dexamethasone of FOXO1. Here, an animal model of dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy was used to further characterize effects of testosterone to abrogate adverse actions of dexamethasone on FOXO1 levels and nuclear localization, and to determine how these agents affect PGC-1{alpha}, and its upstream activators, p38 MAPK and AMPK. In rat gastrocnemius muscle, testosterone blunted the dexamethasone-mediated increase in levels of FOXO1 mRNA, and FOXO1 total and nuclear protein. Dexamethasone reduced total and nuclear PGC-1{alpha} protein levels in the gastrocnemius; co-administration of testosterone with dexamethasone increased total and nuclear PGC-1{alpha} levels above those present in untreated controls. Testosterone blocked dexamethasone-induced decreases in activity of p38 MAPK in the gastrocnemius

  6. Critical Role of FoxO1 in Granulosa Cell Apoptosis Caused by Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Grape Seed Procyanidin B2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Qing; Gao, Bin-Wen; Wang, Jing; Ren, Qiao-Ling; Chen, Jun-Feng; Ma, Qiang; Zhang, Zi-Jing; Xing, Bao-Song

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to the follicular granulosa cell apoptosis. Grape seed procyanidin B2 (GSPB2) has been reported to possess potent antioxidant activity. However, the GSPB2-mediated protective effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in granulosa cell apoptosis process remain unknown. In this study, we showed for the first time that GSPB2 treatment decreased FoxO1 protein level, improved granulosa cell viability, upregulated LC3-II protein level, and reduced granulosa cell apoptosis rate. Under a condition of oxidative stress, GSPB2 reversed FoxO1 nuclear localization and increased its level in cytoplasm. In addition, FoxO1 knockdown inhibited the protective effects of GSPB2 induced. Our findings suggest that FoxO1 plays a pivotal role in regulating autophagy in granulosa cells, GSPB2 exerts a potent and beneficial role in reducing granulosa cell apoptosis and inducing autophagy process, and targeting FoxO1 could be significant in fighting against oxidative stress-reduced female reproductive system diseases. PMID:27057282

  7. Critical Role of FoxO1 in Granulosa Cell Apoptosis Caused by Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Grape Seed Procyanidin B2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Qing; Gao, Bin-Wen; Wang, Jing; Ren, Qiao-Ling; Chen, Jun-Feng; Ma, Qiang; Zhang, Zi-Jing; Xing, Bao-Song

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to the follicular granulosa cell apoptosis. Grape seed procyanidin B2 (GSPB2) has been reported to possess potent antioxidant activity. However, the GSPB2-mediated protective effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in granulosa cell apoptosis process remain unknown. In this study, we showed for the first time that GSPB2 treatment decreased FoxO1 protein level, improved granulosa cell viability, upregulated LC3-II protein level, and reduced granulosa cell apoptosis rate. Under a condition of oxidative stress, GSPB2 reversed FoxO1 nuclear localization and increased its level in cytoplasm. In addition, FoxO1 knockdown inhibited the protective effects of GSPB2 induced. Our findings suggest that FoxO1 plays a pivotal role in regulating autophagy in granulosa cells, GSPB2 exerts a potent and beneficial role in reducing granulosa cell apoptosis and inducing autophagy process, and targeting FoxO1 could be significant in fighting against oxidative stress-reduced female reproductive system diseases. PMID:27057282

  8. Associations between Forkhead Box O1 (FoxO1) Expression and Indicators of Hepatic Glucose Production in Transition Dairy Cows Supplemented with Dietary Nicotinic Acid.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Asako; Locher, Lena; Tienken, Reka; Meyer, Ulrich; Dänicke, Sven; Rehage, Jürgen; Huber, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) is a transcription factor which promotes hepatic glucose production (HGP) by up-regulating the transcription of gluconeogenic enzymes in monogastric species. The activity of FoxO1 is inhibited by insulin-induced phosphorylation. The aims of the present study were to find associations between FoxO1 expression and variables associated with HGP as affected by feeding regimen in dairy cows during the transition period. Twenty one healthy German Holstein cows were allocated to four groups (LC-CON, HC-CON, LC-NA with 5 cows/group and HC-NA with 6 cows/group, respectively). Cows received 0 (LC-CON and HC-CON) or 24 (LC-NA and HC-NA) g/d nicotinic acid with high (HC) or low (LC) concentrate proportion from -42 days (-41.8 + 4.8; mean + standard deviation) relative to expected calving date (d-42) to d24. Liver biopsy was taken at d-42, 1, 21, and 100. The total protein expression of FoxO1 (tFoxO1) and the extent of phosphorylation of FoxO1 at serine 256 (pFoxO1) were analysed semiquantitatively by Western Blotting. The expression of hepatic mRNA of FoxO1 and seven genes associated with HGP was measured by real-time RT-PCR. Mixed model and Pearson's correlation were used for statistical evaluation with the level of significance at P<0.05. No dietary effect was observed either on feed intake, energy balance, or on the concentration of blood metabolites. Neither time nor diet affected the expression of FoxO1 total protein and mRNA. A NA × concentrate interaction was found in pFoxO1. However, no corresponding dietary effect was found in the mRNA expression of investigated genes. Different patterns of correlations between FoxO1-related variables and investigated indicators for HGP were found at d21 and 100. The results indicated that the regulation of HGP did not take place on the levels of mRNA and protein expression and the phosphorylation of FoxO1 in dairy cows in early lactation. PMID:26800252

  9. Associations between Forkhead Box O1 (FoxO1) Expression and Indicators of Hepatic Glucose Production in Transition Dairy Cows Supplemented with Dietary Nicotinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Asako; Locher, Lena; Tienken, Reka; Meyer, Ulrich; Dänicke, Sven; Rehage, Jürgen; Huber, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) is a transcription factor which promotes hepatic glucose production (HGP) by up-regulating the transcription of gluconeogenic enzymes in monogastric species. The activity of FoxO1 is inhibited by insulin-induced phosphorylation. The aims of the present study were to find associations between FoxO1 expression and variables associated with HGP as affected by feeding regimen in dairy cows during the transition period. Twenty one healthy German Holstein cows were allocated to four groups (LC-CON, HC-CON, LC-NA with 5 cows/group and HC-NA with 6 cows/group, respectively). Cows received 0 (LC-CON and HC-CON) or 24 (LC-NA and HC-NA) g/d nicotinic acid with high (HC) or low (LC) concentrate proportion from -42 days (-41.8 + 4.8; mean + standard deviation) relative to expected calving date (d-42) to d24. Liver biopsy was taken at d-42, 1, 21, and 100. The total protein expression of FoxO1 (tFoxO1) and the extent of phosphorylation of FoxO1 at serine 256 (pFoxO1) were analysed semiquantitatively by Western Blotting. The expression of hepatic mRNA of FoxO1 and seven genes associated with HGP was measured by real-time RT-PCR. Mixed model and Pearson’s correlation were used for statistical evaluation with the level of significance at P<0.05. No dietary effect was observed either on feed intake, energy balance, or on the concentration of blood metabolites. Neither time nor diet affected the expression of FoxO1 total protein and mRNA. A NA × concentrate interaction was found in pFoxO1. However, no corresponding dietary effect was found in the mRNA expression of investigated genes. Different patterns of correlations between FoxO1-related variables and investigated indicators for HGP were found at d21 and 100. The results indicated that the regulation of HGP did not take place on the levels of mRNA and protein expression and the phosphorylation of FoxO1 in dairy cows in early lactation. PMID:26800252

  10. Reduced FOXO1 Expression Accelerates Skin Wound Healing and Attenuates Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Katsuya; de Kerckhove, Maiko; Okamoto, Momoko; Kashiyama, Kazuya; Tanaka, Katsumi; Kim, Sangeun; Kawata, Takuya; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Park, Seongjoon; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Martin, Paul; Shimokawa, Isao

    2015-01-01

    The forkhead box O (FOXO) family has been extensively investigated in aging and metabolism, but its role in tissue-repair processes remains largely unknown. Herein, we clarify the molecular aspect of the FOXO family in skin wound healing. We demonstrated that Foxo1 and Foxo3a were both up-regulated during murine skin wound healing. Partial knockout of Foxo1 in Foxo1+/− mice throughout the body led to accelerated skin wound healing with enhanced keratinocyte migration, reduced granulation tissue formation, and decreased collagen density, accompanied by an attenuated inflammatory response, but we observed no wound phenotype in Foxo3a−/− mice. Fibroblast growth factor 2, adiponectin, and notch1 genes were significantly increased at wound sites in Foxo1+/− mice, along with markedly altered extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 and AKT phosphorylation. Similarly, transient knockdown of Foxo1 at the wound site by local delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides enhanced skin wound healing. The link between FOXO1 and scarring extends to patients, in particular keloid scars, where we see FOXO1 expression markedly increased in fibroblasts and inflammatory cells within the otherwise normal dermis. This occurs in the immediate vicinity of the keloid by comparison to the center of the mature keloid, indicating that FOXO1 is associated with the overgrowth of this fibrotic response into adjacent normal skin. Overall, our data indicate that molecular targeting of FOXO1 may improve the quality of healing and reduce pathological scarring. PMID:25010393

  11. Alcohol alters hepatic FoxO1, p53, and mitochondrial SIRT5 deacetylation function

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, Charles S. Leo, Maria Anna; Wang, Xiaolei; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    2008-08-22

    Chronic alcohol consumption affects the gene expression of a NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}). Our aim was to verify that it also alters the forkhead (FoxO1) and p53 transcription factor proteins, critical in the hepatic response to oxidative stress and regulated by SIRT1 through its deacetylating capacity. Accordingly, rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli alcohol-containing liquid diets for 28 days. Alcohol increased hepatic mRNA expression of FoxO1 (p = 0.003) and p53 (p = 0.001) while corresponding protein levels remained unchanged. However phospho-FoxO1 and phospho-Akt (protein kinase) were both decreased by alcohol consumption (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively) while hepatic p53 was found hyperacetylated (p = 0.017). Furthermore, mitochondrial SIRT5 was reduced (p = 0.0025), and PGC-1{alpha} hyperacetylated (p = 0.027), establishing their role in protein modification. Thus, alcohol consumption disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial interactions by post-translation protein modifications, which contribute to alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis through the newly discovered reduction of SIRT5.

  12. Resveratrol inhibits the expression of SREBP1 in cell model of steatosis via Sirt1-FOXO1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Li; Fu, Yu-Cai; Xu, Wen-Can; Feng, Ya-Qing; Fang, Shi-Rong; Zhou, Xiao-Hui

    2009-03-13

    Recent studies in mice have shown that resveratrol can protect the liver from fat accumulation induced by high fat diet. However, the exact mechanism is largely unknown. To explore the possible mechanism, we investigated the anti-lipogenic effect of resveratrol in vitro model. Oil Red O staining revealed that resveratrol could significantly ameliorate the excessive triglyceride accumulation in HepG2 cells induced by palmitate. The results of RT-PCR and Western blotting showed that resveratrol upregulated the expression of Sirt1 and forkhead box O1 (FOXO1), whereas downregulated the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein1 (SREBP1). Moreover, resveratrol was shown to inhibit the activity of SREBP1, as evaluated by immunofluorescence assay. Our results suggest that resveratrol may attenuate fat deposition by inhibiting SREBP1 expression via Sirt1-FOXO1 pathway and thus may have application for the treatment of NAFLD. PMID:19285015

  13. Involvement of the FoxO1/MuRF1/Atrogin-1 Signaling Pathway in the Oxidative Stress-Induced Atrophy of Cultured Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Myotubes.

    PubMed

    Pomiès, Pascal; Blaquière, Marine; Maury, Jonathan; Mercier, Jacques; Gouzi, Fares; Hayot, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be one of the most important mechanisms implicated in the muscle wasting of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but its role has never been demonstrated. We therefore assessed the effects of both pro-oxidant and antioxidant treatments on the oxidative stress levels and atrophic signaling pathway of cultured COPD myotubes. Treatment of cultured COPD myotubes with the pro-oxidant molecule H2O2 resulted in increased ROS production (P = 0.002) and protein carbonylation (P = 0.050), in association with a more pronounced atrophy of the myotubes, as reflected by a reduced diameter (P = 0.003), and the activated expression of atrophic markers MuRF1 and FoxO1 (P = 0.022 and P = 0.030, respectively). Conversely, the antioxidant molecule ascorbic acid induced a reduction in ROS production (P<0.001) and protein carbonylation (P = 0.019), and an increase in the myotube diameter (P<0.001) to a level similar to the diameter of healthy subject myotubes, in association with decreased expression levels of MuRF1, atrogin-1 and FoxO1 (P<0.001, P = 0.002 and P = 0.042, respectively). A significant negative correlation was observed between the variations in myotube diameter and the variations in the expression of MuRF1 after antioxidant treatment (P = 0.047). Moreover, ascorbic acid was able to prevent the H2O2-induced atrophy of COPD myotubes. Last, the proteasome inhibitor MG132 restored the basal atrophy level of the COPD myotubes and also suppressed the H2O2-induced myotube atrophy. These findings demonstrate for the first time the involvement of oxidative stress in the atrophy of COPD peripheral muscle cells in vitro, via the FoxO1/MuRF1/atrogin-1 signaling pathway of the ubiquitin/proteasome system. PMID:27526027

  14. Involvement of the FoxO1/MuRF1/Atrogin-1 Signaling Pathway in the Oxidative Stress-Induced Atrophy of Cultured Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Pomiès, Pascal; Blaquière, Marine; Maury, Jonathan; Mercier, Jacques; Gouzi, Fares; Hayot, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be one of the most important mechanisms implicated in the muscle wasting of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but its role has never been demonstrated. We therefore assessed the effects of both pro-oxidant and antioxidant treatments on the oxidative stress levels and atrophic signaling pathway of cultured COPD myotubes. Treatment of cultured COPD myotubes with the pro-oxidant molecule H2O2 resulted in increased ROS production (P = 0.002) and protein carbonylation (P = 0.050), in association with a more pronounced atrophy of the myotubes, as reflected by a reduced diameter (P = 0.003), and the activated expression of atrophic markers MuRF1 and FoxO1 (P = 0.022 and P = 0.030, respectively). Conversely, the antioxidant molecule ascorbic acid induced a reduction in ROS production (P<0.001) and protein carbonylation (P = 0.019), and an increase in the myotube diameter (P<0.001) to a level similar to the diameter of healthy subject myotubes, in association with decreased expression levels of MuRF1, atrogin-1 and FoxO1 (P<0.001, P = 0.002 and P = 0.042, respectively). A significant negative correlation was observed between the variations in myotube diameter and the variations in the expression of MuRF1 after antioxidant treatment (P = 0.047). Moreover, ascorbic acid was able to prevent the H2O2-induced atrophy of COPD myotubes. Last, the proteasome inhibitor MG132 restored the basal atrophy level of the COPD myotubes and also suppressed the H2O2-induced myotube atrophy. These findings demonstrate for the first time the involvement of oxidative stress in the atrophy of COPD peripheral muscle cells in vitro, via the FoxO1/MuRF1/atrogin-1 signaling pathway of the ubiquitin/proteasome system. PMID:27526027

  15. The Flavones Apigenin and Luteolin Induce FOXO1 Translocation but Inhibit Gluconeogenic and Lipogenic Gene Expression in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bumke-Vogt, Christiane; Osterhoff, Martin A.; Borchert, Andrea; Guzman-Perez, Valentina; Sarem, Zeinab; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Bähr, Volker; Pfeiffer, Andreas F. H.

    2014-01-01

    The flavones apigenin (4′,5,7,-trihydroxyflavone) and luteolin (3′,4′,5,7,-tetrahydroxyflavone) are plant secondary metabolites with antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and anticancer activities. We evaluated their impact on cell signaling pathways related to insulin-resistance and type 2 diabetes. Apigenin and luteolin were identified in our U-2 OS (human osteosarcoma) cell screening assay for micronutrients triggering rapid intracellular translocation of the forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FOXO1), an important mediator of insulin signal transduction. Insulin reversed the translocation of FOXO1 as shown by live cell imaging. The impact on the expression of target genes was evaluated in HepG2 (human hepatoma) cells. The mRNA-expression of the gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), the lipogenic enzymes fatty-acid synthase (FASN) and acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (ACC) were down-regulated by both flavones with smaller effective dosages of apigenin than for luteolin. PKB/AKT-, PRAS40-, p70S6K-, and S6-phosphorylation was reduced by apigenin and luteolin but not that of the insulin-like growth factor receptor IGF-1R by apigenin indicating a direct inhibition of the PKB/AKT-signaling pathway distal to the IGF-1 receptor. N-acetyl-L-cysteine did not prevent FOXO1 nuclear translocation induced by apigenin and luteolin, suggesting that these flavones do not act via oxidative stress. The roles of FOXO1, FOXO3a, AKT, sirtuin1 (SIRT1), and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived2)-like2 (NRF2), investigated by siRNA knockdown, showed differential patterns of signal pathways involved and a role of NRF2 in the inhibition of gluconeogenic enzyme expression. We conclude that these flavones show an antidiabetic potential due to reduction of gluconeogenic and lipogenic capacity despite inhibition of the PKB/AKT pathway which justifies detailed investigation in vivo. PMID:25136826

  16. Curcumin induces G2/M arrest and triggers apoptosis via FoxO1 signaling in U87 human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chao; Jiao, Jian-Tong; Qian, Yu; Guo, Xiao-Yi; Huang, Jin; Dai, Min-Chao; Zhang, Lei; Ding, Xiao-Peng; Zong, Da; Shao, Jun-Fei

    2016-05-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that curcumin possesses an antitumor activity, which is associated with its ability to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However the detailed underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy and underlying mechanism of curcumin‑induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in U87 human glioblastoma cells. By immunofluorescence staining, subcellular fractionation and western blotting, the present study demonstrated that curcumin was able to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by increasing the expression levels of cyclin G2, cleaved caspase‑3 and Fas ligand (FasL), and decreasing the expression of cyclin‑dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). In addition, increased expression of forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) and decreased expression of phosphorylated (p)‑FoxO1 were detected in the curcumin‑treated U87 cells. Curcumin was also able to induce the translocation of FoxO1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Furthermore, following knockdown of FoxO1 expression in curcumin‑treated U87 cells using FoxO1 small interfering RNA, the expression levels of cyclin G2, cleaved caspase‑3 and FasL were inhibited; however, the expression levels of CDK1 were not markedly altered. Notably, following knockdown of CDK1 expression under normal conditions, the total expression of FoxO1 was not affected; however, p‑FoxO1 expression was decreased and FoxO1 nuclear expression was increased. Furthermore, curcumin‑induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis could be attenuated by FoxO1 knockdown. These results indicated that curcumin may induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in U87 cells by increasing FoxO1 expression. The present study identified a novel mechanism underlying the antitumor effects of curcumin, and may provide a theoretical basis for the application of curcumin in glioma treatment. PMID:27035875

  17. Curcumin induces G2/M arrest and triggers apoptosis via FoxO1 signaling in U87 human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, CHAO; JIAO, JIAN-TONG; QIAN, YU; GUO, XIAO-YI; HUANG, JIN; DAI, MIN-CHAO; ZHANG, LEI; DING, XIAO-PENG; ZONG, DA; SHAO, JUN-FEI

    2016-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that curcumin possesses an antitumor activity, which is associated with its ability to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However the detailed underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy and underlying mechanism of curcumin-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in U87 human glioblastoma cells. By immunofluorescence staining, subcellular fractionation and western blotting, the present study demonstrated that curcumin was able to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by increasing the expression levels of cyclin G2, cleaved caspase-3 and Fas ligand (FasL), and decreasing the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). In addition, increased expression of forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) and decreased expression of phosphorylated (p)-FoxO1 were detected in the curcumin-treated U87 cells. Curcumin was also able to induce the translocation of FoxO1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Furthermore, following knockdown of FoxO1 expression in curcumin-treated U87 cells using FoxO1 small interfering RNA, the expression levels of cyclin G2, cleaved caspase-3 and FasL were inhibited; however, the expression levels of CDK1 were not markedly altered. Notably, following knockdown of CDK1 expression under normal conditions, the total expression of FoxO1 was not affected; however, p-FoxO1 expression was decreased and FoxO1 nuclear expression was increased. Furthermore, curcumin-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis could be attenuated by FoxO1 knockdown. These results indicated that curcumin may induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in U87 cells by increasing FoxO1 expression. The present study identified a novel mechanism underlying the antitumor effects of curcumin, and may provide a theoretical basis for the application of curcumin in glioma treatment. PMID:27035875

  18. TLR2 Plays a Critical Role in HMGB1-Induced Glomeruli Cell Proliferation Through the FoxO1 Signaling Pathway in Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Juan; Wu, Chao; Yang, Gui-Fang; Liu, Qing-Juan; Liu, Jin-Xi; Hao, Jun; Xing, Ling-Ling; Yang, Min; Liu, Shu-Xia

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the role and possible mechanisms of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in high-mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1)-induced mouse mesangial cell (MMC) proliferation and glomeruli proliferation of MRL/Fas(lpr) mice. First, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), TLR2 and Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in the glomeruli of MRL/Fas(lpr) mice was quantified, and the correlation with cell proliferation of glomeruli was analyzed. Then, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), TLR2 neutralization antibody, and small hairpin TLR2 (shTLR2) were used to confirm the role of TLR2 in HMGB1-induced MMC proliferation. Furthermore, wild-type FoxO1 (WT-FoxO1) vector was used to investigate the effect of FoxO1 pathway on HMGB1-induced MMC proliferation. Finally, electroporation was used to knockdown TLR2 in the glomeruli of MRL/Fas(lpr) mice, and renal function, FoxO1, and PCNA expression were detected. The results showed that the TLR2 expression was upregulated and FoxO1 expression was decreased in the glomeruli of MRL/Fas(lpr) mice, and these effects were significantly correlated with cell proliferation of the glomeruli. In vitro, the TLR2 neutralization antibody and the WT-FoxO1 vector, both reduced the MMC proliferation levels induced by HMGB1. The TLR2 neutralization antibody also blocked the HMGB1-dependent activation of the FoxO1 pathway and cell proliferation. In addition, transfection with shTLR2 decreased the proliferation levels and PCNA expression induced by HMGB1. In vivo, treatment with shTLR2 significantly reduced the PCNA expression in the glomeruli of MRL/Fas(lpr) mice and improved renal function. In addition, treatment with shTLR2 or blocking of TLR2 also reduced the translocation of FoxO1. Thus, TLR2 plays a critical role in HMGB1-induced glomeruli cell proliferation through the FoxO1 signaling pathway in lupus nephritis. PMID:26799193

  19. GSK3 protein positively regulates type I insulin-like growth factor receptor through forkhead transcription factors FOXO1/3/4.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiaodong; Liu, Shu; Shao, Ting; Hua, Hui; Kong, Qingbin; Wang, Jiao; Luo, Ting; Jiang, Yangfu

    2014-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) has either tumor-suppressive roles or pro-tumor roles in different types of human tumors. A number of GSK3 targets in diverse signaling pathways have been uncovered, such as tuberous sclerosis complex subunit 2 and β-catenin. The O subfamily of forkhead/winged helix transcription factors (FOXO) is known as tumor suppressors that induce apoptosis. In this study, we find that FOXO binds to type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) promoter and stimulates its transcription. GSK3 positively regulates the transactivation activity of FOXO and stimulates IGF-IR expression. Although kinase-dead GSK3β cannot up-regulate IGF-IR, the constitutively active GSK3β induces IGF-IR expression in a FOXO-dependent manner. Serum starvation or Akt inhibition leads to an increase in IGF-IR expression, which could be blunted by GSK3 inhibition. GSK3β knockdown or GSK3 inhibitor suppresses IGF-I-induced IGF-IR, Akt, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, knockdown of GSK3β or FOXO1/3/4 leads to a decrease in cellular proliferation and abrogates IGF-I-induced hepatoma cell proliferation. These results suggest that GSK3 and FOXO may positively regulate IGF-I signaling and hepatoma cell proliferation. PMID:25053419

  20. GSK3 Protein Positively Regulates Type I Insulin-like Growth Factor Receptor through Forkhead Transcription Factors FOXO1/3/4

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Xiaodong; Liu, Shu; Shao, Ting; Hua, Hui; Kong, Qingbin; Wang, Jiao; Luo, Ting; Jiang, Yangfu

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) has either tumor-suppressive roles or pro-tumor roles in different types of human tumors. A number of GSK3 targets in diverse signaling pathways have been uncovered, such as tuberous sclerosis complex subunit 2 and β-catenin. The O subfamily of forkhead/winged helix transcription factors (FOXO) is known as tumor suppressors that induce apoptosis. In this study, we find that FOXO binds to type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) promoter and stimulates its transcription. GSK3 positively regulates the transactivation activity of FOXO and stimulates IGF-IR expression. Although kinase-dead GSK3β cannot up-regulate IGF-IR, the constitutively active GSK3β induces IGF-IR expression in a FOXO-dependent manner. Serum starvation or Akt inhibition leads to an increase in IGF-IR expression, which could be blunted by GSK3 inhibition. GSK3β knockdown or GSK3 inhibitor suppresses IGF-I-induced IGF-IR, Akt, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, knockdown of GSK3β or FOXO1/3/4 leads to a decrease in cellular proliferation and abrogates IGF-I-induced hepatoma cell proliferation. These results suggest that GSK3 and FOXO may positively regulate IGF-I signaling and hepatoma cell proliferation. PMID:25053419

  1. A Derived Allosteric Switch Underlies the Evolution of Conditional Cooperativity between HOXA11 and FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Nnamani, Mauris C; Ganguly, Soumya; Erkenbrack, Eric M; Lynch, Vincent J; Mizoue, Laura S; Tong, Yingchun; Darling, Heather L; Fuxreiter, Monika; Meiler, Jens; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play multiple roles in development. Given this multifunctionality, it has been assumed that TFs are evolutionarily highly constrained. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanisms for the origin of a derived functional interaction between two TFs, HOXA11 and FOXO1. We have previously shown that the regulatory role of HOXA11 in mammalian endometrial stromal cells requires interaction with FOXO1, and that the physical interaction between these proteins evolved before their functional cooperativity. Here, we demonstrate that the derived functional cooperativity between HOXA11 and FOXO1 is due to derived allosteric regulation of HOXA11 by FOXO1. This study shows that TF function can evolve through changes affecting the functional output of a pre-existing protein complex. PMID:27239043

  2. Functional regulation of FoxO1 in neural stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, D-Y; Hwang, I; Muller, F L; Paik, J-H

    2015-12-01

    Forkhead transcription factor family O (FoxO) maintains adult stem cell reserves by supporting their long-term proliferative potential. MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate neuronal stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation and differentiation during neural development by controlling the expression of a specific set of target genes. In the neurogenic subventricular zone, FoxO1 is specifically expressed in NSPCs and is no longer detected during the transition to neuroblast stage, forming an inverse correlation with miR-9 expression. The 3'-untranslated region of FoxO1 contains a conserved target sequence of miR-9 and FoxO1 expression is coordinated in concert with miR-9 during neuronal differentiation. Our study demonstrates that FoxO1 contributes to NSPC fate decision through its cooperation with the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:26470727

  3. miR-96 regulates FOXO1-mediated cell apoptosis in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Liu, Huihui; Zhang, Hui; Shang, Chao; Song, Yongsheng

    2012-09-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is one of the most common types of malignancies and a leading cause of genitourinary system cancer mortality worldwide. The tumor suppressor gene FOXO1, a member of the forkhead box O (FOXO) subfamily of transcription factors, is downregulated in a number of cancers, including TCC; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, we used microRNA (miRNA) target prediction algorithms to identify a conserved potential miR-96 binding site in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of FOXO1. Using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and northern blot analysis, we identified that miR-96 was downregulated in TCC tissues compared to normal bladder tissues (NB), suggesting that the loss of FOXO1 expression in TCC may be mediated by miR-96. To confirm this, we transfected pre-miR-96/anti-miR-96 into the T24 TCC cell line and revealed that miR-96 expression was sufficient to significantly reduce FOXO1 expression. Conversely, FOXO1 expression was not completely restored by the inhibition of miR-96 in T24 cells. Moreover, RNA silencing of FOXO1 significantly reduced miR-96 inhibitor-mediated T24 cell apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the miR-96 targeting of FOXO1 is upregulated in TCC; in addition, TCC tumorigenesis may be partly due to the ability of miR-96 to promote FOXO1 repression, thereby bypassing cell apoptosis controls. PMID:23741253

  4. Transcription Factor Foxo1 Is a Negative Regulator of NK Cell Maturation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Youcai; Kerdiles, Yann; Chu, Jianhong; Yuan, Shunzong; Wang, Youwei; Chen, Xilin; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Hughes, Tiffany; Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Zou, Xianghong; Liu, Chang-Gong; Freud, Aharon G.; Li, Xiaohui; Caligiuri, Michael A; Vivier, Eric; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Little is known about the role of negative regulators in controlling natural killer (NK) cell development and effector functions. Foxo1 is a multifunctional transcription factor of the forkhead family. Using a mouse model of conditional deletion in NK cells, we found that Foxo1 negatively controlled NK cell differentiation and function. Immature NK cells expressed abundant Foxo1 and little Tbx21 relative to mature NK cells, but these two transcription factors reversed their expression as NK cells proceeded through development. Foxo1 promoted NK cell homing to lymph nodes through upregulating CD62L expression, and impaired late-stage maturation and effector functions by repressing Tbx21 expression. Loss of Foxo1 rescued the defect in late-stage NK cell maturation in heterozygous Tbx21+/− mice. Collectively, our data reveal a regulatory pathway by which the negative regulator Foxo1 and the positive regulator Tbx21 play opposing roles in controlling NK cell development and effector functions. PMID:25769609

  5. FoxO1 expression in osteoblasts regulates glucose homeostasis through regulation of osteocalcin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rached, Marie-Therese; Kode, Aruna; Silva, Barbara C.; Jung, Dae Young; Gray, Susan; Ong, Helena; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Kim, Jason K.; Karsenty, Gerard; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2009-01-01

    Osteoblasts have recently been found to play a role in regulating glucose metabolism through secretion of osteocalcin. It is unknown, however, how this osteoblast function is regulated transcriptionally. As FoxO1 is a forkhead family transcription factor known to regulate several key aspects of glucose homeostasis, we investigated whether its expression in osteoblasts may contribute to its metabolic functions. Here we show that mice lacking Foxo1 only in osteoblasts had increased pancreatic β cell proliferation, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity. The ability of osteoblast-specific FoxO1 deficiency to affect metabolic homeostasis was due to increased osteocalcin expression and decreased expression of Esp, a gene that encodes a protein responsible for decreasing the bioactivity of osteocalcin. These results indicate that FoxO1 expression in osteoblasts contributes to FoxO1 control of glucose homeostasis and identify FoxO1 as a key modulator of the ability of the skeleton to function as an endocrine organ regulating glucose metabolism. PMID:20038793

  6. FoxO1 controls lysosomal acid lipase in adipocytes: implication of lipophagy during nutrient restriction and metformin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lettieri Barbato, D; Tatulli, G; Aquilano, K; Ciriolo, M R

    2013-01-01

    Finding new molecular pathways and strategies modulating lipolysis in adipocytes is an attractive goal of the current research. Indeed, it is becoming clear that several human age-related pathologies are caused by adipose tissue expansion and altered lipid metabolism. In the present work, we show that transcription factor forkhead homeobox type protein O1 (FoxO1) is upregulated by nutrient restriction (NR) in adipocytes and exerts the transcriptional control of lipid catabolism via the induction of lysosomal acid lipase (Lipa). An increased autophagy and colocalization of lipid droplets (LDs) with lysosomes was observed implying lipophagy in Lipa-mediated LDs degradation. Interestingly, we found that metformin (Metf), a biguanide drug commonly used to treat type-2 diabetes, exerts effects comparable to that of NR. Actually, it was able to elicit FoxO1-dependent Lipa induction as well as LDs degradation through lipophagy. Moreover, we demonstrate that, during NR or Metf treatment, free fatty acids released by Lipa are directed toward AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated mitochondrial oxidation, thus maintaining energetic homeostasis in adipocytes. In conclusion, our data show that lysosomal-mediated lipid catabolism is activated by NR in adipocytes and give further support to the use of Metf as a NR mimetic to combat age-related diseases associated with altered lipid metabolism. PMID:24136225

  7. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 Controls CD8 T Cell Memory Differentiation in a Foxo1-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianjun; Tschumi, Benjamin O; Lopez-Mejia, Isabel C; Oberle, Susanne G; Meyer, Marten; Samson, Guerric; Rüegg, Markus A; Hall, Michael N; Fajas, Lluis; Zehn, Dietmar; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Donda, Alena; Romero, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    Upon infection, antigen-specific naive CD8 T cells are activated and differentiate into short-lived effector cells (SLECs) and memory precursor cells (MPECs). The underlying signaling pathways remain largely unresolved. We show that Rictor, the core component of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2), regulates SLEC and MPEC commitment. Rictor deficiency favors memory formation and increases IL-2 secretion capacity without dampening effector functions. Moreover, mTORC2-deficient memory T cells mount more potent recall responses. Enhanced memory formation in the absence of mTORC2 was associated with Eomes and Tcf-1 upregulation, repression of T-bet, enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, and fatty acid oxidation. This transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming is mainly driven by nuclear stabilization of Foxo1. Silencing of Foxo1 reversed the increased MPEC differentiation and IL-2 production and led to an impaired recall response of Rictor KO memory T cells. Therefore, mTORC2 is a critical regulator of CD8 T cell differentiation and may be an important target for immunotherapy interventions. PMID:26804903

  8. Acetylation curtails nucleosome binding, not stable nucleosome remodeling, by FoxO1

    SciTech Connect

    Hatta, M.; Liu, F.; Cirillo, L.A.

    2009-02-20

    Transcriptional activity of FoxO factors is controlled through the actions of multiple growth factors signaling through protein kinase B, whereby phosphorylation of FoxO factors inhibits FoxO-mediated transactivation by promoting nuclear export. Phosphorylation of FoxO factors is enhanced by p300-mediated acetylation, which decreases their affinity for DNA. The negative effect of acetylation on FoxO DNA binding, together with nuclear FoxO mobility, is eliminated by over-expression of the de-acetylase Sirt1, suggesting that acetylation mobilizes FoxO factors in chromatin for inducible gene expression. Here, we show that acetylation significantly curtails the affinity of FoxO1 for its binding sites in nucleosomal DNA but has no effect on either stable nucleosome binding or remodeling by this factor. We suggest that, while acetylation provides a first, essential step toward mobilizing FoxO factors for inducible gene repression, additional mechanisms exist for overcoming their inherent capacity to stably bind and remodel nuclear chromatin.

  9. FOXO1 is Required for Binding of PR on IRF4, Novel Transcriptional Regulator of Endometrial Stromal Decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Yasmin M.; Mazur, Erik C.; Li, Xilong; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Jiang, Lichun; Chen, Rui; Lanz, Rainer B.; Kovanci, Ertug; Gibbons, William E.

    2015-01-01

    The forkhead box O1A (FOXO1) is an early-induced target of the protein kinase A pathway during the decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). In this study we identified the cistrome and transcriptome of FOXO1 and its role as a transcriptional regulator of the progesterone receptor (PR). Direct targets of FOXO1 were identified by integrating RNA sequencing with chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing. Gene ontology analysis demonstrated that FOXO1 regulates a subset of genes in decidualization such as those involved in cancer, p53 signaling, focal adhesions, and Wnt signaling. An overlap of the FOXO1 and PR chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing intervals revealed the co-occupancy of FOXO1 in more than 75% of PR binding intervals. Among these intervals were highly enriched motifs for the interferon regulatory factor member 4 (IRF4). IRF4 was determined to be a genomic target of both FOXO1 and PR and also to be differentially regulated in HESCs treated with small interfering RNA targeting FOXO1 or PR prior to decidualization stimulus. Ablation of FOXO1 was found to abolish binding of PR to the shared binding interval downstream of the IRF4 gene. Finally, small interfering RNA-mediated ablation of IRF4 was shown to compromise morphological transformation of decidualized HESCs and to attenuate the expression of the decidual markers IGFBP1, PRL, and WNT4. These results provide the first evidence that FOXO1 is functionally required for the binding of PR to genomic targets. Most notably, FOXO1 and PR are required for the regulation of IRF4, a novel transcriptional regulator of decidualization in HESCs. PMID:25584414

  10. Inhibition of SH2-domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2) ameliorates palmitate induced-apoptosis through regulating Akt/FOXO1 pathway and ROS production in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gorgani-Firuzjaee, Sattar; Adeli, Khosrow; Meshkani, Reza

    2015-08-21

    The serine–threonine kinase Akt regulates proliferation and survival by phosphorylating a network of protein substrates; however, the role of a negative regulator of the Akt pathway, the SH2-domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2) in apoptosis of the hepatocytes, remains unknown. In the present study, we studied the molecular mechanisms linking SHIP2 expression to apoptosis using overexpression or suppression of SHIP2 gene in HepG2 cells exposed to palmitate (0.5 mM). Overexpression of the dominant negative mutant SHIP2 (SHIP2-DN) significantly reduced palmitate-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells, as these cells had increased cell viability, decreased apoptotic cell death and reduced the activity of caspase-3, cytochrome c and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Overexpression of the wild-type SHIP2 gene led to a massive apoptosis in HepG2 cells. The protection from palmitate-induced apoptosis by SHIP2 inhibition was accompanied by a decrease in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, SHIP2 inhibition was accompanied by an increased Akt and FOXO-1 phosphorylation, whereas overexpression of the wild-type SHIP2 gene had the opposite effects. Taken together, these findings suggest that SHIP2 expression level is an important determinant of hepatic lipoapotosis and its inhibition can potentially be a target in treatment of hepatic lipoapoptosis in diabetic patients. - Highlights: • Lipoapoptosis is the major contributor to the development of NAFLD. • The PI3-K/Akt pathway regulates apoptosis in different cells. • The role of negative regulator of this pathway, SHIP2 in lipoapoptosis is unknown. • SHIP2 inhibition significantly reduces palmitate-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. • SHIP2 inhibition prevents palmitate induced-apoptosis by regulating Akt/FOXO1 pathway.

  11. Forkhead Box O1 (FOXO1) Protein, but Not p53, Contributes to Robust Induction of p21 Expression in Fasted Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Tinkum, Kelsey L.; White, Lynn S.; Marpegan, Luciano; Herzog, Erik; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Reporter mice that enable the activity of the endogenous p21 promoter to be dynamically monitored in real time in vivo and under a variety of experimental conditions revealed ubiquitous p21 expression in mouse organs including the brain. Low light bioluminescence microscopy was employed to localize p21 expression to specific regions of the brain. Interestingly, p21 expression was observed in the paraventricular, arcuate, and dorsomedial nuclei of the hypothalamus, regions that detect nutrient levels in the blood stream and signal metabolic actions throughout the body. These results suggested a link between p21 expression and metabolic regulation. We found that short-term food deprivation (fasting) potently induced p21 expression in tissues involved in metabolic regulation including liver, pancreas and hypothalamic nuclei. Conditional reporter mice were generated that enabled hepatocyte-specific expression of p21 to be monitored in vivo. Bioluminescence imaging demonstrated that fasting induced a 7-fold increase in p21 expression in livers of reporter mice and Western blotting demonstrated an increase in protein levels as well. The ability of fasting to induce p21 expression was found to be independent of p53 but dependent on FOXO1. Finally, occupancy of the endogenous p21 promoter by FOXO1 was observed in the livers of fasted but not fed mice. Thus, fasting promotes loading of FOXO1 onto the p21 promoter to induce p21 expression in hepatocytes. PMID:23918930

  12. Forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) protein, but not p53, contributes to robust induction of p21 expression in fasted mice.

    PubMed

    Tinkum, Kelsey L; White, Lynn S; Marpegan, Luciano; Herzog, Erik; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2013-09-27

    Reporter mice that enable the activity of the endogenous p21 promoter to be dynamically monitored in real time in vivo and under a variety of experimental conditions revealed ubiquitous p21 expression in mouse organs including the brain. Low light bioluminescence microscopy was employed to localize p21 expression to specific regions of the brain. Interestingly, p21 expression was observed in the paraventricular, arcuate, and dorsomedial nuclei of the hypothalamus, regions that detect nutrient levels in the blood stream and signal metabolic actions throughout the body. These results suggested a link between p21 expression and metabolic regulation. We found that short-term food deprivation (fasting) potently induced p21 expression in tissues involved in metabolic regulation including liver, pancreas and hypothalamic nuclei. Conditional reporter mice were generated that enabled hepatocyte-specific expression of p21 to be monitored in vivo. Bioluminescence imaging demonstrated that fasting induced a 7-fold increase in p21 expression in livers of reporter mice and Western blotting demonstrated an increase in protein levels as well. The ability of fasting to induce p21 expression was found to be independent of p53 but dependent on FOXO1. Finally, occupancy of the endogenous p21 promoter by FOXO1 was observed in the livers of fasted but not fed mice. Thus, fasting promotes loading of FOXO1 onto the p21 promoter to induce p21 expression in hepatocytes. PMID:23918930

  13. FoxO1-mediated autophagy is required for NK cell development and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Xia, Pengyan; Huang, Guanling; Zhu, Pingping; Liu, Jing; Ye, Buqing; Du, Ying; Fan, Zusen

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells exert a crucial role in early immune responses as a major innate effector component. However, the underlying mechanisms of NK cell development remain largely elusive. Here we show that robust autophagy appears in the stage of immature NK cells (iNKs), which is required for NK cell development. Autophagy defects result in damaged mitochondria and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that leads to apoptosis of NK cells. Autophagy protects NK cell viability during development through removal of damaged mitochondria and intracellular ROS. Phosphorylated Forkhead box O (FoxO)1 is located to the cytoplasm of iNKs and interacts with Atg7, leading to induction of autophagy. FoxO1 deficiency or an inactive FoxO1(AAA) mutant abrogates autophagy initiation in iNKs and impairs NK cell development and viral clearance. Therefore we conclude that FoxO1-mediated autophagy is required for NK cell development and NK cell-induced innate immunity. PMID:27010363

  14. FoxO1-mediated autophagy is required for NK cell development and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Xia, Pengyan; Huang, Guanling; Zhu, Pingping; Liu, Jing; Ye, Buqing; Du, Ying; Fan, Zusen

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells exert a crucial role in early immune responses as a major innate effector component. However, the underlying mechanisms of NK cell development remain largely elusive. Here we show that robust autophagy appears in the stage of immature NK cells (iNKs), which is required for NK cell development. Autophagy defects result in damaged mitochondria and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that leads to apoptosis of NK cells. Autophagy protects NK cell viability during development through removal of damaged mitochondria and intracellular ROS. Phosphorylated Forkhead box O (FoxO)1 is located to the cytoplasm of iNKs and interacts with Atg7, leading to induction of autophagy. FoxO1 deficiency or an inactive FoxO1AAA mutant abrogates autophagy initiation in iNKs and impairs NK cell development and viral clearance. Therefore we conclude that FoxO1-mediated autophagy is required for NK cell development and NK cell-induced innate immunity. PMID:27010363

  15. FoxO1 regulates apoptosis induced by asbestos in the MT-2 human T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Maeda, Megumi; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Otsuki, Takemi

    2016-09-01

    Asbestos is known to cause malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer. Recent studies implicate tumor immunity in the development of various tumors, including malignant mesothelioma. In order to establish an in vitro T-cell model to clarify the effects of long-term exposure of asbestos on tumor immunity, in this study, human T-cell line MT-2 cells were cultured with asbestos for longer than 8 months and the resultant cells (MT-2Rst) were assessed for the expression of forkhead transcription factor FoxO1. Gene expression analysis revealed that the amount of FoxO1 mRNA decreased after long-term exposure of the MT-2 cells to asbestos. In accordance with this reduction in FoxO1, pro-apoptotic Foxo1 target genes Puma, Fas ligand and Bim were also seen to be down-regulated in MT-2Rst cells. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated knock-down of FoxO1 reduced the number of apoptotic parental MT-2 cells after treatment with asbestos. On the other hand, over-expression of FoxO1 did not affect asbestos-induced apoptosis in MT-2Rst cells. These results suggested that FoxO1 played an important role in regulating asbestos-induced apoptosis and confirmed the presence of multiple pathways regulating resistance to asbestos in MT-2Rst cells. PMID:27042963

  16. Legacy Effect of Foxo1 in Pancreatic Endocrine Progenitors on Adult β-Cell Mass and Function.

    PubMed

    Talchai, Shivatra Chutima; Accili, Domenico

    2015-08-01

    β-Cell dysfunction in diabetes results from abnormalities of insulin production, secretion, and cell number. These abnormalities may partly arise from altered developmental programming of β-cells. Foxo1 is important to maintain adult β-cells, but little is known about its role in pancreatic progenitor cells as determinants of future β-cell function. We addressed this question by generating an allelic series of somatic Foxo1 knockouts at different stages of pancreatic development in mice. Surprisingly, ablation of Foxo1 in pancreatic progenitors resulted in delayed appearance of Neurogenin3(+) progenitors and their persistence into adulthood as a self-replicating pool, causing a fourfold increase of β-cell mass. Similarly, Foxo1 ablation in endocrine progenitors increased their numbers, extended their survival, and expanded β-cell mass. In contrast, ablation of Foxo1 in terminally differentiated β-cells did not increase β-cell mass nor did it affect Neurogenin3 expression. Despite the increased β-cell mass, islets from mice lacking Foxo1 in pancreatic or endocrine progenitors responded poorly to glucose, resulting in glucose intolerance. We conclude that Foxo1 integrates cues that determine developmental timing, pool size, and functional features of endocrine progenitor cells, resulting in a legacy effect on adult β-cell mass and function. Our results illustrate how developmental programming predisposes to β-cell dysfunction in adults and raise questions on the desirability of increasing β-cell mass for therapeutic purposes in type 2 diabetes. PMID:25784544

  17. Involvement of the Up-regulated FoxO1 Expression in Follicular Granulosa Cell Apoptosis Induced by Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ming; Lin, Fei; Zhang, Jiaqing; Tang, Yiting; Chen, Wei-Kang; Liu, Honglin

    2012-01-01

    Follicular atresia is common in female mammalian ovaries, where most follicles undergo degeneration at any stage of growth and development. Oxidative stress gives rise to triggering granulosa cell apoptosis, which has been suggested as a major cause of follicular atresia. However, the underlying mechanism by which the oxidative stress induces follicular atresia remains unclear. FoxO transcription factors are known as critical mediators in the regulation of oxidative stress and apoptosis. In this study, the involvement of FoxO1 in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis of mouse follicular granulosa cells (MGCs) was investigated in vivo and in vitro. It was observed that increased apoptotic signals correlated with elevated expression of FoxO1 in MGCs when mice were treated with the oxidant. Correspondingly, the expressions of FoxO1 target genes, such as proapoptotic genes and antioxidative genes, were also up-regulated. In primary cultured MGCs, treatment with H2O2 led to FoxO1 nuclear translocation. Further studies with overexpression and knockdown of FoxO1 demonstrated the critical role of FoxO1 in the induction of MGC apoptosis by oxidative stress. Finally, inactivation of FoxO1 by insulin treatment confirmed that FoxO1 induced by oxidative stress played a pivotal role in up-regulating the expression of downstream apoptosis-related genes in MGCs. Our results suggest that up-regulation of FoxO1 by oxidative stress leads to apoptosis of granulosa cells, which eventually results in follicular atresia in mice. PMID:22669940

  18. SIRT1 Deficiency Downregulates PTEN/JNK/FOXO1 Pathway to Block Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Apoptosis in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Hee-Don

    2011-01-01

    Silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1) plays a critical role in reactive oxygen species-triggered apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells. Here, we investigated a possible role for the PTEN/Akt/JNK pathway in the SIRT1-mediated apoptosis pathway in mES cells. Akt was activated by removal of anti-oxidant 2-mercaptoethanol in SIRT1−/− mES cells. Since PTEN is a negative regulator of Akt and its activity can be modulated by acetylation, we investigated if SIRT1 deacetylated PTEN to downregulate Akt to trigger apoptosis in anti-oxidant-free culture conditions. PTEN was hyperacetylated and excluded from the nucleus in SIRT1−/− mES cells, consistent with enhanced Akt activity. SIRT1 deficiency enhanced the acetylation/phosphorylation level of FOXO1 and subsequently inhibited the nuclear localization of FOXO1. Cellular acetylation levels were enhanced by DNA-damaging agent, not by removal of anti-oxidant. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) was activated by removal of anti-oxidant in SIRT1-dependent manner. Although p53 acetylation was stronger in SIRT1−/− mES cells, DNA-damaging stress activated phosphorylation and enhanced cellular levels of p53 irrespective of SIRT1, whereas removal of anti-oxidant slightly activated p53 only with SIRT1. Expression levels of Bim and Puma were increased in anti-oxidant-free culture conditions in an SIRT1-dependent manner and treatment with JNK inhibitor blocked induction of Bim expression. DNA-damaging agent activated caspase3 regardless of SIRT1. Our data support an important role for SIRT1 in preparing the PTEN/JNK/FOXO1 pathway to respond to cellular reactive oxygen species. PMID:21083429

  19. Evodia alkaloids suppress gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis by activating the constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lushan; Wang, Zhangting; Huang, Minmin; Li, Yingying; Zeng, Kui; Lei, Jinxiu; Hu, Haihong; Chen, Baian; Lu, Jing; Xie, Wen; Zeng, Su

    2016-09-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a key sensor in xenobiotic detoxification and endobiotic metabolism. Increasing evidence suggests that CAR also plays a role in energy metabolism by suppressing the hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of two evodia alkaloids, rutaecarpine (Rut) and evodiamine (Evo), on gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis through their activation of the human CAR (hCAR). We found that both Rut and Evo exhibited anti-lipogenic and anti-gluconeogenic effects in the hyperlipidemic HepG2 cells. Both compounds can potently activate hCAR, and treatment of cells with hCAR antagonists reversed the anti-lipogenic and anti-gluconeogenic effects of Rut and Evo. The anti-gluconeogenic effect of Rut and Evo was due to the CAR-mediated inhibition of the recruitment of forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) onto the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) gene promoters. In vivo, we showed that treatment of mice with Rut improved glucose tolerance in a CAR-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the evodia alkaloids Rut and Evo may have a therapeutic potential for the treatment of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:26455953

  20. Structural Basis for DNA Recognition by FoxO1 and Its Regulation by Posttranslational Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Brent,M.; Anand, R.; Marmorstein, R.

    2008-01-01

    FoxO transcription factors regulate the transcription of genes that control metabolism, cellular proliferation, stress tolerance, and possibly life span. A number of posttranslational modifications within the forkhead DNA-binding domain regulate FoxO-mediated transcription. We describe the crystal structures of FoxO1 bound to three different DNA elements and measure the change in FoxO1-DNA affinity with acetylation and phosphorylation. The structures reveal additional contacts and increased DNA distortion for the highest affinity DNA site. The flexible wing 2 region of the forkhead domain was not observed in the structures but is necessary for DNA binding, and we show that p300 acetylation in wing 2 reduces DNA affinity. We also show that MST1 phosphorylation of FoxO1 prevents high-affinity DNA binding. The observation that FoxO-DNA affinity varies between response elements and with posttranslational modifications suggests that modulation of FoxO-DNA affinity is an important component of FoxO regulation in health and misregulation in disease.

  1. miR-3188 regulates nasopharyngeal carcinoma proliferation and chemosensitivity through a FOXO1-modulated positive feedback loop with mTOR-p-PI3K/AKT-c-JUN.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengyang; Luo, Rongcheng; Liu, Yiyi; Gao, Linyuan; Fu, Zhaojian; Fu, Qiaofen; Luo, Xiaojun; Chen, Yiyu; Deng, Xiaojie; Liang, Zixi; Li, Xin; Cheng, Chao; Liu, Zhen; Fang, Weiyi

    2016-01-01

    The biological role of miR-3188 has not yet been reported in the context of cancer. In this study, we observe that miR-3188 not only reduces cell-cycle transition and proliferation, but also significantly prolongs the survival time of tumour-bearing mice as well as sensitizes cells to 5-FU. Mechanistic analyses indicate that miR-3188 directly targets mTOR to inactivate p-PI3K/p-AKT/c-JUN and induces its own expression. This feedback loop further suppresses cell-cycle signalling through the p-PI3K/p-AKT/p-mTOR pathway. Interestingly, we also observe that miR-3188 direct targeting of mTOR is mediated by FOXO1 suppression of p-PI3K/p-AKT/c-JUN signalling. In clinical samples, reduced miR-3188 is an unfavourable factor and negatively correlates with mTOR and c-JUN levels but positively correlates with FOXO1 expression. Our studies demonstrate that as a tumour suppressor, miR-3188 directly targets mTOR to stimulate its own expression and participates in FOXO1-mediated repression of cell growth, tumorigenesis and NPC chemotherapy resistance. PMID:27095304

  2. miR-3188 regulates nasopharyngeal carcinoma proliferation and chemosensitivity through a FOXO1-modulated positive feedback loop with mTOR–p-PI3K/AKT-c-JUN

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mengyang; Luo, Rongcheng; Liu, Yiyi; Gao, Linyuan; Fu, Zhaojian; Fu, Qiaofen; Luo, Xiaojun; Chen, Yiyu; Deng, Xiaojie; Liang, Zixi; Li, Xin; Cheng, Chao; Liu, Zhen; Fang, Weiyi

    2016-01-01

    The biological role of miR-3188 has not yet been reported in the context of cancer. In this study, we observe that miR-3188 not only reduces cell-cycle transition and proliferation, but also significantly prolongs the survival time of tumour-bearing mice as well as sensitizes cells to 5-FU. Mechanistic analyses indicate that miR-3188 directly targets mTOR to inactivate p-PI3K/p-AKT/c-JUN and induces its own expression. This feedback loop further suppresses cell-cycle signalling through the p-PI3K/p-AKT/p-mTOR pathway. Interestingly, we also observe that miR-3188 direct targeting of mTOR is mediated by FOXO1 suppression of p-PI3K/p-AKT/c-JUN signalling. In clinical samples, reduced miR-3188 is an unfavourable factor and negatively correlates with mTOR and c-JUN levels but positively correlates with FOXO1 expression. Our studies demonstrate that as a tumour suppressor, miR-3188 directly targets mTOR to stimulate its own expression and participates in FOXO1-mediated repression of cell growth, tumorigenesis and NPC chemotherapy resistance. PMID:27095304

  3. FOXO1 and GSK-3β Are Main Targets of Insulin-Mediated Myogenesis in C2C12 Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Litwiniuk, Anna; Pijet, Barbara; Pijet-Kucicka, Maja; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Pająk, Beata; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Myogenesis and muscle hypertrophy account for muscle growth and adaptation to work overload, respectively. In adults, insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 stimulate muscle growth, although their links with cellular energy homeostasis are not fully explained. Insulin plays critical role in the control of mitochondrial activity in skeletal muscle cells, and mitochondria are essential for insulin action. The aim of this study was to elucidate molecular mechanism(s) involved in mitochondrial control of insulin-dependent myogenesis. The effects of several metabolic inhibitors (LY294002, PD98059, SB216763, LiCl, rotenone, oligomycin) on the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts in culture were examined in the short-term (hours) and long-term (days) experiments. Muscle cell viability and mitogenicity were monitored and confronted with the activities of selected genes and proteins expression. These indices focus on the roles of insulin, glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) on myogenesis using a combination of treatments and inhibitors. Long-term insulin (10 nM) treatment in “normoglycemic” conditions led to increased myogenin expression and accelerated myogenesis in C2C12 cells. Insulin-dependent myogenesis was accompanied by the rise of mtTFA, MtSSB, Mfn2, and mitochondrially encoded Cox-1 gene expressions and elevated levels of proteins which control functions of mitochondria (kinase—PKB/AKT, mitofusin 2 protein—Mfn-2). Insulin, via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/AKT-dependent pathway reduced transcription factor FOXO1 activity and altered GSK-3β phosphorylation status. Once FOXO1 and GSK-3β activities were inhibited the rise in Cox-1 gene action and nuclear encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX IV) expressions were observed, even though some mRNA and protein results varied. In contrast to SB216763, LiCl markedly elevated Mfn2 and COX IV protein expression levels when given together with insulin. Thus

  4. FOXO1 and GSK-3β Are Main Targets of Insulin-Mediated Myogenesis in C2C12 Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Litwiniuk, Anna; Pijet, Barbara; Pijet-Kucicka, Maja; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Pająk, Beata; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Myogenesis and muscle hypertrophy account for muscle growth and adaptation to work overload, respectively. In adults, insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 stimulate muscle growth, although their links with cellular energy homeostasis are not fully explained. Insulin plays critical role in the control of mitochondrial activity in skeletal muscle cells, and mitochondria are essential for insulin action. The aim of this study was to elucidate molecular mechanism(s) involved in mitochondrial control of insulin-dependent myogenesis. The effects of several metabolic inhibitors (LY294002, PD98059, SB216763, LiCl, rotenone, oligomycin) on the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts in culture were examined in the short-term (hours) and long-term (days) experiments. Muscle cell viability and mitogenicity were monitored and confronted with the activities of selected genes and proteins expression. These indices focus on the roles of insulin, glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) on myogenesis using a combination of treatments and inhibitors. Long-term insulin (10 nM) treatment in "normoglycemic" conditions led to increased myogenin expression and accelerated myogenesis in C2C12 cells. Insulin-dependent myogenesis was accompanied by the rise of mtTFA, MtSSB, Mfn2, and mitochondrially encoded Cox-1 gene expressions and elevated levels of proteins which control functions of mitochondria (kinase--PKB/AKT, mitofusin 2 protein--Mfn-2). Insulin, via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/AKT-dependent pathway reduced transcription factor FOXO1 activity and altered GSK-3β phosphorylation status. Once FOXO1 and GSK-3β activities were inhibited the rise in Cox-1 gene action and nuclear encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX IV) expressions were observed, even though some mRNA and protein results varied. In contrast to SB216763, LiCl markedly elevated Mfn2 and COX IV protein expression levels when given together with insulin. Thus

  5. Inhibition of Notch signaling ameliorates insulin resistance in a FoxO1–dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Pajvani, Utpal B.; Shawber, Carrie J.; Samuel, Varman T.; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Kitajewski, Jan; Accili, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Summary Transcription factor FoxO1 promotes hepatic glucose production. Genetic inhibition of FoxO1 function prevents diabetes in experimental animal models, providing impetus to identify pharmacological approaches to modulate its function. Altered Notch signaling is seen in tumorigenesis, and Notch antagonists are in clinical testing for cancer application. Here, we report that FoxO1 and Notch coordinately regulate hepatic glucose metabolism. Combined haploinsufficiency of FoxO1 and Notch1 markedly improves insulin sensitivity in diet-induced insulin resistance, as does liver-specific knockout of the Notch transcriptional effector, Rbp-Jk. Conversely, Notch1 gain-of-function promotes insulin resistance in a FoxO1-dependent manner and induces Glucose-6-phosphatase expression. Pharmacological blockade of Notch signaling with γ-secretase inhibitors improves insulin sensitivity following in vivo administration in lean and in obese, insulin-resistant mice. The data identify a heretofore unknown metabolic function of Notch, and suggest that Notch inhibition is beneficial to diabetes treatment, in part by helping to offset excessive FoxO1–driven hepatic glucose production. PMID:21804540

  6. Interaction Between the FOXO1A-209 Genotype and Tea Drinking Is Significantly Associated with Reduced Mortality at Advanced Ages.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi; Chen, Huashuai; Ni, Ting; Ruan, Rongping; Nie, Chao; Liu, Xiaomin; Feng, Lei; Zhang, Fengyu; Lu, Jiehua; Li, Jianxin; Li, Yang; Tao, Wei; Gregory, Simon G; Gottschalk, William; Lutz, Michael W; Land, Kenneth C; Yashin, Anatoli; Tan, Qihua; Yang, Ze; Bolund, Lars; Ming, Qi; Yang, Huanming; Min, Junxia; Willcox, D Craig; Willcox, Bradley J; Gu, Jun; Hauser, Elizabeth; Tian, Xiao-Li; Vaupel, James W

    2016-06-01

    On the basis of the genotypic/phenotypic data from Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) and Cox proportional hazard model, the present study demonstrates that interactions between carrying FOXO1A-209 genotypes and tea drinking are significantly associated with lower risk of mortality at advanced ages. Such a significant association is replicated in two independent Han Chinese CLHLS cohorts (p = 0.028-0.048 in the discovery and replication cohorts, and p = 0.003-0.016 in the combined dataset). We found the associations between tea drinking and reduced mortality are much stronger among carriers of the FOXO1A-209 genotype compared to non-carriers, and drinking tea is associated with a reversal of the negative effects of carrying FOXO1A-209 minor alleles, that is, from a substantially increased mortality risk to substantially reduced mortality risk at advanced ages. The impacts are considerably stronger among those who carry two copies of the FOXO1A minor allele than those who carry one copy. On the basis of previously reported experiments on human cell models concerning FOXO1A-by-tea-compounds interactions, we speculate that results in the present study indicate that tea drinking may inhibit FOXO1A-209 gene expression and its biological functions, which reduces the negative impacts of FOXO1A-209 gene on longevity (as reported in the literature) and offers protection against mortality risk at oldest-old ages. Our empirical findings imply that the health outcomes of particular nutritional interventions, including tea drinking, may, in part, depend upon individual genetic profiles, and the research on the effects of nutrigenomics interactions could potentially be useful for rejuvenation therapies in the clinic or associated healthy aging intervention programs. PMID:26414954

  7. Gfi1b negatively regulates Rag expression directly and via the repression of FoxO1

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Danae; Vassen, Lothar; Chow, Kwan T.; McWhirter, Sarah M.; Amin, Rupesh H.; Möröy, Tarik

    2012-01-01

    Precise regulation of Rag (recombination-activating gene) expression is crucial to prevent genomic instability caused by the generation of Rag-mediated DNA breaks. Although mechanisms of Rag activation have been well characterized, the mechanism by which Rag expression is down-regulated in early B cell development has not been fully elucidated. Using a complementary DNA library screen, we identified the transcriptional repressor Gfi1b as negative regulator of the Rag locus. Expression of Gfi1b causes repression of Rag1 and Rag2 in cell lines and primary mouse cells. Conversely, Gfi1b-deficient cell lines exhibit increased Rag expression, double-strand breaks and recombination, and cell cycle defects. In primary cells, transcription of Gfi1b inversely correlates with Rag transcription, and simultaneous inactivation of Gfi1 and Gfi1b leads to an increase in Rag transcription early in B cell development. In addition, deletion of Gfi1 and Gfi1b in vivo results in a severe block in B cell development. Gfi1b orchestrates Rag repression via a dual mechanism. Direct binding of Gfi1b to a site 5′ of the B cell–specific Erag enhancer results in epigenetic changes in the Rag locus, whereas indirect inhibition is achieved through repression of the trans-activator Foxo1. Together, our experiments show that Gfi family members are essential for normal B cell development and play an important role in modulating expression of the V(D)J recombinase. PMID:22201127

  8. Down-regulation of microRNA-135b inhibited growth of cervical cancer cells by targeting FOXO1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yue; Zhao, Shuhua; Cui, Manhua; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    More and more evidence has confirmed that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) can conduce to the progression of human cancers. Previous studied have shown that dysregulation of miR-135b is in varieties of tumors. However, the roles of miR-135b in cervical cancer remain unknown. Therefore, our aim of this study was to explore the biological function and molecular mechanism of miR-135b in cervical cancer cell lines, discussing whether it could be a therapeutic biomarker of cervical cancer in the future. The MTT assay and ELISA-Brdu assay were used to assess cell proliferation. Cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analyses were used to detect expressions of cyclin D1, p21, p27 and FOXO1. In our study, we found that miR-135b is up-regulated in cervical cancer cell lines. Down-regulation of miR-135b evidently inhibited proliferation and arrested cell cycle in cervical cancer cells. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that the FOXO1 was a potential target gene of miR-135b. Besides, miR-135b inhibition significantly increased expressions of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21/CIP1 and p27/KIP1, and decreased expression of cyclin D1. However, the high level of miR-135b was associated with increased expression of FOXO1 in cervical cancer cells. Further study by luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-135b could directly target FOXO1. Down-regulation of FOXO1 in cervical cancer cells transfected with miR-135b inhibitor partially reversed its inhibitory effects. In conclusion, down-regulation of miR-135b inhibited cell growth in cervical cancer cells by up-regulation of FOXO1. PMID:26617737

  9. Suppressing Irrelevant Information: Knowledge Activation or Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Danielle S.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not…

  10. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  11. Concurrent acetylation of FoxO1/3a and p53 due to sirtuins inhibition elicit Bim/PUMA mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in berberine-treated HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shatrunajay; Sharma, Ankita; Pandey, Vivek Kumar; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Kakkar, Poonam

    2016-01-15

    Post-translational modifications i.e. phosphorylation and acetylation are pivotal requirements for proper functioning of eukaryotic proteins. The current study aimed to decode the impact of acetylation/deacetylation of non-histone targets i.e. FoxO1/3a and p53 of sirtuins (NAD(+) dependent enzymes with lysine deacetylase activity) in berberine treated human hepatoma cells. Berberine (100 μM) inhibited sirtuins significantly (P<0.05) at transcriptional level as well as at translational level. Combination of nicotinamide (sirtuin inhibitor) with berberine potentiated sirtuins inhibition and increased the expression of FoxO1/3a and phosphorylation of p53 tumor suppressor protein. As sirtuins deacetylate non-histone targets including FoxO1/3a and p53, berberine increased the acetylation load of FoxO1/3a and p53 proteins. Acetylated FoxO and p53 proteins transcriptionally activate BH3-only proteins Bim and PUMA (3.89 and 3.87 fold respectively, P<0.001), which are known as direct activator of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein Bax that culminated into mitochondria mediated activation of apoptotic cascade. Bim/PUMA knock-down showed no changes in sirtuins' expression while cytotoxicity induced by berberine and nicotinamide was curtailed up to 28.3% (P<0.001) and it restored pro/anti apoptotic protein ratio in HepG2 cells. Sirtuins inhibition was accompanied by decline in NAD(+)/NADH ratio, ATP generation, enhanced ROS production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. TEM analysis confirmed mitochondrial deterioration and cell damage. SRT-1720 (1-10 μM), a SIRT-1 activator, when pre-treated with berberine (25 μM), reversed sirtuins expression comparable to control and significantly restored the cell viability (P<0.05). Thus, our findings suggest that berberine mediated sirtuins inhibition resulting into FoxO1/3a and p53 acetylation followed by BH3-only protein Bim/PUMA activation may in part be responsible for mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26712469

  12. A role for FOXO1 in BCR-ABL1-independent tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wagle, M; Eiring, A M; Wongchenko, M; Lu, S; Guan, Y; Wang, Y; Lackner, M; Amler, L; Hampton, G; Deininger, M W; O'Hare, T; Yan, Y

    2016-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients who relapse on imatinib due to acquired ABL1 kinase domain mutations are successfully treated with second-generation ABL1-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (ABL-TKIs) such as dasatinib, nilotinib or ponatinib. However, ~40% of relapsed patients have uncharacterized BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent mechanisms of resistance. To identify these mechanisms of resistance and potential treatment options, we generated ABL-TKI-resistant K562 cells through prolonged sequential exposure to imatinib and dasatinib. Dual-resistant K562 cells lacked BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations, but acquired other genomic aberrations that were characterized by next-generation sequencing and copy number analyses. Proteomics showed that dual-resistant cells had elevated levels of FOXO1, phospho-ERK and BCL-2, and that dasatinib no longer inhibited substrates of the PI3K/AKT pathway. In contrast to parental cells, resistant cells were sensitive to growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by the class I PI3K inhibitor, GDC-0941 (pictilisib), which also induced FOXO1 nuclear translocation. FOXO1 was elevated in a subset of primary specimens from relapsed CML patients lacking BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations, and these samples were responsive to GDC-0941 treatment ex vivo. We conclude that elevated FOXO1 contributes to BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent resistance experienced by these CML patients and that PI3K inhibition coupled with BCR-ABL1 inhibition may represent a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:27044711

  13. A role for FOXO1 in BCR–ABL1-independent tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wagle, M; Eiring, A M; Wongchenko, M; Lu, S; Guan, Y; Wang, Y; Lackner, M; Amler, L; Hampton, G; Deininger, M W; O'Hare, T; Yan, Y

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients who relapse on imatinib due to acquired ABL1 kinase domain mutations are successfully treated with second-generation ABL1-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (ABL-TKIs) such as dasatinib, nilotinib or ponatinib. However, ~40% of relapsed patients have uncharacterized BCR–ABL1 kinase-independent mechanisms of resistance. To identify these mechanisms of resistance and potential treatment options, we generated ABL-TKI-resistant K562 cells through prolonged sequential exposure to imatinib and dasatinib. Dual-resistant K562 cells lacked BCR–ABL1 kinase domain mutations, but acquired other genomic aberrations that were characterized by next-generation sequencing and copy number analyses. Proteomics showed that dual-resistant cells had elevated levels of FOXO1, phospho-ERK and BCL-2, and that dasatinib no longer inhibited substrates of the PI3K/AKT pathway. In contrast to parental cells, resistant cells were sensitive to growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by the class I PI3K inhibitor, GDC-0941 (pictilisib), which also induced FOXO1 nuclear translocation. FOXO1 was elevated in a subset of primary specimens from relapsed CML patients lacking BCR–ABL1 kinase domain mutations, and these samples were responsive to GDC-0941 treatment ex vivo. We conclude that elevated FOXO1 contributes to BCR–ABL1 kinase-independent resistance experienced by these CML patients and that PI3K inhibition coupled with BCR–ABL1 inhibition may represent a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:27044711

  14. PP2A inhibition results in hepatic insulin resistance despite Akt2 activation.

    PubMed

    Galbo, Thomas; Perry, Rachel J; Nishimura, Erica; Samuel, Varman T; Quistorff, Bjørn; Shulman, Gerald I

    2013-10-01

    In the liver, insulin suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis by activating Akt, which inactivates the key gluconeogenic transcription factor FoxO1 (Forkhead Box O1). Recent studies have implicated hyperactivity of the Akt phosphatase Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and impaired Akt signaling as a molecular defect underlying insulin resistance. We therefore hypothesized that PP2A inhibition would enhance insulin-stimulated Akt activity and decrease glucose production. PP2A inhibitors increased hepatic Akt phosphorylation and inhibited FoxO1in vitro and in vivo, and suppressed gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes. Paradoxically, PP2A inhibition exacerbated insulin resistance in vivo. This was explained by phosphorylation of both hepatic glycogen synthase (GS) (inactivation) and phosphorylase (activation) resulting in impairment of glycogen storage. Our findings underline the significance of GS and Phosphorylase as hepatic PP2A substrates and importance of glycogen metabolism in acute plasma glucose regulation. PMID:24150286

  15. The miR-491-3p/mTORC2/FOXO1 regulatory loop modulates chemo-sensitivity in human tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Cong; Deng, Yingen; Yin, Jiang; Zhang, Zhijie; Li, Nan; Deng, Min; Liu, Xiaorong; Liu, Hao; Lu, Minying; Wang, Chengkun; Gu, Yixue; He, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    We found that levels of miR-491-3p were decreased in multidrug-resistant tongue cancer (TC) cells. Induction of miR-491-3p expression sensitized TC cells to chemotherapy. In agreement, functional inhibition of miR-491-3p enhanced resistance of TC cells to chemotherapy. We found that miR-491-3p directly targeted mTORC2 component Rictor and inhibited mTORC2 activity, which was increased in resistant TC cells with high p-Akt(Ser473), p-SGK1(Ser422) and p-FOXO1(Thr24) levels. Inhibition of mTORC2 activity via either Rictor knockdown or mTOR inhibitor in turn sensitized TC cells to chemotherapy. In agreement, overexpression of Rictor increased the mTORC2 activity and induced resistance of TC cells to chemotherapy. As a feedback loop, mTORC2 downregulated miR-491-3p expression by inactivating FOXO1, which otherwise would transcriptionally induce miR-491-3p expression. Levels of miR-491–3 and Rictor or mTORC2 activity negatively correlated in TC tissues. Finally, low levels of miR-491-3p and highly expressed Rictor were associated with poor prognosis in tongue cancer patients. These data provide a rationale for targeted intervention on miR-491-3p/mTORC2 axis to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy against tongue cancer. PMID:25749387

  16. The role of FOXO1 in the decidual transformation of the endometrium and early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Takeshi; Brosens, Jan J; Ishihara, Osamu

    2013-06-01

    Successful pregnancy requires coordination of embryo development, decidualization of endometrium, and placenta formation. Decidualization denotes the transformation of endometrial stromal cells into specialized secretory cells, a process further characterized with influx of specialized immune cells into stroma, predominantly uterine natural killer cells and macrophages, and vascular remodeling. This differentiation process depends on the convergence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate and progesterone signaling pathways. The decidual process is indispensable for the formation of a functional feto-maternal interface as it controls tissue homeostasis during endovascular trophoblast invasion and bestows tissue resistance to environmental stress signals, including protection against oxidative cell death. FOXO proteins have emerged as key mediators of cell fate because of their ability to regulate either pro-apoptotic genes or genes involved in differentiation, cell cycle arrest, oxidative defenses, and DNA repair. In the endometrium, FOXO1 is of particular importance as a critical regulator of progesterone-dependent differentiation, menstrual shedding, and protection of the feto-maternal against oxidative damage during pregnancy. PMID:23381604

  17. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  18. BMI-related progression of atypical PKC-dependent aberrations in insulin signaling through IRS-1, Akt, FoxO1 and PGC-1α in livers of obese and type 2 diabetic humans.

    PubMed

    Sajan, Mini P; Ivey, Robert A; Farese, Robert V

    2015-11-01

    Information on insulin resistance in human liver is limited. In mouse diet-induced obesity (DIO), hepatic insulin resistance initially involves: lipid+insulin-induced activation of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC); elevated Akt activity/activation but selective impairment of compartmentalized Akt-dependent FoxO1 phosphorylation; and increases in gluconeogenic and lipogenic enzymes. In advanced stages, e.g., in hepatocytes of type 2 diabetes (T2D) humans, insulin activation of insulin receptor substrate-1(IRS-1) and Akt fails, further increasing FoxO1-dependent gluconeogenic/lipogenic enzyme expression. Increases in hepatic PGC-1α also figure prominently, but uncertainly, in this scheme. Here, we examined signaling factors in liver samples harvested from human transplant donors with increasing BMI, 20→25→30→35→40→45. We found, relative to lean (BMI=20-25) humans, obese (BMI>30) humans had all abnormalities seen in early mouse DIO, but, surprisingly, at all elevated BMI levels, had decreased insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1) levels, decreased Akt activity, and increased expression/abundance of aPKC-ι and PGC-1α. Moreover, with increasing BMI, there were: progressive increases in aPKC activity and PKC-ι expression/abundance; progressive decreases in IRS-1 levels, Akt activity and FoxO1 phosphorylation; progressive increases in expression/abundance of PGC-1α; and progressive increases in gluconeogenic and lipogenic enzymes. Remarkably, all abnormalities reached T2D levels at higher BMI levels. Most importantly, both "early" and advanced abnormalities were largely reversed by 24-hour treatment of T2D hepatocytes with aPKC inhibitor. We conclude: hepatic insulin resistance in human obesity is: advanced; BMI-correlated; and sequentially involves increased aPKC-activating ceramide; increased aPKC levels and activity; decreases in IRS-1 levels, Akt activity, and FoxO1 phosphorylation; and increases in expression/abundance of PGC-1α and gluconeogenic and lipogenic

  19. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  20. Depletion of Aurora A leads to upregulation of FoxO1 to induce cell cycle arrest in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Young; Lee, Gong Rak; Woo, Dong-Hyuk; Park, Neung Hwa; Cha, Hee Jeong; Moon, Yong-Hwan; Han, In-Seob

    2013-01-01

    Aurora A kinase has drawn considerable attention as a therapeutic target for cancer therapy. However, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of the anticancer effects of Aurora A kinase inhibition are still not fully understood. Herein, we show that depletion of Aurora A kinase by RNA interference (RNAi) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells upregulated FoxO1 in a p53-dependent manner, which induces cell cycle arrest. Introduction of an RNAi-resistant Aurora A kinase into Aurora A-knockdown cells resulted in downregulation of FoxO1 expression and rescued proliferation. In addition, silencing of FoxO1 in Aurora A-knockdown cells allowed the cells to exit cytostatic arrest, which, in turn, led to massive cell death. Our results suggest that FoxO1 is responsible for growth arrest at the G2/M phase that is induced by Aurora A kinase inhibition. PMID:23255113

  1. Effects of overexpressing FoxO1 on apoptosis in glomeruli of diabetic mice and in podocytes cultured in high glucose medium.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Wang, Qingzhu; Du, Mengmeng; Ma, Xiaojun; Wu, Lina; Guo, Feng; Zhao, Shuiying; Huang, Fengjuan; Wang, Huanhuan; Qin, Guijun

    2016-09-16

    Podocyte apoptosis induced by high levels of glucose is a key event in the development and prognosis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Forkhead transcription factor O1 (FoxO1) has been defined as a critical mediator of oxidative stress in animal models of diabetes and is involved in mitophagy. To test the role of FoxO1 in regulating podocyte apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro, we generated FoxO1 overexpression models. High-glucose (HG) induced podocyte apoptosis with decreased mitophagy. These changes were accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction and more severe podocyte loss in mouse kidney. FoxO1 overexpression prevented the apoptosis induced by HG. Reduction of cell apoptosis and renal damage depended upon the expression of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1). These findings suggest that specific overexpression of renal FoxO1 decreases podocyte apoptosis, which may be explained in part by its regulation of PINK1, and that targeting FoxO1 may represent a novel therapeutic approach for DN. PMID:27475499

  2. Active flutter suppression using dipole filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinathkumar, S.; Waszak, Martin R.

    1992-01-01

    By using traditional control concepts of gain root locus, the active suppression of a flutter mode of a flexible wing is examined. It is shown that the attraction of the unstable mode towards a critical system zero determines the degree to which the flutter mode can be stabilized. For control situations where the critical zero is adversely placed in the complex plane, a novel compensation scheme called a 'Dipole' filter is proposed. This filter ensures that the flutter mode is stabilized with acceptable control energy. The control strategy is illustrated by designing flutter suppression laws for an active flexible wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model, where minimal control effort solutions are mandated by control rate saturation problems caused by wind-tunnel turbulence.

  3. Is Infant Immunity Actively Suppressed or Immature?

    PubMed Central

    Gervassi, Ana L; Horton, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Almost 7 million children under the age 5 die each year, and most of these deaths are attributable to vaccine-preventable infections. Young infants respond poorly to infections and vaccines. In particular, dendritic cells secrete less IL-12 and IL-18, CD8pos T cells and NK cells have defective cytolysis and cytokine production, and CD4pos T cell responses tend to bias towards a Th2 phenotype and promotion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The basis for these differences is not well understood and may be in part explained by epigenetic differences, as well as immaturity of the infant’s immune system. Here we present a third possibility, which involves active suppression by immune regulatory cells and place in context the immune suppressive pathways of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), CD5pos B cells, and Tregs. The immune pathways that these immune regulatory cells inhibit are similar to those that are defective in the infant. Therefore, the immune deficiencies seen in infants could be explained, in part, by active suppressive cells, indicating potential new avenues for intervention. PMID:25429207

  4. Optimal control techniques for active noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Keeling, S. L.; Silcox, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Active suppression of noise in a bounded enclosure is considered within the framework of optimal control theory. A sinusoidal pressure field due to exterior offending noise sources is assumed to be known in a neighborhood of interior sensors. The pressure field due to interior controlling sources is assumed to be governed by a nonhomogeneous wave equation within the enclosure and by a special boundary condition designed to accommodate frequency-dependent reflection properties of the enclosure boundary. The form of the controlling sources is determined by considering the steady-state behavior of the system, and it is established that the control strategy proposed is stable and asymptotically optimal.

  5. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties. PMID:26274171

  6. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties.

  7. Multiple elements regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FOXO1: characterization of phosphorylation- and 14-3-3-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiangshan; Gan, Lixia; Pan, Haiyun; Kan, Donghui; Majeski, Michael; Adam, Stephen A; Unterman, Terry G

    2004-01-01

    FOXO1, a Forkhead transcription factor, is an important target of insulin and growth factor action. Phosphorylation of Thr-24, Ser-256 and Ser-319 promotes nuclear exclusion of FOXO1, yet the mechanisms regulating nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FOXO1 are poorly understood. Previous studies have identified an NLS (nuclear localization signal) in the C-terminal basic region of the DBD (DNA-binding domain), and a leucine-rich, leptomycin-B sensitive NES (nuclear export signal) located further downstream. Here, we find that other elements in the DBD also contribute to nuclear localization, and that multiple mechanisms contribute to nuclear exclusion of FOXO1. Phosphorylation of Ser-319 and a cluster of nearby residues (Ser-322, Ser-325 and Ser-329) functions co-operatively with the nearby NES to promote nuclear exclusion. The N-terminal region of FOXO1 (amino acids 1-149) also is sufficient to promote nuclear exclusion, and does so through multiple mechanisms. Amino acids 1-50 are sufficient to promote nuclear exclusion of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins, and the phosphorylation of Thr-24 is required for this effect. A leucine-rich, leptomycin B-sensitive export signal is also present nearby. Phosphorylated FOXO1 binds 14-3-3 proteins, and co-precipitation studies with tagged proteins indicate that 14-3-3 binding involves co-operative interactions with both Thr-24 and Ser-256. Ser-256 is located in the C-terminal region of the DBD, where 14-3-3 proteins may interfere both with DNA-binding and with nuclear-localization functions. Together, these studies demonstrate that multiple elements contribute to nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FOXO1, and that phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding regulate the cellular distribution and function of FOXO1 through multiple mechanisms. The presence of these redundant mechanisms supports the concept that the regulation of FOXO1 function plays a critical role in insulin and growth factor action. PMID:14664696

  8. Eigenspace techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Liebst, Bradley S.; Farm, Jerome A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of eigenspace techniques for the design of an active flutter suppression system for a hypothetical research drone is discussed. One leading edge and two trailing edge aerodynamic control surfaces and four sensors (accelerometers) are available for each wing. Full state control laws are designed by selecting feedback gains which place closed loop eigenvalues and shape closed loop eigenvectors so as to stabilize wing flutter and reduce gust loads at the wing root while yielding accepatable robustness and satisfying constrains on rms control surface activity. These controllers are realized by state estimators designed using an eigenvalue placement/eigenvector shaping technique which results in recovery of the full state loop transfer characteristics. The resulting feedback compensators are shown to perform almost as well as the full state designs. They also exhibit acceptable performance in situations in which the failure of an actuator is simulated.

  9. RGD liposome-protamine-siRNA (LPR) nanoparticles targeting PAX3-FOXO1 for alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Rengaswamy, Venkatesh; Zimmer, Doris; Süss, Regine; Rössler, Jochen

    2016-08-10

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) are aggressive soft tissue tumors harboring specific fusion transcripts, notably PAX3-FOXO1 (P3F). Current therapy concepts result in unsatisfactory survival rates making the search for innovative approaches necessary: targeting PAX3-FOXO1 could be a promising strategy. In this study, we developed integrin receptor-targeted Lipid-Protamine-siRNA (LPR) nanoparticles using the RGD peptide and validated target specificity as well as their post-silencing effects. We demonstrate that RGD-LPRs are specific to ARMS in vitro and in vivo. Loaded with siRNA directed against the breakpoint of P3F, these particles efficiently down regulated the fusion transcript and inhibited cell proliferation, but did not induce substantial apoptosis. In a xenograft ARMS model, LPR nanoparticles targeting P3F showed statistically significant tumor growth delay as well as inhibition of tumor initiation when injected in parallel with the tumor cells. These findings suggest that RGD-LPR targeting P3F are promising to be highly effective in the setting of minimal residual disease for ARMS. PMID:27261335

  10. Molecular Cytogenetics Detect an Unbalanced t(2;13)(q36;q14) and PAX3-FOXO1 Fusion in Rhabdomyosarcoma With Mixed Embryonal/Alveolar Features.

    PubMed

    La Starza, Roberta; Nofrini, Valeria; Pierini, Tiziana; Pierini, Valentina; Zin, Angelica; Bisogno, Gianni; Cerri, Carla; Caniglia, Maurizio; Sidoni, Angelo; Ludwig, Kathrin; Mecucci, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Distinguishing between alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is crucial because treatment and prognosis are different. We describe a case of paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), which was classified as mixed ERMS/ARMS. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) detected losses of 3'PAX3 and 5'FOXO1, suggesting they had undergone an unbalanced rearrangement that probably produced the PAX3-FOXO1 fusion. Double-color FISH and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed PAX3-FOXO1, which is characteristic of high-risk RMS. This finding highlights the importance of supplementing histology with genetics so that atypical RMS is appropriately classified and patients are correctly stratified and treated. PMID:26179572

  11. Notum deacylates Wnts to suppress signalling activity

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Steve; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Bineva, Ganka; O’Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Signalling by Wnts is finely balanced to ensure normal development and tissue homeostasis while avoiding diseases such as cancer. This is achieved in part by Notum, a highly conserved secreted feedback antagonist. Notum has been thought to act as a phospholipase, shedding glypicans and associated Wnts from the cell surface. However, this view fails to explain specificity since glypicans bind many extracellular ligands. Here we provide genetic evidence in Drosophila that Notum requires glypicans to suppress Wnt signalling, but does not cleave their glycophosphatidylinositol anchor. Structural analyses reveal glycosaminoglycan binding sites on Notum, which likely help Notum colocalise with Wnts. They also identify, at the active site of human and Drosophila Notum, a large hydrophobic pocket that accommodates palmitoleate. Kinetic and mass spectrometric analyses of human proteins show that Notum is a carboxylesterase that removes an essential palmitoleate moiety from Wnts and thus constitutes the first known extracellular protein deacylase. PMID:25731175

  12. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion

    PubMed Central

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  13. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion.

    PubMed

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  14. Zinc finger protein ZBTB20 is an independent prognostic marker and promotes tumor growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma by repressing FoxO1

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Heping; Huang, Yuqi; Li, Xianghong; Liu, Dingli; Chen, Jianjia; Shu, Miaojiang

    2016-01-01

    Zinc finger and BTB domain-containing 20 (ZBTB20) is a new BTB/POZ-domain gene and a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Notably, the role of ZBTB20 and its underlying mechanisms involved in hepatocarcinogenesis are poorly investigated. In this study, the expression of ZBTB20 was significantly overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues. The positive expression of ZBTB20 was associated with large tumor size, high Edmondson-Steiner grading and advanced tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) tumor stage. Additionally, HCC patients with positive expression of ZBTB20 had a poorer 5-year survival. Multivariate analyses revealed that ZBTB20 overexpression was an independent prognostic factor for HCC. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that ZBTB20 promoted HCC cell viability, proliferation, tumorigenicity, and cell cycle progression. Mechanistically, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin E were increased, while p21 and p27 were decreased by ZBTB20 in HCC cells. FoxO1 was inversely correlated with ZBTB20 protein expression in the same cohort of HCC specimens. We further revealed that FoxO1 was transcriptionally repressed by ZBTB20 in HCC. Moreover, restoration of FoxO1 expression partially abrogated ZBTB20-induced HCC cell proliferation and growth entry in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these results indicate that ZBTB20 may serve as a prognostic marker and promotes tumor growth of HCC via transcriptionally repressing FoxO1. PMID:26893361

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a complex of the FOXO1 and Ets1 DNA-binding domains and DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, Wing W.; Datta, Drishadwatti; Geiger, Catherine A.; Birrane, Gabriel; Grant, Marianne A.

    2013-12-24

    The DNA-binding domains of Ets1 and FOXO1 were expressed, purified, and crystallized in complex with DNA containing a composite sequence for a noncanonical forkhead binding site and an ETS site. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.2 Å.

  16. Suppression of Antigen-Specific Lymphocyte Activation in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, David; Pride, Michael W.; Brown, Eric L.; Risin, Diana; Pellis, Neal R.

    1999-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in astronauts during and after spaceflight, and in isolated immune cells in true and simulated microgravity. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T cells is severely suppressed in true and simulated microgravity. These recent findings with various polyclonal activators suggests a suppression of oligoclonal lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction (MLR), as a model for a primary immune response; a tetanus toxoid (TT) response and a B. burgdorferi (Bb) response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  17. Effect of acute and chronic eccentric exercise on FOXO1 mRNA expression as fiber type transition factor in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Azad, Milad; Khaledi, Neda; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2016-06-15

    Skeletal muscle is a highly elastic tissue which can respond to various functional demands by altering fiber-type composition. Exercise affects muscle fiber phenotype. One of the transcription factors that induce fiber-type transition is forkhead box O1 (FOXO1). Since eccentric contraction considered an essential part of exercise, so we are interested to see the effects of eccentric exercise (acute/chronic) on FOXO1 as an important factor of fiber-type transition in rat skeletal muscles. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats (190-235g) were divided to 3 groups of 8 rats: 1) chronic eccentric exercise (CEE), 2) acute eccentric exercise (AEE), and 3) control (C). The exercise groups underwent downhill running protocol. CEE was running on treadmill in 3days of week for 9weeks, that slope and duration gradually managed from -4° to -16° and 15 to 90min, respectively. AEE group was running with 16m/min on -16° slope for 3 consecutive days that included 18 sets of 5min with rest interval of 2min in between. Soleus and super vastus lateralis (SVL) muscles mRNA were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. SVL FOXO1 mRNA levels increased by 3.92-fold in the AEE and decreased 0.56-fold in the CEE group and were not significant in soleus muscle. In soleus muscle, myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIa, IIx, and IIb decreased in the AEE group and MHC IIa and IIx decreased in the CEE group. In SVL muscle, MHC I, IIa, and IIx increased in the AEE group and MHC IIa and IIX increased in the CEE group. In summary, both acute and chronic eccentric exercise could lead to change in FOXO1 mRNA only in fast SVL muscle of rat and so could induce fiber-type transition in both muscles regardless of changes in expression of FOXO1. So, oxidative stress can play important role in change of FOXO1. PMID:26915490

  18. Suppression of Subthalamic Nucleus Activity by Micromagnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Woo; Fried, Shelley I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic stimulation delivered via 0.5-mm diameter coils was recently shown to activate retinal neurons; the small coil size raises the possibility that micromagnetic stimulation (μMS) could underlie a new generation of implanted neural prosthetics. Such an approach has several inherent advantages over conventional electric stimulation, including the potential for selective activation of neuronal targets as well as less susceptibility to inflamma-tory responses. The viability of μMS for some applications, e.g., deep brain stimulation (DBS), may require suppression (rather than creation) of neuronal activity, however, and therefore we explore here whether (μMS) could, in fact, suppress activity. While single pulses elicited weak and inconsistent spiking in neurons of the mouse subthalamic nucleus (in vitro), repetitive stimulation effectively suppressed activity in ~70% of targeted neurons. This is the same percentage suppressed by conventional electric stimulation; with both modalities, suppression occurred only after an initial increase in spiking. The latency to the onset of suppression was inversely correlated to the energy of the stimulus waveform: larger amplitudes and lower frequencies had the fastest onset of suppression. These findings continue to support the viability of μMS as a next-generation implantable neural prosthetic. PMID:25163063

  19. Active flutter suppression - Control system design and experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of an active flutter suppression controller for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model is presented. The design is accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and with extensive use of simulation-based analysis. The design approach uses a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple controller structure to meet stringent design specifications. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite errors in flutter dynamic pressure and flutter frequency in the mathematical model. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with a roll maneuver controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  20. Valproic acid reduces insulin-resistance, fat deposition and FOXO1-mediated gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sabbir; Kumar, Sandeep; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in insulin-resistance, gluconeogenesis and islet function. HDACs can modulate the expression of various genes, which directly or indirectly affect glucose metabolism. This study was aimed to evaluate the role of valproic acid (VPA) on fat deposition, insulin-resistance and gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat. Diabetes was developed in Sprague-Dawley rats by the combination of high-fat diet and low dose streptozotocin. VPA at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg/day and metformin (positive control) 150 mg/kg twice daily for 10 weeks were administered by oral gavage. Insulin-resistance, dyslipidemia and glycemia were evaluated by biochemical estimations, while fat accumulation and structural alteration were assessed by histopathology. Protein expression and insulin signaling were evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry. VPA treatment significantly reduced the plasma glucose, HbA1c, insulin-resistance, fat deposition in brown adipose tissue, white adipose tissue and liver, which are comparable to metformin treatment. Further, VPA inhibited the gluconeogenesis and glucagon expression as well as restored the histopathological alterations in pancreas and liver. Our findings provide new insights on the anti-diabetic role of VPA in type-2 diabetes mellitus by the modulation of insulin signaling and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1)-mediated gluconeogenesis. Since VPA is a well established clinical drug, the detailed molecular mechanisms of the present findings can be further investigated for possible clinical use. PMID:26944797

  1. Robust control design techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozbay, Hitay; Bachmann, Glen R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, an active flutter suppression problem is studied for a thin airfoil in unsteady aerodynamics. The mathematical model of this system is infinite dimensional because of Theodorsen's function which is irrational. Several second order approximations of Theodorsen's function are compared. A finite dimensional model is obtained from such an approximation. We use H infinity control techniques to find a robustly stabilizing controller for active flutter suppression.

  2. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Line Suppression of Phagolysosome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, AW; Dixit, S; Yu, J

    2015-01-01

    The eye is an immune privileged tissue with multiple mechanisms of immunosuppression to protect the light gathering tissues from the damage of inflammation. One of theses mechanisms involves retinal pigment epithelial cell suppression of phagosome activation in macrophages. The objective of this work is to determine if the human RPE cell line ARPE-19 is capable of suppressing the activation of the phagolysosome in macrophages in a manner similar to primary RPE. The conditioned media of RPE eyecups, sub-confluent, just confluent cultures, or established confluent cultures of human ARPE-19 cells were generated. These condition media were used to treat macrophages phagocytizing pHrodo bioparticles. After 24 hours incubation the macrophages were imaged by fluorescent microscopy, and fluorescence was measured. The fluorescent intensity is proportional to the amount of bioparticles phagocytized and are in an activated phagolysosome. The conditioned media of in situ mouse RPE eyecups significantly suppressed the activation of phagolysosome. The conditioned media from cultures of human ARPE-19 cells, grown to sub-confluence (50%) or grown to confluence had no effect on phagolysosome activation. In contrast, the conditioned media from established confluent cultures significantly suppressed phagolysosome activation. The neuropeptides alpha-MSH and NPY were depleted from the conditioned media of established confluent ARPE-19 cell cultures. This depleted conditioned media had diminished suppression of phagolysosome activation while promoting macrophage cell death. In addition, the condition media from cultures of ARPE-19 monolayers wounded with a bisecting scrape was diminished in suppressing phagolysosome activation. This technical report suggests that like primary RPE monolayers, established confluent cultures of ARPE-19 cells produce soluble factors that suppress the activation of macrophages, and can be used to study the molecular mechanisms of retinal immunobiology. In

  3. Cold Suppresses Agonist-induced Activation of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Chung, M.-K.; Wang, S.

    2011-01-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppressed by cold, it is not known if cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of recombinant TRPV1. We demonstrate that cold strongly suppressed the activation of recombinant TRPV1 by multiple agonists and capsaicin-evoked currents in trigeminal ganglia neurons under normal and phosphorylated conditions. Cold-induced suppression was partially impaired in a TRPV1 mutant that lacked heat-mediated activation and potentiation. These results suggest that cold-induced suppression of TRPV1 may share a common molecular basis with heat-induced potentiation, and that allosteric inhibition may contribute, in part, to the cold-induced suppression. We also show that combination of cold and a specific antagonist of TRPV1 can produce an additive suppression. Our results provide a mechanistic basis for cold therapy and may enhance anti-nociceptive approaches that target TRPV1 for managing pain under inflammation and tissue injury, including that from tooth extraction. PMID:21666106

  4. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pride, M. W.; Brown, E. L.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  5. Flutter suppression by active control and its benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Townsend, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A general discussion of the airplane applications of active flutter suppression systems is presented with focus on supersonic cruise aircraft configurations. Topics addressed include a brief historical review; benefits, risks, and concerns; methods of application; and applicable configurations. Results are presented where the direct operating costs and performance benefits of an arrow wing supersonic cruise vehicle equipped with an active flutter suppression system are compared with corresponding costs and performance of the same baseline airplane where the flutter deficiency was corrected by passive methods (increases in structural stiffness). The design, synthesis, and conceptual mechanization of the active flutter suppression system are discussed. The results show that a substantial weight savings can be accomplished by using the active system. For the same payload and range, airplane direct operating costs are reduced by using the active system. The results also indicate that the weight savings translates into increased range or payload.

  6. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'–based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  7. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils.

    PubMed

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'-based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  8. Soy Leaf Extract Containing Kaempferol Glycosides and Pheophorbides Improves Glucose Homeostasis by Enhancing Pancreatic β-Cell Function and Suppressing Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Ji, Hyeon-Seon; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Dong-Ha; Park, Ho-Yong; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, In-Kyung; Yun, Bong-Sik; Jeong, Tae-Sook

    2015-08-19

    This study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the antidiabetic effect of an ethanol extract of soy leaves (ESL) in db/db mice. Control groups (db/+ and db/db) were fed a normal diet (ND), whereas the db/db-ESL group was fed ND with 1% ESL for 8 weeks. Dietary ESL improved glucose tolerance and lowered plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin, HOMA-IR, and triglyceride levels. The pancreatic insulin content of the db/db-ESL group was significantly greater than that of the db/db group. ESL supplementation altered pancreatic IRS1, IRS2, Pdx1, Ngn3, Pax4, Ins1, Ins2, and FoxO1 expression. Furthermore, ESL suppressed lipid accumulation and increased glucokinase activity in the liver. ESL primarily contained kaempferol glycosides and pheophorbides. Kaempferol, an aglycone of kaempferol glycosides, improved β-cell proliferation through IRS2-related FoxO1 signaling, whereas pheophorbide a, a product of chlorophyll breakdown, improved insulin secretion and β-cell proliferation through IRS1-related signaling with protein kinase A in MIN6 cells. ESL effectively regulates glucose homeostasis by enhancing IRS-mediated β-cell insulin signaling and suppressing SREBP-1-mediated hepatic lipid accumulation in db/db mice. PMID:26211813

  9. Active and passive vibration suppression for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The relative benefits of passive and active vibration suppression for large space structures (LSS) are discussed. The intent is to sketch the true ranges of applicability of these approaches using previously published technical results. It was found that the distinction between active and passive vibration suppression approaches is not as sharp as might be thought at first. The relative simplicity, reliability, and cost effectiveness touted for passive measures are vitiated by 'hidden costs' bound up with detailed engineering implementation issues and inherent performance limitations. At the same time, reliability and robustness issues are often cited against active control. It is argued that a continuum of vibration suppression measures offering mutually supporting capabilities is needed. The challenge is to properly orchestrate a spectrum of methods to reap the synergistic benefits of combined advanced materials, passive damping, and active control.

  10. Nicotinamide Cofactors Suppress Active-Site Labeling of Aldehyde Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Strubl, Laura; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bartels, Dorothea; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-06-17

    Active site labeling by (re)activity-based probes is a powerful chemical proteomic tool to globally map active sites in native proteomes without using substrates. Active site labeling is usually taken as a readout for the active state of the enzyme because labeling reflects the availability and reactivity of active sites, which are hallmarks for enzyme activities. Here, we show that this relationship holds tightly, but we also reveal an important exception to this rule. Labeling of Arabidopsis ALDH3H1 with a chloroacetamide probe occurs at the catalytic Cys, and labeling is suppressed upon nitrosylation and oxidation, and upon treatment with other Cys modifiers. These experiments display a consistent and strong correlation between active site labeling and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, however, labeling is suppressed by the cofactor NAD(+), and this property is shared with other members of the ALDH superfamily and also detected for unrelated GAPDH enzymes with an unrelated hydantoin-based probe in crude extracts of plant cell cultures. Suppression requires cofactor binding to its binding pocket. Labeling is also suppressed by ALDH modulators that bind at the substrate entrance tunnel, confirming that labeling occurs through the substrate-binding cavity. Our data indicate that cofactor binding adjusts the catalytic Cys into a conformation that reduces the reactivity toward chloroacetamide probes. PMID:26990764

  11. Active Suppression of Instabilities in Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2004-01-01

    A method of feedback control has been proposed as a means of suppressing thermo-acoustic instabilities in a liquid- fueled combustor of a type used in an aircraft engine. The basic principle of the method is one of (1) sensing combustor pressure oscillations associated with instabilities and (2) modulating the rate of flow of fuel to the combustor with a control phase that is chosen adaptively so that the pressure oscillations caused by the modulation oppose the sensed pressure oscillations. The need for this method arises because of the planned introduction of advanced, lean-burning aircraft gas turbine engines, which promise to operate with higher efficiencies and to emit smaller quantities of nitrogen oxides, relative to those of present aircraft engines. Unfortunately, the advanced engines are more susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities. These instabilities are hard to control because they include large dead-time phase shifts, wide-band noise characterized by amplitudes that are large relative to those of the instabilities, exponential growth of the instabilities, random net phase walks, and amplitude fluctuations. In this method (see figure), the output of a combustion-pressure sensor would be wide-band-pass filtered and then further processed to generate a control signal that would be applied to a fast-actuation valve to modulate the flow of fuel. Initially, the controller would rapidly take large phase steps in order to home in, within a fraction of a second, to a favorable phase region within which the instability would be reduced. Then the controller would restrict itself to operate within this phase region and would further restrict itself to operate within a region of stability, as long as the power in the instability signal was decreasing. In the phase-shifting scheme of this method, the phase of the control vector would be made to continuously bounce back and forth from one boundary of an effective stability region to the other. Computationally

  12. Direct Hepatocyte Insulin Signaling Is Required for Lipogenesis but Is Dispensable for the Suppression of Glucose Production.

    PubMed

    Titchenell, Paul M; Quinn, William J; Lu, Mingjian; Chu, Qingwei; Lu, Wenyun; Li, Changhong; Chen, Helen; Monks, Bobby R; Chen, Julia; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2016-06-14

    During insulin-resistant states such as type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin fails to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP) yet promotes lipid synthesis. This metabolic state has been termed "selective insulin resistance" to indicate a defect in one arm of the insulin-signaling cascade, potentially downstream of Akt. Here we demonstrate that Akt-dependent activation of mTORC1 and inhibition of Foxo1 are required and sufficient for de novo lipogenesis, suggesting that hepatic insulin signaling is likely to be intact in insulin-resistant states. Moreover, cell-nonautonomous suppression of HGP by insulin depends on a reduction of adipocyte lipolysis and serum FFAs but is independent of vagal efferents or glucagon signaling. These data are consistent with a model in which, during T2DM, intact liver insulin signaling drives enhanced lipogenesis while excess circulating FFAs become a dominant inducer of nonsuppressible HGP. PMID:27238637

  13. Next Generation Active Buffet Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; White, Edward V.; Zimcik, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that is common to high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. This paper describes an international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States involving the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads. The research program is being co-ordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and is being conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). This truly unique collaborative program has been developed to enable each participating country to contribute resources toward a program that coalesces a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation. This collaborative program is directed toward a full-scale test of an F/A-18 empennage, which is an extension of an earlier initial test. The current program aims at applying advanced directional piezoactuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers and advanced control strategies on a full-scale structure to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration.

  14. HCV core protein-induced upregulation of microRNA-196a promotes aberrant proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Li, Guangming; Yue, Zhanyi; Li, Chengzhong

    2016-06-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is critical in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Investigations on HCC have previously focused on microRNAs, a class of small non‑coding RNAs, which are crucial in cancer development and progression. The present study aimed to investigate whether microRNA (miR)‑196a is aberrantly regulated by the HCV core protein, and whether miR‑196a is involved in the regulation of the aberrant proliferation of HCV‑HCC cells. In the study, miRNA expression was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. An Ad‑HCV core adenovirus was constructed and cell proliferation was measured using a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and a cell cycle assay following infection. The results of the present study demonstrated that the HCV core protein increased the expression of miR‑196a, and that overexpression of miR‑196a in the HepG2 and Huh‑7 HCC cell lines promoted cell proliferation by inducing the G1‑S transition. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) was directly regulated by miR‑196a, and was essential in mediating the biological effects of miR‑196a in HCC. The overexpression of FOXO1 markedly reversed the effect of miR‑196a in HCC cell proliferation. Taken together, the data obtained in the present study provided compelling evidence that elevated expression levels of miR‑196a by the HCV core protein can function as an onco‑microRNA during HCV‑induced cell proliferation by downregulating the expression of FOXO1, indicating a potential novel therapeutic target for HCV-related HCC. PMID:27108614

  15. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  16. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  17. Suppression of NF-κB Activation By Gentian Violet Promotes Osteoblastogenesis and Suppresses Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M.; Vikulina, T.; Arbiser, J.L.; Weitzmann, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal mass is regulated by the coordinated action of bone forming osteoblasts and bone resorbing osteoclasts. Accelerated rates of bone resorption relative to bone formation lead to net bone loss and the development of osteoporosis, a devastating disease that predisposes the skeleton to fractures. Bone fractures are associated with significant morbidity and in the case of hip fractures, high mortality. Gentian violet (GV), a cationic triphenylmethane dye, has long been used as an antifungal and antibacterial agent and is presently under investigation as a potential chemotherapeutic and antiangiogenic agent. However, effects on bone cells have not been previously reported and the mechanisms of action of GV, are poorly understood. In this study we show that GV suppresses receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced differentiation of RAW264.7 osteoclast precursors into mature osteoclasts, but paradoxically stimulates the differentiation of MC3T3 cells into mineralizing osteoblasts. These actions stem from the capacity of GV to suppress activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signal transduction pathway that is required for osteoclastogenesis, but inhibitory to osteoblast differentiation and activity. Our data reveal that GV is an inhibitor of NF-κB activation and may hold promise for modulation of bone turnover to promote a balance between bone formation and bone resorption, favorable to gain of bone mass. PMID:25056540

  18. Apigenin blocks IKKα activation and suppresses prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sanjeev; Kanwal, Rajnee; Shankar, Eswar; Datt, Manish; Chance, Mark R; Fu, Pingfu; MacLennan, Gregory T; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-10-13

    IKKα has been implicated as a key regulator of oncogenesis and driver of the metastatic process; therefore is regarded as a promising therapeutic target in anticancer drug development. In spite of the progress made in the development of IKK inhibitors, no potent IKKα inhibitor(s) have been identified. Our multistep approach of molecular modeling and direct binding has led to the identification of plant flavone apigenin as a specific IKKα inhibitor. Here we report apigenin, in micro molar range, inhibits IKKα kinase activity, demonstrates anti-proliferative and anti-invasive activities in functional cell based assays and exhibits anticancer efficacy in experimental tumor model. We found that apigenin directly binds with IKKα, attenuates IKKα kinase activity and suppresses NF-ĸB/p65 activation in human prostate cancer PC-3 and 22Rv1 cells much more effectively than IKK inhibitor, PS1145. We also showed that apigenin caused cell cycle arrest similar to knockdown of IKKα in prostate cancer cells. Studies in xenograft mouse model indicate that apigenin feeding suppresses tumor growth, lowers proliferation and enhances apoptosis. These effects correlated with inhibition of p-IKKα, NF-ĸB/p65, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and increase in cleaved caspase 3 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, our results suggest that inhibition of cell proliferation, invasiveness and decrease in tumor growth by apigenin are mediated by its ability to suppress IKKα and downstream targets affecting NF-ĸB signaling pathways. PMID:26435478

  19. Active Suppression of the Transonic Flutter Using Sliding Mode Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degaki, Takanori; Suzuki, Shinji

    This paper describes two-dimensional active flutter suppression to cope with the transonic dip using the sliding mode control. The airfoil model has plunge and pitch degrees of freedom with leading and trailing edge control surfaces. The aerodynamic forces acting on the airfoil, lift and pitching moment, are calculated by solving Euler's equations using computational fluid dynamics. At a specific altitude, flutter occurs between Mach number of 0.7 and 0.88, which corresponds to the transonic dip. The sliding mode control makes the airfoil to be stable all through the Mach number including the transonic dip. The sliding mode controller gives wider flutter margin than a linear quadratic regulator. These characteristics indicate that the sliding mode control is useful for active flutter suppression in the transonic flight.

  20. Control surface spanwise placement in active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Burken, John J.

    1988-01-01

    A method is developed that determines the placement of an active control surface for maximum effectiveness in suppressing flutter. No specific control law is required by this method which is based on the aerodynamic energy concept. It is argued that the spanwise placement of the active controls should coincide with the locations where maximum energy per unit span is fed into the system. The method enables one to determine the distribution, over the different surfaces of the aircraft, of the energy input into the system as a result of the unstable fluttering mode. The method is illustrated using three numerical examples.

  1. Differential gene expression of FoxO1, ID1, and ID3 between young and older men and associations with muscle mass and function

    PubMed Central

    Buford, Thomas W.; Cooke, Matthew B.; Shelmadine, Brian D.; Hudson, Geoffrey M.; Redd, Liz L.; Willoughby, Darryn S.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Aging is associated with significant losses of skeletal muscle mass and function. Numerous biochemical molecules have been implicated in the development of these age-related changes, however evidence from human models is sparse. Assessment of transcript expression is useful as it requires minimal tissue and may potentially be used in clinical trials. This study aimed to compare mRNA expression of proteolytic genes in skeletal muscle of young (18–35 yrs) and older (55–75 yrs) men. Methods Muscle tissue was obtained from young (n=14, 21.35±1.03 yrs) and older (n=13, 63.85±1.83 yrs) men using percutaneous biopsy, and transcript expression was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Lower limb muscle mass was assessed using DEXA while concentric peak torque (PT) and power were assessed via isokinetic dynamometer. When age-related differences in mRNA expression were observed, Pearson correlation coefficients were obtained to examine the relationship of transcripts to muscle mass and function. Results Older muscle contained significantly more transcript for Forkhead Box O 1 (FoxO1, p=0.001), Inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (ID1, p=0.009), and Inhibitor of DNA Binding 3 (ID3, p=0.043) than young muscle. FoxO1 was significantly correlated with lean mass (R=−0.44, p=0.023) and PT (R=−0.40, p=0.046) while ID3 was significantly correlated with PT (R=−0.58, p=0.001) and power (R=−0.65, p<0.001). Moreover, ID1 was significantly correlated with all assessed measures of muscle function - mass (R=−0.39, p=0.046), PT (R=−0.53, p=0.005), and power (R=−0.520, p=0.005). Conclusion These data suggest that FoxO1, ID1, and ID3 are potentially useful as clinical biomarkers of age-related muscle atrophy and dysfunction. PMID:21993163

  2. Triacylglycerol kinetics in endotoxic rats with suppressed lipoprotein lipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Corll, C.B.; Martinez, R.R.

    1987-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia observed in animals after bacterial endotoxin administration and some forms of sepsis can result from increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) output or decreased TG clearance by extrahepatic tissues. To differentiate between these two possibilities, TG and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics were determined in control and endotoxin-injected rats 18 h after treatment. Plasma TG and FFA kinetics were assessed by a constant intravenous infusion with (9,10-/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled very low-density lipoprotein and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin, respectively. In addition, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue as well as in postheparin plasma of functionally hepatectomized, adrenalectomized, and gonadectomized rats. Plasma FFA acid concentrations were slightly increased in endotoxin-treated rats but their turnover did not differ from control. Endotoxin-treated rats had a threefold increase in plasma TG concentrations and decreased heart, skeletal muscle, and post-heparin plasma LPL activity. Plasma TG turnover was decreased, indicating that hypertriglyceridemia was not due to an increased TG output by the liver. Instead, the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TG concentration was consequence of the 80% reduction in TG metabolic clearance rate. Thus, suppression of LPL activity in endotoxic animals impairs TG clearance resulting in hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, endotoxin administration reduced the delivery of TG-FFA to extrahepatic tissues because hepatic synthesis and secretion of TG from plasma FFA was decreased and LPL activity was suppressed.

  3. Targeting Gli Transcription Activation by Small Molecule Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Clément, Geneviève; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Li, Hui; Mikami, Iwao; Hirata, Tomomi; Yagui-Beltran, Adam; Lui, Natalie; Do, Hanh T.; Cheng, Tiffany; Tseng, Hsin-Hui; Choi, Helen; Fang, Li-Tai; Kim, Il-Jin; Yue, Dongsheng; Wang, Changli; Zheng, Qingfeng; Fujii, Naoaki; Mann, Michael; Jablons, David M.; He, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of Hedgehog signaling at the cell membrane has been associated with anti-cancer activity in preclinical and early clinical studies. Hedgehog signaling involves activation of Gli transcription factors that can also be induced by alternative pathways. In this study we identified an interaction between Gli proteins and a transcription co-activator TAF9, and validated its functional relevance in regulating Gli transactivation. We also describe a novel, synthetic small molecule, FN1-8, that efficiently interferes with Gli/TAF9 interaction and down-regulate Gli/TAF9 dependent transcriptional activity. More importantly, FN1-8 suppresses cancer cell proliferation in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that blocking Gli transactivation, a key control point of multiple oncogenic pathways, may be an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:23686308

  4. Design, test, and evaluation of three active flutter suppression controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, William M., Jr.; Christhilf, David M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    Three control law design techniques for flutter suppression are presented. Each technique uses multiple control surfaces and/or sensors. The first method uses traditional tools (such as pole/zero loci and Nyquist diagrams) for producing a controller that has minimal complexity and which is sufficiently robust to handle plant uncertainty. The second procedure uses linear combinations of several accelerometer signals and dynamic compensation to synthesize the model rate of the critical mode for feedback to the distributed control surfaces. The third technique starts with a minimum-energy linear quadratic Gaussian controller, iteratively modifies intensity matrices corresponding to input and output noise, and applies controller order reduction to achieve a low-order, robust controller. The resulting designs were implemented digitally and tested subsonically on the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Only the traditional pole/zero loci design was sufficiently robust to errors in the nominal plant to successfully suppress flutter during the test. The traditional pole/zero loci design provided simultaneous suppression of symmetric and antisymmetric flutter with a 24-percent increase in attainable dynamic pressure. Posttest analyses are shown which illustrate the problems encountered with the other laws.

  5. Coupling between Nutrient Availability and Thyroid Hormone Activation.

    PubMed

    Lartey, Lattoya J; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro; O-Sullivan, InSug; Unterman, Terry G; Bianco, Antonio C

    2015-12-18

    The activity of the thyroid gland is stimulated by food availability via leptin-induced thyrotropin-releasing hormone/thyroid-stimulating hormone expression. Here we show that food availability also stimulates thyroid hormone activation by accelerating the conversion of thyroxine to triiodothyronine via type 2 deiodinase in mouse skeletal muscle and in a cell model transitioning from 0.1 to 10% FBS. The underlying mechanism is transcriptional derepression of DIO2 through the mTORC2 pathway as defined in rictor knockdown cells. In cells kept in 0.1% FBS, there is DIO2 inhibition via FOXO1 binding to the DIO2 promoter. Repression of DIO2 by FOXO1 was confirmed using its specific inhibitor AS1842856 or adenoviral infection of constitutively active FOXO1. ChIP studies indicate that 4 h after 10% FBS-containing medium, FOXO1 binding markedly decreases, and the DIO2 promoter is activated. Studies in the insulin receptor FOXO1 KO mouse indicate that insulin is a key signaling molecule in this process. We conclude that FOXO1 represses DIO2 during fasting and that derepression occurs via nutritional activation of the PI3K-mTORC2-Akt pathway. PMID:26499800

  6. SCAR arrow-wing active flutter suppression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, C. K.; Visor, O. E.

    1977-01-01

    The potential performance and direct operating cost benefits of an active flutter suppression system (FSS) for the NASA arrow-wing supersonic cruise configuration were determined. A FSS designed to increase the flutter speed of the baseline airplane 20 percent. A comparison was made of the performance and direct operating cost between the FSS equipped aircraft and a previously defined configuration with structural modifications to provide the same flutter speed. Control system synthesis and evaluation indicated that a FSS could provide the increase in flutter speed without degrading airplane reliability, safety, handling qualities, or ride quality, and without increasing repeated loads or hydraulic and electrical power capacity requirements.

  7. Comparative study between two different active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    An activated leading-edge (LE)-tailing-edge (TE) control system is applied to a drone aircraft with the objective of enabling the drone to fly subsonically at dynamic pressures which are 44% above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. The control synthesis approach is based on the aerodynamic energy concept and it incorporates recent developments in this area. A comparison is made between the performance of the activated LE-TE control system and the performance of a TE control system, analyzed in a previous work. The results obtained indicate that although all the control systems achieve the flutter suppression objectives, the TE control system appears to be somewhat superior to the LE-TE control system, in this specific application. This superiority is manifested through reduced values of control surface activity over a wide range of flight conditions.

  8. Nonexocytotic serotonin release tonically suppresses serotonergic neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Montalbano, Alberto; Baccini, Gilda; Tatini, Francesca; Palmini, Rolando Berlinguer; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    The firing activity of serotonergic neurons in raphe nuclei is regulated by negative feedback exerted by extracellular serotonin (5-HT)o acting through somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. The steady-state [5-HT]o, sensed by 5-HT1A autoreceptors, is determined by the balance between the rates of 5-HT release and reuptake. Although it is well established that reuptake of 5-HTo is mediated by 5-HT transporters (SERT), the release mechanism has remained unclear. It is also unclear how selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants increase the [5-HT]o in raphe nuclei and suppress serotonergic neuron activity, thereby potentially diminishing their own therapeutic effect. Using an electrophysiological approach in a slice preparation, we show that, in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), continuous nonexocytotic 5-HT release is responsible for suppression of phenylephrine-facilitated serotonergic neuron firing under basal conditions as well as for autoinhibition induced by SSRI application. By using 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated G protein–gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels of patched serotonergic neurons as 5-HTo sensors, we show substantial nonexocytotic 5-HT release under conditions of abolished firing activity, Ca2+ influx, vesicular monoamine transporter 2–mediated vesicular accumulation of 5-HT, and SERT-mediated 5-HT transport. Our results reveal a cytosolic origin of 5-HTo in the DRN and suggest that 5-HTo may be supplied by simple diffusion across the plasma membrane, primarily from the dense network of neurites of serotonergic neurons surrounding the cell bodies. These findings indicate that the serotonergic system does not function as a sum of independently acting neurons but as a highly interdependent neuronal network, characterized by a shared neurotransmitter pool and the regulation of firing activity by an interneuronal, yet activity-independent, nonexocytotic mechanism. PMID:25712017

  9. Nanostructured lipid carrier mediates effective delivery of methotrexate to induce apoptosis of rheumatoid arthritis via NF-κB and FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Garg, Neeraj K; Tyagi, Rajeev K; Singh, Bhupinder; Sharma, Gajanand; Nirbhavane, Pradip; Kushwah, Varun; Jain, Sanyog; Katare, Om Prakash

    2016-02-29

    Present study was designed to develop novel nano-structured lipid carriers (NLCs) formulated by lipid mixture and chemical permeation enhancer-based hydrogel for an effective transdermal delivery of methotrexate (MTX). The prepared NLCs were optimized with different preparative variables such as particle size <200 nm, poly-dispersity index (PDI) <0.2, and entrapment efficiency ∼85%. The drug incorporated into NLCs-gel base showed excellent spread ability without any grittiness during rheological behavior and texture profile analysis. The in vitro release showed biphasic release pattern with initial fast release of drug (>50%) in 8h followed by sustained release (up to 85%) by the end of 48thh. NLCs showed greater uptake in human hyper-proliferative keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). NLCs showed increased expression of inflammatory mediators as well asapoptosis in U937 monocytic cells. The greater expression of pro-apoptotic gene Bim regulated by NF-κB-IkB and FOXO1 is supported by fold regulations calculated for various apoptotic and pro-inflammatory biomarkers carried out by RT-PCR. The immunocytochemistry to detect IL-6 expression and immunofluorescence assay suggested that induced apoptosis occurs in experimentally induced in vitro arthritis model treated with NLCs-MTX. We saw reduced inflammation and triggered apoptosis through NF-κB & FOXO1 pathways induced by MTX loaded NLCs in rheumatoid arthritic cells. In addition, formulated NLCs exhibit better skin permeation with higher permeation flux & enhancement ratio as shown by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Moreover, histopathological examinations of skin are suggestive of safety potential of NLCs. PMID:26768725

  10. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution. PMID:23011851

  11. Design and test of three active flutter suppression controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Adams, William M.; Srinathkumar, S.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    1991-01-01

    Three flutter suppression control law design techniques are presented. Each uses multiple control surfaces and/or sensors. The first uses linear combinations of several accelerometer signals together with dynamic compensation to synthesize the modal rate of the critical mode for feedback to distributed control surfaces. The second uses traditional tools (pole/zero loci and Nyquist diagrams) to develop a good understanding of the flutter mechanism and produce a controller with minimal complexity and good robustness to plant uncertainty. The third starts with a minimum energy Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller, applies controller order reduction, and then modifies weight and noise covariance matrices to improve multi-variable robustness. The resulting designs were implemented digitally and tested subsonically on the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model. Test results presented here include plant characteristics, maximum attained closed-loop dynamic pressure, and Root Mean Square control surface activity. A key result is that simultaneous symmetric and antisymmetric flutter suppression was achieved by the second control law, with a 24 percent increase in attainable dynamic pressure.

  12. Immune-suppressive activity of punicalagin via inhibition of NFAT activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Ik; Kim, Byoung-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Shin; Lee, Samkeun; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Lim, Jong-Soon

    2008-07-11

    Since T cell activation is central to the development of autoimmune diseases, we screened a natural product library comprising 1400 samples of medicinal herbal extracts, to identify compounds that suppress T cell activity. Punicalagin (PCG) isolated from the fruit of Punica granatum was identified as a potent immune suppressant, based on its inhibitory action on the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). PCG downregulated the mRNA and soluble protein expression of interleukin-2 from anti-CD3/anti-CD28-stimulated murine splenic CD4+ T cells and suppressed mixed leukocytes reaction (MLR) without exhibiting cytotoxicity to the cells. In vivo, the PCG treatment inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced chronic ear edema in mice and decreased CD3+ T cell infiltration of the inflamed tissue. These results suggest that PCG could be a potential candidate for the therapeutics of various immune pathologies.

  13. Notum deacylates Wnt proteins to suppress signalling activity.

    PubMed

    Kakugawa, Satoshi; Langton, Paul F; Zebisch, Matthias; Howell, Steven A; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Bineva, Ganka; O'Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Jones, E Yvonne; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-12

    Signalling by Wnt proteins is finely balanced to ensure normal development and tissue homeostasis while avoiding diseases such as cancer. This is achieved in part by Notum, a highly conserved secreted feedback antagonist. Notum has been thought to act as a phospholipase, shedding glypicans and associated Wnt proteins from the cell surface. However, this view fails to explain specificity, as glypicans bind many extracellular ligands. Here we provide genetic evidence in Drosophila that Notum requires glypicans to suppress Wnt signalling, but does not cleave their glycophosphatidylinositol anchor. Structural analyses reveal glycosaminoglycan binding sites on Notum, which probably help Notum to co-localize with Wnt proteins. They also identify, at the active site of human and Drosophila Notum, a large hydrophobic pocket that accommodates palmitoleate. Kinetic and mass spectrometric analyses of human proteins show that Notum is a carboxylesterase that removes an essential palmitoleate moiety from Wnt proteins and thus constitutes the first known extracellular protein deacylase. PMID:25731175

  14. Hybrid Active/Passive Jet Engine Noise Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parente, C. A.; Arcas, N.; Walker, B. E.; Hersh, A. S.; Rice, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    A novel adaptive segmented liner concept has been developed that employs active control elements to modify the in-duct sound field to enhance the tone-suppressing performance of passive liner elements. This could potentially allow engine designs that inherently produce more tone noise but less broadband noise, or could allow passive liner designs to more optimally address high frequency broadband noise. A proof-of-concept validation program was undertaken, consisting of the development of an adaptive segmented liner that would maximize attenuation of two radial modes in a circular or annular duct. The liner consisted of a leading active segment with dual annuli of axially spaced active Helmholtz resonators, followed by an optimized passive liner and then an array of sensing microphones. Three successively complex versions of the adaptive liner were constructed and their performances tested relative to the performance of optimized uniform passive and segmented passive liners. The salient results of the tests were: The adaptive segmented liner performed well in a high flow speed model fan inlet environment, was successfully scaled to a high sound frequency and successfully attenuated three radial modes using sensor and active resonator arrays that were designed for a two mode, lower frequency environment.

  15. Rodent p53 suppresses the transforming activity of the activated Neu oncogene by modulating the Basal promoter activity of Neu.

    PubMed

    Matin, A; Xie, Y; Kao, M; Hung, M

    1995-05-01

    The rat neu oncogene encodes a dominant transforming oncogene. The mouse wild-type p53 suppresses the transforming activity of the neu oncogene while different p53 mutants demonstrate varying ability to repress neu-induced transformation. Suppression of neu-transforming activity is due to inhibition of transcription. Deletion analysis of the rat neu promoter shows that p53 represses the basal promoter activity of neu. Therefore, rodent p53 suppresses the transforming potential of neu by inhibiting transcription from the basal promoter of neu. PMID:21556644

  16. Geniposide Suppresses Hepatic Glucose Production via AMPK in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lixia; Zheng, Xuxu; Liu, Jianhui; Yin, Zhongyi

    2016-01-01

    Geniposide is one of the main compounds in Gardenia jasminoides ELLIS and has many pharmacological activities, but its anti-hyperglycemic activity has not yet been fully explored. This study was designed to determine, for the first time, how geniposide from G. jasminoides regulates hepatic glucose production, and the underlying mechanisms. During in vitro study, we found the inhibitory effect of geniposide on the hepatic glucose production is partly through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in HepG2 cells. Geniposide significantly inhibited hepatic glucose production in a dose-dependent manner. AMPK, acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACC) and forkhead box class O1 (FoxO1) phosphorylation were stimulated by different concentrations of geniposide. In addition, the enzyme activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) were all significantly suppressed. What is important is that these effects were partly reversed by (1) inhibition of AMPK activity by compound C, a selective AMPK inhibitor, and by (2) suppression of AMPKα expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA). In summary, geniposide potentially ameliorates hyperglycemia through inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by modulation of the AMPK-FoxO1 signaling pathway. Geniposide or geniposide-containing medicinal plants could represent a promising therapeutic agent to prevent type 2 diabetes on gluconeogenesis. PMID:26830672

  17. Monetary reward suppresses anterior insula activity during social pain.

    PubMed

    Cristofori, Irene; Harquel, Sylvain; Isnard, Jean; Mauguière, François; Sirigu, Angela

    2015-12-01

    Social pain after exclusion by others activates brain regions also involved in physical pain. Here we evaluated whether monetary reward could compensate for the negative feeling of social pain in the brain. To address this question we used the unique technique of intracranial electroencephalography in subjects with drug resistant epilepsy. Specifically, we recorded theta activity from intracranial electrodes implanted in the insular cortex while subjects experienced conditions of social inclusion and exclusion associated with monetary gain and loss. Our study confirmed that theta rhythm in the insular cortex is the neural signature of social exclusion. We found that while monetary gain suppresses the effect of social pain in the anterior insula, there is no such effect in the posterior insula. These results imply that the anterior insula can use secondary reward signals to compensate for the negative feeling of social pain. Hence, here we propose that the anterior insula plays a pivotal role in integrating contingencies to update social pain feelings. Finally, the possibility to modulate the theta rhythm through the reward system might open new avenues of research for treating pathologies related to social exclusion. PMID:25964499

  18. Wogonin suppresses osteopontin expression in adipocytes by activating PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye-min; Li, Ming-xin; Tang, Zhao; Wang, Chang-hua

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Wogonin (5,7-dihydroxy-8-methoxyflavone), a major bioactive compound of the flavonoid family, is commonly extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine Scutellaria baicalensis and possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and is assumed to have anti-diabetes function. Indeed, a current study has shown that it can possibly treat metabolic disorders such as those found in db/db mice. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of wogonin on osteopontin (OPN) expression in adipose tissue from type 1 diabetic mice and in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Methods: Type 1 diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) injection. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were converted to 3T3-L1 adipocytes through treatment with insulin, dexamethasone, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Western blot analysis and RT-PCR were performed to detect protein expression and mRNA levels, respectively. Results: Wogonin treatment suppressed the increase in serum OPN levels and reduced OPN expression in adipose tissue from STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Administration of wogonin enhanced PPARα expression and activity. Silencing of PPARα diminished the inhibitory effects of wogonin on OPN expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, the levels of c-Fos and phosphorylated c-Jun were reduced in wogonin-treated adipose tissue and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In addition, wogonin treatment dramatically mitigated p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK by its specific inhibitor SB203580 increased PPARα activity and decreased OPN expression. Conclusion: Our results suggest that wogonin downregulated OPN expression in adipocytes through the inhibition of p38 MAPK and the sequential activation of the PPARα pathway. Given the adverse effects of high OPN levels on metabolism, our results provide evidence for the potential administration of wogonin as a treatment for diabetes. PMID:26073326

  19. A novel function of syndecan-2, suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, which causes suppression of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Munesue, Seiichi; Yoshitomi, Yasuo; Kusano, Yuri; Koyama, Yoshie; Nishiyama, Akiko; Nakanishi, Hayao; Miyazaki, Kaoru; Ishimaru, Takeshi; Miyaura, Shuichi; Okayama, Minoru; Oguri, Kayoko

    2007-09-21

    The syndecans comprise a family of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans exhibiting complex biological functions involving the interaction of heparan sulfate side chains with a variety of soluble and insoluble heparin-binding extracellular ligands. Here we demonstrate an inverse correlation between the expression level of syndecan-2 and the metastatic potential of three clones derived from Lewis lung carcinoma 3LL. This correlation was proved to be a causal relationship, because transfection of syndecan-2 into the higher metastatic clone resulted in the suppression of both spontaneous and experimental metastases to the lung. Although the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and its cell surface activators, such as membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2, were similar regardless of the metastatic potentials of the clones, elevated activation of MMP-2 was observed in the higher metastatic clone. Removal of heparan sulfate from the cell surface of low metastatic cells by treatment with heparitinase-I promoted MMP-2 activation, and transfection of syndecan-2 into highly metastatic cells suppressed MMP-2 activation. Furthermore, transfection of mutated syndecan-2 lacking glycosaminoglycan attachment sites into highly metastatic cells did not have any suppressive effect on MMP-2 activation, suggesting that this suppression was mediated by the heparan sulfate side chains of syndecan-2. Actually, MMP-2 was found to exhibit a strong binding ability to heparin, the dissociation constant value being 62 nM. These results indicate a novel function of syndecan-2, which acts as a suppressor for MMP-2 activation, causing suppression of metastasis in at least the metastatic system used in the present study. PMID:17623663

  20. IL-27 suppresses antimicrobial activity in human leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Rosane M. B.; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M.; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Rea, Thomas H.; Ochoa, Maria T.; Cheng, Genhong; Modlin, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens trigger immunosuppressive pathways are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of microbial infection. One pathway that inhibits host defense responses involves the induction of type I interferons and subsequently IL-10, yet the mechanism by which type I IFN induces IL-10 remains unclear. Our studies of gene expression profiles derived from leprosy skin lesions suggested a link between IL-27 and the IFN-β induced IL-10 pathway. Here, we demonstrate that the IL-27p28 subunit is upregulated following treatment of monocytes with IFN-β and Mycobacterium leprae, the intracellular bacterium that causes leprosy. The ability of IFN-β and M. leprae to induce IL-10 was diminished by IL-27 knockdown. Additionally, treatment of monocytes with recombinant IL-27 was sufficient to induce the production of IL-10. Functionally, IL-27 inhibited the ability of IFN-γ to trigger antimicrobial activity against M. leprae in infected monocytes. At the site of disease, IL-27 was more strongly expressed in skin lesions of patients with progressive lepromatous leprosy, correlating and colocalizing with IFN-β and IL-10 in macrophages. Together, these data provide evidence that in the human cutaneous immune responses to microbial infection, IL-27 contributes to the suppression of host antimicrobial responses. PMID:26030183

  1. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  2. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-10

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time. PMID:22575961

  3. IL-27 Suppresses Antimicrobial Activity in Human Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Teles, Rosane M B; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M; Sarno, Euzenir N; Rea, Thomas H; Ochoa, Maria T; Cheng, Genhong; Modlin, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens trigger immunosuppressive pathways are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of microbial infection. One pathway that inhibits host defense responses involves the induction of type I interferons and subsequently IL-10, yet the mechanism by which type I IFN induces IL-10 remains unclear. Our studies of gene expression profiles derived from leprosy skin lesions suggested a link between IL-27 and the IFN-β induced IL-10 pathway. Here, we demonstrate that the IL-27p28 subunit is upregulated following treatment of monocytes with IFN-β and Mycobacterium leprae, the intracellular bacterium that causes leprosy. The ability of IFN-β and M. leprae to induce IL-10 was diminished by IL-27 knockdown. Additionally, treatment of monocytes with recombinant IL-27 was sufficient to induce the production of IL-10. Functionally, IL-27 inhibited the ability of IFN-γ to trigger antimicrobial activity against M. leprae in infected monocytes. At the site of disease, IL-27 was more strongly expressed in skin lesions of patients with progressive lepromatous leprosy, correlating and colocalizing with IFN-β and IL-10 in macrophages. Together, these data provide evidence that in the human cutaneous immune responses to microbial infection, IL-27 contributes to the suppression of host antimicrobial responses. PMID:26030183

  4. Mincle suppresses Toll-like receptor 4 activation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Ochi, Atsuo; Batel, Jennifer; Deutsch, Michael; Barilla, Rocky; Seifert, Lena; Pachter, H Leon; Daley, Donnele; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Miller, George

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of Toll-like receptor responses is critical for limiting tissue injury and autoimmunity in both sepsis and sterile inflammation. We found that Mincle, a C-type lectin receptor, regulates proinflammatory Toll-like receptor 4 signaling. Specifically, Mincle ligation diminishes Toll-like receptor 4-mediated inflammation, whereas Mincle deletion or knockdown results in marked hyperresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide in vitro, as well as overwhelming lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation in vivo. Mechanistically, Mincle deletion does not up-regulate Toll-like receptor 4 expression or reduce interleukin 10 production after Toll-like receptor 4 ligation; however, Mincle deletion decreases production of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent inhibitory intermediate suppressor of cytokine signaling 1, A20, and ABIN3 and increases expression of the Toll-like receptor 4 coreceptor CD14. Blockade of CD14 mitigates the increased sensitivity of Mincle(-/-) leukocytes to Toll-like receptor 4 ligation. Collectively, we describe a major role for Mincle in suppressing Toll-like receptor 4 responses and implicate its importance in nonmycobacterial models of inflammation. PMID:26747838

  5. FOXOs attenuate bone formation by suppressing Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Srividhya; Ambrogini, Elena; Bartell, Shoshana M; Han, Li; Roberson, Paula K; de Cabo, Rafael; Jilka, Robert L; Weinstein, Robert S; O'Brien, Charles A; Manolagas, Stavros C; Almeida, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Wnt/β-catenin/TCF signaling stimulates bone formation and suppresses adipogenesis. The hallmarks of skeletal involution with age, on the other hand, are decreased bone formation and increased bone marrow adiposity. These changes are associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased growth factor production, which activate members of the FOXO family of transcription factors. FOXOs in turn attenuate Wnt/β-catenin signaling by diverting β-catenin from TCF- to FOXO-mediated transcription. We show herein that mice lacking Foxo1, -3, and -4 in bipotential progenitors of osteoblast and adipocytes (expressing Osterix1) exhibited increased osteoblast number and high bone mass that was maintained in old age as well as decreased adiposity in the aged bone marrow. The increased bone mass in the Foxo-deficient mice was accounted for by increased proliferation of osteoprogenitor cells and bone formation resulting from upregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and cyclin D1 expression, but not changes in redox balance. Consistent with this mechanism, β-catenin deletion in Foxo null cells abrogated both the increased cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. The elucidation of a restraining effect of FOXOs on Wnt signaling in bipotential progenitors suggests that FOXO activation by accumulation of age-associated cellular stressors may be a seminal pathogenetic mechanism in the development of involutional osteoporosis. PMID:23867625

  6. Salidroside protects against kainic acid-induced status epilepticus via suppressing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Si, Pei-Pei; Zhen, Jun-Li; Cai, Yun-Lei; Wang, Wen-Jing; Wang, Wei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous mechanisms by which the brain generates seizures. It is well known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in status epilepticus (SE). Salidroside (SDS) extracted from Rhodiola rosea L. shows multiple bioactive properties, such as neuroprotection and antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo. This study explored the role of SDS in kainic acid (KA)-induced SE and investigated the underlying mechanism. Latency to SE increased in the SDS-pretreated mice compared to the KA group, while the percentage of incidence of SE was significantly reduced. These results suggested that pretreatment with SDS not only delayed SE, but it also decreased the incidence of SE induced by KA. KA increased MDA level and reduced the production of SOD and GSH at multiple timepoints after KA administration. SDS inhibited the change of MDA, SOD and GSH induced by KA prior to SE onset, indicating that SDS protects against KA-induced SE via suppressing oxidative stress. Based on these results, we investigated the possible molecular mechanism of SDS. Pretreatment with SDS reversed the KA-induced decrease in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK); increased the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity in KA-treated mice, which had no demonstrable effect on SIRT1 mRNA and protein; and suppressed the KA-induced increase in Ace-FoxO1. These results showed that AMPK/SIRT1/FoxO1 signaling is possibly the molecular mechanism of neuroprotection by SDS. PMID:26940236

  7. Energy-Recycling Semi-Active Vibration Suppression Experiment of a Truss with Piezoelectric Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makihara, K.

    2002-01-01

    inherent performance in damping is enhanced. Several semi-active vibration suppression approaches have been proposed based on variable-stiffness members, variable-friction devices, or variable-viscosity dampers, and the performance of each of these systems has been studied. The semi-active approach exploits passive energy-dissipation mechanisms, and supplies the system with no additional energy. Semi-active vibration suppression thus ensures that the system is always stable. This is its advantage. However, its performance in vibration suppression is usually inferior to active vibration suppression. have proposed collection of the energy taken from a vibrating system in suppressing its vibration. Using the collected energy to more quickly suppress the vibration is an attractive possibility. Additional energy is still not supplied to the system, and the vibration energy is finally dissipated. Therefore, this is a kind of semi-active approach, and retains the quality of that the system with it is always stable. method of energy-recycling semi-active vibration suppression is described and its performance is demonstrated by an experiment. A five bay truss beam with a piezoelectric transducer was used, and a simple electric circuit with switches was connected to the transducers. Then the switches were controlled by a processor so that the vibration was quickly suppressed by exploiting the collected electric energy. The results of the experiment demonstrated that the performance in vibration suppression of energy-recycling semi-active vibration suppression with actual hardware is much better than that of a traditional semi-active control. The effects of some non-ideal characteristics of real hardware on the performance in vibration suppression are also investigated.

  8. Suppression of Epithelial Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 Activation by Extracts of Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Bharat; Homma, Tetsuya; Norton, James E.; Sha, Quan; Siebert, Jason; Gupta, Dave S.; Schroeder, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (AF) is often pathogenic in immune-deficient individuals and can cause life-threatening infections such as invasive aspergillosis. The pulmonary epithelial response to AF infection and the signaling pathways associated with it have not been completely studied. BEAS-2B cells or primary human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to extracts of AF and challenged with IFN-β or the Toll-like receptor 3 agonist double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Cytokine release (B-cell activating factor of the TNF family [BAFF], IFN-γ–induced protein-10 [IP-10], etc.) was assessed. AF extract was separated into low-molecular-weight (LMW) and high-molecular-weight (HMW) fractions using ultra 4 centrifugal force filters to characterize the activity. Real-time PCR was performed with a TaqMan method, and protein estimation was performed using ELISA techniques. Western blot was performed to assess phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). IFN-β and dsRNA induced messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of BAFF (350- and 452-fold, respectively [n = 3]) and IP-10 (1,081- and 3,044-fold, respectively [n = 3]) in BEAS-2B cells. When cells were pretreated with AF extract for 1 hour and then stimulated with IFN-β or dsRNA for 6 hours, induction of BAFF and IP-10 mRNA was strongly suppressed relative to levels produced by IFN-β and dsRNA alone. When compared with control, soluble BAFF and IP-10 protein levels were maximally suppressed in dsRNA-stimulated wells treated with 1:320 wt/vol AF extract (P < 0.005). Upon molecular size fractionation, a LMW fraction of AF extract had no measurable suppressive effect on IP-10 mRNA expression. However, a HMW fraction of the AF extract significantly suppressed IP-10 expression in BEAS-2B cells that were stimulated with dsRNA or IFN-β. When BEAS-2B cells were pretreated with AF extract and then stimulated with IFN-β, reduced levels of pSTAT1 were observed, with maximum suppression at 4 and 6

  9. Suppression of epithelial signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 activation by extracts of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Homma, Tetsuya; Norton, James E; Sha, Quan; Siebert, Jason; Gupta, Dave S; Schroeder, James W; Schleimer, Robert P

    2015-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (AF) is often pathogenic in immune-deficient individuals and can cause life-threatening infections such as invasive aspergillosis. The pulmonary epithelial response to AF infection and the signaling pathways associated with it have not been completely studied. BEAS-2B cells or primary human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to extracts of AF and challenged with IFN-β or the Toll-like receptor 3 agonist double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Cytokine release (B-cell activating factor of the TNF family [BAFF], IFN-γ-induced protein-10 [IP-10], etc.) was assessed. AF extract was separated into low-molecular-weight (LMW) and high-molecular-weight (HMW) fractions using ultra 4 centrifugal force filters to characterize the activity. Real-time PCR was performed with a TaqMan method, and protein estimation was performed using ELISA techniques. Western blot was performed to assess phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). IFN-β and dsRNA induced messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of BAFF (350- and 452-fold, respectively [n = 3]) and IP-10 (1,081- and 3,044-fold, respectively [n = 3]) in BEAS-2B cells. When cells were pretreated with AF extract for 1 hour and then stimulated with IFN-β or dsRNA for 6 hours, induction of BAFF and IP-10 mRNA was strongly suppressed relative to levels produced by IFN-β and dsRNA alone. When compared with control, soluble BAFF and IP-10 protein levels were maximally suppressed in dsRNA-stimulated wells treated with 1:320 wt/vol AF extract (P < 0.005). Upon molecular size fractionation, a LMW fraction of AF extract had no measurable suppressive effect on IP-10 mRNA expression. However, a HMW fraction of the AF extract significantly suppressed IP-10 expression in BEAS-2B cells that were stimulated with dsRNA or IFN-β. When BEAS-2B cells were pretreated with AF extract and then stimulated with IFN-β, reduced levels of pSTAT1 were observed, with maximum suppression at 4 and 6

  10. [Suppression of sexual activity and reproduction in male small ruminants].

    PubMed

    Mihsler, Lisa; Wagner, Henrik; Wehrend, Axel

    2016-06-16

    Handling and husbandry of male small ruminants after sexual maturity often become difficult. Castration is currently the most reliable solution to this problem. Medicinal procedures for temporary inhibition of the gonad function could provide an alternative. Following a short overview of surgical castration, the current knowledge on the application of vaccines against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH agonist in rams and billy goats is presented in a literature overview. In rams, GnRH vaccination has been used successfully for temporary suppression of the reproduction function, regardless of an animal's age at the time of therapy initiation. Fewer investigations are available for the billy goat. A complete suppression of spermatogenesis was not achieved in all cases. Currently, treatment with GnRH agonists does not represent a relible method for the suppression of gonad function. PMID:27189125

  11. TCF7L2 Modulates Glucose Homeostasis by Regulating CREB- and FoxO1-Dependent Transcriptional Pathway in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Park, Jinyoung; Kim, Su Sung; Oh, Hyunhee; Choi, Cheol Soo; Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral insulin resistance contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. TCF7L2 has been tightly associated with this disease, although the exact mechanism was largely elusive. Here we propose a novel role of TCF7L2 in hepatic glucose metabolism in mammals. Expression of medium and short isoforms of TCF7L2 was greatly diminished in livers of diet-induced and genetic mouse models of insulin resistance, prompting us to delineate the functional role of these isoforms in hepatic glucose metabolism. Knockdown of hepatic TCF7L2 promoted increased blood glucose levels and glucose intolerance with increased gluconeogenic gene expression in wild-type mice, in accordance with the PCR array data showing that only the gluconeogenic pathway is specifically up-regulated upon depletion of hepatic TCF7L2. Conversely, overexpression of a nuclear isoform of TCF7L2 in high-fat diet-fed mice ameliorated hyperglycemia with improved glucose tolerance, suggesting a role of this factor in hepatic glucose metabolism. Indeed, we observed a binding of TCF7L2 to promoters of gluconeogenic genes; and expression of TCF7L2 inhibited adjacent promoter occupancies of CREB, CRTC2, and FoxO1, critical transcriptional modules in hepatic gluconeogenesis, to disrupt target gene transcription. Finally, haploinsufficiency of TCF7L2 in mice displayed higher glucose levels and impaired glucose tolerance, which were rescued by hepatic expression of a nuclear isoform of TCF7L2 at the physiological level. Collectively, these data suggest a crucial role of TCF7L2 in hepatic glucose metabolism; reduced hepatic expression of nuclear isoforms of this factor might be a critical instigator of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. PMID:23028378

  12. Constitutive androstane receptor activation by 2,4,6-triphenyldioxane-1,3 suppresses the expression of the gluconeogenic genes.

    PubMed

    Kachaylo, Ekaterina M; Yarushkin, Andrei A; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O

    2012-03-15

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) has a central role in detoxification processes, regulating the expression of a set of genes involved in metabolism. The dual role of NR1I3 as both a xenosensor and as a regulator of endogenous energy metabolism has recently been accepted. Here, we investigated the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of the glucose metabolising genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) by the cis isomer of 2,4,6-triphenyldioxane-1,3 (cisTPD), a highly effective NR1I3 activator in rat liver. It was shown that expression of the gluconeogenic genes PEPCK and G6Pase was repressed by cisTPD treatment under fasting conditions. Western-blot analysis demonstrated a clear reduction in the intensity of PEPCK and G6Pase immunobands from the livers of cisTPD-treated animals relative to bands from the livers of control animals. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that cisTPD prevents the binding of FOXO1 to the insulin response sequences in the PEPCK and G6Pase gene promoters in rat liver. Moreover, cisTPD-activated NR1I3 inhibited NR2A1 (HNF-4) transactivation by competing with NR2A1 for binding to the NR2A1-binding element (DR1-site) in the gluconeogenic gene promoters. Thus, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the cisTPD-activated NR1I3 participates in the regulation of the gluconeogenic genes PEPCK and G6Pase. PMID:22296760

  13. Adaptive top-down suppression of hippocampal activity and the purging of intrusive memories from consciousness.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Roland G; Hulbert, Justin C; Huddleston, Ean; Anderson, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    When reminded of unwanted memories, people often attempt to suppress these experiences from awareness. Prior work indicates that control processes mediated by the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) modulate hippocampal activity during such retrieval suppression. It remains unknown whether this modulation plays a role in purging an intrusive memory from consciousness. Here, we combined fMRI and effective connectivity analyses with phenomenological reports to scrutinize a role for adaptive top-down suppression of hippocampal retrieval processes in terminating mnemonic awareness of intrusive memories. Participants either suppressed or recalled memories of pictures depicting faces or places. After each trial, they reported their success at regulating awareness of the memory. DLPFC activation was greatest when unwanted memories intruded into consciousness and needed to be purged, and this increased engagement predicted superior control of intrusive memories over time. However, hippocampal activity was decreased during the suppression of place memories only. Importantly, the inhibitory influence of the DLPFC on the hippocampus was linked to the ensuing reduction in intrusions of the suppressed memories. Individuals who exhibited negative top-down coupling during early suppression attempts experienced fewer involuntary memory intrusions later on. Over repeated suppressions, the DLPFC-hippocampus connectivity grew less negative with the degree that they no longer had to purge unwanted memories from awareness. These findings support a role of DLPFC in countermanding the unfolding recollection of an unwanted memory via the suppression of hippocampal processing, a mechanism that may contribute to adaptation in the aftermath of traumatic experiences. PMID:25100219

  14. Why the White Bear is Still There: Electrophysiological Evidence for Ironic Semantic Activation during Thought Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Ryan J.; Wicha, Nicole Y. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Much research has focused on the paradoxical effects of thought suppression, leading to the viewpoint that increases in unwanted thoughts are due to an ironic monitoring process which increases the activation of the very thoughts one is trying to rid from consciousness. However, it remains unclear from behavioral findings whether suppressed thoughts become more accessible during the act of suppression. In the current study, event-related potentials were recorded while participants suppressed or expressed thoughts of a focus word during a simple lexical decision task. Modulations in the N400 component reported here demonstrate the paradoxical effects occurring at the semantic level during suppression, as well as some evidence for the rebound effect after suppression periods. Interestingly, semantic activation was greater for focus words during suppression than expression, despite differences in the N1 window suggesting that expression elicited greater perceptual processing than suppression. Results provide electrophysiological evidence for the Ironic Process model and support recent claims of asymmetric network activation during thought suppression. PMID:20044982

  15. Role of activation in alveolar macrophage-mediated suppression of the plaque-forming cell response.

    PubMed Central

    Mbawuike, I N; Herscowitz, H B

    1988-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are highly suppressive of the in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) response of spleen cells obtained from mice primed with sheep erythrocytes. Comparison of macrophage populations obtained from disparate anatomical sites revealed that although in both cases there was a cell-concentration-dependent suppression of the PFC response, resident AM or AM activated as a result of intravenous injection of Mycobacterium bovis BCG were equally suppressive at the doses examined. Although there was a similar dose-dependent suppression with peritoneal macrophages, BCG-activated cells were more suppressive of the PFC response than were resident cells. In contrast, splenic macrophages at comparable concentrations were not at all suppressive. Resident AM exhibited significantly lower levels of 5'-nucleotidase activity than did resident peritoneal macrophages. Macrophage-mediated suppression of the in vitro PFC response could not be attributed to the release of toxic oxygen metabolites (H2O2, O2- ,and .OH) or prostaglandins, since the addition of catalase, superoxide dismutase, 2-mercaptoethanol, or indomethacin did not completely reverse suppression. These results suggest that the lung microenvironment may maintain AM in an activated state which contributes to their potential immunoregulatory functions. PMID:2830191

  16. Appetite suppression and weight reduction by a centrally active aminosterol.

    PubMed

    Ahima, Rexford S; Patel, Hiralben R; Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Qi, Yong; Hileman, Stanley M; Zasloff, Michael A

    2002-07-01

    The rise in obesity and its complications has generated enormous interest in the regulation of feeding and body weight. We show that a spermine metabolite of cholesterol (MSI-1436) decreases body weight, specifically fat, by suppressing feeding and preventing the reduction in energy expenditure, hormonal changes, and patterns of neuropeptide expression normally associated with weight loss. MSI-1436 enters the brain after peripheral injection and is more potent when injected into the cerebral ventricle (intracerebroventricular [ICV]). Systemic or ICV MSI-1436 administration induced similar patterns of Fos immunoreactivity in the brain, especially the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN). This brain region integrates neural signals from hypothalamic and brain stem nuclei and regulates feeding behavior, autonomic function, and neuroendocrine function. Microinjection of MSI-1436 into the PVN potently suppressed feeding and reduced body weight for several days. Unlike caloric restriction, MSI-1436 decreased mRNA levels of agouti-related peptide and neuropeptide Y in the hypothalamus. These findings indicate that MSI-1436 acts in the brain to regulate food intake and energy expenditure, likely through suppression of orexigenic hypothalamic pathways. PMID:12086938

  17. Vitamin K2 stimulates osteoblastogenesis and suppresses osteoclastogenesis by suppressing NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Weitzmann, M Neale

    2011-01-01

    Several bone protective factors are reported to exhibit stimulatory activities on bone formation coupled with inhibitory effects on bone resorption; one such factor is vitamin K2. Vitamin K species [K1 (phylloquinone) and K2 (menaquinone)] have long been associated with bone protective activities and are receiving intense interest as nutritional supplements for the prevention or amelioration of bone disease in humans. However, the mechanisms of vitamin K action on the skeleton are poorly defined. Activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal transduction pathway is essential for osteoclast formation and resorption. By contrast, NF-κB signaling potently antagonizes osteoblast differentiation and function, prompting us to speculate that NF-κB antagonists may represent a novel class of dual anti-catabolic and pro-anabolic agents. We now show that vitamin K2 action on osteoblast and osteoclast formation and activity is accomplished by down-regulating basal and cytokine-induced NF-κB activation, by increasing IκB mRNA, in a γ-carboxylation-independent manner. Furthermore, vitamin K2 prevented repression by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) of SMAD signaling induced by either transforming growth factor ß (TGFß) or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Vitamin K2 further antagonized receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL)-induced NF-κB activation in osteoclast precursors. Our data provide a novel mechanism to explain the dual pro-anabolic and anti-catabolic activities of vitamin K2, and may further support the concept that pharmacological modulation of NF-κB signal transduction may constitute an effective mechanism for ameliorating pathological bone loss and for promoting bone health. PMID:21072493

  18. Suppression or Induction of Apoptosis by Opposing Pathways Downstream from Calcium-Activated Calcineurin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotem, Joseph; Kama, Rachel; Sachs, Leo

    1999-10-01

    Ca2+-mobilizing compounds such as the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 or the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin can suppress or induce apoptosis in the same cells. The use of different calcineurin inhibitors has shown that both suppression and induction of apoptosis by the Ca2+-mobilizing compounds were mediated by calcineurin activation. Ca2+-mobilizing compounds activated p38 and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Induction of apoptosis by the Ca2+-mobilizing compounds was suppressed by an inhibitor of p38 MAPK but not by an inhibitor of p44/42 MAPK. These MAPK inhibitors did not suppress apoptosis induction by wild-type p53 or by withdrawal of IL-6 from IL-6-dependent cells that are mediated by calcineurin-independent pathways. These MAPK inhibitors also did not affect the ability of Ca2+-mobilizing compounds to suppress apoptosis. The results indicate that (i) Ca2+-mobilizing compounds activate different and opposing pathways that diverge downstream from calcineurin activation that can either suppress or induce apoptosis in the same cells; (ii) p38 MAPK but not p44/42 MAPK is involved in induction of apoptosis but not in its suppression by the Ca2+-mobilizing compounds; and (iii) neither p38 nor p44/42 MAPKs mediate induction of apoptosis by some calcineurin-independent pathways.

  19. Design and experimental validation of a flutter suppression controller for the active flexible wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of an active flutter suppression controller for the Active Flexible Wing wind tunnel model is presented. The design is accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and extensive simulation based analysis. The design approach uses a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple controller structure to meet stringent design specifications. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite modeling errors in predicted flutter dynamic pressure and flutter frequency. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with another controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  20. Flutter suppression for the Active Flexible Wing - Control system design and experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, M. R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of a control law for an active flutter suppression system for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model is presented. The design was accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and with extensive use of simulation-based analysis. The design approach relied on a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple control law structure. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite errors in the design model. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with a rolling maneuver controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  1. Suppression of Chemically Induced and Spontaneous Mouse Oocyte Activation by AMP-Activated Protein Kinase1

    PubMed Central

    Ya, Ru; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oocyte activation is an important process triggered by fertilization that initiates embryonic development. However, parthenogenetic activation can occur either spontaneously or with chemical treatments. The LT/Sv mouse strain is genetically predisposed to spontaneous activation. LT oocytes have a cell cycle defect and are ovulated at the metaphase I stage instead of metaphase II. A thorough understanding of the female meiosis defects in this strain remains elusive. We have reported that AMP-activated protein kinase (PRKA) has an important role in stimulating meiotic resumption and promoting completion of meiosis I while suppressing premature parthenogenetic activation. Here we show that early activation of PRKA during the oocyte maturation period blocked chemically induced activation in B6SJL oocytes and spontaneous activation in LT/SvEiJ oocytes. This inhibitory effect was associated with high levels of MAPK1/3 activity. Furthermore, stimulation of PRKA partially rescued the meiotic defects of LT/Sv mouse oocytes in concert with correction of abnormal spindle pole localization of PRKA and loss of prolonged spindle assembly checkpoint activity. Altogether, these results confirm a role for PRKA in helping sustain the MII arrest in mature oocytes and suggest that dysfunctional PRKA contributes to meiotic defects in LT/SvEiJ oocytes. PMID:23390161

  2. The E–Id protein axis modulates the activities of the PI3K–AKT–mTORC1–Hif1a and c-myc/p19Arf pathways to suppress innate variant TFH cell development, thymocyte expansion, and lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Masaki; Miyazaki, Kazuko; Chen, Shuwen; Chandra, Vivek; Wagatsuma, Keisuke; Agata, Yasutoshi; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Saito, Rintaro; Chang, Aaron N.; Varki, Nissi; Kawamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    It is now well established that the E and Id protein axis regulates multiple steps in lymphocyte development. However, it remains unknown how E and Id proteins mechanistically enforce and maintain the naïve T-cell fate. Here we show that Id2 and Id3 suppressed the development and expansion of innate variant follicular helper T (TFH) cells. Innate variant TFH cells required major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like signaling and were associated with germinal center B cells. We found that Id2 and Id3 induced Foxo1 and Foxp1 expression to antagonize the activation of a TFH transcription signature. We show that Id2 and Id3 acted upstream of the Hif1a/Foxo/AKT/mTORC1 pathway as well as the c-myc/p19Arf module to control cellular expansion. We found that mice depleted for Id2 and Id3 expression developed colitis and αβ T-cell lymphomas. Lymphomas depleted for Id2 and Id3 expression displayed elevated levels of c-myc, whereas p19Arf abundance declined. Transcription signatures of Id2- and Id3-depleted lymphomas revealed similarities to genetic deficiencies associated with Burkitt lymphoma. We propose that, in response to antigen receptor and/or cytokine signaling, the E–Id protein axis modulates the activities of the PI3K–AKT–mTORC1–Hif1a and c-myc/p19Arf pathways to control cellular expansion and homeostatic proliferation. PMID:25691468

  3. The E-Id protein axis modulates the activities of the PI3K-AKT-mTORC1-Hif1a and c-myc/p19Arf pathways to suppress innate variant TFH cell development, thymocyte expansion, and lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masaki; Miyazaki, Kazuko; Chen, Shuwen; Chandra, Vivek; Wagatsuma, Keisuke; Agata, Yasutoshi; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Saito, Rintaro; Chang, Aaron N; Varki, Nissi; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Murre, Cornelis

    2015-02-15

    It is now well established that the E and Id protein axis regulates multiple steps in lymphocyte development. However, it remains unknown how E and Id proteins mechanistically enforce and maintain the naïve T-cell fate. Here we show that Id2 and Id3 suppressed the development and expansion of innate variant follicular helper T (TFH) cells. Innate variant TFH cells required major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like signaling and were associated with germinal center B cells. We found that Id2 and Id3 induced Foxo1 and Foxp1 expression to antagonize the activation of a TFH transcription signature. We show that Id2 and Id3 acted upstream of the Hif1a/Foxo/AKT/mTORC1 pathway as well as the c-myc/p19Arf module to control cellular expansion. We found that mice depleted for Id2 and Id3 expression developed colitis and αβ T-cell lymphomas. Lymphomas depleted for Id2 and Id3 expression displayed elevated levels of c-myc, whereas p19Arf abundance declined. Transcription signatures of Id2- and Id3-depleted lymphomas revealed similarities to genetic deficiencies associated with Burkitt lymphoma. We propose that, in response to antigen receptor and/or cytokine signaling, the E-Id protein axis modulates the activities of the PI3K-AKT-mTORC1-Hif1a and c-myc/p19Arf pathways to control cellular expansion and homeostatic proliferation. PMID:25691468

  4. Suppression of voluntary motor activity revealed using transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex in man.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, N J; Romaiguère, P; Maskill, D W; Ellaway, P H

    1994-01-01

    1. Suppression of voluntary muscle activity of hand and arm muscles in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex has been investigated in man. 2. Suppression could be elicited by low levels of TMS without any prior excitatory response. The latency of the suppression was 3-8 ms longer than the excitation observed at a higher stimulus intensity. The duration of the suppression ranged from 8 to 26 ms. 3. A circular stimulating coil was used to determine threshold intensity for excitation and suppression of contraction of thenar muscles in response to TMS at different locations over the motor cortex. The locations for lowest threshold excitation coincided with those for lowest threshold suppression. Suppression was elicited at a lower threshold than excitation at all locations. 4. A figure-of-eight stimulating coil was positioned over the left motor cortex at the lowest threshold point for excitation of the right thenar muscles. The orientation for the lowest threshold excitatory and inhibitory responses was the same for all subjects. That orientation induced a stimulating current travelling in an antero-medial direction. Suppression was invariably elicited at lower thresholds than excitation. 5. When antagonistic muscles (second and third dorsal interosseus) were co-contracted, TMS evoked coincident suppression of voluntary EMG in the two muscles without prior excitation of either muscle. This suggests that the suppression is not mediated via corticospinal activation of spinal interneurones. 6. Test responses to electrical stimulation of the cervical spinal cord were evoked in both relaxed and activated thenar muscles. In the relaxed muscle, prior TMS at an intensity that would suppress voluntary activity failed to influence the test responses, suggesting absence of inhibition at a spinal level. However, in the activated muscle, prior TMS could reduce the test response. This may be explained by disfacilitation of motoneurones due to

  5. Involvement of NADPH oxidases in suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 promoter-dependent transcriptional activities by sesamol

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Satomi; Ishigamori, Rikako; Fujii, Gen; Takahashi, Mami; Onuma, Wakana; Terasaki, Masaru; Yano, Tomohiro; Mutoh, Michihiro

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been shown to play an important role in colon carcinogenesis. Moreover, one of the components of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1), dominantly expressed in the colon, is implicated in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. We have reported that sesamol, one of the lignans in sesame seeds, suppressed COX-2 gene transcriptional activity in human colon cancer cells, and also suppressed intestinal polyp formation in Apc-mutant mice. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NADPH oxidase in the inhibition of COX-2 transcriptional activity by sesamol. We found that several NADPH oxidase inhibitors, such as apocynin, showed suppressive effects on COX-2 transcriptional activity. Moreover, sesamol significantly suppressed NOX1 mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we demonstrated that knockdown of NOX1 successfully suppressed COX-2 transcriptional activity. These results suggest that inhibition of NADPH oxidase, especially NOX1, may be involved in the mechanism of the suppression of COX-2 transcriptional activity by sesamol. PMID:25759517

  6. Suppression of newborn natural killer cell activity by prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Milch, P.O.; Salvatore, W.; Luft, B.; Baker, D.A.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 on natural killer cell activity of cord blood was examined. Natural killer cell activity, determined by chromium 51 release, was significantly reduced after prostaglandin E2 (1 microgram/ml) treatment. Prostaglandin E2 has been found to enhance the cellular spread of herpesvirus. Thus prostaglandins may enhance viral infections indirectly by suppressing natural killer cell activity.

  7. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  8. Active vertical tail buffeting suppression based on macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chengzhe; Li, Bin; Liang, Li; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic buffet is unsteady airflow exerting forces onto a surface, which can lead to premature fatigue damage of aircraft vertical tail structures, especially for aircrafts with twin vertical tails at high angles of attack. In this work, Macro Fiber Composite (MFC), which can provide strain actuation, was used as the actuator for the buffet-induced vibration control, and the positioning of the MFC patches was led by the strain energy distribution on the vertical tail. Positive Position Feedback (PPF) control algorithm has been widely used for its robustness and simplicity in practice, and consequently it was developed to suppress the buffet responses of first bending and torsional mode of vertical tail. However, its performance is usually attenuated by the phase contributions from non-collocated sensor/actuator configuration and plants. The phase lag between the input and output signals of the control system was identified experimentally, and the phase compensation was considered in the PPF control algorithm. The simulation results of the amplitude frequency of the closed-loop system showed that the buffet response was alleviated notably around the concerned bandwidth. Then the wind tunnel experiment was conducted to verify the effectiveness of MFC actuators and compensated PPF, and the Root Mean Square (RMS) of the acceleration response was reduced 43.4%, 28.4% and 39.5%, respectively, under three different buffeting conditions.

  9. Robust Multivariable Flutter Suppression for the Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1997-01-01

    The Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) project is part of NASA Langley Research Center s Benchmark Models Program for studying transonic aeroelastic phenomena. In January of 1996 the BACT wind-tunnel model was used to successfully demonstrate the application of robust multivariable control design methods (H and -synthesis) to flutter suppression. This paper addresses the design and experimental evaluation of robust multivariable flutter suppression control laws with particular attention paid to the degree to which stability and performance robustness was achieved.

  10. Botulinum Toxin Suppression of CNS Network Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pancrazio, Joseph J.; Gopal, Kamakshi; Keefer, Edward W.; Gross, Guenter W.

    2014-01-01

    The botulinum toxins are potent agents which disrupt synaptic transmission. While the standard method for BoNT detection and quantification is based on the mouse lethality assay, we have examined whether alterations in cultured neuronal network activity can be used to detect the functional effects of BoNT. Murine spinal cord and frontal cortex networks cultured on substrate integrated microelectrode arrays allowed monitoring of spontaneous spike and burst activity with exposure to BoNT serotype A (BoNT-A). Exposure to BoNT-A inhibited spike activity in cultured neuronal networks where, after a delay due to toxin internalization, the rate of activity loss depended on toxin concentration. Over a 30 hr exposure to BoNT-A, the minimum concentration detected was 2 ng/mL, a level consistent with mouse lethality studies. A small proportion of spinal cord networks, but not frontal cortex networks, showed a transient increase in spike and burst activity with exposure to BoNT-A, an effect likely due to preferential inhibition of inhibitory synapses expressed in this tissue. Lastly, prior exposure to human-derived antisera containing neutralizing antibodies prevented BoNT-A induced inhibition of network spike activity. These observations suggest that the extracellular recording from cultured neuronal networks can be used to detect and quantify functional BoNT effects. PMID:24688538

  11. Botulinum toxin suppression of CNS network activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pancrazio, Joseph J; Gopal, Kamakshi; Keefer, Edward W; Gross, Guenter W

    2014-01-01

    The botulinum toxins are potent agents which disrupt synaptic transmission. While the standard method for BoNT detection and quantification is based on the mouse lethality assay, we have examined whether alterations in cultured neuronal network activity can be used to detect the functional effects of BoNT. Murine spinal cord and frontal cortex networks cultured on substrate integrated microelectrode arrays allowed monitoring of spontaneous spike and burst activity with exposure to BoNT serotype A (BoNT-A). Exposure to BoNT-A inhibited spike activity in cultured neuronal networks where, after a delay due to toxin internalization, the rate of activity loss depended on toxin concentration. Over a 30 hr exposure to BoNT-A, the minimum concentration detected was 2 ng/mL, a level consistent with mouse lethality studies. A small proportion of spinal cord networks, but not frontal cortex networks, showed a transient increase in spike and burst activity with exposure to BoNT-A, an effect likely due to preferential inhibition of inhibitory synapses expressed in this tissue. Lastly, prior exposure to human-derived antisera containing neutralizing antibodies prevented BoNT-A induced inhibition of network spike activity. These observations suggest that the extracellular recording from cultured neuronal networks can be used to detect and quantify functional BoNT effects. PMID:24688538

  12. Suppression of irrelevant activation in the horizontal and vertical Simon task differs quantitatively not qualitatively.

    PubMed

    Töbel, Lisa; Hübner, Ronald; Stürmer, Birgit

    2014-10-01

    The Simon effect is usually explained by the assumption that the irrelevant stimulus location automatically activates the corresponding response. In the case of incongruent stimulus-response assignments automatically activated responses therefore have to be suppressed to ensure correct responses. This account, however, has been called into question for other than horizontally arranged visual Simon tasks. We investigated whether there is a qualitative or quantitative difference in suppression of irrelevant activation between horizontally and vertically arranged Simon tasks, using delta-function analyses. Sequential analyses revealed suppression after incongruent trials in both tasks, supporting the idea of a quantitative rather than a qualitative difference between the tasks. We conclude that automatic response activation is weaker in vertical tasks resulting in lower inhibitory demands as compared to horizontal tasks. PMID:25113126

  13. Acetic acid suppresses the increase in disaccharidase activity that occurs during culture of caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Satsu, H; Watanabe, H; Fukaya, M; Tsukamoto, Y; Miyamoto, Y; Shimizu, M

    2000-03-01

    To understand how blood glucose level is lowered by oral administration of vinegar, we examined effects of acetic acid on glucose transport and disaccharidase activity in Caco-2 cells. Cells were cultured for 15 d in a medium containing 5 mmol/L of acetic acid. This chronic treatment did not affect cell growth or viability, and furthermore, apoptotic cell death was not observed. Glucose transport, evaluated with a nonmetabolizable substrate, 3-O-methyl glucose, also was not affected. However, the increase of sucrase activity observed in control cells (no acetic acid) was significantly suppressed by acetic acid (P < 0.01). Acetic acid suppressed sucrase activity in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Similar treatments (5 mmol/L and 15 d) with other organic acids such as citric, succinic, L-maric, L-lactic, L-tartaric and itaconic acids, did not suppress the increase in sucrase activity. Acetic acid treatment (5 mmol/L and 15 d) significantly decreased the activities of disaccharidases (sucrase, maltase, trehalase and lactase) and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme, whereas the activities of other hydrolases (alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase-N, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase) were not affected. To understand mechanisms underlying the suppression of disaccharidase activity by acetic acid, Northern and Western analyses of the sucrase-isomaltase complex were performed. Acetic acid did not affect the de novo synthesis of this complex at either the transcriptional or translational levels. The antihyperglycemic effect of acetic acid may be partially due to the suppression of disaccharidase activity. This suppression seems to occur during the post-translational processing. PMID:10702577

  14. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Laura; Solito, Samantha; Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-12

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression. PMID:26700461

  15. Somatosensory Anticipatory Alpha Activity Increases to Suppress Distracting Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haegens, Saskia; Luther, Lisa; Jensen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Effective processing of sensory input in daily life requires attentional selection and amplification of relevant input and, just as importantly, attenuation of irrelevant information. It has been proposed that top-down modulation of oscillatory alpha band activity (8-14 Hz) serves to allocate resources to various regions, depending on task…

  16. Emergence of spatially heterogeneous burst suppression in a neural field model of electrocortical activity

    PubMed Central

    Bojak, Ingo; Stoyanov, Zhivko V.; Liley, David T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Burst suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is a well-described phenomenon that occurs during deep anesthesia, as well as in a variety of congenital and acquired brain insults. Classically it is thought of as spatially synchronous, quasi-periodic bursts of high amplitude EEG separated by low amplitude activity. However, its characterization as a “global brain state” has been challenged by recent results obtained with intracranial electrocortigraphy. Not only does it appear that burst suppression activity is highly asynchronous across cortex, but also that it may occur in isolated regions of circumscribed spatial extent. Here we outline a realistic neural field model for burst suppression by adding a slow process of synaptic resource depletion and recovery, which is able to reproduce qualitatively the empirically observed features during general anesthesia at the whole cortex level. Simulations reveal heterogeneous bursting over the model cortex and complex spatiotemporal dynamics during simulated anesthetic action, and provide forward predictions of neuroimaging signals for subsequent empirical comparisons and more detailed characterization. Because burst suppression corresponds to a dynamical end-point of brain activity, theoretically accounting for its spatiotemporal emergence will vitally contribute to efforts aimed at clarifying whether a common physiological trajectory is induced by the actions of general anesthetic agents. We have taken a first step in this direction by showing that a neural field model can qualitatively match recent experimental data that indicate spatial differentiation of burst suppression activity across cortex. PMID:25767438

  17. ACTIVE VIBRATION SUPPRESSION R+D FOR THE NEXT LINEARCOLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, Leif S.

    2002-08-20

    The nanometer scale beam sizes at the interaction point in linear colliders limit the allowable motion of the final focus magnets. We have constructed a prototype system to investigate the use of active vibration damping to control magnet motion. Inertial sensors are used to measure the position of a test mass, and a DSP based system provides feedback using electrostatic pushers. Simulation and experimental results for the control of a mechanically simple system are presented.

  18. Active Vibration Suppression R and D for the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef C

    2001-12-17

    The nanometer scale beam sizes at the interaction point in linear colliders limit the allowable motion of the final focus magnets. We have constructed a prototype system to investigate the use of active vibration damping to control magnet motion. Inertial sensors are used to measure the position of a test mass, and a DSP based system provides feedback using electrostatic pushers. Simulation and experimental results for the control of a mechanically simple system are presented.

  19. A Rapid One-Generation Genetic Screen in a Drosophila Model to Capture Rhabdomyosarcoma Effectors and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Kathleen A.; Endicott, Tiana R.; Avirneni-Vadlamudi, Usha; Galindo, Rene L.

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is an aggressive childhood malignancy of neoplastic muscle-lineage precursors that fail to terminally differentiate into syncytial muscle. The most aggressive form of RMS, alveolar-RMS, is driven by misexpression of the PAX-FOXO1 oncoprotein, which is generated by recurrent chromosomal translocations that fuse either the PAX3 or PAX7 gene to FOXO1. The molecular underpinnings of PAX-FOXO1−mediated RMS pathogenesis remain unclear, however, and clinical outcomes poor. Here, we report a new approach to dissect RMS, exploiting a highly efficient Drosophila PAX7-FOXO1 model uniquely configured to uncover PAX-FOXO1 RMS genetic effectors in only one generation. With this system, we have performed a comprehensive deletion screen against the Drosophila autosomes and demonstrate that mutation of Mef2, a myogenesis lynchpin in both flies and mammals, dominantly suppresses PAX7-FOXO1 pathogenicity and acts as a PAX7-FOXO1 gene target. Additionally, we reveal that mutation of mastermind, a gene encoding a MEF2 transcriptional coactivator, similarly suppresses PAX7-FOXO1, further pointing toward MEF2 transcriptional activity as a PAX-FOXO1 underpinning. These studies show the utility of the PAX-FOXO1 Drosophila system as a robust one-generation (F1) RMS gene discovery platform and demonstrate how Drosophila transgenic conditional expression models can be configured for the rapid dissection of human disease. PMID:25491943

  20. Blue light irradiation suppresses dendritic cells activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael R; Abel, Manuela; Lopez Kostka, Susanna; Rudolph, Berenice; Becker, Detlef; von Stebut, Esther

    2013-08-01

    Blue light is a UV-free irradiation suitable for treating chronic skin inflammation, for example, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and hand- and foot eczema. However, a better understanding of the mode of action is still missing. For this reason, we investigated whether dendritic cells (DC) are directly affected by blue light irradiation in vitro. Here, we report that irradiation neither induced apoptosis nor maturation of monocyte-derived and myeloid DC. However, subsequent DC maturation upon LPS/IFNγ stimulation was impaired in a dose-dependent manner as assessed by maturation markers and cytokine release. Moreover, the potential of this DC to induce cytokine secretion from allogeneic CD4 T cells was reduced. In conclusion, unlike UV irradiation, blue light irradiation at high and low doses only resulted in impaired DC maturation upon activation and a reduced subsequent stimulatory capacity in allogeneic MLRs with strongest effects at higher doses. PMID:23879817

  1. Robust Kalman filter design for active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, W. L.; Mahesh, J. K.; Stone, C. R.; Dunn, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    Additional insight is provided into the use of the Doyle-Stein (1979, 1981) technique in aeroelastic control problems by examining the application of the method to a flutter control problem. The system to be controlled consists of a full-size wind tunnel model of a wing, plus an aileron, an actuator, and an accelerometer used to sense the motion of the wing. A full-state feedback controller was designed using linear optimal control theory, and a Kalman filter was used in the feedback loop for state estimation. The filter design procedure is explained along with that to improve closed-loop properties of the system. The locus of the poles of the filter is examined as a scalar design parameter is varied. The Doyle-Stein design procedure is shown to substantially improve the stability properties of an active flutter controller designed using the linear quadratic Gaussian control theory.

  2. 2-Methoxycinnamaldehyde inhibits tumor angiogenesis by suppressing Tie2 activation.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Sakimoto, Susumu; Jia, Weizhen; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2011-11-11

    Blood vessels are mainly composed of intraluminal endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells adhering to the ECs on their basal side. Immature blood vessels lacking mural cells are leaky; thus, the process of mural cell adhesion to ECs is indispensable for stability of the vessels during physiological angiogenesis. However, in the tumor microenvironment, although some blood vessels are well-matured, the majority is immature. Because mural cell adhesion to ECs also has a marked anti-apoptotic effect, angiogenesis inhibitors that destroy immature blood vessels may not affect mature vessels showing more resistance to apoptosis. Activation of Tie2 receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in ECs mediates pro-angiogenic effects via the induction of EC migration but also facilitates vessel maturation via the promotion of cell adhesion between mural cells and ECs. Therefore, inhibition of Tie2 has the advantage of completely inhibiting angiogenesis. Here, we isolated a novel small molecule Tie2 kinase inhibitor, identified as 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde (2-MCA). We found that 2-MCA inhibits both sprouting angiogenesis and maturation of blood vessels, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth. Our results suggest a potent clinical benefit of disrupting these two using Tie2 inhibitors. PMID:22033407

  3. Suppressing Emotions Impairs Subsequent Stroop Performance and Reduces Prefrontal Brain Activation

    PubMed Central

    Luechinger, Roger; Boesiger, Peter; Rasch, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Abundant behavioral evidence suggests that the ability to self-control is limited, and that any exertion of self-control will increase the likelihood of subsequent self-control failures. Here we investigated the neural correlates underlying the aftereffects of self-control on future control processes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). An initial act of self-control (suppressing emotions) impaired subsequent performance in a second task requiring control (Stroop task). On the neural level, increased activity during emotion suppression was followed by a relative decrease in activity during the Stroop task in a cluster in the right lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), an area engaged in the effortful implementation of control. There was no reliable evidence for reduced activity in the medial frontal cortex (MFC) including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which is involved in conflict detection processes and has previously also been implicated in self-control. Follow-up analyses showed that the detected cluster in the right lateral PFC and an area in the MFC were involved in both the emotion suppression task and the Stroop task, but only the cluster in the right lateral PFC showed reduced activation after emotion suppression during the Stroop task. Reduced activity in lateral prefrontal areas relevant for the implementation of control may be a critical consequence of prior self-control exertion if the respective areas are involved in both self-control tasks. PMID:23565239

  4. Activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway Antagonizes Metformin Suppression of Hepatic Glucose Production.

    PubMed

    He, Ling; Chang, Evan; Peng, Jinghua; An, Hongying; McMillin, Sara M; Radovick, Sally; Stratakis, Constantine A; Wondisford, Fredric E

    2016-05-13

    Metformin is the most commonly prescribed oral anti-diabetic agent worldwide. Surprisingly, about 35% of diabetic patients either lack or have a delayed response to metformin treatment, and many patients become less responsive to metformin over time. It remains unknown how metformin resistance or insensitivity occurs. Recently, we found that therapeutic metformin concentrations suppressed glucose production in primary hepatocytes through AMPK; activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway negatively regulates AMPK activity by phosphorylating AMPKα subunit at Ser-485, which in turn reduces AMPK activity. In this study, we find that metformin failed to suppress glucose production in primary hepatocytes with constitutively activated PKA and did not improve hyperglycemia in mice with hyperglucagonemia. Expression of the AMPKα1(S485A) mutant, which is unable to be phosphorylated by PKA, increased both AMPKα activation and the suppression of glucose production in primary hepatocytes treated with metformin. Intriguingly, salicylate/aspirin prevents the phosphorylation of AMPKα at Ser-485, blocks cAMP-PKA negative regulation of AMPK, and improves metformin resistance. We propose that aspirin/salicylate may augment metformin's hepatic action to suppress glucose production. PMID:27002150

  5. The immunobiology of sexual behavior: gender differences in the suppression of sexual activity during illness.

    PubMed

    Avitsur, R; Yirmiya, R

    1999-12-01

    Following infection or injury, sick individuals experience profound psychological and behavioral changes, such as anorexia, depressed activity, and reduced self-care behavior. In the present review, we present evidence for a gender-difference in the behavioral response to sickness. Specifically, following immune activation, sexual activity is suppressed in female, but not in male rats. This gender difference is specific to sexually related responses, because other behaviors, such as locomotion, are equally affected by immune challenges in males and estrous females. The suppression of female sexual behavior, induced by either endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), or the cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1), are mediated by central mechanisms that are independent of alterations in ovarian hormone secretion. Furthermore, synergistic effects of the cytokines IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) are involved in modulating sexual behavior in sick females, and prostaglandins synthesis is required for the effects of IL-1 on female sexual behavior. The gender difference in the behavioral response to immune activation may be related to the findings that at the same doses and timing in which IL-1 suppressed sexual activity in female but not in male rats, females produced more prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the brain, and less corticosterone than males. Finally, we are suggesting that the suppressive effect of cytokines on female reproductive behavior may serve as a mechanism to reduce conception during infection, which exposes the mother and the fetus to dangers such as spontaneous abortions, preterm labor and maternal mortality. PMID:10593202

  6. The Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protein Suppresses the Oncogenic Function of Mutant p53 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D.; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer. PMID:24554706

  7. Relationship between estrogen receptor-binding and estrogenic activities of environmental estrogens and suppression by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Han, Dal-Ho; Denison, Michael S; Tachibana, Hirofumi; Yamada, Koji

    2002-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the estrogenic activity of environmental estrogens by a competition binding assay using a human recombinant estrogens receptor (hERbeta) and by a proliferation assay using MCF-7 cells and a sulforhodamine-B assay. In the binding assay, pharmaceuticals had a stronger binding activity to hERbeta than that of some phytoestrogens (coumestrol, daidzein, genistein, luteolin, chrysin, flavone, and naringenin) or industrial chemicals, but phytoestrogens such as coumestrol had a binding activity as strong as pharmaceuticals such as 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE), tamoxifen (Tam), and mestranol. In the proliferation assay, pharmaceuticals such as diethylstilbestrol, EE, Tam, and clomiphene, and industrial chemicals such as 4-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, and 4-dihydroxybiphenyl had a proliferation-stimulating activity as strong as 17beta-estradiol (ES). In addition, we found that phytoestrogens such as coumestrol, daidzein, luteolin, and quercetin exerted a proliferation stimulating activity as strong as ES. Furthermore, we examined the suppression of proliferation-stimulating activity, induced by environmental estrogen, by flavonoids, such as daidzein, genistein, quercetin, and luteolin, and found that these flavonoids suppressed the induction of the proliferation-stimulating activity of environmental estrogens. The suppressive effect of flavonoids suggests that these compounds have anti-estrogenic and anti-cancer activities. PMID:12224631

  8. Azithromycin suppresses CD4+ T-cell activation by direct modulation of mTOR activity

    PubMed Central

    Ratzinger, F.; Haslacher, H.; Poeppl, W.; Hoermann, G.; Kovarik, J. J.; Jutz, S.; Steinberger, P.; Burgmann, H.; Pickl, W. F.; Schmetterer, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced macrolides, such as azithromycin (AZM) or clarithromycin (CLM), are antibiotics with immunomodulatory properties. Here we have sought to evaluate their in vitro influence on the activation of CD4+ T-cells. Isolated CD4+ T-cells were stimulated with agonistic anti-CD3/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies in the presence of 0.6 mg/L, 2.5 mg/L, 10 mg/L or 40 mg/L AZM or CLM. Cell proliferation, cytokine level in supernatants and cell viability was assessed. Intracellular signaling pathways were evaluated using reporter cell lines, FACS analysis, immunoblotting and in vitro kinase assays. AZM inhibited cell proliferation rate and cytokine secretion of CD4+ T-cells in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, high concentrations of CLM (40 mg/L) also suppressed these T-cell functions. Analysis of molecular signaling pathways revealed that exposure to AZM reduced the phosphorylation of the S6 ribosomal protein, a downstream target of mTOR. This effect was also observed at 40 mg/L CLM. In vitro kinase studies using recombinant mTOR showed that AZM inhibited mTOR activity. In contrast to rapamycin, this inhibition was independent of FKBP12. We show for the first time that AZM and to a lesser extent CLM act as immunosuppressive agents on CD4+ T-cells by inhibiting mTOR activity. Our results might have implications for the clinical use of macrolides. PMID:25500904

  9. Salidroside Suppresses HUVECs Cell Injury Induced by Oxidative Stress through Activating the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Liu, Wei-Wei; Shi, Ai-Wu; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Salidroside (SAL), one of the main effective constituents of Rhodiola rosea, has been reported to suppress oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury and necrosis by promoting transcription of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone1) (NQO1). However, it has not been indicated whether SAL might ameliorate endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress. Here, our study demonstrated that SAL might suppress HUVEC cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. The results of our study indicated that SAL decreased the levels of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), resulting in protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cell damage in HUVECs. It suppressed oxidative stress damage by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activating the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme genes such as HO-1 and NQO1 in HUVECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA abolished the cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, decreased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO1, and inhibited the nucleus translocation of Nrf2 in HUVECs. This study is the first to demonstrate that SAL suppresses HUVECs cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. PMID:27517893

  10. Improving the vibration suppression capabilities of a magneto-rheological damper using hybrid active and semi-active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah Khan, Irfan; Wagg, David; Sims, Neil D.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid active and semi-active control method for vibration suppression in flexible structures. The method uses a combination of a semi-active device and an active control actuator situated elsewhere in the structure to suppress vibrations. The key novelty is to use the hybrid controller to enable the magneto-rheological damper to achieve a performance as close to a fully active device as possible. This is achieved by ensuring that the active actuator can assist the magneto-rheological damper in the regions where energy is required. In addition, the hybrid active and semi-active controller is designed to minimize the switching of the semi-active controller. The control framework used is the immersion and invariance control technique in combination with sliding mode control. A two degree-of-freedom system with lightly damped resonances is used as an example system. Both numerical and experimental results are generated for this system, and then compared as part of a validation study. The experimental system uses hardware-in-the-loop to simulate the effect of both the degrees-of-freedom. The results show that the concept is viable both numerically and experimentally, and improved vibration suppression results can be obtained for the magneto-rheological damper that approach the performance of an active device.

  11. Binge-Like Eating Attenuates Nisoxetine Feeding Suppression, Stress Activation, and Brain Norepinephrine Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Nicholas T.; Yeh, Chung-Yang; Verpeut, Jessica L.; Walters, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Stress is often associated with binge eating. A critical component of the control of stress is the central norepinephrine system. We investigated how dietary-induced binge eating alters central norepinephrine and related behaviors. Young male Sprague Dawley rats received calorie deprivation (24 h) and /or intermittent sweetened fat (vegetable shortening with sucrose; 30 min) twice a week for 10 weeks. The groups were Restrict Binge (calorie deprivation/sweetened fat), Binge (sweetened fat), Restrict (calorie deprivation), and Naive (no calorie deprivation/no sweetened fat). Dietary-induced binge eating was demonstrated by Restrict Binge and Binge, which showed an escalation in 30-min intake over time. Feeding suppression following nisoxetine (3 mg/kg; IP), a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, was not evident in Restrict Binge (Restrict Binge: 107±13, Binge: 52±9, Restrict: 80±8, Naive: 59±13% of saline injection at 1 h). In subsequent experiments with Restrict Binge and Naive, Restrict Binge had reduced corticosterone (Restrict Binge: 266±25; Naive: 494±36 ng/ml) and less feeding suppression (Restrict Binge: 81±12, Naive: 50±11% of non-restraint intake at 30 min) following restraint stress (1 h). Dietary-induced binge eating in Restrict Binge was not altered by a dorsal noradrenergic bundle lesion caused by N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4), but frontal cortex norepinephrine was positively correlated with the average 30-min intake post-lesion (0.69; p<0.01). In a separate set of animals, single-unit in vivo electrophysiological recording of locus coeruleus–norepinephrine neural activity demonstrated reduced sensory-evoked response as a consequence of the Restrict Binge schedule (Restrict Binge: 8.1±0.67, Naive: 11.9±1.09 Hz). These results, which suggest that a consequence of dietary-induced binge eating is to attenuate the responsiveness of the brain norepinephrine system, will further our understanding of how highly

  12. Direct Evidence for Active Suppression of Salient-but-Irrelevant Sensory Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Gaspelin, Nicholas; Leonard, Carly J.; Luck, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have long debated whether attentional capture is purely stimulus-driven or purely goal-driven. In the current study, we test a hybrid account called the signal suppression hypothesis, which posits that stimuli automatically produce a bottom-up salience signal, but that this signal can be suppressed via top-down control processes. To test this account, we used a new capture-probe paradigm in which participants searched for a target shape while ignoring irrelevant color singletons. On occasional probe trials, letters were briefly presented inside the search shapes, and participants attempted to report these letters. Under conditions that promoted capture by singletons, accuracy was greater for the letter inside this singleton than for letters inside nonsingleton objects. However, when the conditions were changed to avoid capture by the singleton, accuracy for the letter inside the irrelevant singleton was reduced below the level observed for nonsingleton objects, indicating active suppression of the singleton. PMID:26420441

  13. Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi

    2012-11-06

    Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

  14. Comparison of analysis and flight test data for a drone aircraft with active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Pototzky, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    A drone aircraft equipped with an active flutter suppression system is considered with emphasis on the comparison of modal dampings and frequencies as a function of Mach number. Results are presented for both symmetric and antisymmetric motion with flutter suppression off. Only symmetric results are given for flutter suppression on. Frequency response functions of the vehicle are presented from both flight test data and analysis. The analysis correlation is improved by using an empirical aerodynamic correction factor which is proportional to the ratio of experimental to analytical steady-state lift curve slope. The mathematical models are included and existing analytical techniques are described as well as an alternative analytical technique for obtaining closed-loop results.

  15. Comparison of analysis and flight test data for a drone aircraft with active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Pototzky, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of analysis and flight test data for a drone aircraft equipped with an active flutter suppression system. Emphasis is placed on the comparison of modal dampings and frequencies as a function of Mach number. Results are presented for both symmetric and antisymmetric motion with flutter suppression off. Only symmetric results are presented for flutter suppression on. Frequency response functions of the vehicle are presented from both flight test data and analysis. The analysis correlation is improved by using an empirical aerodynamic correction factor which is proportional to the ratio of experimental to analytical steady-state lift curve slope. In addition to presenting the mathematical models and a brief description of existing analytical techniques, an alternative analytical technique for obtaining closed-loop results is presented.

  16. ESCRT-0 Is Not Required for Ectopic Notch Activation and Tumor Suppression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Emiliana; Wollscheid, Nadine; Cortese, Katia; Tacchetti, Carlo; Vaccari, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multivesicular endosome (MVE) sorting depends on proteins of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) family. These are organized in four complexes (ESCRT-0, -I, -II, -III) that act in a sequential fashion to deliver ubiquitylated cargoes into the internal luminal vesicles (ILVs) of the MVE. Drosophila genes encoding ESCRT-I, -II, -III components function in sorting signaling receptors, including Notch and the JAK/STAT signaling receptor Domeless. Loss of ESCRT-I, -II, -III in Drosophila epithelia causes altered signaling and cell polarity, suggesting that ESCRTs genes are tumor suppressors. However, the nature of the tumor suppressive function of ESCRTs, and whether tumor suppression is linked to receptor sorting is unclear. Unexpectedly, a null mutant in Hrs, encoding one of the components of the ESCRT-0 complex, which acts upstream of ESCRT-I, -II, -III in MVE sorting is dispensable for tumor suppression. Here, we report that two Drosophila epithelia lacking activity of Stam, the other known components of the ESCRT-0 complex, or of both Hrs and Stam, accumulate the signaling receptors Notch and Dome in endosomes. However, mutant tissue surprisingly maintains normal apico-basal polarity and proliferation control and does not display ectopic Notch signaling activation, unlike cells that lack ESCRT-I, -II, -III activity. Overall, our in vivo data confirm previous evidence indicating that the ESCRT-0 complex plays no crucial role in regulation of tumor suppression, and suggest re-evaluation of the relationship of signaling modulation in endosomes and tumorigenesis. PMID:24718108

  17. An evaluation of Compton suppression neutron activation analysis for determination of trace elements in some geological samples.

    PubMed

    Landsberger, S; Kapsimalis, R

    2009-12-01

    Compton suppressed neutron activation analysis has been used for a variety of applications, but never has a detailed discussion of its use in far more complex matrices, such as geological samples, been fully addressed. This investigation seeks to serve as a qualitative evaluation of Compton suppression neutron activation analysis (CSNAA) and to illustrate the benefits of using Compton suppression with thermal and epithermal neutrons for the analysis of several geological specimens. PMID:19577479

  18. Active suppression of vortex-driven combustion instability using controlled liquid-fuel injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Bin

    Combustion instabilities remain one of the most challenging problems encountered in developing propulsion and power systems. Large amplitude pressure oscillations, driven by unsteady heat release, can produce numerous detrimental effects. Most previous active control studies utilized gaseous fuels to suppress combustion instabilities. However, using liquid fuel to suppress combustion instabilities is more realistic for propulsion applications. Active instability suppression in vortex-driven combustors using a direct liquid fuel injection strategy was theoretically established and experimentally demonstrated in this dissertation work. Droplet size measurements revealed that with pulsed fuel injection management, fuel droplet size could be modulated periodically. Consequently, desired heat release fluctuation could be created. If this oscillatory heat release is coupled with the natural pressure oscillation in an out of phase manner, combustion instabilities can be suppressed. To identify proper locations of supplying additional liquid fuel for the purpose of achieving control, the natural heat release pattern in a vortex-driven combustor was characterized in this study. It was found that at high Damkohler number oscillatory heat release pattern closely followed the evolving vortex front. However, when Damkohler number became close to unity, heat release fluctuation wave no longer coincided with the coherent structures. A heat release deficit area was found near the dump plane when combustor was operated in lean premixed conditions. Active combustion instability suppression experiments were performed in a dump combustor using a controlled liquid fuel injection strategy. High-speed Schlieren results illustrated that vortex shedding plays an important role in maintaining self-sustained combustion instabilities. Complete combustion instability control requires total suppression of these large-scale coherent structures. The sound pressure level at the excited dominant

  19. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yanyan; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Hongzhi; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Teng, Weiping; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-12-15

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBPα and PPARγ. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis.

  20. Central Insulin Action Activates Kupffer Cells by Suppressing Hepatic Vagal Activation via the Nicotinic Alpha 7 Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kumi; Tanida, Mamoru; Nagata, Naoto; Inaba, Yuka; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Kido, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Toshinai, Koji; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kasuga, Masato; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    Central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling, which suppresses the gene expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. The vagus nerve plays an important role in this centrally mediated hepatic response; however, the precise mechanism underlying this brain-liver interaction is unclear. Here, we present our findings that the vagus nerve suppresses hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling via α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAchR) on Kupffer cells, and that central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling by suppressing vagal activity. Indeed, central insulin-mediated hepatic IL-6/STAT3 activation and gluconeogenic gene suppression were impeded in mice with hepatic vagotomy, pharmacological cholinergic blockade, or α7-nAchR deficiency. In high-fat diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant mice, control of the vagus nerve by central insulin action was disturbed, inducing a persistent increase of inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that dysregulation of the α7-nAchR-mediated control of Kupffer cells by central insulin action may affect the pathogenesis of chronic hepatic inflammation in obesity. PMID:26947072

  1. Design for active and passive flutter suppression and gust alleviation. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpel, M.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical design techniques for active and passive control of aeroelastic systems are based on a rational approximation of the unsteady aerodynamic loads in the entire Laplace domain, which yields matrix equations of motion with constant coefficients. Some existing schemes are reviewed, the matrix Pade approximant is modified, and a technique which yields a minimal number of augmented states for a desired accuracy is presented. The state-space aeroelastic model is used to design an active control system for simultaneous flutter suppression and gust alleviation. The design target is for a continuous controller which transfers some measurements taken on the vehicle to a control command applied to a control surface. Structural modifications are formulated in a way which enables the treatment of passive flutter suppression system with the same procedures by which active control systems are designed.

  2. Oral progestin induces rapid, reversible suppression of ovarian activity in the cat.

    PubMed

    Stewart, R A; Pelican, K M; Brown, J L; Wildt, D E; Ottinger, M A; Howard, J G

    2010-04-01

    The influence of oral progestin (altrenogest; ALT) on cat ovarian activity was studied using non-invasive fecal steroid monitoring. Queens were assigned to various ALT dosages: (1) 0mg/kg (control; n=5 cats); (2) 0.044 mg/kg (LOW; n=5); (3) 0.088 mg/kg (MID; n=6); or (4) 0.352 mg/kg (HIGH; n=6). Fecal estrogen and progestagen concentrations were quantified using enzyme immunoassays for 60 days before, 38 days during and 60 days after ALT treatment. Initiation of follicular activity was suppressed in all cats during progestin treatment, whereas controls continued to cycle normally. Females (n=6) with elevated fecal estrogens at treatment onset completed a normal follicular phase before returning to baseline and remained suppressed until treatment withdrawal. All cats receiving oral progestin re-initiated follicular activity after treatment, although MID cats experienced the most synchronized return (within 10-16 days). Mean baseline fecal estrogens and progestagens were higher (P<0.05) after treatment in HIGH, but not in LOW or MID cats compared to pre-treatment values. The results demonstrate that: (1) oral progestin rapidly suppresses initiation of follicular activity in the cat, but does not influence a follicular phase that exists before treatment initiation; and (2) queens return to normal follicular activity after progestin withdrawal. This study provides foundational information for research aimed at using progestin priming to improve ovarian response in felids scheduled for ovulation induction and assisted breeding. PMID:20051246

  3. Oral progestin induces rapid, reversible suppression of ovarian activity in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, R.A.; Pelican, K.M.; Brown, J.L.; Wildt, D.E.; Ottinger, M.A.; Howard, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of oral progestin (altrenogest; ALT) on cat ovarian activity was studied using non-invasive fecal steroid monitoring. Queens were assigned to various ALT dosages: 1) 0 mg/kg (control; n = 5 cats); 2) 0.044 mg/kg (LOW; n = 5); 3) 0.088 mg/kg (MID; n = 6); or 4) 0.352 mg/kg (HIGH; n = 6). Fecal estrogen and progestagen concentrations were quantified using enzyme immunoassays for 60 days before, 38 days during and 60 days after ALT treatment. Initiation of follicular activity was suppressed in all cats during progestin treatment, whereas controls continued to cycle normally. Females (n = 6) with elevated fecal estrogens at treatment onset completed a normal follicular phase before returning to baseline and remained suppressed until treatment withdrawal. All cats receiving oral progestin reinitiated follicular activity after treatment, although MID cats experienced the most synchronized return (within 10-16 days). Mean baseline fecal estrogens and progestagens were higher (P < 0.05) after treatment in HIGH, but not LOW or MID cats compared to pre-treatment values. Results demonstrate that: 1) oral progestin rapidly suppresses initiation of follicular activity in the cat, but does not influence a follicular phase that exists before treatment initiation; and 2) queens return to normal follicular activity after progestin withdrawal. This study provides foundational information for research aimed at using progestin priming to improve ovarian response in felids scheduled for ovulation induction and assisted breeding. PMID:20051246

  4. The serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram suppresses activity in the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Akhmetshina, Dinara; Zakharov, Andrei; Vinokurova, Daria; Nasretdinov, Azat; Valeeva, Guzel; Khazipov, Roustem

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of serotonin uptake, which causes an increase in extracellular serotonin levels, disrupts the development of thalamocortical barrel maps in neonatal rodents. Previous in vitro studies have suggested that the disruptive effect of excessive serotonin on barrel map formation involves a depression at thalamocortical synapses. However, the effects of serotonin uptake inhibitors on the early thalamocortical activity patterns in the developing barrel cortex in vivo remain largely unknown. Here, using extracellular recordings of the local field potentials and multiple unit activity (MUA) we explored the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram (10-20mg/kg, intraperitoneally) on sensory evoked activity in the barrel cortex of neonatal (postnatal days P2-5) rats in vivo. We show that administration of citalopram suppresses the amplitude and prolongs the delay of the sensory evoked potentials, reduces the power and frequency of the early gamma oscillations, and suppresses sensory evoked and spontaneous neuronal firing. In the adolescent P21-29 animals, citalopram affected neither sensory evoked nor spontaneous activity in barrel cortex. We suggest that suppression of the early thalamocortical activity patterns contributes to the disruption of the barrel map development caused by SSRIs and other conditions elevating extracellular serotonin levels. PMID:27016034

  5. Cationic chlorophyl derivatives with SOD mimicking activity suppress the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Maniki, M; Nakamura, K

    1996-06-01

    Derivatives of chlorophyl, e.g. Fe-chlorin e6-Na, alpha, beta, gamma, delta-Tetraphenylporphine-tetrasulfonic acid disulfonic acid salt tetrahydrate (Fe-TPPTS) and alpha, beta, gamma, delta-Tetrakis (4-N-trimethylaminophenyl) porphine, tetra (p-toluensulfonate (Fe-TTMAPP), express SOD mimicking activity. Examination was made of suppressive effects of human cancer cell lines by derivatives of chlorophyl. Fe-TPPTS and Fe-TTMAPP suppressed proliferation of the human ovarian cancer cell lines but Fe-chlorin e6-Na failed to suppress the proliferation. Lipid peroxide was increased by application of Fe-TPPTS and Fe-TTMAPP, but decreased by application of Fe-chlorin e6-Na. SOD activity of the cancer cells did not change by application of these drugs. TPPTS and TTMAPP have a cationic charge but Fe-chlorin e6-Na has an anionic charge. It is suggested that charge of these drugs relates to the suppressive effects of the cancer cell proliferation. PMID:10851538

  6. Broad-spectrum therapeutic suppression of metastatic melanoma through nuclear hormone receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, Nora; Buss, Colin G; Posada, Jessica; Merghoub, Taha; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2014-02-27

    Melanoma metastasis is a devastating outcome lacking an effective preventative therapeutic. We provide pharmacologic, molecular, and genetic evidence establishing the liver-X nuclear hormone receptor (LXR) as a therapeutic target in melanoma. Oral administration of multiple LXR agonists suppressed melanoma invasion, angiogenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis. Molecular and genetic experiments revealed these effects to be mediated by LXRβ, which elicits these outcomes through transcriptional induction of tumoral and stromal apolipoprotein-E (ApoE). LXRβ agonism robustly suppressed tumor growth and metastasis across a diverse mutational spectrum of melanoma lines. LXRβ targeting significantly prolonged animal survival, suppressed the progression of established metastases, and inhibited brain metastatic colonization. Importantly, LXRβ activation displayed melanoma-suppressive cooperativity with the frontline regimens dacarbazine, B-Raf inhibition, and the anti-CTLA-4 antibody and robustly inhibited melanomas that had acquired resistance to B-Raf inhibition or dacarbazine. We present a promising therapeutic approach that uniquely acts by transcriptionally activating a metastasis suppressor gene. PMID:24581497

  7. Pairing broadband noise with cortical stimulation induces extensive suppression of ascending sensory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovitz, Craig D.; Hogan, Patrick S.; Wesen, Kyle A.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The corticofugal system can alter coding along the ascending sensory pathway. Within the auditory system, electrical stimulation of the auditory cortex (AC) paired with a pure tone can cause egocentric shifts in the tuning of auditory neurons, making them more sensitive to the pure tone frequency. Since tinnitus has been linked with hyperactivity across auditory neurons, we sought to develop a new neuromodulation approach that could suppress a wide range of neurons rather than enhance specific frequency-tuned neurons. Approach. We performed experiments in the guinea pig to assess the effects of cortical stimulation paired with broadband noise (PN-Stim) on ascending auditory activity within the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (CNIC), a widely studied region for AC stimulation paradigms. Main results. All eight stimulated AC subregions induced extensive suppression of activity across the CNIC that was not possible with noise stimulation alone. This suppression built up over time and remained after the PN-Stim paradigm. Significance. We propose that the corticofugal system is designed to decrease the brain’s input gain to irrelevant stimuli and PN-Stim is able to artificially amplify this effect to suppress neural firing across the auditory system. The PN-Stim concept may have potential for treating tinnitus and other neurological disorders.

  8. Pairing broadband noise with cortical stimulation induces extensive suppression of ascending sensory activity

    PubMed Central

    Markovitz, Craig D.; Hogan, Patrick S.; Wesen, Kyle A.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The corticofugal system can alter coding along the ascending sensory pathway. Within the auditory system, electrical stimulation of the auditory cortex (AC) paired with a pure tone can cause egocentric shifts in the tuning of auditory neurons, making them more sensitive to the pure tone frequency. Since tinnitus has been linked with hyperactivity across auditory neurons, we sought to develop a new neuromodulation approach that could suppress a wide range of neurons rather than enhance specific frequency-tuned neurons. Approach We performed experiments in the guinea pig to assess the effects of cortical stimulation paired with broadband noise (PN-Stim) on ascending auditory activity within the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (CNIC), a widely studied region for AC stimulation paradigms. Main results All eight stimulated AC regions induced extensive suppression of activity across the CNIC that was not possible with noise stimulation alone. This suppression built up over time and remained after the PN-Stim paradigm. Significance We propose that the corticofugal system is designed to decrease the brain’s input gain to irrelevant stimuli and PN-Stim is able to artificially amplify this effect to suppress neural firing across the auditory system. The PN-Stim concept may have potential for treating tinnitus and other neurological disorders. PMID:25686163

  9. Suppression of cellular proliferation and invasion by the concerted lipid and protein phosphatase activities of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lindsay; Maccario, Helene; Perera, Nevin M.; Yang, Xuesong; Spinelli, Laura; Tibarewal, Priyanka; Glancy, Ben; Gray, Alex; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Downes, C. Peter; Leslie, Nick R.

    2009-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor with phosphatase activity in vitro against both lipids and proteins and other potential non-enzymatic mechanisms of action. Although the importance of PTEN’s lipid phosphatase activity in regulating the PI3K signalling pathway is recognised, the significance of PTEN’s other mechanisms of action is currently unclear. Here, we describe the systematic identification of a PTEN mutant, PTEN Y138L, with activity against lipid, but not soluble substrates. Using this mutant we provide evidence for the interfacial activation of PTEN against lipid substrates. We also show that when re-expressed at physiological levels in PTEN null U87MG glioblastoma cells the protein phosphatase activity of PTEN is not required to regulate cellular PtdInsP3 levels or the downstream protein kinase Akt/PKB. Finally, in 3D Matrigel cultures of U87MG cells similarly re-expressing PTEN mutants, both the protein and lipid phosphatase activities were required to inhibit invasion, but either activity alone significantly inhibited proliferation, albeit only weakly for the protein phosphatase activity. Our data provides a novel tool to address the significance of PTEN’s separable lipid and protein phosphatase activities and suggest that both activities act to suppress proliferation and act together to suppress invasion. PMID:19915616

  10. Suppression of ovine lymphocyte activation by Teladorsagia circumcincta larval excretory-secretory products

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Teladorsagia circumcincta is an important pathogenic nematode of sheep. It has been demonstrated previously that stimulation of murine T lymphocytes with excretory-secretory (ES) products derived from fourth stage larvae of T. circumcincta (Tci-L4-ES) results in de novo expression of Foxp3, a transcription factor intimately involved in regulatory T cell function. In the current study, Foxp3+ T cell responses in the abomasum and the effects of Tci-L4-ES on ovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) following T. circumcincta infection were investigated. T. circumcincta infection resulted in a significant increase in numbers of abomasal Foxp3+ T cells, but not an increase in the proportion of T cells expressing Foxp3. Unlike in mice, Tci-L4-ES was incapable of inducing T cell Foxp3 expression but instead suppressed mitogen-induced and antigen-specific activation and proliferation of ovine PBMC in vitro. This effect was heat labile, suggesting that it is mediated by protein(s). Suppression was associated with up-regulation of interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA, and specific monoclonal antibody neutralisation of IL-10 resulted in a 50% reduction in suppression, indicating involvement of the IL-10 signaling pathway. Suppression was significantly reduced in PBMC isolated from T. circumcincta infected vs. helminth-naïve lambs, and this reduction in suppression was associated with an increase in Tci-L4-ES antigen-specific T cells within the PBMC. In conclusion, we have identified a mechanism by which T. circumcincta may modulate the host adaptive immune response, potentially assisting survival of the parasite within the host. However, the impact of Tci-L4-ES-mediated lymphocyte suppression during T. circumcincta infection remains to be determined. PMID:23964850

  11. Comparative study of two structures of shunt active filter suppressing particular harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchaita, L.; Salem Nia, A.; Saadate, S.

    1998-07-01

    This paper deals with the study of shunt active filters used for suppressing particular harmonics generated by nonlinear loads in utility distribution power systems. Both structures of shunt active filter, voltage source active filter (VSAF) and current source active filter (CSAF), are considered. The analytical study of specific harmonics identification in a given spectrum is first presented. For simulation as well as experimentation the nonlinear load is a conventional three phase thyristor rectifier and harmonics 5 and 7 are selected to be eliminated by active filter. The whole system consisting of the ac power supply network, the SCR rectifier and the shunt active filter (VSAF/CSAF) is then simulated. The simulation results are discussed and the efficiency of the two kinds of active filter are compared. Finally, for the first structure, VSAF, the simulation results are confirmed by experimental test realized by means of a fully digital control active power filter developed in our laboratory.

  12. AMP-activated protein kinase suppresses matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Morizane, Yuki; Thanos, Aristomenis; Takeuchi, Kimio; Murakami, Yusuke; Kayama, Maki; Trichonas, George; Miller, Joan; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Vavvas, Demetrios G

    2011-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays a critical role in tissue remodeling under both physiological and pathological conditions. Although MMP-9 expression is low in most cells and is tightly controlled, the mechanism of its regulation is poorly understood. We utilized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) that were nullizygous for the catalytic α subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a key regulator of energy homeostasis, to identify AMPK as a suppressor of MMP-9 expression. Total AMPKα deletion significantly elevated MMP-9 expression compared with wild-type (WT) MEFs, whereas single knock-out of the isoforms AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 caused minimal change in the level of MMP-9 expression. The suppressive role of AMPK on MMP-9 expression was mediated through both its activity and presence. The AMPK activators 5-amino-4-imidazole carboxamide riboside and A769662 suppressed MMP-9 expression in WT MEFs, and AMPK inhibition by the overexpression of dominant negative (DN) AMPKα elevated MMP-9 expression. However, in AMPKα(-/-) MEFs transduced with DN AMPKα, MMP-9 expression was suppressed. AMPKα(-/-) MEFs showed increased phosphorylation of IκBα, expression of IκBα mRNA, nuclear localization of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and DNA-binding activity of NF-κB compared with WT. Consistently, selective NF-κB inhibitors BMS345541 and SM7368 decreased MMP-9 expression in AMPKα(-/-) MEFs. Overall, our results suggest that both AMPKα isoforms suppress MMP-9 expression and that both the activity and presence of AMPKα contribute to its function as a regulator of MMP-9 expression by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. PMID:21402702

  13. Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, activates PPARalpha and gamma and suppresses COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Mariko; Nakata, Rieko; Katsukawa, Michiko; Hori, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Saori; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, plays a key role in inflammation and circulatory homeostasis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily and are involved in the control of COX-2 expression, and vice versa. Here, we show that COX-2 promoter activity was suppressed by essential oils derived from thyme, clove, rose, eucalyptus, fennel, and bergamot in cell-based transfection assays using bovine arterial endothelial cells. Moreover, from thyme oil, we identified carvacrol as a major component of the suppressor of COX-2 expression and an activator of PPARalpha and gamma. PPARgamma-dependent suppression of COX-2 promoter activity was observed in response to carvacrol treatment. In human macrophage-like U937 cells, carvacrol suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting that carvacrol regulates COX-2 expression through its agonistic effect on PPARgamma. These results may be important in understanding the antiinflammatory and antilifestyle-related disease properties of carvacrol. PMID:19578162

  14. Multirate flutter suppression system design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Martin C.; Mason, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies will be applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing (also called the PAPA wing). Eventually, the designs will be implemented in hardware and tested on the BACT wing in a wind tunnel. This report describes a project at the University of Washington to design a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing. The objective of the project was two fold. First, to develop a methodology for designing robust multirate compensators, and second, to demonstrate the methodology by applying it to the design of a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing. The contributions of this project are (1) development of an algorithm for synthesizing robust low order multirate control laws (the algorithm is capable of synthesizing a single compensator which stabilizes both the nominal plant and multiple plant perturbations; (2) development of a multirate design methodology, and supporting software, for modeling, analyzing and synthesizing multirate compensators; and (3) design of a multirate flutter suppression system for NASA's BACT wing which satisfies the specified design criteria. This report describes each of these contributions in detail. Section 2.0 discusses our design methodology. Section 3.0 details the results of our multirate flutter suppression system design for the BACT wing. Finally, Section 4.0 presents our conclusions and suggestions for future research. The body of the report focuses primarily on the results. The associated theoretical background appears in the three technical papers that are included as Attachments 1-3. Attachment 4 is a user's manual for the software that is key to our design methodology.

  15. Synthesis of active controls for flutter suppression on a flight research wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Perry, B., III; Murrow, H. N.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes some activities associated with the preliminary design of an active control system for flutter suppression capable of demonstrating a 20% increase in flutter velocity. Results from two control system synthesis techniques are given. One technique uses classical control theory, and the other uses an 'aerodynamic energy method' where control surface rates or displacements are minimized. Analytical methods used to synthesize the control systems and evaluate their performance are described. Some aspects of a program for flight testing the active control system are also given. This program, called DAST (Drones for Aerodynamics and Structural Testing), employs modified drone-type vehicles for flight assessments and validation testing.

  16. Sizing of active piezoelectric struts for vibration suppression on a space-based interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirlin, S. W.; Laskin, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The present paper concerns itself with the active suppression of mechanical vibrations on a representative future spaceborne optical interferometer. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a set of piezoelectric struts into the truss structure of the interferometer and the use of these active struts to modify the damping and stiffness characteristics of the truss. It is shown that vibration propagation can be significantly reduced through the use of very simple control laws. It is further shown that the force and stroke requirements for the active struts for this application are rather modest and fall well within the capabilities already demonstrated by prototype hardware in ground testing.

  17. The activation and suppression of plant innate immunity by parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Goverse, Aska; Smant, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes engage in prolonged and intimate relationships with their host plants, often involving complex alterations in host cell morphology and function. It is puzzling how nematodes can achieve this, seemingly without activating the innate immune system of their hosts. Secretions released by infective juvenile nematodes are thought to be crucial for host invasion, for nematode migration inside plants, and for feeding on host cells. In the past, much of the research focused on the manipulation of developmental pathways in host plants by plant-parasitic nematodes. However, recent findings demonstrate that plant-parasitic nematodes also deliver effectors into the apoplast and cytoplasm of host cells to suppress plant defense responses. In this review, we describe the current insights in the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the activation and suppression of host innate immunity by plant-parasitic nematodes along seven critical evolutionary and developmental transitions in plant parasitism. PMID:24906126

  18. Does adrenergic activity suppress insulin secretion during surgery? A clinical experiment with halothane anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Aärimaa, M; Syvälahti, E; Ovaska, J

    1978-01-01

    Peroperative inhibition of insulin release is widely attributed to increased alpha-adrenergic activity. To test this hypothesis serum insulin and glucose concentrations were measured at short intervals in 11 patients who underwent major surgery. Five patients were anesthetized with halothane and six with general anesthesia without halothane. The results were similar in both patient groups; halothane had no effect on insulin. This suggests that suppression of insulin under operations is probably not due to activation of the alpha-adrenergic receptors of the pancreatic beta-cells. The authors propose that suppression of insulin secretion during surgery may be caused by adrenaline, which, in competing for the glucose receptors, insensitizes the pancreatic beta-cells. PMID:202205

  19. Active controls for flutter suppression and gust alleviation in supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Lottati, I.

    1980-01-01

    Application is made in the present paper of the recently developed relaxed aerodynamic energy concept and synthesis techniques to the definition of appropriate active control systems for the low-speed flutter model of the B-2707-300 supersonic cruise airplane. The effectiveness of the resulting activated systems is analytically tested for flutter suppression, wing root bending moment alleviation, and ride control (fuselage accelerations). The results obtained indicate that considerable increase in flutter speeds can be obtained by the various control systems, using a single trailing-edge control. In all cases, the flutter suppression control system led to a substantial reduction in both wing root bending moments and in fuselage and wing accelerations.

  20. Troglitazone inhibits endothelial cell proliferation through suppression of casein kinase 2 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuy-Sook; Park, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seahyoung; Lim, Hyun-Joung; Jang, Yangsoo; Park, Hyun-Young . E-mail: hypark65@nih.go.kr

    2006-07-21

    Troglitazone, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), has been reported to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation by suppressing Akt activation. Recently, it has been also proposed that phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) plays an important role in such effect of troglitazone. However, the mechanism of how troglitazone regulates PTEN remains to be elucidated. We therefore investigated the effects of troglitazone on casein kinase 2 (CK2), which is known to negatively regulate PTEN activity. Troglitazone significantly inhibited serum-induced proliferation of HUVEC in a concentration dependent manner. Serum-induced Akt and its downstream signaling pathway activation was attenuated by troglitazone (10 {mu}M) pretreatment. The phosphorylation of PTEN, which was directly related to Akt activation, was decreased with troglitazone pretreatment and was inversely proportional to CK2 activity. DRB, a CK2 inhibitor, also showed effects similar to that of troglitazone on Akt and its downstream signaling molecules. In conclusion, our results suggest that troglitazone inhibits proliferation of HUVECs through suppression of CK2 activity rendering PTEN to remain activated, and this effect of troglitazone in HUVECs seems to be PPAR{gamma} independent.

  1. LArGe R&D for active background suppression in Gerda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Barnabé-Heider, M.; Budjáš, D.; Cattadori, C.; D'Andragora, A.; Gangapshev, A.; Gusev, K.; Heisel, M.; Junker, M.; Klimenko, A.; Schönert, S.; Smolnikov, A.; Zuzel, G.

    2012-07-01

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m3, 1.4tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 103 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of the order 10-2 cts/(keV-kg-y), which is at the level of the GERDA phase I design goal. As a consequence of these results, the development of an active liquid argon veto in GERDA is pursued.

  2. Inhibition of Cellular Methyltransferases Promotes Endothelial Cell Activation by Suppressing Glutathione Peroxidase 1 Protein Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Madalena; Florindo, Cristina; Kalwa, Hermann; Silva, Zélia; Turanov, Anton A.; Carlson, Bradley A.; de Almeida, Isabel Tavares; Blom, Henk J.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Michel, Thomas; Castro, Rita; Loscalzo, Joseph; Handy, Diane E.

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) is a negative regulator of most methyltransferases and the precursor for the cardiovascular risk factor homocysteine. We have previously identified a link between the homocysteine-induced suppression of the selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1) and endothelial dysfunction. Here we demonstrate a specific mechanism by which hypomethylation, promoted by the accumulation of the homocysteine precursor SAH, suppresses GPx-1 expression and leads to inflammatory activation of endothelial cells. The expression of GPx-1 and a subset of other selenoproteins is dependent on the methylation of the tRNASec to the Um34 form. The formation of methylated tRNASec facilitates translational incorporation of selenocysteine at a UGA codon. Our findings demonstrate that SAH accumulation in endothelial cells suppresses the expression of GPx-1 to promote oxidative stress. Hypomethylation stress, caused by SAH accumulation, inhibits the formation of the methylated isoform of the tRNASec and reduces GPx-1 expression. In contrast, under these conditions, the expression and activity of thioredoxin reductase 1, another selenoprotein, is increased. Furthermore, SAH-induced oxidative stress creates a proinflammatory activation of endothelial cells characterized by up-regulation of adhesion molecules and an augmented capacity to bind leukocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that SAH accumulation in endothelial cells can induce tRNASec hypomethylation, which alters the expression of selenoproteins such as GPx-1 to contribute to a proatherogenic endothelial phenotype. PMID:24719327

  3. Protective effect of carnosine after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion possibly through suppressing astrocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Chen, Jihui; Bo, Shuhong; Lu, Xiaotong; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) induced by chronic hypoperfusion is a common cause of vascular dementia. The aim of this study was to determine whether the protective effect of carnosine on white matter lesion after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion through suppressing astrocyte activation. Methods: Adult male mice (C57BL/6 strain) were subjected to permanent occlusion of the right unilateral common carotid arteries (rUCCAO) and treated with carnosine or histidine. Open field test, freezing test, Klüver-Barrera staining, immunohistochemical analyses and western blot were performed after rUCCAO. Results: We found that carnosine ameliorated white matter lesion and cognitive impairment after rUCCAO. Carnosine suppressed the activation of astrocyte in both wide type mice and histidine decarboxylase knockout mice. However, administration of histidine did not show the same effect. We found that there were no differences between rUCCAO group and sham group for the expression of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). Furthermore, carnosine significantly attenuated the increase of inflammatory cytokine interferon gama. Conclusion: These data suggest carnosine induced neuroprotection during SIVD in mice is not dependent on the histaminergic pathway or the regulation of the expression of GLT-1 and GLAST, but may be due to a suppression of astrocyte activation and inflammatory cytokine release. PMID:26885268

  4. Ligustrazine improves blood circulation by suppressing Platelet activation in a rat model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajuan; Zhu, Huizhi; Tong, Jiabing; Li, Zegeng

    2016-07-01

    Chuan-xiong (Ligusticum wallichii) is a traditional herbal medicine in Eastern Asia, but the effect of its active component ligustrazine remains unclear. We explored its effect and possible mechanism in a well-characterized rat model of allergic asthma. Ligustrazine suppressed bronchial hyper-responsiveness to methacholine, and suppressed lung inflammation in asthmatic rats. Ligustrazine exhibited potent immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory effects: it suppressed lymphocyte and eosinophil mobilization, and reduced cytokine IL-5 and IL-13 production significantly in lung tissues from asthmatic rats (P<0.05). Further histological examinations clearly demonstrated that ligustrazine improved blood circulation and ameliorated platelet activation, aggregation and adhesion, which induced sustained infiltration and activation of various inflammatory cells, including lymphocytes and eosinophils, followed by synthesis and release of a variety of pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines. The present study suggests that ligustrazine is a potent agent for the treatment of allergic asthma due to its strong anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulatory properties. PMID:27362664

  5. Transdermal neuromodulation of noradrenergic activity suppresses psychophysiological and biochemical stress responses in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William J.; Boasso, Alyssa M.; Mortimore, Hailey M.; Silva, Rhonda S.; Charlesworth, Jonathan D.; Marlin, Michelle A.; Aebersold, Kirsten; Aven, Linh; Wetmore, Daniel Z.; Pal, Sumon K.

    2015-01-01

    We engineered a transdermal neuromodulation approach that targets peripheral (cranial and spinal) nerves and utilizes their afferent pathways as signaling conduits to influence brain function. We investigated the effects of this transdermal electrical neurosignaling (TEN) method on sympathetic physiology under different experimental conditions. The TEN method involved delivering high-frequency pulsed electrical currents to ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the right trigeminal nerve and cervical spinal nerve afferents. Under resting conditions, TEN significantly suppressed basal sympathetic tone compared to sham as indicated by functional infrared thermography of facial temperatures. In a different experiment, subjects treated with TEN reported significantly lower levels of tension and anxiety on the Profile of Mood States scale compared to sham. In a third experiment when subjects were experimentally stressed TEN produced a significant suppression of heart rate variability, galvanic skin conductance, and salivary α-amylase levels compared to sham. Collectively these observations demonstrate TEN can dampen basal sympathetic tone and attenuate sympathetic activity in response to acute stress induction. Our physiological and biochemical observations are consistent with the hypothesis that TEN modulates noradrenergic signaling to suppress sympathetic activity. We conclude that dampening sympathetic activity in such a manner represents a promising approach to managing daily stress. PMID:26353920

  6. Transdermal neuromodulation of noradrenergic activity suppresses psychophysiological and biochemical stress responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Tyler, William J; Boasso, Alyssa M; Mortimore, Hailey M; Silva, Rhonda S; Charlesworth, Jonathan D; Marlin, Michelle A; Aebersold, Kirsten; Aven, Linh; Wetmore, Daniel Z; Pal, Sumon K

    2015-01-01

    We engineered a transdermal neuromodulation approach that targets peripheral (cranial and spinal) nerves and utilizes their afferent pathways as signaling conduits to influence brain function. We investigated the effects of this transdermal electrical neurosignaling (TEN) method on sympathetic physiology under different experimental conditions. The TEN method involved delivering high-frequency pulsed electrical currents to ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the right trigeminal nerve and cervical spinal nerve afferents. Under resting conditions, TEN significantly suppressed basal sympathetic tone compared to sham as indicated by functional infrared thermography of facial temperatures. In a different experiment, subjects treated with TEN reported significantly lower levels of tension and anxiety on the Profile of Mood States scale compared to sham. In a third experiment when subjects were experimentally stressed TEN produced a significant suppression of heart rate variability, galvanic skin conductance, and salivary α-amylase levels compared to sham. Collectively these observations demonstrate TEN can dampen basal sympathetic tone and attenuate sympathetic activity in response to acute stress induction. Our physiological and biochemical observations are consistent with the hypothesis that TEN modulates noradrenergic signaling to suppress sympathetic activity. We conclude that dampening sympathetic activity in such a manner represents a promising approach to managing daily stress. PMID:26353920

  7. Suppression of putative tinnitus-related activity by extra-cochlear electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Noreña, A J; Mulders, W H A M; Robertson, D

    2015-01-01

    Studies on animals have shown that noise-induced hearing loss is followed by an increase of spontaneous firing at several stages of the central auditory system. This central hyperactivity has been suggested to underpin the perception of tinnitus. It was shown that decreasing cochlear activity can abolish the noise-induced central hyperactivity. This latter result further suggests that an approach consisting of reducing cochlear activity may provide a therapeutic avenue for tinnitus. In this context, extra-cochlear electric stimulation (ECES) may be a good candidate to modulate cochlear activity and suppress tinnitus. Indeed, it has been shown that a positive current applied at the round window reduces cochlear nerve activity and can suppress tinnitus reliably in tinnitus subjects. The present study investigates whether ECES with a positive current can abolish the noise-induced central hyperactivity, i.e., the putative tinnitus-related activity. Spontaneous and stimulus-evoked neural activity before, during and after ECES was assessed from single-unit recordings in the inferior colliculus of anesthetized guinea pigs. We found that ECES with positive current significantly decreases the spontaneous firing rate of neurons with high characteristic frequencies, whereas negative current produces the opposite effect. The effects of the ECES are absent or even reversed for neurons with low characteristic frequencies. Importantly, ECES with positive current had only a marginal effect on thresholds and tone-induced activity of collicular neurons, suggesting that the main action of positive current is to modulate the spontaneous firing. Overall, cochlear electrical stimulation may be a viable approach for suppressing some forms of (peripheral-dependent) tinnitus. PMID:25298390

  8. ELK3 Suppresses Angiogenesis by Inhibiting the Transcriptional Activity of ETS-1 on MT1-MMP

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Sun-Hee; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2014-01-01

    Ets transcription factors play important roles in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Knockout of the Ets gene family members in mice resulted in disrupted angiogenesis and malformed vascular systems. In this study, the role and mechanism of ELK3, an Ets factor, in angiogenesis was investigated using ELK3-specific siRNA in human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in vivo implantation assay. The suppression of ELK3 expression resulted in the reinforcement of VEGF-induced tube formation in HUVECs. The in vivo Matrigel plug assay also showed that ELK3 knockdown resulted in increased angiogenesis. Luciferase activity of the MT1-MMP promoter induced by ETS-1 factor was attenuated ELK3 co-transfection. CHIP assay showed the binding of ELK3 on the MT1-MMP promoter. MT1-MMP knockdown in the ELK3 knockdowned cells resulted in the decrease of tube formation suggesting that MT1-MMP transcriptional repression is required for ELK3-mediated anti-angiogenesis effect. Our data also showed that the suppressive effect of ELK3 on the angiogenesis was partly due to the inhibitory effect of ELK3 to the ETS-1 transcriptional activity on the MT1-MMP promoter rather than direct suppression of ELK3 on the target gene, since the expression level of co-repressor Sin3A is low in endothelial cells. Our results suggest that ELK3 plays a negative role of VEGF-induced angiogenesis through indirectly inhibiting ETS-1 function. PMID:24719561

  9. ELK3 suppresses angiogenesis by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of ETS-1 on MT1-MMP.

    PubMed

    Heo, Sun-Hee; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2014-01-01

    Ets transcription factors play important roles in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Knockout of the Ets gene family members in mice resulted in disrupted angiogenesis and malformed vascular systems. In this study, the role and mechanism of ELK3, an Ets factor, in angiogenesis was investigated using ELK3-specific siRNA in human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in vivo implantation assay. The suppression of ELK3 expression resulted in the reinforcement of VEGF-induced tube formation in HUVECs. The in vivo Matrigel plug assay also showed that ELK3 knockdown resulted in increased angiogenesis. Luciferase activity of the MT1-MMP promoter induced by ETS-1 factor was attenuated ELK3 co-transfection. CHIP assay showed the binding of ELK3 on the MT1-MMP promoter. MT1-MMP knockdown in the ELK3 knockdowned cells resulted in the decrease of tube formation suggesting that MT1-MMP transcriptional repression is required for ELK3-mediated anti-angiogenesis effect. Our data also showed that the suppressive effect of ELK3 on the angiogenesis was partly due to the inhibitory effect of ELK3 to the ETS-1 transcriptional activity on the MT1-MMP promoter rather than direct suppression of ELK3 on the target gene, since the expression level of co-repressor Sin3A is low in endothelial cells. Our results suggest that ELK3 plays a negative role of VEGF-induced angiogenesis through indirectly inhibiting ETS-1 function. PMID:24719561

  10. Suppression of contractile activity in the small intestine by indomethacin and omeprazole.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberger, Lenard M; Bhattarai, Deepa; Phan, Tri M; Dial, Elizabeth J; Uray, Karen

    2015-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used to treat a number of conditions, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are often used to prevent NSAID-induced gastric mucosal damage; however, the effects of NSAIDs on intestinal motility are poorly understood. The purpose of the present study is to determine the effects of a prototypical NSAID, indomethacin, either alone or in conjunction with the PPI omeprazole, on intestinal motility. Rats were randomly divided into four groups treated with vehicle, omeprazole, indomethacin, or a combination of indomethacin and omeprazole. Intestinal motility and transit were measured along with inflammatory mediators in the intestinal smooth muscle, markers of mucosal damage, and bacterial counts in the intestinal wall. Indomethacin, but not omeprazole, caused mucosal injury indicated by lower gut bleeding; however, both omeprazole and indomethacin suppressed contractile activity and frequency in the distal part of the small intestine. Cotreatment with omeprazole did not reduce indomethacin-induced intestinal bleeding. Furthermore, although indomethacin caused increased inflammation as indicated by increased edema development and inflammatory mediators, cotreatment with omeprazole did not reduce inflammation in the intestinal smooth muscle or prevent the increased bacterial count in the intestinal wall induced by indomethacin. We conclude that both NSAID and PPI treatment suppressed contractile activity in the distal regions of the small intestine. The suppression of intestinal contractility was associated with increased inflammation in both cases; however, indomethacin and omeprazole appear to affect intestinal motility by different mechanisms. PMID:25721304

  11. Flutter suppression control law synthesis for the Active Flexible Wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    The Active Flexible Wing Project is a collaborative effort between the NASA Langley Research Center and Rockwell International. The objectives are the validation of methodologies associated with mathematical modeling, flutter suppression control law development and digital implementation of the control system for application to flexible aircraft. A flutter suppression control law synthesis for this project is described. The state-space mathematical model used for the synthesis included ten flexible modes, four control surface modes and rational function approximation of the doublet-lattice unsteady aerodynamics. The design steps involved developing the full-order optimal control laws, reducing the order of the control law, and optimizing the reduced-order control law in both the continuous and the discrete domains to minimize stochastic response. System robustness was improved using singular value constraints. An 8th order robust control law was designed to increase the symmetric flutter dynamic pressure by 100 percent. Preliminary results are provided and experiences gained are discussed.

  12. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls - Review of developments and applications based on the aerodynamic energy concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    The state of the art of the aerodynamic energy concept, involving the use of active controls for flutter suppression, is reviewed. Applications of the concept include the suppression of external-store flutter of three different configurations of the YF-17 flutter model using a single trailing edge control surface activated by a single fixed-gain control law. Consideration is also given to some initial results concerning the flutter suppression of the 1/20 scale low speed wind-tunnel model of the Boeing 2707-300 supersonic transport using an activated trailing edge control surface.

  13. Heparin suppresses lipid raft-mediated signaling and ligand-independent EGF receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Tao; Song, Lifang; Templeton, Douglas M

    2007-04-01

    Heparin is well known to suppress vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, and attempts to exploit this therapeutically have led to recognition of multiple pathways for heparin's anti-mitogenic actions. At low concentrations (ca. 1 microg.ml(-1)), these suppressive effects may reflect physiological activities of endogenous heparan sulfates, and appear to be rapid responses to extracellular or cell surface-associated heparin. Because heparin has been shown to influence expression of caveolin proteins, and caveolae/lipid rafts are critical structures modulating cell signaling, we examined the effect of heparin on signaling involving cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. The VSMC line PAC-1 activates the MAP kinase Erk in response to the cholesterol-sequestering agents methyl-beta-cyclodextrin and nystatin. This follows a temporal sequence that involves Ras-GTP activation of MEK, and is independent of PKC, Src, and PI3 kinase. However, ligand-independent phosphorylation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by removal of cholesterol precedes Ras activation, and the EGFR kinase inhibitor AG1478 blocks Erk phosphorylation, supporting occurrence of the signaling sequence EGFR-Ras-MEK-Erk. Phosphorylation of EGFR occurs predominantly in caveolin-rich microdomains as identified by Western blotting of fractions from density gradient centrifugation of membranes prepared under detergent-free conditions. In these situations, heparin inhibits phosphorylation of EGFR on the Src-dependent site Tyr(845), but not the autophosphorylation of Tyr(1173), and decreases Ras activation and Erk phosphorylation. We conclude that heparin can suppress Erk signaling in VSMC with effects on site-specific phosphorylation of EGFR localized in caveolin-enriched lipid rafts. PMID:17226785

  14. Active Suppression of Early Immune Response in Tobacco by the Human Pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Shirron, Natali; Yaron, Sima

    2011-01-01

    The persistence of enteric pathogens on plants has been studied extensively, mainly due to the potential hazard of human pathogens such as Salmonella enterica being able to invade and survive in/on plants. Factors involved in the interactions between enteric bacteria and plants have been identified and consequently it was hypothesized that plants may be vectors or alternative hosts for enteric pathogens. To survive, endophytic bacteria have to escape the plant immune systems, which function at different levels through the plant-bacteria interactions. To understand how S. enterica survives endophyticaly we conducted a detailed analysis on its ability to elicit or evade the plant immune response. The models of this study were Nicotiana tabacum plants and cells suspension exposed to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. The plant immune response was analyzed by looking at tissue damage and by testing oxidative burst and pH changes. It was found that S. Typhimurium did not promote disease symptoms in the contaminated plants. Live S. Typhimurium did not trigger the production of an oxidative burst and pH changes by the plant cells, while heat killed or chloramphenicol treated S. Typhimurium and purified LPS of Salmonella were significant elicitors, indicating that S. Typhimurium actively suppress the plant response. By looking at the plant response to mutants defective in virulence factors we showed that the suppression depends on secreted factors. Deletion of invA reduced the ability of S. Typhimurium to suppress oxidative burst and pH changes, indicating that a functional SPI1 TTSS is required for the suppression. This study demonstrates that plant colonization by S. Typhimurium is indeed an active process. S. Typhimurium utilizes adaptive strategies of altering innate plant perception systems to improve its fitness in the plant habitat. All together these results suggest a complex mechanism for perception of S. Typhimurium by plants. PMID:21541320

  15. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Villa, Nancy Y; Wasserfall, Clive H; Meacham, Amy M; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2015-06-11

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens. PMID:25904246

  16. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Meacham, Amy M.; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens. PMID:25904246

  17. Antiosteoclastic activity of milk thistle extract after ovariectomy to suppress estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Lye; Kim, Yun-Ho; Kang, Min-Kyung; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Han, Seoung-Jun; Kang, Young-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Bone integrity abnormality and imbalance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts are known to result in metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Silymarin-rich milk thistle extract (MTE) and its component silibinin enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblasts but reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity of osteoclasts. The osteoprotective effects of MTE were comparable to those of estrogenic isoflavone. Low-dose combination of MTE and isoflavone had a pharmacological synergy that may be useful for osteogenic activity. This study attempted to reveal the suppressive effects of MTE on bone loss. C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized (OVX) as a model for postmenopausal osteopenia and orally administered 10 mg/kg MTE or silibinin for 8 weeks. The sham-operated mice served as estrogen controls. The treatment of ovariectomized mice with nontoxic MTE and silibinin improved femoral bone mineral density and serum receptor activator of nuclear factor- κB ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio, an index of osteoclastogenic stimulus. In addition, the administration of MTE or silibinin inhibited femoral bone loss induced by ovariectomy and suppressed femoral TRAP activity and cathepsin K induction responsible for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Collectively, oral dosage of MTE containing silibinin in the preclinical setting is effective in preventing estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss. PMID:23781510

  18. Artificial Sweeteners Stimulate Adipogenesis and Suppress Lipolysis Independently of Sweet Taste Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Becky R.; Parlee, Sebastian D.; Learman, Brian S.; Mori, Hiroyuki; Scheller, Erica L.; Cawthorn, William P.; Ning, Xiaomin; Gallagher, Katherine; Tyrberg, Björn; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M.; Evans, Charles R.; MacDougald, Ormond A.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate responses to a myriad of ligands, some of which regulate adipocyte differentiation and metabolism. The sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are G protein-coupled receptors that function as carbohydrate sensors in taste buds, gut, and pancreas. Here we report that sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are expressed throughout adipogenesis and in adipose tissues. Treatment of mouse and human precursor cells with artificial sweeteners, saccharin and acesulfame potassium, enhanced adipogenesis. Saccharin treatment of 3T3-L1 cells and primary mesenchymal stem cells rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and downstream targets with functions in adipogenesis such as cAMP-response element-binding protein and FOXO1; however, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α was not observed until relatively late in differentiation. Saccharin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation at Thr-308 occurred within 5 min, was phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent, and occurred in the presence of high concentrations of insulin and dexamethasone; phosphorylation of Ser-473 occurred more gradually. Surprisingly, neither saccharin-stimulated adipogenesis nor Thr-308 phosphorylation was dependent on expression of T1R2 and/or T1R3, although Ser-473 phosphorylation was impaired in T1R2/T1R3 double knock-out precursors. In mature adipocytes, artificial sweetener treatment suppressed lipolysis even in the presence of forskolin, and lipolytic responses were correlated with phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Suppression of lipolysis by saccharin in adipocytes was also independent of T1R2 and T1R3. These results suggest that some artificial sweeteners have previously uncharacterized metabolic effects on adipocyte differentiation and metabolism and that effects of artificial sweeteners on adipose tissue biology may be largely independent of the classical sweet taste receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. PMID

  19. Artificial sweeteners stimulate adipogenesis and suppress lipolysis independently of sweet taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Simon, Becky R; Parlee, Sebastian D; Learman, Brian S; Mori, Hiroyuki; Scheller, Erica L; Cawthorn, William P; Ning, Xiaomin; Gallagher, Katherine; Tyrberg, Björn; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M; Evans, Charles R; MacDougald, Ormond A

    2013-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate responses to a myriad of ligands, some of which regulate adipocyte differentiation and metabolism. The sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are G protein-coupled receptors that function as carbohydrate sensors in taste buds, gut, and pancreas. Here we report that sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are expressed throughout adipogenesis and in adipose tissues. Treatment of mouse and human precursor cells with artificial sweeteners, saccharin and acesulfame potassium, enhanced adipogenesis. Saccharin treatment of 3T3-L1 cells and primary mesenchymal stem cells rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and downstream targets with functions in adipogenesis such as cAMP-response element-binding protein and FOXO1; however, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α was not observed until relatively late in differentiation. Saccharin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation at Thr-308 occurred within 5 min, was phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent, and occurred in the presence of high concentrations of insulin and dexamethasone; phosphorylation of Ser-473 occurred more gradually. Surprisingly, neither saccharin-stimulated adipogenesis nor Thr-308 phosphorylation was dependent on expression of T1R2 and/or T1R3, although Ser-473 phosphorylation was impaired in T1R2/T1R3 double knock-out precursors. In mature adipocytes, artificial sweetener treatment suppressed lipolysis even in the presence of forskolin, and lipolytic responses were correlated with phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Suppression of lipolysis by saccharin in adipocytes was also independent of T1R2 and T1R3. These results suggest that some artificial sweeteners have previously uncharacterized metabolic effects on adipocyte differentiation and metabolism and that effects of artificial sweeteners on adipose tissue biology may be largely independent of the classical sweet taste receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. PMID

  20. Redox-sensitive up-regulation of eNOS by purple grape juice in endothelial cells: role of PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, JNK, FoxO1 and FoxO3a.

    PubMed

    Alhosin, Mahmoud; Anselm, Eric; Rashid, Sherzad; Kim, Jong Hun; Madeira, Socorro Vanesca Frota; Bronner, Christian; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2013-01-01

    The vascular protective effect of grape-derived polyphenols has been attributable, in part, to their direct action on blood vessels by stimulating the endothelial formation of nitric oxide (NO). The aim of the present study was to determine whether Concord grape juice (CGJ), which contains high levels of polyphenols, stimulates the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in porcine coronary artery endothelial cells and, if so, to determine the signaling pathway involved. CGJ dose- and time-dependently increased eNOS mRNA and protein levels and this effect is associated with an increased formation of NO in endothelial cells. The stimulatory effect of CGJ on eNOS mRNA is not associated with an increased eNOS mRNA stability and inhibited by antioxidants such as MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, and catalase, and by wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3-kinase), SB 203580 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK), and SP 600125 (an inhibitor of JNK). Moreover, CGJ induced the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in endothelial cells and this effect is inhibited by MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, and catalase. The CGJ-induced the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and JNK kinases is abolished by MnTMPyP. CGJ induced phosphorylation of transcription factors FoxO1 and FoxO3a, which regulate negatively eNOS expression, and this effect is prevented by MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, wortmannin, SB203580 and SP600125. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that the FoxO3a protein is associated with the eNOS promoter in control cells and that CGJ induced its dissociation. Thus, the present study indicates that CGJ up-regulates the expression of eNOS mRNA and protein leading to an increased formation of NO in endothelial cells. The stimulatory effect of CGJ is a redox-sensitive event involving PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK and JNK pathways, and the inactivation of the FoxO transcription factors, FoxO1 and FoxO3a, thereby preventing their repression of the eNOS gene. PMID:23533577

  1. Redox-Sensitive Up-Regulation of eNOS by Purple Grape Juice in Endothelial Cells: Role of PI3-Kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, JNK, FoxO1 and FoxO3a

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Sherzad; Kim, Jong Hun; Frota Madeira, Socorro Vanesca; Bronner, Christian; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B.

    2013-01-01

    The vascular protective effect of grape-derived polyphenols has been attributable, in part, to their direct action on blood vessels by stimulating the endothelial formation of nitric oxide (NO). The aim of the present study was to determine whether Concord grape juice (CGJ), which contains high levels of polyphenols, stimulates the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in porcine coronary artery endothelial cells and, if so, to determine the signaling pathway involved. CGJ dose- and time-dependently increased eNOS mRNA and protein levels and this effect is associated with an increased formation of NO in endothelial cells. The stimulatory effect of CGJ on eNOS mRNA is not associated with an increased eNOS mRNA stability and inhibited by antioxidants such as MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, and catalase, and by wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3-kinase), SB 203580 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK), and SP 600125 (an inhibitor of JNK). Moreover, CGJ induced the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in endothelial cells and this effect is inhibited by MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, and catalase. The CGJ-induced the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and JNK kinases is abolished by MnTMPyP. CGJ induced phosphorylation of transcription factors FoxO1 and FoxO3a, which regulate negatively eNOS expression, and this effect is prevented by MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, wortmannin, SB203580 and SP600125. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that the FoxO3a protein is associated with the eNOS promoter in control cells and that CGJ induced its dissociation. Thus, the present study indicates that CGJ up-regulates the expression of eNOS mRNA and protein leading to an increased formation of NO in endothelial cells. The stimulatory effect of CGJ is a redox-sensitive event involving PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK and JNK pathways, and the inactivation of the FoxO transcription factors, FoxO1 and FoxO3a, thereby preventing their repression of the eNOS gene. PMID:23533577

  2. Melatonin suppresses hypoxia-induced migration of HUVECs via inhibition of ERK/Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling; Zheng, Jianchao; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Yujie; Gu, Luo; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Yichao; Zhou, Ruijue; Zheng, Lu; Zhang, Xiaoying; Du, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin, a naturally-occurring hormone, possesses antioxidant properties and ameliorates vascular endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we evaluate the impact of melatonin on the migratory capability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to hypoxia and further investigate whether ERK/Rac1 signaling is involved in this process. Here, we found that melatonin inhibited hypoxia-stimulated hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression and cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, melatonin inhibited Rac1 activation and suppressed the co-localized Rac1 and F-actin on the membrane of HUVECs under hypoxic condition. In addition, the blockade of Rac1 activation with ectopic expression of an inactive mutant form of Rac1-T17N suppressed HIF-1α expression and cell migration in response to hypoxia, as well, but constitutive activation of Rac1 mutant Rac1-V12 restored HIF-1α expression, preventing the inhibition of melatonin on cell migration. Furthermore, the anti-Rac1 effect of melatonin in HUVECs appeared to be associated with its inhibition of ERK phosphorylation, but not that of the PI3k/Akt signaling pathway. Taken together, our work indicates that melatonin exerts an anti-migratory effect on hypoxic HUVECs by blocking ERK/Rac1 activation and subsequent HIF-1α upregulation. PMID:25123138

  3. IK-guided PP2A suppresses Aurora B activity in the interphase of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunyi; Jeong, Ae Lee; Park, Jeong Su; Han, Sora; Jang, Chang-Young; Kim, Keun Il; Kim, Yonghwan; Park, Jong Hoon; Lim, Jong-Seok; Lee, Myung Sok; Yang, Young

    2016-09-01

    Aurora B activation is triggered at the mitotic entry and required for proper microtubule-kinetochore attachment at mitotic phase. Therefore, Aurora B should be in inactive form in interphase to prevent aberrant cell cycle progression. However, it is unclear how the inactivation of Aurora B is sustained during interphase. In this study, we find that IK depletion-induced mitotic arrest leads to G2 arrest by Aurora B inhibition, indicating that IK depletion enhances Aurora B activation before mitotic entry. IK binds to Aurora B, and colocalizes on the nuclear foci during interphase. Our data further show that IK inhibits Aurora B activation through recruiting PP2A into IK and Aurora B complex. It is thus believed that IK, as a scaffold protein, guides PP2A into Aurora B to suppress its activity in interphase until mitotic entry. PMID:26906715

  4. Active flutter suppression of a lifting surface using piezoelectric actuation and modern control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jae-Hung; Tani, Junji; Qiu, Jinhao

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical and experimental investigation on active flutter suppression of a swept-back cantilevered lifting surface using piezoelectric (PZT) actuation. A finite element method, a panel aerodynamic method, and the minimum state-space realization are involved in the development of the equation of motion in state-space, which is efficiently used for the analysis of the system and design of control laws with a modern control framework. PZT actuators, bonded symmetrically on the plate, are optimally grouped into two equivalent actuator sets using genetic algorithms to enhance controllability. H2- and μ-synthesized control laws are designed and the flutter suppression performance is evaluated via wind tunnel testing. In the μ-synthesis design, a simple parametric uncertainty model is used to take into account the system changes with respect to airflow speed. Both controllers show comparable flutter suppression performance around the flutter point. However, the μ-synthesized controller shows improved behavior over a wide flow speed range.

  5. Tumoral Immune Suppression by Macrophages Expressing Fibroblast Activation Protein-Alpha and Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, James N.; Magiera, Lukasz; Kraman, Matthew; Fearon, Douglas T.

    2013-01-01

    The depletion of tumor stromal cells that are marked by their expression of the membrane protein fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP) overcomes immune suppression and allows an anti-cancer cell immune response to control tumor growth. In subcutaneous tumors established with immunogenic Lewis lung carcinoma cells expressing ovalbumin (LL2/OVA), the FAP+ population comprises CD45+ and CD45− cells. In the present study, we further characterize the tumoral FAP+/CD45+ population as a minor sub-population of F4/80hi/CCR2+/CD206+ M2 macrophages. Using bone marrow chimeric mice in which the primate diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) is restricted either to the FAP+/CD45+ or to the FAP+/CD45− subset, we demonstrate by conditionally depleting each subset that both independently contribute to the immune suppressive tumor microenvironment. A basis for the function of the FAP+/CD45+ subset is shown to be the immune inhibitory enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The FAP+/CD45+ cells are the major tumoral source of HO-1, and an inhibitor of HO-1, Sn mesoporphyrin, causes the same extent of immune-dependent arrest of LL2/OVA tumor growth as does the depletion of these cells. Since this observation of immune suppression by HO-1 expressed by the FAP+/CD45+ stromal cell is replicated in a transplanted model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, we conclude that pharmacologically targeting this enzyme may improve cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24778275

  6. [EMG analysis of exteroceptive suppression of temporal muscle activity in tension headache].

    PubMed

    Wallasch, T M; Reinecke, M; Langohr, H D

    1991-02-01

    In modification of a method published by Schoenen et al., early (ES 1) and late (ES 2) exteroceptive suppression periods elicited by perioral electrical trigeminus-stimulation during teeth-clenching were recorded with surface electrodes over the temporalis muscles. 29 patients with chronic tension headache, 20 with migraine, 7 patients with combined tension headache and migraine and 19 controls were examined. Duration of the late suppression period for the mean of three single shocks was highly significantly reduced in chronic tension headache sufferers and patients with combined tension headache and migraine when compared with migraine cases or controls. These results are in agreement with those of Schoenen et al. EMG analysis of temporalis late exteroceptive suppression is a helpful diagnostic method in primary headache. The reduction of ES 2 in chronic tension headache sufferers might suggest a deficient activation or excessive inhibition of the motoric trigeminus nucleus by pontobulbar inhibitory neurons which receive a strong input from limbic and nociceptive structures. PMID:2034307

  7. Enhanced Electroluminescence from a Thermally Activated Delayed-Fluorescence Emitter by Suppressing Nonradiative Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizu, Katsuyuki; Uejima, Motoyuki; Nomura, Hiroko; Sato, Tohru; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi; Kaji, Hironori; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-01-01

    Thermally activated delayed-fluorescence (TADF) is a promising approach for realizing highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). By controlling the spatial overlap between the frontier orbitals to suppress nonradiative decay, we develop a highly efficient TADF emitter, N1 -[4-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)phenyl]-N1 -[4-(diphenylamino)-phenyl]-N4 , N4 -diphenylbenzene-1,4-diamine (DPA-TRZ). DPA-TRZ exhibits a photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 100% when doped into a host material, suggesting that nonradiative decay from its excited states is completely suppressed. Transient photoluminescence measurements confirm that DPA-TRZ emits TADF in a doped film. An OLED containing DPA-TRZ as a green emitter shows a maximum external quantum efficiency of 13.8%, which exceeds the theoretical limit for conventional fluorescent OLEDs. This high efficiency results from the effective generation of TADF and suppressed nonradiative decay in DPA-TRZ. Our molecular design strategy based on quantum chemistry provides a rational approach to control radiative and nonradiative decays for optimizing TADF materials.

  8. Functional connectivity in raphé-pontomedullary circuits supports active suppression of breathing during hypocapnic apnea.

    PubMed

    Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; Iceman, Kimberly E; O'Connor, Russell; Dean, Jay B; Bolser, Donald C; Baekey, David M; Dick, Thomas E; Shannon, Roger; Morris, Kendall F; Lindsey, Bruce G

    2015-10-01

    Hyperventilation is a common feature of disordered breathing. Apnea ensues if CO2 drive is sufficiently reduced. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé, ventral respiratory column (VRC), and pontine neurons have functional connectivity and persistent or evoked activities appropriate for roles in the suppression of drive and rhythm during hyperventilation and apnea. Phrenic nerve activity, arterial blood pressure, end-tidal CO2, and other parameters were monitored in 10 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly-blocked, and artificially ventilated cats. Multielectrode arrays recorded spiking activity of 649 neurons. Loss and return of rhythmic activity during passive hyperventilation to apnea were identified with the S-transform. Diverse fluctuating activity patterns were recorded in the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network during the transition to hypocapnic apnea. The firing rates of 160 neurons increased during apnea; the rates of 241 others decreased or stopped. VRC inspiratory neurons were usually the last to cease firing or lose rhythmic activity during the transition to apnea. Mayer wave-related oscillations (0.04-0.1 Hz) in firing rate were also disrupted during apnea. Four-hundred neurons (62%) were elements of pairs with at least one hyperventilation-responsive neuron and a correlational signature of interaction identified by cross-correlation or gravitational clustering. Our results support a model with distinct groups of chemoresponsive raphé neurons contributing to hypocapnic apnea through parallel processes that incorporate disfacilitation and active inhibition of inspiratory motor drive by expiratory neurons. During apnea, carotid chemoreceptors can evoke rhythm reemergence and an inspiratory shift in the balance of reciprocal inhibition via suppression of ongoing tonic expiratory neuron activity. PMID:26203111

  9. Opiate-Induced Suppression of Rat Hypoglossal Motoneuron Activity and Its Reversal by Ampakine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lorier, Amanda R.; Funk, Gregory D.; Greer, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons innervate tongue muscles and are vital for maintaining upper-airway patency during inspiration. Depression of XII nerve activity by opioid analgesics is a significant clinical problem, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Currently there are no suitable pharmacological approaches to counter opiate-induced suppression of XII nerve activity while maintaining analgesia. Ampakines accentuate α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor responses. The AMPA family of glutamate receptors mediate excitatory transmission to XII motoneurons. Therefore the objectives were to determine whether the depressant actions of μ-opioid receptor activation on inspiratory activity includes a direct inhibitory action at the inspiratory premotoneuron to XII motoneuron synapse, and to identify underlying mechanism(s). We then examined whether ampakines counteract opioid-induced depression of XII motoneuron activity. Methodology/Principal Findings A medullary slice preparation from neonatal rat that produces inspiratory-related output in vitro was used. Measurements of inspiratory burst amplitude and frequency were made from XII nerve roots. Whole-cell patch recordings from XII motoneurons were used to measure membrane currents and synaptic events. Application of the μ-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO, to the XII nucleus depressed the output of inspiratory XII motoneurons via presynaptic inhibition of excitatory glutamatergic transmission. Ampakines (CX614 and CX717) alleviated DAMGO-induced depression of XII MN activity through postsynaptic actions on XII motoneurons. Conclusions/Significance The inspiratory-depressant actions of opioid analgesics include presynaptic inhibition of XII motoneuron output. Ampakines counteract μ-opioid receptor-mediated depression of XII motoneuron inspiratory activity. These results suggest that ampakines may be beneficial in countering opiate-induced suppression of XII motoneuron

  10. Dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages via activation of Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Abdalrahman, Akram; Lai, Yimu; Janicki, Joseph S.; Ward, Keith W.; Meyer, Colin J.; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Dh404 suppresses the expression of a selected set of pro-inflammatory cytokines in inflamed macrophages via activating Nrf2. • Dh404 activates Nrf2 while keeping Keap1 function intact in macrophages. • Dh404 minimally regulates NF-κB pathway in macrophages. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular defenses against various pathological stresses in a variety of organ systems, thus Nrf2 has evolved to be an attractive drug target for the treatment and/or prevention of human disease. Several synthetic oleanolic triterpenoids including dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide (dh404) appear to be potent activators of Nrf2 and exhibit chemopreventive promises in multiple disease models. While the pharmacological efficacy of Nrf2 activators may be dependent on the nature of Nrf2 activation in specific cell types of target organs, the precise role of Nrf2 in mediating biological effects of Nrf2 activating compounds in various cell types remains to be further explored. Herein we report a unique and Nrf2-dependent anti-inflammatory profile of dh404 in inflamed macrophages. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed RAW264.7 macrophages, dh404 dramatically suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), while minimally regulating the expression of interleulin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Dh404 potently activated Nrf2 signaling; however, it did not affect LPS-induced NF-κB activity. Dh404 did not interrupt the interaction of Nrf2 with its endogenous inhibitor Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) in macrophages. Moreover, knockout of Nrf2 blocked the dh404-induced anti-inflammatory responses in LPS-inflamed macrophages. These results demonstrated that dh404 suppresses pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages via an activation

  11. Conical Euler simulation and active suppression of delta wing rocking motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    A conical Euler code was developed to study unsteady vortex-dominated flows about rolling highly-swept delta wings, undergoing either forced or free-to-roll motions including active roll suppression. The flow solver of the code involves a multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme which uses a finite volume spatial discretization of the Euler equations on an unstructured grid of triangles. The code allows for the additional analysis of the free-to-roll case, by including the rigid-body equation of motion for its simultaneous time integration with the governing flow equations. Results are presented for a 75 deg swept sharp leading edge delta wing at a freestream Mach number of 1.2 and at alpha equal to 10 and 30 deg angle of attack. A forced harmonic analysis indicates that the rolling moment coefficient provides: (1) a positive damping at the lower angle of attack equal to 10 deg, which is verified in a free-to-roll calculation; (2) a negative damping at the higher angle of attack equal to 30 deg at the small roll amplitudes. A free-to-roll calculation for the latter case produces an initially divergent response, but as the amplitude of motion grows with time, the response transitions to a wing-rock type of limit cycle oscillation. The wing rocking motion may be actively suppressed, however, through the use of a rate-feedback control law and antisymmetrically deflected leading edge flaps. The descriptions of the conical Euler flow solver and the free-to-roll analysis are presented. Results are also presented which give insight into the flow physics associated with unsteady vortical flows about forced and free-to-roll delta wings, including the active roll suppression of this wing-rock phenomenon.

  12. Characterization of suppressive oligodeoxynucleotides that inhibit Toll-like receptor-9-mediated activation of innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Mirjam; Bode, Konrad; Lipford, Grayson B; Eberle, Florian; Heeg, Klaus; Dalpke, Alexander H

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated CpG sequences (CpG-ODNs) stimulate Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR-9), thereby activating innate immunity. Stimulatory CpG-ODNs have been shown to be valuable in modifying immune responses in allergy, infection and cancer. Recently, it has been reported that the stimulation of TLR-9 by endogenous DNA might contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We here report the identification of a suppressive, guanosine-rich ODN (G-ODN) that inhibited the activation of TLR-9 by stimulatory CpG-ODNs. The G-ODN was suppressive in murine macrophages and dendritic cells as well as in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells in vitro. G-ODN blocked the secretion of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-12p40 and interfered with the up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and costimulatory molecules. G-ODN was inhibitory even at a molar ratio of 1 : 10 (G-ODN:CpG-ODN) and when administered up to 7 hr after stimulation with CpG. G-ODN specifically inhibited TLR-9 but not other TLRs. Inhibition was dependent on a string of five guanosines. G-ODN was also inhibitory in an in vivo model of CpG/galactosamin (GalN) lethal shock. G-ODN interfered with upstream TLR-9 signalling. However, by extensive analysis we can exclude that G-ODN acts at the stage of cellular uptake. G-ODN therefore represents a class of suppressive ODNs that could be of therapeutic use in situations with pathologic TLR-9 activation, as has been proposed for certain autoimmune diseases. PMID:17961163

  13. ABCG1 and ABCG4 Suppress γ-Secretase Activity and Amyloid β Production

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Osamu; Tsujita, Maki; Shimizu, Yuji; Kato, Reiko; Kobayashi, Aya; Kioka, Noriyuki; Remaley, Alan T.; Michikawa, Makoto; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Matsuo, Michinori

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1) and ABCG4, expressed in neurons and glia in the central nervous system, mediate cholesterol efflux to lipid acceptors. The relationship between cholesterol level in the central nervous system and Alzheimer’s disease has been reported. In this study, we examined the effects of ABCG1 and ABCG4 on amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, the product of which, amyloid β (Aβ), is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Expression of ABCG1 or ABCG4 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells that stably expressed Swedish-type mutant APP increased cellular and cell surface APP levels. Products of cleavage from APP by α-secretase and by β-secretase also increased. The levels of secreted Aβ, however, decreased in the presence of ABCG1 and ABCG4, but not ABCG4-KM, a nonfunctional Walker-A lysine mutant. In contrast, secreted Aβ levels increased in differentiated SH-SY5Y neuron-like cells in which ABCG1 and ABCG4 were suppressed. Furthermore, Aβ42 peptide in the cerebrospinal fluid from Abcg1 null mice significantly increased compared to the wild type mice. To examine the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the activity and distribution of γ-secretase. ABCG1 and ABCG4 suppressed γ-secretase activity and disturbed γ-secretase localization in the raft domains where γ-secretase functions. These results suggest that ABCG1 and ABCG4 alter the distribution of γ-secretase on the plasma membrane, leading to the decreased γ-secretase activity and suppressed Aβ secretion. ABCG1 and ABCG4 may inhibit the development of Alzheimer’s disease and can be targets for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:27196068

  14. Active Suppression Induced by Repetitive Self-Epitopes Protects against EAE Development

    PubMed Central

    Puentes, Fabiola; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria; Falk, Kirsten; Rötzschke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Background Autoimmune diseases result from a breakdown in self-tolerance to autoantigens. Self-tolerance is induced and sustained by central and peripheral mechanisms intended to deviate harmful immune responses and to maintain homeostasis, where regulatory T cells play a crucial role. The use of self-antigens in the study and treatment of a range of autoimmune diseases has been widely described; however, the mechanisms underlying the induced protection by these means are unclear. This study shows that protection of experimental autoimmune disease induced by T cell self-epitopes in a multimerized form (oligomers) is mediated by the induction of active suppression. Principal Findings The experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model for multiple sclerosis was used to study the mechanisms of protection induced by the treatment of oligomerized T cell epitope of myelin proteolipid protein (PLP139–151). Disease protection attained by the administration of oligomers was shown to be antigen specific and effective in both prevention and treatment of ongoing EAE. Oligomer mediated tolerance was actively transferred by cells from treated mice into adoptive hosts. The induction of active suppression was correlated with the recruitment of cells in the periphery associated with increased production of IL-10 and reduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. The role of suppressive cytokines was demonstrated by the reversion of oligomer-induced protection after in vivo blocking of either IL-10 or TGF-β cytokines. Conclusions This study strongly supports an immunosuppressive role of repeat auto-antigens to control the development of EAE with potential applications in vaccination and antigen specific treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:23738007

  15. Multirate Flutter Suppression System Design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing. Part 1; Theory and Design Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Gregory S.; Berg, Martin C.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2002-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies were applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing. This report describes a project at the University of Washington to design a multirate suppression system for the BACT wing. The objective of the project was two fold. First, to develop a methodology for designing robust multirate compensators, and second, to demonstrate the methodology by applying it to the design of a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing.

  16. Multirate Flutter Suppression System Design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing. Part 2; Methodology Application Software Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Gregory S.; Berg, Martin C.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2002-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies were applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing. This report describes the user's manual and software toolbox developed at the University of Washington to design a multirate flutter suppression control law for the BACT wing.

  17. Digital-flutter-suppression-system investigations for the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Hoadley, Sherwood Tiffany; Cole, Stanley R.; Buttrill, Carey S.

    1990-01-01

    Active flutter suppression control laws were designed, implemented, and tested on an aeroelastically-scaled wind-tunnel model in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. One of the control laws was successful in stabilizing the model while the dynamic pressure was increased to 24 percent greater than the measured open-loop flutter boundary. Other accomplishments included the design, implementation, and successful operation of a one-of-a-kind digital controller, the design and use of two simulation methods to support the project, and the development and successful use of a methodology for online controller performance evaluation.

  18. Digital-flutter-suppression-system investigations for the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Cole, Stanley R.; Buttrill, Carey S.; Houck, Jacob A.

    1990-01-01

    Active flutter suppression control laws were designed, implemented, and tested on an aeroelastically-scaled wind tunnel model in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. One of the control laws was successful in stabilizing the model while the dynamic pressure was increased to 24 percent greater than the measured open-loop flutter boundary. Other accomplishments included the design, implementation, and successful operation of a one-of-a-kind digital controller, the design and use of two simulation methods to support the project, and the development and successful use of a methodology for on-line controller performance evaluation.

  19. Nondestructive determination of arsenic in urine by epithermal neutron activation analysis and Compton suppression.

    PubMed

    Landsberger, S; Swift, G; Neuhoff, J

    1990-01-01

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis, in conjunction with Compton suppression, has been employed to determine arsenic levels in artificially doped urine samples. Typical detection limits were of the order of 10 ng/g. Replicate determinations gave precision values between 2 and 12%, whereas accuracy measurements were between +/- 1 and +/- 20%. Biological and geological reference materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) were also analyzed for arsenic content. Typically, the precision achieved again was between 2 and 12%, whereas the accuracy measurements were in excellent agreement with the certified values. PMID:1704729

  20. An evaluation of thermal and epithermal neutron activation analysis compton suppression methods for biological reference materials.

    PubMed

    Landsberger, S; Wu, D

    1999-01-01

    For neutron activation analysis (NAA), the usual matrix problems of sodium, chlorine, and bromine are well known to give rise to high backgrounds that inhibit the determination of several trace elements for short-lived or medium-lived NAA. For long counting times in long-lived NAA, very low backgrounds are required to achieve good sensitivities. We have investigated the use of thermal and epithermal NAA in conjunction with Compton suppression to determine several elements such as arsenic, antimony, cadmium, and mercury, at the level of a few nanograms. The values of these techniques are discussed in contrast to the standard radiochemical methods. PMID:10676521

  1. Pyruvate kinase M2 activators promote tetramer formation and suppress tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Yu, Yimin; Israelsen, William J.; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Boxer, Matthew B.; Hong, Bum Soo; Tempel, Wolfram; Dimov, Svetoslav; Shen, Min; Jha, Abhishek; Yang, Hua; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Metallo, Christian M.; Fiske, Brian P.; Courtney, Kevin D.; Malstrom, Scott; Khan, Tahsin M.; Kung, Charles; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Veith, Henrike; Southall, Noel; Walsh, Martin J.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Leister, William; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Yen, Katharine E.; Kunii, Kaiko; Davidson, Shawn M.; Christofk, Heather R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James; Harris, Marian H.; Asara, John M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Salituro, Francesco G.; Jin, Shengfang; Dang, Lenny; Auld, Douglas S.; Park, Hee-Won; Cantley, Lewis C.; Thomas, Craig J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2012-08-26

    Cancer cells engage in a metabolic program to enhance biosynthesis and support cell proliferation. The regulatory properties of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) influence altered glucose metabolism in cancer. The interaction of PKM2 with phosphotyrosine-containing proteins inhibits enzyme activity and increases the availability of glycolytic metabolites to support cell proliferation. This suggests that high pyruvate kinase activity may suppress tumor growth. We show that expression of PKM1, the pyruvate kinase isoform with high constitutive activity, or exposure to published small-molecule PKM2 activators inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. Structural studies reveal that small-molecule activators bind PKM2 at the subunit interaction interface, a site that is distinct from that of the endogenous activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). However, unlike FBP, binding of activators to PKM2 promotes a constitutively active enzyme state that is resistant to inhibition by tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. This data supports the notion that small-molecule activation of PKM2 can interfere with anabolic metabolism.

  2. Pyruvate kinase M2 activators promote tetramer formation and suppress tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Yu, Yimin; Israelsen, William J.; Jiang, Jian-kang; Boxer, Matthew B.; Hong, Bum Soo; Tempel, Wolfram; Dimov, Svetoslav; Shen, Min; Jha, Abhishek; Yang, Hua; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Metallo, Christian M.; Fiske, Brian P.; Courtney, Kevin D.; Malstrom, Scott; Khan, Tahsin M.; Kung, Charles; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Veith, Henrike; Southall, Noel; Walsh, Martin J.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Leister, William; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Yen, Katharine E.; Kunii, Kaiko; Davidson, Shawn M.; Christofk, Heather R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James; Harris, Marian H.; Asara, John M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Salituro, Francesco G.; Jin, Shengfang; Dang, Lenny; Auld, Douglas S.; Park, Hee-Won; Cantley, Lewis C.; Thomas, Craig J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells engage in a metabolic program to enhance biosynthesis and support cell proliferation. The regulatory properties of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) influence altered glucose metabolism in cancer. PKM2 interaction with phosphotyrosine-containing proteins inhibits enzyme activity and increases availability of glycolytic metabolites to support cell proliferation. This suggests that high pyruvate kinase activity may suppress tumor growth. We show that expression of PKM1, the pyruvate kinase isoform with high constitutive activity, or exposure to published small molecule PKM2 activators inhibit growth of xenograft tumors. Structural studies reveal that small molecule activators bind PKM2 at the subunit interaction interface, a site distinct from that of the endogenous activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). However, unlike FBP, binding of activators to PKM2 promotes a constitutively active enzyme state that is resistant to inhibition by tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. These data support the notion that small molecule activation of PKM2 can interfere with anabolic metabolism. PMID:22922757

  3. Folliculin Contributes to VHL Tumor Suppressing Activity in Renal Cancer through Regulation of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Emily; Mikhaylova, Olga; Yi, Ying; Sartor, Maureen A.; Medvedovic, Mario; Biesiada, Jacek; Meller, Jarek; Czyzyk-Krzeska, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL) is lost in the majority of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC). Folliculin (FLCN) is a tumor suppressor whose function is lost in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD), a disorder characterized by renal cancer of multiple histological types including clear cell carcinoma, cutaneous fibrofolliculoma, and pneumothorax. Here we explored whether there is connection between VHL and FLCN in clear cell renal carcinoma cell lines and tumors. We demonstrate that VHL regulates expression of FLCN at the mRNA and protein levels in RCC cell lines, and that FLCN protein expression is decreased in human ccRCC tumors with VHL loss, as compared with matched normal kidney tissue. Knockdown of FLCN results in increased formation of tumors by RCC cells with wild-type VHL in orthotopic xenografts in nude mice, an indication that FLCN plays a role in the tumor-suppressing activity of VHL. Interestingly, FLCN, similarly to VHL, is necessary for the activity of LC3C-mediated autophagic program that we have previously characterized as contributing to the tumor suppressing activity of VHL. The results show the existence of functional crosstalk between two major tumor suppressors in renal cancer, VHL and FLCN, converging on regulation of autophagy. PMID:23922894

  4. Inhibitory effect of oblongifolin C on allergic inflammation through the suppression of mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Cai, Shuangfan; Tan, Hongsheng; Fu, Wenwei; Zhang, Hong; Xu, Hongxi

    2015-08-01

    Oblongifolin C (OC), a natural small molecule compound extracted from Garcinia yunnanensis Hu, has been previously shown to have anti-cancer effect, but the anti-allergic effect of OC has not yet been investigated. The aim of the present study is to determine the anti-allergic effect of OC on IgE/Ag-induced mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) and on the passive systemic anaphylaxis (PSA) reaction in mice. OC clearly suppressed cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) generation as well as leukotriene C4 (LTC4) generation and the degranulation reaction in IgE/Ag-stimulated BMMCs. Biochemical analyses of the IgE/Ag-mediated signaling pathways showed that OC suppressed the phosphorylation of phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1)-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) influx and the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway, as well as the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Although OC did not inhibit the phosphorylation of Fyn, Lyn, and Syk, it directly inhibited the tyrosine kinase activity in vitro. Moreover, oral administration of OC inhibited the IgE-induced PSA reaction in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, the present study provides new insights into the anti-allergic activity of OC, which could be a promising candidate for allergic therapy. PMID:25968068

  5. Immunoresponsiveness in Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease—Effect of Colectomy and Suppression of Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lyanga, John; Davis, Paul; Thomson, Alan B. R.

    1988-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of medically induced symptomatic disease improvement on in vitro tests of cell-mediated immune responses in 33 patients with Crohn's disease. When results obtained in 17 patients with ulcerative colitis were compared with those of 10 patients with ulcerative colitis who had undergone a colectomy, no significant correlation was detected between individual clinical and laboratory variables or the Crohn's disease activity index and in vitro tests of cell-mediated immunity. A different pattern emerged from the longitudinal tests of cell-mediated immunity: when these test results were initially abnormal in patients with Crohn's disease, clinical improvement as assessed by the Crohn's disease activity index was associated with normalizing cell-mediated immunity. In contrast, when the test results were initially normal, clinical improvement was not associated with any change in the immune response. Following colectomy in patients with ulcerative colitis, some abnormalities of suppressed immune responses remained, although patients were cured of their disease. Factors other than clinical disease activity may be responsible for the suppressed immunoresponsiveness in some patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and variable changes in cell-mediated immunity occur after both surgical and medical treatment. PMID:3388844

  6. Suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity in vitro by oligonucleotides which form intramolecular tetrads.

    PubMed

    Rando, R F; Ojwang, J; Elbaggari, A; Reyes, G R; Tinder, R; McGrath, M S; Hogan, M E

    1995-01-27

    An oligonucleotide (I100-15) composed of only deoxyguanosine and thymidine was able to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) in culture assay systems. I100-15 did not block virus entry into cells but did reduce viral-specific transcripts. As assessed by NMR and polyacrylamide gel methods, I100-15 appears to form a structure in which two stacked guanosine tetrads are connected by three two-base long loops. Structure/activity experiments indicated that formation of intramolecular guanosine tetrads was necessary to achieve maximum antiviral activity. The single deoxyguanosine nucleotide present in each loop was found to be extremely important for the overall antiviral activity. The toxicity of I100-15 was determined to be well above the 50% effective dose (ED50) in culture which yielded a high therapeutic index (> 100). The addition of a cholesterol moiety to the 3' terminus of I100-15 (I100-23) reduced the ED50 value to less than 50 nM (from 0.12 microM for I100-15) and increased the duration of viral suppression to greater than 21 days (versus 7-10 days for I100-15) after removal of the drug from infected cell cultures. The favorable therapeutic index of such molecules coupled with the prolonged suppression of HIV-1, suggest that such compounds further warrant investigation as potential therapeutic agents. PMID:7829511

  7. Suppression of Abdominal Motor Activity during Swallowing in Cats and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, Teresa; Gayagoy, Albright G.; Rose, Melanie J.; Poliacek, Ivan; Condrey, Jillian A.; Musslewhite, M. Nicholas; Shen, Tabitha Y.; Davenport, Paul W.; Bolser, Donald C

    2015-01-01

    Diseases affecting pulmonary mechanics often result in changes to the coordination of swallow and breathing. We hypothesize that during times of increased intrathoracic pressure, swallow suppresses ongoing expiratory drive to ensure bolus transport through the esophagus. To this end, we sought to determine the effects of swallow on abdominal electromyographic (EMG) activity during expiratory threshold loading in anesthetized cats and in awake-healthy adult humans. Expiratory threshold loads were applied to recruit abdominal motor activity during breathing, and swallow was triggered by infusion of water into the mouth. In both anesthetized cats and humans, expiratory cycles which contained swallows had a significant reduction in abdominal EMG activity, and a greater percentage of swallows were produced during inspiration and/or respiratory phase transitions. These results suggest that: a) spinal expiratory motor pathways play an important role in the execution of swallow, and b) a more complex mechanical relationship exists between breathing and swallow than has previously been envisioned. PMID:26020240

  8. Transgenic songbirds with suppressed or enhanced activity of CREB transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kentaro; Matsui, Sumiko; Watanabe, Dai

    2015-06-16

    Songbirds postnatally develop their skill to utter and to perceive a vocal signal for communication. How genetic and environmental influences act in concert to regulate the development of such skill is not fully understood. Here, we report the phenotype of transgenic songbirds with altered intrinsic activity of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcription factor. By viral vector-mediated modification of genomic DNA, we established germ line-transmitted lines of zebra finches, which exhibited enhanced or suppressed activity of CREB. Although intrinsically acquired vocalizations or their hearing ability were not affected, the transgenic birds showed reduced vocal learning quality of their own songs and impaired audio-memory formation against conspecific songs. These results thus demonstrate that appropriate activity of CREB is necessary for the postnatal acquisition of learned behavior in songbirds, and the CREB transgenic birds offer a unique opportunity to separately manipulate both genetic and environmental factors that impinge on the postnatal song learning. PMID:26048905

  9. Hemodynamic response to burst-suppressed and discontinuous electroencephalography activity in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chalia, Maria; Lee, Chuen Wai; Dempsey, Laura A; Edwards, Andrea D; Singh, Harsimrat; Michell, Andrew W; Everdell, Nicholas L; Hill, Reuben W; Hebden, Jeremy C; Austin, Topun; Cooper, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Burst suppression (BS) is an electroencephalographic state associated with a profound inactivation of the brain. BS and pathological discontinuous electroencephalography (EEG) are often observed in term-age infants with neurological injury and can be indicative of a poor outcome and lifelong disability. Little is known about the neurophysiological mechanisms of BS or how the condition relates to the functional state of the neonatal brain. We used simultaneous EEG and diffuse optical tomography (DOT) to investigate whether bursts of EEG activity in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy are associated with an observable cerebral hemodynamic response. We were able to identify significant changes in concentration of both oxy and deoxyhemoglobin that are temporally correlated with EEG bursts and present a relatively consistent morphology across six infants. Furthermore, DOT reveals patient-specific spatial distributions of this hemodynamic response that may be indicative of a complex pattern of cortical activation underlying discontinuous EEG activity that is not readily apparent in scalp EEG. PMID:27446969

  10. Suppression of hepatic stellate cell activation by microRNA-29b

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, Yumiko; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Ikeda, Kazuo; Kawada, Norifumi

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Expression of miR-29b was found to be down-regulated during the activation of hepatic stellate cells in primary culture. {yields} Transfection of a miR-29b precursor markedly attenuated the expression of Col1a1 and Col1a2 mRNAs. {yields} It blunted the increased expression of {alpha}-SMA, DDR2, FN1, ITGB1, and PDGFR-b mRNAs essential for stellate cell activation. {yields} miR-29b overexpression led stellate cells to remain in a quiescent state, as evidenced by their star-like morphology. {yields} miR-29b overexpression suppressed the expression of c-fos mRNA. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in the regulation of cellular functions including proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. It has been previously shown that the miR-29 family is involved in regulating type I collagen expression by interacting with the 3'UTR of its mRNA. Here, we investigated the roles of miR-29b in the activation of mouse primary-cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a principal collagen-producing cell in the liver. Expression of miR-29b was found to be down-regulated during HSC activation in primary culture. Transfection of a miR-29b precursor markedly attenuated the expression of Col1a1 and Col1a2 mRNAs and additionally blunted the increased expression of {alpha}-SMA, DDR2, FN1, ITGB1, and PDGFR-{beta}, which are key genes involved in the activation of HSCs. Further, overexpression of miR-29b led HSCs to remain in a quiescent state, as evidenced by their quiescent star-like cell morphology. Although phosphorylation of FAK, ERK, and Akt, and the mRNA expression of c-jun was unaffected, miR-29b overexpression suppressed the expression of c-fos mRNA. These results suggested that miR-29b is involved in the activation of HSCs and could be a candidate molecule for suppressing their activation and consequent liver fibrosis.

  11. Acid sphingomyelinase regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in hepatocytes through AKT activation and AMP-activated protein kinase suppression

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Yosuke; Seki, Ekihiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Miura, Kouichi; Adachi, Masayuki; Ito, Hiroyasu; Shiratori, Yoshimune; Banno, Yoshiko; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Nagaki, Masahito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Brenner, David A.; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) regulates the homeostasis of sphingolipids, including ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Because sphingolipids regulate AKT activation, we investigated the role of ASM in hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism. Initially, we overexpressed ASM in the livers of wild-type and diabetic db/db mice by adenovirus vector (Ad5ASM). In these mice, glucose tolerance was improved, and glycogen and lipid accumulation in the liver were increased. Using primary cultured hepatocytes, we confirmed that ASM increased glucose uptake, glycogen deposition, and lipid accumulation through activation of AKT and glycogen synthase kinase-3β. In addition, ASM induced up-regulation of glucose transporter 2 accompanied by suppression of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. Loss of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) diminished ASM-mediated AKT phosphorylation, but exogenous S1P induced AKT activation in hepatocytes. In contrast, SphK1 deficiency did not affect AMPK activation. These results suggest that the SphK/S1P pathway is required for ASM-mediated AKT activation but not for AMPK inactivation. Finally, we found that treatment with high-dose glucose increased glycogen deposition and lipid accumulation in wild-type hepatocytes but not in ASM−/− cells. This result is consistent with glucose intolerance in ASM−/− mice. In conclusion, ASM modulates AKT activation and AMPK inactivation, thus regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver.—Osawa, Y., Seki, E., Kodama, Y., Suetsugu, A., Miura, K., Adachi, M., Ito, H., Shiratori, Y., Banno, Y., Olefsky, J. M., Nagaki, M., Moriwaki, H., Brenner, D. A., Seishima, M. Acid sphingomyelinase regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in hepatocytes through AKT activation and AMP-activated protein kinase suppression. PMID:21163859

  12. A Novel Telomerase Activator Suppresses Lung Damage in a Murine Model of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Le Saux, Claude Jourdan; Davy, Philip; Brampton, Christopher; Ahuja, Seema S.; Fauce, Steven; Shivshankar, Pooja; Nguyen, Hieu; Ramaseshan, Mahesh; Tressler, Robert; Pirot, Zhu; Harley, Calvin B.; Allsopp, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of diseases associated with telomere dysfunction, including AIDS, aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis, has bolstered interest in telomerase activators. We report identification of a new small molecule activator, GRN510, with activity ex vivo and in vivo. Using a novel mouse model, we tested the potential of GRN510 to limit fibrosis induced by bleomycin in mTERT heterozygous mice. Treatment with GRN510 at 10 mg/kg/day activated telomerase 2–4 fold both in hematopoietic progenitors ex vivo and in bone marrow and lung tissue in vivo, respectively. Telomerase activation was countered by co-treatment with Imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor. In this model of bleomycin-induced fibrosis, treatment with GRN510 suppressed the development of fibrosis and accumulation of senescent cells in the lung via a mechanism dependent upon telomerase activation. Treatment of small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) or lung fibroblasts ex vivo with GRN510 revealed telomerase activating and replicative lifespan promoting effects only in the SAEC, suggesting that the mechanism accounting for the protective effects of GRN510 against induced lung fibrosis involves specific types of lung cells. Together, these results support the use of small molecule activators of telomerase in therapies to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23516479

  13. A novel telomerase activator suppresses lung damage in a murine model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Le Saux, Claude Jourdan; Davy, Philip; Brampton, Christopher; Ahuja, Seema S; Fauce, Steven; Shivshankar, Pooja; Nguyen, Hieu; Ramaseshan, Mahesh; Tressler, Robert; Pirot, Zhu; Harley, Calvin B; Allsopp, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of diseases associated with telomere dysfunction, including AIDS, aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis, has bolstered interest in telomerase activators. We report identification of a new small molecule activator, GRN510, with activity ex vivo and in vivo. Using a novel mouse model, we tested the potential of GRN510 to limit fibrosis induced by bleomycin in mTERT heterozygous mice. Treatment with GRN510 at 10 mg/kg/day activated telomerase 2-4 fold both in hematopoietic progenitors ex vivo and in bone marrow and lung tissue in vivo, respectively. Telomerase activation was countered by co-treatment with Imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor. In this model of bleomycin-induced fibrosis, treatment with GRN510 suppressed the development of fibrosis and accumulation of senescent cells in the lung via a mechanism dependent upon telomerase activation. Treatment of small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) or lung fibroblasts ex vivo with GRN510 revealed telomerase activating and replicative lifespan promoting effects only in the SAEC, suggesting that the mechanism accounting for the protective effects of GRN510 against induced lung fibrosis involves specific types of lung cells. Together, these results support the use of small molecule activators of telomerase in therapies to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23516479

  14. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E.; Rautela, Jai; Duivenvoorden, Hendrika M.; Jayatilleke, Krishnath M.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Verdoes, Martijn; Bogyo, Matthew; Parker, Belinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor growth and invasion, such that they may be valid targets for anti-metastatic therapeutic approaches. Using activity-based probes, we have examined the activity and expression of cysteine cathepsins in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to bone. In mice bearing highly metastatic tumors, we detected abundant cysteine cathepsin expression and activity in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These immature immune cells have known metastasis-promoting roles, including immunosuppression and osteoclastogenesis, and we assessed the contribution of cysteine cathepsins to these functions. Blocking cysteine cathepsin activity with multiple small-molecule inhibitors resulted in enhanced differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts. This highlights a potential role for cysteine cathepsin activity in suppressing the fusion of osteoclast precursor cells. In support of this hypothesis, we found that expression and activity of key cysteine cathepsins were downregulated during MDSC-osteoclast differentiation. Another cysteine protease, legumain, also inhibits osteoclastogenesis, in part through modulation of cathepsin L activity. Together, these data suggest that cysteine protease inhibition is associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis, a process that has been implicated in bone metastasis. PMID:26308073

  15. Novel roles of Akt and mTOR in suppressing TGF-β/ALK5-mediated Smad3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyung; Wang, Hui; Krebs, Tracy L; Danielpour, David

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I inhibits transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling by blocking activation of Smad3 (S3), via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt-dependent pathway. Here we provide the first report that the kinase activity of Akt is necessary for its ability to suppress many TGF-β responses, including S3 activation and induction of apoptosis. Wild-type and myristoylated Akts (AktWT and AktMyr) suppress TGF-β-induced phospho-activation of S3 but not Smad2 (S2), whereas kinase-dead Akt1 (Akt1K179M) or dominant-negative PI3K enhances TGF-β-induced phospho-activation of both S2 and S3. Using siRNA, rapamycin (Rap), and adenoviral expression for FKBP12-resistant and constitutively active TGF-β type I receptor (ALK5), we demonstrate that mammalian target of Rap (mTOR) mediates Akt1 suppression of phospho-activation of S3. These and further data on Akt1-S3 binding do not support a recently proposed model that Akt blocks S3 activation through physical interaction and sequestration of S3 from TGF-β receptors. We propose a novel model whereby Akt suppresses activation of S3 in an Akt kinase-dependent manner through mTOR, a likely route for loss of tumor suppression by TGF-β in cancers. PMID:16362038

  16. Genetic suppression of transgenic APP rescues Hypersynchronous network activity in a mouse model of Alzeimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Born, Heather A; Kim, Ji-Yoen; Savjani, Ricky R; Das, Pritam; Dabaghian, Yuri A; Guo, Qinxi; Yoo, Jong W; Schuler, Dorothy R; Cirrito, John R; Zheng, Hui; Golde, Todd E; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Jankowsky, Joanna L

    2014-03-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with an elevated risk for seizures that may be fundamentally connected to cognitive dysfunction. Supporting this link, many mouse models for AD exhibit abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in addition to the expected neuropathology and cognitive deficits. Here, we used a controllable transgenic system to investigate how network changes develop and are maintained in a model characterized by amyloid β (Aβ) overproduction and progressive amyloid pathology. EEG recordings in tet-off mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP) from birth display frequent sharp wave discharges (SWDs). Unexpectedly, we found that withholding APP overexpression until adulthood substantially delayed the appearance of epileptiform activity. Together, these findings suggest that juvenile APP overexpression altered cortical development to favor synchronized firing. Regardless of the age at which EEG abnormalities appeared, the phenotype was dependent on continued APP overexpression and abated over several weeks once transgene expression was suppressed. Abnormal EEG discharges were independent of plaque load and could be extinguished without altering deposited amyloid. Selective reduction of Aβ with a γ-secretase inhibitor has no effect on the frequency of SWDs, indicating that another APP fragment or the full-length protein was likely responsible for maintaining EEG abnormalities. Moreover, transgene suppression normalized the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory innervation in the cortex, whereas secretase inhibition did not. Our results suggest that APP overexpression, and not Aβ overproduction, is responsible for EEG abnormalities in our transgenic mice and can be rescued independently of pathology. PMID:24623762

  17. Modeling the Benchmark Active Control Technology Wind-Tunnel Model for Application to Flutter Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the formulation of a model of the dynamic behavior of the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) wind-tunnel model for application to design and analysis of flutter suppression controllers. The model is formed by combining the equations of motion for the BACT wind-tunnel model with actuator models and a model of wind-tunnel turbulence. The primary focus of this paper is the development of the equations of motion from first principles using Lagrange's equations and the principle of virtual work. A numerical form of the model is generated using values for parameters obtained from both experiment and analysis. A unique aspect of the BACT wind-tunnel model is that it has upper- and lower-surface spoilers for active control. Comparisons with experimental frequency responses and other data show excellent agreement and suggest that simple coefficient-based aerodynamics are sufficient to accurately characterize the aeroelastic response of the BACT wind-tunnel model. The equations of motion developed herein have been used to assist the design and analysis of a number of flutter suppression controllers that have been successfully implemented.

  18. Genetic Suppression of Transgenic APP Rescues Hypersynchronous Network Activity in a Mouse Model of Alzeimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Born, Heather A.; Kim, Ji-Yoen; Savjani, Ricky R.; Das, Pritam; Dabaghian, Yuri A.; Guo, Qinxi; Yoo, Jong W.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Cirrito, John R.; Zheng, Hui; Golde, Todd E.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with an elevated risk for seizures that may be fundamentally connected to cognitive dysfunction. Supporting this link, many mouse models for AD exhibit abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in addition to the expected neuropathology and cognitive deficits. Here, we used a controllable transgenic system to investigate how network changes develop and are maintained in a model characterized by amyloid β (Aβ) overproduction and progressive amyloid pathology. EEG recordings in tet-off mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP) from birth display frequent sharp wave discharges (SWDs). Unexpectedly, we found that withholding APP overexpression until adulthood substantially delayed the appearance of epileptiform activity. Together, these findings suggest that juvenile APP overexpression altered cortical development to favor synchronized firing. Regardless of the age at which EEG abnormalities appeared, the phenotype was dependent on continued APP overexpression and abated over several weeks once transgene expression was suppressed. Abnormal EEG discharges were independent of plaque load and could be extinguished without altering deposited amyloid. Selective reduction of Aβ with a γ-secretase inhibitor has no effect on the frequency of SWDs, indicating that another APP fragment or the full-length protein was likely responsible for maintaining EEG abnormalities. Moreover, transgene suppression normalized the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory innervation in the cortex, whereas secretase inhibition did not. Our results suggest that APP overexpression, and not Aβ overproduction, is responsible for EEG abnormalities in our transgenic mice and can be rescued independently of pathology. PMID:24623762

  19. Dormancy of Cancer Cells with Suppression of AKT Activity Contributes to Survival in Chronic Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Hiroko; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Ohue, Masayuki; Inoue, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    A hypoxic microenvironment in tumors has been recognized as a cause of malignancy or resistance to various cancer therapies. In contrast to recent progress in understanding the acute response of cancer cells to hypoxia, the characteristics of tumor cells in chronic hypoxia remain elusive. We have identified a pancreatic cancer cell line, AsPC-1, that is exceptionally able to survive for weeks under 1% oxygen conditions while most tested cancer cell lines die after only some days under these conditions. In chronic hypoxia, AsPC-1 cells entered a state of dormancy characterized by no proliferation, no death, and metabolic suppression. They reversibly switched to active status after being placed again in optimal culture conditions. ATP turnover, an indicator of energy demand, was markedly decreased and accompanied by reduced AKT phosphorylation. Forced activation of AKT resulted in increased ATP turnover and massive cell death in vitro and a decreased number of dormant cells in vivo. In contrast to most cancer cell lines, primary-cultured colorectal cancer cells easily entered the dormant status with AKT suppression under hypoxia combined with growth factor–depleted conditions. Primary colorectal cancer cells in dormancy were resistant to chemotherapy. Thus, the ability to survive in a deteriorated microenvironment by entering into dormancy under chronic hypoxia might be a common property among cancer cells. Targeting the regulatory mechanism inducing this dormant status could provide a new strategy for treating cancer. PMID:24905002

  20. Increased Intrathecal Immune Activation in Virally Suppressed HIV-1 Infected Patients with Neurocognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Edén, Arvid; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Heaton, Robert K.; Nilsson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Franklin, Donald; Price, Richard W.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.; Gisslén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remain prevalent, a correlation to neuronal injury has not been established in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined the relationship between mild HAND and CSF neurofilament light protein (NFL), a biomarker of neuronal injury; and CSF neopterin, a biomarker of CNS immunoactivation, in virally suppressed patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design and Methods We selected 99 subjects on suppressive ART followed longitudinally from the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. Based on standardized comprehensive neurocognitive performance (NP) testing, subjects were classified as neurocognitively normal (NCN; n = 29) or impaired (NCI; n = 70). The NCI group included subjects with asymptomatic (ANI; n = 37) or mild (MND; n = 33) HAND. CSF biomarkers were analyzed on two occasions. Results Geometric mean CSF neopterin was 25% higher in the NCI group (p = 0.04) and NFL and neopterin were significantly correlated within the NCI group (r = 0.30; p<0.001) but not in the NCN group (r = -0.13; p = 0.3). Additionally, a trend towards higher NFL was seen in the NCI group (p = 0.06). Conclusions Mild HAND was associated with increased intrathecal immune activation, and the correlation between neopterin and NFL found in NCI subjects indicates an association between neurocognitive impairment, CNS inflammation and neuronal damage. Together these findings suggest that NCI despite ART may represent an active pathological process within the CNS that needs further characterization in prospective studies. PMID:27295036

  1. C6-ceramide nanoliposome suppresses tumor metastasis by eliciting PI3K and PKCζ tumor-suppressive activities and regulating integrin affinity modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pu; Fu, Changliang; Hu, Yijuan; Dong, Cheng; Song, Yang; Song, Erqun

    2015-01-01

    Nanoliposomal formulation of C6-ceramide, a proapoptotic sphingolipid metabolite, presents an effective way to treat malignant tumor. Here, we provide evidence that acute treatment (30 min) of melanoma and breast cancer cells with nanoliposomal C6-ceramide (NaL-C6) may suppress cell migration without inducing cell death. By employing a novel flow migration assay, we demonstrated that NaL-C6 decreased tumor extravasation under shear conditions. Compared with ghost nanoliposome, NaL-C6 triggered phosphorylation of PI3K and PKCζ and dephosphorylation of PKCα. Concomitantly, activated PKCζ translocated into cell membrane. siRNA knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of PKCζ or PI3K rescued NaL-C6-mediated suppression of tumor migration. By inducing dephosphorylation of paxillin, PKCζ was responsible for NaL-C6-mediated stress fiber depolymerization and focal adhesion disassembly in the metastatic tumor cells. PKCζ and PI3K regulated cell shear-resistant adhesion in a way that required integrin αvβ3 affinity modulation. In conclusion, we identified a novel role of acute nanoliposomal ceramide treatment in reducing integrin affinity and inhibiting melanoma metastasis by conferring PI3K and PKCζ tumor-suppressive activities. PMID:25792190

  2. Suppression of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell function by neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dallegri, F; Dapino, P; Patrone, F; Sacchetti, C

    1991-01-01

    Peripheral blood neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from healthy donors were found to inhibit the cytolytic efficiency of interleukin 2 (IL-2)-activated lymphocytes (LAK cells) in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory activity of PMN was not merely due to PMN acting as cold alternative targets, PMN ingestion of the label released by target cells or cell overcrowding in test wells. Heat-treated (50 degrees C, 30 min) lysates from PMN maintained their ability to inhibit LAK cell cytotoxicity, whereas PMN supernatants were completely ineffective. Oxidant scavengers (catalase, superoxide, dismutase) did not affect the PMN-mediated inhibition of LAK cell function. The results suggest that PMN contain heat-stable factor(s) able to suppress LAK cytotoxicity and potentially capable of limiting the therapeutic efficacy of IL-2 and/or LAK cells. PMID:1667940

  3. Knockdown of Pokemon protein expression inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation by suppression of AKT activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaosan; Dai, Yichen; Chen, Zhangxin; Xie, Junpei; Zeng, Wei; Lin, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of Pokemon, which is an erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor protein, occurs in different cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Pokemon is also reported to have an oncogenic activity in various human cancers. This study investigated the effect of Pokemon knockdown on the regulation of HCC growth. POK shRNA suppressed the expression of Pokemon protein in HepG2 cells compared to the negative control vector-transfected HCC cells. Pokemon knockdown also reduced HCC cell viability and enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HCC cells. AKT activation and the expression of various cell cycle-related genes were inhibited following Pokemon knockdown. These data demonstrate that Pokemon may play a role in HCC progression, suggesting that inhibition of Pokemon expression using Pokemon shRNA should be further evaluated as a novel target for the control of HCC. PMID:23924858

  4. Papaverine inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced microglial activation by suppressing NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yalong; Mu, Yalin; Wang, Kun; Xu, Ke; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Yu; Luo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of papaverine (PAP) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation and its possible mechanisms. Materials and methods BV2 microglial cells were first pretreated with PAP (0, 0.4, 2, 10, and 50 μg/mL) and then received LPS stimulation. Transcription and production of proinflammatory factors (IL1β, TNFα, iNOS, and COX-2) were used to evaluate microglial activation. The transcriptional changes undergone by M1/M2a/M2b markers were used to evaluate phenotype transformation of BV2 cells. Immunofluorescent staining and Western blot were used to detect the location and expression of P65 and p-IKK in the presence or absence of PAP pretreatment. Results Pretreatment with PAP significantly inhibited the expression of IL1β and TNFα, and suppressed the transcription of M1/M2b markers Il1rn, Socs3, Nos2 and Ptgs2, but upregulated the transcription of M2a markers (Arg1 and Mrc1) in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, PAP pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of p-IKK and inhibited the nuclear translocation of P65 after LPS stimulation. Conclusion PAP not only suppressed the LPS-induced microglial activity by inhibiting transcription/production of proinflammatory factors, but also promoted the transformation of activated BV2 cells from cytotoxic phenotypes (M1/M2b) to a neuroprotective phenotype (M2a). These effects were probably mediated by NF-κB signaling pathway. Thus, it would be a promising candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27013863

  5. Tolfenamic Acid Suppresses Inflammatory Stimuli-Mediated Activation of NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hong Jun; Lou, Zhiyuan; Jeong, Jin Boo; Kim, Kui Jin; Lee, Jihye; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Tolfenamic acid (TA) is a traditional non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and has been broadly used for the treatment of migraines. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a sequence-specific transcription factor and plays a key role in the development and progression of inflammation and cancer. We performed the current study to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which TA suppresses inflammation focusing on NF-κB pathway in TNF-α stimulated human normal and cancer cell lines and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mouse macrophages. Different types of human cells (HCT116, HT-29 and HEK293) and mouse macrophages (RAW264.7) were pre-treated with different concentrations of TA and then exposed to inflammatory stimuli such as TNF-α and LPS. Transcriptional activity of NF-κB, IκB-α-degradation, p65 translocation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activations were measured using luciferase assay and Western blots. Pre-treatment of TA repressed TNF-α- or LPS-stimulated NF-κB transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. TA treatment reduced degradation of IκB-α and subsequent translocation of p65 into nucleus. TA significantly down-regulated the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). However, TA had no effect on NF-κB signaling and JNK phosphorylation in HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells. TA possesses anti-inflammatory activities through suppression of JNK/NF-κB pathway in different types of cells. PMID:25593642

  6. Profilin-PTEN interaction suppresses NF-κB activation via inhibition of IKK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Adeel H; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-04-01

    The molecular mechanism of Profilin for its tumour suppressor activity is still unknown. Nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) is known to activate many target genes involved in cell proliferation. In the present study, we provide evidence that supports the involvement of Profilin in regulation of NF-κB, which might repress the tumorigenic response. Profilin overexpressing cells show low basal activity of IκBα kinase (IKK), high amounts of cytoplasmic inhibitory subunit of NF-κB (IκBα) and p65, and low nuclear NF-κB DNA binding activity. Co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) studies suggest that Profilin interacts with a protein phosphatase, phosphatase and tension homologue (PTEN), and protects it from degradation. In turn, PTEN interacts physically and maintains a low phosphorylated state of the IKK complex and thereby suppresses NF-κB signalling. Thus, Profilin overexpressing cells show a decrease in NF-κB activation mediated by most of the inducers and potentiate cell death by repressing NF-κB-dependent genes involved in cell cycle progression. For the first time, we provide evidence, which suggests that Profilin increases tumour suppressor activity by regulating NF-κB. PMID:26787927

  7. SESN2/sestrin2 suppresses sepsis by inducing mitophagy and inhibiting NLRP3 activation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ji; Bae, Soo Han; Ryu, Jae-Chan; Kwon, Younghee; Oh, Ji-Hwan; Kwon, Jeongho; Moon, Jong-Seok; Kim, Kyubo; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Lee, Min Goo; Shin, Jaekyoon; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K; Rhee, Sue Goo; Ryu, Ji-Hwan; Yoon, Joo-Heon

    2016-08-01

    Proper regulation of mitophagy for mitochondrial homeostasis is important in various inflammatory diseases. However, the precise mechanisms by which mitophagy is activated to regulate inflammatory responses remain largely unknown. The NLRP3 (NLR family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome serves as a platform that triggers the activation of CASP1 (caspase 1) and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we demonstrate that SESN2 (sestrin 2), known as stress-inducible protein, suppresses prolonged NLRP3 inflammasome activation by clearance of damaged mitochondria through inducing mitophagy in macrophages. SESN2 plays a dual role in inducing mitophagy in response to inflammasome activation. First, SESN2 induces "mitochondrial priming" by marking mitochondria for recognition by the autophagic machinery. For mitochondrial preparing, SESN2 facilitates the perinuclear-clustering of mitochondria by mediating aggregation of SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1) and its binding to lysine 63 (Lys63)-linked ubiquitins on the mitochondrial surface. Second, SESN2 activates the specific autophagic machinery for degradation of primed mitochondria via an increase of ULK1 (unc-51 like kinase 1) protein levels. Moreover, increased SESN2 expression by extended LPS (lipopolysaccharide) stimulation is mediated by NOS2 (nitric oxide synthase 2, inducible)-mediated NO (nitric oxide) in macrophages. Thus, Sesn2-deficient mice displayed defective mitophagy, which resulted in hyperactivation of inflammasomes and increased mortality in 2 different sepsis models. Our findings define a unique regulatory mechanism of mitophagy activation for immunological homeostasis that protects the host from sepsis. PMID:27337507

  8. Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates suppression of hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent erythropoietin expression by indoxyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Asai, Hirobumi; Hirata, Junya; Hirano, Ayumi; Hirai, Kazuya; Seki, Sayaka; Watanabe-Akanuma, Mie

    2016-01-15

    Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a representative uremic toxin that accumulates in the blood of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In addition to the involvement in the progression of CKD, a recent report indicates that IS suppresses hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-dependent erythropoietin (EPO) production, suggesting that IS may also contribute to the progression of renal anemia. In this report, we provide evidence that aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates IS-induced suppression of HIF activation and subsequent EPO production. In HepG2 cells, IS at concentrations similar to the blood levels in CKD patients suppressed hypoxia- or cobalt chloride-induced EPO mRNA expression and transcriptional activation of HIF. IS also induced AhR activation, and AhR blockade resulted in abolishment of IS-induced suppression of HIF activation. The HIF transcription factor is a heterodimeric complex composed of HIF-α subunits (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT). IS suppressed nuclear accumulation of the HIF-α-ARNT complex accompanied by an increase of the AhR-ARNT complex in the nucleus, implying the involvement of interactions among AhR, HIF-α, and ARNT in the suppression mechanism. In rats, oral administration of indole, a metabolic precursor of IS, inhibited bleeding-induced elevation of renal EPO mRNA expression and plasma EPO concentration and strongly induced AhR activation in the liver and renal cortex tissues. Collectively, this study is the first to elucidate the detailed mechanism by which AhR plays an indispensable role in the suppression of HIF activation by IS. Hence, IS-induced activation of AhR may be a potential therapeutic target for treating renal anemia. PMID:26561638

  9. Active manipulation of native soil microbial community structure and function to suppress soilborne diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reality of naturally occurring biologically-induced disease suppressive soils suggests opportunity for managing resident soil microbial communities as a disease control method. Disease suppressive soils have yielded a significant body of knowledge concerning operative mechanisms leading to t...

  10. H-reflex suppression and autonomic activation during lucid REM sleep: a case study.

    PubMed

    Brylowski, A; Levitan, L; LaBerge, S

    1989-08-01

    A single subject, a proficient lucid dreamer experienced with signaling the onset of lucidity (reflective consciousness of dreaming) by means of voluntary eye movements, spent 4 nonconsecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. The subject reported becoming lucid and signaling in 8 of the 18 rapid-eye movement (REM) periods recorded. Ten lucid dream reports were verified by polygraphic examination of signals, providing a total of 12.5 min of signal-verified lucid REM. H-Reflex amplitude was recorded every 5 s, along with continuous recording of electroencephalogram, electrooculogram, electromyogram, electrocardiogram, finger pulse, and respiration. Significant findings included greater mean H-reflex suppression during lucid REM sleep than during nonlucid REM and correlations of H-reflex suppression with increased eye movement density, heart rate, and respiration rate. These results support previous studies reporting that lucid REM is not, as might be supposed, a state closer to awakening than ordinary, or nonlucid, REM; rather, lucid dreaming occurs during unequivocal REM sleep and is characteristically associated with phasic REM activation. PMID:2762692

  11. GADD34 suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis and tissue injury through the regulation of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Tanaka, Y; Oshino, R; Okado, S; Hori, M; Isobe, K-I

    2016-01-01

    Growth arrest and DNA damage inducible protein 34 (GADD34) is induced by various cellular stresses, such as DNA damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and amino-acid deprivation. Although the major roles of GADD34 are regulating ER stress responses and apoptosis, a recent study suggested that GADD34 is linked to innate immune responses. In this report, we investigated the roles of GADD34 in inflammatory responses against bacterial infection. To explore the effects of GADD34 on systemic inflammation in vivo, we employed a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine sepsis model and assessed the lethality, serum cytokine levels, and tissue injury in the presence or absence of GADD34. We found that GADD34 deficiency increased the lethality and serum cytokine levels in LPS-induced sepsis. Moreover, GADD34 deficiency enhanced tissue destruction, cell death, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in LPS-induced acute liver injury. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production after LPS stimulation is regulated by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway. In vitro experiments revealed that GADD34 suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages through dephosphorylation of IKKβ. In conclusion, GADD34 attenuates LPS-induced sepsis and acute tissue injury through suppressing macrophage activation. Targeting this anti-inflammatory role of GADD34 may be a promising area for the development of therapeutic agents to regulate inflammatory disorders. PMID:27171261

  12. cis-active elements from mouse chromosomal DNA suppress simian virus 40 DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, M; Willnow, T; Fanning, E

    1990-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40)-containing DNA was rescued after the fusion of SV40-transformed VLM cells with permissive COS1 monkey cells and cloned, and prototype plasmid clones were characterized. A 2-kilobase mouse DNA fragment fused with the rescued SV40 DNA, and derived from mouse DNA flanking the single insert of SV40 DNA in VLM cells, was sequenced. Insertion of the intact rescued mouse sequence, or two nonoverlapping fragments of it, into wild-type SV40 plasmid DNA suppressed replication of the plasmid in TC7 monkey cells, although the plasmids expressed replication-competent T antigen. Rat cells were transformed with linearized wild-type SV40 plasmid DNA with or without fragments of the mouse DNA in cis. Although all of the rat cell lines expressed approximately equal amounts of T antigen and p53, transformants carrying SV40 DNA linked to either of the same two replication suppressor fragments produced significantly less free SV40 DNA after fusion with permissive cells than those transformed by SV40 DNA without a cellular insert or with a cellular insert lacking suppressor activity. The results suggest that two independent segments of cellular DNA act in cis to suppress SV40 replication in vivo, either as a plasmid or integrated in chromosomal DNA. Images PMID:2159549

  13. Hirsutenone in Alnus extract inhibits akt activity and suppresses prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soouk; Kim, Jong-Eun; Li, Yan; Jung, Sung Keun; Song, Nu Ry; Thimmegowda, N R; Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Hyong Joo; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-11-01

    Although specific compounds found in some East Asian traditional medicines have been shown to exhibit bioactive properties, their molecular mechanisms of action remain elusive. The bark of the Alnus species has been used for the treatment of various pathological conditions including hemorrhage, alcoholism, fever, diarrhea, skin diseases, inflammation, and cancer in East Asia for centuries. In this study, we show that hirsutenone, a bioactive compound in Alnus japonica, exhibits anti-cancer effects against prostate cancer through a direct physical inhibition of Akt1/2. Hirsutenone suppressed anchorage-dependent and independent cell growth of PC3 and LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. Annexin V and Propidium iodide (PI) staining results demonstrated that hirsutenone strongly induces apoptotic cell death in both PC3 and LNCaP cells. Furthermore, treatment of hirsutenone attenuated phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream substrate of Akt, without affecting Akt phosphorylation. Kinase and pull-down assay results clearly show that hirsutenone inhibits Akt1 and 2 by direct binding in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-noncompetitive manner in vitro and ex vivo. Our results show that hirsutenone suppresses human prostate cancer by targeting Akt1 and 2 as a key component to explain for anti-cancer activity of Alnus species. PMID:25213146

  14. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Suppresses Biosynthesis of Glucosylceramide by Reducing Intracellular Sugar Nucleotides*

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The membrane glycolipid glucosylceramide (GlcCer) plays a critical role in cellular homeostasis. Its intracellular levels are thought to be tightly regulated. How cells regulate GlcCer levels remains to be clarified. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a crucial cellular energy sensor, regulates glucose and lipid metabolism to maintain energy homeostasis. Here, we investigated whether AMPK affects GlcCer metabolism. AMPK activators (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside and metformin) decreased intracellular GlcCer levels and synthase activity in mouse fibroblasts. AMPK inhibitors or AMPK siRNA reversed these effects, suggesting that GlcCer synthesis is negatively regulated by an AMPK-dependent mechanism. Although AMPK did not affect the phosphorylation or expression of GlcCer synthase, the amount of UDP-glucose, an activated form of glucose required for GlcCer synthesis, decreased under AMPK-activating conditions. Importantly, the UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase Nudt14, which degrades UDP-glucose, generating UMP and glucose 1-phosphate, was phosphorylated and activated by AMPK. On the other hand, suppression of Nudt14 by siRNA had little effect on UDP-glucose levels, indicating that mammalian cells have an alternative UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase that mainly contributes to the reduction of UDP-glucose under AMPK-activating conditions. Because AMPK activators are capable of reducing GlcCer levels in cells from Gaucher disease patients, our findings suggest that reducing GlcCer through AMPK activation may lead to a new strategy for treating diseases caused by abnormal accumulation of GlcCer. PMID:26048992

  15. Sodium Salicylate Suppresses GABAergic Inhibitory Activity in Neurons of Rodent Dorsal Raphe Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yan; Luo, Bin; Su, Yan-Yan; Wang, Xin-Xing; Chen, Liang; Wang, Ming; Wang, Wei-Wen; Chen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Sodium salicylate (NaSal), a tinnitus inducing agent, can activate serotonergic (5-HTergic) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and can increase serotonin (5-HT) level in the inferior colliculus and the auditory cortex in rodents. To explore the underlying neural mechanisms, we first examined effects of NaSal on neuronal intrinsic properties and the inhibitory synaptic transmissions in DRN slices of rats by using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that NaSal hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential, decreased the input resistance, and suppressed spontaneous and current-evoked firing in GABAergic neurons, but not in 5-HTergic neurons. In addition, NaSal reduced GABAergic spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in 5-HTergic neurons. We next examined whether the observed depression of GABAergic activity would cause an increase in the excitability of 5-HTergic neurons using optogenetic technique in DRN slices of the transgenic mouse with channelrhodopsin-2 expressed in GABAergic neurons. When the GABAergic inhibition was enhanced by optical stimulation to GABAergic neurons in mouse DRN, NaSal significantly depolarized the resting membrane potential, increased the input resistance and increased current-evoked firing of 5-HTergic neurons. However, NaSal would fail to increase the excitability of 5-HTergic neurons when the GABAergic synaptic transmission was blocked by picrotoxin, a GABA receptor antagonist. Our results indicate that NaSal suppresses the GABAergic activities to raise the excitability of local 5-HTergic neural circuits in the DRN, which may contribute to the elevated 5-HT level by NaSal in the brain. PMID:25962147

  16. REDOX-REGULATED SUPPRESSION OF SPLENIC T-LYMPHOCYTE ACTIVATION IN A MODEL OF SYMPATHOEXCITATION

    PubMed Central

    Case, Adam J.; Zimmerman, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    Sympathoexcitation, increased circulating norepinephrine, and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species are driving forces underlying numerous cardiovascular diseases including hypertension. However, the effects of elevated norepinephrine and subsequent reactive oxygen species production in splenic T-lymphocytes during hypertension are not currently understood. We hypothesized that increased systemic levels of norepinephrine inhibits the activation of splenic T-lymphocytes via redox signaling. To address this hypothesis, we examined the status of T-lymphocyte activation in spleens of a mouse model of sympathoexcitation-driven hypertension (i.e. norepinephrine infusion). Splenic T-lymphocytes from norepinephrine-infused mice demonstrated decreased proliferation accompanied by a reduction in interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha production as compared to T-lymphocytes from saline-infused mice. Additionally, norepinephrine directly inhibited splenic T-lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production ex vivo in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, norepinephrine caused an increase in G1 arrest in norepinephrine-treated T-lymphocytes, and this was accompanied by a decrease in pro-growth cyclin D3, E1, and E2 mRNA expression. Interestingly, norepinephrine caused an increase in cellular superoxide, which was shown to be partially-causal to the inhibitory effects of norepinephrine as antioxidant supplementation (i.e. Tempol) to norepinephrine-infused mice moderately restored T-lymphocyte growth and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Our findings indicate that suppression of splenic T-lymphocyte activation occurs in a norepinephrine-driven model of hypertension due to, at least in part, an increase in superoxide. We speculate that further understanding of how norepinephrine mediates its inhibitory effects on splenic T-lymphocytes may elucidate novel pathways for therapeutic mimicry to suppress T-lymphocyte-mediated inflammation in an array of diseases. PMID

  17. Active suppression of diabetes after oral administration of insulin is determined by antigen dosage.

    PubMed

    Bergerot, I; Fabien, N; Mayer, A; Thivolet, C

    1996-02-13

    We have previously demonstrated that feeding six-week-old female mice with 20 units of human insulin every 2 - 3 days for 15 or 30 days induced an active mechanism of suppression through the generation of regulatory T cells that reduced the number of successful diabetic transfers in irradiated NOD recipients. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of antigen dosage and the critical period of cell injection to obtain protection. The effects of the dose of insulin feeding were therefore compared during cotransfer experiments of 5 x 10(6) T cells from diabetic mice and 5 x 10(6) T cells from the spleen of mice receiving 10 units, 20 units, or 40 units of insulin or saline every 2 - 3 days for 15 days. Only T lymphocytes from mice fed with 20 units conferred active cellular protection during adoptive transfer with a significant delay in diabetes onset (p = 0.002). No significant difference was noticed during histological analysis of pancreatic glands, indicating tha insulitis was not prevented. However, mice receiving T lymphocytes from the 20 units of insulin-fed animals had a milder form of inflammation, with a significantly lower percentage of severely infiltrated islets. Injecting regulatory T cells 7 days and 14 days after iv injection of diabetogenic T cells did not modify the incidence curves of diabetes in the recipients, suggesting that cellular interactions and delay in cell trafficking were determinants. These results may have important clinical implications in humans. In conclusion, this study indicates the importance but also the limits of antigen therapy in type I diabetes. Antigen dosage is a critical element for active suppression. Such analysis is important to perform in humans before the initiation of a large-scale prevention trial in prediabetic individuals. PMID:8610991

  18. Ephrin-A5 Suppresses Neurotrophin Evoked Neuronal Motility, ERK Activation and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Christin; Anastasiadou, Sofia; Knöll, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    During brain development, growth cones respond to attractive and repulsive axon guidance cues. How growth cones integrate guidance instructions is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate a link between BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor), promoting axonal branching and ephrin-A5, mediating axonal repulsion via Eph receptor tyrosine kinase activation. BDNF enhanced growth cone filopodial dynamics and neurite branching of primary neurons. We show that ephrin-A5 antagonized this BDNF-evoked neuronal motility. BDNF increased ERK phosphorylation (P-ERK) and nuclear ERK entry. Ephrin-A5 suppressed BDNF-induced ERK activity and might sequester P-ERK in the cytoplasm. Neurotrophins are well established stimulators of a neuronal immediate early gene (IEG) response. This is confirmed in this study by e.g. c-fos, Egr1 and Arc upregulation upon BDNF application. This BDNF-evoked IEG response required the transcription factor SRF (serum response factor). Notably, ephrin-A5 suppressed a BDNF-evoked neuronal IEG response, suggesting a role of Eph receptors in modulating gene expression. In opposite to IEGs, long-term ephrin-A5 application induced cytoskeletal gene expression of tropomyosin and actinin. To uncover specific Eph receptors mediating ephrin-As impact on neurotrophin signaling, EphA7 deficient mice were analyzed. In EphA7 deficient neurons alterations in growth cone morphology were observed. However, ephrin-A5 still counteracted neurotrophin signaling suggesting that EphA7 is not required for ephrin and BDNF crosstalk. In sum, our data suggest an interaction of ephrin-As and neurotrophin signaling pathways converging at ERK signaling and nuclear gene activity. As ephrins are involved in development and function of many organs, such modulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and gene expression by Ephs might not be limited to the nervous system. PMID:22022520

  19. Active manipulation of resident biology to suppress Macrophomina phaseolina in strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    M. phaseolina is a pathogen of emerging importance in strawberry production systems. Brassicaceae seed meal amendments suppressed proliferation of M. phaseolina through soil systems, but optimal seed meal-induced pathogen suppression required a functional soil biology. Suppression of M. phaseolina ...

  20. Rifampicin attenuates rotenone-induced inflammation via suppressing NLRP3 inflammasome activation in microglia.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanran; Jing, Xiuna; Zeng, Zhifen; Bi, Wei; Chen, Ying; Wu, Xia; Yang, Lianhong; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Songhua; Liu, Shuqiong; Lin, Danyu; Tao, Enxiang

    2015-10-01

    A growing body of evidence has supported that environmental factors, such as exposure to heavy metal and pesticides, play an important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson׳s disease (PD). Rotenone, the active ingredient in various pesticides, has been identified as an inducer of PD. It has been revealed that rotenone induces activation of microglia and generation of pro-inflammatory factors in PD. Our previous studies demonstrated that rifampicin possessed neural protective effect in PD. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of rifampicin on the inflammation induced by rotenone in microglia and the underlying mechanisms. Results demonstrated that rifampicin pretreatment significantly reduced rotenone-induced cytotoxicity and gene expression of IL-1β in BV2 microglia. Moreover, western blot analysis verified that rifampicin pretreatment suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation via inhibiting caspase-1 cleavage and protein expression of NLRP3. As it is indicated that reactive oxidative stress (ROS) is one of the activators for NLRP3 inflammasome, we further employed 2',7'-Dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) staining and Rhodamine123 staining to detect intracellular ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), respectively. Results confirmed that rifampicin obviously reduced intracellular ROS and reversed loss of MMP in BV2 cells treated by rotenone. Taken together, our data indicate that rifampicin pretreatment inhibits maturation of IL-1β and neuroinflammation induced by rotenone via attenuating NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Rifampicin might emerge as a promising candidate for modulating neuroinflammation in PD. PMID:26086368

  1. Conical Euler analysis and active roll suppression for unsteady vortical flows about rolling delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1993-01-01

    A conical Euler code was developed to study unsteady vortex-dominated flows about rolling, highly swept delta wings undergoing either forced motions or free-to-roll motions that include active roll suppression. The flow solver of the code involves a multistage, Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme that uses a cell-centered, finite-volume, spatial discretization of the Euler equations on an unstructured grid of triangles. The code allows for the additional analysis of the free to-roll case by simultaneously integrating in time the rigid-body equation of motion with the governing flow equations. Results are presented for a delta wing with a 75 deg swept, sharp leading edge at a free-stream Mach number of 1.2 and at 10 deg, 20 deg, and 30 deg angle of attack alpha. At the lower angles of attack (10 and 20 deg), forced-harmonic analyses indicate that the rolling-moment coefficients provide a positive damping, which is verified by free-to-roll calculations. In contrast, at the higher angle of attack (30 deg), a forced-harmonic analysis indicates that the rolling-moment coefficient provides negative damping at the small roll amplitudes. A free-to-roll calculation for this case produces an initially divergent response, but as the amplitude of motion grows with time, the response transitions to a wing-rock type of limit cycle oscillation, which is characteristic of highly swept delta wings. This limit cycle oscillation may be actively suppressed through the use of a rate-feedback control law and antisymmetrically deflected leading-edge flaps. Descriptions of the conical Euler flow solver and the free-to roll analysis are included in this report. Results are presented that demonstrate how the systematic analysis of the forced response of the delta wing can be used to predict the stable, neutrally stable, and unstable free response of the delta wing. These results also give insight into the flow physics associated with unsteady vortical flows about delta wings undergoing forced

  2. Application of Semi Active Control Techniques to the Damping Suppression Problem of Solar Sail Booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adetona, O.; Keel, L. H.; Whorton, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Solar sails provide a propellant free form for space propulsion. These are large flat surfaces that generate thrust when they are impacted by light. When attached to a space vehicle, the thrust generated can propel the space vehicle to great distances at significant speeds. For optimal performance the sail must be kept from excessive vibration. Active control techniques can provide the best performance. However, they require an external power-source that may create significant parasitic mass to the solar sail. However, solar sails require low mass for optimal performance. Secondly, active control techniques typically require a good system model to ensure stability and performance. However, the accuracy of solar sail models validated on earth for a space environment is questionable. An alternative approach is passive vibration techniques. These do not require an external power supply, and do not destabilize the system. A third alternative is referred to as semi-active control. This approach tries to get the best of both active and passive control, while avoiding their pitfalls. In semi-active control, an active control law is designed for the system, and passive control techniques are used to implement it. As a result, no external power supply is needed so the system is not destabilize-able. Though it typically underperforms active control techniques, it has been shown to out-perform passive control approaches and can be unobtrusively installed on a solar sail boom. Motivated by this, the objective of this research is to study the suitability of a Piezoelectric (PZT) patch actuator/sensor based semi-active control system for the vibration suppression problem of solar sail booms. Accordingly, we develop a suitable mathematical and computer model for such studies and demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach with computer simulations.

  3. Queen signals in a stingless bee: suppression of worker ovary activation and spatial distribution of active compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Túlio M.; Mateus, Sidnei; Favaris, Arodi P.; Amaral, Mônica F. Z. J.; von Zuben, Lucas G.; Clososki, Giuliano C.; Bento, José M. S.; Oldroyd, Benjamin P.; Silva, Ricardo; Zucchi, Ronaldo; Silva, Denise B.; Lopes, Norberto P.

    2014-01-01

    In most species of social insect the queen signals her presence to her workers via pheromones. Worker responses to queen pheromones include retinue formation around the queen, inhibition of queen cell production and suppression of worker ovary activation. Here we show that the queen signal of the Brazilian stingless bee Friesella schrottkyi is a mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons. Stingless bees are therefore similar to ants, wasps and bumble bees, but differ from honey bees in which the queen's signal mostly comprises volatile compounds originating from the mandibular glands. This shows that cuticular hydrocarbons have independently evolved as the queen's signal across multiple taxa, and that the honey bees are exceptional. We also report the distribution of four active queen-signal compounds by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging. The results indicate a relationship between the behavior of workers towards the queen and the likely site of secretion of the queen's pheromones. PMID:25502598

  4. Mechanical overstimulation of hair bundles: suppression and recovery of active motility.

    PubMed

    Kao, Albert; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W F; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effects of high-amplitude mechanical stimuli on hair bundles of the bullfrog sacculus. Under in vitro conditions, these bundles exhibit spontaneous limit cycle oscillations. Prolonged deflection exerted two effects. First, it induced an offset in the position of the bundle. Recovery to the original position displayed two distinct time scales, suggesting the existence of two adaptive mechanisms. Second, the stimulus suppressed spontaneous oscillations, indicating a change in the hair bundle's dynamic state. After cessation of the stimulus, active bundle motility recovered with time. Both effects were dependent on the duration of the imposed stimulus. External calcium concentration also affected the recovery to the oscillatory state. Our results indicate that both offset in the bundle position and calcium concentration control the dynamic state of the bundle. PMID:23505461

  5. Mechanical Overstimulation of Hair Bundles: Suppression and Recovery of Active Motility

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Albert; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effects of high-amplitude mechanical stimuli on hair bundles of the bullfrog sacculus. Under in vitro conditions, these bundles exhibit spontaneous limit cycle oscillations. Prolonged deflection exerted two effects. First, it induced an offset in the position of the bundle. Recovery to the original position displayed two distinct time scales, suggesting the existence of two adaptive mechanisms. Second, the stimulus suppressed spontaneous oscillations, indicating a change in the hair bundle’s dynamic state. After cessation of the stimulus, active bundle motility recovered with time. Both effects were dependent on the duration of the imposed stimulus. External calcium concentration also affected the recovery to the oscillatory state. Our results indicate that both offset in the bundle position and calcium concentration control the dynamic state of the bundle. PMID:23505461

  6. Activating the Microscale Edge Effect in a Hierarchical Surface for Frosting Suppression and Defrosting Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuemei; Ma, Ruiyuan; Zhou, Hongbo; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Che, Lufeng; Yao, Shuhuai; Wang, Zuankai

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive progress, current icephobic materials are limited by the breakdown of their icephobicity in the condensation frosting environment. In particular, the frost formation over the entire surface is inevitable as a result of undesired inter-droplet freezing wave propagation initiated by the sample edges. Moreover, the frost formation directly results in an increased frost adhesion, posing severe challenges for the subsequent defrosting process. Here, we report a hierarchical surface which allows for interdroplet freezing wave propagation suppression and efficient frost removal. The enhanced performances are mainly owing to the activation of the microscale edge effect in the hierarchical surface, which increases the energy barrier for ice bridging as well as engendering the liquid lubrication during the defrosting process. We believe the concept of harnessing the surface morphology to achieve superior performances in two opposite phase transition processes might shed new light on the development of novel materials for various applications. PMID:23981909

  7. Modern control techniques in active flutter suppression using a control moment gyro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchek, P. M.

    1974-01-01

    Development of organized synthesis techniques, using concepts of modern control theory was studied for the design of active flutter suppression systems for two and three-dimensional lifting surfaces, utilizing a control moment gyro (CMG) to generate the required control torques. Incompressible flow theory is assumed, with the unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments for arbitrary airfoil motion obtained by using the convolution integral based on Wagner's indicial lift function. Linear optimal control theory is applied to find particular optimal sets of gain values which minimize a quadratic performance function. The closed loop system's response to impulsive gust disturbances and the resulting control power requirements are investigated, and the system eigenvalues necessary to minimize the maximum value of control power are determined.

  8. Active control for vibration suppression in a flexible beam using a modal domain optical fiber sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. E.; Lindner, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the use of a modal-domain (MD) fiber-optic sensor as an active control system component for vibration suppression, whose output is proportional to the integral of the axial strain along the optical fiber. When an MD sensor is attached to, or embedded in, a flexible structure, it senses the strain in the structure along its gage length. On the basis of the present integration of the sensor model into a flexible-structure model, it becomes possible to design a control system with a dynamic compensator which adds damping to the low-order modes of the flexible structure. This modeling procedure has been experimentally validated.

  9. Astrocyte activation is suppressed in both normal and injured brain by FGF signaling.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wenfei; Balordi, Francesca; Su, Nan; Chen, Lin; Fishell, Gordon; Hébert, Jean M

    2014-07-22

    In the brain, astrocytes are multifunctional cells that react to insults and contain damage. However, excessive or sustained reactive astrocytes can be deleterious to functional recovery or contribute to chronic inflammation and neuronal dysfunction. Therefore, astrocyte activation in response to damage is likely to be tightly regulated. Although factors that activate astrocytes have been identified, whether factors also exist that maintain astrocytes as nonreactive or reestablish their nonreactive state after containing damage remains unclear. By using loss- and gain-of-function genetic approaches, we show that, in the unperturbed adult neocortex, FGF signaling is required in astrocytes to maintain their nonreactive state. Similarly, after injury, FGF signaling delays the response of astrocytes and accelerates their deactivation. In addition, disrupting astrocytic FGF receptors results in reduced scar size without affecting neuronal survival. Overall, this study reveals that the activation of astrocytes in the normal and injured neocortex is not only regulated by proinflammatory factors, but also by factors such as FGFs that suppress activation, providing alternative therapeutic targets. PMID:25002516

  10. Astrocyte activation is suppressed in both normal and injured brain by FGF signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wenfei; Balordi, Francesca; Su, Nan; Chen, Lin; Fishell, Gordon; Hébert, Jean M.

    2014-01-01

    In the brain, astrocytes are multifunctional cells that react to insults and contain damage. However, excessive or sustained reactive astrocytes can be deleterious to functional recovery or contribute to chronic inflammation and neuronal dysfunction. Therefore, astrocyte activation in response to damage is likely to be tightly regulated. Although factors that activate astrocytes have been identified, whether factors also exist that maintain astrocytes as nonreactive or reestablish their nonreactive state after containing damage remains unclear. By using loss- and gain-of-function genetic approaches, we show that, in the unperturbed adult neocortex, FGF signaling is required in astrocytes to maintain their nonreactive state. Similarly, after injury, FGF signaling delays the response of astrocytes and accelerates their deactivation. In addition, disrupting astrocytic FGF receptors results in reduced scar size without affecting neuronal survival. Overall, this study reveals that the activation of astrocytes in the normal and injured neocortex is not only regulated by proinflammatory factors, but also by factors such as FGFs that suppress activation, providing alternative therapeutic targets. PMID:25002516

  11. Suppression of B-Raf(V600E) cancers by MAPK hyper-activation

    PubMed Central

    Eldad, Sophia; Smeir, Elia; Bar-Tana, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    B-Raf(V600E) activates MEK/MAPK signalling and acts as oncogenic driver of a variety of cancers, including melanoma, colorectal and papillary thyroid carcinoma. Specific B-Raf(V600E) kinase inhibitors (e.g., Vemurafenib) prove initial efficacy in melanoma followed shortly by acquired resistance, while failing in most other B-Raf(V600E) cancers due to primary resistance. Resistance is due to acquired mutations in the Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK pathway and/or other oncogenic drivers that bypass B-Raf(V600E). Surprisingly, hyper-activation of MAPK by inhibiting its protein phosphatase 2A by a synthetic long-chain fatty acid analogue (MEDICA), results in oncogene-induced growth arrest and apoptosis of B-Raf(V600E) cancer cells. Growth arrest is accompanied by MAPK-mediated serine/threonine phosphorylation and suppression of a variety of oncogenic drivers that resist treatment by B-Raf(V600E) kinase inhibitors, including ErbB members, c-Met, IGFR, IRS, STAT3 and Akt. The combined activities of mutated B-Raf and MEDICA are required for generating hyper-activated MAPK, growth arrest and apoptosis, implying strict specificity for mutated B-Raf cancer cells. PMID:26959890

  12. CBL enhances breast tumor formation by inhibiting tumor suppressive activity of TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Kang, J M; Park, S; Kim, S J; Hong, H Y; Jeong, J; Kim, H-S; Kim, S-J

    2012-12-13

    Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (CBL) protein family functions as multifunctional adaptor proteins and E3 ubiquitin ligases that are implicated as regulators of signaling in various cell types. Recent discovery revealed mutations of proto-oncogenic CBL in the linker region and RING finger domain in human acute myeloid neoplasm, and these transforming mutations induced carcinogenesis. However, the adaptor function of CBL mediated signaling pathway during tumorigenesis has not been well characterized. Here, we show that CBL is highly expressed in breast cancer cells and significantly inhibits transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) tumor suppressive activity. Knockdown of CBL expression resulted in the increased expression of TGF-β target genes, PAI-I and CDK inhibitors such as p15(INK4b) and p21(Cip1). Furthermore, we demonstrate that CBL is frequently overexpressed in human breast cancer tissues, and the loss of CBL decreases the tumorigenic activity of breast cancer cells in vivo. CBL directly binds to Smad3 through its proline-rich motif, thereby preventing Smad3 from interacting with Smad4 and blocking nuclear translocation of Smad3. CBL-b, one of CBL protein family, also interacted with Smad3 and knockdown of both CBL and CBL-b further enhanced TGF-β transcriptional activity. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which oncogenic CBL can block TGF-β tumor suppressor activity. PMID:22310290

  13. Suppression of B-Raf(V600E) cancers by MAPK hyper-activation.

    PubMed

    Atiq, Rawan; Hertz, Rachel; Eldad, Sophia; Smeir, Elia; Bar-Tana, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    B-Raf(V600E) activates MEK/MAPK signalling and acts as oncogenic driver of a variety of cancers, including melanoma, colorectal and papillary thyroid carcinoma. Specific B-Raf(V600E) kinase inhibitors (e.g., Vemurafenib) prove initial efficacy in melanoma followed shortly by acquired resistance, while failing in most other B-Raf(V600E) cancers due to primary resistance. Resistance is due to acquired mutations in the Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK pathway and/or other oncogenic drivers that bypass B-Raf(V600E). Surprisingly, hyper-activation of MAPK by inhibiting its protein phosphatase 2A by a synthetic long-chain fatty acid analogue (MEDICA), results in oncogene-induced growth arrest and apoptosis of B-Raf(V600E) cancer cells. Growth arrest is accompanied by MAPK-mediated serine/threonine phosphorylation and suppression of a variety of oncogenic drivers that resist treatment by B-Raf(V600E) kinase inhibitors, including ErbB members, c-Met, IGFR, IRS, STAT3 and Akt. The combined activities of mutated B-Raf and MEDICA are required for generating hyper-activated MAPK, growth arrest and apoptosis, implying strict specificity for mutated B-Raf cancer cells. PMID:26959890

  14. Activated Drosophila Ras1 is selectively suppressed by isoprenyl transferase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Kauffmann, R C; Qian, Y; Vogt, A; Sebti, S M; Hamilton, A D; Carthew, R W

    1995-01-01

    Ras CAAX (C = cysteine, A = aliphatic amino acid, and X = any amino acid) peptidomimetic inhibitors of farnesyl protein transferase suppress Ras-dependent cell transformation by preventing farnesylation of the Ras oncoprotein. These compounds are potential anticancer agents for tumors associated with Ras mutations. The peptidomimetic FTI-254 was tested for Ras1-inhibiting activity in whole animals by injection of activated Ras1val12 Drosophila larvae. FTI-254 decreased the ability of Ras1val12 to form supernumerary R7 photoreceptor cells in the compound eye of transformed flies. In contrast, it had no effect on the related supernumerary R7 phenotypes of flies transformed with either the activated sevenless receptor tyrosine kinase, Raf kinase, or a chimeric Ras1val12 protein that is membrane associated through myristylation instead of isoprenylation. Therefore, FTI-254 acts as an isoprenylation inhibitor to selectively inhibit Ras1val12 signaling activity in a whole-animal model system. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7479910

  15. Serotonin suppresses β-casein expression via PTP1B activation in human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Takeshi; Maeda, Tomoji; Sanbe, Atsushi; Kudo, Kenzo

    2016-04-22

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytriptamine, 5-HT) has an important role in milk volume homeostasis within the mammary gland during lactation. We have previously shown that the expression of β-casein, a differentiation marker in mammary epithelial cells, is suppressed via 5-HT-mediated inhibition of signal transduction and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) phosphorylation in the human mammary epithelial MCF-12A cell line. In addition, the reduction of β-casein in turn was associated with 5-HT7 receptor expression in the cells. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanisms underlying the 5-HT-mediated suppression of β-casein and STAT5 phosphorylation. The β-casein level and phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5)/STAT5 ratio in the cells co-treated with 5-HT and a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (KT5720) were significantly higher than those of cells treated with 5-HT alone. Exposure to 100 μM db-cAMP for 6 h significantly decreased the protein levels of β-casein and pSTAT5 and the pSTAT5/STAT5 ratio, and significantly increased PTP1B protein levels. In the cells co-treated with 5-HT and an extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK) inhibitor (FR180294) or Akt inhibitor (124005), the β-casein level and pSTAT5/STAT5 ratio were equal to those of cells treated with 5-HT alone. Treatment with 5-HT significantly induced PTP1B protein levels, whereas its increase was inhibited by KT5720. In addition, the PTP1B inhibitor sc-222227 increased the expression levels of β-casein and the pSTAT5/STAT5 ratio. Our observations indicate that PTP1B directly regulates STAT5 phosphorylation and that its activation via the cAMP/PKA pathway downstream of the 5-HT7 receptor is involved in the suppression of β-casein expression in MCF-12A cells. PMID:27016479

  16. Suppression of albumin enhancer activity by H-ras and AP-1 in hepatocyte cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J; Isom, H C

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrated, using a transient transfection assay, that the albumin enhancer increased the expression of the albumin promoter in a highly differentiated, simian virus 40 (SV40)-immortalized hepatocyte cell line, CWSV1, but was not functional in two ras-transformed cell lines (NR3 and NR4) derived from CWSV1 by stable transfection with the T24ras oncogene. A transient cotransfection assay showed that T24ras and normal c-Ha-ras were each able to inhibit the activity of the albumin enhancer in an immortal hepatocyte cell line. DNase I footprinting and gel mobility shift assays demonstrated that the DNA binding activities specific to the albumin enhancer were not decreased in the ras-transformed cells. ras also did not diminish the expression of HNF1 alpha, C/EBP alpha, HNF3 alpha, HNF3 beta, or HNF3 gamma but did significantly increase AP-1 binding activity. Three AP-1 binding sites were identified within the albumin enhancer, and DNA binding activities specific to these AP-1 sites were induced in the ras-transformed hepatocytes. Subsequent functional assays showed that overexpression of c-jun and c-fos inhibited the activity of the albumin enhancer. Site-directed mutagenesis of the AP-1 binding sites in the albumin enhancer partially abrogated the suppressing effect of ras and c-jun/c-fos on the enhancer. These functional studies therefore supported the results of the structural studies with AP-1. We conclude that the activity of the albumin enhancer is subject to regulation by ras signaling pathways and that the effect of ras on the albumin enhancer activity may be mediated by AP-1. Images PMID:8114691

  17. HSP60 mediates the neuroprotective effects of curcumin by suppressing microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Feijia; Li, Fan; Li, Yunhong; Hou, Xiaolin; Ma, Yi; Zhang, Nan; Ma, Jiao; Zhang, Rui; Lang, Bing; Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and has been widely used to treat or prevent neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of curcumin are not well known. In the present study, the effect of curcumin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 mouse microglia cells was investigated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of the culture medium and western blotting of cell lysates. The results showed that curcumin significantly inhibited the LPS-induced expression and release of heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) in the BV2 cells. The level of heat shock factor (HSF)-1 was upregulated in LPS-activated BV2 microglia, indicating that the increased expression of HSP60 was driven by HSF-1 activation. However, the increased HSF-1 level was downregulated by curcumin. Extracellular HSP60 is a ligand of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), and the level of the latter was increased in the LPS-activated BV2 microglia and inhibited by curcumin. The activation of TLR-4 is known to be associated with the activation of myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB, with the subsequent production of proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors. In the present study, curcumin demonstrated marked suppression of the LPS-induced expression of MyD88, NF-κB, caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in the microglia. These results indicate that curcumin may exert its neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting microglial activation through the HSP60/TLR-4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling wpathway. Therefore, curcumin may be useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases that are associated with microglial activation. PMID:27446282

  18. Final design and fabrication of an active control system for flutter suppression on a supercritical aeroelastic research wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, G. E.; Mcgehee, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    The final design and hardware fabrication was completed for an active control system capable of the required flutter suppression, compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA aeroelastic research wing number 1 (ARW-1) on Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The flutter suppression system uses vertical acceleration at win buttock line 1.930 (76), with fuselage vertical and roll accelerations subtracted out, to drive wing outboard aileron control surfaces through appropriate symmetric and antisymmetric shaping filters. The goal of providing an increase of 20 percent above the unaugmented vehicle flutter velocity but below the maximum operating condition at Mach 0.98 is exceeded by the final flutter suppression system. Results indicate that the flutter suppression system mechanical and electronic components are ready for installation on the DAST ARW-1 wing and BQM-34E/F drone fuselage.

  19. Biomechanical Signals Suppress TAK1 Activation to Inhibit NF-κB Transcriptional Activation in Fibrochondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Shashi; Anghelina, Mirela; Sjostrom, Danen; Dossumbekova, Anar; Guttridge, Denis C.; Agarwal, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Exercise/joint mobilization is therapeutic for inflammatory joint diseases like rheumatoid and osteoarthritis, but the mechanisms underlying its actions remain poorly understood. We report that biomechanical signals at low/physiological magnitudes are potent inhibitors of inflammation induced by diverse proinflammatory activators like IL-1β, TNF-α, and lipopolysaccharides, in fibrochondrocytes. These signals exert their anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting phosphorylation of TAK1, a critical point where signals generated by IL-1β, TNF-α, and LPS converge to initiate NF-κB signaling cascade and proinflammatory gene induction. Additionally, biomechanical signals inhibit multiple steps in the IL-1β-induced proinflammatory cascade downstream of IκB kinase activation to regulate IκBα and IκBβ degradation and synthesis, and promote IκBα shuttling to export nuclear NF-κB and terminate its transcriptional activity. The findings demonstrate that biomechanical forces are but another important signal that uses NF-κB pathway to regulate inflammation by switching the molecular activation of discrete molecules involved in proinflammatory gene transcription. PMID:17947700

  20. Inhibition of PARP1 by small interfering RNA enhances docetaxel activity against human prostate cancer PC3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenqi; Kong, Zhenzhen; Duan, Xiaolu; Zhu, Hanliang; Li, Shujue; Zeng, Shaohua; Liang, Yeping; Iliakis, George; Gui, Zhiming; Yang, Dong

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •PARP1 siRNA enhances docetaxel’s activity against PC3 cells. •PARP1 siRNA enhances docetaxel’s activity against EGFR/Akt/FOXO1 pathway. •PARP1 siRNA and PARP1 inhibitor differently affect the phosphorylation and expression of FOXO1. -- Abstract: Though poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitors have benefits in combination with radiotherapy in prostate cancers, few is known about the exactly role and underlying mechanism of PARP1 in combination with chemotherapy agents. Here our data revealed that inhibition of PARP1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could enhance docetaxel’s activity against PC3 cells, which is associated with an accelerate repression of EGF/Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway. Our results provide a novel role of PARP1 in transcription regulation of EGFR/Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway and indicate that PARP1 siRNA combined with docetaxel can be an innovative treatment strategy to potentially improve outcomes in CRPC patients.

  1. Helenalin suppresses essential immune functions of activated CD4+ T cells by multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Berges, Carsten; Fuchs, Dominik; Opelz, Gerhard; Daniel, Volker; Naujokat, Cord

    2009-09-01

    Helenalin is a naturally occuring sesquiterpene lactone extracted from Arnica montana and Arnica chamissonis ssp. foliosa. Helenalin and its derivatives are known for anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects via inhibiting NF-kappaB and telomerase activity and impairing protein and DNA synthesis, suggesting that helenalin is a potential candidate for the treatment of deregulated and unwanted T cell-mediated immune responses. Here we show that helenalin induces apoptosis in activated CD4+ T cells by triggering the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis is accompanied by rapid stabilization of p53, nuclear localization of p53 and AIF, and an increase in ROS production that results in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim). Activated CD4+ T cells which survive exposure to helenalin undergo inhibition of proliferation by induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest. Cell cycle arrest is accompanied by the accumulation of cell cycle regulator proteins p21(WAF/CIP1), p2(KIP1) and cyclin D2, whereas abundance of cyclin A and B(1) is decreased. Cell surface expression of the activation-associated receptors CD25, CD27, CD28, CD120b as well as production of IL-2 are impaired. Transcriptional activation of genes encoding for CD25, IL-2 and IFN-gamma is mediated by transcription factors of the NFAT family, and we demonstrate that helenalin suppresses nuclear translocation of NFATc2 in activated CD4+ T cells. Thus, helenalin can be defined as a new immunosuppressive compound suited for the treatment of deregulated and unwanted T cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:19656571

  2. Suppression of Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Activity by Extratropical Rossby Wave Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Wang, Z.

    2014-12-01

    With warm SST anomalies in the tropical Atlantic and cold SST anomalies in the East Pacific, the reduced Atlantic tropical cyclone activity from August to early September in 2013 was a surprise to the hurricane community. Our analyses suggest that the suppressed storm activity can be attributed to the frequent occurrence of dry air in the middle to upper troposphere along with strong vertical wind shear. Such unfavorable conditions are directly related to the equatorward propagation and breaking of midlatitude Rossby waves, which lead to the equatorward intrusions of cold and dry extratropical air. Further examination suggests the active anti-cyclonic Rossby wave breaking and frequent equatorward intrusions of extratropical air in August 2013 were associated with changes of the midlatitude jet stream (i.e., acceleration, eastward extension and greater strain rate). The EOF analysis of 200-hPa zonal wind identifies a recurrent mode of interannual variability over Atlantic, which is associated with the variations of the intensity and zonal extent of the mid-latitude jet. This mode is found significantly correlated to Atlantic hurricane frequency in August, with a coefficient higher than the Nino3.4 index and comparable to the (relative) SST of Major Development Region (MDR). Our analyses thus emphasize the extratropical impacts on Atlantic tropical cyclones via the Rossby wave breaking. This physical link is missing in most statistical and hybrid forecast schemes and may help explain the seasonal prediction bust in 2013.

  3. Volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Feng-Feng; Pan, Shi-Shi; Ou, Rong-Ying; Zheng, Zhen-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Xiu; Jian, Meng-Ting; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Yang, Yang; Li, Wen-Feng; Shi, Zhi; Yan, Xiao-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Volasertib (BI 6727), a highly selective and potent inhibitor of PLK1, has shown broad antitumor activities in the preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of several types of cancers. However, the anticancer effect of volasertib on cervical cancer cells is still unknown. In the present study, we show that volasertib can markedly induce cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and apoptosis with the decreased protein expressions of PLK1 substrates survivin and wee1 in human cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, volasertib also enhances the intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) levels, and pretreated with ROS scavenger N-acety-L-cysteine totally blocks ROS generation but partly reverses volasertib-induced apoptosis. In addition, volasertib significantly potentiates the activity of cisplatin to inhibit the growth of cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. In brief, volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer, suggesting the combination of volasertib and cisplatin may be a promising strategy for the treatment of patients with cervical cancer. PMID:26885445

  4. Profiling of Sox4-dependent transcriptome in skin links tumour suppression and adult stem cell activation.

    PubMed

    Foronda, Miguel; Morgado-Palacin, Lucia; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Domínguez, Orlando; Pisano, David G; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-12-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) reside in specific niches in a quiescent state in adult mammals. Upon specific cues they become activated and respond by self-renewing and differentiating into newly generated specialised cells that ensure appropriate tissue fitness. ASC quiescence also serves as a tumour suppression mechanism by hampering cellular transformation and expansion (White AC et al., 2014). Some genes restricted to early embryonic development and adult stem cell niches are often potent modulators of stem cell quiescence, and derailed expression of these is commonly associated to cancer (Vervoort SJ et al., 2013). Among them, it has been shown that recommissioned Sox4 expression facilitates proliferation, survival and migration of malignant cells. By generating a conditional Knockout mouse model in stratified epithelia (Sox4 (cKO) mice), we demonstrated a delayed plucking-induced Anagen in the absence of Sox4. Skin global transcriptome analysis revealed a prominent defect in the induction of transcriptional networks that control hair follicle stem cell (HFSC) activation such as those regulated by Wnt/Ctnnb1, Shh, Myc or Sox9, cell cycle and DNA damage response-associated pathways. Besides, Sox4 (cKO) mice are resistant to skin carcinogenesis, thus linking Sox4 to both normal and pathological HFSC activation (Foronda M et al., 2014). Here we provide additional details on the analysis of Sox4-regulated transcriptome in Telogen and Anagen skin. The raw and processed microarray data is deposited in GEO under GSE58155. PMID:26697322

  5. The natural compound nujiangexanthone A suppresses mast cell activation and allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Cai, Shuangfan; Nie, Jia; Li, Yangyang; Shi, Guochao; Hao, Jimin; Fu, Wenwei; Tan, Hongsheng; Chen, Shilin; Li, Bin; Xu, Hongxi

    2016-01-15

    Mast cells play an important role in allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. The genus Garcinia of the family Guttiferae is well known as a prolific source of polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinols and bioactive prenylated xanthones, which exhibit various biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and cytotoxic effects. Nujiangexanthone A (N7) is a novel compound isolated from the leaves of Garcinia nujiangensis. In this paper, we sought to determine the anti-allergic and anti-inflammation activity of N7 in vivo and its mechanism in vitro. We found N7 suppressed IgE/Ag induced mast cell activiation, including degranulation and production of cytokines and eicosanoids, through inhibiting Src kinase activity and Syk dependent pathways. N7 inhibited histamine release, prostaglandin D2 and leukotriene C4 generation in mast cell dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis animal model. We also found N7 inhibited the IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and IgE levels in ovalbumin-induced asthma model. Histological studies demonstrated that N7 substantially inhibited OVA-induced cellular infiltration and increased mucus production in the lung tissue. Our study reveals the anti-allergic function of N7, thereby suggesting the utility of this compound as a possible novel agent for preventing mast cell-related immediate and delayed allergic diseases. PMID:26571438

  6. Suppression of microglial activation is neuroprotective in a mouse model of human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Xiao, Jia; Wang, Ke; So, Kwok-Fai; Tipoe, George L; Lin, Bin

    2014-06-11

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a photoreceptor-degenerative disease caused by various mutations and is characterized by death of rod photoreceptor cell followed by gradual death of cone photoreceptors. The molecular mechanisms that lead to rod and cone death are not yet fully understood. Neuroinflammation contributes to the progression of many chronic neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains to be determined how microglia contribute to photoreceptor disruption in RP. In this study, we explored the role of microglia as a contributor to photoreceptor degeneration in the rd10 mouse model of RP. First, we demonstrated that microglia activation was an early alteration in RP retinas. Inhibition of microglia activation by minocycline reduced photoreceptor apoptosis and significantly improved retinal structure and function and visual behavior in rd10 mice. Second, we identified that minocycline exerted its neuroprotective effects through both anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Third, we found that Cx3cr1 deficiency dysregulated microglia activation and subsequently resulted in increased photoreceptor vulnerability in rd10 mice, suggesting that the Cx3cl1/Cx3cr1 signaling pathway might protect against microglia neurotoxicity. We concluded that suppression of neuroinflammatory responses could be a potential treatment strategy aimed at improving photoreceptor survival in human RP. PMID:24920619

  7. Suppression of the Work-Piece Vibrations in Milling Using Active Clamp System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parus, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Okulik, T.

    The machining is always accompanied by vibration. In certain cases the level of vibration is very high and may cause shortening of the tool life, poor quality of machined surface. Operational speed and machined surface depend on dynamic stability of three components of the machine tool-cutting system: the cutting tool, the machine tool structure, the work-piece and the clamping system. To assure stable machining, parameters of the cutting process have to be tuned and frequently the machining productivity is decreased. For this reasons different types of systems are developed for suppressing the work-piece vibration. In some cases an additional modification of the work-piece is allowed and mounting the vibration absorber is possible. The paper describes a modification of the work-piece dynamic properties using active clamp system. In comparison to the vibration absorbers this solution has a great advantageous - adaptation of the work-piece is not necessary. In the paper the simulation results of different variants of milling process with work-piece mounted using the active clamp are presented. Piezo actuators are used in order to assure active influence on the work-piece. The aim of the state space feedback control system is to minimize the amplitude of the vibration during machining process.

  8. The Flavone Luteolin Suppresses SREBP-2 Expression and Post-Translational Activation in Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tsz Yan; Lin, Shu-mei; Leung, Lai K.

    2015-01-01

    High blood cholesterol has been associated with cardiovascular diseases. The enzyme HMG CoA reductase (HMGCR) is responsible for cholesterol synthesis, and inhibitors of this enzyme (statins) have been used clinically to control blood cholesterol. Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) -2 is a key transcription factor in cholesterol metabolism, and HMGCR is a target gene of SREBP-2. Attenuating SREBP-2 activity could potentially minimize the expression of HMGCR. Luteolin is a flavone that is commonly detected in plant foods. In the present study, Luteolin suppressed the expression of SREBP-2 at concentrations as low as 1 μM in the hepatic cell lines WRL and HepG2. This flavone also prevented the nuclear translocation of SREBP-2. Post-translational processing of SREBP-2 protein was required for nuclear translocation. Luteolin partially blocked this activation route through increased AMP kinase (AMPK) activation. At the transcriptional level, the mRNA and protein expression of SREBP-2 were reduced through luteolin. A reporter gene assay also verified that the transcription of SREBF2 was weakened in response to this flavone. The reduced expression and protein processing of SREBP-2 resulted in decreased nuclear translocation. Thus, the transcription of HMGCR was also decreased after luteolin treatment. In summary, the results of the present study showed that luteolin modulates HMGCR transcription by decreasing the expression and nuclear translocation of SREBP-2. PMID:26302339

  9. New hybrid active power filter for harmonic current suppression and reactive power compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biricik, Samet; Cemal Ozerdem, Ozgur; Redif, Soydan; Sezai Dincer, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    In the case of undistorted and balanced grid voltages, low ratio shunt active power filters (APFs) can give unity power factors and achieve current harmonic cancellation. However, this is not possible when source voltages are distorted and unbalanced. In this study, the cost-effective hybrid active power filter (HAPF) topology for satisfying the requirements of harmonic current suppression and non-active power compensation for industry is presented. An effective strategy is developed to observe the effect of the placement of power capacitors and LC filters with the shunt APF. A new method for alleviating the negative effects of a nonideal grid voltage is proposed that uses a self-tuning filter algorithm with instantaneous reactive power theory. The real-time control of the studied system was achieved with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) architecture, which was developed using the OPAL-RT system. The performance result of the proposed HAPF system is tested and presented under nonideal supply voltage conditions.

  10. Profiling of Sox4-dependent transcriptome in skin links tumour suppression and adult stem cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Foronda, Miguel; Morgado-Palacin, Lucia; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Domínguez, Orlando; Pisano, David G.; Blasco, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) reside in specific niches in a quiescent state in adult mammals. Upon specific cues they become activated and respond by self-renewing and differentiating into newly generated specialised cells that ensure appropriate tissue fitness. ASC quiescence also serves as a tumour suppression mechanism by hampering cellular transformation and expansion (White AC et al., 2014). Some genes restricted to early embryonic development and adult stem cell niches are often potent modulators of stem cell quiescence, and derailed expression of these is commonly associated to cancer (Vervoort SJ et al., 2013). Among them, it has been shown that recommissioned Sox4 expression facilitates proliferation, survival and migration of malignant cells. By generating a conditional Knockout mouse model in stratified epithelia (Sox4cKO mice), we demonstrated a delayed plucking-induced Anagen in the absence of Sox4. Skin global transcriptome analysis revealed a prominent defect in the induction of transcriptional networks that control hair follicle stem cell (HFSC) activation such as those regulated by Wnt/Ctnnb1, Shh, Myc or Sox9, cell cycle and DNA damage response-associated pathways. Besides, Sox4cKO mice are resistant to skin carcinogenesis, thus linking Sox4 to both normal and pathological HFSC activation (Foronda M et al., 2014). Here we provide additional details on the analysis of Sox4-regulated transcriptome in Telogen and Anagen skin. The raw and processed microarray data is deposited in GEO under GSE58155. PMID:26697322

  11. Host Immune Defense Peptide LL-37 Activates Caspase-Independent Apoptosis and Suppresses Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shun X.; Cheng, Alfred S.L.; To, Ka F.; Tong, Joanna H.M.; Li, May S.; Shen, Jin; Wong, Clover C.M.; Zhang, Lin; Chan, Ruby L.Y.; Wang, Xiao J.; Ng, Simon S.M.; Chiu, Lawrence C.M.; Marquez, Victor E.; Gallo, Richard L.; Chan, Francis K.L.; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J.Y.; Wu, William K.K.; Cho, Chi H.

    2014-01-01

    Cathelicidins are a family of bacteriocidal polypeptides secreted by macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). LL-37, the only human cathelicidin, has been implicated in tumorigenesis, but there has been limited investigation of its expression and function in cancer. Here, we report that LL-37 activates a p53-mediated, caspase-independent apoptotic cascade that contributes to suppression of colon cancer. LL-37 was expressed strongly in normal colon mucosa but downregulated in colon cancer tissues, where in both settings its expression correlated with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated dUTP nick end labeling-positive apoptotic cells. Exposure of colon cancer cells to LL-37 induced phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation in a manner independent of caspase activation. Apoptogenic function was mediated by nuclear translocation of the proapoptotic factors, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and endonuclease G (EndoG), through p53-dependent upregulation of Bax and Bak and downregulation of Bcl-2 via a pertussis toxin–sensitive G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) pathway. Correspondingly, colonic mucosa of cathelicidin-deficient mice exhibited reduced expression of p53, Bax, and Bak and increased expression of Bcl-2 together with a lower basal level of apoptosis. Cathelicidin-deficient mice exhibited an increased susceptibility to azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis, establishing pathophysiologic relevance in colon cancer. Collectively, our findings show that LL-37 activates a GPCR-p53-Bax/Bak/Bcl-2 signaling cascade that triggers AIF/EndoG–mediated apoptosis in colon cancer cells. PMID:23100468

  12. Chloroform fraction of Euphorbia maculata has antiplatelet activity via suppressing thromboxane B2 formation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Se-Uk; Cha, Ji-Yoon; Lee, Hoon-Yeon; Xin, Mingjie; Ji, Su-Jeong; Kim, Dae-Ki; Park, Do-Sim; Pyo, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Young-Mi

    2015-06-01

    Euphorbia maculata (EM) is a traditionally used antidiarrheal, antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant agent. However, the effects of EM on platelet activity remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study investigated the antiplatelet effect of various EM extract fractions on platelet aggregation in rats. The antiplatelet activity of the EM fractions on collagen or adenosine diphosphate (ADP)‑induced platelet aggregation was evaluated in vitro and ex vivo. Thromboxane B2 (TXB2) formation, rat‑tail bleeding time and coagulation time were also measured. Among the fractions, the chloroform fraction of EM (CFEM) significantly inhibited ADP‑induced platelet aggregation in vitro. Furthermore, oral administration of 50 mg/kg CFEM to rats significantly reduced ADP‑induced platelet aggregation without increasing the tail bleeding time or coagulation time. In addition, EM significantly inhibited the level of TXB2 formation in a dose‑dependent manner. These results suggest that CFEM exhibits antiplatelet activity, without causing bleeding, via the suppression of TXB2 formation. CFEM may be a type of food which has the potential for preventing cardiovascular disease. PMID:25672843

  13. Suppressed PHA activation of T lymphocytes in simulated microgravity is restored by direct activation of protein kinase C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Utilizing clinostatic rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity, we found phytohemagglutinin (PHA) responsiveness to be almost completely diminished. Activation marker expression was significantly reduced in RWV cultures. Furthermore, cytokine secretion profiles suggested that monocytes are not as adversely affected by simulated microgravity as T cells. Reduced cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions may play a role in the loss of PHA responsiveness because placing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) within small collagen beads did partially restore PHA responsiveness. However, activation of purified T cells with cross-linked CD2/CD28 and CD3/CD28 antibody pairs was completely suppressed in the RWV, suggesting a defect in signal transduction. Activation of purified T cells with PMA and ionomycin was unaffected by RWV culture. Furthermore, sub-mitogenic doses of PMA alone but not ionomycin alone restored PHA responsiveness of PBMC in RWV culture. Thus our data indicate that during polyclonal activation the signaling pathways upstream of PKC activation are sensitive to simulated microgravity.

  14. Structurally-diverse, PPARγ-activating environmental toxicants induce adipogenesis and suppress osteogenesis in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Watt, James; Schlezinger, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental obesogens are a newly recognized category of endocrine disrupting chemicals that have been implicated in contributing to the rising rates of obesity in the United States. While obesity is typically regarded as an increase in visceral fat, adipocyte accumulation in the bone has been linked to increased fracture risk, lower bone density, and osteoporosis. Exposure to environmental toxicants that activate peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a critical regulator of the balance of differentiation between adipogenesis and osteogenesis, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of osteoporosis. However, induction of adipogenesis and suppression of osteogenesis are separable activities of PPARγ, and ligands may selectively alter these activities. It currently is unknown whether suppression of osteogenesis is a common toxic endpoint of environmental PPARγ ligands. Using a primary mouse bone marrow culture model, we tested the hypothesis that environmental toxicants acting as PPARγ agonists divert the differentiation pathway of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells towards adipogenesis and away from osteogenesis. The toxicants tested included the organotins tributyltin and triphenyltin, a ubiquitous phthalate metabolite (mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, MEHP), and two brominated flame retardants (tetrabromobisphenol-a, TBBPA, and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, METBP). All of the compounds activated PPARγ1 and 2. All compounds increased adipogenesis (lipid accumulation, Fabp4 expression) and suppressed osteogenesis (alkaline phosphatase activity, Osx expression) in mouse primary bone marrow cultures, but with different potencies and efficacies. Despite structural dissimilarities, there was a strong negative correlation between efficacies to induce adipogenesis and suppress osteogenesis, with the organotins being distinct in their exceptional ability to suppress osteogenesis. As human exposure to a mixture of

  15. Structurally-diverse, PPARγ-activating environmental toxicants induce adipogenesis and suppress osteogenesis in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Watt, James; Schlezinger, Jennifer J

    2015-05-01

    Environmental obesogens are a newly recognized category of endocrine disrupting chemicals that have been implicated in contributing to the rising rates of obesity in the United States. While obesity is typically regarded as an increase in visceral fat, adipocyte accumulation in the bone has been linked to increased fracture risk, lower bone density, and osteoporosis. Exposure to environmental toxicants that activate peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a critical regulator of the balance of differentiation between adipogenesis and osteogenesis, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of osteoporosis. However, induction of adipogenesis and suppression of osteogenesis are separable activities of PPARγ, and ligands may selectively alter these activities. It currently is unknown whether suppression of osteogenesis is a common toxic endpoint of environmental PPARγ ligands. Using a primary mouse bone marrow culture model, we tested the hypothesis that environmental toxicants acting as PPARγ agonists divert the differentiation pathway of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells towards adipogenesis and away from osteogenesis. The toxicants tested included the organotins tributyltin and triphenyltin, a ubiquitous phthalate metabolite (mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, MEHP), and two brominated flame retardants (tetrabromobisphenol-a, TBBPA, and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, METBP). All of the compounds activated PPARγ1 and 2. All compounds increased adipogenesis (lipid accumulation, Fabp4 expression) and suppressed osteogenesis (alkaline phosphatase activity, Osx expression) in mouse primary bone marrow cultures, but with different potencies and efficacies. Despite structural dissimilarities, there was a strong negative correlation between efficacies to induce adipogenesis and suppress osteogenesis, with the organotins being distinct in their exceptional ability to suppress osteogenesis. As human exposure to a mixture of

  16. MicroRNA-16 suppresses the activation of inflammatory macrophages in atherosclerosis by targeting PDCD4

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, XUE; XU, ZHAO; YUAN, MENG; ZHANG, YUE; ZHAO, BO; WANG, JUNQIAN; ZHANG, AIXUE; LI, GUANGPING

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is involved in a number of bioprocesses, such as apoptosis and inflammation. However, its regulatory mechanisms in atherosclerosis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role and mechanisms of action of PDCD4 in high-fat diet-induced atherosclerosis in mice and in foam cells (characteristic pathological cells in atherosclerotic lesions) derived from ox-LDL-stimulated macrophages. MicroRNA (miR)-16 was predicted to bind PDCD4 by bioinformatics analysis. In the mice with atherosclerosis and in the foam cells, PDCD4 protein expression (but not the mRNA expression) was enhanced, while that of miR-16 was reduced. Transfection with miR-16 mimic decreased the activity of a luciferase reporter containing the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of PDCD4 in the macrophage-derived foam cells. Conversely, treatment with miR-16 inhibitor enhanced the luciferase activity. However, by introducing mutations in the predicted binding site located in the 3′UTR of PDCD4, the miR-16 mimic and inhibitor were unable to alter the level of PDCD4, suggesting that miR-16 is a direct negative regulator of PDCD4 in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, transfection wtih miR-16 mimic and siRNA targeting PDCD4 suppressed the secretion and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas it enhanced the secretion and mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory factor, IL-10. Treatment with miR-16 inhibitor exerted the opposite effects. In addition, the phosphorylation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression were altered by miR-16. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the targeting of PDCD4 by miR-16 may suppress the activation of inflammatory macrophages though mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB signaling in atherosclerosis; thus, PDCD4 may prove to be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of

  17. Active vibration suppression of self-excited structures using an adaptive LMS algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danda Roy, Indranil

    The purpose of this investigation is to study the feasibility of an adaptive feedforward controller for active flutter suppression in representative linear wing models. The ability of the controller to suppress limit-cycle oscillations in wing models having root springs with freeplay nonlinearities has also been studied. For the purposes of numerical simulation, mathematical models of a rigid and a flexible wing structure have been developed. The rigid wing model is represented by a simple three-degree-of-freedom airfoil while the flexible wing is modelled by a multi-degree-of-freedom finite element representation with beam elements for bending and rod elements for torsion. Control action is provided by one or more flaps attached to the trailing edge and extending along the entire wing span for the rigid model and a fraction of the wing span for the flexible model. Both two-dimensional quasi-steady aerodynamics and time-domain unsteady aerodynamics have been used to generate the airforces in the wing models. An adaptive feedforward controller has been designed based on the filtered-X Least Mean Squares (LMS) algorithm. The control configuration for the rigid wing model is single-input single-output (SISO) while both SISO and multi-input multi-output (MIMO) configurations have been applied on the flexible wing model. The controller includes an on-line adaptive system identification scheme which provides the LMS controller with a reasonably accurate model of the plant. This enables the adaptive controller to track time-varying parameters in the plant and provide effective control. The wing models in closed-loop exhibit highly damped responses at airspeeds where the open-loop responses are destructive. Simulations with the rigid and the flexible wing models in a time-varying airstream show a 63% and 53% increase, respectively, over their corresponding open-loop flutter airspeeds. The ability of the LMS controller to suppress wing store flutter in the two models has

  18. NO CLEAR SUBMILLIMETER SIGNATURE OF SUPPRESSED STAR FORMATION AMONG X-RAY LUMINOUS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Del Moro, A.; Rovilos, E.; Altieri, B.; Coia, D.; Charmandaris, V.; Daddi, E.; Le Floc'h, E.; Leiton, R.; Dasyra, K.; Dickinson, M.; Kartaltepe, J.; Hickox, R. C.; Ivison, R. J.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Rosario, D.; and others

    2012-11-20

    Many theoretical models require powerful active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to suppress star formation in distant galaxies and reproduce the observed properties of today's massive galaxies. A recent study based on Herschel-SPIRE submillimeter observations claimed to provide direct support for this picture, reporting a significant decrease in the mean star formation rates (SFRs) of the most luminous AGNs (L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) at z Almost-Equal-To 1-3 in the Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N). In this Letter, we extend these results using Herschel-SPIRE 250 {mu}m data in the COSMOS and Chandra Deep Field-South fields to achieve an order-of-magnitude improvement in the number of sources at L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. On the basis of our analysis, we find no strong evidence for suppressed star formation in L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} AGNs at z Almost-Equal-To 1-3. The mean SFRs of the AGNs are constant over the broad X-ray luminosity range of L{sub X} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 43}-10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1} (with mean SFRs consistent with typical star-forming galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 2; (SFRs) Almost-Equal-To 100-200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). We suggest that the previous CDF-N results were likely due to low number statistics. We discuss our results in the context of current theoretical models.

  19. Galanin Activates G Protein Gated Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels and Suppresses Kisspeptin-10 Activation of GnRH Neurons.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Stephanie; Wray, Susan

    2016-08-01

    GnRH neurons are regulated by hypothalamic kisspeptin neurons. Recently, galanin was identified in a subpopulation of kisspeptin neurons. Although the literature thoroughly describes kisspeptin activation of GnRH neurons, little is known about the effects of galanin on GnRH neurons. This study investigated whether galanin could alter kisspeptin signaling to GnRH neurons. GnRH cells maintained in explants, known to display spontaneous calcium oscillations, and a long-lasting calcium response to kisspeptin-10 (kp-10), were used. First, transcripts for galanin receptors (GalRs) were examined. Only GalR1 was found in GnRH neurons. A series of experiments was then performed to determine the action of galanin on kp-10 activated GnRH neurons. Applied after kp-10 activation, galanin 1-16 (Gal1-16) rapidly suppressed kp-10 activation. Applied with kp-10, Gal1-16 prevented kp-10 activation until its removal. To determine the mechanism by which galanin inhibited kp-10 activation of GnRH neurons, Gal1-16 and galanin were applied to spontaneously active GnRH neurons. Both inhibited GnRH neuronal activity, independent of GnRH neuronal inputs. This inhibition was mimicked by a GalR1 agonist but not by GalR2 or GalR2/3 agonists. Although Gal1-16 inhibition relied on Gi/o signaling, it was independent of cAMP levels but sensitive to blockers of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels. A newly developed bioassay for GnRH detection showed Gal1-16 decreased the kp-10-evoked GnRH secretion below detection threshold. Together, this study shows that galanin is a potent regulator of GnRH neurons, possibly acting as a physiological break to kisspeptin excitation. PMID:27359210

  20. Organic Amendments to Avocado Crops Induce Suppressiveness and Influence the Composition and Activity of Soil Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Nuria; Vida, Carmen; Martínez-Alonso, Maira; Landa, Blanca B.; Gaju, Nuria; Cazorla, Francisco M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main avocado diseases in southern Spain is white root rot caused by the fungus Rosellinia necatrix Prill. The use of organic soil amendments to enhance the suppressiveness of natural soil is an inviting approach that has successfully controlled other soilborne pathogens. This study tested the suppressive capacity of different organic amendments against R. necatrix and analyzed their effects on soil microbial communities and enzymatic activities. Two-year-old avocado trees were grown in soil treated with composted organic amendments and then used for inoculation assays. All of the organic treatments reduced disease development in comparison to unamended control soil, especially yard waste (YW) and almond shells (AS). The YW had a strong effect on microbial communities in bulk soil and produced larger population levels and diversity, higher hydrolytic activity and strong changes in the bacterial community composition of bulk soil, suggesting a mechanism of general suppression. Amendment with AS induced more subtle changes in bacterial community composition and specific enzymatic activities, with the strongest effects observed in the rhizosphere. Even if the effect was not strong, the changes caused by AS in bulk soil microbiota were related to the direct inhibition of R. necatrix by this amendment, most likely being connected to specific populations able to recolonize conducive soil after pasteurization. All of the organic amendments assayed in this study were able to suppress white root rot, although their suppressiveness appears to be mediated differentially. PMID:25769825

  1. Organic amendments to avocado crops induce suppressiveness and influence the composition and activity of soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Nuria; Vida, Carmen; Martínez-Alonso, Maira; Landa, Blanca B; Gaju, Nuria; Cazorla, Francisco M; de Vicente, Antonio

    2015-05-15

    One of the main avocado diseases in southern Spain is white root rot caused by the fungus Rosellinia necatrix Prill. The use of organic soil amendments to enhance the suppressiveness of natural soil is an inviting approach that has successfully controlled other soilborne pathogens. This study tested the suppressive capacity of different organic amendments against R. necatrix and analyzed their effects on soil microbial communities and enzymatic activities. Two-year-old avocado trees were grown in soil treated with composted organic amendments and then used for inoculation assays. All of the organic treatments reduced disease development in comparison to unamended control soil, especially yard waste (YW) and almond shells (AS). The YW had a strong effect on microbial communities in bulk soil and produced larger population levels and diversity, higher hydrolytic activity and strong changes in the bacterial community composition of bulk soil, suggesting a mechanism of general suppression. Amendment with AS induced more subtle changes in bacterial community composition and specific enzymatic activities, with the strongest effects observed in the rhizosphere. Even if the effect was not strong, the changes caused by AS in bulk soil microbiota were related to the direct inhibition of R. necatrix by this amendment, most likely being connected to specific populations able to recolonize conducive soil after pasteurization. All of the organic amendments assayed in this study were able to suppress white root rot, although their suppressiveness appears to be mediated differentially. PMID:25769825

  2. Suppression of ischaemia-induced injuries in rat brain by protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) activating peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xia; Ng, Ethel Sau Kuen; Lam, Francis Fu Yuen

    2016-09-01

    Ischaemic stroke has become one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. The role of protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) in this disease is uncertain. In the present study, the actions of a protease activated receptor-1 activating peptide (PAR-1 AP) SFLLRN-NH2 were investigated in an in vivo rat model of ischaemic stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and in an in vitro model induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in primary cultured rat embryonic cortical neurones. Rats subjected to MCAO exhibited increased brain infarct volume, oedema, and neurological deficit. Rat cortical neurones subjected to OGD showed increased lactate dehydrogenase, caspase-3 activity and TUNEL positive cells, whereas, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell viability were decreased. Furthermore, both models had elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, nitrite, and malondialdehyde, while anti-oxidant enzymes and bcl-2/bax ratio were decreased. These detrimental changes were suppressed by SFLLRN-NH2, and its protective actions were inhibited by a PAR-1 antagonist (BMS-200261). In summary, SFLLRN-NH2 was found to possess anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic properties, and it produced marked inhibition on the detrimental effects of ischaemia in in vivo and in vitro models of ischaemic stroke. The present findings suggest PAR-1 is a promising target for development of novel treatments of ischaemic brain disease. PMID:27238976

  3. Livers with Constitutive mTORC1 Activity Resist Steatosis Independent of Feedback Suppression of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Kenerson, Heidi L.; Subramanian, Savitha; McIntyre, Rebecca; Kazami, Machiko; Yeung, Raymond S.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is an important contributing factor in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. AKT and mTORC1 are key components of the insulin pathway, and play a role in promoting de novo lipogenesis. However, mTORC1 hyperactivity per se does not induce steatosis in mouse livers, but instead, protects against high-fat diet induced steatosis. Here, we investigate the in vivo mechanism of steatosis-resistance secondary to mTORC1 activation, with emphasis on the role of S6K1-mediated feedback inhibition of AKT. Mice with single or double deletion of Tsc1 and/or S6k1 in a liver-specific or whole-body manner were generated to study glucose and hepatic lipid metabolism between the ages of 6–14 weeks. Following 8 weeks of high-fat diet, the Tsc1-/-;S6k1-/- mice had lower body weights but higher liver TG levels compared to that of the Tsc1-/- mice. However, the loss of S6k1 did not relieve feedback inhibition of Akt activity in the Tsc1-/- livers. To overcome Akt suppression, Pten was deleted in Tsc1-/- livers, and the resultant mice showed improved glucose tolerance compared with the Tsc1-/- mice. However, liver TG levels were significantly reduced in the Tsc1-/-;Pten-/- mice compared to the Pten-/- mice, which was restored with rapamycin. We found no correlation between liver TG and serum NEFA levels. Expression of lipogenic genes (Srebp1c, Fasn) were elevated in the Tsc1-/-;Pten-/- livers, but this was counter-balanced by an up-regulation of Cpt1a involved in fatty acid oxidation and the anti-oxidant protein, Nrf2. In summary, our in vivo models showed that mTORC1-induced resistance to steatosis was dependent on S6K1 activity, but not secondary to AKT suppression. These findings confirm that AKT and mTORC1 have opposing effects on hepatic lipid metabolism in vivo. PMID:25646773

  4. The TLR2 is activated by sporozoites and suppresses intrahepatic rodent malaria parasite development

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Tan, Zhangping; Zhou, TaoLi; Zhu, Feng; Ding, Yan; Liu, Taiping; Wu, Yuzhang; Xu, Wenyue

    2015-01-01

    TLRs (Toll-like receptors) play an important role in the initiation of innate immune responses against invading microorganisms. Although several TLRs have been reported to be involved in the innate immune response against the blood-stage of malaria parasites, the role of TLRs in the development of the pre-erythrocytic stage is still largely unknown. Here, we found that sporozoite and its lysate could significantly activate the TLR2, and induce macrophages to release proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-6, MCP-1 and TNF-α, in a TLR2-dependent manner. Further studies showed that sporozoite and its lysate could be recognized by either TLR2 homodimers or TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 heterodimers, implicating the complexity of TLR2 agonist in sporozoite. Interestingly, the TLR2 signaling can significantly suppress the development of the pre-erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium yoelii, as both liver parasite load and subsequent parasitemia were significantly elevated in both TLR2- and MyD88-deficient mice. Additionally, the observed higher level of parasite burden in TLR2−/− mice was found to be closely associated with a reduction in proinflammatory cytokines in the liver. Therefore, we provide the first evidence that sporozoites can activate the TLR2 signaling, which in turn significantly inhibits the intrahepatic parasites. This may provide us with novel clues to design preventive anti-malaria therapies. PMID:26667391

  5. Genipin inhibits NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome activation via autophagy suppression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shui-Xing; Du, Chong-Tao; Chen, Wei; Lei, Qian-Qian; Li, Ning; Qi, Shuai; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Hu, Gui-Qiu; Deng, Xu-Ming; Han, Wen-Yu; Yang, Yong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic, multiprotein complexes that trigger caspase-1 activation and IL-1β maturation in response to diverse stimuli. Although inflammasomes play important roles in host defense against microbial infection, overactive inflammasomes are deleterious and lead to various autoinflammatory diseases. In the current study, we demonstrated that genipin inhibits the induction of IL-1β production and caspase-1 activation by NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes. Furthermore, genipin specifically prevented NLRP3-mediated, but not NLRC4-mediated, ASC oligomerization. Notably, genipin inhibited autophagy, leading to NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome inhibition. UCP2-ROS signaling may be involved in inflammasome suppression by genipin. In vivo, we showed that genipin inhibited NLRP3-dependent IL-1β production and neutrophil flux in LPS- and alum-induced murine peritonitis. Additionally, genipin provided protection against flagellin-induced lung inflammation by reducing IL-1β production and neutrophil recruitment. Collectively, our results revealed a novel role in inhibition of inflammatory diseases for genipin that has been used as therapeutics for centuries in herb medicine. PMID:26659006

  6. Imperatorin Suppresses Degranulation and Eicosanoid Generation in Activated Bone Marrow-Derived Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Eujin; Park, Na-Young; Kim, Sun-Gun; Park, Hyo-Hyun; Lee, Jiean; Lee, Youn Ju; Lee, Eunkyung

    2015-01-01

    Imperatorin has been known to exert many biological functions including anti-inflammatory activity. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of imperatorin on the production of inflammatory mediators in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC). Imperatorin inhibited degranulation and the generation of eicosanoids (leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2)) in IgE/antigen (Ag)-stimulated BMMC. To elucidate the molecular mechanism involved in this process, we investigated the effect of imperatorin on intracellular signaling in BMMC. Biochemical analyses of the IgE/Ag-mediated signaling pathway demonstrated that imperatorin dramatically attenuated degranulation and the production of 5-lipoxygenase-dependent LTC4 and cyclooxygenase-2-dependent PGD2 through the inhibition of intracellular calcium influx/phospholipase Cγ1, cytosolic phospholipase A2/mitogen-activated protein kinases and/or nuclear factor-κB pathways in BMMC. These results suggest that the effects of imperatorin on inhibition of degranulation and eicosanoid generation through the suppression of multiple steps of IgE/Ag-mediated signaling pathways would be beneficial for the prevention of allergic inflammation. PMID:26336581

  7. Genipin inhibits NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome activation via autophagy suppression

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shui-Xing; Du, Chong-Tao; Chen, Wei; Lei, Qian-Qian; Li, Ning; Qi, Shuai; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Hu, Gui-Qiu; Deng, Xu-Ming; Han, Wen-Yu; Yang, Yong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic, multiprotein complexes that trigger caspase-1 activation and IL-1β maturation in response to diverse stimuli. Although inflammasomes play important roles in host defense against microbial infection, overactive inflammasomes are deleterious and lead to various autoinflammatory diseases. In the current study, we demonstrated that genipin inhibits the induction of IL-1β production and caspase-1 activation by NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes. Furthermore, genipin specifically prevented NLRP3-mediated, but not NLRC4-mediated, ASC oligomerization. Notably, genipin inhibited autophagy, leading to NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome inhibition. UCP2-ROS signaling may be involved in inflammasome suppression by genipin. In vivo, we showed that genipin inhibited NLRP3-dependent IL-1β production and neutrophil flux in LPS- and alum-induced murine peritonitis. Additionally, genipin provided protection against flagellin-induced lung inflammation by reducing IL-1β production and neutrophil recruitment. Collectively, our results revealed a novel role in inhibition of inflammatory diseases for genipin that has been used as therapeutics for centuries in herb medicine. PMID:26659006

  8. Aurora B suppresses microtubule dynamics and limits central spindle size by locally activating KIF4A

    PubMed Central

    Nunes Bastos, Ricardo; Gandhi, Sapan R.; Baron, Ryan D.; Gruneberg, Ulrike; Nigg, Erich A.

    2013-01-01

    Anaphase central spindle formation is controlled by the microtubule-stabilizing factor PRC1 and the kinesin KIF4A. We show that an MKlp2-dependent pool of Aurora B at the central spindle, rather than global Aurora B activity, regulates KIF4A accumulation at the central spindle. KIF4A phosphorylation by Aurora B stimulates the maximal microtubule-dependent ATPase activity of KIF4A and promotes its interaction with PRC1. In the presence of phosphorylated KIF4A, microtubules grew more slowly and showed long pauses in growth, resulting in the generation of shorter PRC1-stabilized microtubule overlaps in vitro. Cells expressing only mutant forms of KIF4A lacking the Aurora B phosphorylation site overextended the anaphase central spindle, demonstrating that this regulation is crucial for microtubule length control in vivo. Aurora B therefore ensures that suppression of microtubule dynamic instability by KIF4A is restricted to a specific subset of microtubules and thereby contributes to central spindle size control in anaphase. PMID:23940115

  9. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darrion L.; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  10. Nur77 modulates hepatic lipid metabolism through suppression of SREBP1c activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pols, Thijs W.H.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Vos, Mariska; Levels, Johannes H.M.; Quax, Paul H.A.; Meijers, Joost C.M.; Pannekoek, Hans; Groen, Albert K.; Vries, Carlie J.M. de

    2008-02-22

    NR4A nuclear receptors are induced in the liver upon fasting and regulate hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we studied the role of nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) in hepatic lipid metabolism. We generated mice expressing hepatic Nur77 using adenoviral vectors, and demonstrate that these mice exhibit a modulation of the plasma lipid profile and a reduction in hepatic triglyceride. Expression analysis of >25 key genes involved in lipid metabolism revealed that Nur77 inhibits SREBP1c expression. This results in decreased SREBP1c activity as is illustrated by reduced expression of its target genes stearoyl-coA desaturase-1, mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, fatty acid synthase and the LDL receptor, and provides a mechanism for the physiological changes observed in response to Nur77. Expression of LXR target genes Abcg5 and Abcg8 is reduced by Nur77, and may suggest involvement of LXR in the inhibitory action of Nur77 on SREBP1c expression. Taken together, our study demonstrates that Nur77 modulates hepatic lipid metabolism through suppression of SREBP1c activity.

  11. DNA-Binding and Topoisomerase-I-Suppressing Activities of Novel Vanadium Compound Van-7

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Xiao-mei; Chen, Zhan-fang; Qi, Xin; Li, Yan-tuan; Li, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Vanadium compounds were studied during recent years to be considered as a representative of a new class of nonplatinum metal anticancer agents in combination to its low toxicity. Here, we found a vanadium compound Van-7 as an inhibitor of Topo I other than Topo II using topoisomerase-mediated supercoiled DNA relaxation assay. Agarose gel electrophoresis and comet assay showed that Van-7 treatment did not produce cleavable complexes like HCPT, thereby suggesting that Topo I inhibition occurred upstream of the relegation step. Further studies revealed that Van-7 inhibited Topo I DNA binding involved in its intercalating DNA. Van-7 did not affect the catalytic activity of DNase I even up to100 μM. Van-7 significantly suppressed the growth of cancer cell lines with IC50 at nanomolar concentrations and arrested cell cycle of A549 cells at G2/M phase. All these results indicate that Van-7 is a potential selective Topo I inhibitor with anticancer activities as a kind of Topo I suppressor, not Topo I poison. PMID:23055949

  12. DNA-Binding and Topoisomerase-I-Suppressing Activities of Novel Vanadium Compound Van-7.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Zhan-Fang; Qi, Xin; Li, Yan-Tuan; Li, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Vanadium compounds were studied during recent years to be considered as a representative of a new class of nonplatinum metal anticancer agents in combination to its low toxicity. Here, we found a vanadium compound Van-7 as an inhibitor of Topo I other than Topo II using topoisomerase-mediated supercoiled DNA relaxation assay. Agarose gel electrophoresis and comet assay showed that Van-7 treatment did not produce cleavable complexes like HCPT, thereby suggesting that Topo I inhibition occurred upstream of the relegation step. Further studies revealed that Van-7 inhibited Topo I DNA binding involved in its intercalating DNA. Van-7 did not affect the catalytic activity of DNase I even up to100 μM. Van-7 significantly suppressed the growth of cancer cell lines with IC(50) at nanomolar concentrations and arrested cell cycle of A549 cells at G2/M phase. All these results indicate that Van-7 is a potential selective Topo I inhibitor with anticancer activities as a kind of Topo I suppressor, not Topo I poison. PMID:23055949

  13. A low-power integrated bioamplifier with active low-frequency suppression.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, B; Sawan, M; Chapman, C A

    2007-09-01

    We present in this paper a low-power bioamplifier suitable for massive integration in dense multichannel recording devices. This bioamplifier achieves reduced-size compared to previous designs by means of active low-frequency suppression. An active integrator located in the feedback path of a low-noise amplifier is employed for placing a highpass cutoff frequency within the transfer function. A very long integrating time constant is achieved using a small integrated capacitor and a MOS-bipolar equivalent resistor. This configuration rejects unwanted low-frequency contents without the need for input RC networks or large feedback capacitors. Therefore, the bioamplifier high-input impedance and small size are preserved. The bioamplifier, implemented in a 0.18-mum CMOS process, has been designed for neural recording of action potentials, and optimised through a transconductance-ef-ficiency design methodology for micropower operation. Measured performance and results obtained from in vivo recordings are presented. The integrated bioamplifier provides a midband gain of 50 dB, and achieves an input-referred noise of 5.6 muVrms. It occupies less than 0.050 mm(2) of chip area and dissipates 8.6 muW. PMID:23852412

  14. Human endogenous retrovirus envelope proteins target dendritic cells to suppress T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Jonas; Kämmerer, Ulrike; Müller, Nora; Avota, Elita; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2015-06-01

    Though mostly defective, human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) can retain open reading frames, which are especially expressed in the placenta. There, the envelope (env) proteins of HERV-W (Syncytin-1), HERV-FRD (Syncytin-2), and HERV-K (HML-2) were implicated in tolerance against the semi-allogenic fetus. Here, we show that the known HERV env-binding receptors ASCT-1 and -2 and MFSD2 are expressed by DCs and T-cells. When used as effectors in coculture systems, CHO cells transfected to express Syncytin-1, -2, or HML-2 did not affect T-cell expansion or overall LPS-driven phenotypic DC maturation, however, promoted release of IL-12 and TNF-α rather than IL-10. In contrast, HERV env expressing choriocarcinoma cell lines suppressed T-cell proliferation and LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-12 release, however, promoted IL-10 accumulation, indicating that these effects might not rely on HERV env interactions. However, DCs conditioned by choriocarcinoma, but also transgenic CHO cells failed to promote allogenic T-cell expansion. This was associated with a loss of DC/T-cell conjugate frequencies, impaired Ca(2+) mobilization, and aberrant patterning of f-actin and tyrosine phosphorylated proteins in T-cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that HERV env proteins target T-cell activation indirectly by modulating the stimulatory activity of DCs. PMID:25752285

  15. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Suppresses Profibrotic Responses in Fibroblasts from Fibrotic Lungs*

    PubMed Central

    Marudamuthu, Amarnath S.; Shetty, Shwetha K.; Bhandary, Yashodhar P.; Karandashova, Sophia; Thompson, Michael; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Florova, Galina; Hogan, Taryn B.; Pabelick, Christina M.; Prakash, Y. S.; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Fu, Jian; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Idell, Steven; Shetty, Sreerama

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal lung disease characterized by progressive interstitial scarification. A hallmark morphological lesion is the accumulation of myofibroblasts or fibrotic lung fibroblasts (FL-fibroblasts) in areas called fibroblastic foci. We previously demonstrated that the expression of both urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the uPA receptor are elevated in FL-fibroblasts from the lungs of patients with IPF. FL-fibroblasts isolated from human IPF lungs and from mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis showed an increased rate of proliferation compared with normal lung fibroblasts (NL-fibroblasts) derived from histologically “normal” lung. Basal expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in human and murine FL-fibroblasts was reduced, whereas collagen-I and α-smooth muscle actin were markedly elevated. Conversely, alveolar type II epithelial cells surrounding the fibrotic foci in situ, as well as those isolated from IPF lungs, showed increased activation of caspase-3 and PAI-1 with a parallel reduction in uPA expression. Transduction of an adenovirus PAI-1 cDNA construct (Ad-PAI-1) suppressed expression of uPA and collagen-I and attenuated proliferation in FL-fibroblasts. On the contrary, inhibition of basal PAI-1 in NL-fibroblasts increased collagen-I and α-smooth muscle actin. Fibroblasts isolated from PAI-1-deficient mice without lung injury also showed increased collagen-I and uPA. These changes were associated with increased Akt/phosphatase and tensin homolog proliferation/survival signals in FL-fibroblasts, which were reversed by transduction with Ad-PAI-1. This study defines a new role of PAI-1 in the control of fibroblast activation and expansion and its role in the pathogenesis of fibrosing lung disease and, in particular, IPF. PMID:25648892

  16. Inhibitory effect of putranjivain A on allergic inflammation through suppression of mast cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Park, Seung-Bin; Lee, Soyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. Putranjivain A (PJA), member of ellagitannin, is known to possess beneficial effects including anti-cancer and anti-viral activities. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether PJA modulates the allergic inflammatory reaction and to study its possible mechanisms of action using mast cell-based in vitro and in vivo models. The study was performed in anaphylaxis mouse model and cultured mast cells. PJA inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immunoglobulin E-stimulated mast cells. PJA reduced this expression by inhibiting nuclear factor (NF)-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cell. The oral administration of PJA reduced systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis, the release of serum histamine, and the expression of the histamine H{sub 1} receptor. In addition, PJA attenuated the activation of mast cells. PJA inhibited the release of histamine from various types of mast cells by the suppression of intracellular calcium. The inhibitory activity of PJA on the allergic reaction was similar to that of disodium cromoglycate, a known anti-allergic drug. These results suggest that PJA can facilitate the prevention or treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases mediated by mast cells. - Highlights: • PJA reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • PJA inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines. • The effect of PJA on allergic reaction was comparable to the DSCG. • PJA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

  17. Diminished nitric oxide generation from neutrophils suppresses platelet activation in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Daniele C; Brunini, Tatiana M C; Matsuura, Cristiane; Mury, Wanda Vianna; Corrêa, Carolina R; Santos, Sérgio F; Ormonde do Carmo, Monique B O; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio Cláudio

    2015-03-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a complex clinical condition associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and thrombosis leading to cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to investigate in detail the NO pathway in neutrophils obtained from hemodialysis patients and its association with platelet function and oxidative status. Fifteen CRF patients on hemodialysis and fifteen controls were included in this study. Laboratory and experimental evaluations were performed after hemodialysis in CRF patients. We evaluated L-[³H] arginine transport, NO synthase (NOS) activity, amino acid concentration in neutrophils, and expressions of NOS isoforms and p47(phox) by western blotting. Platelet aggregation was analyzed in the presence or absence of neutrophils. Oxidative status was measured through glutathione peroxidase, catalase activities, protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and DNA/RNA oxidation in serum. Basal NOS activity (pmol/10⁶ cells/min) was impaired in CRF patients on hemodialysis (0.33 ± 0.17) compared to controls (0.65 ± 0.12), whereas the expression of NOS isoforms remained unaltered. L-Arginine transport into neutrophils was similar in CRF patients on hemodialysis and controls. In addition, intracellular concentration of L-arginine was increased fourfold in the patient group. Systemic oxidative stress markers were not affected by CRF. On the other hand, NADPH oxidase subunit p47(phox) in neutrophils was overexpressed in CRF. In the presence of neutrophils, there was a reduction time-dependent in platelet aggregation in both groups with no difference between them. This data suggest that reduced basal generation of NO by neutrophils in CRF patients on hemodialysis occurs independently of L-arginine bioavailability and is able to suppress platelet activation. PMID:25524601

  18. Timing within the oestrous cycle modulates adrenergic suppression of NK activity and resistance to metastasis: possible clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Ben-Eliyahu, S; Shakhar, G; Shakhar, K; Melamed, R

    2000-12-01

    Clinical observations suggest that the rate of metastatic development and long-term mortality following surgery in breast cancer patients is influenced by the menstrual phase during which surgery is conducted. The menstrual cycle is known to modulate various physiological responses and medical conditions that involve adrenergic mechanisms (e.g., asthma). Natural killer activity (NKA), an immune function controlling metastasis, is suppressed following surgery, and in vitro by adrenaline. We therefore hypothesize that the clinical observation may be partly attributable to surgery-induced adrenergic suppression of NK-dependent resistance to metastasis, a suppression that depends on menstrual phase during surgery. To test this hypothesis in rats, 140 F344 females at different phases of their oestrous cycle were injected with a beta-adrenergic agonist, metaproterenol (MP) (0.4 or 0.8 mg kg(-1), s.c.), or with vehicle, before i.v. inoculation with MADB106 tumour cells. This syngeneic mammary adenocarcinoma line metastasizes only to the lungs, and is highly sensitive to NKA. In a second experiment, the suppression of NKA by MP was studied in vitro in blood drawn at different phases of the oestrous cycle (n = 36). Finally, the effects of stress on the number and activity of NK cells were assessed along the oestrous cycle (n = 71). The findings indicate that the suppressive effects of MP on resistance to metastasis and on NKA, are significantly greater during the oestrous phase characterized by high oestradiol levels (D3/proestrus/oestrus). Similarly, NKA per cell was suppressed by stress only during this phase. In untreated animals, in which inadvertent stress was minimized, no effects of the oestrous cycle on NKA or on resistance to metastasis were evident. These findings indicate that the oestrous cycle modulates adrenergic suppression of NKA and of resistance to metastasis. The relevance of these findings to the above clinical observation, as well as that of our related

  19. Promising weed suppressive activity in high-yielding indica rice and hybrid rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective weed control in U.S. rice has relied primarily on herbicides since the 1960s. Several indica rice lines tested in the 1980s suppressed aquatic weeds. Since then, they and their crosses with standard U.S. cultivars, and other indica lines were found to suppress barnyardgrass (Echinochloa ...

  20. EWS-FLI1 Suppresses NOTCH-Activated p53 in Ewing’s Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Jozef; Bennani-Baiti, Idriss M.; Kauer, Max; Schaefer, Karl-Ludwig; Poremba, Christopher; Jug, Gunhild; Schwentner, Raphaela; Smrzka, Oskar; Muehlbacher, Karin; Aryee, Dave N.T.; Kovar, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Although p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in cancer, half of human tumors retain wild-type p53, whereby it is unknown whether normal p53 function is compromised by other cancer-associated alterations. One example is Ewing’s sarcoma family tumors (ESFT), where 90% express wild-type p53. ESFT are characterized by EWS-FLI1 oncogene fusions. Studying 6 ESFT cell lines, silencing of EWS-FLI1 in a wild-type p53 context resulted in increased p53 and p21WAF1/CIP1 levels, causing cell cycle arrest. Using a candidate gene approach, HEY1 was linked to p53 induction. HEY1 was rarely expressed in 59 primary tumors, but consistently induced upon EWS-FLI1 knockdown in ESFT cell lines. The NOTCH signaling pathway targets HEY1, and we show NOTCH2 and NOTCH3 to be expressed in ESFT primary tumors and cell lines. Upon EWS-FLI1 silencing, NOTCH3 processing accompanied by nuclear translocation of the activated intracellular domain was observed in all but one p53-mutant cell line. In cell lines with the highest HEY1 induction, NOTCH3 activation was the consequence of JAG1 transcriptional induction. JAG1 modulation by specific siRNA, NOTCH-processing inhibition by either GSI or ectopic NUMB1, and siRNA-mediated HEY1 knockdown all inhibited p53 and p21WAF1/CIP1 induction. Conversely, forced expression of JAG1, activated NOTCH3, or HEY1 induced p53 and p21WAF1/CIP1. These results indicate that suppression of EWS-FLI1 reactivates NOTCH signaling in ESFT cells, resulting in p53-dependent cell cycle arrest. Our data link EWS-FLI1 to the NOTCH and p53 pathways and provide a plausible basis both for NOTCH tumor suppressor effects and oncogenesis of cancers that retain wild-type p53. PMID:18757425

  1. Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Tetramethylpyrazine Is Mediated through Suppression of NF-k

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Weixiong; Zhu, Jinshui; Chen, Niwei; Lu, Yunmin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of tetramethlpyrazine on oxazolone-induced colitis mice. Spleen mononuclear cells (SMC), lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from oxazolone-induced colitis and normal mice. The colitis cells treated by oxazolone were randomly divided into model, low dose, middle dose and high dose groups treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/L tetramethlpyrazine, respectively. The apoptotic rate of SMC and LPMC in the oxazolone-induced group was lower than that in the normal group. Compared with model group, apoptotic rate of SMC was significantly increased in the high dose group, while the apoptotic rate of LPMC in the middle dose group was increased. Compared with SMC, LPMC and PBMC of normal group, the mRNA level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB), transcription factor-activated protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) were higher in model group. Tetramethylpyrazine inhibited the increase of NF-kB, AP-1 and NF-AT mRNA induced by oxazolone. For SMC, LPMC and PBMC there was significant difference in the mRNA level of AP-1 among the three different doses of tetramethylpyrazine treated groups. However, no significant difference was observed in the mRNA levels of NF-AT and NF-κB between normal and middle groups. Tetramethylpyrazine promoted the apoptotic rate of SMC and LPMC in-vitro, and suppressed the expression of transcription factors in SMC, LPMC and PBMC isolated from oxazolone-induced colitis mice. The study provides a novel insight into the mechanism behind the effect of etramethylpyrazine on colitis. PMID:27610159

  2. Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Tetramethylpyrazine Is Mediated through Suppression of NF-k.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Weixiong; Zhu, Jinshui; Chen, Niwei; Lu, Yunmin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of tetramethlpyrazine on oxazolone-induced colitis mice. Spleen mononuclear cells (SMC), lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from oxazolone-induced colitis and normal mice. The colitis cells treated by oxazolone were randomly divided into model, low dose, middle dose and high dose groups treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/L tetramethlpyrazine, respectively. The apoptotic rate of SMC and LPMC in the oxazolone-induced group was lower than that in the normal group. Compared with model group, apoptotic rate of SMC was significantly increased in the high dose group, while the apoptotic rate of LPMC in the middle dose group was increased. Compared with SMC, LPMC and PBMC of normal group, the mRNA level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB), transcription factor-activated protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) were higher in model group. Tetramethylpyrazine inhibited the increase of NF-kB, AP-1 and NF-AT mRNA induced by oxazolone. For SMC, LPMC and PBMC there was significant difference in the mRNA level of AP-1 among the three different doses of tetramethylpyrazine treated groups. However, no significant difference was observed in the mRNA levels of NF-AT and NF-κB between normal and middle groups. Tetramethylpyrazine promoted the apoptotic rate of SMC and LPMC in-vitro, and suppressed the expression of transcription factors in SMC, LPMC and PBMC isolated from oxazolone-induced colitis mice. The study provides a novel insight into the mechanism behind the effect of etramethylpyrazine on colitis. PMID:27610159

  3. SIRT6 suppresses isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy through activation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Sun, Duanping; Liu, Zhiping; Li, Min; Hong, Huiqi; Liu, Cui; Gao, Si; Li, Hong; Cai, Yi; Chen, Shaorui; Li, Zhuoming; Ye, Jiantao; Liu, Peiqing

    2016-06-01

    Reduction in autophagy has been reported to contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the molecular pathways leading to impaired autophagy at the presence of hypertrophic stimuli remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the role of sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), a sirtuin family member, in regulating cardiomyocyte autophagy, and its implication in prevention of cardiac hypertrophy. Primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) or Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were submitted to isoproterenol (ISO) treatment, and then the hypertrophic responses and changes in autophagy activity were measured. The influence of SIRT6 on autophagy was observed in cultured NRCMs with gain- and loss-of-function approaches to regulate SIRT6 expression, and further confirmed in vivo by intramyocardial delivery of an adenovirus vector encoding SIRT6 cDNA. In addition, the involvement of SIRT6-mediated autophagy in attenuation of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by ISO was determined basing on genetic or pharmaceutical disruption of autophagy, and the underlying mechanism was preliminarily explored. ISO-caused cardiac hypertrophy accompanying with a significant decrease in autophagy activity. SIRT6 overexpression enhanced autophagy in NRCMs and in rat hearts, whereas knockdown of SIRT6 by RNA interference led to suppression of cardiomyocyte autophagy. Furthermore, the protective effect of SIRT6 against ISO-stimulated hypertrophy was associated with induction of autophagy. SIRT6 promoted nuclear retention of forkhead box O3 transcription factor possibly via attenuating Akt signaling, which was responsible for autophagy activation. Our findings revealed that SIRT6 positively regulates autophagy in cardiomyocytes, which may help to ameliorate ISO-induced cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27016702

  4. EFFECTS OF MANGANESE, CALCIUM, MAGNESIUM, AND ZINC ON NICKEL-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF MURINE NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects that divalent metals have on nickel-induced suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity were studied in mice. Male CBA/J mice were given a single intramuscular injection of nickel chloride (4.5-36 micrograms NiCl2/g), manganese chloride (20-80 micrograms MnCl2/g)...

  5. Antitumor activity of 2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde for human colon cancer cells through suppression of β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Ai; Park, Hyen Joo; Chung, Hwa-Jin; Kim, Won Kyung; Lee, Sang Kook

    2013-07-26

    The antiproliferative and antitumor activities of 2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (1), a phenylpropanoid isolated from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia, were investigated using human colorectal cancer cells. Compound 1 exhibited antiproliferative effects in HCT116 colon cancer cells, accompanied by modulation of the Wnt/β-catenin cell signaling pathway. This substance was found also to inhibit β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Further mechanistic investigations in human colon cancer cells with aberrantly activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling showed that 1 significantly suppressed the binding of β-catenin/TCF complexes to their specific genomic targets in the nucleus and led to the down-regulation of Wnt target genes such as c-myc and cyclin D1. In an in vivo xenograft model, the intraperitoneal administration of 1 (10 or 20 mg/kg body weight, three times/week) for four weeks suppressed tumor growth in athymic nude mice implanted with HCT116 colon cancer cells significantly, without any apparent toxicity. In an ex vivo biochemical analysis of the tumors, compound 1 was also found to suppress Wnt target genes associated with tumor growth including β-catenin, c-myc, cyclin D1, and survivin. The suppression of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a plausible mechanism of action underlying the antiproliferative and antitumor activity of 1 in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:23855266

  6. Suppression of EMG activity by subthreshold paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to the leg motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Roy, François D

    2009-03-01

    Cortical activity driving a voluntary muscle contraction is inhibited by very low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and is reflected in the suppression of the average rectified EMG. This approach offers a method to test the contribution of cortical neurons actively involved in a motor task, but requires a large number of stimuli (approximately 100) to suitably depress the average EMG. Here, we investigated whether two pulses of subthreshold TMS at interstimulus intervals (ISIs) ranging between 1 and 12 ms could enhance the amount of EMG suppression in the tibialis anterior muscle compared to a single pulse. Pairs of subthreshold TMS at an ISI of 7 ms produced the maximum EMG suppression that was 42% more than the inhibition elicited using a single pulse. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio of the TMS-induced suppression was further increased by a second pulse, delivered 7 ms later. The reduction in the EMG at the 7 ms paired-pulse interval occurred without any short-latency excitation suggesting that the two stimuli increased the activation of cortical inhibitory neurons. Subthreshold paired-pulse TMS at ISIs of 1-3 ms was prone to EMG excitation in the period that immediately preceded the inhibition and is consistent with the recruitment of short-interval intracortical facilitation (SICF). We propose that pairs of subthreshold TMS outside the range of SICF with an inter-pulse interval of 7 ms is optimal to inhibit ongoing cortical activity during human motor movement. PMID:19183971

  7. Neuronal TRPV1 activation regulates alveolar bone resorption by suppressing osteoclastogenesis via CGRP.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoki; Matsuda, Yumi; Sato, Keisuke; de Jong, Petrus R; Bertin, Samuel; Tabeta, Koichi; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is abundantly expressed in peripheral sensory neurons where it acts as an important polymodal cellular sensor for heat, acidic pH, capsaicin, and other noxious stimuli. The oral cavity is densely innervated by afferent sensory neurons and is a highly specialized organ that protects against infections as well as physical, chemical, and thermal stresses in its capacity as the first part of the digestive system. While the function of TRPV1 in sensory neurons has been intensively studied in other organs, its physiological role in periodontal tissues is unclear. In this study we found that Trpv1(-/-) mice developed severe bone loss in an experimental model of periodontitis. Chemical ablation of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons recapitulated the phenotype of Trpv1(-/-) mice, suggesting a functional link between neuronal TRPV1 signaling and periodontal bone loss. TRPV1 activation in gingival nerves induced production of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and CGRP treatment inhibited osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Oral administration of the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, suppressed ligature-induced bone loss in mice with fewer tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells in alveolar bone. These results suggest that neuronal TRPV1 signaling in periodontal tissue is crucial for the regulation of osteoclastogenesis via the neuropeptide CGRP. PMID:27388773

  8. Activation and suppression of the trapezius muscle induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Jahns, R

    1998-01-01

    Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and silent periods (SPs) in the trapezius muscle induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were investigated in 15 healthy subjects. Stimuli were applied with a Novametrix Magnetic stimulator using a 14 cm circular coil 4 cm lateral to the vertex on the biauricular line. Surface electrodes were used for simultaneous bilateral electromyographic recordings of the trapezius. TMS invariably induced contralateral MEPs (latency 10.5 +/- 1.3 ms, mean +/- SD), with ipsilateral responses in 53% of the subjects (latency 11.1 +/- 2.5 ms). The mean duration of the SPs was approximately 90 ms on both sides. There were no significant side differences between any of the MEP or SP parameters. To study the influence of subcortical inhibition phenomena TMS induced responses were assessed following electrical mental nerve stimulation with interstimulus intervals (ISI) of 0-100 ms. MEP latencies significantly increased at ISI of 10-100 ms, whereas MEP amplitudes and SPs did not change. These findings may reflect a trigeminal induced exteroceptive suppression of trapezius muscle activity. PMID:9637939

  9. MUC1 oncoprotein suppresses activation of the ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Raina, Deepak; Ahmad, Rehan; Chen, Dongshu; Kumar, Shailendra; Kharbanda, Surender; Kufe, Donald

    2008-12-01

    The MUC1 oncoprotein interacts with the c-Abl tyrosine kinase and blocks nuclear targeting of c-Abl in the apoptotic response to DNA damage. Mutation of the MUC1 cytoplasmic domain at Tyr-60 disrupts the MUC1-c-Abl interaction. The present results demonstrate that the MUC1(Y60F) mutant is a potent inducer of the ARF tumor suppressor. MUC1(Y60F) induces transcription of the ARF locus by a c-Abl-dependent mechanism that promotes CUL-4A-mediated nuclear export of the replication protein Cdc6. The functional significance of these findings is that MUC1(Y60F)-induced ARF expression and thereby inhibition of MDM2 results in the upregulation of p53 and the homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) serine/threonine kinase. HIPK2-mediated phosphorylation of p53 on Ser-46 was further associated with a shift from expression of the cell cycle arrest-related p21 gene to the apoptosis-related PUMA gene. We also show that the MUC1(Y60F) mutant functions as dominant negative inhibitor of tumorigenicity. These findings indicate that the oncogenic function of MUC1 is conferred by suppressing activation of the ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway. PMID:18981727

  10. Neuronal TRPV1 activation regulates alveolar bone resorption by suppressing osteoclastogenesis via CGRP

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Naoki; Matsuda, Yumi; Sato, Keisuke; de Jong, Petrus R.; Bertin, Samuel; Tabeta, Koichi; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is abundantly expressed in peripheral sensory neurons where it acts as an important polymodal cellular sensor for heat, acidic pH, capsaicin, and other noxious stimuli. The oral cavity is densely innervated by afferent sensory neurons and is a highly specialized organ that protects against infections as well as physical, chemical, and thermal stresses in its capacity as the first part of the digestive system. While the function of TRPV1 in sensory neurons has been intensively studied in other organs, its physiological role in periodontal tissues is unclear. In this study we found that Trpv1−/− mice developed severe bone loss in an experimental model of periodontitis. Chemical ablation of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons recapitulated the phenotype of Trpv1−/− mice, suggesting a functional link between neuronal TRPV1 signaling and periodontal bone loss. TRPV1 activation in gingival nerves induced production of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and CGRP treatment inhibited osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Oral administration of the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, suppressed ligature-induced bone loss in mice with fewer tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells in alveolar bone. These results suggest that neuronal TRPV1 signaling in periodontal tissue is crucial for the regulation of osteoclastogenesis via the neuropeptide CGRP. PMID:27388773

  11. Neuropeptide Y acts in the paraventricular nucleus to suppress sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation.

    PubMed

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Li, Baoxin; Reis, Wagner L; Clute-Reinig, Nicholas M; Stern, Javier E; Brooks, Virginia L

    2014-04-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a brain neuromodulator that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of energy balance, also acts centrally to inhibit sympathetic nerve activity (SNA); however, the site and mechanism of action are unknown. In chloralose-anaesthetized female rats, nanoinjection of NPY into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) dose-dependently suppressed lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation, and these effects were blocked by prior inhibition of NPY Y1 or Y5 receptors. Moreover, PVN injection of Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists in otherwise untreated rats increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA, indicating that endogenous NPY tonically inhibits PVN presympathetic neurons. The sympathoexcitation following blockade of PVN NPY inhibition was eliminated by prior PVN nanoinjection of the melanocortin 3/4 receptor inhibitor SHU9119. Moreover, presympathetic neurons, identified immunohistochemically using cholera toxin b neuronal tract tracing from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), express NPY Y1 receptor immunoreactivity, and patch-clamp recordings revealed that both NPY and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) inhibit and stimulate, respectively, PVN-RVLM neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that PVN NPY inputs converge with α-MSH to influence presympathetic neurons. Together these results identify endogenous NPY as a novel and potent inhibitory neuromodulator within the PVN that may contribute to changes in SNA that occur in states associated with altered energy balance, such as obesity and pregnancy. PMID:24535439

  12. Neuropeptide Y acts in the paraventricular nucleus to suppress sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Li, Baoxin; Reis, Wagner L; Clute-Reinig, Nicholas M; Stern, Javier E; Brooks, Virginia L

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a brain neuromodulator that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of energy balance, also acts centrally to inhibit sympathetic nerve activity (SNA); however, the site and mechanism of action are unknown. In chloralose-anaesthetized female rats, nanoinjection of NPY into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) dose-dependently suppressed lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation, and these effects were blocked by prior inhibition of NPY Y1 or Y5 receptors. Moreover, PVN injection of Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists in otherwise untreated rats increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA, indicating that endogenous NPY tonically inhibits PVN presympathetic neurons. The sympathoexcitation following blockade of PVN NPY inhibition was eliminated by prior PVN nanoinjection of the melanocortin 3/4 receptor inhibitor SHU9119. Moreover, presympathetic neurons, identified immunohistochemically using cholera toxin b neuronal tract tracing from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), express NPY Y1 receptor immunoreactivity, and patch-clamp recordings revealed that both NPY and α–melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) inhibit and stimulate, respectively, PVN–RVLM neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that PVN NPY inputs converge with α-MSH to influence presympathetic neurons. Together these results identify endogenous NPY as a novel and potent inhibitory neuromodulator within the PVN that may contribute to changes in SNA that occur in states associated with altered energy balance, such as obesity and pregnancy. PMID:24535439

  13. A novel active suppression technology against thermal drift for ultra-precision spherical capacitive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Junning; Lu, Yesheng; Sun, Tao; Ou, Yaodong

    2015-02-01

    In order to solve the problem of thermal drift and further improve the performance for sensors with extreme demand for precision, based on analysis of shortcomings of existing compensation methods and characteristics of thermal drift, a novel active suppression technology against thermal drift is proposed. Considering the change of properties of reference elements in sensors caused by temperature variation is the most major factor that introduces thermal drift error, a special thermal structure is designed to provide a small environmental chamber with sub-structure design of high performance heat isolation, heat conduction and homogenization of temperature, and the temperature in the environmental chamber is controlled with high precision based on bilateral temperature adjusting with thermo electronic cooler (TEC) devices, and a compound control algorithm of Bang-Bang and anti-windup PID. Experimental results with an ultra-precision spherical capacitive sensor show thermal drift error is significantly eliminated and the precision of the sensor can reach the level of several resolutions.

  14. Xantivin suppresses the activity of EGF-CFC genes to regulate nodal signaling.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, Kousuke; Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Yokota, Chika; Takahashi, Shuji; Asashima, Makoto

    2004-06-01

    Lefty, antivin and related genes act in a feedback inhibition mechanism for nodal signaling at a number of stages of vertebrate embryogenesis. To analyze the function of the feedback inhibitor of nodal signaling, Xantivin in Xenopus embryos, we designed a morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (XatvMO) for this gene. XatvMO caused the expansion of mesodermal tissue and head defects. XatvMO-injected gastrulae showed up-regulated expression of the mesodermal markers Xbra, Xwnt8, Xnot, and Chordin, suggesting expansion of the trunk-tail organizer. As expected, depletion of Xantivin also up-regulated nodal signaling as confirmed by the enhanced ectopic expression of Xantivin mRNA, a known target gene of nodal signaling. Furthermore, we investigated the relationship between Xantivin and the EGF-CFC gene FRL-1, which is a component of the nodal receptor. In animal cap assays, FRL-1 could not induce expression of nodal-responsive genes, but could up-regulate expression of these genes when FRL-1 was coinjected with a low dose of Xnr1; coinjection of Xantivin suppressed this up-regulation by FRL-1. We also found that Xantivin can rescue the caudalized phenotype induced by overexpression of FRL-1. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that Xantivin interacted with the EGF-CFC proteins, FRL-1 and cripto. Taken together, these results suggest that Xantivin opposes the activity of EGF-CFC genes and thereby antagonizes nodal signaling. PMID:15300508

  15. The Relationship between Expressive/Suppressive Hostility Behavior and Cardiac Autonomic Activations in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Mei; Weng, Chia-Ying; Lin, Tin-Kwang; Lin, Chin-Lon

    2015-01-01

    Background Hostility is an important psychosocial risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). Expressive and suppressive hostility behaviors are related to cardiovascular response in healthy adults. However, the relationships of these behavioral dimensions to cardiac autonomic activations in CAD remain unclear. Method This study involved 76 patients with CAD to whom a hostility inventory was administered, who were instructed to recall a neutral event and an anger-related event. Heart rate and blood pressure were obtained for each patient as the indices of cardiovascular response; heart rate variability was transformed from electrocardiograph and as the indices of cardiac autonomic activation. Results The results showed that CAD patients with expressive hostility behavior experienced higher cardiovascular autonomic activations during the neutral and anger recall tasks, and lower parasympathetic activations during the recovery after an anger episode. On the other hand, CAD patients with suppressive hostility behavior experienced both sympathetic and parasympathetic activations during the baseline and recovery stages, as well as simultaneously activated higher parasympathetic response. Conclusions The results of this study suggested that it is appropriate to extend the cardiac autonomic activation model for expressive and suppressive hostility behaviors in patients with CAD. PMID:27122887

  16. Chrysanthemum indicum L. extract induces apoptosis through suppression of constitutive STAT3 activation in human prostate cancer DU145 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chulwon; Kim, Moo-Chang; Kim, Sung-Moo; Nam, Dongwoo; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Ahn, Kyoo Seok; Lee, Eun Ha; Jung, Sang Hoon; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2013-01-01

    Chrysanthemum indicum L. has been shown to possess antiinflammatory and anticancer activities, but its molecular targets/pathways are not yet fully understood in tumor cells. In the present study, the potential effects of C. indicum on signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in different tumor cells were examined. The solvent fractions (hexane, CH₂Cl₂, EtOAc, and BuOH,) were obtained from a crude extract (80% EOH extract) of C. indicum. The methylene chloride fraction of C. indicum (MCI) exhibited strong cytotoxic activity as compared with the other fractions and clearly suppressed constitutive STAT3 activation against both DU145 and U266 cells, but not MDA-MB-231 cells. The suppression of constitutive STAT3 activation by MCI is associated with blocking upstream JAK1 and JAK2, but not Src. MCI downregulated the expression of STAT3-regulated gene products; this is correlated with the accumulation of the cell cycle at sub-G1 phase, the induction of caspase-3 activation, and apoptosis. Moreover, the major components of the MCI were bioactive compounds such as sudachitin, hesperetin, chrysoeriol, and acacetin. Sudachitin, chrysoeriol, and acacetin also exerted significantly cytotoxicity, clearly suppressed constitutive STAT3 activation, and induced apoptosis, although hesperetin did not show any significant effect in DU145 cells. Overall, our results demonstrate that MCI could induce apoptosis through inhibition of the JAK1/2 and STAT3 signaling pathways. PMID:22438130

  17. Inhibitory Effect of mTOR Activator MHY1485 on Autophagy: Suppression of Lysosomal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeon Ja; Park, Yun Jung; Park, Ji Young; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Kim, Dae Hyun; Ha, Young Mi; Kim, Ji Min; Song, Yu Min; Heo, Hyoung-Sam; Yu, Byung Pal; Chun, Pusoon; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Chung, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a major degradative process responsible for the disposal of cytoplasmic proteins and dysfunctional organelles via the lysosomal pathway. During the autophagic process, cells form double-membraned vesicles called autophagosomes that sequester disposable materials in the cytoplasm and finally fuse with lysosomes. In the present study, we investigated the inhibition of autophagy by a synthesized compound, MHY1485, in a culture system by using Ac2F rat hepatocytes. Autophagic flux was measured to evaluate the autophagic activity. Autophagosomes were visualized in Ac2F cells transfected with AdGFP-LC3 by live-cell confocal microscopy. In addition, activity of mTOR, a major regulatory protein of autophagy, was assessed by western blot and docking simulation using AutoDock 4.2. In the result, treatment with MHY1485 suppressed the basal autophagic flux, and this inhibitory effect was clearly confirmed in cells under starvation, a strong physiological inducer of autophagy. The levels of p62 and beclin-1 did not show significant change after treatment with MHY1485. Decreased co-localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes in confocal microscopic images revealed the inhibitory effect of MHY1485 on lysosomal fusion during starvation-induced autophagy. These effects of MHY1485 led to the accumulation of LC3II and enlargement of the autophagosomes in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Furthermore, MHY1485 induced mTOR activation and correspondingly showed a higher docking score than PP242, a well-known ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, in docking simulation. In conclusion, MHY1485 has an inhibitory effect on the autophagic process by inhibition of fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes leading to the accumulation of LC3II protein and enlarged autophagosomes. MHY1485 also induces mTOR activity, providing a possibility for another regulatory mechanism of autophagy by the MHY compound. The significance of this study is the finding of a novel inhibitor of autophagy

  18. Heat transfer model to characterize the focal cooling necessary to suppress spontaneous epileptiform activity (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Reynaldo G.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Garcia, Paul A.; Rubinsky, Boris; Berger, Mitchel

    2005-04-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by paroxysmal transient disturbances of the electrical activity of the brain. Symptoms are manifested as impairment of motor, sensory, or psychic function with or without loss of consciousness or convulsive seizures. This paper presents an initial post-operative heat transfer analysis of surgery performed on a 41 year-old man with medically intractable Epilepsy. The surgery involved tumor removal and the resection of adjacent epileptogenic tissue. Electrocorticography was performed before resection. Cold saline was applied to the resulting interictal spike foci resulting in transient, complete cessation of spiking. A transient one dimensional semi-infinite finite element model of the surface of the brain was developed to simulate the surgery. An approximate temperature distribution of the perfused brain was developed by applying the bioheat equation. The model quantifies the surface heat flux reached in achieving seizure cessation to within an order of magnitude. Rat models have previously shown that the brain surface temperature range to rapidly terminate epileptogenic activity is 20-24°C. The developed model predicts that a constant heat flux of approximately -13,000W/m2, applied at the surface of the human brain, would achieve a surface temperature in this range in approximately 3 seconds. A parametric study was subsequently performed to characterize the effects of brain metabolism and brain blood perfusion as a function of the determined heat flux. The results of these findings can be used as a first approximation in defining the specifications of a cooling device to suppress seizures in human models.

  19. Nuclear heparanase-1 activity suppresses melanoma progression via its DNA-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Gorzelanny, C; Bauer, A T; Halter, N; Komljenovic, D; Bäuerle, T; Borsig, L; Roblek, M; Schneider, S W

    2015-11-19

    Heparanase-1 (HPSE) plays a pivotal role in structural remodeling of the ECM and the glycocalyx, thus conferring protumorigenic, proangiogenic and prometastatic properties to many cancer entities. In addition to its extracellular function, recent studies suggest an intracellular activity of HPSE with a largely unknown significance during tumor progression. Therefore, we investigated the relevance of the dual functions of HPSE to malignant melanoma in vitro, as well as in different mouse melanoma models based on the intradermal or intravenous injection of melanoma cells. Consistent with its extracellular action, an HPSE deficiency led to a reduced shedding of the glycocalyx accompanied by a reduced availability of vascular endothelial growth factor, affecting tumor growth and vascularization. In contrast, we measured an elevated expression of the protumorigenic factors pentraxin-3, tissue factor, TNF-α and most prominently, MMP-9, upon HPSE knockdown. In vivo, an HPSE deficiency was related to increased lymph node metastasis. Since the inhibition of its extracellular function with heparin was unable to block the gene regulatory impact of HPSE, we proposed an intracellular mechanism. Immunostaining revealed a counter-staining of HPSE and NF-κB in the nucleus, suggesting a close relationship between both proteins. This finding was further supported by the discovery of a direct charge-driven molecular interaction between HPSE and DNA by using atomic force microscopy and a co-precipitation approach. Our findings are novel and point towards a dual function for HPSE in malignant melanoma with a protumorigenic extracellular activity and a tumor-suppressive nuclear action. The identification of molecular strategies to shuttle extracellular HPSE into the nuclei of cancer cells could provide new therapeutic options. PMID:25745999

  20. Autophagy regulates odontoblast differentiation by suppressing NF-κB activation in an inflammatory environment

    PubMed Central

    Pei, F; Wang, H S; Chen, Z; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Odontoblasts are derived from dental papilla mesenchymal cells and have an important role in defense against bacterial infection, whereas autophagy can recycle long-lived proteins and damaged organelles to sustain cellular homeostasis. Thus, this study explores the role of autophagy in odontoblast differentiation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in vitro and the colocalization of p-NF-κB and LC3 in caries teeth. The odontoblasts differentiation was enhanced through LPS stimulation, and this outcome was reflected in the increased number of mineralized nodules and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. The expression levels of the autophagy markers LC3, Atg5, Beclin1 and TFE3 increased time dependently, as well along with the amount of autophagosomes and autophagy fluxes. This result suggests that autophagy was enhanced in odontoblasts cultured with mineralized-induced media containing LPS. To confirm the role of autophagy in differentiated odontoblasts with LPS stimulation, chloroquine (CQ) or rapamycin were used to either block or enhance autophagy. The number of mineralized nodules decreased when autophagy was inhibited, but this number increased with rapamycin treatment. Phosphorylated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression was negatively related to autophagy and could inhibit odontoblast differentiation. Furthermore, p-NF-κB and LC3 colocalization could be detected in cells stimulated with LPS. The nucleus translocation of p-NF-κB in odontoblasts was enhanced when autophagy was inhibited by Atg5 small interfering RNA. In addition, the colocalization of p-NF-κB and LC3 in odontoblasts and sub-odontoblastic layers was observed in caries teeth with reactionary dentin. Therefore, our findings provide a novel insight into the role of autophagy in regulating odontoblast differentiation by suppressing NF-κB activation in inflammatory environments. PMID:26938294

  1. Activation of mesenchymal stem cells by macrophages promotes tumor progression through immune suppressive effects

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiao-hua; Feng, Guo-wei; Wang, Zhong-liang; Du, Yang; Shen, Chen; Hui, Hui; Peng, Dong; Li, Zong-jin; Kong, De-ling; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer development and progression is linked to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Distinct TAMs subsets perform either protective or pathogenic effects in cancer. A protective role in carcinogenesis has been described for M1 macrophages, which activate antitumor mechanisms. By comparison, TAMs isolated from solid and metastatic tumors have a suppressive M2-like phenotype, which could support multiple aspects of tumor progression. Currently, it has not been clearly understood how macrophages in tumor-associated stroma could be hijacked to support tumor growth. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) actively interact with components of the innate immune system and display both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory effects. Here, we tested whether MSCs could favor the tumor to escape from immunologic surveillance in the presence of M1 macrophages. We found that MSCs educated by M1 condition medium (cMSCs) possessed a greatly enhanced ability in promoting tumor growth in vivo. Examination of cytokines/chemokines showed that the cMSCs acquired a regulatory profile, which expressed high levels of iNOS and MCP1. Consistent with an elevated MCP1 expression in cMSCs, the tumor-promoting effect of the cMSCs depended on MCP1 mediated macrophage recruitment to tumor sites. Furthermore, IL-6 secreted by the cMSCs could polarize infiltrated TAMs into M2-like macrophages. Therefore, when macrophages changed into M1 pro-inflammation type in tumor microenvironment, the MSCs would act as poor sensors and switchers to accelerate tumor growth. PMID:26988913

  2. Autophagy regulates odontoblast differentiation by suppressing NF-κB activation in an inflammatory environment.

    PubMed

    Pei, F; Wang, H S; Chen, Z; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Odontoblasts are derived from dental papilla mesenchymal cells and have an important role in defense against bacterial infection, whereas autophagy can recycle long-lived proteins and damaged organelles to sustain cellular homeostasis. Thus, this study explores the role of autophagy in odontoblast differentiation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in vitro and the colocalization of p-NF-κB and LC3 in caries teeth. The odontoblasts differentiation was enhanced through LPS stimulation, and this outcome was reflected in the increased number of mineralized nodules and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. The expression levels of the autophagy markers LC3, Atg5, Beclin1 and TFE3 increased time dependently, as well along with the amount of autophagosomes and autophagy fluxes. This result suggests that autophagy was enhanced in odontoblasts cultured with mineralized-induced media containing LPS. To confirm the role of autophagy in differentiated odontoblasts with LPS stimulation, chloroquine (CQ) or rapamycin were used to either block or enhance autophagy. The number of mineralized nodules decreased when autophagy was inhibited, but this number increased with rapamycin treatment. Phosphorylated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression was negatively related to autophagy and could inhibit odontoblast differentiation. Furthermore, p-NF-κB and LC3 colocalization could be detected in cells stimulated with LPS. The nucleus translocation of p-NF-κB in odontoblasts was enhanced when autophagy was inhibited by Atg5 small interfering RNA. In addition, the colocalization of p-NF-κB and LC3 in odontoblasts and sub-odontoblastic layers was observed in caries teeth with reactionary dentin. Therefore, our findings provide a novel insight into the role of autophagy in regulating odontoblast differentiation by suppressing NF-κB activation in inflammatory environments. PMID:26938294

  3. Activation of GPER suppresses epithelial mesenchymal transition of triple negative breast cancer cells via NF-κB signals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo-Jia; Wei, Wei; Jiang, Guan-Min; Liu, Hao; Wei, Wei-Dong; Yang, Xiangling; Wu, Ying-Min; Liu, Huanliang; Wong, Chris K C; Du, Jun; Wang, Hong-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    The targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a great challenge due to our poor understanding on its molecular etiology. In the present study, our clinical data showed that the expression of G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is negatively associated with lymph node metastasis, high-grade tumor and fibronectin (FN) expression while positively associated with the favorable outcome in 135 TNBC patients. In our experimental studies, both the in vitro migration and invasion of TNBC cells were inhibited by GPER specific agonist G-1, through the suppression of the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). The G-1 treatment also reduced the phosphorylation, nuclear localization, and transcriptional activities of NF-κB. While over expression of NF-κB attenuated the action of G-1 in suppressing EMT. Our data further illustrated that the phosphorylation of GSK-3β by PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 mediated, at least partially, the inhibitory effect of G-1 on NF-κB activities. It was further confirmed in a study of MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts in nude mice. The data showed that G-1 inhibited the in vivo growth and invasive potential of TNBC via suppression of EMT. Our present study demonstrated that an activation of GPER pathway elicits tumor suppressive actions on TNBC, and supports the use of G-1 therapeutics for TNBC metastasis. PMID:26842883

  4. Monocytes stimulated by 110-kDa fibronectin fragments suppress proliferation of anti-CD3-activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, Holly H; Porter, Wendy J; Trial, JoAnn; Rossen, Roger D

    2005-09-01

    One hundred ten to 120-kDa fragments of fibronectin (FNf), generated by proteases released in the course of tissue injury and inflammation, stimulate monocytes to produce proinflammatory cytokines, promote mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) transendothelial migration, up-regulate monocyte CD11b and CD86 expression, and induce monocyte-derived dendritic cell differentiation. To investigate whether the proinflammatory consequences of FNf are offset by responses that can suppress proliferation of activated T lymphocytes, we investigated the effect of FNf-treated MNL on autologous T lymphocytes induced to proliferate by substrate-immobilized anti-CD3. FNf-stimulated MNL suppressed anti-CD3-induced T cell proliferation through both contact-dependent and contact-independent mechanisms. Contact-independent suppression was mediated, at least in part, by IL-10 and TGF-beta released by the FNf-stimulated MNL. After 24-48 h exposure to FNf, activated T cells and monocytes formed clusters displaying CD25, CD14, CD3, and CD4 that were not dissociable by chelation of divalent cations. Killing monocytes with l-leucine methyl ester abolished these T cell-monocyte clusters and the ability of the FNf-stimulated MNL to suppress anti-CD3 induced T cell proliferation. Thus, in addition to activating MNL and causing them to migrate to sites of injury, FNf appears to induce suppressor monocytes. PMID:16116227

  5. Loss of VHL promotes progerin expression, leading to impaired p14/ARF function and suppression of p53 activity.

    PubMed

    Jung, Youn-Sang; Lee, Su-Jin; Lee, Sun-Hye; Chung, Ji-Yun; Jung, Youn Jin; Hwang, Sang Hyun; Ha, Nam-Chul; Park, Bum-Joon

    2013-07-15

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are frequently occurring genitourinary malignancies in the aged population. A morphological characteristic of RCCs is an irregular nuclear shape, which is used to index cancer grades. Other features of RCCs include the genetic inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau gene, VHL, and p53 genetic-independent inactivation. An aberrant nuclear shape or p53 suppression has not yet been demonstrated. We examined the effect of progerin (an altered splicing product of the LMNA gene linked to Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome; HGPS) on the nuclear deformation of RCCs in comparison to that of HGPS cells. In this study, we showed that progerin was suppressed by pVHL and was responsible for nuclear irregularities as well as p53 inactivation. Thus, progerin suppression can ameliorate nuclear abnormalities and reactivate p53 in response to genotoxic addition. Furthermore, we found that progerin was a target of pVHL E3 ligase and suppressed p53 activity by p14/ARF inhibition. Our findings indicate that the elevated expression of progerin in RCCs results from the loss of pVHL and leads to p53 inactivation through p14/ARF suppression. Interestingly, we showed that progerin was expressed in human leukemia and primary cell lines, raising the possibility that the expression of this LMNA variant may be a common event in age-related cancer progression. PMID:24067370

  6. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou

    2014-12-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals.

  7. Cells transformed by murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) release compounds with transforming and transformed phenotype suppressing activity resembling growth factors.

    PubMed

    Šupolíková, M; Staňová, A Vojs; Kúdelová, M; Marák, J; Zelník, V; Golais, F

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the medium of